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Sample records for equilibration test pet

  1. Comparison of peritoneal equilibration test(PET) with Tc99m-DTPA excretion in the assessment of peritoneal permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Senthilnathan, M.S.; Pradhan, P.K.; Jeloka, T.K.; Nagabhushan, S.; Sharma, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Assessment of peritoneal permeability is necessary for successful management of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients by Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD). Twardowski in 1987 described for the first time a method know as Peritoneal Equilibration Test (PET ) to determine peritoneal membrane characteristics. However, this test is not only cumbersome but is associated with several limitations. The objective of this study was to develop an alternative method of assessing the peritoneal permeability and compare this method with the conventional PET. Method: Twenty patients under going regular CAPD were included in this study. Before starting the peritoneal dialysis 370 MBq (10 mCi) 99mTc-DTPA was injected intravenously in the same standard precondition as for PET evaluation. A standard dose of same quantity was kept and used later for calculations. At the end of four hours a dialysate fluid sample (1 ml) was collected and the total dialysis effluent fluid volume was measured. Excretion of 99mTc-DTPA into the dialysate fluid as percentage of injected dose was calculated. Simultaneously standard PET values were recorded for comparison. Results: Peritoneal excretion of 99mTc-DTPA ranged from 8 % to 16 % of the injected dose depending upon the peritoneal membrane permeability. Depending upon the DTPA excretion the patients were divided into 4 groups: High Transporter (15% and above; High Average (12 to 15 %); Low Average (10 to 12%); Low Average (10% and less). When the results were compared with the conventional PET values, a good correlation (r=0.79) could be found. Conclusion: Determining the excretion of 99mTc-DTPA in the dialysate fluid after 4 hrs as percentage of the injected dose is a simple and convenient method to assess the peritoneal membrane permeability and can be used as an alternative technique to conventional PET which is very cumbersome and associated with many limitations

  2. ASSESSMENT OF SATISFACTION IN PERITONEAL EQUILIBRATION TEST: A STUDY ON THE VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY OF THE PERITONEAL EQUILIBRATION SATISFACTION SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eylem TOPBAŞ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study has been designed to develop an assessment tool to be used in determining the patients’ satisfaction level with the peritoneal equilibration test (PET procedure. Materials and Methods: The development and validation of the peritoneal equilibration test Satisfaction Scale (PETSS was completed in two phases. Phase I focused on instrument construction and included item development and establishment of concurrent validity. Phase II included the factor analysis and psychometric assessment of the scale. In statistical evaluation of the data descriptive statistics and non-paratmetric tests were used. Results: The first version of the scale that has 3.62 Content Validity Index value was composed of 20 items. It was found that the latest version of the scale that has 14 items explained 46% of the variance. It was found that the Cronbach alfa value of this scale, which has 0.52-0.89 coefficient of item-total correlation was 0.96. Psychometric assessment of the scale revealed that except for type of the PET application, none of the demographic and clinical characteristics effect patients level of satisfaction during the PET application. Conclusion: This preliminary study showed that PETSS was a valid and reliable scale that can be used for determining satisfaction level of patients during PET application.

  3. Changes of peritoneal transport parameters with time on dialysis: assessment with sequential peritoneal equilibration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2017-10-27

    Sequential peritoneal equilibration test (sPET) is based on the consecutive performance of the peritoneal equilibration test (PET, 4-hour, glucose 2.27%) and the mini-PET (1-hour, glucose 3.86%), and the estimation of peritoneal transport parameters with the 2-pore model. It enables the assessment of the functional transport barrier for fluid and small solutes. The objective of this study was to check whether the estimated model parameters can serve as better and earlier indicators of the changes in the peritoneal transport characteristics than directly measured transport indices that depend on several transport processes. 17 patients were examined using sPET twice with the interval of about 8 months (230 ± 60 days). There was no difference between the observational parameters measured in the 2 examinations. The indices for solute transport, but not net UF, were well correlated between the examinations. Among the estimated parameters, a significant decrease between the 2 examinations was found only for hydraulic permeability LpS, and osmotic conductance for glucose, whereas the other parameters remained unchanged. These fluid transport parameters did not correlate with D/P for creatinine, although the decrease in LpS values between the examinations was observed mostly for patients with low D/P for creatinine. We conclude that changes in fluid transport parameters, hydraulic permeability and osmotic conductance for glucose, as assessed by the pore model, may precede the changes in small solute transport. The systematic assessment of fluid transport status needs specific clinical and mathematical tools beside the standard PET tests.

  4. [Peritoneal dialysis adequacy in pediatrics. From the peritoneal equilibration test to the aquaporins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Lillian; Cano, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An evaluation of the characteristics of peritoneal solute and water transport is essential to assess the suitability of prescribing dialysis in patients suffering from chronic renal disease. There are currently a series of models to perform this evaluation. The peritoneal equilibration test (PET) evaluates the peritoneal transport capacity, classifying the patients into four transport categories: high, high-average, low-average, and low. The short PET enables the same evaluation to be made in only 2hours, and has been validated in paediatric patients. On the other hand, the MiniPET provides additional information by evaluating the free water transport capacity by the ultra-small pores, and the Accelerated Peritoneal Examination Time (APEX) evaluates the time when the glucose and urea equilibration curves cross, and has been proposed as the optimum dwell time to achieve adequate ultrafiltration. An analysis is presented on the current information on these diagnostic methods as regards free water transport via aquaporins, which could be an important tool in optimising solute and water transport in patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis, particularly as regards the cardiovascular prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  6. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  7. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  8. Balance Assessment in Sports-Related Concussion: Evaluating Test-Retest Reliability of the Equilibrate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Mitchell J; Lee, Young M; Zuckerman, Scott L; Apple, Rachel P; Germanos, Theodore; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the test-retest reliability of a novel computer-based, portable balance assessment tool, the Equilibrate System (ES), used to diagnose sports-related concussion. Twenty-seven students participated in ES testing consisting of three sessions over 4 weeks. The modified Balance Error Scoring System was performed. For each participant, test-retest reliability was established using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ES test-retest reliability from baseline to week 2 produced an ICC value of 0.495 (95% CI, 0.123-0.745). Week 2 testing produced ICC values of 0.602 (95% CI, 0.279-0.803) and 0.610 (95% CI, 0.299-0.804), respectively. All other single measures test-retest reliability values produced poor ICC values. Same-day ES testing showed fair to good test-retest reliability while interweek measures displayed poor to fair test-retest reliability. Testing conditions should be controlled when using computerized balance assessment methods. ES testing should only be used as a part of a comprehensive assessment.

  9. Particle-particle correlations and lifetimes of composite nuclei: New tests for the evaporation model and for statistical equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeYoung, P.A.; Gelderloos, C.J.; Kortering, D.; Sarafa, J.; Zienert, K.; Gordon, M.S.; Fineman, B.J.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Lu, X.; McGrath, R.L.; de Castro Rizzo, D.M.; Alexander, J.M.; Auger, G.; Kox, S.; Vaz, L.C.; Beck, C.; Henderson, D.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Vineyard, M.F.; Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794; Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439)

    1990-01-01

    We present data for small-angle particle-particle correlations from the reactions 80, 140, 215, and 250 MeV 16 O+ 27 Al→p-p or p-d. The main features of these data are anticorrelations for small relative momenta (≤25 MeV/c) that strengthen with increasing bombarding energy. Statistical model calculations have been performed to predict the mean lifetimes for each step of evaporative decay, and then simulate the trajectories of the particle pairs and the resulting particle correlations. This simulation accounts very well for the trends of the data and can provide an important new test for the hypothesis of equilibration on which the model is built

  10. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Koren, Courtney; Schreiman, Judith S.; Majewski, Stan; Marano, Gary D.; Abraham, Jame; Kurian, Sobha; Hazard, Hannah; Filburn, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  11. Qualification test of a MPPC-based PET module for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Funamoto, H.; Tsujikawa, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a high-resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module for future use in MRI-PET scanners. The module consists of large-area, 4×4 ch MPPC arrays (Hamamatsu S11827-3344MG) optically coupled with Ce:LYSO scintillators fabricated into 12×12 matrices of 1×1 mm2 pixels. At this stage, a pair of module and coincidence circuits was assembled into an experimental prototype gantry arranged in a ring of 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. The PET detector ring was then positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point 22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure interference between the MPPC-based PET and the MRI. We only found a slight degradation in the spatial resolution of the PET image from 1.63 to 1.70 mm (FWHM; x-direction), or 1.48-1.55 mm (FWHM; y-direction) when operating with the MRI, while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI image was only degraded by 5%. These results encouraged us to develop a more advanced version of the MRI-PET gantry with eight MPPC-based PET modules, whose detailed design and first qualification test are also presented in this paper.

  12. Impact of pre-equilibration and diffusion limited release kinetics on effluent concentration in column leaching tests: Insights from numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Michael; Grathwohl, Peter

    2017-05-01

    Column leaching tests have become a standard method for assessing leaching of pollutants from materials used, e.g., for road and railway constructions and in landscaping measures. Column tests showed to be practical in laboratories yielding robust and reproducible results. However, considerable uncertainty still exists related particularly to the degree of equilibration of the pore water with the solids during preparation (pre-equilibration) and percolation of the column. We analyse equilibration time scales and sensitivity of concentrations in column leachate with respect to initial conditions in a series of numerical experiments covering a broad spectrum of material and solute properties. Slow release of pollutants from solid materials is described by a spherical diffusion model of kinetic sorption accounting for multiple grain size fractions and sorption capacities. Results show that the cumulative concentrations are rather independent of the pre-equilibration level for a broad spectrum of parameter settings, e.g. if intra-particle porosity is high, grain size is small, or if the sorption coefficient is large. Sensitivity increases with decreasing liquid solid ratios and contact time during percolation. Significant variations with initial column conditions are to be expected for material and compound properties leading to slow release kinetics. In these cases, sensitivity to initial conditions may have to be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A rapidly equilibrating, thin film, passive water sampler for organic contaminants; characterization and field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St George, Tiffany [Department of Marine Science, University of Connecticut, 1080 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Department of Science, United States Coast Guard Academy, 27 Mohegan Ave., New London, CT 06320 (United States); Vlahos, Penny, E-mail: penny.vlahos@uconn.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, 55 Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Department of Marine Science, University of Connecticut, 1080 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Harner, Tom [Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada); Helm, Paul [Environmental Monitoring and Reporting Branch, Ontario Ministry of the Environment, 125 Resources Rd, Toronto, Ontario M9P 3V6 (Canada); Wilford, Bryony [Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 4905 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario M3H 5T4 (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Improving methods for assessing the spatial and temporal resolution of organic compound concentrations in marine environments is important to the sustainable management of our coastal systems. Here we evaluate the use of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as a candidate polymer for thin-film passive sampling in waters of marine environments. Log K{sub EVA-W} partition coefficients correlate well (r{sup 2} = 0.87) with Log K{sub OW} values for selected pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) where Log K{sub EVA-W} = 1.04 Log K{sub OW} + 0.22. EVA is a suitable polymer for passive sampling due to both its high affinity for organic compounds and its ease of coating at sub-micron film thicknesses on various substrates. Twelve-day field deployments were effective in detecting target compounds with good precision making EVA a potential multi-media fugacity meter. - Research highlights: Calibration and field testing of a thin-film passive sampler in marine systems. Ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is effective for a wide spectrum of organic compounds. EVA performs with high precision and reproducibility. EVA is effective in marine systems at environmentally relevant concentrations. EVA is recommended as a multi-media fugacity meter for environmental applications. - An ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), thin-film passive sampler for the detection of organic compounds in marine environments is calibrated and field tested.

  14. Suggestion for improvement of PET quality control tests in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Fernanda C.L.; Magalhaes, Cinthia M.S.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays nuclear medicine has a considerable importance among the other medical specialties. This medical specialty utilizes high-tech equipment for imaging in the diagnosis, obtaining information on the clinical functionality of organs and systems of the human body through the use of radioisotopes . In view of the importance of guaranteeing the image quality in SPECT and PET systems, enabling patients not repeat exams due to lack of quality control of equipment used in nuclear medicine, this paper aims to present a possible suggestion to update the quality control tests needed for quality assurance of nuclear medicine services. They were considered the requirements of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in Brazil. The minimum requirements to be defined for inclusion of quality control tests on PET in the standard CNEN are extremely important because they will guide the evaluation of PET systems, determining the quality control tests to be performed. And those tests for PET will be a regulatory requirement by the CNEN and ANVISA. As the National Health Surveillance Agency has already publication of RDC 38 with recommendations for services of nuclear medicine. This study will continue with evaluation of PET systems and presenting the tests of quality control with additional objects and simulators to ensure safety in PET systems have not standardized in nuclear medicine services in Brazil. (author)

  15. Philips Gemini TF64 PET/CT Acceptance Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Gonzalez, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marin, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Machado Tejeda, Adalberto; González Correa, Héctor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Philips Gemini TF64 is the first PET/CT scanner installed in Cuba at the Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology in 2014. It is a third generation fully tridimensional whole body PET scanner with time-of-flight (TOF) technology combined with a 64-slice Brilliance CT scanner. The CT detector module contains 672x64 solid state detector, incorporating GOS scintillators, optical diodes and electronic signal channels arranged in 64 side by side arcs, with 672 detectors in each arc. There are sixteen 0.75 mm individual detector elements around the center and four 1.5 mm elements at each end, resulting in a 24 mm total detection length. The PET detector consists of 28 pixelar modules of a 23x44 array of 4x4x22 mm3 of LYSO crystals arranged in an Anger-logic detector design. The hardware coincidence-timing window for this scanner is set at 4 ns and delayed coincidence window technique is used to estimate the random coincidences in collected data. In this study the performance characteristics of PET/CT scanner were measured as part of the program tests of acceptance for clinical use.Methodology. The performance characteristics of CT scanner were evaluated by manufacturer protocol using Philips system performance phantom. Some additional geometrical tests were performed by the user. The intrinsic measurements of energy resolution as well as timing resolution, which define the TOF performance of PET scanner, were performed following the recommendations of manufacturer using 18 F. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, counting rate performance, image quality and accuracy were measured according to the NEMA NU-2 2007 procedures. Additionally, to characterize the effect of TOF reconstruction on lesion contrast and noise, the standard NEMA torso phantom was reconstructed with and without TOF capability. The accuracy of PET/CT image registration was tested according to the manufacturer protocol using an image alignment calibration holder with 6 point sources of 22

  16. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5x5x4 cm 3 . Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5x2.5x15 mm 3 ) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ∼60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ∼85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy

  17. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R. [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States)]. E-mail: rraylman@wvu.edu; Majewski, Stan [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S. Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, West Virginia University, HSB Box 9236, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brain [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G. [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wojcik, Randy [Detector Group, Physics Division, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2006-12-20

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5x5x4 cm{sup 3}. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5x2.5x15 mm{sup 3}) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of {approx}60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to {approx}85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy.

  18. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  19. Biophase equilibration times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veng-Pedersen, P; Mandema, J W; Danhof, M

    1991-09-01

    Various methods for describing how quickly a drug equilibrates at the biophase are proposed. The biophase equilibration time (BET) is the time it takes the biophase drug level to reach a given percentage (p) of its predicted steady state in a drug administration that leads to a steady-state condition. The time to reach biophase equilibrium may be defined as the BET value for p = 95, and the 50% biophase equilibration time is obtained when p = 50. Biophase equilibration profiles (BEPs), obtained by plotting p versus BET, give a dynamic representation of the approach to equilibrium and may serve as an indicator of the rate of drug delivery to the biophase. A pharmacodynamic system analysis method is proposed to determine BETs and BEPs from the biophase conduction function. The approach is demonstrated using pharmacodynamic data from the CNS effect of amobarbital evaluated by an aperiodic analysis of EEG recordings. The relevance of the BET and/or BEP principles in optimal computer-controlled drug infusion, drug design, and evaluation of targeted drug delivery is discussed. Both vascular and extravascular drug administrations are considered in the analysis.

  20. Comparison of peritoneal equilibration test with 99mTc-DTPA excretion in the assessment of peritoneal permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Senthilnathan, M.S.; Pradhan, P.K.; Nagabhushan, S.; Jeloka, T.K.; Sharma, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of peritoneal permeability is necessary for successful management of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The objective of this study was to develop an alternative method of assessing the peritoneal permeability and to compare this method with the conventional method, the peritoneal equilibrium test, first described by Twardowski in 1987. Twenty patients undergoing regular CAPD were included in this study. Before starting the peritoneal dialysis, 370 MBq (10 mCi) technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) was injected intravenously. A standard dose of the same quantity was kept and used later for calculations. At the end of 4 h, a dialysate fluid sample (1 ml) was collected and the total dialysis effluent fluid volume was measured. Excretion of 99m Tc-DTPA into the dialysate fluid as a percentage of the injected dose was calculated. Simultaneously, standard peritoneal equilibrium test values were recorded for comparison. Peritoneal excretion of 99m Tc-DTPA ranged from 8% to 25% of the injected dose, depending on the peritoneal membrane permeability. When the results were compared with the conventional method, a good correlation (r=0.79) was found. This innovative radionuclide technique is a simple and convenient method to assess the peritoneal membrane permeability and can be used as an alternative to the peritoneal equilibrium test, which is very cumbersome and associated with many limitations. (orig.)

  1. Chemical equilibration of antihyperons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C.

    2002-01-01

    Rapid chemical equilibration of antihyperons by means of the interplay between strong annihilation on baryons and the corresponding backreactions of multi-mesonic (fusion-type) processes in the later, hadronic stage of an ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision will be discussed. Explicit rate calculations for a dynamical setup are presented. At maximum SPS energies yields of each antihyperon specie are obtained which are consistent with chemical saturated populations of T∼150-160 MeV. The proposed picture supports dynamically the popular chemical freeze-out parameters extracted within thermal models. (orig.)

  2. Batch test equilibration studies examining the removal of Cs, Sr, and Tc from supernatants from ORNL underground storage tanks by selected ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.; Egan, B.Z.; Anderson, K.K.; Chase, C.W.; Bell, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    Bench-scale batch equilibration tests have been conducted with supernatants from two underground tanks at the Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine the effectiveness of selected ion exchangers in removing cesium, strontium, and technetium. Seven sorbents were evaluated for cesium removal, nine for strontium removal, and four for technetium removal. The results indicate that granular potassium cobalt hexacyanoferrate was the most effective of the exchangers evaluated for removing cesium from the supernatants. The powdered forms of sodium titanate (NaTiO) and cystalline silicotitanate (CST) were superior in removing the strontium; however, for the sorbents of suitable particle size for column use, titanium monohydrogen phosphate (TiHP φ), sodium titanate/polyacrylonitrile (NaTiO-PAN), and titanium monohydrogen phosphate/polyacrylonitrile (TiP-PAN) gave the best results and were about equally effective. Reillex trademark 402 was the most effective exchanger in removing the technetium; however, it was only slightly more satisfactory than Reillex trademark HPQ

  3. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Pet Allergy ▸ Pet Allergy Quiz Share | Pet Allergy Quiz More than half of U.S. households ... cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge ...

  4. Characterization of a PET-NEMA/IEC body phantom for quality control tests of PET/CT equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio M.; Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Sa, Lidia V. de

    2011-01-01

    The Brazilian Sanitary Agency from Ministry of Health requires that all PET/CT equipment must undergo minimal quality control tests using manufacturer simulators. The PET-NEMA/IEC body phantom is recommended by the IEC and NEMA to perform acceptance testing and quality control in PET/CT equipment according to specific protocols. It is essential that all simulator components (spheres and body) are properly characterized in relation to their size and internal structure volumes, since they are used to calculate the overall activity concentration and the total weight. The objective of this work was characterize a PET-NEMA/IEC body phantom for the true reconstruction in computational modeling and correct analysis of experimental results. The simulator is basically composed of three structures: the body (simulating a portion of the chest), an inner cylinder (simulating the lung tissue) and a top cover in which are coupled spheres of different sizes simulating 'hot' (tumors) and cold lesions. The spheres were evaluated in terms of volume. The same evaluations were performed with the body of the simulator and the inner cylinder, beyond of analysis of their weights (filled with water) and wall thickness. The data showed that the total weight of the simulator with all its internal structures is 12.5 kg and the volume of the 'hot' and 'cold' spheres are approximately equal to those presented by the manufacturer. The inner cylinder volume showed a significant difference between the measured and the presented in the manual. The results were used for reconstruction of the simulator in computational modeling using the code GATE. (author)

  5. Pilot testing a digital pet avatar for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Nai-Ching; Sparks, Olivia; Lin, Shih-Yin; Lazar, Amanda; Thompson, Hilaire J; Demiris, George

    Social isolation in older adults is a major public health concern. An embodied conversational agent (ECA) has the potential to enhance older adults' social interaction. However, little is known about older adults' experience with an ECA. In this paper, we conducted a pilot study to examine the perceived acceptance and utility of a tablet-based conversational agent in the form of an avatar (termed "digital pet") for older adults. We performed secondary analysis of data collected from a study that employed the use of a digital pet in ten older adults' homes for three months. Most of the participants enjoyed the companionship, entertainment, reminders, and instant assistance from the digital pet. However, participants identified limited conversational ability and technical issues as system challenges. Privacy, dependence, and cost were major concerns. Future applications should maximize the agent's conversational ability and the system's overall usability. Our results can inform future designs of conversational agents for older adults, which need to include older adults as system co-designers to maximize usability and acceptance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pilot tests of a PET detector using the TOF-PET ASIC based on monolithic crystals and SiPMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A.; González-Montoro, A.; González, A.J.; Hernández, L.; Monzó, J.M.; Benlloch, J.M.; Bugalho, R.; Ferramacho, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we show pilot tests of PET detector blocks using the TOF-PET ASIC, coupled to SiPM detector arrays and different crystal configurations. We have characterized the main ASIC features running calibration processes to compensate the time dispersion among the different ASIC/SiPM paths as well as for the time walk on the arrival of optical photons. The aim of this work is to use of LYSO monolithic crystals and explore their photon Depth of Interaction (DOI) capabilities, keeping good energy and spatial resolutions. First tests have been carried out with crystal arrays. Here we made it possible to reach a coincidence resolving times (CRT) of 370 ps FWHM, with energy resolutions better than 20% and resolving well 2 mm sized crystal elements. When using monolithic crystals, a single-pixel LYSO reference crystal helped to explore the CRT performance. We studied different strategies to provide the best timestamp determination in the monolithic scintillator. Times around 1 ns FWHM have been achieved in these pilot studies. In terms of spatial and energy resolution, values of about 3 mm and better than 30% were found, respectively. We have also demonstrated the capability of this system (monolithic and ASIC) to return accurate DOI information.

  7. The Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET as a Cancer Screening Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Doo Heun; Choi, Joon Young; Song, Yun Mi; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Moon Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects. The subjects were 1,762 men and 259 women who voluntarily underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET for cancer screening as a part of a routine health examination. Final diagnosis was decided by other diagnostic studies, pathological results or clinical follow-up for 1 year. Of 2,021 subjects, 40 (2.0%) were finally proved to have cancer. Abnormal focal {sup 18}F-FDG uptake suggesting malignancy was found in 102 subjects (5.0%). Among them, 21 subjects (1.0%) were proved to have cancer. Other tests in the routine health examination could not find 9 of 21 cancers (42.9%) detected by PET. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET for cancer screening were 52.5%, 95.9%, 20.6%, and 99.0%, respectively. Pathologies of cancers missed on PET were adenocarcinoma (n=9; 3 colon cancers, 3 prostate cancers, 2 stomach cancers, and 1 rectal cancer), differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n=6), bronchioalveolar cell carcinoma (n=2), urinary bladder cancer (n=1), and melanoma (n=1). More than half of cancers which were not detected by PET were smaller than 1 cm in diameter. {sup 18}F-FDG PET might be useful for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects due to its high specificity and negative predictive value and play a supplementary role to the conventional health check-up, but it could not replace due to limited sensitivity for urological cancers, small-sized tumors and some hypometaboic cancers.

  8. The Usefulness of 18F-FDG PET as a Cancer Screening Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Doo Heun; Choi, Joon Young; Song, Yun Mi; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Lee, Moon Kyu

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects. The subjects were 1,762 men and 259 women who voluntarily underwent 18 F-FDG PET for cancer screening as a part of a routine health examination. Final diagnosis was decided by other diagnostic studies, pathological results or clinical follow-up for 1 year. Of 2,021 subjects, 40 (2.0%) were finally proved to have cancer. Abnormal focal 18 F-FDG uptake suggesting malignancy was found in 102 subjects (5.0%). Among them, 21 subjects (1.0%) were proved to have cancer. Other tests in the routine health examination could not find 9 of 21 cancers (42.9%) detected by PET. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET for cancer screening were 52.5%, 95.9%, 20.6%, and 99.0%, respectively. Pathologies of cancers missed on PET were adenocarcinoma (n=9; 3 colon cancers, 3 prostate cancers, 2 stomach cancers, and 1 rectal cancer), differentiated thyroid carcinoma (n=6), bronchioalveolar cell carcinoma (n=2), urinary bladder cancer (n=1), and melanoma (n=1). More than half of cancers which were not detected by PET were smaller than 1 cm in diameter. 18 F-FDG PET might be useful for cancer screening in asymptomatic subjects due to its high specificity and negative predictive value and play a supplementary role to the conventional health check-up, but it could not replace due to limited sensitivity for urological cancers, small-sized tumors and some hypometaboic cancers

  9. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  10. Preparation of Ga-68-NOTA as a renal PET agent and feasibility tests in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Youn; Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Young Ju; Jeong, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sang; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography (PET) may provide more accurate quantification of kidney function such as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) than gamma imaging. The purpose of these experiments was to prepare and evaluate Ga-68 complexes as potential PET agents for measurement of GFR. Methods: We labeled EDTA, DTPA, DOTA, and NOTA with Ga-68 obtained from a Ge-68/Ga-68-generator and measured the binding to serum and red blood cells. Biodistribution study was performed in male BALB/c mice after intravenous injection together with Cr-51-EDTA as the standard for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement. Animal-PET study was performed using BALB/c mice. Results: All the tested chelating agents except DTPA showed quantitative labeling yields (> 99%). Among them, Ga-68-NOTA showed consistently low binding to both human and mouse RBC and serum protein. Biodistribution study showed no significant difference between Ga-68-NOTA and Cr-51-EDTA groups by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the GFR values obtained by Ga-68-NOTA and Cr-51-EDTA were almost same (0.26 ± 0.04 and 0.25 ± 0.04 mL/min, respectively). Animal-PET study showed almost the same GFR (0.25 mL/min) with the values obtained by biodistribution study. Conclusion: We proved that an easy-to-prepare agent Ga-68-NOTA is ideal for renal PET as well as for GFR measurement

  11. Dynamic tensile test of single PET textile cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasco F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The tyres conception involves for certain applications, the use of textile cables as reinforcement. During its use, the tyre undergoes temperatures variations and dynamic loading rates. The consideration of these conditions during the numeric simulations requires the knowledge of the sensitivity of the mechanical behaviour to loading rate and temperature. In this paper, we developed an experimental methodology for testing textile cable up to high strain rate. The main difficulty of testing cables is the optimization of cable fixing on the machine. For that purpose, we adapted the solution of fixing by progressive binding already used in quasi-static, while taking into account constraints inherent to high strain tests. Firstly, the mass of grips was decreased in order to get force signal less sensitive to grips inertia. The method was developed on a high speed hydraulic machine equipped with a thermal enclosure. The investigated temperatures and strain rates range from room temperature to 373 ∘K (100 ∘C and from 0,01 to 100/s, respectively. In addition, the hydraulic machine was equipped with a high speed video camera. The obtained images were analysed by a tracking technique to measure the average strain in the cable (from 50 to 20000 f/s.

  12. Equilibration Influence on Jet Energy Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Luan; Wang Enke

    2010-01-01

    With the initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution. With considering the parton equilibration, we obtain the time dependence of the opacity when the jet propagates through the QGP medium. The parton equilibration affect the jet energy loss with detailed balance evidently. Both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss.

  13. Testing and development of an OWC MRI compatible PET insert front-end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinou, G.; Ali, W.; Chil, R.; Cossu, G.; Ciaramella, E.; Vaquero, J.J.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and development of a positron emission tomography (PET) detector module that could be used inside magnetic resonance imager (MRI). Critical factors compromising this combination have been studied and different solutions have been offered. Our design divides the detector module in two sections: one is the insert front-end that is placed inside the MRI and that comprises of a scintillator, a silicon photomultiplier and minimum analog electronics. The analog pulses are sent to the second section, the back-end digitalization and reconstruction module. The analog link is implemented using optical wireless communication (OWC) techniques. In this work we study how such a setting retains all the necessary characteristics for the detection and characterization of gamma scintillation events, providing sufficient communication quality with low consumption and minimizing the need for space. Possible multiplexing schemes for achieving the necessary transmission with less communication channels are also proposed and studied. A series of tests and measurements on different settings demonstrate the viability of this technique. When fully developed, it can provide a cost effective alternative for the industrial production of a flexible and customizable modular PET detector insert that can be applied to pre-existing small animal or human MRI settings, only minimally affecting the size of the MRI bore, without compromising the PET signal quality. (Author)

  14. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  15. Equilibrator: Modeling Chemical Equilibria with Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Griend, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrator is a Microsoft Excel program for learning about chemical equilibria through modeling, similar in function to EQS4WIN, which is no longer supported and does not work well with newer Windows operating systems. Similar to EQS4WIN, Equilibrator allows the user to define a system with temperature, initial moles, and then either total…

  16. Multiscale approach to equilibrating model polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Ali Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein; Hojdis, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective and simple multiscale method for equilibrating Kremer Grest model polymer melts of varying stiffness. In our approach, we progressively equilibrate the melt structure above the tube scale, inside the tube and finally at the monomeric scale. We make use of models designed...

  17. Different concentrations and volumes of p-phenylenediamine in pet. (equivalent doses) are associated with similar patch test outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming; Hamann, Carsten R; Andersen, Klaus E

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concern about causing active sensitization when patch testing is performed with p-phenylenediamine (PPD) 1% pet. has led to a recommendation to use PPD 0.3% pet. as a potentially safer preparation. However, the dose per area of allergen delivered, and hence the risk of active...... sensitization, depend on the amount dispensed into the patch test chamber, which can vary widely. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patch testing with equivalent doses of different concentrations of PPD in pet. is associated with similar outcomes. METHODS: Seventeen known PPD-sensitive subjects were patch tested...... with different volumes and concentrations of PPD in pet. that deliver the same allergen dose per unit area (6 mg of PPD 1% pet. and 20 mg of PPD 0.3% pet. in Finn Chambers®, both equivalent to ∼ 0.09 mg/cm2 ). RESULTS: Eleven patients (65%) had positive reactions to both doses; 4 patients (24%) had negative...

  18. Neutron radiographic testing of samples of special concrete containing recycled PET granules as aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Antonio Carlos Alves de; Crispim, Verginia Reis

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at inspecting microcracks in test specimens of special concrete, through neutron radiography tests. The thermal neutron flux used was extracted from the J-9 irradiation channel, placed in the thermal column of Argonauta/IEN/CNEN/RJ reactor, where a neutron radiographic system is installed. The test specimens inspected were molded in a cylindrical shape, with standard concrete and modified concrete where coarse sand was substituted by granules of recycled PET. They were submitted to compression in a SHIMADSU UH F 1000 press, causing microcracks. Then, slices of 50 μm thickness were obtained using an electrical saw. Gadolinium nitrate was used as contrast liquid in order to enhance the visualization of those microcracks. The Neutron Radiography technique proved to be appropriate for this kind of inspection, allowing to clearly visualizing the microcracks. Recycled PET granules met ABNT standards, and may be used in the construction of low income people houses, as structural concrete (25 % PP) or house floors (25% to 50% PEAD). The mechanical properties of compression and elasticity demonstrated for this special concrete, on Civil Engineering conventional tests, and by the neutron radiographic images obtained, showed that its use is viable even for civil construction in areas subject to seismic vents. (author)

  19. Equilibration and thermalization in finite quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V I

    2011-01-01

    Experiments with trapped atomic gases have opened novel possibilities for studying the evolution of nonequilibrium finite quantum systems, which revived the necessity of reconsidering and developing the theory of such processes. This review analyzes the basic approaches to describing the phenomena of equilibration, thermalization, and decoherence in finite quantum systems. Isolated, nonisolated, and quasi-isolated quantum systems are considered. The relations between equilibration, decoherence, and the existence of time arrow are emphasized. The possibility for the occurrence of rare events, preventing complete equilibration, are mentioned

  20. Chemical equilibration due to heavy Hagedorn states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C; Koch-Steinheimer, P; Liu, F M; Shovkovy, I A; Stoecker, H

    2005-01-01

    A scenario of heavy resonances, called massive Hagedorn states, is proposed which exhibits a fast (t ∼ 1 fm/c) chemical equilibration of (strange) baryons and anti-baryons at the QCD critical temperature T c . For relativistic heavy ion collisions this scenario predicts that hadronization is followed by a brief expansion phase during which the equilibration rate is higher than the expansion rate, so that baryons and antibaryons reach chemical equilibrium before chemical freeze-out occurs

  1. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=3.3 mm±1.0 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=3.6 mm±1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=0.7 mm±0.8 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=0.3 mm±1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for

  2. Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, L.; Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-01

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with 30 ps time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below 600 e‑ RMS and a pulse rise time of less than 2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of 0.8 pF were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than 99% and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately 200 ps .

  3. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Stability of FDG-PET Radiomics features - An integrated analysis of test-retest and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leijenaar, Ralph T. H.; Carvalho, Sara; Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel [Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Besides basic measurements as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV){sub max} or SUV{sub mean} derived from 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) scans, more advanced quantitative imaging features (i.e. 'Radiomics' features) are increasingly investigated for treatment monitoring, outcome prediction, or as potential biomarkers. With these prospected applications of Radiomics features, it is a requisite that they provide robust and reliable measurements. The aim of our study was therefore to perform an integrated stability analysis of a large number of PET-derived features in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), based on both a test-retest and an inter-observer setup. Methods: Eleven NSCLC patients were included in the test-retest cohort. Patients underwent repeated PET imaging within a one day interval, before any treatment was delivered. Lesions were delineated by applying a threshold of 50 % of the maximum uptake value within the tumor. Twenty-three NSCLC patients were included in the inter-observer cohort. Patients underwent a diagnostic whole body PET-computed tomography (CT). Lesions were manually delineated based on fused PET-CT, using a standardized clinical delineation protocol. Delineation was performed independently by five observers, blinded to each other. Fifteen first order statistics, 39 descriptors of intensity volume histograms, eight geometric features and 44 textural features were extracted. For every feature, test-retest and inter-observer stability was assessed with the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the coefficient of variability, normalized to mean and range. Similarity between test-retest and inter-observer stability rankings of features was assessed with Spear man's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Results showed that the majority of assessed features had both a high test-retest (71%) and inter-observer (91%) stability in terms of their ICC. Overall, features more stable in repeated PET

  5. Voltage equilibration for reactive atomistic simulations of electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We introduce electrochemical dynamics with implicit degrees of freedom (EChemDID), a model to describe electrochemical driving force in reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The method describes the equilibration of external electrochemical potentials (voltage) within metallic structures and their effect on the self-consistent partial atomic charges used in reactive molecular dynamics. An additional variable assigned to each atom denotes the local potential in its vicinity and we use fictitious, but computationally convenient, dynamics to describe its equilibration within connected metallic structures on-the-fly during the molecular dynamics simulation. This local electrostatic potential is used to dynamically modify the atomic electronegativities used to compute partial atomic changes via charge equilibration. Validation tests show that the method provides an accurate description of the electric fields generated by the applied voltage and the driving force for electrochemical reactions. We demonstrate EChemDID via simulations of the operation of electrochemical metallization cells. The simulations predict the switching of the device between a high-resistance to a low-resistance state as a conductive metallic bridge is formed and resistive currents that can be compared with experimental measurements. In addition to applications in nanoelectronics, EChemDID could be useful to model electrochemical energy conversion devices

  6. Test-retest measurements of dopamine D_1-type receptors using simultaneous PET/MRI imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaller, Simon; Patt, Marianne; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Luthardt, Julia; Meyer, Philipp M.; Werner, Peter; Barthel, Henryk; Bresch, Anke; Sabri, Osama; Rullmann, Michael; Girbardt, Johanna; Fritz, Thomas H.; Hesse, Swen

    2017-01-01

    The role of dopamine D_1-type receptor (D_1R)-expressing neurons in the regulation of motivated behavior and reward prediction has not yet been fully established. As a prerequisite for future research assessing D_1-mediated neuronal network regulation using simultaneous PET/MRI and D_1R-selective ["1"1C]SCH23390, this study investigated the stability of central D_1R measurements between two independent PET/MRI sessions under baseline conditions. Thirteen healthy volunteers (7 female, age 33 ± 13 yrs) underwent 90-min emission scans, each after 90-s bolus injection of 486 ± 16 MBq ["1"1C]SCH23390, on two separate days within 2-4 weeks using a PET/MRI system. Parametric images of D_1R distribution volume ratio (DVR) and binding potential (BP_N_D) were generated by a multi-linear reference tissue model with two parameters and the cerebellar cortex as receptor-free reference region. Volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis was performed with manual VOIs drawn on consecutive transverse MRI slices for brain regions with high and low D_1R density. The DVR varied from 2.5 ± 0.3 to 2.9 ± 0.5 in regions with high D_1R density (e.g. the head of the caudate) and from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.2 in regions with low D_1R density (e.g. the prefrontal cortex). The absolute variability of the DVR ranged from 2.4% ± 1.3% to 5.1% ± 5.3%, while Bland-Altman analyses revealed very low differences in mean DVR (e.g. 0.013 ± 0.17 for the nucleus accumbens). Intraclass correlation (one-way, random) indicated very high agreement (0.93 in average) for both DVR and BP_N_D values. Accordingly, the absolute variability of BP_N_D ranged from 7.0% ± 4.7% to 12.5% ± 10.6%; however, there were regions with very low D_1R content, such as the occipital cortex, with higher mean variability. The test-retest reliability of D_1R measurements in this study was very high. This was the case not only for D_1R-rich brain areas, but also for regions with low D_1R density. These results will provide a solid base

  7. Equilibration of particles with abelian charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redlich, K.; Tounsi, A.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate the kinetic equation for time evolution and chemical equilibration of particles that carries an abelian charge. We show that dependently on the thermal conditions inside a fireball the system approaches to different chemical equilibrium limits. The role of exact conservation of quantum numbers in the kinetic description of rarely produced particles is explained. (orig.)

  8. Correlation of 68Ga Ventilation-Perfusion PET/CT with Pulmonary Function Test Indices for Assessing Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Steinfort, Daniel P; Callahan, Jason; Eu, Peter; Irving, Lou B; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are routinely used to assess lung function, but they do not provide information about regional pulmonary dysfunction. We aimed to assess correlation of quantitative ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT with PFT indices. Thirty patients underwent V/Q PET/CT and PFT. Respiration-gated images were acquired after inhalation of (68)Ga-carbon nanoparticles and administration of (68)Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Functional volumes were calculated by dividing the volume of normal ventilated and perfused (%NVQ), unmatched and matched defects by the total lung volume. These functional volumes were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO). All functional volumes were significantly different in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P volume of unmatched defects (r = -0.55). Considering %NVQ only, a cutoff value of 90% correctly categorized 28 of 30 patients with or without significant pulmonary function impairment. Our study demonstrates strong correlations between V/Q PET/CT functional volumes and PFT parameters. Because V/Q PET/CT is able to assess regional lung function, these data support the feasibility of its use in radiation therapy and preoperative planning and assessing pulmonary dysfunction in a variety of respiratory diseases. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskal, P.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Bednarski, T.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kubicz, E.; Moskal, I.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Sharma, N.G.; Silarski, M.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.; Białas, P.; Gajos, A.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.

    2014-01-01

    A Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this paper we report on tests of a single detection module built out from the BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5×19×300 mm 3 ) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68 Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50 ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80 ps (σ) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93 cm (σ) for the annihilation quanta. The fractional energy resolution for the energy E deposited by the annihilation quanta via the Compton scattering amounts to σ(E)/E≈0.044/√(E(MeV)) and corresponds to the σ(E)/E of 7.5% at the Compton edge

  10. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, P.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Bednarski, T.; Czerwiński, E.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kubicz, E.; Moskal, I.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.; Białas, P.; Gajos, A.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Molenda, M.; Pałka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Salabura, P.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.

    2014-11-01

    A Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this paper we report on tests of a single detection module built out from the BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5×19×300 mm3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50 ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80 ps (σ) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93 cm (σ) for the annihilation quanta. The fractional energy resolution for the energy E deposited by the annihilation quanta via the Compton scattering amounts to σ(E) / E ≈ 0.044 /√{ E(MeV) } and corresponds to the σ(E) / E of 7.5% at the Compton edge.

  11. Strangeness Production in a Chemically Equilibrating Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ze-Jun; LONG Jia-Li; MA Yu-Gang; MA Guo-Liang

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study the strangeness of a chemically equilibrating quark-gluon plasma at finite baryon density based on the and will accelerate with the change of the initial system from a chemically non-equilibrated to an equilibrated system. We also find that the calculated strangeness is very different from the one in the thermodynamic equilibrium system. This study may be helpful to understand the formation of quark-gluon plasma via a chemically non-equilibrated evolution framework.

  12. Test-retest repeatability of myocardial oxidative metabolism and efficiency using standalone dynamic 11C-acetate PET and multimodality approaches in healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils Henrik; Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Kim, Won Yong; Nielsen, Roni; Tolbod, Lars P; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Wiggers, Henrik; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sörensen, Jens

    2018-05-31

    Myocardial efficiency measured by 11 C-acetate positron emission tomography (PET) has successfully been used in clinical research to quantify mechanoenergetic coupling. The objective of this study was to establish the repeatability of myocardial external efficiency (MEE) and work metabolic index (WMI) by non-invasive concepts. Ten healthy volunteers (63 ± 4 years) were examined twice, one week apart, using 11 C-acetate PET, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), and echocardiography. Myocardial oxygen consumption from PET was combined with stroke work data from CMR, echocardiography, or PET to obtain MEE and WMI for each modality. Repeatability was estimated as the coefficient of variation (CV) between test and retest. MEE CMR , MEE Echo , and MEE PET values were 21.9 ± 2.7%, 16.4 ± 3.7%, and 23.8 ± 4.9%, respectively, P PET values were 4.42 ± 0.90, 4.07 ± 0.63, and 4.58 ± 1.13 mmHg × mL/m 2  × 10 6 , respectively, P = .45. Repeatability for MEE CMR was superior compared with MEE Echo but did not differ significantly compared with MEE PET (6.3% vs 12.9% and 9.4%, P = .04 and .25). CV values for WMI CMR , WMI Echo , and WMI PET were 10.0%, 14.8%, and 12.0%, respectively, (P = .53). Non-invasive measurements of MEE using 11 C-acetate PET are highly repeatable. A PET-only approach did not differ significantly from CMR/PET and might facilitate further clinical research due to lower costs and broader applicability.

  13. Recovery coefficients as a test of system linearity of response in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geworski, L.; Munz, D.L.; Knoop, B.; Hofmann, M.; Knapp, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: New imaging protocols have created an increasing demand for quantitation in dedicated PET. Besides attenuation and scatter correction the recovery correction, accounting for the instrument's limited spatial resolution, has gained importance. For clinical practicability these corrections should work independent from the object, i.e. from the actual distribution of emitter and absorber. Aim of the study was to test this object independency, i.e. system linearity of response, by comparing recovery coefficients (RC) determined for different object geometries. In fact, this comparison may serve as a final test on system linearity of response, as measured on the quantitative accuracy by which the activity concentration in small lesions can be recovered. Method: For hot and cold spot imaging situations spatial distribution of activity is different. Therefore, scatter correction algorithm has to deal with different scatter distributions. If all factors disturbing system linearity, specifically scatter and attenuation, are corrected to a sufficient degree of accuracy, the system behaves linearly resulting in the theoretical relationship. CSRC = (1-HSRC). Thus, this equation, applied hot and cold spot measurements, will serve as a test on the effectiveness of the corrections and, hence, as a test of system linearity of response. Following IEC standard procedures (IEC 61675-1) measurements were done with and without interplane septa (2D/3D) on an ECAT EXACT 922 using a cylindrical phantom containing six spheres of different diameters (10 mm - 40 mm). All data were corrected for attenuation (transmission scan) and scatter (2D: deconvolution, 3D: scatter model), as implemented in the scanner's standard software. Recovery coefficients were determined for cold (CSRC) and hot (HSRC) lesions using both 2D and 3D acquisition mode. Results: CSRC directly measured versus CSRC calculated according to eq. (1) from HSRC resulted in an excellent agreement for both 2D and 3D data

  14. Whole-body PET acceptance test in 2D and 3D using NEMA NU 2-2001 protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Shamurailatpam Dayananda; Deshpande, D.; Prasad, R.; Shetye, Bina; Rangarajan, V.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Dinshaw, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated PET/CT has emerged as an integral component of oncology management because of its unique potential of providing both functional and morphological images in a single imaging session. In this work, performance of the 'bismuth germinate (BGO) crystal'-based PET of a newly installed Discovery ST PET/CT was evaluated in 2D and 3D mode for whole-body scanning using National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2001 protocol and the recommended phantoms. During the entire measurements, the system operates with an energy window of 375-650 keV and 11.7 ns coincidence time window. The set of tests performed were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction (SF) and counting rate performance. The average transaxial and axial spatial resolution measured as full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function at 1 cm (and 10 cm) off-axis was 0.632 (0.691) and 0.491 (0.653) cm in 2D and 0.646 (0.682) and 0.54 (0.601) cm in 3D respectively. The average sensitivity for the two radial positions (R = 0 cm and R = 10 cm) was 2.56 (2.63) cps/kBq in 2D and 11.85 (12.14) cps/kBq in 3D. The average scatter fraction was 19.79% in 2D and 46.19% in 3D. The peak noise equivalent counting rate (NECR) evaluated with single random subtraction was 89.41 kcps at 49 kBq/cc in 2D and 60 kcps at 12 kBq/cc in 3D acquisition mode. The NECR with delayed random subtraction was 61.47 kcps at 40.67 kBq/cc in 2D and 45.57 kcps at 16.45 kBq/cc in 3D. The performance of the PET scanner was satisfactory within the manufacturer-specified limits. The test result of PET shows excellent system sensitivity with relatively uniform resolution throughout the FOV, making this scanner highly suitable for whole-body studies. (author)

  15. Time dependent black holes and thermal equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Karch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We study aspects of a recently proposed exact time dependent black hole solution of IIB string theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence. The dual field theory is a thermal system in which initially a vacuum density for a non-conserved operator is turned on. We can see that in agreement with general thermal field theory expectation the system equilibrates: the expectation value of the non-conserved operator goes to zero exponentially and the entropy increases. In the field theory the process can be described quantitatively in terms of a thermofield state and exact agreement with the gravity answers is found

  16. The development and preliminary testing of new boronated agents for BNCT based on PET derived data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, T.; Kabalka, G.; Kahn, M.; Das, B.; Das, S.; Bao, W.; Miller, L.

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been utilized at the University of Tennessee for evaluating a variety of tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). Studies have been carried out utilizing fluorine-18 labeled p-boronophenylalanine ( 18 F-BPA) and other unnatural amino acids. A comparison of PET studies obtained using 18 F-BPA and a carbon-11 labeled cyclobutane-based amino acid ( 11 C-ACBC) revealed that 11 C-ACBC localized effectively in GBM tumors. Based on these results, we have prepared a series of boronated, aminocyclobutanecarboxylic acids. Preliminary uptake and cell toxicity studies have been carried out and show that many of the agents are not toxic. In one instance, a biodistribution study carried out using nude mice implanted with a human glioblastoma tumor, the tumor to normal tissue uptake of boron exceeds that observed for BPA. (author)

  17. Evaluation of patient absorbed dose in a PET-CT test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra P, F.; Mourao F, A. P.; Santana, P. C.

    2017-10-01

    Images of PET-CT has important diagnostic applications, especially in oncology. This equipment allows overlapping of functional images obtained from the administration of radionuclides and anatomical, generated by X-rays. The PET-CT technique may generate higher doses in patients due to the fact that two diagnostic modalities are used in a single examination. A whole body CT scan is performed and in sequence, a capture of the signal generated by the photons emitted is done. In this study, the absorbed and effective doses generated by the CT scan and incorporated by the administration of the radionuclide were evaluated in 19 organs. To evaluate the CT dose, 32 radiochromic film strips were correctly positioned into the anthropomorphic male phantom. The CT protocol performed was whole-body scanning and a high-resolution lung scan. This protocol is currently used in most services. The calculation of the effective dose from the injected activity in the patient was performed using the ICRP 106 Biokinetic model (ICRP 106, 2008). The activity to be injected may vary according to the patients body mass and with the sensitivity of the detector. The mass of the simulator used is 73.5 kg, then the simulation with and injected activity of 244.76 MBq was used. It was observed that 87.4% of the effective dose in examination PET/CT comes from the CT scans, being 63.8% of the whole body scan and 23.6% of high resolution lung scan. Using activity of 0.09 mCi x kg 18 F-FDG radiopharmaceutical contributes only 12.6% of the final effective dose. As a conclusion, it was observed that the dose in patients submitted to the 18 F-FDG PET-CT examination is high, being of great value efforts for its reduction, such as the use of appropriate image acquisition techniques and promoting the application of the principle of optimization of practice. (Author)

  18. Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Wortman, Warner A

    2011-01-01

    A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

  19. In-treatment tests for the monitoring of proton and carbon-ion therapy with a large area PET system at CNAO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, V., E-mail: valeria.rosso@pi.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ciocca, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Collini, F. [Department of Physical Sciences, Earth and Environment, University of Siena and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.C.; Lucenò, S. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.; Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    One of the most promising new radiotherapy techniques makes use of charged particles like protons and carbon ions, rather than photons. At present, there are more than 50 particle therapy centers operating worldwide, and many new centers are being constructed. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is considered a well-established non-invasive technique to monitor range and delivered dose in patients treated with particle therapy. Nuclear interactions of the charged hadrons with the patient tissue lead to the production of β+ emitting isotopes (mainly {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C), that decay with a short lifetime producing a positron. The two 511 keV annihilation photons can be detected with a PET detector. In-beam PET is particularly interesting because it could allow monitoring the ions range also during dose delivery. A large area dual head PET prototype was built and tested. The system is based on an upgraded version of the previously developed DoPET prototype. Each head covers now 15×15 cm{sup 2} and is composed by 9 (3×3) independent modules. Each module consists of a 23×23 LYSO crystal matrix (2 mm pitch) coupled to H8500 PMT and is readout by custom front-end and a FPGA based data acquisition electronics. Data taken at the CNAO treatment facility in Pavia with proton and carbon beams impinging on heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate the DoPET capability to detect the presence of a small air cavity in the phantom.

  20. Elliptic flow and incomplete equilibration at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, R S; Borghini, N; Ollitrault, Jean Yves

    2005-01-01

    We argue that RHIC data, in particular those on the anisotropic flow coefficients v_2 and v_4, suggest that the matter produced in the early stages of nucleus-nucleus collisions is incompletely thermalized. We interpret the parameter (1/S)(dN/dy), where S is the transverse area of the collision zone and dN/dy the multiplicity density, as an indicator of the number of collisions per particle at the time when elliptic flow is established, and hence as a measure of the degree of equilibration. This number serves as a control parameter which can be varied experimentally by changing the system size, the centrality or the beam energy. We provide predictions for Cu-Cu collisions at RHIC as well as for Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC.

  1. Evaluation of patient absorbed dose in a PET-CT test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra P, F.; Mourao F, A. P. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, CEP 31270-901, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santana, P. C., E-mail: fgpaiva92@gmail.com [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Medical School, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, CEP 30123970, Santa Efigenia, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    Images of PET-CT has important diagnostic applications, especially in oncology. This equipment allows overlapping of functional images obtained from the administration of radionuclides and anatomical, generated by X-rays. The PET-CT technique may generate higher doses in patients due to the fact that two diagnostic modalities are used in a single examination. A whole body CT scan is performed and in sequence, a capture of the signal generated by the photons emitted is done. In this study, the absorbed and effective doses generated by the CT scan and incorporated by the administration of the radionuclide were evaluated in 19 organs. To evaluate the CT dose, 32 radiochromic film strips were correctly positioned into the anthropomorphic male phantom. The CT protocol performed was whole-body scanning and a high-resolution lung scan. This protocol is currently used in most services. The calculation of the effective dose from the injected activity in the patient was performed using the ICRP 106 Biokinetic model (ICRP 106, 2008). The activity to be injected may vary according to the patients body mass and with the sensitivity of the detector. The mass of the simulator used is 73.5 kg, then the simulation with and injected activity of 244.76 MBq was used. It was observed that 87.4% of the effective dose in examination PET/CT comes from the CT scans, being 63.8% of the whole body scan and 23.6% of high resolution lung scan. Using activity of 0.09 mCi x kg {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical contributes only 12.6% of the final effective dose. As a conclusion, it was observed that the dose in patients submitted to the {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT examination is high, being of great value efforts for its reduction, such as the use of appropriate image acquisition techniques and promoting the application of the principle of optimization of practice. (Author)

  2. Chemical equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gerald E.; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, Mannque

    2005-01-01

    In the hadronic sector of relativistic heavy ion physics, the ρ<-2π reaction is the strongest one, strong enough to equilibrate the ρ with the pions throughout the region from chemical freezeout to thermal freezeout when free-particle interactions (with no medium-dependent effects) are employed. Above the chiral restoration temperature, only ρ's and π's are present, in that the chirally restored A1 is equivalent to the ρ and the mesons have an SU(4) symmetry, with no dependence on isospin and negligible dependence on spin. In the same sense the σ and π are 'equivalent' scalars. Thus the chirally restored ρ<-2π exhaust the interspecies transitions. We evaluate this reaction at Tc and find it to be much larger than below Tc, certainly strong enough to equilibrate the chirally restored mesons just above Tc. When emitted just below Tc the mesons remain in the Tc+ε freezeout distribution, at least in the chiral limit because of the Harada-Yamawaki 'vector manifestation' that requires that mesonic coupling constants go to zero (in the chiral limit) as T goes to Tc from below. Our estimates in the chiral limit give deviations in some particle ratios from the standard scenario (of equilibrium in the hadronic sector just below Tc) of about double those indicated experimentally. This may be due to the neglect of explicit chiral symmetry breaking in our estimates. We also show that the instanton molecules present above Tc are the giant multipole vibrations found by Asakawa, Hatsuda and Nakahara and of Wetzorke et al. in lattice gauge calculations. Thus, the matter formed by RHIC can equivalently be called: chirally restored mesons, instanton molecules, or giant collective vibrations. It is a strongly interacting liquid

  3. Crossover from equilibration to aging: Nonequilibrium theory versus simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Méndez, P; Lázaro-Lázaro, E; Sánchez-Díaz, L E; Ramírez-González, P E; Pérez-Ángel, G; Medina-Noyola, M

    2017-08-01

    Understanding glasses and the glass transition requires comprehending the nature of the crossover from the ergodic (or equilibrium) regime, in which the stationary properties of the system have no history dependence, to the mysterious glass transition region, where the measured properties are nonstationary and depend on the protocol of preparation. In this work we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to test the main features of the crossover predicted by the molecular version of the recently developed multicomponent nonequilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory. According to this theory, the glass transition involves the abrupt passage from the ordinary pattern of full equilibration to the aging scenario characteristic of glass-forming liquids. The same theory explains that this abrupt transition will always be observed as a blurred crossover due to the unavoidable finiteness of the time window of any experimental observation. We find that within their finite waiting-time window, the simulations confirm the general trends predicted by the theory.

  4. The dynamics of carbon dioxide equilibration after alterations in the respiratory rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, Sarah; Jensen, Marie C; Gottlieb, Dominik; Eckle, Daniel; Szczyrba, Marc; Schumann, Stefan; Guttmann, Josef; Lozano-Zahonero, Sara; Moeller, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Manual or automated control of mechanical ventilation can be realized as an open or closed-loop system for which the regulation of the ventilation parameters ideally is tuned to the dynamics and equilibration time of the biological system. We investigated the dynamic, transient state and equilibration time (t eq ) of the CO 2 partial pressure (PCO 2 ) after changes in the respiratory rate (ΔRR). In 17 anaesthetized patients without known history of lung disease, respiratory rate was alternately increased and decreased and end-tidal CO 2 partial pressures (PetCO 2 ) were measured. Linear relations were found between ΔRR and PetCO 2 changes (ΔPetCO 2 = 0.3 − 1.1 · ΔRR) and between ΔRR and t eq for increasing and decreasing RR (t eq(hypervent) = 0.5 · |ΔRR|, t eq(hypovent) = 0.7 · |ΔRR|). Extrapolation of the transition between two PCO 2 steady-states allowed for the prediction of the new PCO 2 steady-state as early as 0.5 · t eq with an error <4 mmHg. At bedside or in automated ventilation systems, the linear dependencies between ΔRR and ΔPCO 2 and between ΔRR and t eq as well as early steady-state prediction of PCO 2 could be used as a guidance towards a timing and step size regulation of RR that is well adapted to the biological system. (paper)

  5. Equilibration: Developing the Hard Core of the Piagetian Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Argues that the status of the concept of equilibration is classified by considering Piagetian theory as a research program in the sense elaborated in 1974 by Lakatos. A pilot study was made to examine the precision and testability of equilibration in Piaget's 1977 model.(Author/RH)

  6. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, Liam; Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; Schee, Wilke van der; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  7. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, Liam [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Kurkela, Aleksi [Physics Department, Theory Unit, CERN,CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Stavanger,4036 Stavanger (Norway); Romatschke, Paul [Department of Physics, 390 UCB, University of Colorado at Boulder,Boulder, CO (United States); Center for Theory of Quantum Matter, University of Colorado,Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, MIT,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics,P.O. Box 64, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-04-06

    We present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of the system.

  8. Test-retest repeatability of myocardial blood flow and infarct size using 11C-acetate micro-PET imaging in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; McDonald, Matthew; Klein, Ran; DaSilva, Jean N.; Beanlands, Rob S.B.; DeKemp, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Global and regional responses of absolute myocardial blood flow index (iMBF) are used as surrogate markers to assess response to therapies in coronary artery disease. In this study, we assessed the test-retest repeatability of iMBF imaging, and the accuracy of infarct sizing in mice using 11 C-acetate PET. 11 C-Acetate cardiac PET images were acquired in healthy controls, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout transgenic mice, and mice after myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate global and regional iMBF, and myocardial infarct size compared to 18 F-FDG PET and ex-vivo histology results. Global test-retest iMBF values had good coefficients of repeatability (CR) in healthy mice, eNOS knockout mice and normally perfused regions in MI mice (CR = 1.6, 2.0 and 1.5 mL/min/g, respectively). Infarct size measured on 11 C-acetate iMBF images was also repeatable (CR = 17 %) and showed a good correlation with the infarct sizes found on 18 F-FDG PET and histopathology (r 2 > 0.77; p < 0.05). 11 C-Acetate micro-PET assessment of iMBF and infarct size is repeatable and suitable for serial investigation of coronary artery disease progression and therapy. (orig.)

  9. Test-retest repeatability of myocardial blood flow and infarct size using {sup 11}C-acetate micro-PET imaging in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Etienne; Renaud, Jennifer M.; McDonald, Matthew; Klein, Ran; DaSilva, Jean N.; Beanlands, Rob S.B.; DeKemp, Robert A. [University of Ottawa Heart Institute, National Cardiac PET Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Global and regional responses of absolute myocardial blood flow index (iMBF) are used as surrogate markers to assess response to therapies in coronary artery disease. In this study, we assessed the test-retest repeatability of iMBF imaging, and the accuracy of infarct sizing in mice using {sup 11}C-acetate PET. {sup 11}C-Acetate cardiac PET images were acquired in healthy controls, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout transgenic mice, and mice after myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate global and regional iMBF, and myocardial infarct size compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET and ex-vivo histology results. Global test-retest iMBF values had good coefficients of repeatability (CR) in healthy mice, eNOS knockout mice and normally perfused regions in MI mice (CR = 1.6, 2.0 and 1.5 mL/min/g, respectively). Infarct size measured on {sup 11}C-acetate iMBF images was also repeatable (CR = 17 %) and showed a good correlation with the infarct sizes found on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and histopathology (r{sup 2} > 0.77; p < 0.05). {sup 11}C-Acetate micro-PET assessment of iMBF and infarct size is repeatable and suitable for serial investigation of coronary artery disease progression and therapy. (orig.)

  10. An open loop equilibrator for continuous monitoring of radon at the groundwater-surface water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil Yong Lee; Yoon Yeol Yoon; Soo Young Cho; Eunhee Lee; Sang-Ho Moon; Dong-Chan Koh; Kyoochul Ha; Yongcheol Kim; Kyung-Seok Ko

    2015-01-01

    A continuous monitoring system (CMS) using an open loop equilibrator for assessment of 222 Rn at the groundwater-surface water interface was developed and tested. For the characterization and validation of the system, three air loops (open loop, closed loop, and open bubble loop) were tested in relation to high and precise count rates, rapid response, and equilibration of radon. The water and air stream is fed to the equilibrator by an experimental setup with a commercial submersible water pump and the internal pump with built-in radon-in-air detector. Efficiency calibration of the CMS is done by simultaneous determination of a groundwater sample using liquid scintillation counting, and the RAD7 accessories RAD-H 2 O, BigBottle RAD-H 2 O. The higher count rates are provided by the closed loop. However, the open loop with bubbler (open bubble loop) provides the best precision count rates, rapid response, and equilibration time. The CMS allows radon determination in discrete water samples as well as continuous water streams. (author)

  11. Kinetics of bacterial potentiometric titrations: the effect of equilibration time on buffering capacity of Pantoea agglomerans suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2011-07-15

    Several recent studies have made use of continuous acid-base titration data to describe the surface chemistry of bacterial cells as a basis for accurately modelling metal adsorption to bacteria and other biomaterials of potential industrial importance. These studies do not share a common protocol; rather they titrate in different pH ranges and they use different stability criteria to define equilibration time during titration. In the present study we investigate the kinetics of bacterial titrations and test the effect they have on the derivation of functional group concentrations and acidity constants. We titrated suspensions of Pantoea agglomerans by varying the equilibration time between successive titrant additions until stability of 0.1 or 0.001 mV s(-1) was attained. We show that under longer equilibration times, titration results are less reproducible and suspensions exhibit marginally higher buffering. Fluorescence images suggest that cell lysis is not responsible for these effects. Rather, high DOC values and titration reversibility hysterisis after long equilibration times suggest that variability in buffering is due to the presence of bacterial exudates, as demonstrated by titrating supernatants separated from suspensions of different equilibration times. It is recommended that an optimal equilibration time is always determined with variable stability control and preliminary reversibility titration experiments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Test-retest reliability of the novel 5-HT1B receptor PET radioligand [11C]P943

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saricicek, Aybala; Chen, Jason; Ruf, Barbara; Planeta, Beata; Labaree, David; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Huang, Yiyun; Subramanyam, Kalyani; Maloney, Kathleen; Matuskey, David; Deserno, Lorenz; Neumeister, Alexander; Krystal, John H.; Carson, Richard E.; Bhagwagar, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    [ 11 C]P943 is a novel, highly selective 5-HT 1B PET radioligand. The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of [ 11 C]P943 using two different modeling methods and to perform a power analysis with each quantification technique. Seven healthy volunteers underwent two PET scans on the same day. Regions of interest (ROIs) were the amygdala, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, insula, frontal, anterior cingulate, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and cerebellum. Two multilinear radioligand quantification techniques were used to estimate binding potential: MA1, using arterial input function data, and the second version of the multilinear reference tissue model analysis (MRTM2), using the cerebellum as the reference region. Between-scan percent variability and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess test-retest reliability. We also performed power analyses to determine the method that would allow the least number of subjects using within-subject or between-subject study designs. A voxel-wise ICC analysis for MRTM2 BP ND was performed for the whole brain and all the ROIs studied. Mean percent variability between two scans across regions ranged between 0.4 % and 12.4 % for MA1 BP ND , 0.5 % and 11.5 % for MA1 BP P , 16.7 % and 28.3 % for MA1 BP F , and between 0.2 % and 5.4 % for MRTM2 BP ND . The power analyses showed a greater number of subjects were required using MA1 BP F compared with other outcome measures for both within-subject and between-subject study designs. ICC values were the highest using MRTM2 BP ND and the lowest with MA1 BP F in ten ROIs. Small regions and regions with low binding had lower ICC values than large regions and regions with high binding. Reliable measures of 5-HT 1B receptor binding can be obtained using the novel PET radioligand [ 11 C]P943. Quantification of 5-HT 1B receptor binding with MRTM2 BP ND and with MA1 BP P provided the least variability and optimal power for within-subject and

  13. Pressure equilibration in the penguin middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadé, Jacob; Handrich, Yves; Bernheim, Joelle; Cohen, David

    2008-01-01

    King penguins have a venous structure in the form of a corpus cavernosum (CC) in their middle ear (ME) submucosa. The CC may be viewed as a special organelle that can change ME volume for pressure equilibration during deep-sea diving it is a pressure regulating organelle (PRO). A similar CC and muscles also surround the external ear (EE) and may constrict it, isolating the tympanic membrane from the outside. A CC was previously found also in the ME of marine diving mammals and can be expected to exist in other deep diving animals, such as marine turtles. Marine animals require equalization of middle ear (ME) pressure when diving hundreds or thousands of meters to catch prey. We investigated what mechanism enables king penguins to protect their ME when they dive to great depths. Biopsies and serial sections of the ME and the EE of the deep diving king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) were examined microscopically. It was demonstrated that the penguin ME has an extensive network of small and large submucosal venous sinuses. This venous formation, a corpus cavernosum, can expand and potentially 'flood' the ME almost completely on diving, thus elevating ME pressure and reducing the ME space. The EE has a similar protective mechanism.

  14. arXiv Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    CERN Document Server

    Paolozzi, L.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-12

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with  30 ps  time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below  600 e− RMS  and a pulse rise time of less than  2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of  0.8 pF  were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than  99%  and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately  200 ps .

  15. Rapid spatial equilibration of a particle in a box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabarba, Artur S L; Linden, Noah; Short, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    We study the equilibration behavior of a quantum particle in a one-dimensional box, with respect to a coarse-grained position measurement (whether it lies in a certain spatial window or not). We show that equilibration in this context indeed takes place and does so very rapidly, in a time comparable to the time for the initial wave packet to reach the edges of the box. We also show that, for this situation, the equilibration behavior is relatively insensitive to the precise choice of position measurements or initial condition.

  16. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  17. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almási, Gábor András, E-mail: g.almasi@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wolf, György, E-mail: wolf.gyorgy@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1–7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20–40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff–Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  18. Test-retest measurements of dopamine D{sub 1}-type receptors using simultaneous PET/MRI imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaller, Simon; Patt, Marianne; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Luthardt, Julia; Meyer, Philipp M.; Werner, Peter; Barthel, Henryk; Bresch, Anke; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Rullmann, Michael [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Girbardt, Johanna [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Fritz, Thomas H. [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); University of Gent, Institute for Psychoacoustics and Electronic Music (IPEM), Ghent (Belgium); Hesse, Swen [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Research and Treatment Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The role of dopamine D{sub 1}-type receptor (D{sub 1}R)-expressing neurons in the regulation of motivated behavior and reward prediction has not yet been fully established. As a prerequisite for future research assessing D{sub 1}-mediated neuronal network regulation using simultaneous PET/MRI and D{sub 1}R-selective [{sup 11}C]SCH23390, this study investigated the stability of central D{sub 1}R measurements between two independent PET/MRI sessions under baseline conditions. Thirteen healthy volunteers (7 female, age 33 ± 13 yrs) underwent 90-min emission scans, each after 90-s bolus injection of 486 ± 16 MBq [{sup 11}C]SCH23390, on two separate days within 2-4 weeks using a PET/MRI system. Parametric images of D{sub 1}R distribution volume ratio (DVR) and binding potential (BP{sub ND}) were generated by a multi-linear reference tissue model with two parameters and the cerebellar cortex as receptor-free reference region. Volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis was performed with manual VOIs drawn on consecutive transverse MRI slices for brain regions with high and low D{sub 1}R density. The DVR varied from 2.5 ± 0.3 to 2.9 ± 0.5 in regions with high D{sub 1}R density (e.g. the head of the caudate) and from 1.2 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.2 in regions with low D{sub 1}R density (e.g. the prefrontal cortex). The absolute variability of the DVR ranged from 2.4% ± 1.3% to 5.1% ± 5.3%, while Bland-Altman analyses revealed very low differences in mean DVR (e.g. 0.013 ± 0.17 for the nucleus accumbens). Intraclass correlation (one-way, random) indicated very high agreement (0.93 in average) for both DVR and BP{sub ND} values. Accordingly, the absolute variability of BP{sub ND} ranged from 7.0% ± 4.7% to 12.5% ± 10.6%; however, there were regions with very low D{sub 1}R content, such as the occipital cortex, with higher mean variability. The test-retest reliability of D{sub 1}R measurements in this study was very high. This was the case not only for D{sub 1}R-rich brain areas, but

  19. Test-retest variability of high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cortical serotonin (5HT2A) receptors in older, healthy adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Tiffany W; Mamo, David C; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Houle, Sylvain; Smith, Gwenn S; Pollock, Bruce G; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2009-01-01

    Position emission tomography (PET) imaging using [ 18 F]-setoperone to quantify cortical 5-HT 2A receptors has the potential to inform pharmacological treatments for geriatric depression and dementia. Prior reports indicate a significant normal aging effect on serotonin 5HT 2A receptor (5HT 2A R) binding potential. The purpose of this study was to assess the test-retest variability of [ 18 F]-setoperone PET with a high resolution scanner (HRRT) for measuring 5HT 2A R availability in subjects greater than 60 years old. Methods: Six healthy subjects (age range = 65–78 years) completed two [ 18 F]-setoperone PET scans on two separate occasions 5–16 weeks apart. The average difference in the binding potential (BP ND ) as measured on the two occasions in the frontal and temporal cortical regions ranged between 2 and 12%, with the lowest intraclass correlation coefficient in anterior cingulate regions. We conclude that the test-retest variability of [ 18 F]-setoperone PET in elderly subjects is comparable to that of [ 18 F]-setoperone and other 5HT 2A R radiotracers in younger subject samples

  20. Flavour equilibration studies of quark-gluon plasma with non-zero ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Flavour equilibration for a thermally equilibrated but chemically non- equilibrated quark-gluon plasma is presented. Flavour equilibration is studied enforcing baryon number conservation. In addition to the usual processes like single additional gluon production gg ⇌ ggg and its reverse and quark–antiquark pair ...

  1. Test-retest reliability of {sup 11}C-ORM-13070 in PET imaging of α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors in vivo in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehto, Jussi; Peltonen, Juha M.; Volanen, Iina; Scheinin, Mika [University of Turku, Clinical Research Services Turku CRST, Turku (Finland); TYKSLAB, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); Virta, Jere R. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); Oikonen, Vesa; Roivainen, Anne; Luoto, Pauliina; Arponen, Eveliina; Helin, Semi; Virtanen, Kirsi [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Hietamaeki, Johanna; Holopainen, Aila; Rouru, Juha; Sallinen, Jukka [Orion Pharma, Turku (Finland); Kailajaervi, Marita [Turku Imanet, GE Healthcare, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Clinical Research Services Turku CRST, Turku (Finland)

    2015-01-15

    α{sub 2C}-Adrenoceptors share inhibitory presynaptic functions with the more abundant α{sub 2A}-adrenoceptor subtype, but they also have widespread postsynaptic modulatory functions in the brain. Research on the noradrenergic system of the human brain has been hampered by the lack of suitable PET tracers targeted to the α{sub 2}-adrenoceptor subtypes. PET imaging with the specific α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptor antagonist tracer [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 was performed twice in six healthy male subjects to investigate the test-retest reliability of tracer binding. The bound/free ratio of tracer uptake relative to nonspecific uptake into the cerebellum during the time interval of 5 - 30 min was most prominent in the dorsal striatum: 0.77 in the putamen and 0.58 in the caudate nucleus. Absolute test-retest variability in bound/free ratios of tracer ranged from 4.3 % in the putamen to 29 % in the hippocampus. Variability was also <10 % in the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) ranged from 0.50 in the hippocampus to 0.89 in the thalamus (ICC >0.70 was also reached in the caudate nucleus, putamen, lateral frontal cortex and parietal cortex). The pattern of [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 binding, as determined by PET, was in good agreement with receptor density results previously derived from post-mortem autoradiography. PET data analysis results obtained with a compartmental model fit, the simplified reference tissue model and a graphical reference tissue analysis method were convergent with the tissue ratio method. The results of this study support the use of [{sup 11}C]ORM-13070 PET in the quantitative assessment of α{sub 2C}-adrenoceptors in the human brain in vivo. Reliable assessment of specific tracer binding in the dorsal striatum is possible with the help of reference tissue ratios. (orig.)

  2. Primary Germ Cell Tumor of Testes with Extensive Lymph Nodal and Splenic Metastases Masquerading Lymphoma on 18-F-FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Mukherjee, Anirban; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Mallick, Saumyaranjan; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) account for the 95% of the malignancies associated with testes. They are the most common solid malignancies affecting the males in the age group of 15–35 years. It is known to be bilateral in 3% of cases. We herein present FDG PET-CT findings of a case with biopsy proven GCT with multiple lymph nodal and splenic metastases mimicking lymphomatous neoplasm. PMID:28533651

  3. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, Linda; Wah, Darren; Vahala, George; Carter, Jonathan; Pavlo, Pavol

    2000-01-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. Thermal lattice Boltzmann simulation for multispecies fluid equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Wah, Darren [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Vahala, George [Department of Physics, William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); Carter, Jonathan [NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 97320 (United States); Pavlo, Pavol [Institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Science, Praha 8, (Czech Republic)

    2000-07-01

    The equilibration rate for multispecies fluids is examined using thermal lattice Boltzmann simulations. Two-dimensional free-decay simulations are performed for effects of velocity shear layer turbulence on sharp temperature profiles. In particular, parameters are so chosen that the lighter species is turbulent while the heavier species is laminar--and so its vorticity layers would simply decay and diffuse in time. With species coupling, however, there is velocity equilibration followed by the final relaxation to one large co- and one large counter-rotating vortex. The temperature equilibration proceeds on a slower time scale and is in good agreement with the theoretical order of magnitude estimate of Morse [Phys. Fluids 6, 1420 (1963)]. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Direct Test for Neuroinflammation with [11C]DAP-713-PET Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    role in the pathogenesis of GWI Aim 3: Perform multiple neuroimaging, EEG and neuropsychological testing protocols on a representative sample of Gulf...Title: Characterizing Altered Levels of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and Serum Markers in Recent Onset Schizophrenia Time Commitment: 1.86 Calendar...Description of Goals: The goal is to identify central and peripheral biomarkers present early in the course of schizophrenia . Aim 1. Characterization of

  6. Evaluation of the PET component of simultaneous [18F]choline PET/MRI in prostate cancer: comparison with [18F]choline PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetter, Axel; Lipponer, Christine; Nensa, Felix; Altenbernd, Jens-Christian; Schlosser, Thomas; Lauenstein, Thomas; Heusch, Philipp; Ruebben, Herbert; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten; Nagarajah, James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the positron emission tomography (PET) component of [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI and compare it with the PET component of [ 18 F]choline PET/CT in patients with histologically proven prostate cancer and suspected recurrent prostate cancer. Thirty-six patients were examined with simultaneous [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI following combined [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Fifty-eight PET-positive lesions in PET/CT and PET/MRI were evaluated by measuring the maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) using volume of interest (VOI) analysis. A scoring system was applied to determine the quality of the PET images of both PET/CT and PET/MRI. Agreement between PET/CT and PET/MRI regarding SUV max and SUV mean was tested using Pearson's product-moment correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. All PET-positive lesions that were visible on PET/CT were also detectable on PET/MRI. The quality of the PET images was comparable in both groups. Median SUV max and SUV mean of all lesions were significantly lower in PET/MRI than in PET/CT (5.2 vs 6.1, p max of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.86, p mean of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.81, p max of PET/CT vs PET/MRI and -1.12 to +2.23 between SUV mean of PET/CT vs PET/MRI. PET image quality of PET/MRI was comparable to that of PET/CT. A highly significant correlation between SUV max and SUV mean was found. Both SUV max and SUV mean were significantly lower in [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI than in [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Differences of SUV max and SUV mean might be caused by different techniques of attenuation correction. Furthermore, differences in biodistribution and biokinetics of [ 18 F]choline between the subsequent examinations and in the respective organ systems have to be taken into account. (orig.)

  7. Extrinsic labelling of staple food crops with isotopic iron does not consistently result in full equilibration: Revisiting the methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrinsic isotopic labeling of food Fe has been used for over 50 years to measure Fe absorption. This method is based on the assumption that complete equilibration occurs between the extrinsic and the intrinsic Fe prior to intestinal absorption. The present study tested this assumption via use of in...

  8. MicroPET imaging of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in rat brain: a test-retest [{sup 18}F]MPPF study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznavour, Nicolas [McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Laboratory of Neuroenergetics and Cellular Dynamics, EPFL, SV, BMI, Lausanne (Switzerland); Benkelfat, Chawki; Gravel, Paul [McGill University, Department of Psychiatry, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aliaga, Antonio [McGill University, Department of Small Animal Imaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Rosa-Neto, Pedro [Douglas Hospital, Molecular NeuroImaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Bedell, Barry [McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[McGill University, Department of Small Animal Imaging Laboratory, Montreal, QC (Canada); Zimmer, Luc [CERMEP, ANIMAGE Department, Lyon (France)]|[Universite Lyon 1 and CNRS, Lyon (France); Descarries, Laurent [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Universite de Montreal, Department of Physiology, Montreal, QC (Canada)]|[Universite de Montreal, GRSNC, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Earlier studies have shown that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the radioligand [{sup 18}F]MPPF allows for measuring the binding potential of serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine{sub 1A} (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors in different regions of animal and human brain, including that of 5-HT{sub 1A} autoreceptors in the raphe nuclei. In the present study, we sought to determine if such data could be obtained in rat, with a microPET (R4, Concorde Microsystems). Scans from isoflurane-anaesthetised rats (n = 18, including six test-retest) were co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging data, and binding potential, blood to plasma ratio and radiotracer efflux were estimated according to a simplified reference tissue model. Values of binding potential for hippocampus (1.2), entorhinal cortex (1.1), septum (1.1), medial prefrontal cortex (1.0), amygdala (0.8), raphe nuclei (0.6), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (0.5) and raphe obscurus (0.5) were comparable to those previously measured with PET in cats, non-human primates or humans. Test-retest variability was in the order of 10% in the larger brain regions (hippocampus, medial prefrontal and entorhinal cortex) and less than 20% in small nuclei such as the septum and the paraventricular hypothalamic, basolateral amygdaloid and raphe nuclei. MicroPET brain imaging of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors with [{sup 18}F]MPPF thus represents a promising avenue for investigating 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor function in rat. (orig.)

  9. PARTON SATURATION, PRODUCTION, AND EQUILIBRATION IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    1999-01-01

    Deeply inelastic scattering of electrons off nuclei can determine whether parton distributions saturate at HERA energies. If so, this phenomenon will also tell us a great deal about how particles are produced, and whether they equilibrate, in high energy nuclear collisions

  10. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which ... Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up ...

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  14. The petit rat (pet/pet), a new semilethal mutant dwarf rat with thymic and testicular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Junko; Suzuki, Katsushi; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2008-12-01

    The petit rat (pet/pet) is a recently discovered semilethal mutant dwarf. The neonatal pet/pet rats had a low body weight and small thymus and testis. During the first 3 d after birth, 50% of the male and 80% of the female pet/pet pups were lost or found dead. Surviving pet/pet rats showed marked retardation of postnatal growth, and their body weights were 41% (female rats) and 32% (male rats) of those of normal rats at the adult stage. The pet/pet rats exhibited proportional dwarfism, and their longitudinal bones were shorter than those of controls without skeletal malformations. Most organs of male pet/pet rats, especially the thymus, testis, adipose tissue surrounding the kidney, and accessory sex organs, weighed markedly less at 140 d of age than did those of their normal counterparts. The thymus of pet/pet rats was small with abnormal thymic follicles. Testes from pet/pet rats exhibited 2 patterns of abnormal histology. Spermatogenesis was present in testes that were only slightly anomalous, but the seminiferous tubules were reduced in diameter. In severely affected testes, most of the seminiferous tubules showed degeneration, and interstitial tissue was increased. Plasma growth hormone concentrations did not differ between pet/pet and normal male rats. The dwarf phenotype of pet/pet rats was inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. These results indicate that the pet/pet rat has a semilethal growth-hormone-independent dwarf phenotype that is accompanied by thymic and testicular anomalies and low birth weight.

  15. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed flexible PET (fxPET) scanner prototype. This fxPET system involves dual arc-shaped detectors based on silicon photomultipliers that are designed to fit existing MRI devices, allowing us to obtain fused PET and MR images by sequential PET and MR scanning. This prospective study sought to evaluate the image quality, lesion detection rate, and quantitative values of fxPET in comparison with conventional whole-body (WB) PET and to assess the accuracy of registration. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or known malignant tumors were analyzed. Approximately 1 h after intravenous injection of 18 F-FDG, WB PET/CT was performed, followed by fxPET and MRI. For reconstruction of fxPET images, MRI-based attenuation correction was applied. The quality of fxPET images was visually assessed, and the number of detected lesions was compared between the 2 imaging methods. SUV max and maximum average SUV within a 1 cm 3 spheric volume (SUV peak ) of lesions were also compared. In addition, the magnitude of misregistration between fxPET and MR images was evaluated. Results: The image quality of fxPET was acceptable for diagnosis of malignant tumors. There was no significant difference in detectability of malignant lesions between fxPET and WB PET ( P > 0.05). However, the fxPET system did not exhibit superior performance to the WB PET system. There were strong positive correlations between the 2 imaging modalities in SUV max (ρ = 0.88) and SUV peak (ρ = 0.81). SUV max and SUV peak measured with fxPET were approximately 1.1-fold greater than measured with WB PET. The average misregistration between fxPET and MR images was 5.5 ± 3.4 mm. Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicate that running an fxPET scanner near an existing MRI system provides visually and quantitatively acceptable fused PET/MR images for diagnosis of malignant lesions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  16. A consequence of local equilibration and heterogeneity in glassy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthier, Ludovic

    2003-01-01

    The existence of a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem observed in simulations and experiments performed in various glassy materials is related to the concepts of local equilibration and heterogeneity in space. Assuming the existence of a dynamic coherence length scale up to which the system is locally equilibrated, we extend previous generalizations of the FDT relating static to dynamic quantities to the physically relevant domain where asymptotic limits of large times and sizes are not reached. The formulation relies on a simple scaling argument and thus does not have the character of a theorem. Extensive numerical simulations support this proposition. Our results quite generally apply to systems with slow dynamics, independently of the space dimensionality, the chosen dynamics or the presence of disorder

  17. Revisiting M&M with Taxes: An Alternative Equilibrating Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Kopecky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modigliani and Miller present an equity-quantity shifting equilibrating process to achieve an optimal firm value in the presence of corporate taxes. However, in the era in which they derived their various propositions regarding the relation between a firm’s value and its capital structure, well-capitalized takeover specialists including private equity firms and sovereign funds did not exist, at least by today’s standards. In this paper we develop a simple arbitrage strategy, made viable by the presence of takeover firms, which presents an alternative equilibrating process to achieve the same optimal firm value. This alternative process is markedly different from that of the Modigliani and Miller theorem in terms of its predictions for debt use and restores the prospect of capital structure irrelevancy despite the existence of corporate taxes.

  18. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgstedt, H; Frees, G; Peric, Z [Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Materials and Solid State Research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1980-05-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  19. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.; Frees, G.; Peric, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  20. Interpretation of Fermion system equilibration by energy fluid motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.

    1990-01-01

    We study the equilibration of fermion system with the help of both linear and non-linear master equations which are originated from the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation of motion. We show how the non-linear master equation for nucleon occupation number transforms into the Navier-Stokes type of one dimensional equation for non-stationary flow of a compressible and viscous fluid. Physical consequences of these equations are investigated by providing illustrative examples

  1. The impact of owner age on companionship with virtual pets

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Chesney, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues of interaction with a particular type of mobile information system – virtual pets. It examines the impact of owner age on companionship with virtual pets, and tests the hypothesis that younger virtual pet owners will experience closer companionship with their virtual pet than older owners. This is in response to the marketing stance adopted by virtual pet manufacturers who clearly target younger people as the main consumers of their products. The hypothesis was te...

  2. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jennifer C.; Powell, Brian A.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Begg, James D.; Kersting, Annie B.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  3. The Other End of the Leash: An Experimental Test to Analyze How Owners Interact with Their Pet Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Giulia; Turcsán, Borbála; Range, Friederike; Virányi, Zsófia

    2017-10-13

    It has been suggested that the way in which owners interact with their dogs can largely vary and influence the dog-owner bond, but very few objective studies, so far, have addressed how the owner interacts with the dog. The goal of the present study was to record dog owners' interaction styles by means of objective observation and coding. The experiment included eight standardized situations in which owners of pet dogs were asked to perform specific tasks including both positive (i.e. playing, teaching a new task, showing a preference towards an object in a food searching task, greeting after separation) and potentially distressing tasks (i.e. physical restriction during DNA sampling, putting a T-shirt onto the dog, giving basic obedience commands while the dog was distracted). The video recordings were coded off-line using a specifically designed coding scheme including scores for communication, social support, warmth, enthusiasm, and play style, as well as frequency of behaviors like petting, praising, commands, and attention sounds. Exploratory Factor Analysis of the 20 variables measured revealed 3 factors, labeled as Owner Warmth, Owner Social Support, and Owner Control, which can be viewed as analogues to parenting style dimensions. The experimental procedure introduced here represents the first standardized measure of interaction styles of dog owners. The methodology presented here is a useful tool to investigate individual variation in the interaction style of pet dog owners that can be used to explain differences in the dog-human relationship, dogs' behavioral outcomes, and dogs stress coping strategies, all crucial elements both from a theoretical and applied point of view.

  4. Evaluation of coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers: Cold pressor test using [15O]H2O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Byeong-il; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate coronary endothelial dysfunction in young healthy smokers by measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) using [ 15 O]H 2 O-PET. The study population was 18 young male volunteers consisted of 9 smokers (age: 23.8±1.1 yr) and 9 non-smokers (age: 25.0±2.5 yr). The smokers had been smoking cigarettes for 6.6±2.5 pack years. Myocardial [ 15 O]H 2 O-PET was performed at rest, during cold (5 deg. C) pressor stimulation and during adenosine infusion. Left ventricular (LV) input function and tissue time-activity curves were obtained by drawing region of interest (ROI) on the LV blood pool and myocardium images obtained by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) of dynamic [ 15 O]H 2 O-PET data, and MBF was calculated using these time-activity curves and single compartmental model. There were no significant difference in resting MBF between two groups (smokers: 1.43±0.41 and non-smokers: 1.37±0.41 ml/g/min; P=NS). However, during cold pressor stimulation, MBF in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers (1.25±0.33 vs. 1.59±0.29 ml/g/min; P=0.019). MBF changed to 90±24% of resting MBF in smokers and 122±28% in non-smokers. The difference in the ratio of cold pressor MBF to basal MBF between two groups was also significant (P=0.024). During adenosine infusion, however, hyperemic MBF did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (5.81±1.99 vs. 5.03±1.27 ml/g/min; P=NS). This study shows that [ 15 O]H 2 O PET analysis can reveal that endothelial dysfunction occurs in even young smokers of about 6 pack years.

  5. Equilibration and nonclassicality of a double-well potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steve; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro

    2016-01-29

    A double well loaded with bosonic atoms represents an ideal candidate to simulate some of the most interesting aspects in the phenomenology of thermalisation and equilibration. Here we report an exhaustive analysis of the dynamics and steady state properties of such a system locally in contact with different temperature reservoirs. We show that thermalisation only occurs 'accidentally'. We further examine the nonclassical features and energy fluxes implied by the dynamics of the double-well system, thus exploring its finite-time thermodynamics in relation to the settlement of nonclassical correlations between the wells.

  6. Ultrafast equilibration of excited electrons in dynamical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhibin; Allen, Roland E

    2009-12-02

    In our density-functional-based simulations of materials responding to femtosecond-scale laser pulses, we have observed a potentially useful phenomenon: the excited electrons automatically equilibrate to a Fermi-Dirac distribution within ∼100 fs, solely because of their coupling to the nuclear motion, even though the resulting electronic temperature is one to two orders of magnitude higher than the kinetic temperature defined by the nuclear motion. Microscopic simulations like these can then provide the separate electronic and kinetic temperatures, chemical potentials, pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses as input for studies on larger lengths and timescales.

  7. Evaluation of endothelium-dependent myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy smokers; cold pressor test using H215O PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Ho Young; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Much evidence suggests long-term cigarette smoking alters coronary vascular endothelial response. In this study, we applied nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), an unsupervised learning algorithm, to CO-less H 2 15 O-PET to investigate coronary endothelial dysfunction caused by smoking noninvasively. This study enrolled eighteen young male volunteers consisting of 9 smokers (23.8±1.1 yr; 6.6±2.5 pack-years) and 9 nonsmokers (23.8±2.9 yr). They do not have any cardiovascular risk factor or disease history. Myocardial H 2 15 O-PET was performed at rest, during cold (5.deg.C) pressor stimulation and during adenosine infusion. Left ventricular blood pool and myocardium were segmented on dynamic PET data by NMF method. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was calculated from input and tissue functions by a single compartmental model with correction of partial volume and spillover effects. There were no significant difference in resting MBF between the two groups (Smokers: 1.43 0.41ml/g/min and non-smokers: 1.37±0.41 ml/g/min; p = NS). during cold pressor stimulation, MBF in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers (1.25±0.34 ml/g/min vs 1.59±0.29 ml/g/min ; p = 0.019). The difference in the ratio of cold pressor MBF to resting MBF between the two groups was also significant (p=0.024; 90±24% in smokers and 122±28% in non-smokers.). During adenosine infusion, however, hyperemic MBF did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (5.81±1.99 ml/g/min vs 5.11±1.31 ml/g/min ; p=NS). In smokers, MBF during cold pressor stimulation was significantly lower compared with nonsmokers, reflecting smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction. However, there was no significant difference in MBF during adenosine-induced hyperemia between the two groups

  8. PET-COMPTON System. Comparative evaluation with PET System using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Arista Romeu, Eduardo; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera HernAndez, Ibrahin; Bolannos Perez, Lourdes; Rubio Rodriguez, Juan A.; Perez Morales, Jose M.; Arce Dubois, Pedro; Vela Morales, Oscar; Willmott Zappacosta, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called PET-Compton systems and has included comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation was done on a PET-Compton system made-up of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named Clear-PET and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e+) and quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. By means of analytical reconstruction using SSRB (Single Slide Rebinning) method were obtained superior spatial resolution in PET-Compton system for all tested radionuclides (reaching sub-millimeter values of for 22Na source). However this analysis done by simulation have shown limited global efficiency values in PET-Compton system (in the order of 10 -5 -10 -6 %) instead of values around 5*10 -1 % that have been achieved in PET system. (author)

  9. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P bear sperm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction and tests of demonstrator modules for a 3-D axial PET system for brain or small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Pauss, P; Meddi, F; Beltrame, P; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Casella, C; Djambazov, G; Smith, S; Johnson, I; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; Honscheid, K; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Cochran, E; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Huh, S; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    The design and construction of a PET camera module with high sensitivity, full 3-D spatial reconstruction and very good energy resolution is presented. The basic principle consists of an axial arrangement of long scintillation crystals around the Field Of View (FOV), providing a measurement of the transverse coordinates of the interacting 511 keV gamma ray. On top of each layer of crystals, an array of Wave-Length Shifter (WLS) strips, which collect the light leaving the crystals sideways, is positioned orthogonal to the crystal direction. The signals in the WLS strips allow a precise measurement of the z (axial) co-ordinate of the 511 keV gamma-ray gamma impact. The construction of two modules used for demonstration of the concept is described. First preliminary results on spatial and energy resolution from one full module will be shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the spread of germs between pets and people. Keep pets and their supplies out of the kitchen, and ... a local wildlife rehabilitation facility. More Information Healthy Pets Healthy People Clean Hands Save Lives! Stay Healthy at Animal ...

  12. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  13. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-[ 3 H]ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO 2 , and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment

  14. Test-retest reliability of the novel 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor PET radioligand [{sup 11}C]P943

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricicek, Aybala [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Izmir Katip Celebi University, Department of Psychiatry, Izmir (Turkey); Chen, Jason; Ruf, Barbara [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Planeta, Beata; Labaree, David; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Huang, Yiyun [Yale University, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Subramanyam, Kalyani; Maloney, Kathleen [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Matuskey, David [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Yale University, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Deserno, Lorenz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Berlin (Germany); Neumeister, Alexander [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD, West Haven, CT (United States); Krystal, John H. [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD, West Haven, CT (United States); Carson, Richard E. [Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Bhagwagar, Zubin [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    2014-11-27

    [{sup 11}C]P943 is a novel, highly selective 5-HT{sub 1B} PET radioligand. The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of [{sup 11}C]P943 using two different modeling methods and to perform a power analysis with each quantification technique. Seven healthy volunteers underwent two PET scans on the same day. Regions of interest (ROIs) were the amygdala, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, insula, frontal, anterior cingulate, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and cerebellum. Two multilinear radioligand quantification techniques were used to estimate binding potential: MA1, using arterial input function data, and the second version of the multilinear reference tissue model analysis (MRTM2), using the cerebellum as the reference region. Between-scan percent variability and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess test-retest reliability. We also performed power analyses to determine the method that would allow the least number of subjects using within-subject or between-subject study designs. A voxel-wise ICC analysis for MRTM2 BP{sub ND} was performed for the whole brain and all the ROIs studied. Mean percent variability between two scans across regions ranged between 0.4 % and 12.4 % for MA1 BP{sub ND}, 0.5 % and 11.5 % for MA1 BP{sub P}, 16.7 % and 28.3 % for MA1 BP{sub F}, and between 0.2 % and 5.4 % for MRTM2 BP{sub ND}. The power analyses showed a greater number of subjects were required using MA1 BP{sub F} compared with other outcome measures for both within-subject and between-subject study designs. ICC values were the highest using MRTM2 BP{sub ND} and the lowest with MA1 BP{sub F} in ten ROIs. Small regions and regions with low binding had lower ICC values than large regions and regions with high binding. Reliable measures of 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor binding can be obtained using the novel PET radioligand [{sup 11}C]P943. Quantification of 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor binding with MRTM2 BP{sub ND} and with MA1 BP{sub P

  15. Colorectal cancer staging: comparison of whole-body PET/CT and PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Coutinho, Artur M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Vangel, Mark G; Gee, Michael S; Hahn, Peter F; Witzel, Thomas; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce R; Gervais, Debra

    2017-04-01

    Correct staging is imperative for colorectal cancer (CRC) since it influences both prognosis and management. Several imaging methods are used for this purpose, with variable performance. Positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is an innovative imaging technique recently employed for clinical application. The present study was undertaken to compare the staging accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with whole-body PET/MR in patients with both newly diagnosed and treated colorectal cancer. Twenty-six patients, who underwent same day whole-body (WB) PET/CT and WB-PET/MR, were evaluated. PET/CT and PET/MR studies were interpreted by consensus by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Correlations with prior imaging and follow-up studies were used as the reference standard. Correct staging was compared between methods using McNemar's Chi square test. The two methods were in agreement and correct for 18/26 (69%) patients, and in agreement and incorrect for one patient (3.8%). PET/MR and PET/CT stages for the remaining 7/26 patients (27%) were discordant, with PET/MR staging being correct in all seven cases. PET/MR significantly outperformed PET/CT overall for accurate staging (P = 0.02). PET/MR outperformed PET/CT in CRC staging. PET/MR might allow accurate local and distant staging of CRC patients during both at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up.

  16. Diagnostic test accuracy study of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT, 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate SPECT/CT, and planar bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Randi F; Zacho, Helle D; Langkilde, Niels C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare planar, bone scan (BS) versus SPECT/CT and NaF PET/CT in detecting bone metastases in prostate cancer. Thirty-seven consecutive, newly diagnosed, prostate cancer patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels ≥ 50 ng/mL and who were...... considered eligible for androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) were included in this study. BS, SPECT/CT, and NaF PET/CT, were performed prior to treatment and were repeated after six months of ADT. Baseline images from each index test were independently read by two experienced readers. The reference standard......%, and 96%, respectively, and the negative predictive values were 60%, 77% and 75%, respectively. No statistically significant difference among the three imaging modalities was observed. All three imaging modalities showed high sensitivity and specificity. NaF PET/CT and SPECT/CT showed numerically improved...

  17. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  18. Construction and tests of an in-beam PET-like demonstrator for hadrontherapy beam ballistic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montarou, G., E-mail: montarou@clermont.in2p3.fr [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Bony, M.; Busato, E.; Chadelas, R. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Donnarieix, D. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Force, P.; Guicheney, C.; Insa, C.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Magne, M.; Martin, F. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Millardet, C. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Nivoix, M.; Podlyski, F.; Rozes, A. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France)

    2017-02-11

    We present the first results obtained with a detector, called Large Area Pixelized Detector (LAPD), dedicated to the study the ballistic control of the beam delivered to the patient by in-beam and real time detection of secondary particles, emitted during its irradiation in the context of hadrontherapy. These particles are 511 keV γ from the annihilation of a positron issued from the β{sup +} emitters induced in the patient tissues along the beam path. The LAPD basic concepts are similar to a conventional PET camera. The 511 keV γ are detected and the reconstructed lines of response allow to measure the β{sup +} activity distribution. Nevertheless, when trying to use γ from positron annihilation for the ballistic control in hadrontherapy, the large prompt γ background should be taken into account and properly rejected. First reconstruction results, obtained with a phantom filled with a high intensity FDG source at the cancer research centre of Clermont-Ferrand are shown. We also report results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre with one third of the detector, using proton and carbon ion beams.

  19. Effects of fluoxetine on the rat brain in the forced swimming test: a [F-18]FDG micro-PET imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong-Pyo; Lee, So-Hee; Park, Chan-Woong; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2009-02-13

    We used the [F-18]FDG micro-PET neuroimaging to examine the effects of fluoxetine on brain activity in rats and on their behavioral response in the forced swimming test (FST). In the first experiment, the rats were administered doses of fluoxetine (10 or 20mg/kg) 24, 19 and 1h before the rat brains were scanned. Fluoxetine induced strong activation of the dorsal hippocampus and the deactivation of the inferior colliculus, medulla oblongata, and prelimbic cortex in a dose-dependent manner. These results seemed to be related with the changes in 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) levels after selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitor treatments. In the second experiment, the changes in glucose metabolism in the test session were measured after fluoxetine was given between pre-test and test sessions of the FST. Fluoxetine administration significantly decreased immobility behavior compared with saline administration. At the same time, the activity of the insular/piriform cortex decreased significantly. In contrast, the extent of cerebellar activation increased. The glucose metabolism of the dorsal hippocampus also increased, which suggests that post-stress changes in the facilitation of hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission lead to decreased immobilization in the FST.

  20. Combinations of glycerol percent, glycerol equilibration time, and thawing rate upon freezability of bull spermatozoa in plastic straws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggin, H B; Almquist, J O

    1975-03-01

    Twelve ejaculates were used in a central composite experiment to test 15 combinations of glycerol (7, 9, 11, 13, or 15%), glycerol equilibration times (1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 h) and thawing rates (water at 35 C for 15 s, 50 C for 13 s, 65 C for 11 s, 80 C for 9 s, or 95 C for 7 s). Semen was diluted in heated skim milk-glycerol, packaged in .3-ml. Continental U.S. straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor. Based on post-thaw progressive sperm motility after storage at -196 C for 9 to 11 days, estimated optima from multiple regression were 10.7% for glycerol, 2.0 h for glycerol equilibration time, and 76 C for thawing bath temperature. Only the linear effect for each variable was significant. Much faster thawing rates and shorter glycerol equilibration times than those for freezing bull spermatozoa in glass ampules should be used for maximum post-thaw sperm motility in straws.

  1. Dynamical equilibration in strongly-interacting parton-hadron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorenstein M.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton-hadron matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach, which is based on a dynamical quasiparticle model for partons matched to reproduce lattice-QCD results – including the partonic equation of state – in thermodynamic equilibrium. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different baryon density (or chemical potential and energy density. The transition from initially pure partonic matter to hadronic degrees of freedom (or vice versa occurs dynamically by interactions. Different thermody-namical distributions of the strongly-interacting quark-gluon plasma (sQGP are addressed and discussed.

  2. D2-H2 equilibration over γ-irradiated zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, J.; Wichterlova, B.

    1987-01-01

    D 2 -H 2 equilibration was studied at 77 and 298 K over HY, AlHY, HZSM-5 and Alsub(x)Osub(y)HZSM-5 zeolites which had been γ-irradiated at 77 and/or 298 K. The exchange rate was found to be higher at the lower temperature regardless of the temperature of irradiation. Moreover, at 77 K the exchange rates were similar and more stable over the individual zeolites than at 298 K, thus indicating a common reaction path at 77 K. The exchange rate at 298 K depended on the zeolite type: it was more stable and higher over HZSM-5 than over HY, and extra-lattice Al increased both these properties on HY as well as on HZSM-5. The reaction mechanism is discussed in connection with the nature of defects generated by γ-irradiation. (author)

  3. Strangeness chemical equilibration in a quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2007-01-01

    We study, in the dynamically evolving quark-gluon plasma (QGP) fireball formed in relativistic heavy ion collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the growth of strangeness yield toward and beyond the chemical equilibrium. We account for the contribution of the direct strangeness production and evaluate the thermal-QCD strangeness production mechanisms. The specific yield of strangeness per entropy, s/S, is the primary target variable. We explore the effect of collision impact parameter, i.e., fireball size, on kinetic strangeness chemical equilibration in QGP. Insights gained in studying the RHIC data with regard to the dynamics of the fireball are applied to the study of strangeness production at the LHC. We use these results and consider the strange hadron relative particle yields at RHIC and LHC in a systematic fashion. We consider both the dependence on s/S and the direct dependence on the participant number

  4. Comparison between PET/MR and PET/CT in evaluation of oncological patients%PET/MR与PET/CT的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐白萱; 富丽萍; 关志伟; 尹大一; 刘家金; 杨晖; 张锦明; 陈英茂; 安宁豫

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify the feasibility of the integrated PET/MR for oncological applications by comparing PET/MR with PET/CT in terms of lesion detection and quantitative measurement.Methods A total of 277 patients (165 males,112 females,average age (52.9± 12.6) years) voluntarily participated in this same-day PET/CT and PET/MR comparative study.The time interval between the two studies was 15-35 min.PET/CT images were acquired and reconstructed following standard protocols.PET/MR covered the body trunk with a sequence combination of transverse T1 weighted imaging (WI) 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold,T2WI turbo spin echo with fat saturation,diffusion-weighted imaging,and simultaneous PET acquisition.PET images were reconstructed by vender-provided attenuation correction methods.The results of PET/CT and PET/MR were regarded as positive if any modality (CT,PET or MRI) was positive.SUVmax was obtained by the manually drawn ROI.Detection rates were compared with x2 test and SUVmax from the two modalities was analyzed with Spearman correlation analysis.Results A total of 353 lesions were detected in 220 patients.Compared to PET/CT,PET/MR revealed 30 additional true-positive lesions,while missed 6.The detection rates between PET/CT and PET/MR were significantly different (P<0.05).The lesion-based and patient-based consistency was 89.8% (317/353) and 85.9% (189/220),respectively.There were significant correlations of SUVmax between PET/MR and PET/CT for lesions(rs =0.91,P<0.01) and for normal tissues(rs =0.62-0.76,all P<0.01).Conclusions With reference to PET/CT,integrated PET/MR may provide comparable semi-quantitative measurements of pathological lesions as well as normal tissues.Integrated PET/MR may be more effective to detect lesions in abdomen and pelvis.%目的 通过与PET/CT在病灶检测及定量分析方面的比较,论证PET/MR一体机应用于临床的可行性.方法 2012年5月至2013年2月共300例患者同天间隔15 ~ 35 min行PET

  5. PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, F.; Pawitan, Y.; Harrison, R.L.; Lewellen, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    In statistical terms, filtered backprojection can be viewed as smoothed Least Squares (LS). In this paper, the authors report on improvement in LS resolution by: incorporating locally adaptive smoothers, imposing positivity and using statistical methods for optimal selection of the resolution parameter. The resulting algorithm has high computational efficiency relative to more elaborate Maximum Likelihood (ML) type techniques (i.e. EM with sieves). Practical aspects of the procedure are discussed in the context of PET and illustrations with computer simulated and real tomograph data are presented. The relative recovery coefficients for a 9mm sphere in a computer simulated hot-spot phantom range from .3 to .6 when the number of counts ranges from 10,000 to 640,000 respectively. The authors will also present results illustrating the relative efficacy of ML and LS reconstruction techniques

  6. Genotyping and antifungal susceptibility testing of multiple Malassezia pachydermatis isolates from otitis and dermatitis cases in pets: is it really worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-01-01

    A total of 216 colonies of Malassezia pachydermatis from 28 cases of fungal otitis or dermatitis in pets were genotyped by M13 fingerprinting and tested for antifungal susceptibility. A huge genetic diversity was found (157 M13 types in total), with all animals having a polyclonal pattern of infection (5.4 ± 1.5 genotypes/sample). Furthermore, analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that most genetic diversity (44%) was found at the within sample level. In contrast, variability in antifungal susceptibility among isolates from the same sample was less important, with different M13 types displaying in most cases identical or very similar MIC results. Most isolates displayed high in vitro susceptibility to amphotericin B, terbinafine and all azoles tested except fluconazole, for which MIC values were always ≥4 μg/ml and a 26.9% of isolates displayed values ≥32 μg/ml. We conclude that although characterization of multiple yeast isolates results in a considerable increase in laboratory workload and expenses, it may help to get a better understanding of the epidemiology of M. pachydermatis in a given patient population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Dual gated PET/CT imaging of small targets of the heart: method description and testing with a dynamic heart phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokki, Tommi; Sipilä, Hannu T; Teräs, Mika; Noponen, Tommi; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Klén, Riku; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-01-01

    In PET imaging respiratory and cardiac contraction motions interfere the imaging of heart. The aim was to develop and evaluate dual gating method for improving the detection of small targets of the heart. The method utilizes two independent triggers which are sent periodically into list mode data based on respiratory and ECG cycles. An algorithm for generating dual gated segments from list mode data was developed. The test measurements showed that rotational and axial movements of point source can be separated spatially to different segments with well-defined borders. The effect of dual gating on detection of small moving targets was tested with a moving heart phantom. Dual gated images showed 51% elimination (3.6 mm out of 7.0 mm) of contraction motion of hot spot (diameter 3 mm) and 70% elimination (14 mm out of 20 mm) of respiratory motion. Averaged activity value of hot spot increases by 89% when comparing to non-gated images. Patient study of suspected cardiac sarcoidosis shows sharper spatial myocardial uptake profile and improved detection of small myocardial structures such as papillary muscles. The dual gating method improves detection of small moving targets in a phantom and it is feasible in clinical situations.

  8. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  9. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  10. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  11. Trends in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT)

  12. Value of PET and PET-CT for monitoring tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET or PET-CT is an accurate test for differentiating residual viable tumor tissue from therapy-induced changes in tumor. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of therapy-induced changes in tumor 18 F-FDG uptake may allow the prediction of tumor response. Treatment may be adjusted according to tumor response. So it is increasingly used to monitor tumor response in patients undergoing chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Here we focused on practical aspects of 18 F-FDG PET or PET-CT for treatment monitoring and on the existing advantages and challenges. (authors)

  13. Para hydrogen equilibration in the atmospheres of the outer planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrath, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets is strongly dependent on the extent to which local thermal equilibration of the ortho and para states of molecular hydrogen is achieved. Voyager IRIS data from Jupiter imply substantial departures of the para hydrogen fraction from equilibrium in the upper troposphere at low latitudes, but with values approaching equilibrium at higher latitudes. Data from Saturn are less sensitive to the orth-para ratio, but suggest para hydrogen fractions near the equilibrium value. Above approximately the 200 K temperature level, para hydrogen conversion can enhance the efficiency of convection, resulting in a substantial increase in overturning times on all of the outer planets. Currently available data cannot definitively establish the ortho-para ratios in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune, but suggest values closer to local equilibrium than to the 3.1 normal ratio. Modeling of sub-millimeter wavelength measurements of these planets suggest thermal structures with frozen equilibrium lapse rates in their convective regions

  14. Equilibration of matter near the QCD critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravina, L V; Arsene, I; Nilsson, M S; Tywoniuk, K; Zabrodin, E E

    2006-01-01

    The relaxation of hot and dense nuclear matter to local equilibrium in the central zone of heavy-ion collisions at energies around 40 A GeV is studied within the microscopic transport model. Dynamical calculations performed for the central cell in the reaction are compared to the predictions of the thermal statistical model. It is found that kinetic, thermal and chemical equilibrations of the expanding hadronic matter are nearly approached for the period of 10-18 fm/c. Within this time, the matter in the cell expands almost isentropically. It is quite interesting that in the T-μ B plane the system crosses the critical point predicted by lattice QCD calculations. Similar to the cells studied at lower (AGS) and higher (SPS, RHIC) energies, the central cell at 40 A GeV possesses negative (though small) net strangeness. Several peculiarities are observed as well. These features can be attributed to the transition from baryon-dominated to meson-dominated matter, discussed recently

  15. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  16. Maintenance of lettuce seed viability and counter-action of radiation damage by moisture equilibration-drying treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Bina; Basu, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    Lettuce seeds were subjected to X- and gamma-radiation after moisture equilibration-drying or they were equilibrated with a saturated atmosphere for 24 hrs immediately after irradiation followed by drying back to the original weight. Results showed that moisture-equilibration drying treatment either before or after irradiation counteracts the adverse effects of irradiation. (M.G.B.)

  17. Maintenance of lettuce seed viability and counter-action of radiation damage by moisture equilibration-drying treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punjabi, B; Basu, R N

    1982-10-01

    Lettuce seeds were subjected to X- and gamma-radiation after moisture equilibration-drying or they were equilibrated with a saturated atmosphere for 24 hrs immediately after irradiation followed by drying back to the original weight. Results showed that moisture-equilibration drying treatment either before or after irradiation counteracts the adverse effects of irradiation. (M.G.B.). 14 refs.

  18. A proposal of an open PET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Minohara, Shinichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Lam, Chih Fung [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-02-07

    The long patient port of a PET scanner tends to put stress on patients, especially patients with claustrophobia. It also prevents doctors and technicians from taking care of patients during scanning. In this paper, we proposed an 'open PET' geometry, which consists of two axially separated detector rings. A long and continuous field-of-view (FOV) including a 360 deg. opened gap between two detector rings can be imaged enabling a fully 3D image reconstruction of all the possible lines-of-response. The open PET will become practical if iterative image reconstruction methods are applied even though image reconstruction of the open PET is analytically an incomplete problem. First we implemented a 'masked' 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) in which the system matrix was obtained from a long 'gapless' scanner by applying a mask to detectors corresponding to the open space. Next, in order to evaluate imaging performance of the proposed open PET geometry, we simulated a dual HR+ scanner (ring diameter of D = 827 mm, axial length of W = 154 mm x 2) separated by a variable gap. The gap W was the maximum limit to have axially continuous FOV of 3W though the maximum diameter of FOV at the central slice was limited to D/2. Artifacts, observed on both sides of the open space when the gap exceeded W, were effectively reduced by inserting detectors partially into unnecessary open spaces. We also tested the open PET geometry using experimental data obtained by the jPET-D4. The jPET-D4 is a prototype brain scanner, which has 5 rings of 24 detector blocks. We simulated the open jPET-D4 with a gap of 66 mm by eliminating 1 block-ring from experimental data. Although some artifacts were seen at both ends of the opened gap, very similar images were obtained with and without the gap. The proposed open PET geometry is expected to lead to realization of in-beam PET, which is a method for an in situ monitoring of charged particle therapy, by

  19. Comparing PETS and GEPT in China and Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares the Public English Test System (PETS) administered in mainland, China and the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT) administered in Taiwan, from the aspects of test levels, test contents and scoring weight. Compared with the PETS, the GEPT is found to value the English productive skills more, and have a greater ability to…

  20. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  1. Pets and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good news is that this rarely happens. Most pet-to-people diseases can be avoided by following a few ... your doctor Can a parasite cause death in people and pets? Can human disease from a parasite be treated ...

  2. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  3. [Principles of PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthien-Baumann, B

    2018-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a procedure in nuclear medicine, which is applied predominantly in oncological diagnostics. In the form of modern hybrid machines, such as PET computed tomography (PET/CT) and PET magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) it has found wide acceptance and availability. The PET procedure is more than just another imaging technique, but a functional method with the capability for quantification in addition to the distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, the results of which are used for therapeutic decisions. A profound knowledge of the principles of PET including the correct indications, patient preparation, and possible artifacts is mandatory for the correct interpretation of PET results.

  4. Temperature equilibration rate with Fermi-Dirac statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lowell S.; Singleton, Robert L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate analytically the electron-ion temperature equilibration rate in a fully ionized, weakly to moderately coupled plasma, using an exact treatment of the Fermi-Dirac electrons. The temperature is sufficiently high so that the quantum-mechanical Born approximation to the scattering is valid. It should be emphasized that we do not build a model of the energy exchange mechanism, but rather, we perform a systematic first principles calculation of the energy exchange. At the heart of this calculation lies the method of dimensional continuation, a technique that we borrow from quantum field theory and use in a different fashion to regulate the kinetic equations in a consistent manner. We can then perform a systematic perturbation expansion and thereby obtain a finite first-principles result to leading and next-to-leading order. Unlike model building, this systematic calculation yields an estimate of its own error and thus prescribes its domain of applicability. The calculational error is small for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma, for which our result is nearly exact. It should also be emphasized that our calculation becomes unreliable for a strongly coupled plasma, where the perturbative expansion that we employ breaks down, and one must then utilize model building and computer simulations. Besides providing different and potentially useful results, we use this calculation as an opportunity to explain the method of dimensional continuation in a pedagogical fashion. Interestingly, in the regime of relevance for many inertial confinement fusion experiments, the degeneracy corrections are comparable in size to the subleading quantum correction below the Born approximation. For consistency, we therefore present this subleading quantum-to-classical transition correction in addition to the degeneracy correction

  5. Equilibration and hydrodynamics at strong and weak coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Wilke

    2017-11-01

    We give an updated overview of both weak and strong coupling methods to describe the approach to a plasma described by viscous hydrodynamics, a process now called hydrodynamisation. At weak coupling the very first moments after a heavy ion collision is described by the colour-glass condensate framework, but quickly thereafter the mean free path is long enough for kinetic theory to become applicable. Recent simulations indicate thermalization in a time t ∼ 40(η / s) 4 / 3 / T [L. Keegan, A. Kurkela, P. Romatschke, W. van der Schee, Y. Zhu, Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories, JHEP 04 (2016) 031. arxiv:arXiv:1512.05347, doi:10.1007/JHEP04(2016)031], with T the temperature at that time and η / s the shear viscosity divided by the entropy density. At (infinitely) strong coupling it is possible to mimic heavy ion collisions by using holography, which leads to a dual description of colliding gravitational shock waves. The plasma formed hydrodynamises within a time of 0.41/T recent extension found corrections to this result for finite values of the coupling, when η / s is bigger than the canonical value of 1/4π, which leads to t ∼ (0.41 + 1.6 (η / s - 1 / 4 π)) / T [S. Grozdanov, W. van der Schee, Coupling constant corrections in holographic heavy ion collisions, arxiv:arXiv:1610.08976]. Future improvements include the inclusion of the effects of the running coupling constant in QCD.

  6. Photon production in an expanding and chemically equilibrating gluon-enriched plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaempfer, B.; Technische Univ. Dresden; Pavlenko, O.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1993-12-01

    Photon production in a longitudinally and transversely expanding gluon plasma with initially little quark admixture is considered. Chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons is followed by rate equations. The yields of hard photons with E ≥ 2 GeV are insensitive to chemical equilibration and depend mainly on the initial thermalized state. Medium-energy photons with E ∼ 1 GeV are more frequently produced in case of faster equilibration, despite of faster cooling. For an assumed fast equilibration we follow the evolution of matter through mixed and hadron phases. The transverse momentum kick, due to transverse expansion, of photons from hadron matter is shown to be reduced for an equation of state with reduced latent heat. The photon yield in the region E > 1 GeV from deconfined matter dominates for conditions, estimated to be achieved at RHIC, in case of a weakly first-order confinement transition. (orig.)

  7. A critical evaluation of multistage equilibration technique for preconcentration by ion-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Capabilities of the method of preconcentration of heavy metal ions from aqueous samples by Chelex 100 using a successive equilibration technique has been evaluated. The process of successive equilibrations may be looked upon in one of the two ways: one of equilibrating a given amount of resin with n successive aliquots so that sample size increases n-fold. Alternatively one may consider this as dividing a large-sized sample into n equal aliquots and carrying out the equilibrations with a smaller amount of resin maintaining the v/m ratio. Expressions have been derived for overall recovery, percentage recovery and decontamination factor for the successive equilibration technique. The validity of the expressions has been checked with experimental data. The values for recovery and decontamination factor have been compared with those for a single equilibration using the whole sample. Finally the factors which affect the value of recovery have been examined and their effect on the recovery has been evaluated. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 1 appendix

  8. Similarities between obesity in pets and children: the addiction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, Robert A; Corbee, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pets is a frustrating, major health problem. Obesity in human children is similar. Prevailing theories accounting for the rising obesity rates - for example, poor nutrition and sedentary activity - are being challenged. Obesity interventions in both pets and children have produced modest short-term but poor long-term results. New strategies are needed. A novel theory posits that obesity in pets and children is due to 'treats' and excessive meal amounts given by the 'pet-parent' and child-parent to obtain affection from the pet/child, which enables 'eating addiction' in the pet/child and results in parental 'co-dependence'. Pet-parents and child-parents may even become hostage to the treats/food to avoid the ire of the pet/child. Eating addiction in the pet/child also may be brought about by emotional factors such as stress, independent of parental co-dependence. An applicable treatment for child obesity has been trialled using classic addiction withdrawal/abstinence techniques, as well as behavioural addiction methods, with significant results. Both the child and the parent progress through withdrawal from specific 'problem foods', next from snacking (non-specific foods) and finally from excessive portions at meals (gradual reductions). This approach should adapt well for pets and pet-parents. Pet obesity is more 'pure' than child obesity, in that contributing factors and treatment points are essentially under the control of the pet-parent. Pet obesity might thus serve as an ideal test bed for the treatment and prevention of child obesity, with focus primarily on parental behaviours. Sharing information between the fields of pet and child obesity would be mutually beneficial.

  9. Performance characterization of the PET-CT tomograph at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    OpenAIRE

    Amato, Ernesto; Baldari, Sergio; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry plant was built at Messina University Hospital, whose diagnostics section was equipped with a PET-CT scanner composed by a time of flight PET and a 16-slice CT. The present note reports about the results of tomograph's acceptance tests, which had been planned and carried out in order to verify the correspondence of the specific scanner's performances declared by the firm and the fulfillment of Italian law's minimal criteria of acceptability. Acceptance tests...

  10. Selecting Safe Pets (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supplies (pet bowls, pet bed, leash, etc.) as gifts, then selecting the pet as a family. That way, everyone has time to really think about whether your family is ready for a pet. Key Questions Before adopting or purchasing any pet, talk to all family members, discuss ...

  11. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  12. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATAC patientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATAC boneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC boneless (-9.4% ± 3.7) was significantly worse than that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC patientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET/MR imaging achieves similar quantification accuracy to that from CTAC by means of atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. Equilibrating high-molecular-weight symmetric and miscible polymer blends with hierarchical back-mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuma, Takahiro; Kremer, Kurt; Daoulas, Kostas

    2018-05-01

    Understanding properties of polymer alloys with computer simulations frequently requires equilibration of samples comprised of microscopically described long molecules. We present the extension of an efficient hierarchical backmapping strategy, initially developed for homopolymer melts, to equilibrate high-molecular-weight binary blends. These mixtures present significant interest for practical applications and fundamental polymer physics. In our approach, the blend is coarse-grained into models representing polymers as chains of soft blobs. Each blob stands for a subchain with N b microscopic monomers. A hierarchy of blob-based models with different resolution is obtained by varying N b. First the model with the largest N b is used to obtain an equilibrated blend. This configuration is sequentially fine-grained, reinserting at each step the degrees of freedom of the next in the hierarchy blob-based model. Once the blob-based description is sufficiently detailed, the microscopic monomers are reinserted. The hard excluded volume is recovered through a push-off procedure and the sample is re-equilibrated with molecular dynamics (MD), requiring relaxation on the order of the entanglement time. For the initial method development we focus on miscible blends described on microscopic level through a generic bead-spring model, which reproduces hard excluded volume, strong covalent bonds, and realistic liquid density. The blended homopolymers are symmetric with respect to molecular architecture and liquid structure. To parameterize the blob-based models and validate equilibration of backmapped samples, we obtain reference data from independent hybrid simulations combining MD and identity exchange Monte Carlo moves, taking advantage of the symmetry of the blends. The potential of the backmapping strategy is demonstrated by equilibrating blend samples with different degree of miscibility, containing 500 chains with 1000 monomers each. Equilibration is verified by comparing

  14. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedro, R; Silva, J; Maio, A; Gurriana, L; Silva, J M; Augusto, J Soares

    2013-01-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius φ=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (φ=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137 Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22 Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  15. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa; Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass

    2017-01-01

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or 11 C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  16. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  17. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Healthy pets healthy people. www.cdc.gov/healthypets . Updated July 19, 2016. ...

  18. Measurement of plant and soil water isotope composition by direct equilibration methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, C. M.

    1995-11-01

    Water contained in plant and soil samples can be analysed for 2H and 18O content by direct equilibration while contained within the sample matrix. Methods for this are described and compared with the commonly used azeotropic distillation of samples before isotope analysis. For δ18O, direct equilibration with CO 2 gives results in good agreement with azeotropic distillation, i.e. within 0.5%o at natural abundance. Direct equilibration is a practical method for individual twig samples containing less than 0.5 ml of water, and offers significant operator time savings compared with azeotropic distillation. Batches of up to 100 samples can be prepared in less time than required for a single azeotropic distillation, and analysis by automated continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry after equilibration for 3 days again requires a minimum of operator time. Complete equilibration of plant water with H 2 for δ2H measurement occurs only after the plant material has been heated to 100°C under vacuum. The method described here is barely precise enough for natural abundance measurements ( δ 2H ± 15‰ ) but is well suited to field tracer studies with deuterium oxide.

  19. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  1. Health Examination by PET. (1) Cancer Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Cancer examination by positron emission tomography (PET) started in Japan in 1994 and has been rapidly popularized. This paper describes author's experience of the examination in his hospital along the recent Japanese guideline for the PET cancer examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is intravenously injected at 3.7 (or 4.6, for diabetic patients) MBq/kg after 4-5 hr fasting and 40 min later, imaging is conducted with additional delayed scan at 2 hr to reduce the possible false positive. Image is taken by the equipment with PET-specific camera, of which quality assurance (QA) is maintained according to the guideline, and 3D image is constructed by the ordered subset expectation maximization method. Number of examinees during 4.5 years are 18,210 (M/F=9,735/8,475), and 236 (1.3%), together with use of other test measures like ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical marker and occult blood as well, are found to have cancer of thyroid, large bowel, lung, breast and others. The false negative rate by PET alone is 78/236 (33%) for cancer. PET examination has problems of image reading and specificity of organs, and tasks of informed consent, test cost, increased exchange of information and radiation exposure. However, PET cancer examination will be established as a routine diagnostic tool when the accumulated evidence of early cancer detection is shown useful for improving the survival rate and for reducing the medicare cost. (T.I.)

  2. PET/CT with intravenous contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelsen, A.K.; Holm, S.; Loft, A.; Klausen, T.L.; Andersen, F.; Hoejgaard, L.

    2005-01-01

    If the CT scan of a combined PET/CT study is performed as a full diagnostic quality CT scan including intravenous (IV) contrast agent, the quality of the joint PET/CT procedure is improved and a separate diagnostic CT scan can be avoided. CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction, but this may result in a bias in the attenuation factors. The clinical significance of this bias has not been established. Our aim was to perform a prospective clinical study where each patient had CT performed with and without IV contrast agent to establish whether PET/CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation without reducing the clinical value of the PET scan. A uniform phantom study was used to document that the PET acquisition itself is not significantly influenced by the presence of IV contrast medium. Then, 19 patients referred to PET/CT with IV contrast underwent CT scans without, and then with contrast agent, followed by an 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body PET scan. The CT examinations were performed with identical parameters on a GE Discovery LS scanner. The PET data were reconstructed with attenuation correction based on the two CT data sets. A global comparison of standard uptake value (SUV) was performed, and SUVs in tumour, in non-tumour tissue and in the subclavian vein were calculated. Clinical evaluation of the number and location of lesions on all PET/CT scans was performed twice, blinded and in a different random order, by two independent nuclear medicine specialists. In all patients, the measured global SUV of PET images based on CT with IV contrast agent was higher than the global activity using non-contrast correction. The overall increase in the mean SUV (for two different conversion tables tested) was 4.5±2.3% and 1.6±0.5%, respectively. In 11/19 patients, focal uptake was identified corresponding to malignant tumours. Eight out of 11 tumours showed an increased SUV max (2.9±3.1%) on the PET images reconstructed using IV contrast

  3. Prognostic value of pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT and human papillomavirus type 16 testing in locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu; Huang, Chung-Guei; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) positivity is associated with favourable survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We report here a study of the prognostic significance of 18 F-FDG PET/CT functional parameters and HPV-16 infection in OPSCC patients. We retrospectively analysed 60 patients with stage III or IV OPSCC who had had a pretherapy 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and had completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 58) or curative radiotherapy (n = 2). All patients were followed up for ≥24 months or until death. We determined total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) of the primary tumour and neck lymph nodes from the pretherapy 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan. Optimal cut-offs of the 18 F-FDG PET/CT parameters were obtained by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Pretherapy tumour biopsies were studied by polymerase chain reaction to determine HPV infection status. The pretherapy tumour biopsies were positive for HPV-16 in 12 patients (20.0 %). Cox regression analyses revealed HPV-16 positivity and tumour TLG >135.3 g to be independently associated with overall survival (p = 0.027 and 0.011, respectively). However, only tumour TLG >135.3 g was independently associated with progression-free survival, disease-free survival and locoregional control (p = 0.011, 0.001 and 0.034, respectively). A scoring system was formulated to define distinct overall survival groups using tumour TLG and HPV-16 status. Patients positive for HPV-16 and with tumour TLG ≤135.3 g experienced better survival than those with tumour TLG >135.3 g and no HPV infection (p = 0.001). Tumour TLG was an independent predictor of survival in patients with locally advanced OPSCC. A scoring system was developed and may serve as a risk stratification strategy for guiding therapy. (orig.)

  4. Prognostic value of pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and human papillomavirus type 16 testing in locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Tsan, Din-Li; Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Huang, Chung-Guei [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Wang, Hung-Ming; Hsu, Cheng-Lung [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2012-11-15

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) positivity is associated with favourable survival in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). We report here a study of the prognostic significance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT functional parameters and HPV-16 infection in OPSCC patients. We retrospectively analysed 60 patients with stage III or IV OPSCC who had had a pretherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan and had completed concurrent chemoradiotherapy (n = 58) or curative radiotherapy (n = 2). All patients were followed up for {>=}24 months or until death. We determined total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the primary tumour and neck lymph nodes from the pretherapy {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan. Optimal cut-offs of the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters were obtained by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Pretherapy tumour biopsies were studied by polymerase chain reaction to determine HPV infection status. The pretherapy tumour biopsies were positive for HPV-16 in 12 patients (20.0 %). Cox regression analyses revealed HPV-16 positivity and tumour TLG >135.3 g to be independently associated with overall survival (p = 0.027 and 0.011, respectively). However, only tumour TLG >135.3 g was independently associated with progression-free survival, disease-free survival and locoregional control (p = 0.011, 0.001 and 0.034, respectively). A scoring system was formulated to define distinct overall survival groups using tumour TLG and HPV-16 status. Patients positive for HPV-16 and with tumour TLG {<=}135.3 g experienced better survival than those with tumour TLG >135.3 g and no HPV infection (p = 0.001). Tumour TLG was an independent predictor of survival in patients with locally advanced OPSCC. A scoring system was developed and may serve as a risk stratification strategy for guiding therapy. (orig.)

  5. Automatic delineation of brain regions on MRI and PET images from the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne D; Jørgensen, Louise M

    2018-01-01

    : Manual inter-modality spatial normalization to a MRI atlas is operator-dependent, time-consuming, and can be inaccurate with lack of cortical radiotracer binding or skull uptake. NEW METHOD: A parcellated PET template that allows for automatic spatial normalization to PET images of any radiotracer....... RESULTS: MRI and [11C]Cimbi-36 PET scans obtained in sixteen pigs made the basis for the atlas. The high resolution MRI scans allowed for creation of an accurately averaged MRI template. By aligning the within-subject PET scans to their MRI counterparts, an averaged PET template was created in the same...... the MRI template with individual MRI images and 0.92±0.26mm using the PET template with individual [11C]Cimbi-36 PET images. We tested the automatic procedure by assessing eleven PET radiotracers with different kinetics and spatial distributions by using perfusion-weighted images of early PET time frames...

  6. Achieving swift equilibration of a Brownian particle using flow-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Ayoti; Jarzynski, Christopher

    Can a system be driven to a targeted equilibrium state on a timescale that is much shorter than its natural equilibration time? In a recent experiment, the swift equilibration of an overdamped Brownian particle was achieved by use of an appropriately designed, time-dependent optical trap potential. Motivated by these results, we develop a general theoretical approach for guiding an ensemble of Brownian particles to track the instantaneous equilibrium distribution of a desired potential U (q , t) . In our approach, we use flow-fields associated with the parametric evolution of the targeted equilibrium state to construct an auxiliary potential U (q , t) , such that dynamics under the composite potential U (t) + U (t) achieves the desired evolution. Our results establish a close connection between the swift equilibration of Brownian particles, quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity, and the dissipationless driving of a classical, Hamiltonian system.

  7. Equilibration of metabolic CO2 with preformed CO2 and bicarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hems, R.; Saez, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Entry of metabolic 14 CO 2 into urea is shown to occur more readily than it equilibrates with the general pool of cellular plus extracellular bicarbonate plus CO 2 . Since the sites of CO 2 production (pyruvate dehydrogenase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) and of fixation (carbamoylphosphate synthetase) are intramitochondrial, it is likely that the fixation of CO 2 is also more rapid than its equilibration with the cytoplasmic pool of bicarbonate plus CO 2 . This observation may point to a more general problem concerning the interpretation of isotope data, with compartmentation or proximity of sites of production and utilisation of metabolites may result in the isotope following a preferred pathway. (Auth.)

  8. Determination of equilibration kinetics of oxide electrode materials using a manometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwal, S.P.S.; Jiang, S.P.; Love, J.; Nowotny, J.; Rekas, M.

    1998-01-01

    The gas/solid equilibration kinetics for electrode oxide materials, such as (La 0.8 Sr 0.2 )MnO 3 , using a manometric method, was determined. The reaction kinetics between oxygen and the oxide material was monitored using the measurements of the P(O 2 ) changes during isothermic experiments of oxidation and reduction. The procedure of the determination will be described and relevant kinetic equations was derived. The equilibration kinetic data obtained can be used to determine the chemical diffusion coefficient. Copyright (1998) Australasian Ceramic Society

  9. Birds Kept as Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pet’s health Visit a veterinarian who has experience with pet birds for routine check-ups to keep your bird healthy and prevent infectious diseases. If your bird becomes sick or dies within a month after purchase or adoption: Contact your veterinarian. Inform the pet ...

  10. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  11. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  12. Oncology PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to 'Where is Waldo?' I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the 'hallmarks of cancer'. (author)

  13. MRI-assisted PET motion correction for neurologic studies in an integrated MR-PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; van der Kouwe, Andre; Byars, Larry; Hamm, Michael; Chonde, Daniel B; Michel, Christian J; El Fakhri, Georges; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Head motion is difficult to avoid in long PET studies, degrading the image quality and offsetting the benefit of using a high-resolution scanner. As a potential solution in an integrated MR-PET scanner, the simultaneously acquired MRI data can be used for motion tracking. In this work, a novel algorithm for data processing and rigid-body motion correction (MC) for the MRI-compatible BrainPET prototype scanner is described, and proof-of-principle phantom and human studies are presented. To account for motion, the PET prompt and random coincidences and sensitivity data for postnormalization were processed in the line-of-response (LOR) space according to the MRI-derived motion estimates. The processing time on the standard BrainPET workstation is approximately 16 s for each motion estimate. After rebinning in the sinogram space, the motion corrected data were summed, and the PET volume was reconstructed using the attenuation and scatter sinograms in the reference position. The accuracy of the MC algorithm was first tested using a Hoffman phantom. Next, human volunteer studies were performed, and motion estimates were obtained using 2 high-temporal-resolution MRI-based motion-tracking techniques. After accounting for the misalignment between the 2 scanners, perfectly coregistered MRI and PET volumes were reproducibly obtained. The MRI output gates inserted into the PET list-mode allow the temporal correlation of the 2 datasets within 0.2 ms. The Hoffman phantom volume reconstructed by processing the PET data in the LOR space was similar to the one obtained by processing the data using the standard methods and applying the MC in the image space, demonstrating the quantitative accuracy of the procedure. In human volunteer studies, motion estimates were obtained from echo planar imaging and cloverleaf navigator sequences every 3 s and 20 ms, respectively. Motion-deblurred PET images, with excellent delineation of specific brain structures, were obtained using these 2 MRI

  14. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Lino M; Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Heusch, Philipp; Lahner, Harald; Führer, Dagmar; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Umutlu, Lale

    2017-10-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p PET/MRI (both p PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. • 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI correctly identified more NET lesions than 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. • 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI provides better NET lesion conspicuity than 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. • SUVmax values from the two modalities are strongly correlated and do not differ significantly.

  15. An Evaluation of PET Using Extant Achievement Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, Garrett K.

    Data gathered under various statewide testing programs in South Carolina were used to assess the effects of PET (data base) training for teachers on student achievement. Reading and mathematics achievement data for students in grades 1 through 4 in South Carolina were compared for teachers who had received PET training and those who did not. A…

  16. Using a Popular Pet Fish Species to Study Territorial Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abante, Maria E.

    2005-01-01

    The colourful, vigorous territorial display behaviour of the Siamese fighting fish, "Betta splendens", has great appeal for both pet enthusiasts and animal behaviourists. Their beauty, longevity, easy maintenance and rearing make them a popular pet and an ideal science laboratory specimen. This investigation utilises "B. splendens" to test for the…

  17. Evaluation of coronary endothelial dysfunction in healthy young smokers: Cold pressor test using [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gachon University Gil Hospital of Korea, 1198, Guwol-dong, Namdong-gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: forrest88@hanmail.net; Lee, Byeong-il [Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Chonnam National University Hospital of Korea, 671, Jebong-no, Dong-gu, Gwangju 0-757 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: dewpapa@hanmail.net; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Seoul National University of Korea, 28, Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate coronary endothelial dysfunction in young healthy smokers by measuring myocardial blood flow (MBF) using [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O-PET. The study population was 18 young male volunteers consisted of 9 smokers (age: 23.8{+-}1.1 yr) and 9 non-smokers (age: 25.0{+-}2.5 yr). The smokers had been smoking cigarettes for 6.6{+-}2.5 pack years. Myocardial [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O-PET was performed at rest, during cold (5 deg. C) pressor stimulation and during adenosine infusion. Left ventricular (LV) input function and tissue time-activity curves were obtained by drawing region of interest (ROI) on the LV blood pool and myocardium images obtained by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) of dynamic [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O-PET data, and MBF was calculated using these time-activity curves and single compartmental model. There were no significant difference in resting MBF between two groups (smokers: 1.43{+-}0.41 and non-smokers: 1.37{+-}0.41 ml/g/min; P=NS). However, during cold pressor stimulation, MBF in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers (1.25{+-}0.33 vs. 1.59{+-}0.29 ml/g/min; P=0.019). MBF changed to 90{+-}24% of resting MBF in smokers and 122{+-}28% in non-smokers. The difference in the ratio of cold pressor MBF to basal MBF between two groups was also significant (P=0.024). During adenosine infusion, however, hyperemic MBF did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (5.81{+-}1.99 vs. 5.03{+-}1.27 ml/g/min; P=NS). This study shows that [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O PET analysis can reveal that endothelial dysfunction occurs in even young smokers of about 6 pack years.

  18. Neuchatel ne gardera pas le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "La ville de Neuchatel ne souhaite pas conserver le Palais de l'equilibre apres Expo.02. Par 24 voix contre 7, le Conseil general a rejete le plan special du Conseil communal qui proposait de transformer l'edifice en un centre de congres" (1/2 page).

  19. PET/CT与PET/MR在诊断宫颈癌原发灶及评价盆腔淋巴结转移的比较研究%Value of PET/CT and PET/MR in diagnosing primary cervical cancer and evaluating pelvic lymph node metastasis: Comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚靳; 孙洪赞; 辛军; 郭启勇

    2018-01-01

    目的 比较PET/CT和PET/MR在诊断宫颈癌原发灶及盆腔淋巴结转移中的应用价值.方法 对40例宫颈癌患者于治疗前分别行PET/CT和PET/MR检查并进行评价.采用Kappa一致性检验及配对x2检验分别评价PET/CT和PET/MR与金标准的诊断一致性及差异.采用ROC曲线分析两者对盆腔转移淋巴结的诊断效能,采用秩和检验分析两者评价转移淋巴结的可见性及诊断自信度的差异.结果 PET/MR分期与金标准的诊断一致性显著高于PET/CT,二者对宫颈癌分期诊断的差异有统计学意义(x2=10.286,P=0.002);PET/CT和PET/MR诊断转移淋巴结的曲线下面积差异无统计学意义(Z=0.83,P>0.05);二者对转移淋巴结的可见性评分差异无统计学意义(P=0.157),诊断自信度评分差异有统计学意义(P=0.014).结论 PET/CT和PET/MR对检出宫颈癌原发灶均有较高的诊断价值,但PET/MR对宫颈癌分期及判定淋巴结转移有更大的诊断优势,PET/MR有望在综合评价宫颈恶性病变进展中成为替代PET/CT的一种新技术.%Objective To compare the application value between PET/CT and PET/MR in diagnosing primary cervical cancer and pelvic lymph node metastasis.Methods Forty cases of cervical cancer were prospectively enrolled.PET/CT and PET/MR examinations were performed before treatment.All imaging data were evaluated by two experienced radiologists.The diagnostic consistency and difference of PET/CT and PET/MR were evaluated with Cohen's Kappa and paired Chi-square test.ROC curve was adopted to observe the value in diagnosing pelvic lymph node metastasis of cervical cancer.The lesions' visibility and diagnostic confidence of metastatic lymph nodes on PET/CT and PET/MR images were compared with Wilcoxon signed ranks test.Results Compared with the gold standard,the diagnostic consistency of PET/MR staging was much higher than that of PET/CT (x2 =10.286,P=0.002).The area under ROC curve of PET/CT and PET/MR on lymph node metastasis

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  1. MR-assisted PET motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI studies of dementia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin T; Salcedo, Stephanie; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Levine, Michael A; Price, Julie C; Dickerson, Bradford C; Catana, Ciprian

    2018-03-08

    Subject motion in positron emission tomography (PET) studies leads to image blurring and artifacts; simultaneously acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data provides a means for motion correction (MC) in integrated PET/MRI scanners. To assess the effect of realistic head motion and MR-based MC on static [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images in dementia patients. Observational study. Thirty dementia subjects were recruited. 3T hybrid PET/MR scanner where EPI-based and T 1 -weighted sequences were acquired simultaneously with the PET data. Head motion parameters estimated from high temporal resolution MR volumes were used for PET MC. The MR-based MC method was compared to PET frame-based MC methods in which motion parameters were estimated by coregistering 5-minute frames before and after accounting for the attenuation-emission mismatch. The relative changes in standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) between the PET volumes processed with the various MC methods, without MC, and the PET volumes with simulated motion were compared in relevant brain regions. The absolute value of the regional SUVR relative change was assessed with pairwise paired t-tests testing at the P = 0.05 level, comparing the values obtained through different MR-based MC processing methods as well as across different motion groups. The intraregion voxelwise variability of regional SUVRs obtained through different MR-based MC processing methods was also assessed with pairwise paired t-tests testing at the P = 0.05 level. MC had a greater impact on PET data quantification in subjects with larger amplitude motion (higher than 18% in the medial orbitofrontal cortex) and greater changes were generally observed for the MR-based MC method compared to the frame-based methods. Furthermore, a mean relative change of ∼4% was observed after MC even at the group level, suggesting the importance of routinely applying this correction. The intraregion voxelwise variability of regional SUVRs

  2. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin L; Muzik, Otto; Beyer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET)-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic paramet...

  3. Particle Accelerators for PET radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost-effectively achie......The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost......-effectively achieved by the well proven technology of the compact medical cyclotron, presently available from several companies. The main features of these cyclotrons are essential similar: resistive, sector focused iron magnets, internal negative ion sources and stripping extraction. The remaining differences between...... different manufacturers will be discussed the light of what is actually needed for a given PET site operation. Alternatives to the conventional cyclotron have been proposed and tested but have at present very limited use. These alternatives will be discussed, as well as the future possibilities of supplying...

  4. Reproducibility of Quantitative Brain Imaging Using a PET-Only and a Combined PET/MR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L. Lassen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of migrating a quantitative brain imaging protocol from a positron emission tomography (PET-only system to an integrated PET/MR system. Potential differences in both absolute radiotracer concentration as well as in the derived kinetic parameters as a function of PET system choice have been investigated. Five healthy volunteers underwent dynamic (R-[11C]verapamil imaging on the same day using a GE-Advance (PET-only and a Siemens Biograph mMR system (PET/MR. PET-emission data were reconstructed using a transmission-based attenuation correction (AC map (PET-only, whereas a standard MR-DIXON as well as a low-dose CT AC map was applied to PET/MR emission data. Kinetic modeling based on arterial blood sampling was performed using a 1-tissue-2-rate constant compartment model, yielding kinetic parameters (K1 and k2 and distribution volume (VT. Differences for parametric values obtained in the PET-only and the PET/MR systems were analyzed using a 2-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. Comparison of DIXON-based AC (PET/MR with emission data derived from the PET-only system revealed average inter-system differences of −33 ± 14% (p < 0.05 for the K1 parameter and −19 ± 9% (p < 0.05 for k2. Using a CT-based AC for PET/MR resulted in slightly lower systematic differences of −16 ± 18% for K1 and −9 ± 10% for k2. The average differences in VT were −18 ± 10% (p < 0.05 for DIXON- and −8 ± 13% for CT-based AC. Significant systematic differences were observed for kinetic parameters derived from emission data obtained from PET/MR and PET-only imaging due to different standard AC methods employed. Therefore, a transfer of imaging protocols from PET-only to PET/MR systems is not straightforward without application of proper correction methods.Clinical Trial Registration:www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, identifier 2013-001724-19

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.; Hines, H.

    2001-01-01

    ADAC Laboratories has two main imaging strengths: PET and Gamma Cameras. PET's three-dimensional imaging of metabolic function is used in oncology, with emerging opportunties in cardiology, genetic mapping and pharmaceuticals research. In oncology, PET imaging can provide comprehensive and accurate staging information which is not available from CT or MRI. In some cases, this information can lead to modification of treatment, for example from an aggressive approach to one of palliation. The SKYLight is the world's first and only gantry-free camera. It is a dual-detector variable angle camera designed for high throughput, with unsurpassed openness and patient access. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of central μ-opioid receptor binding in vivo with PET and [11C]carfentanil: a test-retest study in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirvonen, Jussi; Aalto, Sargo; Maksimow, Anu; Oikonen, Vesa; Naagren, Kjell; Hagelberg, Nora; Scheinin, Harry; Ingman, Kimmo; Virkkala, Jussi

    2009-01-01

    [ 11 C]Carfentanil has been widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies for measuring μ-opioid receptor binding in humans, but the reproducibility of the binding parameter estimates is unknown. Eight healthy volunteers were scanned twice during the same day with [ 11 C]carfentanil PET, and binding to receptors was assessed with both reference tissue and arterial plasma input-based models using region of interest (ROI) and voxel-based quantification. The two-tissue compartmental model distribution volume (V T ) was highly reproducible as indicated by low variability (VAR 0.93). BP ND (BP relative to the nondisplaceable tissue compartment) was also highly reproducible (VAR 0.90) both at ROI- and voxel-level, and reference tissue-based models provided stable estimates after 40 min. The reproducibility of [ 11 C]carfentanil binding parameter estimates is excellent with outcome measures based on both arterial plasma and reference tissue input, and a scanning time of 40 min appears sufficient. (orig.)

  7. Usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, combined FDG-PET/CT and EUS in diagnosing primary pancreatic carcinoma: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Shuang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Huang Gang, E-mail: huang2802@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Jianjun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Liu Tao [Department of Orthopedics, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Treven, Lyndal [Faculty of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Song Saoli; Zhang Chenpeng; Pan Lingling [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Zhang Ting [Department of Anesthesiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2011-04-15

    The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), combined {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in diagnosing patients with pancreatic carcinoma. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and some other databases, from January 1966 to April 2009, were searched for initial studies. All the studies published in English or Chinese relating to the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, PET/CT and EUS for patients with pancreatic cancer were collected. Methodological quality was assessed. The statistic software called 'Meta-Disc 1.4' was used for data analysis. Results: 51 studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity estimate for combined PET/CT (90.1%) was significantly higher than PET (88.4%) and EUS (81.2%). The pooled specificity estimate for EUS (93.2%) was significantly higher than PET (83.1%) and PET/CT (80.1%). The pooled DOR estimate for EUS (49.774) was significantly higher than PET (32.778) and PET/CT (27.105). SROC curves for PET/CT and EUS showed a little better diagnostic accuracy than PET alone. For PET alone, when interpreted the results with knowledge of other imaging tests, its sensitivity (89.4%) and specificity (80.1%) were closer to PET/CT. For EUS, its diagnostic value decreased in differentiating pancreatic cancer for patients with chronic pancreatitis. In conclusion, PET/CT was a high sensitive and EUS was a high specific modality in diagnosing patients with pancreatic cancer. PET/CT and EUS could play different roles during different conditions in diagnosing pancreatic carcinoma.

  8. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  9. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  10. Depiction and characterization of liver lesions in whole body [18F]-FDG PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Gomez, Benedikt; Buchbender, Christian; Hartung, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Nensa, Felix; Kuehl, Hilmar; Bockisch, Andreas; Lauenstein, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]-FDG using a whole body protocol for the depiction and characterization of liver lesions in comparison to PET/CT. Methods: 70 patients (31 women, 39 men) with solid tumors underwent [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT and followed by an additional PET/MRI using an integrated scanner. Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding conspicuity of hepatic lesions (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (5-point ordinal scale). Median scores for lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Prior examinations, histopathology and clinical follow-up (116 ± 54 days) served as standard of reference. Results: 36 of 70 (51%) patients showed liver lesions. Using PET/CT and PET/MRI all patients with liver metastases could correctly be identified. A total of 97 lesions were found (malignant n = 26; benign n = 71). For lesion conspicuity significantly higher scores were obtained for PET/MRI in comparison to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Significantly better performance for diagnostic confidence was observed in PET/MRI, both for malignant as for benign lesions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: PET/MRI, even in the setting of a whole body approach, provides higher lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence compared to PET/CT and may therefore evolve as an attractive alternative in oncologic imaging

  11. MR-assisted PET Motion Correction for eurological Studies in an Integrated MR-PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; van der Kouwe, Andre; Byars, Larry; Hamm, Michael; Chonde, Daniel B.; Michel, Christian J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A. Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Head motion is difficult to avoid in long PET studies, degrading the image quality and offsetting the benefit of using a high-resolution scanner. As a potential solution in an integrated MR-PET scanner, the simultaneously acquired MR data can be used for motion tracking. In this work, a novel data processing and rigid-body motion correction (MC) algorithm for the MR-compatible BrainPET prototype scanner is described and proof-of-principle phantom and human studies are presented. Methods To account for motion, the PET prompts and randoms coincidences as well as the sensitivity data are processed in the line or response (LOR) space according to the MR-derived motion estimates. After sinogram space rebinning, the corrected data are summed and the motion corrected PET volume is reconstructed from these sinograms and the attenuation and scatter sinograms in the reference position. The accuracy of the MC algorithm was first tested using a Hoffman phantom. Next, human volunteer studies were performed and motion estimates were obtained using two high temporal resolution MR-based motion tracking techniques. Results After accounting for the physical mismatch between the two scanners, perfectly co-registered MR and PET volumes are reproducibly obtained. The MR output gates inserted in to the PET list-mode allow the temporal correlation of the two data sets within 0.2 s. The Hoffman phantom volume reconstructed processing the PET data in the LOR space was similar to the one obtained processing the data using the standard methods and applying the MC in the image space, demonstrating the quantitative accuracy of the novel MC algorithm. In human volunteer studies, motion estimates were obtained from echo planar imaging and cloverleaf navigator sequences every 3 seconds and 20 ms, respectively. Substantially improved PET images with excellent delineation of specific brain structures were obtained after applying the MC using these MR-based estimates. Conclusion A novel MR-based MC

  12. Determination of delta sub(18) in water from delta sub(18) in equilibrated CO2: influence of changes in experimental parameters on the equilibration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestler, V.; Arora, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The result of an isotopic exchange reaction is expressed in terms of the isotopic abundance ratios, the fractionation factor and the atom number ratio of the reactants. The general formula is applied to the CO 2 -H 2 O system and simplified by neglecting terms small in relation to the experimental error. The influence of variations in the experimental parameters on the equilibrium is discussed. It is found that changes in temperature as well as atom number ratio will influence the equilibration process appreciably [pt

  13. PET studies in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  14. Evaluation of endothelium-dependent myocardial perfusion reserve in healthy smokers; cold pressor test using H{sub 2}{sup 15}O PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon [School of Medicine, Gachon Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Ho Young; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Much evidence suggests long-term cigarette smoking alters coronary vascular endothelial response. In this study, we applied nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), an unsupervised learning algorithm, to CO-less H{sub 2}{sup 15}O-PET to investigate coronary endothelial dysfunction caused by smoking noninvasively. This study enrolled eighteen young male volunteers consisting of 9 smokers (23.8{+-}1.1 yr; 6.6{+-}2.5 pack-years) and 9 nonsmokers (23.8{+-}2.9 yr). They do not have any cardiovascular risk factor or disease history. Myocardial H{sub 2}{sup 15}O-PET was performed at rest, during cold (5.deg.C) pressor stimulation and during adenosine infusion. Left ventricular blood pool and myocardium were segmented on dynamic PET data by NMF method. Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was calculated from input and tissue functions by a single compartmental model with correction of partial volume and spillover effects. There were no significant difference in resting MBF between the two groups (Smokers: 1.43 0.41ml/g/min and non-smokers: 1.37{+-}0.41 ml/g/min; p = NS). during cold pressor stimulation, MBF in smokers was significantly lower than that in non-smokers (1.25{+-}0.34 ml/g/min vs 1.59{+-}0.29 ml/g/min ; p = 0.019). The difference in the ratio of cold pressor MBF to resting MBF between the two groups was also significant (p=0.024; 90{+-}24% in smokers and 122{+-}28% in non-smokers.). During adenosine infusion, however, hyperemic MBF did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (5.81{+-}1.99 ml/g/min vs 5.11{+-}1.31 ml/g/min ; p=NS). In smokers, MBF during cold pressor stimulation was significantly lower compared with nonsmokers, reflecting smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction. However, there was no significant difference in MBF during adenosine-induced hyperemia between the two groups.

  15. PET and Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Sevencan; Songul A. Vaizoglu

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water,...

  16. Parasites in pet reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavri Urška

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles, belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (4 of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3% of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (6 of endoparasites in 252 (76.1% of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1 and Protozoa (2 of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5% animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners.

  17. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Sportelli, G.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Cecchetti, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Retico, A.; Romano, F.; Sala, P.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-04-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β+ activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β+ activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo.

  18. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarlinghi, N; Sportelli, G; Belcari, N; Cecchetti, M; Ferretti, S; Kraan, A; Retico, A; Straub, K; Guerra, A Del; Rosso, V; Battistoni, G; Sala, P; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Romano, F; Tramontana, A

    2014-01-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β + activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β + activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo

  19. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander; Grueneisen, Johannes; Sawicki, Lino M.; Grafe, Hong; Forsting, Michael; Bockisch, Andreas; Umutlu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  20. Hybrid imaging for detection of carcinoma of unknown primary: A preliminary comparison trial of whole-body PET/MRI versus PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhlmann, Verena; Ruhlmann, Marcus; Bellendorf, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Sawicki, Lino M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Grafe, Hong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Forsting, Michael [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany); Umutlu, Lale, E-mail: verena.ruhlmann@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Both 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MRI provide a comparable diagnostic ability for detection of primary cancer and metastases in CUP-syndrome. • Both imaging methods showed comparably high lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence (superior assessment of cervical lesions in PET/MRI). • PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative, particularly for therapy monitoring or surveillance considering the long-term cumulative dose. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare the diagnostic potential of integrated whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/MRI to [18F]FDG-PET/CT for detection of a potential primary cancer and metastases in patients suspected for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Methods: A total of 20 patients (15 male, 5 female, age 53 ± 13 years) suspect for CUP underwent a dedicated head and neck & whole-body [18F]FDG-PET/CT (Biograph mCT 128, Siemens Healthcare) and a subsequent simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examination (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding the detection of the primary cancer and metastases, lesion conspicuity (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (3-point ordinal scale). PET analysis comprised the assessment of maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all PET-positive lesions using volume of interest (VOI) analysis derived from the PET/CT and PET/MR datasets. All available data considering histology and imaging including prior and clinical follow-up examinations served as reference standard. Statistical analysis included comparison of mean values using Mann-Whitney U test and correlation of SUVmax using Pearson‘s correlation. Results: In 14 out of 20 patients 49 malignant lesions were present. The primary cancer could be correctly identified in 11/20 patients with both PET/CT and PET/MRI. PET/CT enabled the detection of a total 38 metastases, PET/MR respectively of 37 metastases (one lung metastasis <5mm was missed). PET/CT and

  1. Additional value of integrated PET/CT over PET alone in the initial staging and follow up of head and neck malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikita, Tomohiro; Oriuchi, Noboru; Higuchi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Clinical application of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) in head and neck cancer includes identification of metastases, unknown primary head and neck malignancy, or second primary carcinoma, and also recurrent tumor after treatment. In this study, the additional value of PET/CT fusion images over PET images alone was evaluated in patients with initial staging and follow up of head and neck malignancy. Forty patients with suspected primary head and neck malignancy and 129 patients with suspected relapse after treatment of head and neck malignancy were included. FDG-PET/CT study was performed after the intravenous administration of FDG (5 MBq/kg). Target of evaluation was set at primary tumor, cervical lymph node, and whole body. PET images and PET with CT fusion images were compared. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Results of PET and PET/CT were compared with postoperative histopathological examination, and case by case comparison of PET and PET/CT results for each region was performed. The additional value of CT images over PET only images was assessed. Statistical differences in sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. In the comparative evaluation of 507 targets by PET alone and PET/CT, 401 targets showed agreement of the results. Of the 106 discordant targets, 103 showed a positive result on PET alone and negative result on PET/CT. These results showed a significant difference (p<0.01). Sensitivity of PET/CT was slightly higher than that of PET without statistical significance, while specificity of PET/CT was significantly higher than that of PET alone (Initial Staging: 90.5% vs. 62.2%, p<0.01; Follow up: 97.2% vs. 74.4%, p<0.01). In Fisher's direct probability test, a significant difference was noted in the sensitivity (Initial staging: 91.3% vs. 87.0%, p<0.01; Follow up: 93.9% vs. 91.4%, p<0.01). Combined PET/CT showed improved diagnostic

  2. Centrifugally Spun Recycled PET: Processing and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phu Phong Vo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal spinning, which is a high-productivity fiber fabrication technique, was used to produce a value-added product from recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate (rPET. In the present study, rPET fibers, with fiber diameters ranging from submicron to micrometer in scale, were fabricated by spinning a solution of rPET in a mixture of dichloromethane and trifluoroacetic acid. The influence of the polymer solution concentration (the viscosity, the rotational speed of the spinneret, and the inner diameter of the needles on the formation and morphology and mechanical properties of the fibers were examined through scanning electron microscopy and using a tensile testing machine. The thermal behaviors of fibrous mats with various average diameters were also investigated through differential scanning calorimetry. The smoothest and smallest fibers, with an average diameter of 619 nm, were generated using an rPET solution of 10 wt % under a rotation speed of 15,000 rpm using needles having an inner diameter of 160 μm. The fibrous mats have an average tensile strength and modulus of 4.3 MPa and 34.4 MPa, respectively. The productivity and the mechanical properties indicate that centrifugal spinning is an effective technique to fabricate high-value product from rPET.

  3. Development of HM12 cyclotron for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takuzo; Kawama, Tetsuo; Fujii, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, there are at present more than 30 PET (Positron Emission Tomography) facilities. The movements of medical insurance application to the PET diagnosis using [ 18 F] FDG (2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose) by the Ministry of Health and Welfare are being enhanced by PET related people. Therefore, more clinical centers using PET system are expected to be built in the near future. HM12 cyclotron was developed to meet such market demands for PET, and the prototype machine has been rent to Cyclotron Radio Isotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University since Oct. 1998 for their use of clinical research with positron emitters like 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F. We got many technical data of HM12 Cyclotron on the clinical base. The data was enough to establish the reliability of HM12 system operation under the clinical condition. The first commercial product of HM12 Cyclotron was delivered to National Cancer Center in March 2000. The final performance test will be finished by the end of June 2000. (author)

  4. Equilibration, thermalisation, and the emergence of statistical mechanics in closed quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolin, Christian; Eisert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We review selected advances in the theoretical understanding of complex quantum many-body systems with regard to emergent notions of quantum statistical mechanics. We cover topics such as equilibration and thermalisation in pure state statistical mechanics, the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, the equivalence of ensembles, non-equilibration dynamics following global and local quenches as well as ramps. We also address initial state independence, absence of thermalisation, and many-body localisation. We elucidate the role played by key concepts for these phenomena, such as Lieb-Robinson bounds, entanglement growth, typicality arguments, quantum maximum entropy principles and the generalised Gibbs ensembles, and quantum (non-)integrability. We put emphasis on rigorous approaches and present the most important results in a unified language.

  5. Comparison of /sup 133/Xe washout curves after bolus inhalation, perfusion, and equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devos, P; Demedts, M; Vandecruys, A; Cosemans, J; De Roo, M

    1978-01-01

    In 6 healthy subjects and 13 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease, /sup 133/Xe washout curves after bolus inhalation, perfusion and equilibration were compared, using a gamma camera and computerized data handling. In healthy subjects the washout after equilibration was significantly slower than after the two other procedures. As this phenomenon occurred at the basal zones, it was attributed to the presence of airway closure in some units. In patients, the three washouts were significantly different from each other. This indicated the existence of intraregional inhomogeneity in ventilation, perfusion and ventilation-perfusion ratio. Our conclusion is that comparison of these different washout methods yields valuable information not only on absolute values of pulmonary function but also on the intraregional distribution, which cannot be obtained by other examinations.

  6. Enhanced electron/fuel-ion equilibration through impurity ions: Studies applicable to NIF and Omega

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Simpson, R.; Parker, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Casey, D.; Grabowski, P.; Graziani, F.; Taitano, W.; Le, A.; Chacon, L.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Simakov, A.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Betti, R.; Srinivasan, B.; Mancini, R.

    2017-10-01

    In shock-driven exploding-pushers, a platform used extensively to study multi-species and kinetic effects, electrons and fuel ions are far out of equilibrium, as reflected by very different temperatures. However, impurity ions, even in small quantities, can couple effectively to the electrons, because of a Z2 dependence, and in turn, impurity ions can then strongly couple to the fuel ions. Through this mechanism, electrons and fuel-ions can equilibrate much faster than they otherwise would. This is a quantitative issue, depending upon the amount and Z of the impurity. For NIF and Omega, we consider the role of this process. Coupled non-linear equations, reflecting the temperatures of the three species, are solved for a range of conditions. Consideration is also given to ablatively driven implosions, since impurities can similarly affect the equilibration. This work was supported in part by DOE/NNSA DE-NA0002949 and DE-NA0002726.

  7. Black hole spectra in holography: Consequences for equilibration of dual gauge theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Buchel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For a closed system to equilibrate from a given initial condition there must exist an equilibrium state with the energy equal to the initial one. Equilibrium states of a strongly coupled gauge theory with a gravitational holographic dual are represented by black holes. We study the spectrum of black holes in Pilch–Warner geometry. These black holes are holographically dual to equilibrium states of strongly coupled SU(N N=2⁎ gauge theory plasma on S3 in the planar limit. We find that there is no energy gap in the black hole spectrum. Thus, there is a priori no obstruction for equilibration of arbitrary low-energy states in the theory via a small black hole gravitational collapse. The latter is contrasted with phenomenological examples of holography with dual four-dimensional CFTs having non-equal central charges in the stress–energy tensor trace anomaly.

  8. High value carbon materials from PET recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, J.B.; Ania, C.O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Poly(ethylene) terephthalate (PET), has become one of the major post-consumer plastic waste. In this work special attention was paid to minimising PET residues and to obtain a high value carbon material. Pyrolysis and subsequent activation of PET from post-consumer soft-drink bottles was performed. Activation was carried out at 925 deg. C under CO 2 atmosphere to different burn-off degrees. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N 2 adsorption isotherms at -196 deg. C. The obtained carbons materials were mainly microporous, presenting low meso and macroporosity, and apparent BET surface areas of upto 2500 m 2 g -1 . The capacity of these materials for phenol adsorption and PAHs removal from aqueous solutions was measured and compared with that attained with commercial active carbons. Preliminary tests also showed high hydrogen uptake values, as good as the results obtained with high-tech carbon materials

  9. Prevent Heartworms in Pets Year-Round

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing, you may be putting your pet in danger. The preventive medication can kill so many microfilariae ( ... لعربية | Kreyòl Ayisyen | Français | Polski | Português | Italiano | Deutsch | 日本語 | ف ...

  10. The first component of the Palais de l'Equilibre arrives at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Jean-Luc Baldy, Head of CERN civil engineering; Heiner Rieder, from the company appointed by the Swiss Confederation; Thomas B chi, wood-engineer from the Charpente-Concept SA; Carlo Wyss, CERN director for accelerators, and Hervé Dessinoz, the architect, in front of the keystone of the Palais de l'Equilibre.This was given to CERN by the Swiss Confederation to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of CERN and renamed the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  11. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Ezequiel Alejandro; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Beaton, Michael; Buhrmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the "laws" of sensorimotor contingencies (SMCs). In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget's theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget's theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  12. Learning to perceive in the sensorimotor approach: Piaget's theory of equilibration interpreted dynamically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Alejandro Di Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning to perceive faces a classical paradox: if understanding is required for perception, how can we learn to perceive something new, something we do not yet understand? According to the sensorimotor approach, perception involves mastery of regular sensorimotor co-variations that depend on the agent and the environment, also known as the ‘laws’ of sensorimotor contingencies. In this sense, perception involves enacting relevant sensorimotor skills in each situation. It is important for this proposal that such skills can be learned and refined with experience and yet up to this date, the sensorimotor approach has had no explicit theory of perceptual learning. The situation is made more complex if we acknowledge the open-ended nature of human learning. In this paper we propose Piaget’s theory of equilibration as a potential candidate to fulfill this role. This theory highlights the importance of intrinsic sensorimotor norms, in terms of the closure of sensorimotor schemes. It also explains how the equilibration of a sensorimotor organization faced with novelty or breakdowns proceeds by re-shaping pre-existing structures in coupling with dynamical regularities of the world. This way learning to perceive is guided by the equilibration of emerging forms of skillful coping with the world. We demonstrate the compatibility between Piaget’s theory and the sensorimotor approach by providing a dynamical formalization of equilibration to give an explicit micro-genetic account of sensorimotor learning and, by extension, of how we learn to perceive. This allows us to draw important lessons in the form of general principles for open-ended sensorimotor learning, including the need for an intrinsic normative evaluation by the agent itself. We also explore implications of our micro-genetic account at the personal level.

  13. Dynamical Equilibration Across a Quenched Phase Transition in a Trapped Quantum Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, I. -K.; Donadello, S.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.; Gou, S. -C.; Dalfovo, F.; Proukakis, N. P.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of an equilibrium quantum state from an uncorrelated thermal one through the dynamical crossing of a phase transition is a central question of non-equilibrium many-body physics. During such crossing, the system breaks its symmetry by establishing numerous uncorrelated regions separated by spontaneously-generated defects, whose emergence obeys a universal scaling law with the quench duration. Much less is known about the ensuing re-equilibrating or "coarse-graining" stage, which ...

  14. Effect of long-term equilibration on the toxicity of molybdenum to soil organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; McGrath, Steve P.; Smolders, Erik; Diez Ortiz, Maria; Borgman, Eef; Verweij, Rudo A.; Buekers, Jurgen; Oorts, Koen

    2012-01-01

    To determine if long-term equilibration may alleviate molybdenum toxicity, earthworms, enchytraeids, collembolans and four plant species were exposed to three soils freshly spiked with Na 2 MoO 4 .2H 2 O and equilibrated for 6 or 11 months in the field with free drainage. Total Mo concentrations in soil decreased by leaching, most (up to 98%) in sandy soil and less (54–62%) in silty and clayey soils. Changes in residual Mo toxicity with time were inconclusive in sandy soil. In the other two soils, toxicity of residual total Mo was significantly reduced after 11 months equilibration with a median 5.5-fold increase in ED50s. Mo fixation in soil, i.e. the decrease of soil solution Mo concentrations at equivalent residual total soil Mo, was maximally a factor of 2.1 only. This experiment shows natural attenuation of molybdate ecotoxicity under field conditions is related to leaching of excess Mo and other ions as well as to slow ageing reactions. - Highlights: ► Three molybdate-spiked soils were equilibrated for 6 and 11 months outdoors. ► Mo chronic toxicity to earthworms, enchytraeids, Collembola and four plant species was assessed. ► Mo concentrations in all soils decreased due to leaching. ► Based on actual total Mo remaining in the soil, Mo toxicity decreased by a median factor of 5.5. ► Decreased Mo toxicity was due to leaching as well as slow ageing reactions. - Natural attenuation under field conditions is more related to leaching of excess molybdate than to slow ageing reactions

  15. Tensile properties of interwoven hemp/PET (Polyethylene Terephthalate) epoxy hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M. A. A.; Majid, M. S. A.; Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Firdaus, A. Z. A.; Amin, N. A. M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the experimental investigation of the tensile properties of interwoven Hemp/PET hybrid composites. The effect of hybridization of hemp (warp) with PET fibres (weft) on tensile properties was of interest. Hemp and PET fibres were selected as the reinforcing material while epoxy resin was chosen as the matrix. The interwoven Hemp/PET fabric was used to produce hybrid composite using a vacuum infusion process. The tensile test was conducted using Universal Testing Machine in accordance to the ASTM D638. The tensile properties of the interwoven Hemp/PET hybrid composite were then compared with the neat woven hemp/epoxy composite. The results show that the strength of hemp/PET with the warp direction was increased by 8% compared to the neat woven hemp composite. This enhancement of tensile strength was due to the improved interlocking structure of interwoven Hemp/PET hybrid fabric.

  16. High yield expression and purification of equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 (ENT7) from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Christopher; Arutyunova, Elena; Syed, Maria; Traub, Michaela; Möhlmann, Torsten; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-09-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) facilitate the import of nucleosides and their analogs into cells in a bidirectional, non-concentrative manner. However, in contrast to their name, most characterized plant ENTs act in a concentrative manner. A direct characterization of any ENT protein has been hindered due to difficulties in overexpression and obtaining pure recombinant protein. The equilibrative nucleoside transporter 7 from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtENT7) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess mechanism of substrate uptake. Recombinant protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in Pichia pastoris to characterize its oligomeric state by gel filtration and substrate binding by microscale thermophoresis (MST). AtENT7 expressed in X. laevis oocytes works as a classic equilibrative transporter. The expression of AtENT7-eGFP in the P. pastoris system yielded milligram amounts of pure protein that exists as stable homodimers. The concentration dependent binding of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides to the purified recombinant protein, assessed by MST, confirmed that AtENT7-eGFP is properly folded. For the first time the binding of nucleobases was observed for AtENT7. The availability of pure recombinant AtENT7 will permit detailed kinetic and structural studies of this unique member of the ENT family and, given the functional similarity to mammalian ENTs, will serve as a good model for understanding the structural basis of translocation mechanism for the family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Fermi level equilibration between colloidal lead and silver particles in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henglein, A.; Holzwarth, A.; Mulvaney, P.

    1992-01-01

    Colloidal solutions of lead and silver were mixed under the exclusion of air. The equilibration of the Fermi levels in the two different types of metal particles took place over a few days at room temperature. The equilibration took place by the transfer of lead atoms from lead to silver particles until the latter carried a lead mantle of one to two monolayers. This could be concluded from the observed changes in the optical spectrum of the silver particles. The results are discussed in terms of two mechanisms: (1) Pb atom transfer following heterocoagulation of the lead and silver particles and (2) electron transfer during Brownian encounters, followed by Pb 2+ desorption from the lead particles and subsequent Pb 2+ reductor on the silver particles carrying the transferred electrons. Traces of methylviologen, MV 2+ , in the solution drastically increase the rate of equilibration; this is explained by a relay mechanism in which electrons in the lead particles are first picked up by MV 2+ and are then transferred from MV + to the silver particles. 2 refs., 4 figs

  18. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during increased permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The initial equilibration of 125 I-labelled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw heel skin of anesthetized rabbits. Bradykinin (0.3 μg/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery. A second group of rabbits served as control. Following bradykinin, prenodal popliteal lymph flow was 4 times control flow. The lymph-to-plasma concentration ratios for total protein and albumin were, respectively, 60% and 50% larger than control. Tissue albumin concentration was twice control. After reaching a steady, elevated lymph flow, tracer albumin was infused to maintain plasma activity constant for 3 hrs. The plasma volume in tissue samples was measured using 131 I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity was 3 times greater than control. In the control group, plasma albumin equilibrated more rapidly with lymph than with tissue (p < 0.05). Following bradykinin, extravascular specific activity was 4 times control, resulting in lymph and tissue equilibrating with plasma at similar rates. Thus, increasing capillary permeability causes the extravascular albumin mass to behave as if distributed in a single compartment

  19. Relative rates of albumin equilibration in the skin interstitium and lymph during vasodilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.R.; Wallace, J.R.; Bell, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    The initial equilibration of 125 I-labeled albumin between the vascular and extravascular compartments was studied in hindpaw skin of 6 anesthetized rabbits. Papavarine (200 ug/min) was infused into a small branch of the femoral artery of one limb with the contralateral limb as a control. There was a 1.2-fold increase in lymph flow (p 131 I-labeled albumin injected 10 min before ending the experiment. Endogenous albumin was measured in plasma, lymph, and tissue samples using rocket electroimmunoassay. After 3 hrs of tracer infusion, lymph specific activity relative to plasma was significantly greater in the vasodilated hindlimb (0.30 +/- 0.07 vs 0.13 +/- 0.05; mean +/- SE; p < 0.01). Extravascular specific activity relative to plasma was greater in the vasodilated limb (0.13 +/- 0.02 vs 0.09 +/- 0.02; p < 0.05). Thus, vasodilation increased the rates at which lymph and tissue equilibrate with plasma. Also, the difference between lymph and tissue equilibration was greater in the vasodilated hindlimb

  20. LOAD EQUILIBRATION OF WORKING PLACES ARRANGED ON CONVEYORS USED FOR FOOTWEAR UPPERS MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARNAGEA Florentina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper there is presented how to achieve a load equilibration of workstations for a conveyor with imposed pace, in the case of manufacturing uppers for a women boots model. Equilibration of work charging is done by switching worker’s operations in order to use at full time each worker placed in the technological flow process. In the manufacruring process of shoe uppers of the considered model, there have been established the operative time and production rates per operation. Thus there has been calculated the work necessary amount Nci for accomplishing different production rates: Q=600,650, 700, 750... 900pairs/ 8 h and the necessary amount of work Nai was adopted. A technology line of manufacturing a footwear item is used at its optimum capacity when the number of work vacancy is minimum, 0.013 corresponding to a flow production of 700pairs / 8h the highest labor productivity being obtained, ie 17.5 pairs / worker • 8h. By equilibrating the work charge for each operation, it is obtained, for a daily production of 700pairs / 8h, a reduction of the number of workspaces from 40 to 36 workers and hence a labor productivity of 19.44 pairs / worker • 8h.

  1. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  2. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  3. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Healthy Pets Healthy People : CDC website with helpful resources and information on health benefits of pets and disease risks Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles ...

  4. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  5. Thermal and tensile properties of alumina filled PET nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, Pravin N.; Deshpande, Vineeta D.

    2018-05-01

    In the present investigation, nanocomposites of poly(ethylene terephathalate)(PET) with different content (0 to 5 wt.%) of alumina nanoparticles (n-Al2O3) were prepared by melt-extrusion technique. Morphological characterization of samples was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Morphological analysis revealed that degree of dispersion of alumina nanoparticles (ANPs) was increased at lower content (i.e. upto 2 wt.%), which observed by TEM. Thermal and tensile measurements were carried out using and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and universal testing machine (UTM). The thermal analysis showed that the glass transition termperature (Tg), melting temperature (Tm), crystallization temperature (Tc) of PET/alumina nanocomposites (PNCs) were higher than neat PET (PET0). The heat enthalpy (ΔHm) of crystallization for PNCs was increased compared to PET0, which indicates that degree of crystallinity of PNCs also increased compared to PET0. The half-time (t0.5) of crystallization of PNCs were decreased compared to PET0 which indicates that the incorporation of ANPs nucleate the PET molecular chains and allowing the easily crystallization during nonisothermal process. The tensile analysis revealed that the tensile elastic modulus (i.e. Young's modulus) of PNCs increased almost linearly with increasing the content of ANPs while tensile elongation at break decreased nonlinearly. The tensile strength of PNCs increased with a 1 wt.% of ANPs whereas the higher content of ANPs decreased the tensile strength.

  6. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  7. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.......The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants...... critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how...

  8. Breast cancer detection using high-resolution breast PET compared to whole-body PET or PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinyak, Judith E. [Naviscan Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Berg, Wendie A. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Schilling, Kathy [Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Madsen, Kathleen S. [Certus International, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Narayanan, Deepa [Naviscan Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Tartar, Marie [Scripps Clinic, Scripps Green Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To compare the performance characteristics of positron emission mammography (PEM) with those of whole-body PET (WBPET) and PET/CT in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. A total of 178 women consented to PEM for presurgical planning in an IRB-approved protocol and also underwent either WBPET (n = 69) or PET/CT (n = 109) imaging, as per usual care at three centers. Tumor detection sensitivity, positive predictive values, and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were compared between the modalities. The effects of tumor size, type, and grade on detection were examined. The chi-squared or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare distributions between groups, and McNemar's test was used to compare distributions for paired data within subject groups, i.e. PEM versus WBPET or PEM versus PET/CT. The mean age of the women was 59 ± 12 years (median 60 years, range 26-89 years), with a mean invasive index tumor size of 1.6 ± 0.8 cm (median 1.5 cm, range 0.5-4.0 cm). PEM detected more index tumors (61/66, 92 %) than WBPET (37/66, 56 %; p < 0.001) or PET/CT (95/109, 87 % vs. 104/109, 95 % for PEM; p < 0.029). Sensitivity for the detection of additional ipsilateral malignancies was also greater with PEM (7/15, 47 %) than with WBPET (1/15, 6.7 %; p = 0.014) or PET/CT (3/23, 13 % vs. 13/23, 57 % for PEM; p = 0.003). Index tumor detection decreased with decreasing invasive tumor size for both WBPET (p = 0.002) and PET/CT (p < 0.001); PEM was not significantly affected (p = 0.20). FDG uptake, quantified in terms of maximum PEM uptake value, was lowest in ductal carcinoma in situ (median 1.5, range 0.7-3.0) and invasive lobular carcinoma (median 1.5, range 0.7-3.4), and highest in grade III invasive ductal carcinoma (median 3.1, range 1.4-12.9). PEM was more sensitive than either WBPET or PET/CT in showing index and additional ipsilateral breast tumors and remained highly sensitive for tumors smaller than 1 cm. (orig.)

  9. Diagnostic value of [18F] FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huojun; Xing, Wei; Kang, Qinqin; Chen, Chao; Wang, Linhui; Lu, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    An early diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer is crucial for early treatment and management. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer with meta-analysis. The PubMed and CNKI databases were searched for the eligible studies published up to June 01, 2014. The sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer were pooled along with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Ten studies met our inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer in meta-analysis were as follows: a pooled sensitivity, 0.82 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 0.88); a pooled specificity, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.87 to 0.95); positive likelihood ratio, 6.80 (95 % CI, 4.31 to 10.74); negative likelihood ratio, 0.27 (95 % CI, 0.19 to 0.36); and diagnostic odds ratio, 25.18 (95 % CI, 17.58 to 70.4). The results indicate that 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT are relatively high sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer.

  10. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  11. Neural correlates of cognitive dysfunction in Lewy body diseases and tauopathies: combined assessment with FDG-PET and the CERAD test battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Frings, Lars; Bormann, Tobias; Kreft, Annabelle; Amtage, Florian; Spehl, Timo S; Weiller, Cornelius; Tüscher, Oliver; Meyer, Philipp T

    2013-11-01

    We investigated disease-specific cognitive profiles and their neural correlates in Lewy-body diseases (LBD) and tauopathies by CERAD assessment and FDG-PET. Analyses revealed a significant interaction between reduced semantic fluency in tauopathies and impaired verbal learning in LBD. Semantic fluency discriminated between groups with high accuracy (83%). Compared to LBD, tauopathy patients showed bilateral hypometabolism of midbrain, thalamus, middle cingulate gyrus and supplementary motor/premotor cortex. In the reverse contrast, LBD patients exhibited bilateral hypometabolism in posterior parietal cortex, precuneus and inferior temporal gyrus extending into occipital and frontal cortices. In diagnosis-independent voxel-based analyses, verbal learning/memory correlated with left temporal and right parietal metabolism, while fluency was coupled to bilateral striatal and frontal metabolism. Naming correlated with left frontal metabolism and drawing with metabolism in bilateral temporal and left frontal regions. In line with disease-specific patterns of regional glucose metabolism, tauopathies and LBD show distinct cognitive profiles, which may assist clinical differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A rapidly equilibrating, thin film, passive water sampler for organic contaminants; characterization and field testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St George, Tiffany; Vlahos, Penny; Harner, Tom; Helm, Paul; Wilford, Bryony

    2011-02-01

    Improving methods for assessing the spatial and temporal resolution of organic compound concentrations in marine environments is important to the sustainable management of our coastal systems. Here we evaluate the use of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) as a candidate polymer for thin-film passive sampling in waters of marine environments. Log K(EVA-W) partition coefficients correlate well (r(2) = 0.87) with Log K(OW) values for selected pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) where Log K(EVA-W) = 1.04 Log K(OW) + 0.22. EVA is a suitable polymer for passive sampling due to both its high affinity for organic compounds and its ease of coating at sub-micron film thicknesses on various substrates. Twelve-day field deployments were effective in detecting target compounds with good precision making EVA a potential multi-media fugacity meter. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. PET imaging of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common place and often chronic. Most inflammatory cells have increased uptake of glucose which is enhanced in the presence of local cytokines. Therefore, imaging glucose metabolism by the means of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) holds significant promise in imaging focal inflammation. Most of the work published involved small series of patients with either vasculitis, sarcoid or rheumatoid arthritis. It would appear that FDG PET is a simple and effective technique to identify inflammatory tissue in these conditions. There is even some work to suggest that by comparing baseline and early post therapy scans clinical outcome can be predicted. This would appear to be true with vasculitis as well as retroperitoneal fibrosis. The number of patients in each study is small but the evidence is compelling enough to recommend FDG PET imaging in the routine care of these patients.

  14. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  15. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  16. Novel PET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.R.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of novel molecular sensors that utilize the phenomena of Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). PET design can be incorporated into molecules to allow them to selectively bind certain guest molecules. PET works by the modulation of electron potentials within a molecule. Binding events between a host and guest can, if designed suitably, change these potentials enough to cause a transfer of electronic charge within the molecular sensor. This event can be accurately and sensitively monitored by the use of ultra violet or fluorescence spectroscopy. A sensor molecule can be constructed by matching the guest to a suitable receptor site and incorporating this into a molecule containing a fluorophore with the correct electron potential characteristics. By using existing synthetic routes as well as exploiting new pathways these sensor molecules C n be constructed to contain a fluorophore separated from a guest receptor(s) by suitable spacers units. When put together these facets go to creating molecules that by design are sensitive and selective for certain guest molecules or functional groups. This methodology allows the synthetic chemist to rationally design and synthesise PET sensors, tailored to the needs of the guest. In this thesis the synthesis and evaluation of a novel PET sensors for D-glucosamine, disaccharides and fluoride is presented. It is believed that the novel sensors using the PET phenomenon presented in this thesis are a worthwhile extension of previous works undertaken by other groups around the world and shows new pathways to increasingly complex and sophisticated sensor molecular design. (author)

  17. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  18. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  19. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Hernández, Trinitat; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo; Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del; Roselló Ferrando, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ("1"8F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good performance

  20. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  1. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiping Shao; Cherry, Simon R.; Meadors, Ken; Siegel, Stefan; Silverman, Robert W.; Farahani, Keyvan; Marsden, Paul K.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a prototype PET detector which is compatible with a clinical MRI system to provide simultaneous PET and MR imaging. This single-slice PET system consists of 48 2x2x10mm 3 LSO crystals in a 38 mm diameter ring configuration that can be placed inside the receiver coil of the MRI system, coupled to three multi-channel photomultipliers housed outside the main magnetic field via 4 m long and 2 mm diameter optical fibres. The PET system exhibits 2 mm spatial resolution, 41% energy resolution at 511 keV and 20 ns timing resolution. Simultaneous PET and MR phantom images were successfully acquired. (author)

  2. Self-consolidating concretes containing waste PET bottles as sand replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Faisal Sheikh; Azmi, Nurul Bazilah; Mazenan, Puteri Natasya; Shahidan, Shahiron; Othman, Nor hazurina; Guntor, Nickholas Anting Anak

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluates the effect of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) containing waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) granules on the fresh, mechanical and water absorption properties. Fine aggregates were replaced from 0% to 8% by PET granules. The fresh properties of SCC containing PET granules were determined using slump flow and V-funnel flow time tests. The compressive and splitting tensile strength were evaluated. The results indicated that utilization of waste PET granules in production of SCC could be an effective way for recycling purpose. The maximum amount of PET replacement should be limited to 5%. Exceeding 5% of PET content may result in an increase of V-funnel flow time to overpass the limiting value, decrease in strength. The production of high performance SCC containing 5% PET granules satisfies all the requirements for SCC with satisfactory outputs.

  3. Validation of a simultaneous PET/MR system model for PET simulation using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, Florian; Fayad, Hadi; Bert, Julien; Schmidt, Holger; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous PET/MR acquisition shows promise in a range of applications. Simulation using GATE is an essential tool that allows obtaining the ground truth for such acquisitions and therefore helping in the development and the validation of innovative processing methods such as PET image reconstruction, attenuation correction and motion correction. The purpose of this work is to validate the GATE simulation of the Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MR system. A model of the Siemens Biograph mMR was developed. This model includes the geometry and spatial positioning of the crystals inside the scanner and the characteristics of the detection process. The accuracy of the model was tested by comparing, on a real physical phantom study, GATE simulated results to reconstructed PET images using measured results obtained from a Siemens Biograph mMR system. The same parameters such as the acquisition time and phantom position inside the scanner were fixed for our simulations. List-mode outputs were recovered in both cases and reconstructed using the OPL-EM algorithm. Several parameters were used to compare the two reconstructed images such as profile comparison, signal-to-noise ratio and activity contrast analysis. Finally patient acquired MR images were segmented and used for the simulation of corresponding PET images. The simulated and acquired sets of reconstructed phantom images showed close emission values in regions of interest with relative differences lower than 5%. The scatter fraction was within a <3% agreement. Close matching of profiles and contrast indices were obtained between simulated and corresponding acquired PET images. Our results indicate that the GATE developed Biograph mMR model is accurate in comparison to the real scanner performance and can be used for evaluating innovative processing methods for applications in clinical PET/MR protocols.

  4. The promise and limits of PET texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Ming; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic heterogeneity is a recognized characteristic of malignant tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) texture analysis evaluated intratumoral heterogeneity in the uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose. There were recent evidences that PET textural features were of prognostic significance in patients with different solid tumors. Unfortunately, there are still crucial standardization challenges to transform PET texture parameters from their current use as research tools into the arena of validated technologies for use in oncology practice. Testing its generalizability, robustness, consistency, and limitations is necessary before implementing it in daily patient care.

  5. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  6. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  7. I Love Petting Zoos!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-23

    This Kidtastics podcast helps children learn about how to stay safe and healthy when visiting petting zoos and other animal exhibits.  Created: 3/23/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/23/2010.

  8. PET's indsats under lup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peer Henrik

    2006-01-01

    En undersøgelseskommission nedsat i 1999. Fem medlemmer skal undersøge PET's efterretningsvirksomhed i forhold til politiske partier, faglige konflikter og politisk ideologiske bevægelser i Danmark under den kolde krig. Kommissionens rapport forventes færdig næste år. Udgivelsesdato: 2. juli 2006...

  9. Choosing a Pet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    THE capital boasts countless markets of all kinds,but some of its insect,bird and pet markets immortalize Beijing culture and folkloric traditions.Don’t miss it! The Huasheng Tianqiao Market,south of the famous Panjiayuan Antique Market, was moved a few years ago and rebuilt in the

  10. PET CT and lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about Tc and lymphomas. Classification and clinical cases of various cancer such as gastro duodenal or ulcer, mama, medullary, lymph and neck, leukemia, nodular sclerosis. Metabolic information, anatomical nature of lymphoma and its clinical presentation determine the extent that PET should be used in the patient.

  11. Test-retest reproducibility of dopamine D{sub 2/3} receptor binding in human brain measured by PET with [{sup 11}C]MNPA and [{sup 11}C]raclopride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaka, Fumitoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Neuroimaging Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Hiroshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Neuroimaging Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Biophysics Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Kimura, Yasuyuki; Fujie, Saori; Takano, Harumasa; Fujiwara, Hironobu; Sasaki, Takeshi; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Neuroimaging Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Nakayama, Kazuhiko [Jikei University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Dopamine D{sub 2/3} receptors (D{sub 2/3}Rs) have two affinity states for endogenous dopamine, referred to as high-affinity state (D{sub 2/3} {sup HIGH}), which has a high affinity for endogenous dopamine, and low-affinity state (D{sub 2/3} {sup LOW}). The density of D{sub 2/3} {sup HIGH} can be measured with (R)-2-{sup 11}CH{sub 3}O-N-n-propylnorapomorphine ([{sup 11}C]MNPA), while total density of D{sub 2/3} {sup HIGH} and D{sub 2/3} {sup LOW} (D{sub 2/3}Rs) can be measured with [{sup 11}C]raclopride using positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, the ratio of the binding potential (BP) of [{sup 11}C]MNPA to that of [{sup 11}C]raclopride ([{sup 11}C]MNPA/[{sup 11}C]raclopride) may reflect the proportion of the density of D{sub 2/3} {sup HIGH} to that of D{sub 2/3}Rs. In the caudate and putamen, [{sup 11}C]MNPA/[{sup 11}C]raclopride reflects the proportion of the density of D{sub 2} {sup HIGH} to that of D{sub 2}Rs. To evaluate the reliability of the PET paradigm with [{sup 11}C]MNPA and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, we investigated the test-retest reproducibility of non-displaceable BP (BP{sub ND}) measured with [{sup 11}C]MNPA and of [{sup 11}C]MNPA/[{sup 11}C]raclopride in healthy humans. Eleven healthy male volunteers underwent two sets of PET studies on separate days that each included [{sup 11}C]MNPA and [{sup 11}C]raclopride scans. BP{sub ND} values in the caudate and putamen were calculated. Test-retest reproducibility of BP{sub ND} of [{sup 11}C]MNPA and [{sup 11}C]MNPA/[{sup 11}C]raclopride was assessed by intra-subject variability (absolute variability) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient: ICC). The absolute variability of [{sup 11}C]MNPA BP{sub ND} was 5.30 {+-} 3.96 % and 12.3 {+-} 7.95 % and the ICC values of [{sup 11}C]MNPA BP{sub ND} were 0.72 and 0.82 in the caudate and putamen, respectively. The absolute variability of [{sup 11}C]MNPA/[{sup 11}C]raclopride was 6.11 {+-} 3.68 % and 11.60 {+-} 5.70 % and the ICC values of [{sup

  12. DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells: distribution and rates of equilibration between nucleus and cytoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid nuclear isolation technique was adapted in order to examine the question of DNA precursor compartmentation in mammalian cells. By using this method a reproducible proportion of the cellular nucleotides remained associated with the isolated nuclei. Examination, at several different cell densities, of exponentially growing HeLa cells showed that the nuclei contained a constant but distinct proportion of each dNTP. The nuclear dATP and dTTP concentrations were equal at all densities examined even though the dTTP pool was 150% of the dATP whole-cell pool. The nuclear portion of the whole-cell pools was roughly equal to the volume occupied by the nucleus. The nuclear-cytoplasmic dNTP pool distribution did not change throughout the cell cycle of synchronized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rates at which either radiolabeled cytidine or deoxycytidine equilibrated with the nuclear and whole-cell dCTP pools of G1 and S phase CHO cells were compared. Experiments comparing the labeling kinetics of 3 H-thymidine in G1, S phase, and exponentially growing cells revealed that the S phase dTTP pool equilibrated with exogenously added thymidine faster than the G1 phase pool. The rate of equilibration in exponentially growing cells appeared to be a combination of that seen in G1 and S phases. A linear rate of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into DNA occurred at the same rate in S phase and exponentially growing cells

  13. Continuous high-frequency dissolved O2/Ar measurements by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Nicolas; Barnett, Bruce A; Bender, Michael L; Kaiser, Jan; Hamme, Roberta C; Tilbrook, Bronte

    2009-03-01

    The oxygen (O(2)) concentration in the surface ocean is influenced by biological and physical processes. With concurrent measurements of argon (Ar), which has similar solubility properties as oxygen, we can remove the physical contribution to O(2) supersaturation and determine the biological oxygen supersaturation. Biological O(2) supersaturation in the surface ocean reflects the net metabolic balance between photosynthesis and respiration, i.e., the net community productivity (NCP). We present a new method for continuous shipboard measurements of O(2)/Ar by equilibrator inlet mass spectrometry (EIMS). From these measurements and an appropriate gas exchange parametrization, NCP can be estimated at high spatial and temporal resolution. In the EIMS configuration, seawater from the ship's continuous intake flows through a cartridge enclosing a gas-permeable microporous membrane contactor. Gases in the headspace of the cartridge equilibrate with dissolved gases in the flowing seawater. A fused-silica capillary continuously samples headspace gases, and the O(2)/Ar ratio is measured by mass spectrometry. The ion current measurements on the mass spectrometer reflect the partial pressures of dissolved gases in the water flowing through the equilibrator. Calibration of the O(2)/Ar ion current ratio (32/40) is performed automatically every 2 h by sampling ambient air through a second capillary. A conceptual model demonstrates that the ratio of gases reaching the mass spectrometer is dependent on several parameters, such as the differences in molecular diffusivities and solubilities of the gases. Laboratory experiments and field observations performed by EIMS are discussed. We also present preliminary evidence that other gas measurements, such as N(2)/Ar and pCO(2) measurements, may potentially be performed with EIMS. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the EIMS with the previously described membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) approach.

  14. Impact of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption behaviour in some selected saline sodic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Q.U.; HAN; Khan, M.J.; Rehman, S.; Khan, S.U.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of equilibrating time on phosphate adsorption and desorption on saline sodic soils a study was carried using three soil series from Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan) district, namely Zindani, Tikken and Gishkori. These soils are alkaline calcareous in nature with greater Electrical Conductivity (EC) and Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR) values which classify them as saline sodic soils. The equilibrating time for the adsorption study was 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 48 and 72 hours for two levels (5 mg L/sup -1/ and 100 mg L/sup -1/). For desorption study 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours after 24 hours for low and high dilution. Adsorption and desorption isotherms of phosphate were developed for these soils. The Gishkori soil showed the greatest rate of adsorption as compared with the other two soils. Applying Langmuir and Freundlich models to P adsorption data revealed that Freundlich equation (R2 = 0.99) showed a better fit over the Langmuir equation (R2 =0. 97) in the three soils. The desorption curves varied similarly from each other. The amount of P adsorbed was different from that released back to the soil solution. The amount of adsorption increased with the time. Statistical analysis showed that the rate of adsorption for both 5 and 100 mg P L/sup -1/ was significantly different at P<0.05 at 16 and 20 hours and at P<0.01 beyond 20 hours. However, the rate of desorption was not significantly influenced by the equilibrating time as compared with the theoretical values of the three series. As the P - desorption curve did not coincide the P - adsorption curve, hence the availability of P to plant was adversely affected on its application. (author)

  15. Equilibration and analysis of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, William; Gygi, François

    2018-03-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations based on density functional theory are becoming increasingly popular for the description of liquids. In view of the high computational cost of these simulations, the choice of an appropriate equilibration protocol is critical. We assess two methods of estimation of equilibration times using a large dataset of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations of water. The Gelman-Rubin potential scale reduction factor [A. Gelman and D. B. Rubin, Stat. Sci. 7, 457 (1992)] and the marginal standard error rule heuristic proposed by White [Simulation 69, 323 (1997)] are evaluated on a set of 32 independent 64-molecule simulations of 58 ps each, amounting to a combined cumulative time of 1.85 ns. The availability of multiple independent simulations also allows for an estimation of the variance of averaged quantities, both within MD runs and between runs. We analyze atomic trajectories, focusing on correlations of the Kohn-Sham energy, pair correlation functions, number of hydrogen bonds, and diffusion coefficient. The observed variability across samples provides a measure of the uncertainty associated with these quantities, thus facilitating meaningful comparisons of different approximations used in the simulations. We find that the computed diffusion coefficient and average number of hydrogen bonds are affected by a significant uncertainty in spite of the large size of the dataset used. A comparison with classical simulations using the TIP4P/2005 model confirms that the variability of the diffusivity is also observed after long equilibration times. Complete atomic trajectories and simulation output files are available online for further analysis.

  16. Reduction by metals dissolved in liquid ammonia of keto steroids. Equilibration of the alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giroud, A.M.

    1970-01-01

    Reducing a ketone by dissolved metals involves two electrons; we may consider as intermediate a radical-anion, then a di-anion or a carbo-anion. The radical-anion may also split and give pinacols away. In order to discuss the reduction proceeds, we had to know the respective stabilities of the alcohols, which lead us to effectuate equilibration. The first chapter is devoted to the method of preparing the androstanone-II and the androstanols-IIα and II-β. We further establish the impossibility of using our methods for reaching a conclusion about the alcohols relative stability by experimental equilibration. Last we describe the methods for reducing the ketone by alkaline and earth-alkaline metals, dissolved in liquid ammonia, either in contact with a protons donor or with a later added protons donor. The resulting mixture of the two alcohols shows a prevailing quantity of the stable equatorial isomer α. In a second chapter, we study the action of selenic acid and hydroperoxide on cholestanone-3, which leads us to study the preparation and stereochemistry of the A-nor cholestane derivates. We further describe the preparation of the A-nor cholestanols-2α and 2β, and the corresponding acetates. Equilibration of the alcohols by chemical methods shows the 2 α-alcohol more stable than the 2β, which is mathematically confirmed. Last, the reduction of the A-nor cholestanone-2 by dissolved metals consistently leads to the less stable 2 β epimer, with associated pinacols. The third chapter is devoted to the study of the androstanone-17 reductions, and the relative stabilities of the 17α and 17β alcohols. Whichever operating methods is used, we predominantly obtain the more stable 17β alcohol. In all cases, a pinacol production is observed. Summing up, we note that, in all cases, we predominantly obtain the equatorial epimer, whether it should be the more stable or the less stable. (author) [fr

  17. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Application of health insurance of [15O]oxygen PET and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji

    2009-01-01

    As regards the application required for health insurance of PET, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare indicates the following procedures: first, request a permission to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the clinical use of the automatic synthetic instrument for PET drug, approved according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. Second, put into practice the use of PET test, under the highly advanced medicine premises. Then, in case of gathered positive results, the health insurance is approved for this PET test. Thus, following the above mentioned procedures, first, the use of [ 15 O] oxygen PET was approved in April 1996. Second, the use of [ 18 F]FDG-PET was approved in 12 different diseases: epilepsy, ischemic heart disease and 10 different types of cancer, in April 2002. Third, in April 2006, a additional 3 types of cancer were approved. Now, we are in the process to get the health insurance of all kinds of malignant tumors (cancer and sarcoma) except for the early gastric cancer. (author)

  18. Centrifugal Separation and Equilibration Dynamics in an Electron-Antiproton Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Hayden, M. E.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; So, C.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Humphries, A. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Cesar, C. L.; Friesen, T.

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  19. THE IMPACT OF SYSTEM OF BUDGET EQUILIBRATION ON MACROECONOMIC INDEXES OF RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Peshina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical regulations of basic conceptions of budget equilibration are considered in the article and the position of budget deficit/proficit in a system of socioeconomics relations is grounded. Estimation of control mechanism of budget deficit and proficit in the system of socioeconomics relations was conducted. This estimation confirmed an analysis inference about large discontinuity and fragmentation, that is outboard, first of all in respect of strategy of financial policy, sum-total of using, at present, principles, methods and regulations of budgetary management. The article contains a description of basic directions of budgetary policy about optimization of budget deficit/proficit in Russian Federation.

  20. Centrifugal separation and equilibration dynamics in an electron-antiproton plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Charges in cold, multiple-species, non-neutral plasmas separate radially by mass, forming centrifugally-separated states. Here, we report the first detailed measurements of such states in an electron-antiproton plasma, and the first observations of the separation dynamics in any centrifugally-separated system. While the observed equilibrium states are expected and in agreement with theory, the equilibration time is approximately constant over a wide range of parameters, a surprising and as yet unexplained result. Electron-antiproton plasmas play a crucial role in antihydrogen trapping experiments.

  1. Depiction and characterization of liver lesions in whole body [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.beiderwellen@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt, E-mail: Benedikt.gomez@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian, E-mail: Christian.buchbender@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Dusseldorf, 40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Hartung, Verena, E-mail: Verena.hartung@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten D., E-mail: Thorsten.Poeppel@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Nensa, Felix, E-mail: felix.nensa@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Kuehl, Hilmar, E-mail: Hilmar.Kuehl@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.bockisch@uk-essen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany); Lauenstein, Thomas C., E-mail: Thomas.Lauenstein@uk-essen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]-FDG using a whole body protocol for the depiction and characterization of liver lesions in comparison to PET/CT. Methods: 70 patients (31 women, 39 men) with solid tumors underwent [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/CT and followed by an additional PET/MRI using an integrated scanner. Two readers rated the datasets (PET/CT; PET/MRI) regarding conspicuity of hepatic lesions (4-point ordinal scale) and diagnostic confidence (5-point ordinal scale). Median scores for lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Prior examinations, histopathology and clinical follow-up (116 ± 54 days) served as standard of reference. Results: 36 of 70 (51%) patients showed liver lesions. Using PET/CT and PET/MRI all patients with liver metastases could correctly be identified. A total of 97 lesions were found (malignant n = 26; benign n = 71). For lesion conspicuity significantly higher scores were obtained for PET/MRI in comparison to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Significantly better performance for diagnostic confidence was observed in PET/MRI, both for malignant as for benign lesions (p < 0.001). Conclusions: PET/MRI, even in the setting of a whole body approach, provides higher lesion conspicuity and diagnostic confidence compared to PET/CT and may therefore evolve as an attractive alternative in oncologic imaging.

  2. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5 pts (range: 12-32% increase in max D and 12-39% increase in SUV) and RT-CT detected PD in 3 pts (11-21% increase in max D, paired t test: p = 0.19). Stage-PET detected 28 mediastinal/hilar nodal sites. RT-PET detected PD in 11 of these lesions in 4 pts (31%) and CT detected similar progression in 8 lesions in 2 pts. RT-PET detected 10 new lesions in 3 pts (23%) resulting in upstaging to N3 in 2 pts (supraclavicular and hilar nodes) and M1 in 1 pt (bone). Conclusion: A dedicated RT PET-CT has the potential to detect disease progression and impact on RT planning in a large number of patients.

  3. [18F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Umutlu, Lale; Ruhlmann, Verena; Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye; Heusch, Philipp; Kraff, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  4. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  5. Pet birds II. Complementary diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beregi, A.; Molnar, V.; Felkai, F.; Biro, F.

    1997-01-01

    Microscopical examinations are useful in detecting bacteria from droppings and body fluids. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests are also used to perform antimicrobial therapy. Parasitological examinations can also be done on pet birds. Hematological examinations are not very common because of the difficulties in determining the normal serum values that might vary by species and sexes. The vena cutanea ulnaris is the best vein for drawing blood from a pet bird but nail clipping for this purpose is also widely used. The most common and basic complementary examination method is radiology. Birds can be radiographed without anesthesia. Ventrodorsal and latero-lateral pictures are required. The right positioning and setting the adequate values is the most important. Contrast radiographs can also be made on birds. Endoscopy is widely used for sex determination but also can be used for the examination of abdominal organs. Ultrasound examination of pet birds is not a common method because of the difficulties provided by the air sacs. ECG is not a widely used method either because of the high heart beat frequency of birds. Other methods such as necropsy, cytological, histological and toxicological examinations can also be performed on pet birds

  6. Influence of the clay in the stress cracking resistance of PET; Influencia de silicatos em camadas na resistencia ao 'stress cracking' do PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, Edvania T. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Silva, Emanuela S.; Silva, Suedina M.L.; Rabello, Marcelo S., E-mail: marcelo@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The environmental stress cracking resistance in PET and hybrid PET/clay were conducted under stress relaxation test. X-ray diffraction analysis show that was obtained immiscible system. In the absence of aggressive fluids the hybrid exhibited higher relaxation rates than the PET. Already in contact with aggressive fluids showed a similar or lower relaxation rate than the PET, being more resistant. Suggesting that the clay, though not interlayer, interferes with the distribution of the stress cracking agent. Thus, the barrier effect caused by the clay was more significant than the stress concentration caused by it. (author)

  7. Staging performance of whole-body DWI, PET/CT and PET/MRI in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Daye, Dania; Signore, Alberto; Iannace, Carlo; Vangel, Mark; Luongo, Angelo; Catalano, Marco; Filomena, Mazzeo; Mansi, Luigi; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Fuin, Niccolo; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI), whole-body positron emission tomography with computed tomography (WB-PET/CT), and whole-body positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance imaging (WB-PET/MRI) in staging patients with untreated invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Fifty-one women with newly diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast underwent WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI before treatment. A radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician reviewed in consensus the images from the three modalities and searched for occurrence, number and location of metastases. Final staging, according to each technique, was compared. Pathology and imaging follow-up were used as the reference. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI correctly and concordantly staged 33/51 patients: stage IIA in 7 patients, stage IIB in 8 patients, stage IIIC in 4 patients and stage IV in 14 patients. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI incorrectly and concordantly staged 1/51 patient as stage IV instead of IIIA. Discordant staging was reported in 17/51 patients. WB-PET/MRI resulted in improved staging when compared to WB-PET/CT (50 correctly staged on WB-PET/MRI vs. 38 correctly staged on WB-PET/CT; McNemar's test; p<0.01). Comparing the performance of WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI (43 correct) did not reveal a statistically significant difference (McNemar test, p=0.14). WB-PET/MRI is more accurate in the initial staging of breast cancer than WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT, however, the discrepancies between WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI were not statistically significant. When available, WB-PET/MRI should be considered for staging patient with invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

  8. Quantitative assessment of human and pet exposure to Salmonella associated with dry pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Ford, Randall M; Baker, Robert C; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-04

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet foods and treats highlight the importance of these foods as previously overlooked exposure vehicles for both pets and humans. In the last decade efforts have been made to raise the safety of this class of products, for instance by upgrading production equipment, cleaning protocols, and finished product testing. However, no comprehensive or quantitative risk profile is available for pet foods, thus limiting the ability to establish safety standards and assess the effectiveness of current and proposed Salmonella control measures. This study sought to develop an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative microbial exposure assessment model to: 1) estimate pet and human exposure to Salmonella via dry pet food, and 2) assess the impact of industry and household-level mitigation strategies on exposure. Data on prevalence and concentration of Salmonella in pet food ingredients, production process parameters, bacterial ecology, and contact transfer in the household were obtained through literature review, industry data, and targeted research. A probabilistic Monte Carlo modeling framework was developed to simulate the production process and basic household exposure routes. Under the range of assumptions adopted in this model, human exposure due to handling pet food is null to minimal if contamination occurs exclusively before extrusion. Exposure increases considerably if recontamination occurs post-extrusion during coating with fat, although mean ingested doses remain modest even at high fat contamination levels, due to the low percent of fat in the finished product. Exposure is highly variable, with the distribution of doses ingested by adult pet owners spanning 3Log CFU per exposure event. Child exposure due to ingestion of 1g of pet food leads to significantly higher doses than adult doses associated with handling the food. Recontamination after extrusion and coating, e.g., via dust or equipment surfaces, may also lead to

  9. PET or PET-CT with cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    At present, cancer screening remains a lot of debate in contemporary medical practice. Many constitutes have done a lot of experiments in cancer screening. The same version is that recommendations and decisions regarding cancer screening should be based on reliable data, not self- approbation. Now, some institutes advocate 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET-CT for cancer screening, here, discussed status quo, potential financial, radiation safety and statistical data in 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET- CT cancer screening. (authors)

  10. (18)F-FDG PET-CT simulation for non-small-cell lung cancer: effect in patients already staged by PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Gerard G; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J; Stewart, David P; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H; Young, V A Linda; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV(CT) to GTV(FUSED) was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  11. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, Lino M.; Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale; Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald; Lahner, Harald; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p < 0.001) and did not differ significantly (p = 0.35) between the modalities. Overall conspicuity and NET lesion conspicuity were higher on PET/MRI (both p < 0.01). Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. (orig.)

  12. Detection of relevant colonic neoplasms with PET/CT: promising accuracy with minimal CT dose and a standardised PET cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luboldt, Wolfgang [Multiorgan Screening Foundation, Frankfurt (Germany); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Volker, Teresa; Zoephel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Joerg [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Wiedemann, Baerbel [University Hospital Dresden, Institute of Medical Informatics and Biometrics, Dresden (Germany); Wehrmann, Ursula [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Policlinic of Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Koch, Arne; Abolmaali, Nasreddin [University Hospital Dresden, Oncoray, Dresden (Germany); Toussaint, Todd; Luboldt, Hans-Joachim [Multiorgan Screening Foundation, Frankfurt (Germany); Middendorp, Markus; Gruenwald, Frank [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Frankfurt (Germany); Aust, Daniela [University Hospital Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    To determine the performance of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of relevant colorectal neoplasms (adenomas {>=}10 mm, with high-grade dysplasia, cancer) in relation to CT dose and contrast administration and to find a PET cut-off. 84 patients, who underwent PET/CT and colonoscopy (n=79)/sigmoidoscopy (n=5) for (79 x 6+5 x 2)=484 colonic segments, were included in a retrospective study. The accuracy of low-dose PET/CT in detecting mass-positive segments was evaluated by ROC analysis by two blinded independent reviewers relative to contrast-enhanced PET/CT. On a per-lesion basis characteristic PET values were tested as cut-offs. Low-dose PET/CT and contrast-enhanced PET/CT provide similar accuracies (area under the curve for the average ROC ratings 0.925 vs. 0.929, respectively). PET demonstrated all carcinomas (n=23) and 83% (30/36) of relevant adenomas. In all carcinomas and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (n=10) the SUV{sub max} was {>=}5. This cut-off resulted in a better per-segment sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) than the average PET/CT reviews (sensitivity: 89% vs. 82%; NPV: 99% vs. 98%). All other tested cut-offs were inferior to the SUV{sub max}. FDG-PET/CT provides promising accuracy for colorectal mass detection. Low dose and lack of iodine contrast in the CT component do not impact the accuracy. The PET cut-off SUV{sub max}{>=} 5 improves the accuracy. (orig.)

  13. 18F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV CT to GTV FUSED was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  14. Detection of relevant colonic neoplasms with PET/CT: promising accuracy with minimal CT dose and a standardised PET cut-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luboldt, Wolfgang; Volker, Teresa; Zoephel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wiedemann, Baerbel; Wehrmann, Ursula; Koch, Arne; Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Toussaint, Todd; Luboldt, Hans-Joachim; Middendorp, Markus; Gruenwald, Frank; Aust, Daniela; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the performance of FDG-PET/CT in the detection of relevant colorectal neoplasms (adenomas ≥10 mm, with high-grade dysplasia, cancer) in relation to CT dose and contrast administration and to find a PET cut-off. 84 patients, who underwent PET/CT and colonoscopy (n=79)/sigmoidoscopy (n=5) for (79 x 6+5 x 2)=484 colonic segments, were included in a retrospective study. The accuracy of low-dose PET/CT in detecting mass-positive segments was evaluated by ROC analysis by two blinded independent reviewers relative to contrast-enhanced PET/CT. On a per-lesion basis characteristic PET values were tested as cut-offs. Low-dose PET/CT and contrast-enhanced PET/CT provide similar accuracies (area under the curve for the average ROC ratings 0.925 vs. 0.929, respectively). PET demonstrated all carcinomas (n=23) and 83% (30/36) of relevant adenomas. In all carcinomas and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (n=10) the SUV max was ≥5. This cut-off resulted in a better per-segment sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) than the average PET/CT reviews (sensitivity: 89% vs. 82%; NPV: 99% vs. 98%). All other tested cut-offs were inferior to the SUV max . FDG-PET/CT provides promising accuracy for colorectal mass detection. Low dose and lack of iodine contrast in the CT component do not impact the accuracy. The PET cut-off SUV max ≥ 5 improves the accuracy. (orig.)

  15. Equilibration in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach probed with the Wigner distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebl, N.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2011-01-01

    By calculating the Wigner distribution function in the reaction plane, we are able to probe the phase-space behavior in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock scheme during a heavy-ion collision in a consistent framework. Various expectation values of operators are calculated by evaluating the corresponding integrals over the Wigner function. In this approach, it is straightforward to define and analyze quantities even locally. We compare the Wigner distribution function with the smoothed Husimi distribution function. Different reaction scenarios are presented by analyzing central and noncentral 16 O + 16 O and 96 Zr + 132 Sn collisions. Although we observe strong dissipation in the time evolution of global observables, there is no evidence for complete equilibration in the local analysis of the Wigner function. Because the initial phase-space volumes of the fragments barely merge and mean values of the observables are conserved in fusion reactions over thousands of fm/c, we conclude that the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method provides a good description of the early stage of a heavy-ion collision but does not provide a mechanism to change the phase-space structure in a dramatic way necessary to obtain complete equilibration.

  16. Equilibration in the reaction of 175 and 252 MeV 20Ne with 197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, J.B.

    1978-06-01

    The highly inelastic nuclear reaction of 197 Au with 20 Ne at 175 and 252 MeV laboratory energies is studied. Energy-, elemental-, and angular- distributions for atomic numbers 5 to 30 (175 MeV) or 34 (252 MeV) are presented. The means and widths of the kinetic energy spectra for detected elements are compared with a theoretical calculation. The calculation postulates thermalization of the incident projectile kinetic energy, and includes one sha(e-vibrational degree of freedom and rigid rotation of the reaction complex. The effect of particle evaporation is considered. Good agreement of the expurimental mean energies with the theory is obtained. Poorer agreement of the kinetic energy widths with the theory may be due to a low-temperature quantal effect. The relative elemental yields are analyzed for their degree of equilibration, based on a model of diffusive nucleon exchange as described by the master equation. A similar degree of equilibration is observed for both reaction energies. The absolute elemental yields are reproduced qualitatively by employing an advanced diffusion code, coupled with calculation of the subsequent fission of heavy reaction products, including the compound nucleus. The angular distributions are analyzed with a simple model, to estimate the reaction lifetime of selected elements

  17. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N. Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L.; Latour, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  18. Read the Label First: Protect Your Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the importance of reading pet products labels before purchasing and using any product to insure the safety of your pets. Find tips for ways to reduce the changes of pets accessing potentially dangerous products.

  19. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  20. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ( 18 F-F-DOPA) and for ( 11 C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  1. PET studies in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik and Max-Planck-Inst. fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ({sup 18}F-F-DOPA) and for ({sup 11}C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs.

  2. Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Coate; Brian Knight

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of pet overpopulation. It develops a tractable dynamic model whose positive predictions square well with key features of the current U.S. market for pets. The model is used to understand, from a welfare economic perspective, the sense in which there is \\overpopulation" of pets and the underlying causes of the problem. The paper also employs the model to consider what policies might be implemented to deal with the problem. A calibrated example is developed to i...

  3. Click synthesis of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mei; Kuang Chunxiang

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on synthesis radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). The recent years witnessed applications of click chemistry to PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis,because of its distinctive advantages including high speed,yield and stereospecificity under mild conditions. Synthesis of 18 F-labeled and 11 C-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and intermediates via click chemistry are reviewed. The future trend of click chemistry for the synthesis of PET radiopharmaceutical is prospected. (authors)

  4. Detector Position Estimation for PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-06-11

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  5. Detector position estimation for PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  6. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 307-312

  7. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 307-312

  8. Hybrid MR-PET of brain tumours using amino acid PET and chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, N A; Lohmann, P; Fairney, J; Magill, A W; Oros Peusquens, A-M; Choi, C-H; Stirnberg, R; Stoffels, G; Galldiks, N; Golay, X; Langen, K-J; Jon Shah, N

    2018-06-01

    PET using radiolabelled amino acids has become a promising tool in the diagnostics of gliomas and brain metastasis. Current research is focused on the evaluation of amide proton transfer (APT) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MR imaging for brain tumour imaging. In this hybrid MR-PET study, brain tumours were compared using 3D data derived from APT-CEST MRI and amino acid PET using O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET). Eight patients with gliomas were investigated simultaneously with 18 F-FET PET and APT-CEST MRI using a 3-T MR-BrainPET scanner. CEST imaging was based on a steady-state approach using a B 1 average power of 1μT. B 0 field inhomogeneities were corrected a Prametric images of magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (MTR asym ) and differences to the extrapolated semi-solid magnetisation transfer reference method, APT# and nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE#), were calculated. Statistical analysis of the tumour-to-brain ratio of the CEST data was performed against PET data using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. A tumour-to-brain ratio derived from APT# and 18 F-FET presented no significant differences, and no correlation was found between APT# and 18 F-FET PET data. The distance between local hot spot APT# and 18 F-FET were different (average 20 ± 13 mm, range 4-45 mm). For the first time, CEST images were compared with 18 F-FET in a simultaneous MR-PET measurement. Imaging findings derived from 18 F-FET PET and APT CEST MRI seem to provide different biological information. The validation of these imaging findings by histological confirmation is necessary, ideally using stereotactic biopsy.

  9. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  10. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  11. Development of UV absorbing PET through Electron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Na Eun; Lim, Hyung San; Park, Yang Jeong; Cho, Sung Oh

    2017-01-01

    Experiment to increase UV absorbance through electron beam irradiation on PET was performed. Moreover, surface hardness and roughness of each sample were observed to find the key factor increasing UV absorbance. PET sheets were irradiated with an electron beam at various fluences. The irradiated samples, as well as pristine sample, were subjected to UV-visible spectral study(UV-Vis), pencil hardness test, and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) experiment. In this study, PET samples irradiated at several conditions were analyzed through various measurements. UV absorbance-another meaning of transmittance in this study- of irradiated PET sample increased compared with pristine sample as fluence was increased in UV-Visible spectroscopy experiment.

  12. PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver mass biopsies and ablations: Targeting accuracy of a single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyn, P.B.; Tatli, S.; Sahni, V.A.; Sadow, C.A.; Forgione, K.; Mauri, G.; Morrison, P.R.; Catalano, P.J.; Silverman, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether a single 20 s breath-hold positron-emission tomography (PET) acquisition obtained during combined PET/computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous liver biopsy or ablation procedures has the potential to target 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-avid liver masses as accurately as up to 180 s breath-hold PET acquisitions. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 10 adult patients with 13 liver masses who underwent FDG PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies (n = 5) or ablations (n = 5). PET was acquired as nine sequential 20 s, monitored, same-level breath-hold frames and CT was acquired in one monitored breath-hold. Twenty, 40, 60, and 180 s PET datasets were reconstructed. Two blinded readers marked tumour centres on randomized PET and CT datasets. Three-dimensional spatial localization differences between PET datasets and either 180 s PET or CT were analysed using multiple regression analyses. Statistical tests were two-sided and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Targeting differences between 20 s PET and 180 s PET ranged from 0.7–20.3 mm (mean 5.3 ± 4.4 mm; median 4.3) and were not statistically different from 40 or 60 s PET (p = 0.74 and 0.91, respectively). Targeting differences between 20 s PET and CT ranged from 1.4–36 mm (mean 9.6 ± 7.1 mm; median 8.2 mm) and were not statistically different from 40, 60, or 180 s PET (p = 0.84, 0.77, and 0.35, respectively). Conclusion: Single 20 s breath-hold PET acquisitions from PET/CT-guided percutaneous liver procedures have the potential to target FDG-avid liver masses with equivalent accuracy to 180 s summed, breath-hold PET acquisitions and may facilitate strategies that improve image registration and shorten procedure times

  13. Development of a PET Insert for simultaneously small animal PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yingjie; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Daowu; Liu, Shuangquan; Wang, Peilin; Feng, Baotong; Chai, Pei; Wei, Long [Division of Nuclear Technology and Applications, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Radiographic Techniques and Equipment, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2015-05-18

    PET/MR is a new multi-modality imaging system which provide both structural and functional information with good soft tissue imaging ability and no ionizing radiation. In recent years, PET/MR is under major progress because of the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The goal of this study is to develop a MRI compatible PET insert based on SiPM and LYSO scintillator. The PET system was constituted by the detector ring, electronics and software. The detector ring consists of 16 detector module. The inner diameter of the ring was 151 mm, the external diameter was 216 mm, which was big enough for small animal research, e.g. rat, rabbit and tupaia. The sensor of each module was 2*2 SensL SPMArraySL, coupled with an array of 14 x 14 LYSO crystals, each crystal measuring 2 mm x 2 mm 10 mm. The detector was encapsulated in a copper box for light and magnetic shielding. Resister charge multiplexing circuit was used in the front end electronics. Each detector output 8X and 8Y position signals. One summed timing signal was extracted from the common cathode of all 64 channels. All these signals were transmitted to digital electronic board by a 3 m long coaxial cable from inside of the MR to the outside. Each digital electronic board handled 8 detector modules based on FPGA to obtain the timing, position and energy information of a single event. And then these single events were sent to the coincidence processing board to produce coincidence packets which are prepared for further processing. A 0.2mCi 68Ge line source was used to do the preliminary imaging test. The image was reconstructed by 3D-OSEM algorithm. The initial result proved the system to be feasible as a PET. FDG phantom imaging and simultaneous PET/MR imaging are in progress.

  14. Adhesion of nitrile rubber (NBR) to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric. Part 1: PET surface modification by methylenediphenyl di-isocyanate (MDI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Glutaric anhydride peroxide (GAP) was grafted on PET surface by UV irradiation method. Then MDI was attached to GAP on PET surface. • The fabric was vulcanized by nitrile rubber. • Peet test was performed after each stage of surface modification. • Curing temperature was increased and the tests were repeated. • Effect of MDI coating on PET without carboxylation was evaluated. Effect of vulcanizing temperature on this product was also studied. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber composite industry. It is well known that surface physical, mechanical and chemical treatments are effective methods to improve interfacial bonding. Ultra violet (UV) light irradiation is an efficient method which is used to increase interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabric was used to increase its bonding to nitrile rubber (NBR). NBR is perfect selection to produce fuel and oil resistant rubber parts but it has weak bonding to fabrics. For this purpose at first, the PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was reacted and grafted to carboxylated PET. T-peel test was used to evaluate PET fabric to NBR bonding strength. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-AT) was used to assess surface modifications of the PET fabrics. The chemical composition of the PET surfaces before and after carboxylation and MDI grafting was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that at vulcanizing temperature of 150 °C, carboxylation in contrary to MDI grafting, improved considerably PET to NBR adhesion. Finally effect of curing temperature on PET to NBR bonding strength was determined. It was found that increasing vulcanizing temperature to 170 °C caused considerable improvement (about 134%) in bonding strength.

  15. Evaluating radon loss from water during storage in standard PET, bio-based PET, and PLA bottles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchetti, Carlo; De Simone, Gabriele; Galli, Gianfranco; Tuccimei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polylactic acid (PLA) bottles were tested to evaluate radon loss from water during 15 days of storage. PET bottles (lower surface/volume-ratio vials) lost 0.4–7.1% of initial radon, whereas PLA bottles lost 3.7% of it. PET bottles with volume of 0.5 L, lower surface/weight ratio, and hence higher thickness display proportionally reduced radon loss. Corrections for dissolved radium are needed during analyses. Formulas for calculating degassing efficiency and water interference on electrostatic collections are developed. - Highlights: • Radon loss from water during storage in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polylactic acid (PLA) bottles was evaluated. • Surface/volume ratio and thickness of plastic materials were studied. • A correction for dissolved radium concentration was applied to estimate gas loss. • Proper corrections for degassing efficiency of aerators were developed. • The interference of H 2 O on radon daughter electrostatic collection was quantified.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  17. The value of 18-FDG PET in the diagnosis of tumours associated with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyngkaran, Guru; Chatterton, Barry; Schultz, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Several studies have shown the value of PET in diagnosing occult tumours in patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). Objective: To audit our experience with PET in the diagnosis of occult tumours in PNS. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all PET and PET/CT scans done for PNS in South Australia from the time the PET/CT was installed (2002) till September 2008. Results of antibody tests, imaging, final diagnosis and outcome were obtained with a mean follow up of 8I9 days. Results: 24 patients (15 women), mean age 62 (range 36-80) were included. The mean interval between symptom onset and PET was 19 days (range 3-29). There were a variety of PNS including subacute sensory neuropathy, cerebellar syndrome. encephalitis, Lambert Eaton myasthenic syndrome, myopathy, transverese myelitis and subacute global neurological deterioration. Abnormal FDG uptake was seen in eight but malignancy was only confirmed in 2 patients. One patient died shortly after PET/CT likely because of lung malignancy. There were 5 false positives. At follow up 14 had no formal diagnosis, 4 had autoimmune illness and in 3 the diagnosis of PNS was revised. The sensitivity was 100%, specificity 76%, positive predictive value 37.5% and negative predictive value 100%. Conclusion: PET was positive in only 12.5% of these patients. When the 3 patients without PNS are excluded the diagnostic yield of PET is 43%. PET is a useful tool in PNS but patient selection is important.

  18. Applying Amide Proton Transfer MR Imaging to Hybrid Brain PET/MR: Concordance with Gadolinium Enhancement and Added Value to [18F]FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongzan; Xin, Jun; Zhou, Jinyuan; Lu, Zaiming; Guo, Qiyong

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic concordance and metric correlations of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F-]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), using hybrid brain PET/MRI. Twenty-one subjects underwent brain gadolinium-enhanced [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI prospectively. Imaging accuracy was compared between unenhanced MRI, MRI with enhancement, APT-weighted (APTW) images, and PET based on six diagnostic criteria. Among tumors, the McNemar test was further used for concordance assessment between gadolinium-enhanced imaging, APT imaging, and [ 18 F]FDG PET. As well, the relation of metrics between APT imaging and PET was analyzed by the Pearson correlation analysis. APT imaging and gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed superior and similar diagnostic accuracy. APTW signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement were concordant in 19 tumors (100 %), while high [ 18 F]FDG avidity was shown in only 12 (63.2 %). For the metrics from APT imaging and PET, there was significant correlation for 13 hypermetabolic tumors (P PET in the evaluation of tumor metabolic activity during brain PET/MR studies.

  19. An Austrian framework for PET quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoletti, R.; Dobrozemsky, G.; Minear, G.; Bergmann, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The European patient protection directive (97/43 EURATOM) requires regular routine quality control (QC) of PET imaging devices. Since no standards were available covering this area and in order to comply with the directive a joint working party of the Austrian societies of nuclear medicine and of medical physics have developed a set of procedures suitable for both dedicated PET scanners and gamma cameras operating in coincidence mode (GCPET). The routine procedures proposed include both manufacturer recommended procedures and tests for specific parameters and calibration procedures. Wherever possible, procedures adapted or derived from NEMA standards publication NU 2-2001 were used to permit direct comparison with specified parameters of image quality. For dedicated PET scanners the most important procedures are the checking of detector sensitivities and the attenuation calibration scan. With full ring scanners the attenuation calibration scan is a blank scan, with partial ring devices a special attenuation calibration phantom has to be used. Test protocols are specific to manufacturer and scanner type. They are usually performed automatically overnight. In addition, some instruments require special calibrations, e.g. gain adjustments or coincidence timing calibration. GCPET procedures include the frequent assessment in coincidence mode of detector uniformity, energy resolution and system sensitivity. Common to both dedicated PET and GCPET are the regular quarterly assessment of tomographic spatial resolution and the calibration of the system for quantitative measurements. As a total performance test for both systems assessment of image quality following NU 2-2001 was included, to be carried out after major system changes or repairs. The suite of QC procedures was tested on several dedicated PET and GCPET systems including all major manufacturers' systems. Due to missing hardware or software not all tests could be performed on all systems. Some of the

  20. Hybrid PET/MRI insert: B0 field optimization by applying active and passive shimming on PET detector level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehner, Jakob [Department of Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Weissler, Bjoern [Philips Research Europe, Aachen (Germany); Schulz, Volkmar [Department of Physics of Molecular Imaging Systems, Institute for Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Combining PET and MRI into a hybrid device is challenging since both systems might influence each other. A typical interference problem of such a combined device is the distortion of the MRI’s B{sub 0} field distribution due to the material brought inside the MRI’s FOV which is in particular challenging for small-bore PET-systems. High field homogeneity is needed for a good MRI acquisition in general as well as in certain applications. Typically, active shimming using dedicated coils is applied to improve the field homogeneity. However, these techniques are limited especially for localized distortion profiles with higher-order characteristics caused by PET/MRI inserts. As a consequence, we are exploring the potential application of shimming on PET detector level (for the Hyperion-II{sup D} PET/MRI insert), meaning that the distortion profile caused by PET modules is compensated using additional magnetic materials (passive shimming) and DC coils (active shimming). To explore the technique, B{sub 0} field measurements have been performed using a whole-body phantom in combination with the MRI body coil. An FFE sequence was used to measure distortion maps of DC loops and small magnetic objects (capacitors, ferrites). These distortion maps served as input for a software framework which has been written to perform the field optimization. The implementation was verified by measurements and fits were performed to extract characteristic parameters of the tested objects. Finally, the implemented software framework was used to homogenize a measured distortion map produced by a single PET module by superimposing distortion corrections from additional simulated materials. The resulting superimposed distortion map showed a significantly improved B{sub 0} field map quality (reduced spectral width and improved homogeneity). The simulated susceptibility distribution will be applied on PET module level and tested in experiments. Results and details about this study will be

  1. Automatic delineation of brain regions on MRI and PET images from the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne D; Jørgensen, Louise M; Keller, Sune H; Andersen, Flemming L; Petersen, Ida N; Knudsen, Gitte M; Svarer, Claus

    2018-01-15

    The increasing use of the pig as a research model in neuroimaging requires standardized processing tools. For example, extraction of regional dynamic time series from brain PET images requires parcellation procedures that benefit from being automated. Manual inter-modality spatial normalization to a MRI atlas is operator-dependent, time-consuming, and can be inaccurate with lack of cortical radiotracer binding or skull uptake. A parcellated PET template that allows for automatic spatial normalization to PET images of any radiotracer. MRI and [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET scans obtained in sixteen pigs made the basis for the atlas. The high resolution MRI scans allowed for creation of an accurately averaged MRI template. By aligning the within-subject PET scans to their MRI counterparts, an averaged PET template was created in the same space. We developed an automatic procedure for spatial normalization of the averaged PET template to new PET images and hereby facilitated transfer of the atlas regional parcellation. Evaluation of the automatic spatial normalization procedure found the median voxel displacement to be 0.22±0.08mm using the MRI template with individual MRI images and 0.92±0.26mm using the PET template with individual [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET images. We tested the automatic procedure by assessing eleven PET radiotracers with different kinetics and spatial distributions by using perfusion-weighted images of early PET time frames. We here present an automatic procedure for accurate and reproducible spatial normalization and parcellation of pig PET images of any radiotracer with reasonable blood-brain barrier penetration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Usefulness of a breath-holding acquisition method in PET/CT for pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Toshiaki; Ueda, Osamu; Hara, Hideyuki; Sakai, Hiroto; Kida, Tohru; Suzuki, Kayo; Adachi, Shuji; Ishii, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a breath-holding (BH) 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) technique for PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning of pulmonary lesions near the diaphragm, where image quality is influenced by respiratory motion. In a basic study, simulated breath-holding PET (sBH-PET) data were acquired by repeating image acquisition eight times with fixation of a phantom at 15 s/bed. Free-breathing PET (FB-PET) was simulated by acquiring data even as moving the phantom at 120 s/bed (sFB-PET). Images with total acquisition times of 15 s, 30 s, 45 s, 60 s, and 120 s were generated for sBH-PET. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses and determination of the statistical significance of differences between sFB-PET images and sBH-PET images were performed. A total of 22 pulmonary lesions in 21 patients (12 men and 9 women, mean age 61.3±10.6 years, 10 benign lesions in 9 patients and 12 malignant lesions in 12 patients) were examined by FB-PET and BH-PET). For evaluation of these two acquisition methods, displacement of the lesion between CT and PET was considered to be a translation, and the statistical significance of differences in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of the lesion was assessed using the paired t test. In the basic study, sBH-PET images with acquisition times of 45 s, 60 s, and 120 s had significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than 120-s sFB-PET images (P max of the lesions in the BH-PET images was significantly higher than that in the FB-PET images (benign: 2.40±0.86 vs. 2.20±0.85, P=0.005; malignant: 4.84±2.16 vs. 3.75±2.11, P=0.001). BH-PET provides images with better diagnostic accuracy, avoids image degradation owing to respiratory motion, and yields more accurate attenuation correction. This method is very useful for overcoming the problem of respiratory motion. (author)

  3. Progress on dedicated animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, as the leading technology providing molecular imaging of biological processes, is widely used on living laboratory animals. High-resolution dedicated animal PET scanners have been developed. Although the dedicated animal PET faces obstacles and challenges, this advanced technology would play an important role in molecular biomedicine researches, such as diseases study, medicine development, and gene therapy

  4. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  5. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing

  6. Implementation and application of simulation platform of PET based on GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Shixun; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for obtaining functional image in vivo and GATE is a dedicated software for PET/SPECT simulation based on Mentor Carlo Method. It encapsulates the Geant4 libraries to achieve a modular and provides a number of new characteristics. In practice, a simulation platform of PET has been builded employing GATE based on Ubuntu operating system, including many keys and skills in the process. We have exploited benchmark PET, a testing example in GATE, and implemented PET scanner simulation in the end. Through analyzing the simulation data, the result demonstrate that predictive goal has been reached. The work provides the foundation for investigating PET scanner and optimizing the algorithm of tomograph image reconstruction. (authors)

  7. Selected PET radiomic features remain the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Tsuyoshi, Hideaki; Kanno, Masafumi; Yamada, Shizuka; Kobayashi, Masato; Narita, Norihiko; Kimura, Hirohiko; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Yoshio; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2018-04-17

    We investigated whether PET radiomic features are affected by differences in the scanner, scan protocol, and lesion location using 18 F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR scans. SUV, TMR, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and homogeneity strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. SUVs were significantly higher on PET/MR 0-2 min and PET/MR 0-10 min than on PET/CT in gynecological cancer ( p = 0.008 and 0.008, respectively), whereas no significant difference was observed between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. TMRs on PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min increased in this order in gynecological cancer and oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. In contrast to conventional and histogram indices, 4 textural features (entropy, homogeneity, SRE, and LRE) were not significantly different between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images. 18 F-FDG PET radiomic features strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. Dixon-based attenuation correction on PET/MR images underestimated tumor tracer uptake more significantly in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer than in gynecological cancer. 18 F-FDG PET textural features were affected less by differences in the scanner and scan protocol than conventional and histogram features, possibly due to the resampling process using a medium bin width. Eight patients with gynecological cancer and 7 with oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer underwent a whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and regional PET/MR scan in one day. PET/MR scans were performed for 10 minutes in the list mode, and PET/CT and 0-2 min and 0-10 min PET/MR images were reconstructed. The standardized uptake value (SUV), tumor-to-muscle SUV ratio (TMR), skewness, kurtosis, entropy, homogeneity, short-run emphasis (SRE), and long-run emphasis (LRE) were compared between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images.

  8. A neural-network potential through charge equilibration for WS2: From clusters to sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Roohollah; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Hashemifar, S. Javad; Akbarzadeh, Hadi

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, we use a machine learning method to construct a high-dimensional potential for tungsten disulfide using a charge equilibration neural-network technique. A training set of stoichiometric WS2 clusters is prepared in the framework of density functional theory. After training the neural-network potential, the reliability and transferability of the potential are verified by performing a crystal structure search on bulk phases of WS2 and by plotting energy-area curves of two different monolayers. Then, we use the potential to investigate various triangular nano-clusters and nanotubes of WS2. In the case of nano-structures, we argue that 2H atomic configurations with sulfur rich edges are thermodynamically more stable than the other investigated configurations. We also studied a number of WS2 nanotubes which revealed that 1T tubes with armchair chirality exhibit lower bending stiffness.

  9. Correlations in plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium; Les correlations dans un plasma en equilibre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    This paper treats of a fully, ionized plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium. An attempt is made at reviewing the calculation of spatial correlations in such a plasma. The equation of recurrence and the principle of superposition are used. The linear approximation is first treated. The next higher approximation is studied in the case of a neutral homogeneous and isotropic plasma. (author) [French] Un plasma completement ionise est en equilibre thermodynamique. On tente une mise au point du calcul des correlations de position dans ce plasma. On utilise les equations de recurrence et le principe de superposition. On expose d'abord l'approximation lineaire. Dans le cas d'un plasma neutre homogene et isotrope l'etude est poursuivie a l'approximation suivante. (auteur)

  10. Unusual equilibration of a particle in a potential with a thermal wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Deepak; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Kundu, Anupam; Dhar, Abhishek

    2017-11-01

    We consider a particle in a one-dimensional box of length L, with a Maxwell bath at one end and a reflecting wall at the other end. Using a renewal approach, as well as directly solving the master equation, we show that the system exhibits a slow power law relaxation, with a logarithmic correction, towards the final equilibrium state. We extend the renewal approach to a class of confining potentials of the form U(x) \\propto x^α , x>0 , where we find that the relaxation is ∼ t-(α+2)/(α-2) for α >2 , with a logarithmic correction when (α+2)/(α-2) is an integer. For α <2 the relaxation is exponential. Interestingly for α=2 (harmonic potential) the localised bath cannot equilibrate the particle.

  11. Universality in the equilibration of quantum systems after a small quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    A sudden change in the Hamiltonian parameter drives a quantum system out of equilibrium. For a finite-size system, expectations of observables start fluctuating in time without converging to a precise limit. A new equilibrium state emerges only in the probabilistic sense, when the probability distribution for the observable expectations over long times concentrates around their mean value. In this paper we study the full statistic of generic observables after a small quench. When the quench is performed around a regular (i.e., noncritical) point of the phase diagram, generic observables are expected to be characterized by Gaussian distribution functions ('good equilibration'). Instead, when quenching around a critical point a new, universal, double-peaked distribution function emerges for relevant perturbations. Our analytic predictions are numerically checked for a nonintegrable extension of the quantum Ising model.

  12. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Both brittle and ductile deformation can facilitate re-equilibration of mineral inclusions. The presence of inclusions also influences stress and strain distribution in the host. The processes governing feedbacks between brittle deformation, ductile deformation, and inclusion re-equilibration have been studied using unique microstructures in Permian meta-pegmatite garnets from the Koralpe, Eastern Alps, Austria. Sampled almandine-spessartine garnets contain highly abundant submicron-sized inclusions, which originated during or subsequent to magmatic garnet growth. The Permian magmatic assemblages were affected by eclogite facies metamorphism during the Cretaceous tectono-metamorphic event. The meta-pegmatite garnet deformed crystal-plastically at this metamorphic stage (Bestmann et al. 2008) and the host-inclusion system was affected by partial recrystallization. Trails of coarser inclusions (1-10µm diameter) crosscut the magmatic submicron inclusion density zoning in the garnet, defining curviplanar geometrical surfaces in 3D. In 10-40µm broad 'bleaching zones' flanking inclusion trails, the original ≤1µm sized inclusions are not seen in the optical microscope or SEM, however inclusions <100nm are still abundant in TEM foils from these areas. From their microstructural characteristics it is inferred that the trails formed at sites of healed brittle cracks. FEG-microprobe data showed that inclusion-trails and associated bleaching zones can be formed isochemically, although some trails showed non-isochemical coarsening. In both cases no change in garnet major element composition was observed. EBSD mapping revealed two phenomena that were investigated by cutting targeted TEM foils. Firstly, bleaching zones are associated with systematic very low angle (ca. 0.5°) garnet lattice orientation changes along discrete boundaries. TEM foils transecting such a boundary show a lower concentration of dislocations than expected for the lattice rotation inferred from EBSD

  13. Studies of the surface of titanium dioxide. IV. The hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, T.; Katsuta, K.; Miura, M.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of hydrogen with the surface of titanium dioxide has been studied in connection with the hydrogen-reduction mechanism of titanium dioxide, by means of such measurements as weight decrease, magnetic susceptibility, hydrogen uptake, and electrical conductance. It was postulated in the previous study that the rate-determining step of the hydrogen-reduction reaction may be the formation of surface hydroxyl groups, followed by the rapid removal of water molecules from the surface. In this study, the interactions between hydrogen and the surface of titanium dioxide were investigated by measuring the hydrogen-deuterium equilibration reaction, H 2 + D 2 = 2HD, at temperatures above 200 0 C on both surfaces before and after hydrogen reduction to compare the differences in the reactivities

  14. Influence of the clay in the stress cracking resistance of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, Edvania T.; Silva, Emanuela S.; Silva, Suedina M.L.; Rabello, Marcelo S.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental stress cracking resistance in PET and hybrid PET/clay were conducted under stress relaxation test. X-ray diffraction analysis show that was obtained immiscible system. In the absence of aggressive fluids the hybrid exhibited higher relaxation rates than the PET. Already in contact with aggressive fluids showed a similar or lower relaxation rate than the PET, being more resistant. Suggesting that the clay, though not interlayer, interferes with the distribution of the stress cracking agent. Thus, the barrier effect caused by the clay was more significant than the stress concentration caused by it. (author)

  15. NEMA NU 2-2012 performance studies for the SiPM-based ToF-PET component of the GE SIGNA PET/MR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Alexander M. [Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 and Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Deller, Timothy W.; Maramraju, Sri Harsha [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188-1678 (United States); Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi [GE Healthcare, Applied Science Lab, Menlo Park, California 94025-3493 (United States); Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare and University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich 8006 (Switzerland); Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The GE SIGNA PET/MR is a new whole body integrated time-of-flight (ToF)-PET/MR scanner from GE Healthcare. The system is capable of simultaneous PET and MR image acquisition with sub-400 ps coincidence time resolution. Simultaneous PET/MR holds great potential as a method of interrogating molecular, functional, and anatomical parameters in clinical disease in one study. Despite the complementary imaging capabilities of PET and MRI, their respective hardware tends to be incompatible due to mutual interference. In this work, the GE SIGNA PET/MR is evaluated in terms of PET performance and the potential effects of interference from MRI operation. Methods: The NEMA NU 2-2012 protocol was followed to measure PET performance parameters including spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, sensitivity, accuracy, and image quality. Each of these tests was performed both with the MR subsystem idle and with continuous MR pulsing for the duration of the PET data acquisition. Most measurements were repeated at three separate test sites where the system is installed. Results: The scanner has achieved an average of 4.4, 4.1, and 5.3 mm full width at half maximum radial, tangential, and axial spatial resolutions, respectively, at 1 cm from the transaxial FOV center. The peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) of 218 kcps and a scatter fraction of 43.6% are reached at an activity concentration of 17.8 kBq/ml. Sensitivity at the center position is 23.3 cps/kBq. The maximum relative slice count rate error below peak NECR was 3.3%, and the residual error from attenuation and scatter corrections was 3.6%. Continuous MR pulsing had either no effect or a minor effect on each measurement. Conclusions: Performance measurements of the ToF-PET whole body GE SIGNA PET/MR system indicate that it is a promising new simultaneous imaging platform.

  16. NEMA NU 2-2012 performance studies for the SiPM-based ToF-PET component of the GE SIGNA PET/MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Alexander M.; Deller, Timothy W.; Maramraju, Sri Harsha; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Delso, Gaspar; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The GE SIGNA PET/MR is a new whole body integrated time-of-flight (ToF)-PET/MR scanner from GE Healthcare. The system is capable of simultaneous PET and MR image acquisition with sub-400 ps coincidence time resolution. Simultaneous PET/MR holds great potential as a method of interrogating molecular, functional, and anatomical parameters in clinical disease in one study. Despite the complementary imaging capabilities of PET and MRI, their respective hardware tends to be incompatible due to mutual interference. In this work, the GE SIGNA PET/MR is evaluated in terms of PET performance and the potential effects of interference from MRI operation. Methods: The NEMA NU 2-2012 protocol was followed to measure PET performance parameters including spatial resolution, noise equivalent count rate, sensitivity, accuracy, and image quality. Each of these tests was performed both with the MR subsystem idle and with continuous MR pulsing for the duration of the PET data acquisition. Most measurements were repeated at three separate test sites where the system is installed. Results: The scanner has achieved an average of 4.4, 4.1, and 5.3 mm full width at half maximum radial, tangential, and axial spatial resolutions, respectively, at 1 cm from the transaxial FOV center. The peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) of 218 kcps and a scatter fraction of 43.6% are reached at an activity concentration of 17.8 kBq/ml. Sensitivity at the center position is 23.3 cps/kBq. The maximum relative slice count rate error below peak NECR was 3.3%, and the residual error from attenuation and scatter corrections was 3.6%. Continuous MR pulsing had either no effect or a minor effect on each measurement. Conclusions: Performance measurements of the ToF-PET whole body GE SIGNA PET/MR system indicate that it is a promising new simultaneous imaging platform.

  17. The value of [11C]-acetate PET and [18F]-FDG PET in hepatocellular carcinoma before and after treatment with transarterial chemoembolization and bevacizumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuren; Ubl, Philipp; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Rainer, Eva; Haug, Alexander; Hacker, Marcus; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Pinter, Matthias; Wang, Hao; Nanoff, Christian; Kaczirek, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study was to investigate the value of [ 11 C]-acetate PET and [ 18 F]-FDG PET in the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) before and after treatment with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody (bevacizumab). Twenty-two patients (three women, 19 men; 62 ± 8 years) with HCC verified by histopathology were treated with TACE and bevacizumab (n = 11) or placebo (n = 11). [ 11 C]-acetate PET and [ 18 F]-FDG PET were performed before and after TACE with bevacizumab or placebo. Comparisons between groups were performed with t-tests and Chi-squared tests, where appropriate. Overall survival (OS) was defined as the time from start of bevacizumab or placebo until the date of death/last follow-up, respectively. The patient-related sensitivity of [ 11 C]-acetate PET, [ 18 F]-FDG PET, and combined [ 11 C]-acetate and [ 18 F]-FDG PET was 68%, 45%, and 73%, respectively. There was a significantly higher rate of conversion from [ 11 C]-acetate positive lesions to negative lesions in patients treated with TACE and bevacizumab as compared with that in patients with TACE and placebo (p < 0.05). In patients with negative acetate PET, the mean OS in patients treated with TACE and bevacizumab was 259 ± 118 days and was markedly shorter as compared with that (668 ± 217 days) in patients treated with TACE and placebo (p < 0.05). In patients treated with TACE and placebo, there was significant difference in mean OS in patients with positive FDG PET as compared with that in patients with negative FDG PET (p < 0.05). The HCC lesions had different tracer avidities showing the heterogeneity of HCC. Our study suggests that combining [ 18 F]-FDG with [ 11 C]-acetate PET could be useful for the management of HCC patients and might also provide relevant prognostic and molecular heterogeneity information. (orig.)

  18. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  19. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D 2 receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D 1 receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D 2 receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [ 11 C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [ 11 C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D 2 receptors. [ 11 C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D 2 receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D 2 occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D 2 receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D 2 , dopamine D 1 receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT 2A receptors have been studied with [ 11 C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT 1A receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [ 11 C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly been developed, and serotonin transporters have recently begun to be

  20. Experimental studies of N/Z equilibration in peripheral collisions using fragment yield ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keksis, A. L.; May, L. W.; Kohley, Z.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.; Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Shetty, D. V.; Tripathi, R.; Li, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral collisions of 40 Ca and 48 Ca projectiles at 32 MeV/nucleon on 112 Sn and 124 Sn targets were studied in this work. The fragments of the projectile-like source (quasiprojectile) were collected with a charged-particle multidetector array. The average value of the neutron-to-proton ratio N/Z of the quasiprojectiles formed in the reactions was determined with two approaches. The first is a direct reconstruction approach using isotopically resolved fragments and is hindered by undetected neutrons leading to lower N/Z values. The second approach, based on the assumption of early fragment formation, employs yield ratios of fragment isobars and is not hindered by undetected neutrons. Using this approach, the amount of N/Z mixing that occurred in the quasiprojectiles (compared to a fully N/Z equilibrated system) was found to be approximately 53%. The experimental results were compared with model calculations. First, the phenomenological DIT (deep inelastic transfer) model was used, followed by the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). The results of these calculations are in close agreement with the data and indicate that the mean number of undetected neutrons increases with the N/Z of the composite system, accounting for the difference observed between the two approaches of quasiprojectile N/Z determination. Second, the microscopic transport model IBUU (isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck) was employed, providing preliminary results in reasonable agreement with the data. The determination of the degree of N/Z equilibration employing the present fragment yield ratio approach may provide a valuable probe to study the isospin part of the nuclear equation of state in conjunction with detailed microscopic models of the collisions in the Fermi energy regime.

  1. Cherenkov TOF PET with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenec, R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Pestotnik, R.

    2015-12-01

    As previously demonstrated, an excellent timing resolution below 100 ps FWHM is possible in time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET) if the detection method is based on the principle of detecting photons of Cherenkov light, produced in a suitable material and detected by microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCP PMTs). In this work, the silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were tested for the first time as the photodetectors in Cherenkov TOF PET. The high photon detection efficiency (PDE) of SiPMs led to a large improvement in detection efficiency. On the other hand, the time response of currently available SiPMs is not as good as that of MCP PMTs. The SiPM dark counts introduce a new source of random coincidences in Cherenkov method, which would be overwhelming with present SiPM technology at room temperature. When the apparatus was cooled, its performance significantly improved.

  2. The value of 18F-DOPA PET-CT in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma: comparison with 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Poecher, Sigrid; Vali, Reza; Nader, Michael; Langsteger, Werner; Waldenberger, Peter; Broinger, Gabriele; Kohlfuerst, Susanne; Pirich, Christian; Dralle, Henning

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to compare the value of DOPA PET-CT with FDG PET-CT in the detection of malignant lesions in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Twenty-six consecutive patients (10 men, 16 women, mean age 59 ± 14 years) with elevated calcitonin levels were evaluated in this prospective study. DOPA and FDG PET-CT modalities were performed within a maximum of 4 weeks (median 7 days) in all patients. The data were evaluated on a patient- and lesion-based analysis. The final diagnosis of positive PET lesions was based on histopathological findings and/or imaging follow-up studies (i.e., DOPA and/or FDG PET-CT) for at least 6 months (range 6-24 months). In 21 (21/26) patients at least one malignant lesion was detected by DOPA PET, while only 15 (15/26) patients showed abnormal FDG uptake. DOPA PET provided important additional information in the follow-up assessment in seven (27%) patients which changed the therapeutic management. The patient-based analysis of our data demonstrated a sensitivity of 81% for DOPA PET versus 58% for FDG PET, respectively. In four (4/26) postoperative patients DOPA and FDG PET-CT studies were negative in spite of elevated serum calcitonin and CEA levels as well as abnormal pentagastrin tests. Overall 59 pathological lesions with abnormal tracer uptake were seen on DOPA and/or FDG PET studies. In the final diagnosis 53 lesions proved to be malignant. DOPA PET correctly detected 94% (50/53) of malignant lesions, whereas only 62% (33/53) of malignant lesions were detected with FDG PET. DOPA PET-CT showed superior results to FDG PET-CT in the preoperative and follow-up assessment of MTC patients. Therefore, we recommend DOPA PET-CT as a one-stop diagnostic procedure to provide both functional and morphological data in order to select those patients who may benefit from (re-)operation with curative intent as well as guiding further surgical procedures. (orig.)

  3. A retrospective comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Frech, Andreas; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Url, Christoph; Widmann, Gerlig; Prommegger, Rupert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias

    2013-01-01

    18 F-Fluoro-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by 68 Ga-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18 F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 18 F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 18 F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100 % in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100 % and that of 18 F-DOPA PET was 56.0 %. Overall, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and 18 F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100 % (McNemar, P 18 F-DOPA PET was 71.1 % (McNemar, P max (mean ± SD) of all 32 concordant lesions was 67.9 ± 61.5 for 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 11.8 ± 7.9 for 18 F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET may be superior to 18 F-DOPA PET and diagnostic CT in providing valuable information for pretherapeutic staging of extra-adrenal PGL, particularly in surgically

  4. Locoregional tumour evaluation of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck area: a comparison between MRI, PET/CT and integrated PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruhlmann, Marcus; Ruhlmann, Verena [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Bergmann, Christoph [University Hospital Essen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Marburg (Germany); Forsting, Michael; Wetter, Axel [University Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging for locoregional tumour evaluation compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and MR imaging in initial tumour and recurrence diagnosis in histopathologically confirmed head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging were performed for initial tumour staging or recurrence diagnosis in 25 patients with HNSCC. MR, fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and fused {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR images were analysed by two independent readers in separate sessions in random order. In initial tumour staging, T and N staging was performed while individual lesions were analysed in patients with suspected cancer recurrence. In T and N staging, histopathological results after tumour resection served as the reference standard while histopathological sampling as well as cross-sectional and clinical follow-up were accepted in cancer recurrence diagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy of each modality was calculated separately for T and N staging as well as for tumour recurrence, and compared using McNemar's test. Values of p <0.017 were considered statistically significant after Bonferroni correction. In 12 patients undergoing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR for initial tumour staging, T staging was accurate in 50 % with MRI, in 59 % with PET/CT and in 75 % with PET/MR while N staging was accurate in 75 % with MRI, in 77 % with PET/CT and in 71 % with PET/MR in relation to the reference standard. No significant differences were observed in T and N staging among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In 13 patients undergoing hybrid imaging for cancer recurrence diagnosis, diagnostic accuracy was 57 % with MRI and in 72 % with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, respectively. Again, no significant differences were found among the three modalities (p > 0.017). In this initial study, no significant differences were found among {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR, {sup 18}F

  5. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-01-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test

  6. Functional neuroimaging in epilepsy: FDG-PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Finding epileptogenic zone is the most important step for the successful epilepsy surgery. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used in the localization of epileptogenic foci. In medial temporal lobe epilepsy, the diagnostic sensitivity of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT is excellent. However, detection of hippocampal sclerosis by MRI is so certain that use of FDG-PET and ictal SPECT in medial temporal lobe epilepsy is limited for some occasions. In neocortical epilepsy, the sensitivities of FDG-PET or ictal SPECT are fair. However, FDG-PET and ictal SPECT can have a crucial role in the localization of epileptogenic foci for non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. Interpretation of FDG-PET has been recently advanced by voxel-based analysis and automatic volume of interest analysis based on a population template. Both analytical methods can aid the objective diagnosis of epileptogenic foci. lctal SPECT was analyzed using subtraction methods and voxel-based analysis. Rapidity of injection of tracers, ictal EEG findings during injection of tracer, and repeated ictal SPECT were important technical issues of ictal SPECT. SPECT can also be used in the evaluation of validity of Wada test.

  7. Effective dose and cancer risk in PET/CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Gabriella M.; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de

    2013-01-01

    Due to the use of radiopharmaceutical positron-emitting in PET exam and realization of tomography by x-ray transmission in CT examination, an increase of dose with hybrid PET/CT technology is expected. However, differences of doses have been reported in many countries for the same type of procedure. It is expected that the dose is an influent parameter to standardize the protocols of PET/CT. This study aimed to estimate the effective doses and absorbed in 65 patients submitted to oncological Protocol in a nuclear medicine clinic in Rio de Janeiro, considering the risk of induction of cancer from the scan. The CT exam-related doses were estimated with a simulator of PMMA and simulated on the lmPACT resistance, which for program effective dose, were considered the weight factors of the lCRP 103. The PET exam doses were estimated by multiplying the activity administered to the patient with the ICRP dose 80 factors. The radiological risk for cancer incidence were estimated according to the ICRP 103. The results showed that the effective dose from CT exam is responsible for 70% of the effective total in a PET/CT scan. values of effective dose for the PET/CT exam reached average values of up to 25 mSv leading to a risk of 2, 57 x 10 -4 . Considering that in staging of oncological diseases at least four tests are performed annually, the total risk comes to 1,03x 10 -3

  8. Multicentre assessment and monitored use of [18F]FDG-PET in oncology: the Spanish experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Garrido, Manuel; Asensio-del-Barrio, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of [ 18 F]FDG-PET in oncological diseases and to assess its clinical utility and impact (on the clinical and therapeutic management of these patients). This health technology assessment was performed in Spain, using the monitored use (MU) procedure. A multicentre and prospective follow-up study was performed in a non-consecutive sample of oncological patients who were examined with PET and other conventional diagnostic tests. A protocol for this MU method (PET-MU protocol) was developed, including the three forms used to collect all the information. Enrolment of new patients began in June 2002 and continued until August 2004. A descriptive analysis and an evaluation of the diagnostic effectiveness of FDG-PET were performed. The study population comprised 2,824 oncological patients (the third form relating to follow-up was completed for only 967 of these patients) from 100 Spanish hospitals and 16 PET centres. Seventy-nine percent of cases met the clinical requirements of the PET-MU protocol. Global diagnostic parameters of PET performance and their 95% CI values were as follows: sensitivity 86% (82-89%), specificity 83% (79-86%), positive and negative predictive values 87% (83-90%) and 82% (77-85%) respectively, diagnostic accuracy 84% (82-87%) and diagnostic odds ratio 28.75 (19.75-41.84). PET detected unsuspected new lesions in 39% of patients and avoided other unnecessary diagnostic techniques and treatments in 69% of cases. In 88% of cases, PET was considered useful by the physicians who asked for the PET tests (it was deemed decisive in 30% and very useful in almost 37%). This PET-MU study has confirmed the high diagnostic effectiveness of FDG-PET for oncological indications and demonstrates that it has a great influence on the clinical and therapeutic management of patients. (orig.)

  9. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  10. AX-PET: A novel PET concept with G-APD readout

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, M; Casella, C; Chesi, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Fanti, V; Gillam, J E; Joram, C; Lustermann, W; Nappi, E; Oliver, J F; Pauss, F; Rafecas, M; Rudge, A; Ruotsalainen, U; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Stapnes, S; Tuna, U; Weilhammer, P

    2012-01-01

    The AX-PET collaboration has developed a novel concept for high resolution PET imaging to overcome some of the performance limitations of classical PET cameras, in particular the compromise between spatial resolution and sensitivity introduced by the parallax error. The detector consists of an arrangement of long LYSO scintillating crystals axially oriented around the field of view together with arrays of wave length shifter strips orthogonal to the crystals. This matrix allows a precise 3D measurement of the photon interaction point. This is valid both for photoelectric absorption at 511 key and for Compton scattering down to deposited energies of about 100 keV. Crystals and WLS strips are individually read out using Geiger-mode Avalanche Photo Diodes (G-APDs). The sensitivity of such a detector can be adjusted by changing the number of layers and the resolution is defined by the crystal and strip dimensions. Two AX-PET modules were built and fully characterized in dedicated test set-ups at CERN, with point-...

  11. Effect of filters and reconstruction algorithms on I-124 PET in Siemens Inveon PET scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Yu, A.; Kim, Jin Su

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the effects of filtering and reconstruction on Siemens I-124 PET data. Methods: A Siemens Inveon PET was used. Spatial resolution of I-124 was measured to a transverse offset of 50 mm from the center FBP, 2D ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM2D), 3D re-projection algorithm (3DRP), and maximum a posteriori (MAP) methods were tested. Non-uniformity (NU), recovery coefficient (RC), and spillover ratio (SOR) parameterized image quality. Mini deluxe phantom data of I-124 was also assessed. Results: Volumetric resolution was 7.3 mm3 from the transverse FOV center when FBP reconstruction algorithms with ramp filter was used. MAP yielded minimal NU with β =1.5. OSEM2D yielded maximal RC. SOR was below 4% for FBP with ramp, Hamming, Hanning, or Shepp-Logan filters. Based on the mini deluxe phantom results, an FBP with Hanning or Parzen filters, or a 3DRP with Hanning filter yielded feasible I-124 PET data.Conclusions: Reconstruction algorithms and filters were compared. FBP with Hanning or Parzen filters, or 3DRP with Hanning filter yielded feasible data for quantifying I-124 PET.

  12. Effects of nuclear elastic scattering and modifications of ion-electron equilibration power on advanced-fuel burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of Nuclear Elastic Scattering (NES) of fusion products and modifications of the ion-electron equilibration power on D-T and D-based advanced-fuel fusion plasmas are presented here. The processes causing the modifications to the equilibration power included here are: (1) depletion of low-energy electrons by Coulomb collisions with the ions; and (2) magnetic field effects on the energy transfer between the ions and the electrons. Both NES and the equilibration modifications affect the flow of power to the plasma ions, which is an important factor in the analysis of advanced-fuels. A Hot Ion Mode (HIM) analysis was used to investigate the changes in the minimum ignition requirements for Cat-D and D- 3 He plasmas, due to the changes in the allowable T/sub i/T/sub e/ for ignition from NES and equilibration modifications. Both of these effects have the strongest influence on the ignition requirements for high temperature (>50 keV), low beta (<15%) plasmas, where the cyclotron radiation power loss from the electrons (which is particularly sensitive to changes in the electron temperature) is large

  13. A redox equilibrator for the preparation of cytochrome oxidase of mixed valence states and intermediate compounds for x-ray synchrotron studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, B.; Moore, J.; Powers, L.; Ching, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A redox titrator for the preparation of small volumes of highly concentrated biological samples of X-ray synchrotron studies provides for the redox equilibration at temperatures of 40 to -30 0 C. Anaerobic transfer directly to the X-ray sample chamber and mixing of an additional reagent just prior to freeze-trapping of the redox-equilibrated sample are provided

  14. Neuropsychiatry: PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana F, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with PET and SPECT have a definitive and well established role in the investigation of a variety of conditions such as dementia, epilepsy and drug addiction. With these methods it is possible to detect early rCBF (regional Cerebral Blood Flow) changes seen in dementia (even before clinical symptoms) and differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other dementias by means of the rCBF pattern change. 18-F-FDG PET imaging is a useful tool in partial epilepsy because both rCBF and brain metabolism are compromised at the epileptogenic focus. During the seizure, rCBF dramatically increases locally. Using SPECT it is possible to locate such foci with 97% accuracy. In drug addiction, particularly with cocaine, functional imaging has proven to be very sensitive to detect brain flow and metabolism derangement early in the course of this condition. These findings are important in many ways: prognostic value, they are used as a powerful reinforcement tool and to monitor functional recovery with rehabilitation. There are many other conditions in which functional brain imaging is of importance such as acute stroke treatment assessment, trauma rehabilitation and in psychiatric and abnormal movement diseases specially with the development of receptor imaging (au)

  15. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  16. FDG PET imaging dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia

  17. Silicon Photomultipliers and Monolithic Scintillators for Time-of-Flight PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, S.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging modality. Its aim is to visualize the 3-dimensional distribution of a radiopharmaceutical (also called the tracer) within a patient (clinical PET) or test-animal (in case of preclinical investigations). The information that can be

  18. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambraia Lopes Ferreira da Silva, P.; Bauer, J.; Salomon, A.; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V.; Tessonnier, T.; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D.R.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong 15O signal due to its relatively short half-life (∼2 min) and high

  19. MO-AB-206-01: PET Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkington, T. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  20. MO-AB-206-01: PET Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkington, T.

    2016-01-01

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  1. Performance characterization of the PET-CT tomograph at the PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry site of Messina University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Amato

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A PET-cyclotron-radiochemistry plant was built at Messina University Hospital, whose diagnostics section was equipped with a PET-CT scanner composed by a time of flight PET and a 16-slice CT. The present note reports about the results of tomograph's acceptance tests, which had been planned and carried out in order to verify the correspondence of the specific scanner's performances declared by the firm and the fulfillment of Italian law's minimal criteria of acceptability. Acceptance tests gave positive results for all the physical parameters measured. The assessment of CT slice thickness, with regard to the thinner slices of 0.75 and 0.6 mm, required the employment of a manual procedure exploiting a phantom equipped with low inclination ramps. These results allowed us to assess a baseline of performance parameters to be taken as a reference for periodic constance tests.

  2. High-resolution multi-slice PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasillo, N.J.; Chintu Chen; Ordonez, C.E.; Kapp, O.H.; Sosnowski, J.; Beck, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report evaluates the progress to test the feasibility and to initiate the design of a high resolution multi-slice PET system. The following specific areas were evaluated: detector development and testing; electronics configuration and design; mechanical design; and system simulation. The design and construction of a multiple-slice, high-resolution positron tomograph will provide substantial improvements in the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements of the distribution of activity concentrations in the brain. The range of functional brain research and our understanding of local brain function will be greatly extended when the development of this instrumentation is completed

  3. Pet ownership and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchock, Robert L

    2015-09-01

    Pet ownership and brief human-animal interactions can serve as a form of social support and convey a host of beneficial psychological and physiological health benefits. This article critically examines recent relevant literature on the pet-health connection. Cross-sectional studies indicate correlations between pet ownership and numerous aspects of positive health outcomes, including improvements on cardiovascular measures and decreases in loneliness. Quasi-experimental studies and better controlled experimental studies corroborate these associations and suggest that owning and/or interacting with a pet may be causally related to some positive health outcomes. The value of pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy (AAT), as a nonpharmacological treatment modality, augmentation to traditional treatment, and healthy preventive behavior (in the case of pet ownership), is starting to be realized. However, more investigations that employ randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and investigations that more closely examine the underlying mechanism of the pet-health effect, such as oxytocin, are needed.

  4. New developments in PET detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Lingxin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Bin; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    The researches on PET detector are always active and innovative area. The research direction of PET detector includes improving performances of scintillator-based detectors, investigating new detectors suitable for multi-modality imaging (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI), meeting requirements of TOF and DOI technologies and boosting the development of the technologies. In this paper, new developments in PET detector technology about scintillation crystal, photodetector and semiconductor detector is introduced. (authors)

  5. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  6. High value carbon materials from PET recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, J.B.; Ania, C.O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J.J

    2004-11-15

    Poly(ethylene) terephthalate (PET), has become one of the major post-consumer plastic waste. In this work special attention was paid to minimising PET residues and to obtain a high value carbon material. Pyrolysis and subsequent activation of PET from post-consumer soft-drink bottles was performed. Activation was carried out at 925 deg. C under CO{sub 2} atmosphere to different burn-off degrees. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at -196 deg. C. The obtained carbons materials were mainly microporous, presenting low meso and macroporosity, and apparent BET surface areas of upto 2500 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The capacity of these materials for phenol adsorption and PAHs removal from aqueous solutions was measured and compared with that attained with commercial active carbons. Preliminary tests also showed high hydrogen uptake values, as good as the results obtained with high-tech carbon materials.

  7. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C.

    1994-01-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithm is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an ASIC implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine

  8. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C.; Baker, K.; Jones, B.

    1994-01-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithms is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine

  9. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C. M.; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  10. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C. M., E-mail: christopher.thomas@gstt.nhs.uk; Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Hartill, C. E. [Guy' s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Radiotherapy, Clinical Outpatients Clinic, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  11. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, Erica [SimonMed Imaging, Department of Radiology, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Zhang, Wei [Texas Children' s Hospital, Outcomes and Impact Service, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-10-15

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  12. A retrospective comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Frech, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Url, Christoph; Widmann, Gerlig; Prommegger, Rupert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Fraedrich, Gustav; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-12-01

    (18)F-Fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by (68)Ga-DOTA-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100% in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100% and that of (18)F-DOPA PET was 56.0%. Overall, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and (18)F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100% (McNemar, P TOC PET and 11.8 ± 7.9 for (18)F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P TOC PET may be superior to (18)F-DOPA PET and diagnostic CT in providing valuable information for pretherapeutic staging of extra-adrenal PGL, particularly in surgically inoperable tumours and metastatic or multifocal disease.

  13. SU-E-J-124: FDG PET Metrics Analysis in the Context of An Adaptive PET Protocol for Node Positive Gynecologic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, J; Chino, J; Light, K; Vergalasova, I; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare PET extracted metrics and investigate the role of a gradient-based PET segmentation tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH), in the context of an adaptive PET protocol for node positive gynecologic cancer patients. Methods: An IRB approved protocol enrolled women with gynecological, PET visible malignancies. A PET-CT was obtained for treatment planning prescribed to 45–50.4Gy with a 55– 70Gy boost to the PET positive nodes. An intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained between 30–36Gy, and all volumes re-contoured. Standard uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmedian) and GTV volumes were extracted from the clinician contoured GTVs on the pre- and intra-treament PET-CT for primaries and nodes and compared with a two tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between primary and node GTV volumes contoured in the treatment planning system and those volumes generated using PET Edge were also investigated. Bland-Altman plots were used to describe significant differences between the two contouring methods. Results: Thirteen women were enrolled in this study. The median baseline/intra-treatment primary (SUVmax, mean, median) were (30.5, 9.09, 7.83)/( 16.6, 4.35, 3.74), and nodes were (20.1, 4.64, 3.93)/( 6.78, 3.13, 3.26). The p values were all < 0.001. The clinical contours were all larger than the PET Edge generated ones, with mean difference of +20.6 ml for primary, and +23.5 ml for nodes. The Bland-Altman revealed changes between clinician/PET Edge contours to be mostly within the margins of the coefficient of variability. However, there was a proportional trend, i.e. the larger the GTV, the larger the clinical contours as compared to PET Edge contours. Conclusion: Primary and node SUV values taken from the intratreament PET-CT can be used to assess the disease response and to design an adaptive plan. The PET Edge tool can streamline the contouring process and lead to smaller, less user-dependent contours.

  14. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI to PET/CT-acquired FDG brain exams for seizure focus detection: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paldino, Michael J.; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Mahmood, Nadia; Sher, Andrew; Hayatghaibi, Shireen; Seghers, Victor; Yang, Erica; Zhang, Wei; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar

    2017-01-01

    There is great interest in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) as a clinical tool due to its capacity to provide diverse diagnostic information in a single exam. The goal of this exam is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR-acquired [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) brain exams to that of PET/CT with respect to identifying seizure foci in children with localization-related epilepsy. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained for this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, prospective study. All patients referred for clinical FDG-PET/CT exams of the brain at our institution for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy were prospectively recruited to undergo an additional FDG-PET acquisition on a tandem PET/MR system. Attenuation-corrected FDG images acquired at PET/MR and PET/CT were interpreted independently by five expert readers. Readers were blinded to the scanner used for acquisition and attenuation correction as well as all other clinical and imaging data. A Likert scale scoring system (1-5) was used to assess image quality. The locale of seizure origin determined at multidisciplinary epilepsy surgery work rounds was considered the reference standard. Non-inferiority testing for paired data was used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MR to that of PET/CT. The final study population comprised 35 patients referred for a diagnosis of localization-related epilepsy (age range: 2-19 years; median: 11 years; 21 males, 14 females). Image quality did not differ significantly between the two modalities. The accuracy of PET/MR was not inferior to that of PET/CT for localization of a seizure focus (P=0.017). The diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET images acquired on a PET/MR scanner and generated using MR-based attenuation correction was not inferior to that of PET images processed by traditional CT-based correction. (orig.)

  15. Biodistribution and stability studies of [18F]Fluoroethylrhodamine B, a potential PET myocardial perfusion agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottumukkala, Vijay; Heinrich, Tobias K.; Baker, Amanda; Dunning, Patricia; Fahey, Frederic H.; Treves, S. Ted; Packard, Alan B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Fluorine-18-labeled rhodamine B was developed as a potential positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion, but preliminary studies in mice showed no accumulation in the heart suggesting that it was rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo in mice. A study was therefore undertaken to further evaluate this hypothesis. Methods: [ 18 F]Fluoroethylrhodamine B was equilibrated for 2 h at 37 deg. C in human, rat and mouse serum and in phosphate-buffered saline. Samples were removed periodically and assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on the results of the stability study, microPET imaging and a biodistribution study were carried out in rats. Results: In vitro stability studies demonstrated that [ 18 F]fluoroethylrhodamine B much more stable in rat and human sera than in mouse serum. After 2 h, the compound was >80% intact in rat serum but 18 F-labeled rhodamines should accumulate in the heart. Conclusions: [ 18 F]Fluoroethylrhodamine B is more stable in rat and human sera than it is in mouse serum. This improved stability is demonstrated by the high uptake of the tracer in the rat heart in comparison to the absence of visible uptake in the mouse heart. These observations suggest that 18 F-labeled rhodamines are promising candidates for more extensive evaluation as PET tracers for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion.

  16. Adaptive template generation for amyloid PET using a deep learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Kwan; Seo, Seongho; Shin, Seong A; Byun, Min Soo; Lee, Dong Young; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung

    2018-05-11

    Accurate spatial normalization (SN) of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) images for Alzheimer's disease assessment without coregistered anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the same individual is technically challenging. In this study, we applied deep neural networks to generate individually adaptive PET templates for robust and accurate SN of amyloid PET without using matched 3D MR images. Using 681 pairs of simultaneously acquired 11 C-PIB PET and T1-weighted 3D MRI scans of AD, MCI, and cognitively normal subjects, we trained and tested two deep neural networks [convolutional auto-encoder (CAE) and generative adversarial network (GAN)] that produce adaptive best PET templates. More specifically, the networks were trained using 685,100 pieces of augmented data generated by rotating 527 randomly selected datasets and validated using 154 datasets. The input to the supervised neural networks was the 3D PET volume in native space and the label was the spatially normalized 3D PET image using the transformation parameters obtained from MRI-based SN. The proposed deep learning approach significantly enhanced the quantitative accuracy of MRI-less amyloid PET assessment by reducing the SN error observed when an average amyloid PET template is used. Given an input image, the trained deep neural networks rapidly provide individually adaptive 3D PET templates without any discontinuity between the slices (in 0.02 s). As the proposed method does not require 3D MRI for the SN of PET images, it has great potential for use in routine analysis of amyloid PET images in clinical practice and research. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Mi Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Hwang, Hee Sung

    2008-01-01

    PET or PET/CT detects only less than 50% of early gastric cancer and 62-98% of advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, mass screening programs are recommended for all adults over the age of 40 for early detection and early treatment of gastric cancer through endoscopy or various radiological tests. The most important step after diagnosis of gastric cancer is accurate staging, which mainly evaluates tumor resectability to avoid unnecessary surgery. Important factors that affect tumor resectability are whether the tumor can be separated from adjacent organs or important blood vessels, the extent of lymph node metastasis, presence of peritoneal metastasis, or distant organ metastasis. To evaluate the extent of local tumor invasion, anatomical imaging that has superior spatial resolution is essential. There are a few studies on prognostic significance of FDG uptake with inconsistent results between them. In spite of lower sensitivity for lymph node staging, the specificity of CT and PET are very high, and the specificity for PET tends to be higher than that for CT. Limited data published so far show that PET seems less useful in the detection of lung and bone metastasis. In the evaluation of pleural or peritoneal metastasis, PET seems very specific but insensitive as well. When FDG uptake of primary tumor is low, distant metastasis also tends to show low FDG uptake reducing its detection on PET. There are only a few data available in the evaluation of recurrence detection and treatment response using FDG PET or PET/CT

  18. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  19. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D L (0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D L (0)/D eq from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D eq is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm 3 thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E in /E or E out /E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD eq was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose ratios changed with beam aperture and

  20. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  1. Kinetic Investigation of Homogeneous H(2)-D(2) Equilibration Catalyzed by Pt-Au Cluster Compounds. Characterization of the Cluster [(H)Pt(AuPPh(3))(9)](NO(3))(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Leon I.; Pignolet, Louis H.

    1996-11-06

    The new Pt-Au hydrido cluster compound [(H)Pt(AuPPh(3))(9)](NO(3))(2) (3) has been synthesized and characterized by NMR, FABMS, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction [triclinic, P&onemacr;, a = 17.0452(1) Å, b = 17.4045(2) Å, c = 55.2353(1) Å, alpha = 89.891(1) degrees, beta = 85.287(1) degrees, gamma = 75.173(1) degrees, V = 15784.0(2) Å(3), Z = 4 (two molecules in asymmetric unit), residual R = 0.089 for 45 929 observed reflections and 3367 variables, Mo Kalpha radiation]. The Pt(AuP)(9) core geometry is a distorted icosahedron with three vertices vacant. The Pt-Au, Au-Au, and Au-P distances are within the normal ranges observed in other Pt-Au clusters. This cluster is a catalyst for H(2)-D(2) equilibration in homogeneous solution phase and has been used in a general mechanistic study of this reaction catalyzed by Pt-Au clusters. We previously proposed that a key step in the mechanism for catalytic H(2)-D(2) equilibration is the dissociation of a PPh(3) ligand to give a cluster with an open Au site for bonding of H(2) or D(2). This was based on qualitative observations that PPh(3) inhibited the rate of HD production with [Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) (1) as catalyst. In order to test this hypothesis, phosphine inhibition (on the rate of HD production) and phosphine ligand exchange kinetic experiments were carried out with [(H)(PPh(3))Pt(AuPPh(3))(7)](NO(3))(2) (2) and 3. In this paper we show that the rate constant for phosphine dissociation determined from the PPh(3) inhibition rate study of H(2)-D(2) equilibration with cluster 2 is nearly identical to the rate constant for dissociative phosphine ligand exchange. The slower rate for H(2)-D(2) equilibration observed with 3 compared with 2 (5.5 x 10(-3) vs 7.7 x 10(-2) turnover s(-1)) is explained by its smaller rate constant for phosphine dissociation (2.8 x 10(-5) vs 2.9 x 10(-4) s(-1)). The fact that clusters 2 and 3 show similar kinetic behaviors suggests that the PPh(3) dissociation step in the catalytic H(2

  2. PET/TAC in Oncology; PET/TAC en Oncologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, A M [Especialista en Medicina Nuclear, Profa. Depto. Radiologia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy.

  3. Adhesion of nitrile rubber (NBR) to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric. Part 1: PET surface modification by methylenediphenyl di-isocyanate (MDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber composite industry. It is well known that surface physical, mechanical and chemical treatments are effective methods to improve interfacial bonding. Ultra violet (UV) light irradiation is an efficient method which is used to increase interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabric was used to increase its bonding to nitrile rubber (NBR). NBR is perfect selection to produce fuel and oil resistant rubber parts but it has weak bonding to fabrics. For this purpose at first, the PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was reacted and grafted to carboxylated PET. T-peel test was used to evaluate PET fabric to NBR bonding strength. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-AT) was used to assess surface modifications of the PET fabrics. The chemical composition of the PET surfaces before and after carboxylation and MDI grafting was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that at vulcanizing temperature of 150 °C, carboxylation in contrary to MDI grafting, improved considerably PET to NBR adhesion. Finally effect of curing temperature on PET to NBR bonding strength was determined. It was found that increasing vulcanizing temperature to 170 °C caused considerable improvement (about 134%) in bonding strength.

  4. Diagnostic test accuracy study of 18F-sodium fluoride PET/CT, 99mTc-labelled diphosphonate SPECT/CT, and planar bone scintigraphy for diagnosis of bone metastases in newly diagnosed, high-risk prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Randi F; Zacho, Helle D; Langkilde, Niels C

    2017-01-01

    %, and 96%, respectively, and the negative predictive values were 60%, 77% and 75%, respectively. No statistically significant difference among the three imaging modalities was observed. All three imaging modalities showed high sensitivity and specificity. NaF PET/CT and SPECT/CT showed numerically improved...

  5. Risk-related 18F-FDG PET/CT and new diagnostic strategies in patients with solitary pulmonary nodule: the ITALIAN multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadafora, Marco; Pace, Leonardo; Evangelista, Laura; Mansi, Luigi; Del Prete, Francesco; Saladini, Giorgio; Miletto, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Guerra, Luca; Pepe, Giovanna; Peluso, Giuseppina; Nicolai, Emanuele; Storto, Giovanni; Ferdeghini, Marco; Giordano, Alessandro; Farsad, Mohsen; Schillaci, Orazio; Gridelli, Cesare; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-05-05

    Diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is an important public health issue and 18 F-FDG PET/CT has proven to be more effective than CT alone. Pre-test risk stratification and clinical presentation of SPN could affect the diagnostic strategy. A relevant issue is whether thoracic segmental (s)-PET/CT could be implemented in patients with SPN. This retrospective multicenter study compared the results of FDG whole-body (wb)-PET/CT to those of s-PET/CT. 18 F-FDG PET/CT of 502 patients, stratified for pre-test cancer risk, were retrospectively analyzed. The thoracic part of wb-PET/CT, considered s-PET/CT, was compared to wb-PET/CT. Clinical and PET/CT variables were investigated for SPN characterization as well as for identification of patients in whom s-PET/CT could be performed. Histopathology or follow-up data were used as a reference. In the study population, 36% had malignant, 35% benign, and 29% indeterminate SPN. 18 F-FDG uptake indicative of thoracic and extra-thoracic lesions was detectable in 13% and 3% of the patients. All patients with extra-thoracic metastases (n = 13) had thoracic lymph node involvement and highest 18 F-FDG uptake at level of SPN (negative predictive value 100%). Compared to wb-PET/CT, s-PET/CT could save about 2/3 of 18 F-FDG dose, radiation exposure or scan-time, without affecting the clinical impact of PET/CT. Pre-test probability of malignancy can guide the diagnostic strategy of 18 FDG-PET/CT in patients with SPN. In subjects with low-intermediate pretest probability s-PET/CT imaging might be planned in advance, while in those at high risk and with thoracic lymph node involvement a wb-PET/CT is necessary.

  6. Experience with PET FDG - Preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jofre, Josefina; Canessa, Jose; Gonzalez, Patricio; Humeres, Pamela; Sierralta, Paulina; Galaz, Rodrigo; Miranda, Karina

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this preliminary communication was to analyse the indications and data in initial group of patients studied with first dedicated PET scanner in the country at Hospital Militar in Santiago Chile. The main application of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-Fluoro deoxyglucose (FDG) is related with oncological patients management. We studied 136 patients, 131 (97%) with known or suspected malignant disease and remaining 5 for cardiological or neuropsychiatric disease. Ten patients were controlled diabetics (1 insulin dependent). Their mean age was 51.6±18 years ranging from 6 to 84 years and 65% were females. A total of 177 scans were acquired using a dedicated PET (Siemens HR + with 4mm resolution) system. Mean F18-FDG injected dose was 477±107 MBq (12.9±2.9 mCi). Mean blood glucose levels, performed prior the injection, were 94±17mg/dl (range 62-161). F18-FDG was obtained from the cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9 installed in the Chilean Agency of Nuclear Energy, distant about 15 miles away from the clinical PET facility. PET studies were analyzed by at least 4 independent observers visually. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in some cases. Image fusion of FDG images with recent anatomical (CT, MRI) studies was performed where available. Data acquisition protocol consisted in 7-8 beds/study from head to mid-thighs, with 6-7-min/bed acquisitions, 36% transmission with germanium 68 rods. Data was reconstructed with standard OSEM protocol. The main indications included pulmonary lesions in 31%, gastrointestinal cancers in 21%, melanoma in 13% and lymphoma in 9% patients. The remaining were of breast, thyroid, testes, ovary, musculoskeletal (soft tissue and bone), brain tumour etc. Abnormal focal tracer uptake was observed in 83/131 oncological patients, 54% corroborating with clinical diagnosis of primary tumor or recurrence while 46% showed new metastatic localization. FDG scans were normal 36/131 patients. In 9 patients

  7. Experience with PET FDG - Preliminary analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massardo, Teresa; Jofre, Josefina; Canessa, Jose; Gonzalez, Patricio; Humeres, Pamela; Sierralta, Paulina; Galaz, Rodrigo; Miranda, Karina [Centro PET de Imagenes Moleculares, Hospital Militar de Santiago, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The objective of this preliminary communication was to analyse the indications and data in initial group of patients studied with first dedicated PET scanner in the country at Hospital Militar in Santiago Chile. The main application of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18-Fluoro deoxyglucose (FDG) is related with oncological patients management. We studied 136 patients, 131 (97%) with known or suspected malignant disease and remaining 5 for cardiological or neuropsychiatric disease. Ten patients were controlled diabetics (1 insulin dependent). Their mean age was 51.6{+-}18 years ranging from 6 to 84 years and 65% were females. A total of 177 scans were acquired using a dedicated PET (Siemens HR + with 4mm resolution) system. Mean F18-FDG injected dose was 477{+-}107 MBq (12.9{+-}2.9 mCi). Mean blood glucose levels, performed prior the injection, were 94{+-}17mg/dl (range 62-161). F18-FDG was obtained from the cyclotron IBA Cyclone 18/9 installed in the Chilean Agency of Nuclear Energy, distant about 15 miles away from the clinical PET facility. PET studies were analyzed by at least 4 independent observers visually. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated in some cases. Image fusion of FDG images with recent anatomical (CT, MRI) studies was performed where available. Data acquisition protocol consisted in 7-8 beds/study from head to mid-thighs, with 6-7-min/bed acquisitions, 36% transmission with germanium 68 rods. Data was reconstructed with standard OSEM protocol. The main indications included pulmonary lesions in 31%, gastrointestinal cancers in 21%, melanoma in 13% and lymphoma in 9% patients. The remaining were of breast, thyroid, testes, ovary, musculoskeletal (soft tissue and bone), brain tumour etc. Abnormal focal tracer uptake was observed in 83/131 oncological patients, 54% corroborating with clinical diagnosis of primary tumor or recurrence while 46% showed new metastatic localization. FDG scans were normal 36/131 patients. In 9

  8. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, P.G.; Boehlen, T.T.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.P.W.; Ferrari, A.; Mancini, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Mairani, A.; Sala, Paola R.

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  9. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin; PET y PET/CT en tumor de origen indeterminado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  10. PET imaging for brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Described are the principle of PET and its characteristics, imaging of human brain function, mapping of detailed human cerebral functions and PET imaging of nerve transmission. Following compounds labeled by positron emitters are used for PET imaging of brain functions: for blood flow and oxygen metabolism, 15 O-O 2 gas, water and carbon dioxide; for energy metabolism, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose; and for nerve transmission functions in receptor binding, transporter, transmitter synthesis and enzyme, 11 C- or 18 F-dopamine, serotonin and their analogues, and acetylcholine analogues. For brain mapping, examples of cognition tasks, results and their statistics are presented with images for blood flow. Nerve transmissions in schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease are imaged with labeled analogues of dopamine and acetylcholine, respectively. PET is becoming more and more important in the field of psychiatric science particularly in the coming society of increasing aged people. (N.I.)

  11. Measuring receptor occupancy with PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, A

    Many physiological and biochemical measurements can be performed noninvasively in humans with modern imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This review focuses on the monitoring of

  12. The potential of a modified physiologically equivalent temperature (mPET) based on local thermal comfort perception in hot and humid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Chen, Yung-Chang; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    Physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) is a thermal index that is widely used in the field of human biometeorology and urban bioclimate. However, it has several limitations, including its poor ability to predict thermo-physiological parameters and its weak response to both clothing insulation and humid conditions. A modified PET (mPET) was therefore developed to address these shortcomings. To determine whether the application of mPET in hot-humid regions is more appropriate than the PET, an analysis of a thermal comfort survey database, containing 2071 questionnaires collected from participants in hot-humid Taiwan, was conducted. The results indicate that the thermal comfort range is similar (26-30 °C) when the mPET and PET are applied as thermal indices to the database. The sensitivity test for vapor pressure and clothing insulation also show that the mPET responds well to the behavior and perceptions of local people in a subtropical climate.

  13. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer.

  14. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer

  15. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  16. PET/TAC in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy

  17. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  19. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  20. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz; Leiner, Tim; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  1. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  2. Are Pets in the Bedroom a Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Lois E; Tovar, M Diane; Miller, Bernie

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pets in the bedroom can alter the sleep environment in ways that could affect sleep. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 150 consecutive patients seen at the Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Seventy-four people (49%) reported having pets, with 31 (41% of pet owners) having multiple pets. More than half of pet owners (56%) allowed their pets to sleep in the bedroom. Fifteen pet owners (20%) described their pets as disruptive, whereas 31 (41%) perceived their pets as unobtrusive or even beneficial to sleep. Health care professionals working with patients with sleep concerns should inquire about the presence of companion animals in the sleep environment to help them find solutions and optimize their sleep. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Facet-controlled phase separation in supersaturated Au-Ni nanoparticles upon shape equilibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, A., E-mail: andreas.herz@tu-ilmenau.de, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Rossberg, D.; Hentschel, M.; Theska, F.; Wang, D., E-mail: andreas.herz@tu-ilmenau.de, E-mail: dong.wang@tu-ilmenau.de; Schaaf, P. [Department of Materials for Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Micro- and Nanotechnologies MacroNano, TU Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Friák, M. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC MU, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Holec, D. [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Šob, M. [Central European Institute of Technology, CEITEC MU, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, CZ-625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlářská 2, CZ-611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Schneeweiss, O. [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Žižkova 22, CZ-616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-17

    Solid-state dewetting is used to fabricate supersaturated, submicron-sized Au-Ni solid solution particles out of thin Au/Ni bilayers by means of a rapid thermal annealing technique. Phase separation in such particles is studied with respect to their equilibrium crystal (or Wulff) shape by subsequent annealing at elevated temperature. It is found that (100) faceting planes of the equilibrated particles are enriched with Ni and (111) faces with Au. Both phases are considered by quantum-mechanical calculations in combination with an error-reduction scheme that was developed to compensate for a missing exchange-correlation potential that would reliably describe both Au and Ni. The observed phase configuration is then related to the minimization of strongly anisotropic elastic energies of Au- and Ni-rich phases and results in a rather unique nanoparticle composite state that is characterized by nearly uniform value of elastic response to epitaxial strains all over the faceted surface. The same conclusion is yielded also by evaluating bi-axial elastic moduli when employing interpolated experimental elastic constants. This work demonstrates a useful route for studying features of physical metallurgy at the mesoscale.

  4. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S X

    2011-07-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown ∼6% more laser absorption, ∼6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and ∼10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by ∼10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  5. Equilibration in long-range quantum spin systems from a BBGKY perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paškauskas, Rytis; Kastner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The time evolution of l-spin reduced density operators is studied for a class of Heisenberg-type quantum spin models with long-range interactions. In the framework of the quantum Bogoliubov–Born–Green–Kirkwood–Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy, we introduce an unconventional representation, different from the usual cluster expansion, which casts the hierarchy into the form of a second-order recursion. This structure suggests a scaling of the expansion coefficients and the corresponding time scales in powers of N 1/2 with the system size N, implying a separation of time scales in the large-system limit. For special parameter values and initial conditions, we can show analytically that closing the BBGKY hierarchy by neglecting l-spin correlations never leads to equilibration, but gives rise to quasi-periodic time evolution with at most l/2 independent frequencies. Moreover, for the same special parameter values and in the large-N limit, we solve the complete recursion relation (the full BBGKY hierarchy), observing a superexponential decay to equilibrium in rescaled time τ = tN −1/2

  6. Chemical-Petrographic Types and Shock Metamorphism of 184 Grove Mountains Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deqiu Dai

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We reported the petrography and mineral chemistry of 184 equilibrated ordinary chondrites collected from Grove Mountains, Antarctica. The chemical-petrographic types and shock metamorphism degrees of these chondrites were assigned. They were classified into 46 H groups (22 H4, 20 H5, and four H6, 133 L groups (eight L4, 75 L5, and 50 L6, and five LL groups (four LL4 and one LL5. Some of these chondrites could be paired; however, both H and L group meteorites were affected. Further studies such as terrestrial ages and thermal luminescence are required in order to confirm the pairings. The relative abundances of H, L, and LL are different in Grove Mountain meteorites, when compared to those in Transcontinental Ridge meteorites. Based on the shock effects, the shock metamorphism degrees of these chondrites were assigned. Compared to previous studies, the heavily shocked samples of S4 and S5 have a higher fraction (59 out of 184 in Grove Mountain ordinary chondrites. The L group (54 out of 59 is the dominant chemical group in the heavily shocked chondrites, except for five meteorites which belong to the H group. The shock metamorphism degrees of the H and L groups are distinct, which may indicate different surface properties in their parent bodies. In addition, the petrologic types and shock degrees are probably closely related, with the most heavily shocked chondrites observed in types 5 and 6.

  7. Analytical treatment of neutrino asymmetry equilibration from flavor oscillations in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yvonne Y.

    2002-07-01

    A recent numerical study by A. D. Dolgov, S. H. Hansen, S. Pastor, S. T. Petcov, G. G. Raffelt, and D. V. Semikoz (DHPPRS) [Nucl. Phys. B632, 363 (2002)] found that complete or partial equilibrium between all active neutrino flavors can be achieved before the big bang nucleosynthesis epoch via flavor oscillations, if the oscillation parameters are those inferred from the atmospheric and solar neutrino data, and, in some cases, if θ13 is also sizable. As such, cosmological constraints on the electron neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry are now applicable in all three neutrino sectors. In the present work, we provide an analytical treatment of the scenarios considered in DHPPRS, and demonstrate that their results are stable even for very large initial asymmetries. The equilibration mechanism can be understood in terms of a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein-like effect for a maximally mixed and effectively monochromatic system. We also comment on the DHPPRS's choices of mixing parameters, and their handling of collisional effects, both of which could impinge on the extent of flavor equilibrium.

  8. Cardiac 82rubidium PET/CT: initial European experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, Ashley M.; Dickson, John C.; Kayani, Irfan; Endozo, Raymondo; Blanchard, Patty; Shastry, Manu; Prvulovich, Elizabeth; Waddington, Wendy A.; Ben-Haim, Simona; Bomanji, Jamshed B.; Ell, Peter J.; Speechly-Dick, Marie-Elsya; McEwan, Jean R.

    2007-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion with PET/CT has advantages over conventional SPECT. We describe our initial European experience using 82 Rubidium-PET/CT, as part of a clinical myocardial perfusion service. We studied the first 100 patients (64 male; 36 female, mean age = 60: SD +/-12.5y, mean body mass index = 30: SD +/-6.9kg/m 2 ) who underwent 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT in our institution. Thirty patients had recently undergone coronary angiography. Patients underwent imaging during adenosine infusion and at rest. Images were acquired over 5 minutes using a GE-PET/CT instrument. Image quality was described as good, adequate or inadequate. Images were reported patient-by-patient by a minimum of five nuclear medicine physicians. A segment-by-segment analysis (17-segment model) was also performed. Image quality was good in 77%, adequate 23% and inadequate 0%. There was no statistical difference in image quality between obese and non-obese patients (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.2864). 59% had normal perfusion studies, 29% had inducible ischaemia, 12% had myocardial infarction (11% with super added ischaemia). There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake in 132/1700 segments during stress. There was reduced 82 Rubidium uptake at rest in 42/1700 segments. The 82 Rubidium PET/CT findings were consistent with the angiographic findings in 28/30 cases. We show that, even from initial use of 82 Rubidium, it is possible to perform myocardial perfusion studies quickly with good image quality, even in the obese. The PET findings correlated well in the third of the cases where angiography was available. As such, 82 Rubidium cardiac PET/CT is likely to be an exciting addition to the European nuclear physician/ cardiologist's radionuclide imaging arsenal. (orig.)

  9. Game Design to Introduce Pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Febriyanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of animals from an early age can make children to love animals, especially pets. Children are the easiest group to receive stimulation, such as for example the stimulation of introducing children to the pet. Various media are used by parents to introduce pet. For examplle, by the media of books, multimedia, etc. One of the interesting media to introduce pet is with game. Of these problems then need to know how to make concept and design game to introduced pets for children age 3-6 years. In this paper, author formulate how to make pet game design include game genre, user interface design, image model selection, game characters, and game engine. The expected design of this game can be formulation of learning through proper game as a learning tool children. Game design derived from this writing by using model 2-dimensional images are funny and interesting coloring. And combines several game genres into one, or use the mini games that children do not get bored quickly. Design of GUI (Graphical User Interface is made as simple as possible so that children easily understand in playing this game, but also must use an interesting image

  10. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system.

  11. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET on early stage posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai LIU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background  Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a kind of progressive neurodegenerative disease with cortical visual impairment as the first symptom. Because of rare clinical incidence, early onset age, special clinical symptoms and unobvious MRI abnormality, the definitive diagnosis of PCA is difficult. This study used 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG PET and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB PET for PCA patients with unobvious MRI abnormality, so as to discuss the value of PET in the early diagnosis of PCA.  Methods  Five patients diagnosed as PCA in our hospital between April 2012 and March 2015 were enrolled in this study. Cognitive function was measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, Activities of Daily Living (ADL and Clock Drawing Test (CDT. Brain MRI, 18F-FDG PET and 11C-PIB PET were performed to analyze glucose metabolism and perfusion of posterior cortex.  Results Neuropsychological tests revealed that the ability of writing, calculating, visuospatial and executive function of all these patients were impaired. Color vision tests showed abnormal results. MRI showed that the posterior atrophy (PA scores were 0-2 (average 1 on the left side and 0-1 (average 0.80 on the right side. The medial temporal atrophy (MTA scores were 1-3 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-4 (average 2 on the right side. The ventricular enlargement (VE scores were 1-2 (average 1.80 on the left side and 1-2 (average 1.60 on the right side. 18F-FDG PET showed glucose metabolism decreased obviously on bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortex, precuneus and cingulate gyrus, and slightly on frontal lobes and subcortical structure. 11C-PIB PET showed radioactive 11C-PIB deposition on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex, and the outline of cerebellar cortex was clear.  Conclusions  For PCA patients whose parietal and occipital cortical atrophy is not obvious on MRI, 18F-FDG PET

  12. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A.; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, H.; Cascio, E.; Bonab, A.; Bortfeld, T.

    2008-08-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6° to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the PET

  13. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, A; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Parodi, K [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bonab, A [Department of Radiology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6{sup 0} to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  14. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, T

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6 degrees to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  15. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano; Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele; Versari, Annibale; Chauvie, Stephane; Bianchi, Andrea; Rensi, Marco; Bello, Marilena; Gallamini, Andrea; Patriarca, Francesca; Gay, Francesca; Gamberi, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  16. Interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma (IMPeTUs): final results. IMPeTUs (Italian myeloma criteria for PET USe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Cristina; Versari, Annibale; Chauvie, Stephane; Bertone, Elisa; Bianchi, Andrea; Rensi, Marco; Bellò, Marilena; Gallamini, Andrea; Patriarca, Francesca; Gay, Francesca; Gamberi, Barbara; Ghedini, Pietro; Cavo, Michele; Fanti, Stefano; Zamagni, Elena

    2018-05-01

    ᅟ: FDG PET/CT ( 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) is a useful tool to image multiple myeloma (MM). However, simple and reproducible reporting criteria are still lacking and there is the need for harmonization. Recently, a group of Italian nuclear medicine experts defined new visual descriptive criteria (Italian Myeloma criteria for Pet Use: IMPeTUs) to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients. The aim of this study was to assess IMPeTUs reproducibility on a large prospective cohort of MM patients. Patients affected by symptomatic MM who had performed an FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET0), after induction (PET-AI), and the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were prospectively enrolled in a multicenter trial (EMN02)(NCT01910987; MMY3033). After anonymization, PET images were uploaded in the web platform WIDEN® and hence distributed to five expert nuclear medicine reviewers for a blinded independent central review according to the IMPeTUs criteria. Consensus among reviewers was measured by the percentage of agreement and the Krippendorff's alpha. Furthermore, on a patient-based analysis, the concordance among all the reviewers in terms of positivity or negativity of the FDG PET/CT scan was tested for different thresholds of positivity (Deauville score (DS 2, 3, 4, 5) for the main parameters (bone marrow, focal score, extra-medullary disease). Eighty-six patients (211 FDG PET/CT scans) were included in this analysis. Median patient age was 58 years (range, 35-66 years), 45% were male, 15% of them were in stage ISS (International Staging System) III, and 42% had high-risk cytogenetics. The percentage agreement was superior to 75% for all the time points, reaching 100% of agreement in assessing the presence skull lesions after therapy. Comparable results were obtained when the agreement analysis was performed using the Krippendorff's alpha coefficient, either in every single time point of scanning (PET0, PET-AI or PET-EoT) or

  17. Image interpretation criteria for FDG PET/CT in multiple myeloma: a new proposal from an Italian expert panel. IMPeTUs (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Rambaldi, Ilaria; Fanti, Stefano [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele [AOU Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Hematology, Bologna (Italy); Versari, Annibale [IRCSS, Nuclear Medicine, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Unit, Cuneo (Italy); Bianchi, Andrea [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Cuneo (Italy); Rensi, Marco [AOU S.Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Udine (Italy); Bello, Marilena [AO Citta della Salute e della Scienza, Nuclear Medicine, Torino (Italy); Gallamini, Andrea [A Lacassagne Cancer Center, Research and Innovation Department, Nice (France); Patriarca, Francesca [Udine University, Hematologic Clinic, Udine (Italy); Gay, Francesca [University of Torino, Myeloma Unit, Division of Hematology, Torino (Italy); Gamberi, Barbara [IRCCS, Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    FDG PET/CT is able to detect active disease in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and can be helpful for staging and assessing therapy response, but no standard interpretation criteria have been proposed for the evaluation of FDG PET/CT in MM. A group of Italian nuclear medicine physicians and haematologists met to propose new visual interpretation criteria to standardize FDG PET/CT evaluation in MM patients (Italian Myeloma criteria for PET USe; IMPeTUs) and the reproducibility of these criteria was tested. This Italian multicentre protocol was set up as a subprotocol of EMN02, an international prospective multicentre trial of the European Myeloma Network. The criteria were agreed at multidisciplinary consensus meetings. They include a description of the metabolic state of the bone marrow (BM), number and site of focal PET-positive lesions, the number of osteolytic lesions, and the presence and site of extramedullary disease, paramedullary disease and fractures. A visual degree of uptake was defined for the target lesion and extramedullary lesions according to modified Deauville criteria. MM patients who had undergone FDG PET/CT at baseline (PET-0), after induction (PET-AI) and at the end of treatment (PET-EoT) were enrolled. The patients had been prospectively enrolled in EMN02 and their PET scans were a posteriori reinterpreted in a blinded independent central review process managed by WIDEN registered. Five expert nuclear medicine physicians scored the scans according to the new criteria. A case was considered read when four out of the five reviewers completed the report. Concordance among reviewers on different metrics was calculated using Krippendorff's alpha coefficient. A total of 17 consecutive patients were enrolled. On PET-0, the alpha coefficients for the BM score, the score for the hottest focal lesion, the number of focal lesions and the number of lytic lesions were 0.33 and 0.47, 0.40 and 0.32, respectively. On PET-AI, the alpha coefficients

  18. What do we measure in oncology PET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, Seong Jang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the practice of oncology. It is known that {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is more sensitive for the assessment of treatment response than conventional imaging. In addition, PET has an advantage in the use of quantitative analysis of the study. Nowadays, various PET parameters are adopted in clinical settings. In addition, a wide range of factors has been known to be associated with FDG uptake. Therefore, there has been a need for standardization and harmonization of protocols and PET parameters. We will introduce PET parameters and discuss major issues in this review.

  19. Imaging performance of a full-ring prototype PET-MRI system based on four-layer DOI-PET detectors integrated with a RF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tashima, Hideaki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Inadama, Naoko; Eiji, Yoshida; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-05-18

    We are developing a PET system integrated with a birdcage RF-coil for PET-MRI in order to realize both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution of the PET image by using the 4-layered depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detector. We constructed a full-ring prototype system and evaluated performances, especially imaging performance, of the prototype system in simultaneous measurement. The prototype system consists of eight four-layer DOI-PET detectors and a prototype birdcage RF-coil developed for the proposed system. The PET detectors consist of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter array (S11064-050P), a readout circuit, fourlayer DOI scintillator arrays and a shielding box made of 35 μm thick copper foil. The crystal array consists of 2.0 mm x 2.0 mm x 5.0 mm LYSO crystals arranged in 38 x 6 x 4 layer. The RF-coil has eight coil elements and the eight PET detectors are positioned at each element gap. The diameter of the RF-coil elements is 261 mm. We conducted performance tests of the prototype system with a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio). Only the PET detectors, the RF-coil and the cables were in an MRI room during measurements. A data acquisition system and power supplies for the MPPCs and preamplifiers were outside the MRI room and connected to all the detectors through a penetration panel. As a result, the spatial resolutions of a Na-22 point source in the PET image were lower than 1.6 mm in whole the FOV due to the DOI capability. In addition, the influence of the simultaneous measurements on the PET performance is negligible. On the other hand, the SNR of the phantom image in the magnitude images was degraded from 259.7 to 209.4 due to noise contamination from the power supplies.

  20. Imaging performance of a full-ring prototype PET-MRI system based on four-layer DOI-PET detectors integrated with a RF coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tashima, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio; Inadama, Naoko; Eiji, Yoshida; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a PET system integrated with a birdcage RF-coil for PET-MRI in order to realize both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution of the PET image by using the 4-layered depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detector. We constructed a full-ring prototype system and evaluated performances, especially imaging performance, of the prototype system in simultaneous measurement. The prototype system consists of eight four-layer DOI-PET detectors and a prototype birdcage RF-coil developed for the proposed system. The PET detectors consist of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter array (S11064-050P), a readout circuit, fourlayer DOI scintillator arrays and a shielding box made of 35 μm thick copper foil. The crystal array consists of 2.0 mm x 2.0 mm x 5.0 mm LYSO crystals arranged in 38 x 6 x 4 layer. The RF-coil has eight coil elements and the eight PET detectors are positioned at each element gap. The diameter of the RF-coil elements is 261 mm. We conducted performance tests of the prototype system with a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio). Only the PET detectors, the RF-coil and the cables were in an MRI room during measurements. A data acquisition system and power supplies for the MPPCs and preamplifiers were outside the MRI room and connected to all the detectors through a penetration panel. As a result, the spatial resolutions of a Na-22 point source in the PET image were lower than 1.6 mm in whole the FOV due to the DOI capability. In addition, the influence of the simultaneous measurements on the PET performance is negligible. On the other hand, the SNR of the phantom image in the magnitude images was degraded from 259.7 to 209.4 due to noise contamination from the power supplies.

  1. Effects of an extension of the equilibration period up to 96 hours on the characteristics of cryopreserved bull semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisch, A; Malama, E; Witschi, U; Leiding, C; Siuda, M; Janett, F; Bollwein, H

    2017-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of an equilibration period up to 96 hours and three extenders (AndroMed, OPTIXcell, and Triladyl) on the quality of cryopreserved bull semen and to evaluate, whether an extension of the equilibration time to 72 hours does affect fertility in the field. One ejaculate of 17 bulls was collected and divided into three equal aliquots and diluted, respectively, with the three extenders. Each aliquot was again divided into five parts and equilibrated for 4, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours before freezing in an automatic freezer. Sperm motility, plasma membrane and acrosome integrity (PMAI), and DNA fragmentation index (% DFI) were measured during equilibration. In addition to the parameters measured during equilibration, the percentage of viable sperm cells with high mitochondrial membrane potential (HMMP) was measured immediately after thawing, and after 3 hours of incubation at 37 °C. Sperm motility was assessed using CASA, and PMAI, HMMP, and % DFI were measured using flow cytometry. Equilibration time did affect all parameters before freezing (P semen characteristics during 3 hours of incubation were also dependent on the equilibration time and the extender used in all parameters (P semen of nine bulls was collected thrice weekly, processed using Triladyl egg yolk extender, and frozen in 0.25 mL straws with 15 × 10 6 spermatozoa per straw. In total, the nonreturn rates on Day 90 after insemination (NRR90) of 263,816 inseminations in two periods were evaluated. Whereas semen collected on Mondays and Wednesdays was equilibrated for 24 hours in both periods, semen collected on Fridays was equilibrated for 4 hours in period one and equilibrated for 72 hours in period 2. No differences in NRR90 could be found (P > 0.05). In conclusion, extension of the equilibration time from 4 hours to 24-72 hours can improve motility and viability of cryopreserved semen after thawing. The extent of improvement in semen quality

  2. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K; Velan, S Sendhil; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D

    2006-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging

  3. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raylman, Raymond R [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Majewski, Stan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Lemieux, Susan K [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Velan, S Sendhil [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kross, Brian [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Popov, Vladimir [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Smith, Mark F [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Zorn, Carl [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Ave., Newport News, VA (United States); Marano, Gary D [Center for Advanced Imaging, Department of Radiology, Box 9236, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2006-12-21

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  4. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcaoezoglu, Semiha; Atis, Cengiz Duran; Akcaoezoglu, Kubilay

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependant on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving.

  5. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçaözoğlu, Semiha; Atiş, Cengiz Duran; Akçaözoğlu, Kubilay

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependent on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving.

  6. A prospective study of the clinical impact of PET scanning in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kalff, V.; Binns, D.S.; McManus, M.; Millward, M.; Ball, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), has been shown to very accurately stage patients with non-small cell lung cancer. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging where there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening test including CT scanning. This study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 45 consecutive patients (26 males, mean age 69±9 yrs: range 36-78 yrs). Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of aU their current investigations, including CT scans, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre scan plans. Results:, PET was used to stage 27 patients, restage 8, plan radiotherapy in 4, post treatment follow-up in 3, assess solitary nodules in 2, and as a baseline for experimental therapy in 1. To date follow-up has shown that in 14 (31%) patients PET scanning found new distant abnormalities which caused planned radical surgery or radiotherapy to be changed to palliative treatment only. Following PET findings, which clarified equivocal findings on other imaging modalities 9 patients underwent curative lung surgery. This found localised disease only in the 5 who have had surgery to this time. Similarly 7 patients continued on to have radical radiotherapy. In 3 patients, original treatment protocols changed (smaller radiation portal, surgery after good response to radiotherapy, planned chemotherapy ceased). In 8(18%) patients PET scans did not alter planned therapy. 1 patient awaits follow-up. Conclusions: In carefully selected patients with lung cancer, PET scanning significantly affected management decisions in 82%. It was used not only to spare unnecessary treatment, but also to target treatment appropriate to

  7. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Bäumer, P; Kopka, K; Hadaschik, B A; Hohenfellner, M; Kopp-Schneider, A; Haberkorn, U; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this retrospective analysis were to compare 68 Ga-PSMA PET findings and low-dose CT findings (120 kV, 30 mA), and to obtain semiquantitative and quantitative 68 Ga-PSMA PET data in patients with prostate cancer (PC) bone metastases. In total, 152 PET/CT scans from 140 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 30 had previously untreated primary PC, and 110 had biochemical relapse after treatment of primary PC. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT scanning of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with 68 Ga-PSMA-11. The PET/CT scans were analysed qualitatively (visually), semiquantitatively (SUV), and quantitatively based on a two-tissue compartment model and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of the fractal dimension. Differences were considered significant for p values PET-positive and CT-positive, 65 were only 68 Ga-PSMA-positive, and 10 were only CT-positive. The Yang test showed that there were significantly more 68 Ga-PSMA PET-positive lesions than CT-positive lesions. Association analysis showed that PSA plasma levels were significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA-11-associated parameters in bone metastases, including the degree of tracer uptake (SUV average and SUV max ), its transport rate from plasma to the interstitial/intracellular compartment (K 1 ), its rate of binding to the PSMA receptor and its internalization (k 3 ), its influx rate (K i ), and its distribution heterogeneity. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a useful diagnostic tool in the detection of bone metastases in PC. 68 Ga-PSMA PET visualizes more bone metastases than low-dose CT. PSA plasma levels are significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA PET parameters.

  8. The system of the designing for PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zongliang

    2006-01-01

    PET stands for Positron Emission Tomography, a new nuclear medicine imaging device. PET detector is the key of PET. This paper introduces a system of the designing for PET detector. The system can be used to design various PET detector. A PET detector BLOCK with 8 x 8 crystals has been designed and built by this system. (authors)

  9. Scintillator studies for the HPD-PET concept

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, D; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Joram, C; Lagamba, L; Nappi, E; Séguinot, Jacques; Vilardi, I; Weilhammer, P

    2007-01-01

    The spatial, energy, and time resolutions of 10 cm long polished YAP:Ce and LYSO:Ce crystals have been measured. The work is part of the novel HPD-PET concept, based on a full three-dimensional, free of parallax errors, reconstruction of the γ-ray interaction point in 10–15 cm long scintillators. The effective light attenuation length, a key parameter of the HPD-PET concept, and the resolutions have been measured for various wrappings and coatings of the crystal lateral surfaces. Even if the final HPD-PET prototype could use scintillators and/or wrappings different from those tested, the results here presented prove the feasibility of the concept and provide hints on its potential capabilities.

  10. Motion and Emotional Behavior Design for Pet Robot Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Tai; Yang, Yu-Ting; Miao, Shih-Heng; Wong, Ching-Chang

    A pet robot dog with two ears, one mouth, one facial expression plane, and one vision system is designed and implemented so that it can do some emotional behaviors. Three processors (Inter® Pentium® M 1.0 GHz, an 8-bit processer 8051, and embedded soft-core processer NIOS) are used to control the robot. One camera, one power detector, four touch sensors, and one temperature detector are used to obtain the information of the environment. The designed robot with 20 DOF (degrees of freedom) is able to accomplish the walking motion. A behavior system is built on the implemented pet robot so that it is able to choose a suitable behavior for different environmental situation. From the practical test, we can see that the implemented pet robot dog can do some emotional interaction with the human.

  11. Role of -FDG PET Scan in Rheumatoid Lung Nodule: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Chhakchhuak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flourine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT is a useful test for the management of malignant conditions. Inflammatory and infectious processes, however, can cause increased uptake on PET scanning, often causing diagnostic dilemmas. This knowledge is important to the rheumatologist not only because of the inflammatory conditions we treat but also because certain rheumatic diseases impose an increased risk of malignancy either due to the disease itself or as a consequence of medications used to treat the rheumatic diseases. There is an increasing body of evidence investigating the role of PET scans in inflammatory conditions. This paper describes a patient with rheumatoid arthritis who developed pulmonary nodules that showed increased uptake on PET/CT scan and reviews the use of PET scanning in the diagnosis and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Thermal oxidative degradation behaviours of flame-retardant thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester/PET blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiaohua; Zhao Chengshou; Wang Yuzhong; Zhou Qian; Deng Yi; Qu Minghai; Yang Bing

    2006-01-01

    The flame retardancy and the thermal oxidative degradation behaviors of the blend of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with a kind of phosphorus-containing thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester (TLCP) with high flame retardancy (limited oxygen index, 70%) have been investigated by oxygen index test (LOI), UL-94 rating and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in air. The results show that TLCP can dramatically improve the flame retardancy and the melt dripping behavior of PET. Moreover, the apparent activation energies of thermal oxidative degradation of the blends were evaluated using Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. It is found that addition of TLCP improve thermal stability and restrain thermal decomposition of PET in air, especially at the primary degradation stage. Py-GC/MS analysis shows that there are remarkable changes in the pyrolysis products when TLCP are blended into PET. The interaction between TLCP and PET has changed their thermal oxidative degradation mechanism

  13. Detection of Cancer with PET and PET/CT in Asymptomatic Volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ji In; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Yoon Ho; Cho, Han Byoul; Shim, Jae Yong

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the diagnostic performance of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer detection in asymptomatic health-check examinees. This study consisted of 5091 PET or PET/CT conducted as part of annual health examination at one hospital from March 1998 to February 2008. To find the incidence of cancers, medical records of the subjects were thoroughly reviewed for a follow-up period of one year. The patterns of formal readings of PET and PET/CT were analyzed to assess the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection. The histopathology and stage of the cancers were evaluated in relation to the results of PET. Eighty-six cancers (1.7%) were diagnosed within one year after PET or PET/CT. When PET and PET/CT results were combined, the sensitivity was 48.8% and specificity was 81.1% for cancer detection. PET only had a sensitivity of 46.2% and a specificity of 81.4%, and PET/CT only had a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 78.5% respectively. There were no significant differences in cancer site, stage and histopathology between PET positive and PET negative cancers. In 19.3% of formal readings of PET and PET/CT, further evaluation to exclude malignancy or significant disease was recommended. Head and neck area and upper gastrointestinal tract were commonly recommended sites for further evaluation. PET and PET/CT showed moderate performance for detecting cancers in asymptomatic adults in this study. More experience and further investigation are needed to overcome limitations of PET and PET/CT for cancer screening

  14. Rapid, Real-time Methane Detection in Ground Water Using a New Gas-Water Equilibrator Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruybal, C. J.; DiGiulio, D. C.; Wilkin, R. T.; Hargrove, K. D.; McCray, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent increases in unconventional gas development have been accompanied by public concern for methane contamination in drinking water wells near production areas. Although not a regulated pollutant, methane may be a marker contaminant for others that are less mobile in groundwater and thus may be detected later, or at a location closer to the source. In addition, methane poses an explosion hazard if exsolved concentrations reach 5 - 15% volume in air. Methods for determining dissolved gases, such as methane, have evolved over 60 years. However, the response time of these methods is insufficient to monitor trends in methane concentration in real-time. To enable rapid, real-time monitoring of aqueous methane concentrations during ground water purging, a new gas-water equilibrator (GWE) was designed that increases gas-water mass exchange rates of methane for measurement. Monitoring of concentration trends allows a comparison of temporal trends between sampling events and comparison of baseline conditions with potential post-impact conditions. These trends may be a result of removal of stored casing water, pre-purge ambient borehole flow, formation physical and chemical heterogeneity, or flow outside of well casing due to inadequate seals. Real-time information in the field can help focus an investigation, aid in determining when to collect a sample, save money by limiting costs (e.g. analytical, sample transport and storage), and provide an immediate assessment of local methane concentrations. Four domestic water wells, one municipal water well, and one agricultural water well were sampled for traditional laboratory analysis and compared to the field GWE results. Aqueous concentrations measured on the GWE ranged from non-detect to 1,470 μg/L methane. Some trends in aqueous methane concentrations measured on the GWE were observed during purging. Applying a paired t-test comparing the new GWE method and traditional laboratory analysis yielded a p-value 0

  15. FDG-PET/CT and FLT-PET/CT for differentiating between lipid-poor benign and malignant adrenal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajo, Masatoyo; Jinguji, Megumi; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Nakabeppu, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kagoshima University, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Kajiya, Yoriko; Tani, Atushi; Nakajo, Masayuki [Nanpuh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima (Japan); Arimura, Hiroshi; Nishio, Yoshihiko [Kagoshima University, Department of Diabetes and Endocrine Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    To compare F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT examinations for differentiating between benign and malignant adrenal tumours. Thirty lipid-poor benign and 11 malignant tumours of 40 patients were included. FDG- and FLT-based indices including visual score, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and FDG adrenal lesion/liver SUVmax (A/L SUVmax) or FLT adrenal lesion/back muscle SUVmax (A/B SUVmax) ratio were compared between benign and malignant tumours using the Mann-Whitney's U or Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and their diagnostic performances were evaluated by means of the area under the curve (AUC) values derived from the receiver operating characteristic analysis. All indices were significantly higher in malignant than benign tumours on both images (p < 0.05 each). On FDG-PET/CT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 91 %, 63 % and 71 % for visual score, 91 %, 67 % and 73 % for SUVmax, and 100 %, 70 % and 78 % for A/L SUVmax ratio, respectively. On FLT-PET/CT, they were 100 %, 97 % and 98 % for visual score, SUVmax and A/B SUVmax ratio, respectively. All FLT indices were significantly higher than those of FDG in AUC (p < 0.05 each). FLT-PET/CT may be superior to FDG-PET/CT in differentiating lipid-poor benign from malignant adrenal tumours because of higher specificity and accuracy. (orig.)

  16. PET and PET/CT in oncology: the key of diagnostic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortelmans, L.; Stroobants, S.; Spaepen, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present use of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. This lecture is divided to the following parts: (1) Assessment of treatment response; (2) Treatment monitoring by PET: clinical examples; (3) PET for early response assessment; (4) Use of PET in Radiotherapy planning

  17. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner

  18. Assessment of endothelial function and myocardial flow reserve using {sup 15}O-water PET without attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuffier, Stephane; Joubert, Michael; Bailliez, Alban [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Legallois, Damien [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Caen (France); Belin, Annette [Caen University Hospital, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Caen (France); Redonnet, Michel [Rouen University Hospital, Department of Cardiac Surgery, Rouen (France); Agostini, Denis [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Manrique, Alain [EA 4650, Normandie Universite, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Cyceron PET Centre, Caen (France)

    2016-02-15

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement using positron emission tomography (PET) from the washout rate of {sup 15}O-water is theoretically independent of tissue attenuation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of not using attenuation correction in the assessment of coronary endothelial function and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) using {sup 15}O-water PET. We retrospectively processed 70 consecutive {sup 15}O-water PET examinations obtained at rest and during cold pressor testing (CPT) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 58), or at rest and during adenosine infusion in heart transplant recipients (n = 12). Data were reconstructed with attenuation correction (AC) and without attenuation correction (NAC) using filtered backprojection, and MBF was quantified using a single compartmental model. The agreement between AC and NAC data was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient followed by Bland-Altman plot analysis. Regarding endothelial function, NAC PET showed poor reproducibility and poor agreement with AC PET data. Conversely, NAC PET demonstrated high reproducibility and a strong agreement with AC PET for the assessment of MFR. Non-attenuation-corrected {sup 15}O-water PET provided an accurate measurement of MFR compared to attenuation-corrected PET. However, non-attenuation-corrected PET data were less effective for the assessment of endothelial function using CPT in this population. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of endothelial function and myocardial flow reserve using 15O-water PET without attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuffier, Stephane; Joubert, Michael; Bailliez, Alban; Legallois, Damien; Belin, Annette; Redonnet, Michel; Agostini, Denis; Manrique, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurement using positron emission tomography (PET) from the washout rate of 15 O-water is theoretically independent of tissue attenuation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of not using attenuation correction in the assessment of coronary endothelial function and myocardial flow reserve (MFR) using 15 O-water PET. We retrospectively processed 70 consecutive 15 O-water PET examinations obtained at rest and during cold pressor testing (CPT) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 58), or at rest and during adenosine infusion in heart transplant recipients (n = 12). Data were reconstructed with attenuation correction (AC) and without attenuation correction (NAC) using filtered backprojection, and MBF was quantified using a single compartmental model. The agreement between AC and NAC data was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficient followed by Bland-Altman plot analysis. Regarding endothelial function, NAC PET showed poor reproducibility and poor agreement with AC PET data. Conversely, NAC PET demonstrated high reproducibility and a strong agreement with AC PET for the assessment of MFR. Non-attenuation-corrected 15 O-water PET provided an accurate measurement of MFR compared to attenuation-corrected PET. However, non-attenuation-corrected PET data were less effective for the assessment of endothelial function using CPT in this population. (orig.)

  20. Energy loss, equilibration, and thermodynamics of a baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougemont, Romulo [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ficnar, Andrej [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Finazzo, Stefano I. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade do Estado de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, CEP 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Noronha, Jorge [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, 1371, Butantã, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Lattice data for the QCD equation of state and the baryon susceptibility near the crossover phase transition (at zero baryon density) are used to determine the input parameters of a 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton holographic model that provides a consistent holographic framework to study both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium properties of a hot and baryon rich strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We compare our holographic equation of state computed at nonzero baryon chemical potential, μ{sub B}, with recent lattice calculations and find quantitative agreement for the pressure and the speed of sound for μ{sub B}≤400 MeV. This holographic model is used to obtain holographic predictions for the temperature and μ{sub B} dependence of the drag force and the Langevin diffusion coefficients associated with heavy quark jet propagation as well as the jet quenching parameter q̂ and the shooting string energy loss of light quarks in the baryon dense plasma. We find that the energy loss of heavy and light quarks generally displays a nontrivial, fast-varying behavior as a function of the temperature near the crossover. Moreover, energy loss is also found to generally increase due to nonzero baryon density effects even though this strongly coupled liquid cannot be described in terms of well defined quasiparticle excitations. Furthermore, to get a glimpse of how thermalization occurs in a hot and baryon dense QGP, we study how the lowest quasinormal mode of an external massless scalar disturbance in the bulk is affected by a nonzero baryon charge. We find that the equilibration time associated with the lowest quasinormal mode decreases in a dense medium.

  1. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  2. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm 3 GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a 22 Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that 18 F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging

  3. Clinical usefulness of PET in the management of oral cancer. Comparison between FDG-PET and MET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saitoh, Masaaki; Nakamura, Mikiko

    2007-01-01

    Inductive chemoradiotherapy has played an important role in preserving organs and functions in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To determine whether a reduced form of surgery should be performed after chemoradiotherapy, accurate evaluation of residual tumor cells is essential. We investigated the clinical value of positron emission tomography with 18 F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the management of oral SCCs. Forty-five patients underwent two FDG-PET studies, one prior to and one at 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment FDG-PET was useful in predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET could evaluate residual viable cells and prognosis. Organ preservation may be feasible based on PET evaluation. Hence FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of oral cancer. 11 C-Methionine (MET) is another promising tracer for PET that can be used to assess metabolic demand for amino acids in cancer cells. A MET-PET and FDG-PET study was performed during the same period to investigate diagnostic accuracy in 40 oral malignancies. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of MET-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively, and were comparable with those of FDG-PET. Further study is required to determine the diagnostic significance of MET-PET in evaluating response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  4. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud, E-mail: mjamshidi@iust.ac.ir

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • In this research UV-irradiated PET fabric was chemically modified. • The fabric at first carboxylated under UV irradiation using glutaric anhydride, then it was grafted using isocyanate (i.e. MDI). • The surface of the fabric was characterized before and after each treating satge. • The composite samples were prepared and tested for T-Peel test. The surfaces of the fabrics were surface characterized to understand. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  5. Adhesion of nitrile rubber to UV-assisted surface chemical modified PET fabric, part II: Interfacial characterization of MDI grafted PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavizadeh, Mahmoud; Jamshidi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • In this research UV-irradiated PET fabric was chemically modified. • The fabric at first carboxylated under UV irradiation using glutaric anhydride, then it was grafted using isocyanate (i.e. MDI). • The surface of the fabric was characterized before and after each treating satge. • The composite samples were prepared and tested for T-Peel test. The surfaces of the fabrics were surface characterized to understand. - Abstract: Fiber to rubber adhesion is an important subject in rubber industry. It is well known that surface treatment (i.e. physical, mechanical and chemical) is an effective method to improve interfacial bonding of fibers and/or fabrics to rubbers. UV irradiation is an effective method which has been used to increase fabric-rubber interfacial interactions. In this research UV assisted chemical modification of PET fabrics was used to increase PET to nitrile rubber (NBR) adhesion. Nitrile rubber is a perfect selection as fuel and oil resistant rubber. However it has weak bonding to PET fabric. For this purpose PET fabric was carboxylated under UV irradiation and then methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was grafted on carboxylated PET. The chemical composition of the fabric before and after surface treatment was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sectional morphology of the experimental PET fibers and the interface between rubber compound and PET fabric was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The morphology and structure of the product were analyzed by an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). FTIR-ATR and H NMR analysis were used to assess surface modifications on the PET irradiated fabrics.

  6. Value of fusion of PET and MRI in the detection of intra-pelvic recurrence of gynecological tumor: comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and pelvic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Makihara, Natsuko; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto; Takahashi, Satoru; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of retrospective image fusion from pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in detecting intra-pelvic recurrence of gynecological tumor. Thirty patients with a suspicion of recurrence of gynecological malignancy underwent inline contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) and pelvic contrast-enhanced MRI for restaging. Diagnostic performance about the local recurrence, pelvic lymph node and bone metastasis and peritoneal lesion of PET/low-dose non-enhanced CT (PET/ldCT), PET/full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (PET/ceCT), contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) were evaluated by two experienced readers. Final diagnoses were obtained by histopathological examinations, radiological imaging and clinical follow-up for at least 6 months. McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Documented positive locally recurrent disease, pelvic lymph node and bone metastases, and peritoneal dissemination were present in 53.3, 26.7, 10.0, and 16.7%, respectively. Patient-based sensitivity for detecting local recurrence, pelvic lymph node and bone metastasis and peritoneal lesion were 87.5, 87.5, 100 and 80.0%, respectively, for fused PET/MRI, 87.5, 62.5, 66.7 and 60.0%, respectively, for contrast-enhanced MRI, 62.5, 87.5, 66.7 and 80.0%, respectively, for PET/ceCT, and 50.0, 87.5, 66.7 and 60.0%, respectively, for PET/ldCT. The sensitivity of diagnosing local recurrence by fused PET/MRI was significantly better than that of PET/ldCT (p=0.041). The patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for the detection of intra-pelvic recurrence/metastasis were 91.3, 100 and 93.3% for fused PET/MRI, 82.6, 100 and 86.7% for contrast-enhanced MRI, 82.6, 100 and 86.7% for PET/ceCT and 78.3, 85.7 and 80.0% for PET/ldCT. Fused PET/MRI combines the individual advantages of MRI and PET, and is a valuable technique for assessment of intra

  7. Approaches using molecular imaging technology -- use of PET in clinical microdose studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Langer, Oliver

    2011-06-19

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging uses minute amounts of radiolabeled drug tracers and thereby meets the criteria for clinical microdose studies. The advantage of PET, when compared to other analytical methods used in microdose studies, is that the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a drug can be determined in the tissue targeted for drug treatment. PET microdosing already offers interesting applications in clinical oncology and in the development of central nervous system pharmaceuticals and is extending its range of application to many other fields of pharmaceutical medicine. Although requirements for preclinical safety testing for microdose studies have been cut down by regulatory authorities, radiopharmaceuticals increasingly need to be produced under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, which increases the costs of PET microdosing studies. Further challenges in PET microdosing include combining PET with other ultrasensitive analytical methods, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), to gain plasma PK data of drugs, beyond the short PET examination periods. Finally, conducting clinical PET studies with radiolabeled drugs both at micro- and therapeutic doses is encouraged to answer the question of dose linearity in clinical microdosing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Approaches using molecular imaging technology - use of PET in clinical microdose studies§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging uses minute amounts of radiolabeled drug tracers and thereby meets the criteria for clinical microdose studies. The advantage of PET, when compared to other analytical methods used in microdose studies, is that the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a drug can be determined in the tissue targeted for drug treatment. PET microdosing already offers interesting applications in clinical oncology and in the development of central nervous system pharmaceuticals and is extending its range of application to many other fields of pharmaceutical medicine. Although requirements for preclinical safety testing for microdose studies have been cut down by regulatory authorities, radiopharmaceuticals increasingly need to be produced under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, which increases the costs of PET microdosing studies. Further challenges in PET microdosing include combining PET with other ultrasensitive analytical methods, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), to gain plasma PK data of drugs, beyond the short PET examination periods. Finally, conducting clinical PET studies with radiolabeled drugs both at micro- and therapeutic doses is encouraged to answer the question of dose linearity in clinical microdosing. PMID:20887762

  9. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyesi, G.; Imrek, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Valastyan, I.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Kis, S.; Tron, L.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Research on small animal PET scanners has been a hot topic in recent years. These devices are used in the preclinical phases of drug tests and during the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. They also provide a cost efficient way to test new materials, new design concepts and new technologies that later can be used to build more efficient human medical imaging devices. The development of a PET scanner requires expertise on different fields, therefore a consortium was formed that brought together Hungarian academic and industrial partners: the Nuclear Research Institute (which has experience in the development of nuclear detectors and data acquisition systems), the PET Center of the University of Debrecen (which has clinical experience in the application of nuclear imaging devices and background in image processing software), Mediso Ltd. (which has been developing, manufacturing, selling and servicing medical imaging devices since 1990) and other academic partners. This consortium has been working together since 2003: the knowledge base acquired during the development of our small animal PET scanners (miniPET-I and miniPET-II) is now being utilized to build a commercial multimodal human PET scanner. The operation of a PET scanner is based on the simultaneous detection ('coincidence') of two gamma photons originating from a positron annihilation. In traditional PET scanners coincidence is detected by a central unit during the measurement. In our system there is no such central module: all detected single gamma events are recorded (list mode data acquisition), and the list of events are processed using a computer cluster (built from PCs). The usage of independent detector modules and commercial components reduce both development and maintenance costs. Also, this mode of data acquisition is more suitable for development purposes, since once the data is collected and stored it can be used many times to test different signal

  11. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  12. 11C-MET PET/MRI for detection of recurrent glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, C; Kirchner, J; Poeppel, T D; Schaarschmidt, B; Kebir, S; El Hindy, N; Hense, J; Quick, H H; Glas, M; Herrmann, K; Umutlu, L; Moenninghoff, C; Radbruch, A; Forsting, M; Schlamann, M

    2018-04-01

    Radiological assessment of brain tumors is widely based on the Radiology Assessment of Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria that consider non-specific T1 and T2 weighted images. Limitation of the RANO criteria is that they do not include metabolic imaging techniques that have been reported to be helpful to differentiate treatment related changes from true tumor progression. In the current study, we assessed if the combined use of MRI and PET with hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI can improve diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic confidence of the readers to differentiate treatment related changes from true progression in recurrent glioma. Fifty consecutive patients with histopathologically proven glioma were prospectively enrolled for a hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI to differentiate recurrent glioma from treatment induced changes. Sole MRI data were analyzed based on RANO. Sole PET data and in a third evaluation hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI data were assessed for metabolic respectively metabolic and morphologic glioma recurrence. Diagnostic performance and diagnostic confidence of the reader were calculated for the different modalities, and the McNemar test and Mann-Whitney U Test were applied for statistical analysis. Hybrid 11 C-MET PET/MRI was successfully performed in all 50 patients. Glioma recurrence was diagnosed in 35 of the 50 patients (70%). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for MRI (86.11% and 71.43%), for 11 C-MET PET (96.77% and 73.68%), and for hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI (97.14% and 93.33%). For diagnostic accuracy hybrid 11 C-MET-PET/MRI (96%) showed significantly higher values than MRI alone (82%), whereas no significant difference was found for 11C-MET PET (88%). Furthermore, by rating on a five-point Likert scale significantly higher scores were found for diagnostic confidence when comparing 11 C-MET PET/MRI (4.26 ± 0,777) to either PET alone (3.44 ± 0.705) or MRI alone (3.56 ± 0.733). This feasibility study showed that hybrid PET/MRI might strengthen

  13. {sup 11}C-MET PET/MRI for detection of recurrent glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuschl, C. [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); Kirchner, J.; Schaarschmidt, B. [University Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Poeppel, T.D.; Herrmann, K. [University Hospital Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Kebir, S.; Glas, M. [University Hospital Essen, Division of Clinical Neurooncology, Department of Neurology, Essen (Germany); El Hindy, N. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurosurgery, Essen (Germany); Hense, J. [University Hospital Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, Essen (Germany); Quick, H.H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L.; Moenninghoff, C.; Radbruch, A.; Forsting, M. [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, M. [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cologne (Germany)

    2018-04-15

    Radiological assessment of brain tumors is widely based on the Radiology Assessment of Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria that consider non-specific T1 and T2 weighted images. Limitation of the RANO criteria is that they do not include metabolic imaging techniques that have been reported to be helpful to differentiate treatment related changes from true tumor progression. In the current study, we assessed if the combined use of MRI and PET with hybrid {sup 11}C-MET PET/MRI can improve diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic confidence of the readers to differentiate treatment related changes from true progression in recurrent glioma. Fifty consecutive patients with histopathologically proven glioma were prospectively enrolled for a hybrid {sup 11}C-MET PET/MRI to differentiate recurrent glioma from treatment induced changes. Sole MRI data were analyzed based on RANO. Sole PET data and in a third evaluation hybrid {sup 11}C-MET-PET/MRI data were assessed for metabolic respectively metabolic and morphologic glioma recurrence. Diagnostic performance and diagnostic confidence of the reader were calculated for the different modalities, and the McNemar test and Mann-Whitney U Test were applied for statistical analysis. Hybrid {sup 11}C-MET PET/MRI was successfully performed in all 50 patients. Glioma recurrence was diagnosed in 35 of the 50 patients (70%). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for MRI (86.11% and 71.43%), for {sup 11}C-MET PET (96.77% and 73.68%), and for hybrid {sup 11}C-MET-PET/MRI (97.14% and 93.33%). For diagnostic accuracy hybrid {sup 11}C-MET-PET/MRI (96%) showed significantly higher values than MRI alone (82%), whereas no significant difference was found for 11C-MET PET (88%). Furthermore, by rating on a five-point Likert scale significantly higher scores were found for diagnostic confidence when comparing {sup 11}C-MET PET/MRI (4.26 ± 0,777) to either PET alone (3.44 ± 0.705) or MRI alone (3.56 ± 0.733). This feasibility study showed that hybrid

  14. Generalized study of the return to equilibrium of a particle in a plasma (Fokker-Planck formalism) (1961); Etude generale du retour a l'equilibre d'une particule au sein d'un plasma (formalisme de Fokker-Planck) (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Faculte des Sciences de Caen, 14 (France)

    1961-07-01

    The author examines the problem of the return to equilibrium of a particle in a plasma and completely explains Fokker-Planck equation. After that, he studies the possibility of interpreting the return of the test particle to Maxwellian distribution, using the development - which is obtained. He discusses the validity limits of the Rosenbluth, MacDonald and Judd approximation. (author) [French] Examinant le probleme du retour a l'equilibre d'une particule test au sein d'un plasma en equilibre, l'auteur cherche a expliciter completement l'expression de l'operateur de Fokker-Planck. Il etudie ensuite les conditions de coherence, c'est-a-dire la possibilite pour le developpement obtenu de traduire le retour de la particule test a l'etat maxwellien et discute des limites de validite de la formule de 'Rosenbluth, Mac Donald et Judd'. (auteur)

  15. FDG-PET and CT patterns of bone metastases and their relationship to previously administered anti-cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, Ora; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Keidar, Zohar; Goldberg, Anat; Nachtigal, Alicia; Militianu, Daniela; Fogelman, Ignac

    2006-01-01

    To assess 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in bone metastases in patients with and without previous treatment, and compare positive positron emission tomography (PET) with osteolytic or osteoblastic changes on computed tomography (CT). One hundred and thirty-one FDG-PET/CT studies were reviewed for bone metastases. A total of 294 lesions were found in 76 patients, 81 in untreated patients and 213 in previously treated patients. PET was assessed for abnormal FDG uptake localised by PET/CT to the skeleton. CT was evaluated for bone metastases and for blastic or lytic pattern. The relationship between the presence and pattern of bone metastases on PET and CT, and prior treatment was statistically analysed using the chi-square test. PET identified 174 (59%) metastases, while CT detected 280 (95%). FDG-avid metastases included 74/81 (91%) untreated and 100/213 (47%) treated lesions (p<0.001). On CT there were 76/81 (94%) untreated and 204/213 (96%) treated metastases (p NS). In untreated patients, 85% of lesions were seen on both PET and CT (26 blastic, 43 lytic). In treated patients, 53% of lesions were seen only on CT (95 blastic, 18 lytic). Of the osteoblastic metastases, 65/174 (37%) were PET positive and 98/120 (82%), PET negative (p<0.001). The results of the present study indicate that when imaging bone metastases, prior treatment can alter the relationship between PET and CT findings. Most untreated bone metastases are PET positive and lytic on CT, while in previously treated patients most lesions are PET negative and blastic on CT. PET and CT therefore appear to be complementary in the assessment of bone metastases. (orig.)

  16. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with {sup 18}F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy.

  17. SU-C-9A-06: The Impact of CT Image Used for Attenuation Correction in 4D-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Y; Bowsher, J; Yan, S; Cai, J; Das, S; Yin, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the appropriateness of using 3D non-gated CT image for attenuation correction (AC) in a 4D-PET (gated PET) imaging protocol used in radiotherapy treatment planning simulation. Methods: The 4D-PET imaging protocol in a Siemens PET/CT simulator (Biograph mCT, Siemens Medical Solutions, Hoffman Estates, IL) was evaluated. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) with a moving glass sphere (8 mL) in the middle of its thorax portion was used in the experiments. The glass was filled with 18 F-FDG and was in a longitudinal motion derived from a real patient breathing pattern. Varian RPM system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) was used for respiratory gating. Both phase-gating and amplitude-gating methods were tested. The clinical imaging protocol was modified to use three different CT images for AC in 4D-PET reconstruction: first is to use a single-phase CT image to mimic actual clinical protocol (single-CT-PET); second is to use the average intensity projection CT (AveIP-CT) derived from 4D-CT scanning (AveIP-CT-PET); third is to use 4D-CT image to do the phase-matched AC (phase-matching- PET). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) and volume of the moving target (glass sphere) with threshold of 40% SUVmax were calculated for comparison between 4D-PET images derived with different AC methods. Results: The SUVmax varied 7.3%±6.9% over the breathing cycle in single-CT-PET, compared to 2.5%±2.8% in AveIP-CT-PET and 1.3%±1.2% in phasematching PET. The SUVmax in single-CT-PET differed by up to 15% from those in phase-matching-PET. The target volumes measured from single- CT-PET images also presented variations up to 10% among different phases of 4D PET in both phase-gating and amplitude-gating experiments. Conclusion: Attenuation correction using non-gated CT in 4D-PET imaging is not optimal process for quantitative analysis. Clinical 4D-PET imaging protocols should consider phase-matched 4D-CT image if available to achieve better accuracy

  18. Performance of a high sensitivity time-of-flight PET ring operating simultaneously within a 3T MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Craig S; Jansen, Floris; Deller, Tim; Maramraju, Sri Harsha; Grant, Alex; Iagaru, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF)-PET/MR research system installed at Stanford will be used to test the hypotheses that (a) it is possible to acquire simultaneous TOF-PET and 3T MR data while achieving uncompromised performance in both modalities and (b) simultaneous TOF-PET/MR is a tool for multi-parameter characterization of disease. In this paper we will describe the design as well as performance measurements both for the standalone PET ring, and with the two systems integrated. We will also show a selection of clinical images to compare the performance of the integrated TOF-PET/MR system with that of a state-of-the-art PET/CT system.

  19. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on

  20. Pets in the family: practical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate; Darling, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Adapting family life cycle theory to include pets provides veterinarians with a framework for understanding and reinforcing the human-animal bond. The family genogram with pets is a practice tool that identifies all people and pets in the family, enhancing the practice of One Health at the community level.

  1. Pets or People: Another Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, John

    1986-01-01

    Compared four samples of elderly women: living alone, with other persons, and with and without a pet. Pets only made a difference for those living alone. At best, pets only attenuate the sense of loneliness. In intervention with the elderly, the provision of human supports should remain a priority. (Author/BL)

  2. Pain Medicines for Pets: Know the Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approved veterinary oral NSAIDs. Are OTC Meds for People Safe for Pets? McLean says that it’s not unusual for pet ... or that a dose that is safe for people may not be safe for their pets,” she notes. In fact, some over-the-counter ( ...

  3. PET/MRI. Challenges, solutions and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Hans [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4

    2012-07-01

    Already from the start of PET/CT integrating positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in one instrument, there have been considerations how to combine PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) so that their complementary abilities can be utilized in a single investigation. Since classical PET electronics fail in an even weak magnetic field and PET signal processing might disturb high-frequency signals of MRI, it soon became clear that new solutions had to be found to avoid mutual interferences. During the last fifteen years a number of different approaches towards PET/MRI for small animal imaging have been developed by research groups which together with their specific features are summarized in this review. Recently, PET/MRI for human imaging became available as well - this time by industrial initiatives. First some prototypes of BrainPET/MRI were developed followed by commercial products for simultaneous and non-simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI. Although only PET/MRI integrated in one scanner offers the full diversity of complementary multiparametric imaging, there are also promising applications of non-simultaneous sequential PET/MRI. While describing the present instrumentation for human PET/MRI, this review discusses the challenges and promises related to this new imaging technology. (orig.)

  4. Application of PET in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Dong Young

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging method that employs radionuclide and tomography techniques. Since 1995, we applied PET not only to the diagnosis of breast cancer but also to the detection of abnormalities in the augmented breast and to the detection of metastasis. Until 2001, we evaluated 242 breast cases by PET at PET center of Seoul National University Hospital. Our group has reported serially at the international journals. In the firtst report, PET showed high sensitivity for detecting breast cancer, both the primary and axillary node metastasis. A total of 27 patients underwent breast operations based on PET results at Seoul National University Hospital from 1995 to 1996. The diagnostic accuracy of PET were 97% for the primary tumor mass and 96% for axillary lymph node metastasis. In case of the breast augmented, PET also showed excellent diagnostic results for primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis where mammography and ultrasound could not diagnose properly. PET also had outstanding results in the detection of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer(sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%, accuracy 89%). In addition, our study gave some evidence that PET could be applied further to evaluate the growth rate of tumors by measuring SUV, and finally to prognosticated the disease. PET could also be applied to evaluate the response after chemotherapy to measure its metabolic rate and size. In conclsion, PET is a highly sensitive, accurate diagnostic tool for breast cancer of primary lesion in various conditions including metastasis

  5. Procedures for evaluating technical specifications (PETS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, P.K.; Boccio, J.L.; Vesely, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, aspects of technical specifications relating to Generic Issues B-56 and B-61 are discussed from a risk-standpoint. These primarily deal with the risk issues associated with (1) adaptive diesel test requirements/surveillance test intervals, and (2) the effectiveness of cumulative outage time requirements for controlling downtime risk. Risk and reliability approaches are presented which (1) allow risk-acceptable test intervals to be determined for any diesel and (2) show the potential risk-control capability of prescribed allowed cumulative outage times. This work was conducted through NRC's Procedures for Evaluating Technical Specifications (PETS) Program. The overall objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate methodologies that utilize risk insights and reliability techniques for evaluating the scope, detailed requirements, and safety impact of plant technical specifications

  6. Nontuberculous mycobacteria in captive and pet reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Reil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to highlight the importance of nontuberculous mycobacteria species in the pathology of various reptilian pet species as well as their epidemiological significance of infection transmission to humans. Faeces samples from six living reptiles and organs from ten carcasses were submitted to bacteriological testing during the years 2003–2015. Positive colonies from one faeces sample and two organs showed the presence of a gene coding 65kDa antigen common for all mycobacteria. Further identification to the species level revealed that the isolates belong to Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, later subjected to drug susceptibility testing which confirmed high resistance levels in both isolates. In conclusion, there is a great significance of the occurrence of nontuberculous mycobacteria in captive and pet reptiles, presenting reptiles as possible hosts representing a serious threat of transmission of high resistance mycobacterial isolates to humans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of M. avium subsp. hominissuis occurrence in reptiles.

  7. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R G

    1994-04-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective.

  8. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  9. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  10. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4...

  11. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Croteau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose, proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET imaging using the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication–-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  12. Evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Lino M. [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Lahner, Harald; Fuehrer, Dagmar [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Endocrine Tumour Center at WTZ and ENETS Center of Excellence, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Endocrine Tumour Center at WTZ and ENETS Center of Excellence, Essen (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p < 0.001) and did not differ significantly (p = 0.35) between the modalities. Overall conspicuity and NET lesion conspicuity were higher on PET/MRI (both p < 0.01). Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. (orig.)

  13. Semiautomated analysis of small-animal PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Adam L; Dahlbom, Magnus; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Hsueh, Wei-Ann; Pio, Betty S; Czernin, Johannes; Kreissl, Michael; Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Silverman, Daniel H S

    2006-07-01

    The objective of the work reported here was to develop and test automated methods to calculate biodistribution of PET tracers using small-animal PET images. After developing software that uses visually distinguishable organs and other landmarks on a scan to semiautomatically coregister a digital mouse phantom with a small-animal PET scan, we elastically transformed the phantom to conform to those landmarks in 9 simulated scans and in 18 actual PET scans acquired of 9 mice. Tracer concentrations were automatically calculated in 22 regions of interest (ROIs) reflecting the whole body and 21 individual organs. To assess the accuracy of this approach, we compared the software-measured activities in the ROIs of simulated PET scans with the known activities, and we compared the software-measured activities in the ROIs of real PET scans both with manually established ROI activities in original scan data and with actual radioactivity content in immediately harvested tissues of imaged animals. PET/atlas coregistrations were successfully generated with minimal end-user input, allowing rapid quantification of 22 separate tissue ROIs. The simulated scan analysis found the method to be robust with respect to the overall size and shape of individual animal scans, with average activity values for all organs tested falling within the range of 98% +/- 3% of the organ activity measured in the unstretched phantom scan. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) measured from actual PET scans using this semiautomated method correlated reasonably well with radioactivity content measured in harvested organs (median r = 0.94) and compared favorably with conventional SUV correlations with harvested organ data (median r = 0.825). A semiautomated analytic approach involving coregistration of scan-derived images with atlas-type images can be used in small-animal whole-body radiotracer studies to estimate radioactivity concentrations in organs. This approach is rapid and less labor intensive than are

  14. Design and evaluation of the MAMMI dedicated breast PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moliner, L.; González, A. J.; Soriano, A.; Sánchez, F.; Correcher, C.; Orero, A.; Carles, M.; Vidal, L. F.; Barberá, J.; Caballero, L.; Seimetz, M.; Vázquez, C.; Benlloch, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A breast dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner has been developed based on monolithic LYSO crystals coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). In this study, we describe the design of the PET system and report on its performance evaluation. Methods: MAMMI is a breast PET scanner based on monolithic LYSO crystals. It consists of 12 compact modules with a transaxial field of view (FOV) of 170 mm in diameter and 40 mm axial FOV that translates to cover up to 170 mm. The patient lies down in a prone position that facilitates maximum breast elongation. Quantitative performance analysis of the calculated method for the attenuation correction specifically developed for MAMMI, and based on PET image segmentation, has also been conducted in this evaluation. In order to fully determine the MAMMI prototype's performance, we have adapted the measurements suggested for National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 and NU 4-2008 protocol tests, as they are defined for whole-body and small animal PET scanners, respectively. Results: Spatial resolutions of 1.6, 1.8, and 1.9 mm were measured in the axial, radial, and tangential directions, respectively. A scatter fraction of 20.8% was obtained and the maximum NEC was determined to be 25 kcps at 44 MBq. The average sensitivity of the system was observed to be 1% for an energy window of (250 keV–750 keV) and a maximum absolute sensitivity of 1.8% was measured at the FOV center. Conclusions: The overall performance of the MAMMI reported on this evaluation quantifies its ability to produce high quality PET images. Spatial resolution values below 3 mm were measured in most of the FOV. Only the radial component of spatial resolution exceeds the 3 mm at radial positions larger than 60 mm. This study emphasizes the need for standardized testing methodologies for dedicated breast PET systems similar to NEMA standards for whole-body and small animal PET scanners.

  15. PET in tumor imaging: research only or a cost effective clinical tool?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    PET imaging has for many years been a versatile tool for non-invasive imaging of neuro-physiology and, indeed, whole body physiology. Quantitative PET imaging of trace amounts of radioactivity is scientifically elegant and can be very complex. This lecture focuses on whether and where this test is clinically useful. Because of the research tradition, PET imaging has been perceived as an 'expensive' test, as it costs more per scan than CT and MRI scans at most institutions. Such a superficial analysis is incorrect, however, as it is increasingly recognized that imaging costs, which in some circumstances will be increased by the use of PET, are only a relatively small component of patient care costs. Thus, PET may raise imaging costs and the number of imaging procedures in some settings, though PET may reduce imaging test numbers in other settings. However, the analysis must focus on the total costs of patient management. Analyses focused on total patient care costs, including cost of hospitalization and cost surgery as well as imaging costs, have shown that PET can substantially reduce total patient care costs in several settings. This is achieved by providing a more accurate diagnosis, and thus having fewer instances of an incorrect diagnosis resulting in subsequent inappropriate surgery or investigations. Several institutions have shown scenarios in which PET for tumor imaging is cost effective. While the specific results of the analyses vary based on disease prevalence and cost input values for each procedure, as well as the projected performance of PET, the similar results showing total care cost savings in the management of several common cancers, strongly supports the rational for the use of PET in cancer management. In addition, promising clinical results are forthcoming in several other illnesses, suggesting PET will have broader utility than these uses, alone. Thus, while PET is an 'expensive' imaging procedure and has considerable utility as a research

  16. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  17. Introducing the PET Centre Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belohlavek, O.

    2001-01-01

    The PET Centre Prague (www.homolka.cz/nm) was established in 1999 as the outcome of a joint project of the public Na Homolce Hospital and the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, plc, the Czech radiopharmaceutical producer. Technical and financial assistance was provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which perceived the Centre as its model project that could serve as a guide for the development of PET centres in countries sharing a comparable level of development with the Czech Republic. The article maps the history of the project, its design, workplace lay-out and equipment, radiation protection arrangements and spectrum of the first approx. 3000 investigations. (author)

  18. F-18 FDG PET finding in autonomous thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan H.; Lee, Myoung Hoon; Yoon, Seek Nam; Hwang, Kyung Hoon

    2001-01-01

    F-18 FDG PET has become an important diagnostic imaging modality of various malignancies including thyroid cancer. Focal hypermetabolic lesion in the thyroid gland is usually considered malignant (Fig.1), although some benign lesions are also hypermetabolic. The aim of our poster presentation is to demonstrate F-18- FDG PET finding in autonomous thyroid nodules (ATN) and to avoid confusion in the interpretation of F-18-FDG PET performed for the evaluation of thyroid malignancy. Two patients with ATN (one with toxic and the other with nontoxic) underwent F-18-PET. ATN was proven by Tc-99m pertechnate thyroid scan (TS) and thyroid function tests (TFTs) were performed. First patient with ATN was asymptomatic and had a long history of thyroid nodule. Second patient was suffering from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and he was mildly thyrotoxic clinically and chemically. Gamma camera based F-18 FDG PET was performed utilizing Elscints Varicam (Haifa, Israel) one hour after IV administration of 111 MBq (3mCi) F-18 FDG. Patients were fasting more than 6 hours prior ot FDG injection. First patients was scanned the neck and second patient had scan of the whole trunk including neck for the evaluation of AML. Both nontoxic and toxic ATNs were hypermetabolic and it was impossible to differentiate benign from malignancy. Biopsy of nodule of the first patient and surgical removal of the nodule in the second patient was benign. Benign nontoxic and toxic ATNs are F-18 FDG avid. The reason for this is that ATN has increased glycolysis and iodide metabolism. T