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Sample records for epithelial cells orchestrates

  1. 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D-mediated orchestration of anticancer, transcript-level effects in the immortalized, non-transformed prostate epithelial cell line, RWPE1

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    Clinton Steve K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality among US men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that high vitamin D status protects men from prostate cancer and the active form of vitamin D, 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH2D has anti-cancer effects in cultured prostate cells. Still, the molecular mechanisms and the gene targets for vitamin D-mediated prostate cancer prevention are unknown. Results We examined the effect of 1,25(OH2D (+/- 100 nM, 6, 24, 48 h on the transcript profile of proliferating RWPE1 cells, an immortalized, non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cell line that is growth arrested by 1,25(OH2D (Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0, n = 4/treatment per time and dose. Our analysis revealed many transcript level changes at a 5% false detection rate: 6 h, 1571 (61% up, 24 h, 1816 (60% up, 48 h, 3566 (38% up. 288 transcripts were regulated similarly at all time points (182 up, 80 down and many of the promoters for these transcripts contained putative vitamin D response elements. Functional analysis by pathway or Gene Set Analysis revealed early suppression of WNT, Notch, NF-kB, and IGF1 signaling. Transcripts related to inflammation were suppressed at 6 h (e.g. IL-1 pathway and suppression of proinflammatory pathways continued at later time points (e.g. IL-17 and IL-6 pathways. There was also evidence for induction of anti-angiogenic pathways and induction of transcripts for protection from oxidative stress or maintenance of cell redox homeostasis at 6 h. Conclusions Our data reveal of large number of potential new, direct vitamin D target genes relevant to prostate cancer prevention. In addition, our data suggests that rather than having a single strong regulatory effect, vitamin D orchestrates a pattern of changes within prostate epithelial cells that limit or slow carcinogenesis.

  2. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  3. Dynamin 2 orchestrates the global actomyosin cytoskeleton for epithelial maintenance and apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jennifer; Rikhy, Richa; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2009-12-08

    The mechanisms controlling cell shape changes within epithelial monolayers for tissue formation and reorganization remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of dynamin, a large GTPase, in epithelial morphogenesis. Depletion of dynamin 2 (Dyn2), the only dynamin in epithelial cells, prevents establishment and maintenance of epithelial polarity, with no junctional formation and abnormal actin organization. Expression of Dyn2 mutants shifted to a non-GTP state, by contrast, causes dramatic apical constriction without disrupting polarity. This is due to Dyn2's interactions with deacetylated cortactin and downstream effectors, which cause enhanced actomyosin contraction. Neither inhibitors of endocytosis nor GTP-shifted Dyn2 mutants induce apical constriction. This suggests that GTPase-dependent changes in Dyn2 lead to interactions with different effectors that may differentially modulate endocytosis and/or actomyosin dynamics in polarized cells. We propose this enables Dyn2 to coordinate, in a GTPase-dependent manner, membrane recycling and actomyosin contractility during epithelial morphogenesis.

  4. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkopf, Nadine; Pickert, Geethanjali; Billmeier, Ulrike; Mahapatro, Mousumi; Wirtz, Stefan; Martini, Eva; Leppkes, Moritz; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Becker, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  5. Activation of intestinal epithelial Stat3 orchestrates tissue defense during gastrointestinal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Wittkopf

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal infections with EHEC and EPEC are responsible for outbreaks of diarrheal diseases and represent a global health problem. Innate first-line-defense mechanisms such as production of mucus and antimicrobial peptides by intestinal epithelial cells are of utmost importance for host control of gastrointestinal infections. For the first time, we directly demonstrate a critical role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells upon infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium - a murine pathogen that mimics human infections with attaching and effacing Escherichia coli. C. rodentium induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-22 in gut samples of mice and was associated with activation of the transcription factor Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells. C. rodentium infection induced expression of several antimicrobial peptides such as RegIIIγ and Pla2g2a in the intestine which was critically dependent on Stat3 activation. Consequently, mice with specific deletion of Stat3 in intestinal epithelial cells showed increased susceptibility to C. rodentium infection as indicated by high bacterial load, severe gut inflammation, pronounced intestinal epithelial cell death and dissemination of bacteria to distant organs. Together, our data implicate an essential role for Stat3 activation in intestinal epithelial cells during C. rodentium infection. Stat3 concerts the host response to bacterial infection by controlling bacterial growth and suppression of apoptosis to maintain intestinal epithelial barrier function.

  6. Natural Killer Cells in the Orchestration of Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

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    Luca Parisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, altered immune cell phenotype, and functions are key features shared by diverse chronic diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cancer. Natural killer cells are innate lymphoid cells primarily involved in the immune system response to non-self-components but their plasticity is largely influenced by the pathological microenvironment. Altered NK phenotype and function have been reported in several pathological conditions, basically related to impaired or enhanced toxicity. Here we reviewed and discussed the role of NKs in selected, different, and “distant” chronic diseases, cancer, diabetes, periodontitis, and atherosclerosis, placing NK cells as crucial orchestrator of these pathologic conditions.

  7. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

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    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  8. From cells to tissue: A continuum model of epithelial mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Shuji; Marcq, Philippe; Sugimura, Kaoru

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional continuum model of epithelial tissue mechanics was formulated using cellular-level mechanical ingredients and cell morphogenetic processes, including cellular shape changes and cellular rearrangements. This model incorporates stress and deformation tensors, which can be compared with experimental data. Focusing on the interplay between cell shape changes and cell rearrangements, we elucidated dynamical behavior underlying passive relaxation, active contraction-elongation, and tissue shear flow, including a mechanism for contraction-elongation, whereby tissue flows perpendicularly to the axis of cell elongation. This study provides an integrated scheme for the understanding of the orchestration of morphogenetic processes in individual cells to achieve epithelial tissue morphogenesis.

  9. Gastric Epithelial Stem Cells

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    MILLS, JASON C.; SHIVDASANI, RAMESH A.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of stem cells in the gastrointestinal tract include the identification of molecular markers of stem and early progenitor cells in the small intestine. Although gastric epithelial stem cells have been localized, little is known about their molecular biology. Recent reports describe the use of inducible Cre recombinase activity to indelibly label candidate stem cells and their progeny in the distal stomach, (ie, the antrum and pylorus). No such lineage labeling of epithelial stem cells has been reported in the gastric body (corpus). Among stem cells in the alimentary canal, those of the adult corpus are unique in that they lie close to the lumen and increase proliferation following loss of a single mature progeny lineage, the acid-secreting parietal cell. They are also unique in that they neither depend on Wnt signaling nor express the surface marker Lgr5. Because pathogenesis of gastric adenocarcinoma has been associated with abnormal patterns of gastric differentiation and with chronic tissue injury, there has been much research on the response of stomach epithelial stem cells to inflammation. Chronic inflammation, as induced by infection with Helicobacter pylori, affects differentiation and promotes metaplasias. Several studies have identified cellular and molecular mechanisms in spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing (pseudopyloric) metaplasia. Researchers have also begun to identify signaling pathways and events that take place during embryonic development that eventually establish the adult stem cells to maintain the specific features and functions of the stomach mucosa. We review the cytologic, molecular, functional, and developmental properties of gastric epithelial stem cells. PMID:21144849

  10. Substrate stiffness orchestrates epithelial cellular heterogeneity with controlled proliferative pattern via E-cadherin/β-catenin mechanotransduction.

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    Wang, Bingjie; Qin, Peng; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Tie; Wang, Jingyu; Liu, Longwei; Zhu, Lu; Xu, Jing; Huang, Chenyu; Shi, Yan; Du, Yanan

    2016-09-01

    Epithelial cellular heterogeneity has been observed in pathological tissues with abnormal matrix stiffness and cells cultured on rigid substrates. However, it remains unclear how matrix stiffness influences cellular heterogeneity formation in multi-cellular population. Here, we demonstrated that cellular heterogeneity regulated by substrate stiffness is evident starting from the initial single-cell stage (indicated by cellular Young's modulus and morphology) until the resulting multi-cellular stage (indicated by cellular functions) through distinguished proliferative patterns. Epithelial cells on soft substrate proliferated in a neighbor-dependent manner with stronger E-cadherin expression and more homogeneous E-cadherin/β-catenin localization compared to those on coverslips, which resulted in reduced heterogeneity in downstream cellular functions of the multi-cellular population. In particular, decreased heterogeneity in human embryonic stem cells upon expansion and endodermal induction was achieved on soft substrate. Overall, our work provides new insights on mechanotransduction during epithelial proliferation which regulates the formation of cellular heterogeneity and potentially provides a highly efficient approach to regulate stem cell fate by fine-tuning substrate stiffness. This study demonstrates that cellular heterogeneity regulated by substrate stiffness is evident starting from the initial single-cell stage until the resulting multi-cellular stage through distinguished proliferative patterns. During this process, E-cadherin/β-catenin mechanotransduction is found to play important role in substrate stiffness-regulated epithelial cellular heterogeneity formation. In particular, decreased heterogeneity in human embryonic stem cells upon expansion and endodermal induction is achieved on soft substrate. Hence, we believe that this work not only provides new insights on mechanotransduction of E-cadherin/β-catenin which regulates the formation of cellular

  11. Epithelial cell polarity, stem cells and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Belmonte, Fernando; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2011-01-01

    , deregulation of adhesion and polarity proteins can cause misoriented cell divisions and increased self-renewal of adult epithelial stem cells. In this Review, we highlight some advances in the understanding of how loss of epithelial cell polarity contributes to tumorigenesis.......After years of extensive scientific discovery much has been learned about the networks that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Loss of expression or functional activity of cell adhesion and cell polarity proteins (including the PAR, crumbs (CRB) and scribble (SCRIB) complexes) is intricately related...

  12. The Peroxisome: Orchestrating Important Developmental Decisions from inside the Cell

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vladimir I. Titorenko; Richard A. Rachubinski

    2004-01-01

    ... decisions from inside the cell. This review highlights various strategies that peroxisomes employ to regulate the processes of development, differentiation, and morphogenesis and critically evaluates several molecular mechanisms...

  13. Metabolic reprogramming orchestrates cancer stem cell properties in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao-An; Wang, Chia-Yu; Hsieh, Yi-Tao; Chen, Yann-Jang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumor cells endowed with self-renewal capacity and are considered as an underlying cause of tumor recurrence and metastasis. The metabolic signatures of CSCs and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their stem cell-like properties still remain elusive. We utilized nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) CSCs as a model to dissect their metabolic signatures and found that CSCs underwent metabolic shift and mitochondrial resetting distinguished from their differentiated counterparts. In metabolic shift, CSCs showed a greater reliance on glycolysis for energy supply compared with the parental cells. In mitochondrial resetting, the quantity and function of mitochondria of CSCs were modulated by the biogenesis of the organelles, and the round-shaped mitochondria were distributed in a peri-nuclear manner similar to those seen in the stem cells. In addition, we blocked the glycolytic pathway, increased the ROS levels, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes of CSCs, respectively, and examined the effects of these metabolic factors on CSC properties. Intriguingly, the properties of CSCs were curbed when we redirected the quintessential metabolic reprogramming, which indicates that the plasticity of energy metabolism regulated the balance between acquisition and loss of the stemness status. Taken together, we suggest that metabolic reprogramming is critical for CSCs to sustain self-renewal, deter from differentiation and enhance the antioxidant defense mechanism. Characterization of metabolic reprogramming governing CSC properties is paramount to the design of novel therapeutic strategies through metabolic intervention of CSCs.

  14. Sensing sound: molecules that orchestrate mechanotransduction by hair cells.

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    Kazmierczak, Piotr; Müller, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    Animals use acoustic signals to communicate and to obtain information about their environment. The processing of acoustic signals is initiated at auditory sense organs, where mechanosensory hair cells convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. Although the biophysical principles underlying the mechanotransduction process in hair cells have been characterized in much detail over the past 30 years, the molecular building-blocks of the mechanotransduction machinery have proved to be difficult to determine. We review here recent studies that have both identified some of these molecules and established the mechanisms by which they regulate the activity of the still-elusive mechanotransduction channel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted Disruption of Orchestration between Stroma and Tumor Cells in Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Implications

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    Kong, Xiangyu; Li, Lei; Li, Zhaoshen; Xie, Keping

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies, with a prominent desmoplastic reaction as the defining hallmark of the disease. The past several decades have seen dramatic progress in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including the identification of precursor lesions, sequential transformation from normal pancreas to invasive pancreatic cancer and corresponding signature genetic events, and the biological impact of those alterations on malignant behaviors. However, the current therapeutic strategies for epithelial tumor cells, which have exhibited potent antitumor activity in cell culture and animal models, have failed to have significant effects in the clinic. The desmoplastic stroma surrounding pancreatic cancer cells, which accounts for about 90% of a tumor’s mass, clearly is not a passive scaffold for cancer cells but an active contributor to carcinogenesis. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and their stroma will be important to designing new, effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on the origination of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic tumors, their biological effects on pancreatic cancer cells, and the orchestration between these two components. PMID:22749856

  16. RNA Helicases DDX5 and DDX17 Dynamically Orchestrate Transcription, miRNA, and Splicing Programs in Cell Differentiation

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    Etienne Dardenne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The RNA helicases DDX5 and DDX17 are members of a large family of highly conserved proteins that are involved in gene-expression regulation; however, their in vivo targets and activities in biological processes such as cell differentiation, which requires reprogramming of gene-expression programs at multiple levels, are not well characterized. Here, we uncovered a mechanism by which DDX5 and DDX17 cooperate with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP H/F splicing factors to define epithelial- and myoblast-specific splicing subprograms. We then observed that downregulation of DDX5 and DDX17 protein expression during myogenesis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation contributes to the switching of splicing programs during these processes. Remarkably, this downregulation is mediated by the production of miRNAs induced upon differentiation in a DDX5/DDX17-dependent manner. Since DDX5 and DDX17 also function as coregulators of master transcriptional regulators of differentiation, we propose to name these proteins “master orchestrators” of differentiation that dynamically orchestrate several layers of gene expression.

  17. Epithelial rotation is preceded by planar symmetry breaking of actomyosin and protects epithelial tissue from cell deformations.

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    Ivana Viktorinová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry breaking is involved in many developmental processes that form bodies and organs. One of them is the epithelial rotation of developing tubular and acinar organs. However, how epithelial cells move, how they break symmetry to define their common direction, and what function rotational epithelial motions have remains elusive. Here, we identify a dynamic actomyosin network that breaks symmetry at the basal surface of the Drosophila follicle epithelium of acinar-like primitive organs, called egg chambers, and may represent a candidate force-generation mechanism that underlies the unidirectional motion of this epithelial tissue. We provide evidence that the atypical cadherin Fat2, a key planar cell polarity regulator in Drosophila oogenesis, directs and orchestrates transmission of the intracellular actomyosin asymmetry cue onto a tissue plane in order to break planar actomyosin symmetry, facilitate epithelial rotation in the opposite direction, and direct the elongation of follicle cells. In contrast, loss of this rotational motion results in anisotropic non-muscle Myosin II pulses that are disorganized in plane and causes cell deformations in the epithelial tissue of Drosophila eggs. Our work demonstrates that atypical cadherins play an important role in the control of symmetry breaking of cellular mechanics in order to facilitate tissue motion and model epithelial tissue. We propose that their functions may be evolutionarily conserved in tubular/acinar vertebrate organs.

  18. Epithelial rotation is preceded by planar symmetry breaking of actomyosin and protects epithelial tissue from cell deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorinová, Ivana; Henry, Ian; Tomancak, Pavel

    2017-11-01

    Symmetry breaking is involved in many developmental processes that form bodies and organs. One of them is the epithelial rotation of developing tubular and acinar organs. However, how epithelial cells move, how they break symmetry to define their common direction, and what function rotational epithelial motions have remains elusive. Here, we identify a dynamic actomyosin network that breaks symmetry at the basal surface of the Drosophila follicle epithelium of acinar-like primitive organs, called egg chambers, and may represent a candidate force-generation mechanism that underlies the unidirectional motion of this epithelial tissue. We provide evidence that the atypical cadherin Fat2, a key planar cell polarity regulator in Drosophila oogenesis, directs and orchestrates transmission of the intracellular actomyosin asymmetry cue onto a tissue plane in order to break planar actomyosin symmetry, facilitate epithelial rotation in the opposite direction, and direct the elongation of follicle cells. In contrast, loss of this rotational motion results in anisotropic non-muscle Myosin II pulses that are disorganized in plane and causes cell deformations in the epithelial tissue of Drosophila eggs. Our work demonstrates that atypical cadherins play an important role in the control of symmetry breaking of cellular mechanics in order to facilitate tissue motion and model epithelial tissue. We propose that their functions may be evolutionarily conserved in tubular/acinar vertebrate organs.

  19. Eosinophils promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Atsushi Yasukawa

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling of the airways including subepithelial fibrosis and myofibroblast hyperplasia are characteristic pathological findings of bronchial asthma. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT plays a critical role in airway remodelling. In this study, we hypothesized that infiltrating eosinophils promote airway remodelling in bronchial asthma. To demonstrate this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of eosinophils on EMT by in vitro and in vivo studies. EMT was assessed in mice that received intra-tracheal instillation of mouse bone marrow derived eosinophils and in human bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with eosinophils freshly purified from healthy individuals or with eosinophilic leukemia cell lines. Intra-tracheal instillation of eosinophils was associated with enhanced bronchial inflammation and fibrosis and increased lung concentration of growth factors. Mice instilled with eosinophils pre-treated with transforming growth factor(TGF-β1 siRNA had decreased bronchial wall fibrosis compared to controls. EMT was induced in bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with human eosinophils and it was associated with increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 phosphorylation in the bronchial epithelial cells. Treatment with anti-TGF-β1 antibody blocked EMT in bronchial epithelial cells. Eosinophils induced EMT in bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting their contribution to the pathogenesis of airway remodelling.

  20. iNKT cell development is orchestrated by different branches of TGF-β signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doisne, Jean-Marc; Bartholin, Laurent; Yan, Kai-Ping; Garcia, Céline N.; Duarte, Nadia; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Vincent, David; Cyprian, Farhan; Horvat, Branka; Martel, Sylvie; Rimokh, Ruth; Losson, Régine; Benlagha, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells constitute a distinct subset of T lymphocytes exhibiting important immune-regulatory functions. Although various steps of their differentiation have been well characterized, the factors controlling their development remain poorly documented. Here, we show that TGF-β controls the differentiation program of iNKT cells. We demonstrate that TGF-β signaling carefully and specifically orchestrates several steps of iNKT cell development. In vivo, this multifaceted role of TGF-β involves the concerted action of different pathways of TGF-β signaling. Whereas the Tif-1γ branch controls lineage expansion, the Smad4 branch maintains the maturation stage that is initially repressed by a Tif-1γ/Smad4-independent branch. Thus, these three different branches of TGF-β signaling function in concert as complementary effectors, allowing TGF-β to fine tune the iNKT cell differentiation program. PMID:19451264

  1. Isolation and culture of biliary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Joplin, R

    1994-01-01

    At one time it was thought that biliary epithelial cells simply formed the lining to the tubular conduits which constitute the biliary tract. Development of in vitro systems for culturing biliary epithelial cells has enabled functional studies which increasingly show that this is far from true, and that biliary epithelial cells do have important functional roles. Disruption of these functions may be involved in the generation of pathology. Most functional studies to date have utilised cells i...

  2. Acinetobacter baumannii invades epithelial cells and outer membrane protein A mediates interactions with epithelial cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choi, Chul Hee; Lee, Jun Sik; Lee, Yoo Chul; Park, Tae In; Lee, Je Chul

    2008-01-01

    ... of A. baumannii outer membrane protein A (AbOmpA) in interactions with epithelial cells. A. baumannii invaded epithelial cells by a zipper-like mechanism, which is associated with microfilament- and microtubule-dependent uptake mechanisms...

  3. Cistrome-based Cooperation between Airway Epithelial Glucocorticoid Receptor and NF-κB Orchestrates Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Vineela; Sasse, Sarah K; Altonsy, Mohammed O; Berman, Reena; Chu, Hong W; Phang, Tzu L; Gerber, Anthony N

    2016-06-10

    Antagonism of pro-inflammatory transcription factors by monomeric glucocorticoid receptor (GR) has long been viewed as central to glucocorticoid (GC) efficacy. However, the mechanisms and targets through which GCs exert therapeutic effects in diseases such as asthma remain incompletely understood. We previously defined a surprising cooperative interaction between GR and NF-κB that enhanced expression of A20 (TNFAIP3), a potent inhibitor of NF-κB. Here we extend this observation to establish that A20 is required for maximal cytokine repression by GCs. To ascertain the global extent of GR and NF-κB cooperation, we determined genome-wide occupancy of GR, the p65 subunit of NF-κB, and RNA polymerase II in airway epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone, TNF, or both using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. We found that GR recruits p65 to dimeric GR binding sites across the genome and discovered additional regulatory elements in which GR-p65 cooperation augments gene expression. GR targets regulated by this mechanism include key anti-inflammatory and injury response genes such as SERPINA1, which encodes α1 antitrypsin, and FOXP4, an inhibitor of mucus production. Although dexamethasone treatment reduced RNA polymerase II occupancy of TNF targets such as IL8 and TNFAIP2, we were unable to correlate specific binding sequences for GR or occupancy patterns with repressive effects on transcription. Our results suggest that cooperative anti-inflammatory gene regulation by GR and p65 contributes to GC efficacy, whereas tethering interactions between GR and p65 are not universally required for GC-based gene repression. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Syk signaling in dendritic cells orchestrates innate resistance to systemic fungal infection.

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    Paul G Whitney

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host protection from fungal infection is thought to ensue in part from the activity of Syk-coupled C-type lectin receptors and MyD88-coupled toll-like receptors in myeloid cells, including neutrophils, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. Given the multitude of cell types and receptors involved, elimination of a single pathway for fungal recognition in a cell type such as DCs, primarily known for their ability to prime T cell responses, would be expected to have little effect on innate resistance to fungal infection. Here we report that this is surprisingly not the case and that selective loss of Syk but not MyD88 in DCs abrogates innate resistance to acute systemic Candida albicans infection in mice. We show that Syk expression by DCs is necessary for IL-23p19 production in response to C. albicans, which is essential to transiently induce GM-CSF secretion by NK cells that are recruited to the site of fungal replication. NK cell-derived-GM-CSF in turn sustains the anti-microbial activity of neutrophils, the main fungicidal effectors. Thus, the activity of a single kinase in a single myeloid cell type orchestrates a complex series of molecular and cellular events that underlies innate resistance to fungal sepsis.

  5. Perivascular Mast Cells Govern Shear Stress-Induced Arteriogenesis by Orchestrating Leukocyte Function

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    Omary Chillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The body has the capacity to compensate for an occluded artery by creating a natural bypass upon increased fluid shear stress. How this mechanical force is translated into collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis is unresolved. We show that extravasation of neutrophils mediated by the platelet receptor GPIbα and uPA results in Nox2-derived reactive oxygen radicals, which activate perivascular mast cells. These c-kit+/CXCR-4+ cells stimulate arteriogenesis by recruiting additional neutrophils as well as growth-promoting monocytes and T cells. Additionally, mast cells may directly contribute to vascular remodeling and vascular cell proliferation through increased MMP activity and by supplying growth-promoting factors. Boosting mast cell recruitment and activation effectively promotes arteriogenesis, thereby protecting tissue from severe ischemic damage. We thus find that perivascular mast cells are central regulators of shear stress-induced arteriogenesis by orchestrating leukocyte function and growth factor/cytokine release, thus providing a therapeutic target for treatment of vascular occlusive diseases.

  6. Epithelial Cells in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/epithelialcellsinurine.html Epithelial Cells in Urine To use the sharing features on ... page, please enable JavaScript. What is an Epithelial Cells in Urine Test? Epithelial cells are a type ...

  7. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSalazar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. Dendritic cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors dendritic cells are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence dendritic cells behaviour through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarise current understanding of how allergens are recognised by dendritic cells and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitisation and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signalling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitisation hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases.

  8. Patterning bacterial communities on epithelial cells.

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    Mohammed Dwidar

    Full Text Available Micropatterning of bacteria using aqueous two phase system (ATPS enables the localized culture and formation of physically separated bacterial communities on human epithelial cell sheets. This method was used to compare the effects of Escherichia coli strain MG1655 and an isogenic invasive counterpart that expresses the invasin (inv gene from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis on the underlying epithelial cell layer. Large portions of the cell layer beneath the invasive strain were killed or detached while the non-invasive E. coli had no apparent effect on the epithelial cell layer over a 24 h observation period. In addition, simultaneous testing of the localized effects of three different bacterial species; E. coli MG1655, Shigella boydii KACC 10792 and Pseudomonas sp DSM 50906 on an epithelial cell layer is also demonstrated. The paper further shows the ability to use a bacterial predator, Bdellovibriobacteriovorus HD 100, to selectively remove the E. coli, S. boydii and P. sp communities from this bacteria-patterned epithelial cell layer. Importantly, predation and removal of the P. Sp was critical for maintaining viability of the underlying epithelial cells. Although this paper focuses on a few specific cell types, the technique should be broadly applicable to understand a variety of bacteria-epithelial cell interactions.

  9. Identification of epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotto, S; Rado, V; Dal Vecchio, A; Milani, G; Fabbri, L M; Maestrelli, P

    1993-01-01

    1. Damage to the bronchial epithelium occurs after the inhalation of toxic substances and allergens, and through virus infections and it may lead to increased desquamation of epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). 2. In this study we compared two methods of staining the epithelial cells of BAL, the conventional cytochemical May Grunwald-Giemsa stain (MGG) and an immunocytochemical technique using a monoclonal antibody anti-human cytokeratin (CK) detected with APAAP immuno-alkaline phosphatase. BAL was obtained from 13 subjects and the epithelial cells were cytocentrifuged either immediately after collection (fraction A) or after washing (fraction B). 3. Higher percentages of epithelial cells were identified in fraction A with CK (20.0 +/- 5.1%) than in fraction A with MGG (11.2 +/- 2.3%), which recognized only ciliated epithelial cells. In fact a proportion of CK-positive cells (34%) in fraction A were not ciliated. Underestimation of epithelial cells by MGG compared to CK was more pronounced in fraction B (8.0 +/- 2.9% and 22.9 +/- 3.0%, respectively) as there was a relative loss of ciliated CK+ cells after washings. 4. These results suggest that immunocytochemical staining with an anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody is more sensitive than using the MGG stain in detecting epithelial cells in BAL.

  10. Orchestrating Docker

    CERN Document Server

    Holla, Shrikrishna

    2015-01-01

    If you are a competent developer or DevOps with a good understanding of Linux filesystems but want to manage and orchestrate Docker services, images, and products using a multitude of techniques, then this book is for you. No prior knowledge of Docker or container virtualization is required.

  11. RXR heterodimers orchestrate transcriptional control of neurogenesis and cell fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simandi, Zoltan; Horvath, Attila; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Sauer, Sascha; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Nagy, Laszlo

    2017-08-02

    Retinoid X Receptors (RXRs) are unique and enigmatic members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family with extensive and complex biological functions in cellular differentiation. On the one hand, RXRs through permissive heterodimerization with other NRs are able to integrate multiple lipid signaling pathways and are believed to play a central role to coordinate the development of the central nervous system. On the other hand, RXRs may have heterodimer-independent functions as well. Therefore, a more RXR-centric analysis is warranted to identify its genomic binding sites and regulated gene networks, which are orchestrating the earliest events in neuronal differentiation. Recently developed genome-wide approaches allow systematic analyses of the RXR-driven neural differentiation. Here we applied next generation sequencing-based methodology to track the dynamic redistribution of the RXR cistrome along the path of embryonic stem cell to glutamatergic neuron differentiation. We identified Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) and Liver X Receptor (LXR) as dominant heterodimeric partners of RXR in these cellular stages. Our data presented here characterize the RAR:RXR and LXR:RXR-mediated transcriptional program in embryonic stem cells, neural progenitors and terminally differentiated neurons. Considering the growing evidence for dysregulated RXR-mediated signaling in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's Disease or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, the data presented here will be also a valuable resource for the field of neuro(patho)biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  13. Thymic epithelial cells. I. Expression of strong suppressive (veto) activity in mouse thymic epithelial cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Ropke, C

    1990-01-01

    We show that thymic epithelial cells grown under serum-free conditions in a chemically defined culture medium can act as veto cells in vitro. The veto activity of thymic epithelial cells results in inactivation of specific alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursors at the clonal level. It is conclu....... It is concluded that the epithelial stromal cells of the thymus, by acting as veto cells, may be responsible for the negative intrathymic selection of self-reactive thymocytes leading to elimination of the vast majority of immature thymic lymphocytes....

  14. The thymic orchestration involving Aire, miRNAs and cell-cell interactions during the induction of central tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Geraldo eAleixo Passos; DANIELLA AREAS MENDES-DA-CRUZ; Ernna Hérida Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs), a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clon...

  15. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  16. Membrane lipidome of an epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaio, Julio L; Gerl, Mathias J; Klose, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tissue differentiation is an important process that involves major cellular membrane remodeling. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney cells as a model for epithelium formation and investigated the remodeling of the total cell membrane lipidome during the transition from a nonpolarized morphology...... to an epithelial morphology and vice versa. To achieve this, we developed a shotgun-based lipidomics workflow that enabled the absolute quantification of mammalian membrane lipidomes with minimal sample processing from low sample amounts. Epithelial morphogenesis was accompanied by a major shift from sphingomyelin...... to glycosphingolipid, together with an increase in plasmalogen, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol content, whereas the opposite changes took place during an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Moreover, during polarization, the sphingolipids became longer, more saturated, and more hydroxylated as required...

  17. Protons sensitize epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Saha, Janapriya; Sridharan, Deepa M; Pluth, Janice M; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2012-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has gained more favor among oncologists as a treatment option for localized and deep-seated tumors. In addition, protons are a major constituent of the space radiation astronauts receive during space flights. The potential for these exposures to lead to, or enhance cancer risk has not been well studied. Our objective is to study the biological effects of low energy protons on epithelial cells and its propensity to enhance transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1)-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process occurring during tumor progression and critical for invasion and metastasis. Non-transformed mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu) and hTERT- immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells (EPC) were used in this study. EMT was identified by alterations in cell morphology, EMT-related gene expression changes determined using real-time PCR, and EMT changes in specific cellular markers detected by immunostaining and western blotting. Although TGFβ1 treatment alone is able to induce EMT in both Mv1Lu and EPC cells, low energy protons (5 MeV) at doses as low as 0.1 Gy can enhance TGFβ1 induced EMT. Protons alone can also induce a mild induction of EMT. SD208, a potent TGFβ Receptor 1 (TGFβR1) kinase inhibitor, can efficiently block TGFβ1/Smad signaling and attenuate EMT induction. We suggest a model for EMT after proton irradiation in normal and cancerous tissue based on our results that showed that low and high doses of protons can sensitize normal human epithelial cells to mesenchymal transition, more prominently in the presence of TGFβ1, but also in the absence of TGFβ1.

  18. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  19. Cell Adhesion Molecule CD166/ALCAM Functions Within the Crypt to Orchestrate Murine Intestinal Stem Cell HomeostasisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R. Smith

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Intestinal epithelial homeostasis is maintained by active-cycling and slow-cycling stem cells confined within an instructive crypt-based niche. Exquisite regulating of these stem cell populations along the proliferation-to-differentiation axis maintains a homeostatic balance to prevent hyperproliferation and cancer. Although recent studies focus on how secreted ligands from mesenchymal and epithelial populations regulate intestinal stem cells (ISCs, it remains unclear what role cell adhesion plays in shaping the regulatory niche. Previously we have shown that the cell adhesion molecule and cancer stem cell marker, CD166/ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, is highly expressed by both active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs and adjacent Paneth cells within the crypt base, supporting the hypothesis that CD166 functions to mediate ISC maintenance and signal coordination. Methods: Here we tested this hypothesis by analyzing a CD166–/– mouse combined with immunohistochemical, flow cytometry, gene expression, and enteroid culture. Results: We found that animals lacking CD166 expression harbored fewer active-cycling Lgr5+ ISCs. Homeostasis was maintained by expansion of the transit-amplifying compartment and not by slow-cycling Bmi1+ ISC stimulation. Loss of active-cycling ISCs was coupled with deregulated Paneth cell homeostasis, manifested as increased numbers of immature Paneth progenitors due to decreased terminal differentiation, linked to defective Wnt signaling. CD166–/– Paneth cells expressed reduced Wnt3 ligand expression and depleted nuclear β-catenin. Conclusions: These data support a function for CD166 as an important cell adhesion molecule that shapes the signaling microenvironment by mediating ISC–niche cell interactions. Furthermore, loss of CD166 expression results in decreased ISC and Paneth cell homeostasis and an altered Wnt microenvironment. Keywords: Intestinal Stem Cell, Homeostasis

  20. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  1. Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system, largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only after the cancer has metastasized into the...Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal malignancy of the female reproductive system, largely due to the fact that most EOCs are diagnosed only...experience in ovary research (ovarian physiology , oogonial stem cells) to work on this project. We also ! 5! obtained approval of our animal

  2. Photoperiod length paces the temporal orchestration of cell cycle and carbon-nitrogen metabolism in Crocosphaera watsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Anthony; Rabouille, Sophie; Claquin, Pascal; Talec, Amélie; Raimbault, Virginie; Sciandra, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    We analysed the effect of photoperiod length (PPL) (16:8 and 8:16 h of light-dark regime, named long and short PPL, respectively) on the temporal orchestration of the two antagonistic, carbon and nitrogen acquisitions in the unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii strain WH8501 growing diazotrophically. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism were monitored at high frequency, and their patterns were compared with the cell cycle progression. The oxygen-sensitive N2 fixation process occurred mainly during the dark period, where photosynthesis cannot take place, inducing a light-dark cycle of cellular C : N ratio. Examination of circadian patterns in the cell cycle revealed that cell division occurred during the midlight period, (8 h and 4 h into the light in the long and short PPL conditions, respectively), thus timely separated from the energy-intensive diazotrophic process. Results consistently show a nearly 5 h time lag between the end of cell division and the onset of N2 fixation. Shorter PPLs affected DNA compaction of C. watsonii cells and also led to a decrease in the cell division rate. Therefore, PPL paces the growth of C. watsonii: a long PPL enhances cell division while a short PPL favours somatic growth (biomass production) with higher carbon and nitrogen cell contents. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Lactobacillus decelerates cervical epithelial cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vielfort

    Full Text Available We investigated cell cycle progression in epithelial cervical ME-180 cells during colonization of three different Lactobacillus species utilizing live cell microscopy, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays, and flow cytometry. The colonization of these ME-180 cells by L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri, originating from human gastric epithelia and saliva, respectively, was shown to reduce cell cycle progression and to cause host cells to accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The G1 phase accumulation in L. rhamnosus-colonized cells was accompanied by the up-regulation and nuclear accumulation of p21. By contrast, the vaginal isolate L. crispatus did not affect cell cycle progression. Furthermore, both the supernatants from the lactic acid-producing L. rhamnosus colonies and lactic acid added to cell culture media were able to reduce the proliferation of ME-180 cells. In this study, we reveal the diversity of the Lactobacillus species to affect host cell cycle progression and demonstrate that L. rhamnosus and L. reuteri exert anti-proliferative effects on human cervical carcinoma cells.

  4. MUCOUS CELLS IN THE EPITHELIAL LINING OF DENTIGEROUS CYST

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiksha; Sangeeta; Sumanta; Prashanti; Sathyajitraje; Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial lining of both the developmental and inflammatory cysts of odontogenic origin are primarily composed of squamous epithelium. Various forms of metaplasia and degenerations are observed in these epithelial linings e.g. mucous cells, ciliated cells, para and/or orthokeratinization and formation of hyaline bodies. The present study was designed to investigate the incidences of mucous cells in the epithelial lining of dentigerous cyst. Mucous cells were observed ...

  5. Growth of cultured porcine retinal pigment epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, A.K.; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nicolini, Jair

    2003-01-01

    To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation.......To establish and characterize cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelial (pRPE) cells in order to produce confluent monolayers of cells for transplantation....

  6. Cell reintegration: Stray epithelial cells make their way home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tyler J; Bergstralh, Dan T

    2017-06-01

    Ongoing work shows that misplaced epithelial cells have the capacity to reintegrate back into tissue layers. This movement appears to underlie tissue stability and may also control aspects of tissue structure. A recent study reveals that cell reintegration in at least one tissue, the Drosophila follicular epithelium, is based on adhesion molecules that line lateral cell surfaces. In this article we will review these observations, discuss their implications for epithelial tissue development and maintenance, and identify future directions for study. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cellular Homeostasis and Antioxidant Response in Epithelial HT29 Cells on Titania Nanotube Arrays Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabiatul Basria SMN Mydin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth and proliferative activities on titania nanotube arrays (TNA have raised alerts on genotoxicity risk. Present toxicogenomic approach focused on epithelial HT29 cells with TNA surface. Fledgling cell-TNA interaction has triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrests and initiates DNA damage surveillance checkpoint, which possibly indicated the cellular stress stimuli. A profound gene regulation was observed to be involved in cellular growth and survival signals such as p53 and AKT expressions. Interestingly, the activation of redox regulator pathways (antioxidant defense was observed through the cascade interactions of GADD45, MYC, CHECK1, and ATR genes. These mechanisms furnish to protect DNA during cellular division from an oxidative challenge, set in motion with XRRC5 and RAD50 genes for DNA damage and repair activities. The cell fate decision on TNA-nanoenvironment has been reported to possibly regulate proliferative activities via expression of p27 and BCL2 tumor suppressor proteins, cogent with SKP2 and BCL2 oncogenic proteins suppression. Findings suggested that epithelial HT29 cells on the surface of TNA may have a positive regulation via cell-homeostasis mechanisms: a careful circadian orchestration between cell proliferation, survival, and death. This nanomolecular knowledge could be beneficial for advanced medical applications such as in nanomedicine and nanotherapeutics.

  8. Effects of epiplakin-knockdown in cultured corneal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kokado, Masahide; Okada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Osamu; Saika, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate effects of knockdown of epiplakin gene expression on the homeostasis of cultured corneal epithelial cell line. We previously reported acceleration of corneal epithelial wound healing in an epiplakin-null mouse. Methods Gene expression of epiplakin was knockdowned by employing siRNA transfection in SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line. Protein expression of E-cadherin, keratin 6 and vimentin was examined by western blotting. Cell migration and prolifer...

  9. Novel application of artificial dermis plus autologous vital epithelial cells: improved wound epithelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Tzu; Kwan, Po-Cheung; Wong, Yong-Kie

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate artificial dermis with the simultaneous addition of autologous epithelial cells for oral lesion defect reconstruction. Surgical wounds reconstructed with artificial dermis plus scraped epithelial cells were evaluated in 5 patients with oral benign lesions or squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical follow-up indices included scar formation and tissue surface texture observation. The neomucosal layers were analyzed histologically to establish the degree of epithelialization. Clinical observation showed that the oral mucosal texture was smoother in artificial dermis with added epithelial cells at 4 weeks postoperation compared with artificial dermis alone. The wound contraction and scar formation processes were slow. Viable epithelial cells with flat rete ridges remained in the artificial dermis, and a neoepithelial layer was present in the histological findings. We showed that healthy granulation tissue and neoepithelial formation in artificial dermis with epithelial cells was beneficial for the repair of oral defects. Scraping oral epithelial cells and applying them to artificial dermis assisted in the early preparation of composite grafts and minimized requirement for donor sites. This technique may improve the treatment of patients with oral benign tumors and early-stage squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of epithelial cell polarity by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Rocio; Kralicek, Sarah E; Hecht, Gail A

    2017-10-01

    Epithelial cells constitute a physical barrier that aids in protecting the host from microbial pathogens. Polarized epithelial cells contain distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains separated by intercellular junctions, including tight junctions (TJs), which contribute to the maintenance of apical-basal polarity. Polarity complexes also contribute to the establishment of TJ formation. Several pathogens perturb epithelial TJ barrier function and structure in addition to causing a loss of apical-basal polarity. Here, we review the impact of pathogenic bacteria on the disruption of cell-cell junctions and epithelial polarity. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  12. Cancer stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition: concepts and molecular links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Christina; Weinberg, Robert A

    2012-10-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers mesenchymal properties on epithelial cells and has been closely associated with the acquisition of aggressive traits by carcinoma cells. EMT programs are orchestrated by a set of pleiotropically acting transcription factors (TFs). The actions of these EMT-TFs enable the early steps of metastasis: local invasion and subsequent dissemination of carcinoma cells to distant sites. However, in most malignancies, the subsequent outgrowth of micrometastatic deposits into macroscopic metastases has the greatest impact on clinical progression. Such metastatic "colonization" reflects the ability of disseminated tumor cells to adapt to a foreign tissue microenvironment. The outgrowth of a metastasis is also thought to be associated with self-renewal, the defining cellular trait of cancer stem cells (CSCs), also termed tumor-initiating cells. Importantly, molecular links between EMT-TFs and self-renewal have emerged, suggesting that EMT programs play critical roles both early and late in the metastatic cascade. The genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the activation of EMT-TFs and the traits they induce are areas under intensive investigation. Such studies may provide new opportunities for therapeutic intervention and help to overcome tumor heterogeneity and therapeutic resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, M., E-mail: phyrenmq@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Rajendran, Reshmi [Lab of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consotium, 11 Biopolis Way, 02-02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Ng, Mary [Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Jenner, Andrew Michael [Illawara Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI), University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Dyall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell hypothesis is becoming more widely accepted as a model for carcinogenesis. Tumours are heterogeneous both at the molecular and cellular level, containing a small population of cells that possess highly tumourigenic “stem-cell” properties. Cancer stem cells (CSCs, or tumour-initiating cells, have the ability to self-renew, generate xenografts reminiscent of the primary tumour that they were derived from, and are chemoresistant. The characterisation of the CSC population within a tumour that drives its growth could provide novel target therapeutics against these cells specifically, eradicating the cancer completely. There have been several reports describing the isolation of putative cancer stem cell populations in several cancers; however, no defined set of markers has been identified that conclusively characterises “stem-like” cancer cells. This paper highlights the current experimental approaches that have been used in the field and discusses their limitations, with specific emphasis on the identification and characterisation of the CSC population in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  15. The differentiation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells is orchestrated by Runx1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Puspa; Manso, Bryce; Chung, Ji Young; Romera Arocha, Sinibaldo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Angelo, Derek B Sant'; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2017-08-01

    iNKT cells are a unique lineage of T cells that recognize glycolipid presented by CD1d. In the thymus, they differentiate into iNKT1, iNKT2 and iNKT17 effector subsets, characterized by preferential expression of Tbet, Gata3 and ROR-γt and production of IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17, respectively. We demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator Runx1 is essential for the generation of ROR-γt expressing iNKT17 cells. PLZF-cre Runx1 cKO mice lack iNKT17 cells in the thymus, spleen and liver. Runx1-deficient iNKT cells have altered expression of several genes important for iNKT17 differentiation, including decreased expression of IL-7Rα, BATF and c-Maf and increased expression of Bcl11b and Lef1. However, reduction of Lef1 expression or introduction of an IL-7Rα transgene is not sufficient to correct the defect in iNKT17 differentiation, demonstrating that Runx1 is a key regulator of several genes required for iNKT17 differentiation. Loss of Runx1 leads to a severe decrease in iNKT cell numbers in the thymus, spleen and liver. The decrease in cell number is due to a combined decrease in proliferation at Stage 1 during thymic development and increased apoptosis. Thus, we describe a novel role of Runx1 in iNKT cell development and differentiation, particularly in orchestrating iNKT17 differentiation.

  16. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense

    OpenAIRE

    Frauke Stanke

    2015-01-01

    In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how t...

  17. Intestinal transport: studies with isolated epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimmich, G.A.

    1979-12-01

    Isolated intestinal epithelial cells have been extremely useful for characterizing the nature of intestinal absorption processes and for providing insight into the energetics of Na/sup +/-dependent transport systems. This report describes a number of experimental approaches which have been used for investigating the specific epithelial transport systems involved in sugar absorption, but provides information which ultimately should prove useful for characterizing a number of different intestinal transport events. Similar experiments should also prove useful for exploring the effect of environmental agents on the function of intestinal tissue. In the case of sugars, net absorption is accomplished via a mucosal, Na/sup +/-dependent concentrative transport system acting in sequence with a passive serosal system which does not require Na/sup +/. The serosal system limits the full gradient-forming capability of the muscosal system. Agents such as phloretin or cytochalasin B which inhibit serosal transport allow the cells to establish sugar gradients as high as 70 fold in contrast to 10 to 15 fold gradients observed for control cells. Sevety-fold sugar gradients cannot be explained in terms of the energy available in the electrochemical potential for Na/sup +/ if the Na/sub 2/: sugar coupling stoichiometry is 1:1 as commonly assumed. New information indicates that the true Na/sup +/:sugar stoichiometry is in fact 2:1. Flow of two Na/sup +/ ions per sugar molecule down the transmembrane electrochemical potential for Na/sup +/ provides more than sufficient energy to account for observed 70 fold sugar gradients. If flow of sugar by other routes could be completely inhibited, theoretical sugar gradients as high as 400 could be achieved assuming that the cells maintain a membrane potential of -36 mV as measured for intact tissue.

  18. Uranium induces apoptosis in lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sadanandan, Bindu; Thomas, Renard; Wilson, Bobby L. [Texas Southern University, Environmental Toxicology Program, Department of Chemistry, Houston, TX (United States); Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Sharma, Chidananda S.; Ramesh, Vani; Hall, Joseph C.; Ramesh, Govindarajan T. [Norfolk State University, Molecular Toxicology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Biomedical Sciences, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Uranium is a naturally occurring radioactive material present everywhere in the environment. It is toxic because of its chemical or radioactive properties. Uranium enters environment mainly from mines and industry and cause threat to human health by accumulating in lungs as a result of inhalation. In our previous study, we have shown the effectiveness of antioxidant system response to the oxidative stress induced by uranyl acetate (UA) in rat lung epithelial (LE) cells. As part of our continuing studies; here, we investigated the mechanism underlying when LE cells are exposed to different concentration of UA. Oxidative stress may lead to apoptotic signaling pathways. LE cells treated with 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mM of UA results in dose and time-dependent increase in activity of both caspases-3 and -8. Increase in the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase in cytosol was seen in LE cells treated with 1 mM UA as a result of mitochondria membrane permeability. The cytochrome-c leakage may trigger the apoptotic pathway. TUNEL assay performed in LE cells treated with 1 mM of UA showed significant incorporation of dNTPs in the nucleus after 24 h. In the presence of the caspase inhibitors, we observed the significant decrease in the activity of caspases-8 and -3 in 0.5 and 1 mM UA-treated LE cells. (orig.)

  19. The Thymic Orchestration Involving Aire, miRNAs, and Cell-Cell Interactions during the Induction of Central Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Geraldo Aleixo; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas; Oliveira, Ernna Hérida

    2015-01-01

    Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs), a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clones that have a high affinity for PTAs are eliminated by apoptosis in a process termed negative selection, which is essential for tolerance induction. The Aire gene is an important factor that controls the expression of a large set of PTAs. In addition to PTAs, Aire also controls the expression of miRNAs in mTECs. These miRNAs are important in the organization of the thymic architecture and act as posttranscriptional controllers of PTAs. Herein, we discuss recent discoveries and highlight open questions regarding the migration and interaction of developing thymocytes with thymic stroma, the ectopic expression of PTAs by mTECs, the association between Aire and miRNAs and its effects on central tolerance.

  20. The thymic orchestration involving Aire, miRNAs and cell-cell interactions during the induction of central tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo eAleixo Passos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing thymocytes interact sequentially with two distinct structures within the thymus: the cortex and medulla. Surviving single-positive and double-positive thymocytes from the cortex migrate into the medulla, where they interact with medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs. These cells ectopically express a vast set of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs, a property termed promiscuous gene expression that is associated with the presentation of PTAs by mTECs to thymocytes. Thymocyte clones that have a high affinity for PTAs are eliminated by apoptosis in a process termed negative selection, which is essential for tolerance induction. The Aire gene is an important factor that controls the expression of a large set of PTAs. In addition to PTAs, Aire also controls the expression of miRNAs in mTECs. These miRNAs are important in the organization of the thymic architecture and act as posttranscriptional controllers of PTAs. Herein, we discuss recent discoveries and highlight open questions regarding the migration and interaction of developing thymocytes with thymic stroma, the ectopic expression of PTAs by mTECs, the association between Aire and miRNAs and its effects on central tolerance.

  1. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  2. A CDK-independent metabolic oscillator orchestrates the budding yeast cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, A.; Niebel, B.; Wit, E.; Heinemann, M.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division is known to be controlled by the cyclin/ CDK machinery. However, eukaryotes have evolved prior to CDKs, and cells can divide in the absence of major cyclin/CDK components. We hypothesized that an autonomous metabolic oscillator provides dynamic triggers for cell cycle

  3. IL-4 orchestrates STAT6-mediated DNA demethylation leading to dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento-Tormo, Roser; Company, Carlos; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; de la Rica, Lorenzo; Urquiza, José M; Javierre, Biola M; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Luque, Ana; Esteller, Manel; Aran, Josep M; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Ballestar, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    The role of cytokines in establishing specific transcriptional programmes in innate immune cells has long been recognized. However, little is known about how these extracellular factors instruct innate immune cell epigenomes to engage specific differentiation states. Human monocytes differentiate under inflammatory conditions into effector cells with non-redundant functions, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. In this context, interleukin 4 (IL-4) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) drive dendritic cell differentiation, whereas GM-CSF alone leads to macrophage differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of IL-4 in directing functionally relevant dendritic-cell-specific DNA methylation changes. A comparison of DNA methylome dynamics during differentiation from human monocytes to dendritic cells and macrophages identified gene sets undergoing dendritic-cell-specific or macrophage-specific demethylation. Demethylation is TET2-dependent and is essential for acquiring proper dendritic cell and macrophage identity. Most importantly, activation of the JAK3-STAT6 pathway, downstream of IL-4, is required for the acquisition of the dendritic-cell-specific demethylation and expression signature, following STAT6 binding. A constitutively activated form of STAT6 is able to bypass IL-4 upstream signalling and instruct dendritic-cell-specific functional DNA methylation changes. Our study is the first description of a cytokine-mediated sequence of events leading to direct gene-specific demethylation in innate immune cell differentiation.

  4. Nutrients released by gastric epithelial cells enhance Helicobacter pylori growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Karin; van der Ende, Arie

    2004-01-01

    Background. Helicobacter pylori survives and proliferates in the human gastric mucosa. In this niche, H. pylori adheres to the gastric epithelial cells near the tight junctions. In vitro, H. pylori proliferated well in tissue-culture medium near gastric epithelial cells. However, in the absence of

  5. In vitro effect of smokeless tobacco on gingival epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Beklen

    2017-05-01

    Epithelial cells are the first line of defense against pathogens in the oral cavity. The results suggest that smokeless tobacco not only inhibits the growth of epithelial cells but also induce the generation of inflammatory cytokines which leads to smokeless tobacco-exacerbated disease.

  6. Heterogeneity and stochastic growth regulation of biliary epithelial cells dictate dynamic epithelial tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimoto, Kenji; Kaneko, Kota; Kok, Cindy Yuet-Yin; Okada, Hajime; Miyajima, Atsushi; Itoh, Tohru

    2016-07-19

    Dynamic remodeling of the intrahepatic biliary epithelial tissue plays key roles in liver regeneration, yet the cellular basis for this process remains unclear. We took an unbiased approach based on in vivo clonal labeling and tracking of biliary epithelial cells in the three-dimensional landscape, in combination with mathematical simulation, to understand their mode of proliferation in a mouse liver injury model where the nascent biliary structure formed in a tissue-intrinsic manner. An apparent heterogeneity among biliary epithelial cells was observed: whereas most of the responders that entered the cell cycle upon injury exhibited a limited and tapering growth potential, a select population continued to proliferate, making a major contribution in sustaining the biliary expansion. Our study has highlighted a unique mode of epithelial tissue dynamics, which depends not on a hierarchical system driven by fixated stem cells, but rather, on a stochastically maintained progenitor population with persistent proliferative activity.

  7. Isolation of fibroblasts and epithelial cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Kathryn; Albares, Luke; Wendt, Chris; Hubel, Allison

    2013-04-01

    The long-term outcome of lung transplants is poor with 60%-70% of patients developing chronic rejection. Chronic rejection is manifested histologically by obliterative bronchiolitis with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), the clinical surrogate. Recent studies suggest that fibroblasts and epithelial cells present in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) may be a clinically relevant biomarker for BOS. The goal of this investigation was to develop a fast, repeatable method to individually isolate these low-frequency cell types. Fibroblasts and epithelial cells were isolated from BAL using attachment methods and the phenotype of the cells confirmed using immunostaining for vimentin (fibroblasts) and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, epithelial cells). Both fibroblasts and epithelial cells were isolated in every sample of BAL processed with the frequency of fibroblasts ranging from 0.03% to 0.48% and epithelial cells ranging from 0.05% to 1.5% of the total sample. Additional studies were performed using cytospins of cells after macrophages were depleted; cells exhibiting characteristics of both fibroblasts and epithelial cells were observed. The frequency of the cells of interest suggests that conventional methods of immunomagnetic isolation will not be effective in isolating these subpopulations. Finally, some of the low-frequency cells isolated via cytospin exhibit characteristics of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (which was not observed in plating incubations), indicating that the epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition fibroblasts may be nonadherent. In future studies, this technique and dataset may be of use to statistically correlate low-frequency cell type abundance to the onset and development of BOS.

  8. Multi-functionality and plasticity characterize epithelial cells in Hydra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzgariu, W; Al Haddad, S; Tomczyk, S; Wenger, Y; Galliot, B

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial sheets, a synapomorphy of all metazoans but porifers, are present as 2 layers in cnidarians, ectoderm and endoderm, joined at their basal side by an extra-cellular matrix named mesoglea. In the Hydra polyp, epithelial cells of the body column are unipotent stem cells that continuously self-renew and concomitantly express their epitheliomuscular features. These multifunctional contractile cells maintain homeostasis by providing a protective physical barrier, by digesting nutrients, by selecting a stable microbiota, and by rapidly closing wounds. In addition, epithelial cells are highly plastic, supporting the adaptation of Hydra to physiological and environmental changes, such as long starvation periods where survival relies on a highly dynamic autophagy flux. Epithelial cells also play key roles in developmental processes as evidenced by the organizer activity they develop to promote budding and regeneration. We propose here an integrative view of the homeostatic and developmental aspects of epithelial plasticity in Hydra. PMID:26716072

  9. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ + group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Li (Zhi); T. Hodgkinson (Tom); E.J. Gothard (Elizabeth J.); S. Boroumand (Soulmaz); R. Lamb (Rebecca); I. Cummins (Ian); P. Narang (Priyanka); A. Sawtell (Amy); J. Coles (Jenny); G. Leonov (German); A. Reboldi (Andrea); C.D. Buckley; T. Cupedo (Tom); C. Siebel (Christian); A. Bayat (Ardeshir); M. Coles (Mark); C.A. Ambler (Carrie A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNotch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal.

  10. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  11. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Emilio eRojas; Yolanda eLorenzo; Kristiane eHuag-Berg; Bjørn eNicolaissen; Mahara eValverde

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many org...

  12. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  13. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  14. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Samuel M; Carpenter, Stephen M; Booty, Matthew G; Barber, Daniel L; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-12-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease--the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CD4+ T Cells Orchestrate Lethal Immune Pathology despite Fungal Clearance during Cryptococcus neoformans Meningoencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Lori M.; Xing, Enze; Xu, Jintao; Kolbe, Jessica L.; Osterholzer, John J.; Segal, Benjamin M.; Williamson, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a major fungal pathogen that disseminates to the central nervous system (CNS) to cause fatal meningoencephalitis, but little is known about immune responses within this immune-privileged site. CD4+ T cells have demonstrated roles in anticryptococcal defenses, but increasing evidence suggests that they may contribute to clinical deterioration and pathology in both HIV-positive (HIV+) and non-HIV patients who develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) and post-infectious inflammatory response syndrome (PIIRS), respectively. Here we report a novel murine model of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and a potential damaging role of T cells in disseminated cryptococcal CNS infection. In this model, fungal burdens plateaued in the infected brain by day 7 postinfection, but activation of microglia and accumulation of CD45hi leukocytes was significantly delayed relative to fungal growth and did not peak until day 21. The inflammatory leukocyte infiltrate consisted predominantly of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4+ T cells, conventionally believed to promote fungal clearance and recovery. However, more than 50% of mice succumbed to infection and neurological dysfunction between days 21 and 35 despite a 100-fold reduction in fungal burdens. Depletion of CD4+ cells significantly impaired IFN-γ production, CD8+ T cell and myeloid cell accumulation, and fungal clearance from the CNS but prevented the development of clinical symptoms and mortality. These findings conclusively demonstrate that although CD4+ T cells are necessary to control fungal growth, they can also promote significant immunopathology and mortality during CNS infection. The results from this model may provide important guidance for development and use of anti-inflammatory therapies to minimize CNS injury in patients with severe cryptococcal infections. PMID:29162707

  16. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Soumya C, E-mail: chidambaram.soumya@gmail.com [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Kannan, Anbarasu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Gopal, Ashidha [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Devaraj, Niranjali [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India); Halagowder, Devaraj [Unit of Biochemistry, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  17. Quantitative assessment of cytosolic Salmonella in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh A Knodler

    Full Text Available Within mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium inhabits a membrane-bound vacuole known as the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV. We have recently shown that wild type S. Typhimurium also colonizes the cytosol of epithelial cells. Here we sought to quantify the contribution of cytosolic Salmonella to the total population over a time course of infection in different epithelial cell lines and under conditions of altered vacuolar escape. We found that the lysosomotropic agent, chloroquine, acts on vacuolar, but not cytosolic, Salmonella. After chloroquine treatment, vacuolar bacteria are not transcriptionally active or replicative and appear degraded. Using a chloroquine resistance assay, in addition to digitonin permeabilization, we found that S. Typhimurium lyses its nascent vacuole in numerous epithelial cell lines, albeit with different frequencies, and hyper-replication in the cytosol is also widespread. At later times post-infection, cytosolic bacteria account for half of the total population in some epithelial cell lines, namely HeLa and Caco-2 C2Bbe1. Both techniques accurately measured increased vacuole lysis in epithelial cells upon treatment with wortmannin. By chloroquine resistance assay, we also determined that Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1, but not SPI-2, the virulence plasmid nor the flagellar apparatus, was required for vacuolar escape and cytosolic replication in epithelial cells. Together, digitonin permeabilization and the chloroquine resistance assay will be useful, complementary tools for deciphering the mechanisms of SCV lysis and Salmonella replication in the epithelial cell cytosol.

  18. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  19. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells maintain intestinal epithelial stem cells after tissue damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Aparicio-Domingo (Patricia); M. Romera-Hernandez (Monica); J.J. Karrich (Julien J.); F.H.J. Cornelissen (Ferry); N. Papazian (Natalie); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); J.A. Butler (James A.); L. Boon (Louis); M. Coles (Mark); J.N. Samsom (Janneke); T. Cupedo (Tom)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDisruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier allows bacterial translocation and predisposes to destructive inflammation. To ensure proper barrier composition, crypt-residing stem cells continuously proliferate and replenish all intestinal epithelial cells within days. As a consequence

  20. NFIL3 Orchestrates the Emergence of Common Helper Innate Lymphoid Cell Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are a family of effectors that originate from a common innate lymphoid cell progenitor. However, the transcriptional program that sets the identity of the ILC lineage remains elusive. Here, we show that NFIL3 is a critical regulator of the common helper-like innate lymphoid cell progenitor (CHILP. Cell-intrinsic Nfil3 ablation led to variably impaired development of fetal and adult ILC subsets. Conditional gene targeting demonstrated that NFIL3 exerted its function prior to ILC subset commitment. Accordingly, NFIL3 ablation resulted in loss of ID2+ CHILP and PLZF+ ILC progenitors. Nfil3 expression in lymphoid progenitors was under the control of the mesenchyme-derived hematopoietin IL-7, and NFIL3 exerted its function via direct Id2 regulation in the CHILP. Moreover, ectopic Id2 expression in Nfil3-null precursors rescued defective ILC lineage development in vivo. Our data establish NFIL3 as a key regulator of common helper-like ILC progenitors as they emerge during early lymphopoiesis.

  1. International organizations as orchestrators

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    International Organizations as Orchestrators reveals how IOs leverage their limited authority and resources to increase their effectiveness, power, and autonomy from states. By 'orchestrating' intermediaries - including NGOs - IOs can shape and steer global governance without engaging in hard, direct regulation. This volume is organized around a theoretical model that emphasizes voluntary collaboration and support. An outstanding group of scholars investigate the significance of orchestration across key issue areas, including trade, finance, environment and labor, and in leading organizations, including the GEF, G20, WTO, EU, Kimberley Process, UNEP and ILO. The empirical studies find that orchestration is pervasive. They broadly confirm the theoretical hypotheses while providing important new insights, especially that states often welcome IO orchestration as achieving governance without creating strong institutions. This volume changes our understanding of the relationships among IOs, nonstate actors and sta...

  2. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eRojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes.Over a thirty year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been litlle employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  3. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases.

  4. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  5. BMP signaling orchestrates a transcriptional network to control the fate of mesenchymal stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jifan; Jing, Junjun; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Punj, Vasu; Zhang, Tingwei; Xu, Jian; Chai, Yang

    2017-07-15

    Signaling pathways are used reiteratively in different developmental processes yet produce distinct cell fates through specific downstream transcription factors. In this study, we used tooth root development as a model with which to investigate how the BMP signaling pathway regulates transcriptional complexes to direct the fate determination of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We first identified the MSC population supporting mouse molar root growth as Gli1+ cells. Using a Gli1-driven Cre-mediated recombination system, our results provide the first in vivo evidence that BMP signaling activity is required for the odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Specifically, we identified the transcription factors Pax9, Klf4, Satb2 and Lhx8 as being downstream of BMP signaling and expressed in a spatially restricted pattern that is potentially involved in determining distinct cellular identities within the dental mesenchyme. Finally, we found that overactivation of one key transcription factor, Klf4, which is associated with the odontogenic region, promotes odontogenic differentiation of MSCs. Collectively, our results demonstrate the functional significance of BMP signaling in regulating MSC fate during root development and shed light on how BMP signaling can achieve functional specificity in regulating diverse organ development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. NRF2 Orchestrates the Metabolic Shift during Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Hawkins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in disease modeling and regenerative medicine is vast, but current methodologies remain inefficient. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying iPSC reprogramming, such as the metabolic shift from oxidative to glycolytic energy production, is key to improving its efficiency. We have developed a lentiviral reporter system to assay longitudinal changes in cell signaling and transcription factor activity in living cells throughout iPSC reprogramming of human dermal fibroblasts. We reveal early NF-κB, AP-1, and NRF2 transcription factor activation prior to a temporal peak in hypoxia inducible factor α (HIFα activity. Mechanistically, we show that an early burst in oxidative phosphorylation and elevated reactive oxygen species generation mediates increased NRF2 activity, which in turn initiates the HIFα-mediated glycolytic shift and may modulate glucose redistribution to the pentose phosphate pathway. Critically, inhibition of NRF2 by KEAP1 overexpression compromises metabolic reprogramming and results in reduced efficiency of iPSC colony formation.

  7. Regulated Mucin Secretion from Airway Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Bruce Adler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Secretory epithelial cells of the proximal airways synthesize and secrete gel-forming polymeric mucins. The secreted mucins adsorb water to form mucus that is propelled by neighboring ciliated cells, providing a mobile barrier which removes inhaled particles and pathogens from the lungs. Several features of the intracellular trafficking of mucins make the airway secretory cell an interesting comparator for the cell biology of regulated exocytosis. Polymeric mucins are exceedingly large molecules (up to 3x10^6 D per monomer whose folding and initial polymerization in the ER requires the protein disulfide isomerase Agr2. In the Golgi, mucins further polymerize to form chains and possibly branched networks comprising more than 20 monomers. The large size of mucin polymers imposes constraints on their packaging into transport vesicles along the secretory pathway. Sugar side chains account for >70% of the mass of mucins, and their attachment to the protein core by O-glycosylation occurs in the Golgi. Mature polymeric mucins are stored in large secretory granules ~1 um in diameter. These are translocated to the apical membrane to be positioned for exocytosis by cooperative interactions among MARCKS, cysteine string protein (CSP, HSP70 and the cytoskeleton. Mucin granules undergo exocytic fusion with the plasma membrane at a low basal rate and a high stimulated rate. Both rates are mediated by a regulated exocytic mechanism as indicated by phenotypes in both basal and stimulated secretion in mice lacking Munc13-2, a sensor of the second messengers calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG. Basal secretion is induced by low levels of activation of P2Y2 purinergic and A3 adenosine receptors by extracellular ATP released in paracrine fashion and its metabolite adenosine. Stimulated secretion is induced by high levels of the same ligands, and possibly by inflammatory mediators as well. Activated receptors are coupled to phospholipase C by Gq, resulting in the

  8. Theca Cell INSL3 and Steroids Together Orchestrate the Growing Bovine Antral Follicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhenzi Dai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3 and its specific receptor RXFP2 are both expressed by theca interna cells of the growing antral follicle where they form an essential regulatory element in the production of the steroid precursor androstenedione. Using primary cultures of bovine theca cells from the mid follicular phase together with steroid agonists and antagonists we have examined how ovarian steroids modulate INSL3 expression. Transcript analysis shows that these cells express estrogen receptors α and β, androgen and progesterone receptors, besides the orphan nuclear receptors SF1 and nur77. Whereas, exogenous androgens have little or no effect, the androgen antagonist bicalutamide stimulates INSL3 production. In contrast, estrogen receptor agonists, as also progesterone, are stimulatory. Importantly, estrogen receptor signaling is convergent with the protein kinase A signaling pathway activated by LH, such that the estrogen receptor antagonist can inhibit the mild stimulatory effect of LH, and vice versa the PKA antagonist H89 blocks stimulation by estradiol. A significant finding is that the major steroid metabolite androstenedione appears to act predominantly as an estrogen and not an androgen in this system. Transfection of INSL3 gene promoter-reporter constructs together with various steroid receptor expression plasmids supports these findings and shows that steroid action uses non-classical pathways not requiring canonical steroid-responsive elements in the proximal promoter region. Together, the results indicate that increasing estrogens in the follicular phase stimulate a feedforward loop driving INSL3 signaling and thereby promoting steroidogenesis in the growing antral follicle until the LH surge which effectively switches off INSL3 expression.

  9. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstralh, Dan T.; Lovegrove, Holly?E.; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from NPG via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncb3248 Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epi...

  10. Proximal location of mouse prostate epithelial stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujimura, Akira; Koikawa, Yasuhiro; Salm, Sarah; Takao, Tetsuya; Coetzee, Sandra; Moscatelli, David; Shapiro, Ellen; Lepor, Herbert; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wilson, E. Lynette

    2002-01-01

    Stem cells are believed to regulate normal prostatic homeostasis and to play a role in the etiology of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. We show here that the proximal region of mouse prostatic ducts is enriched in a subpopulation of epithelial cells that exhibit three important attributes of epithelial stem cells: they are slow cycling, possess a high in vitro proliferative potential, and can reconstitute highly branched glandular ductal structures in collagen gels. We propos...

  11. SWCNTs induced autophagic cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Zahari, Nur Elida M; Lee, Eun-Woo; Song, Jaewhan; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being actively introduced in electronics, computer science, aerospace, and other industries. Thus, the urgent need for toxicological studies on CNTs is mounting. In this study, we investigated the alterations in cellular response with morphological changes induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. At 24h after exposure, SWCNTs rapidly decreased ATP production and cell viability as well a slight increase in the number of cells in the subG1 and G1 phases. In addition, SWCNTs increased the expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, but not SOD-2, and the number of cells generating ROS. The concentration of Cu and Zn ions also increased in a dose-dependent manner in cells exposed to SWCNTs. SWCNTs significantly enhanced the release of nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and up-regulated the expression of chemokine- and cytokine-related genes. Furthermore, the levels of autophagy-related genes, especially the DRAM1 gene, and the autophagosome formation-related proteins, were clearly up-regulated together with an increase of autophagosome-like vacuoles. Based on these results, we suggest that SWCNTs induce autophagic cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic damage in human bronchial epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... MPs inhibited MPC fusion while anti-inflammatory MPs strongly promoted MPC differentiation by increasing their commitment into differentiated myocytes and the formation of mature myotubes. Furthermore, the in vivo time course of expression of myogenic and MP markers was studied in regenerating human...... healthy muscle after damage. We observed that regenerating areas containing proliferating MPCs were preferentially associated with MPs expressing proinflammatory markers. In the same muscle, regenerating areas containing differentiating myogenin-positive MPCs were preferentially coupled to MPs harboring...

  13. Communication between Corneal Epithelial Cells and Trigeminal Neurons Is Facilitated by Purinergic (P2) and Glutamatergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Monique; Chi, Cheryl; Ren, Ruiyi; Rich, Celeste B.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2) receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca2+ wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca2+ wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca2+ mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca2+ mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca2+ waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner. PMID:22970252

  14. Communication between corneal epithelial cells and trigeminal neurons is facilitated by purinergic (P2 and glutamatergic receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane J Oswald

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2 receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca(2+ wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca(2+ wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca(2+ mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca(2+ mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca(2+ waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner.

  15. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how the epithelial cell senses the presence of pathogens and inflammatory conditions, which, in turn, facilitates the activation of CFTR and thus directly promotes pathogens clearance and innate immune defense on the surface of the epithelial cell. This paper summarizes functional data that describes the effect of cytokines, chemokines, infectious agents, and inflammatory conditions on the ion transport properties of the epithelial cell and relates these key properties to the molecular pathology of cystic fibrosis. Recent findings on the role of cystic fibrosis modifier genes that underscore the role of the epithelial ion transport in host defense and inflammation are discussed.

  16. The Contribution of the Airway Epithelial Cell to Host Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Stanke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of cystic fibrosis, the epithelial cell has been characterized in terms of its ion transport capabilities. The ability of an epithelial cell to initiate CFTR-mediated chloride and bicarbonate transport has been recognized early as a means to regulate the thickness of the epithelial lining fluid and recently as a means to regulate the pH, thereby determining critically whether or not host defense proteins such as mucins are able to fold appropriately. This review describes how the epithelial cell senses the presence of pathogens and inflammatory conditions, which, in turn, facilitates the activation of CFTR and thus directly promotes pathogens clearance and innate immune defense on the surface of the epithelial cell. This paper summarizes functional data that describes the effect of cytokines, chemokines, infectious agents, and inflammatory conditions on the ion transport properties of the epithelial cell and relates these key properties to the molecular pathology of cystic fibrosis. Recent findings on the role of cystic fibrosis modifier genes that underscore the role of the epithelial ion transport in host defense and inflammation are discussed.

  17. CUX1/Wnt signaling regulates Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition in EBV infected epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malizia, Andrea P.; Lacey, Noreen [Clinical Research Centre, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin. 21, Nelson Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland); Walls, Dermot [School of Biotechnology, Dublin City University. Dublin, 9. Ireland (Ireland); Egan, Jim J. [Advanced Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Program, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital. 44, Eccles Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland); Doran, Peter P., E-mail: peter.doran@ucd.ie [Clinical Research Centre, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin. 21, Nelson Street. Dublin, 7. Ireland (Ireland)

    2009-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a refractory and lethal interstitial lung disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis, fibroblast proliferation and extra-cellular matrix protein deposition. EBV, localised to alveolar epithelial cells of pulmonary fibrosis patients is associated with a poor prognosis. A strategy based on microarray-differential gene expression analysis to identify molecular drivers of EBV-associated lung fibrosis was utilized. Alveolar epithelial cells were infected with EBV to identify genes whose expression was altered following TGF{beta}1-mediated lytic phase. EBV lytic reactivation by TGF{beta}1 drives a selective alteration in CUX1 variant (a) (NCBI accession number NM{sub 1}81552) expression, inducing activation of non-canonical Wnt pathway mediators, implicating it in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), the molecular event underpinning scar production in tissue fibrosis. The role of EBV in EMT can be attenuated by antiviral strategies and inhibition of Wnt signaling by using All-Trans Retinoic Acids (ATRA). Activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway by EBV in epithelial cells suggests a novel mechanism of EMT via CUX1 signaling. These data present a framework for further description of the link between infectious agents and fibrosis, a significant disease burden.

  18. Proteoglycan synthesis and Golgi organization in polarized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Gunnar; Akslen-Hoel, Linn K; Grøndahl, Frøy; Kjos, Ingrid; Prydz, Kristian

    2012-12-01

    A large number of complex glycosylation mechanisms take place in the Golgi apparatus. In epithelial cells, glycosylated protein molecules are transported to both the apical and the basolateral surface domains. Although the prevailing view is that the Golgi apparatus provides the same lumenal environment for glycosylation of apical and basolateral cargo proteins, there are indications that proteoglycans destined for the two opposite epithelial surfaces are exposed to different conditions in transit through the Golgi apparatus. We will here review data relating proteoglycan and glycoprotein synthesis to characteristics of the apical and basolateral secretory pathways in epithelial cells.

  19. Human amniotic epithelial cells inhibit growth of epithelial ovarian cancer cells via TGF‑β1-mediated cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Shixia; Zhang, Qiuwan; Wang, Qian; Lai, Dongmei

    2017-11-01

    It is reported that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) endow intrinsic antitumor effects on certain kinds of cancer. This research was designed to evaluate whether hAECs endowed potential anticancer properties on epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vivo and in vitro, which has not been reported before. In this study, we established a xenografted BALB/c nude mouse model by subcutaneously co-injecting ovarian cancer cell line, SK-OV-3, and hAECs for 28 days. In ex vivo experiments, CCK‑8 cell viability assay, real-time PCR, cell counting assay, cell cycle analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay were used to detect the effects of hAEC‑secreted factors on the proliferation and cell cycle progression of EOC cells. A cytokine array was conducted to detect anticancer-related cytokines released from hAECs. Human recombinant TGF‑β1 and TGF‑β1 antibody were used to treat EOC cells and analyzed whether TGF‑β1 contributed to the cell cycle arrest. Results from in vivo and ex vivo experiments showed that hAEC-secreted factors and rhTGF‑β1 decreased proliferation of EOC cells and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which could be partially reversed by excess TGF‑β1 antibody. These data indicate that hAECs endow potential anticancer properties on epithelial ovarian cancer in vivo and in vitro which is partially mediated by hAEC‑secreted TGF‑β1-induced cell cycle arrest. This study suggests a potential application of hAEC‑based therapy against epithelial ovarian cancer.

  20. Cell volume regulation in epithelial physiology and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig; Hoffmann, Else Kay; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    regulation both rely on the spatially and temporally coordinated function of ion channels and transporters. In healthy epithelia, specific ion channels/transporters localize to the luminal and basolateral membranes, contributing to functional epithelial polarity. In pathophysiological processes...... such as cancer, transepithelial and cell volume regulatory ion transport are dys-regulated. Furthermore, epithelial architecture and coordinated ion transport function are lost, cell survival/death balance is altered, and new interactions with the stroma arise, all contributing to drug resistance. Since altered...

  1. Formation of reactive oxygen species in rat epithelial cells upon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2.1 Cell culture. RLE-6TN epithelial cells (ATCC Rockville, MD, USA) have been immortalized by transfection of rat alveolar type II cells with SV40 DNA (Driscoll et al 1995). Cells were maintained in Dulbecco's Modified .... candidate because it is bound to desferrioxamine with a stability constant near 1031. The hint that ...

  2. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwei Wang

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R and regulating cell cycle.BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA.Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the expression of IGF-1R

  3. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  4. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R; Murugesan, Senthil V; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea; Dockray, Graham J

    2015-07-15

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Characterisation of cell adhesion in airway epithelial cell types using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Noordhoek, J A; Postma, D S; Slebos, D-J; van Oosterhout, A J M

    Research on epithelial cell lines and primary epithelium is required to dissect the mechanisms underlying the structural abnormalities in airway epithelium observed for respiratory diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The novel electric cell-substrate impedance

  6. In Vitro Compatibility of Contact Lenses With Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ajay K; Fadli, Zohra; Lakkis, Carol; Coles-Brennan, Chantal; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-07-18

    To determine the interaction of contact lenses of different materials with corneal epithelial cells grown in tissue culture. Two different corneal epithelial cell lines were grown to confluence in culture media. Two hydrogel contact lenses with and without polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) {1-DAY ACUVUE MOIST (1-Day ACUVUE [hydrogel lenses]) and a silicone hydrogel contact lens, AIR OPTIX NIGHT & DAY} were removed from their blister packs, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and applied to the cells. After exposure for 24 hr at 37°C, lenses were removed, and the corneal cells and supernatants processed. Supernatants from the cell assays were used to quantify the amount of 17 different cytokines that were produced using a multiplex bead assay. Cells were stained to assess amount of cell death (apoptosis or necrosis) or stained to determine the level of mitochondrial activity. Stimulants of necrotic death (latex) or apoptotic death (sorbitol) were used as positive controls. Cells produced cytokines during normal growth. Exposure of cells to the hydrogel lenses resulted in only minimal changes to normal production of cytokines, but latex or sorbitol produced the most change. Exposure of the cells to all three lenses caused 4% to 23% reduction in mitochondrial activity, whereas exposure to the positive controls caused 71% to 98% reduction in mitochondrial activity. Exposure of the corneal epithelial cells to contact lenses produced minimal morphological changes, whereas exposure to latex or sorbitol produced significant changes to the human corneal epithelial cell line. Exposure of corneal epithelial cells to contact lenses had minimal impact on their physiology. There was no difference in epithelial cell responses to hydrogel with or without PVP compared with the silicone hydrogel contact lens.

  7. Human airway epithelial cells investigated by atomic force microscopy: A hint to cystic fibrosis epithelial pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasalvia, Maria [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Castellani, Stefano [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); D’Antonio, Palma [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Perna, Giuseppe [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Carbone, Annalucia [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Colia, Anna Laura; Maffione, Angela Bruna [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Capozzi, Vito [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Conese, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.conese@unifg.it [Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease stems from mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to a chronic respiratory disease. Actin cytoskeleton is disorganized in CF airway epithelial cells, likely contributing to the CF-associated basic defects, i.e. defective chloride secretion and sodium/fluid hypersorption. In this work, we aimed to find whether this alteration could be pointed out by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigation, as roughness and Young's elastic module. Moreover, we also sought to determine whether disorganization of actin cytoskeleton is linked to hypersoption of apical fluid. Not only CFBE41o- (CFBE) cells, immortalized airway epithelial cells homozygous for the F508del CFTR allele, showed a different morphology in comparison with 16HBE14o- (16HBE) epithelial cells, wild-type for CFTR, but also they displayed a lack of stress fibers, suggestive of a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. AFM measurements showed that CFBE cells presented a higher membrane roughness and decreased rigidity as compared with 16HBE cells. CFBE overexpressing wtCFTR became more elongated than the parental CFBE cell line and presented actin stress fibers. CFBE cells absorbed more fluid from the apical compartment. Study of fluid absorption with the F-actin-depolymerizing agent Latrunculin B demonstrated that actin cytoskeletal disorganization increased fluid absorption, an effect observed at higher magnitude in 16HBE than in CFBE cells. For the first time, we demonstrate that actin cytoskeleton disorganization is reflected by AFM parameters in CF airway epithelial cells. Our data also strongly suggest that the lack of stress fibers is involved in at least one of the early step in CF pathophysiology at the levels of the airways, i.e. fluid hypersorption. - Highlights: • CF bronchial epithelial (CFBE) cells show a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. • CFBE cells present high roughness and low rigidity in

  8. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  9. Alteration of canonical and non-canonical WNT-signaling by crystalline silica in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Timothy N; Dentener, Mieke A; Stassen, Frank R; Rohde, Gernot G; Mossman, Brooke T; Wouters, Emiel F M; Reynaert, Niki L

    2016-06-15

    Growth and development of the mature lung is a complex process orchestrated by a number of intricate developmental signaling pathways. Wingless-type MMTV-integration site (WNT) signaling plays critical roles in controlling branching morphogenesis cell differentiation, and formation of the conducting and respiratory airways. In addition, WNT pathways are often re-activated in mature lungs during repair and regeneration. WNT- signaling has been elucidated as a crucial contributor to the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as other hyper-proliferative lung diseases. Silicosis, a detrimental occupational lung disease caused by excessive inhalation of crystalline silica dust, is hallmarked by repeated cycles of damaging inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and formation of dense, hyalinized nodules of whorled collagen. However, mechanisms of epithelial cell hyperplasia and matrix deposition are not well understood, as most research efforts have focused on the pronounced inflammatory response. Microarray data from our previous studies has revealed a number of WNT-signaling and WNT-target genes altered by crystalline silica in human lung epithelial cells. In the present study, we utilize pathway analysis to designate connections between genes altered by silica in WNT-signaling networks. Furthermore, we confirm microarray findings by QRT-PCR and demonstrate both activation of canonical (β-catenin) and down-regulation of non-canonical (WNT5A) signaling in immortalized (BEAS-2B) and primary (PBEC) human bronchial epithelial cells. These findings suggest that WNT-signaling and cross-talk with other pathways (e.g. Notch), may contribute to proliferative, fibrogenic and inflammatory responses to silica in lung epithelial cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelium; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells seems to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelial layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions.

  11. Lingual Epithelial Stem Cells and Organoid Culture of Them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Hisha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As tongue cancer is one of the major malignant cancers in the world, understanding the mechanism of maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue, which is known to be the origin of tongue cancer, is unquestionably important. However, the actual stem cells that are responsible for the long-term maintenance of the lingual epithelium have not been identified. Moreover, a simple and convenient culture method for lingual epithelial stem cells has not yet been established. Recently, we have shown that Bmi1-positive cells, residing at the second or third layer of the epithelial cell layer at the base of the interpapillary pit (IPP, were slow-cycling and could supply keratinized epithelial cells for over one year, indicating that Bmi1-positive cells are long-term lingual epithelial stem cells. In addition, we have developed a novel lingual epithelium organoid culture system using a three-dimensional matrix and growth factors. Here, we discuss current progress in the identification of lingual stem cells and future applications of the lingual culture system for studying the regulatory mechanisms of the lingual epithelium and for regenerative medicine.

  12. Effects of epiplakin-knockdown in cultured corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokado, Masahide; Okada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Osamu; Saika, Shizuya

    2016-05-20

    To investigate effects of knockdown of epiplakin gene expression on the homeostasis of cultured corneal epithelial cell line. We previously reported acceleration of corneal epithelial wound healing in an epiplakin-null mouse. Gene expression of epiplakin was knockdowned by employing siRNA transfection in SV40-immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line. Protein expression of E-cadherin, keratin 6 and vimentin was examined by western blotting. Cell migration and proliferation were examined by using scratch assay and Alamar blue assay, respectively. Scratch assay and Alamar blue assay showed migration and proliferation of the cells was accelerated by epiplakin knockdown. siRNA-knockdown of epiplakin suppressed protein expression of E-cadherin, keratin 6 and vimentin. Decreased expression of E-cadherin, keratin 6 and vimentin might be included in the mechanisms of cell migration acceleration in the absence of epiplakin. The mechanism of cell proliferation stimulation by epiplakin knockdown is to be investigated.

  13. Endothelial protein C receptor in renal tubular epithelial cells and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... However, troglitazone had protective effects of EPCR on injured cells. Key words: Endothelial protein C receptor, renal tubular epithelial cell, troglitazone, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β; high glucose. ..... induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells through an extracellular signal- regulated ...

  14. Toxic mechanisms of copper oxide nanoparticles in epithelial kidney cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thit, Amalie; Selck, Henriette; Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2015-01-01

    CuO NPs have previously been reported as toxic to a range of cell cultures including kidney epithelial cells from the frog, Xenopus laevis (A6). Here we examine the molecular mechanisms affecting toxicity of Cu in different forms and particle sizes. A6 cells were exposed to ionic Cu (Cu2+) or CuO...

  15. Type I interferon signalling in the intestinal epithelium affects Paneth cells, microbial ecology and epithelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtschenthaler, Markus; Wang, Jun; Fricke, Cornelia; Fritz, Teresa M J; Niederreiter, Lukas; Adolph, Timon E; Sarcevic, Edina; Künzel, Sven; Offner, Felix A; Kalinke, Ulrich; Baines, John F; Tilg, Herbert; Kaser, Arthur

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) at the internal/external interface orchestrate the mucosal immune response. Paneth cells secrete antimicrobial peptides and inflammatory mediators, protect from pathogens and shape the commensal microbiota. Prompted by the genetic association of the locus harbouring the type I interferon (IFN) receptor (IFNAR1) with Crohn's disease, and a transcriptional signature for type I IFN signalling in Paneth cells, we studied the function of IFNAR1 in IECs. Type I IFN signalling was studied in mice with conditional deletion of Ifnar1 in IECs. Phenotype was characterised at baseline, and gut microbiota composition was assessed by 16S rDNA ribotyping. The role of IFNAR1 was also investigated in experimental colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and colitis-associated cancer induced by DSS in conjunction with azoxymethane (AOM). Ifnar1(-/-(IEC)) mice displayed expansion of Paneth cell numbers and epithelial hyperproliferation compared with Ifnar1-sufficient littermates. While Ifnar1(-/-(IEC)) mice did not exhibit spontaneous inflammation or increased severity in DSS colitis compared with Ifnar1(+/+(IEC)) mice, they exhibited an increased tumour burden in the AOM/DSS model. Both hyperproliferation and tumour promotion were dependent on the microbial flora, as the differences between genotypes were marked upon separately housing mice, but disappeared when Ifnar1(-/-(IEC)) and Ifnar1(+/+(IEC)) mice were co-housed. Accordingly, ribotyping revealed marked differences between Ifnar1(-/-(IEC)) and Ifnar1(+/+(IEC)) mice that where diminished upon co-housing. IFNAR1 in IECs, and Paneth cells in particular, contributes to the regulation of the host-microbiota relationship, with consequences for intestinal regeneration and colitis-associated tumour formation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Human airway epithelial cells investigated by atomic force microscopy: A hint to cystic fibrosis epithelial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalvia, Maria; Castellani, Stefano; D'Antonio, Palma; Perna, Giuseppe; Carbone, Annalucia; Colia, Anna Laura; Maffione, Angela Bruna; Capozzi, Vito; Conese, Massimo

    2016-10-15

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease stems from mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to a chronic respiratory disease. Actin cytoskeleton is disorganized in CF airway epithelial cells, likely contributing to the CF-associated basic defects, i.e. defective chloride secretion and sodium/fluid hypersorption. In this work, we aimed to find whether this alteration could be pointed out by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigation, as roughness and Young's elastic module. Moreover, we also sought to determine whether disorganization of actin cytoskeleton is linked to hypersoption of apical fluid. Not only CFBE41o- (CFBE) cells, immortalized airway epithelial cells homozygous for the F508del CFTR allele, showed a different morphology in comparison with 16HBE14o- (16HBE) epithelial cells, wild-type for CFTR, but also they displayed a lack of stress fibers, suggestive of a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. AFM measurements showed that CFBE cells presented a higher membrane roughness and decreased rigidity as compared with 16HBE cells. CFBE overexpressing wtCFTR became more elongated than the parental CFBE cell line and presented actin stress fibers. CFBE cells absorbed more fluid from the apical compartment. Study of fluid absorption with the F-actin-depolymerizing agent Latrunculin B demonstrated that actin cytoskeletal disorganization increased fluid absorption, an effect observed at higher magnitude in 16HBE than in CFBE cells. For the first time, we demonstrate that actin cytoskeleton disorganization is reflected by AFM parameters in CF airway epithelial cells. Our data also strongly suggest that the lack of stress fibers is involved in at least one of the early step in CF pathophysiology at the levels of the airways, i.e. fluid hypersorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  18. Increased epithelial-free areas in thymuses with altered EphB-mediated thymocyte-thymic epithelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ceca, Javier; Montero-Herradón, Sara; Alfaro, David; Zapata, Agustín G

    2017-10-01

    Epithelial-free areas, present in both thymic cortex and medulla, have been studied in WT and EphB-deficient mice that have important alterations in the development of thymic epithelium due to the lack of proper thymocyte-thymic epithelial cell interactions. In both WT and mutant thymuses, the number and size of epithelial-free areas are significantly larger in the medulla than in the cortex. The two parameters show a reverse correlation: low numbers of these areas course with large epithelial-free areas and vice versa. However, their structure and cell content are similar in mutant and WT thymuses. Cortical epithelial-free areas just contain DP thymocytes, while the medullary ones consist of SP cells, blood vessels, mesenchyme-derived ER-TR7+ cells and components of the extracellular matrix (i.e., collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin). Other components, such as desmin, αSMA, PDGFRβ and Ng2, frequently associated with blood vessel walls, also appear. Vimentin, although present in medullary epithelial-free areas, does not co-express with epithelial cells. Other markers related to epithelial-mesenchymal transitions, such as Snail, Slug or FSP1, are not expressed. These results suggest that alterations in the cell interactions between distinct thymic cell components that induce both increased proportions of apoptotic thymic epithelial cells and altered behavior of the mesenchyme associated with the medullary vasculature could explain the appearance of these areas and their differences in the cortex and medulla.

  19. Exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yijie; Han, Shichao; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Liu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated physiological process consisting of a complex events, and scarless wound healing is highly desired for the development and application in clinical medicine. Recently, we have demonstrated that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) promoted wound healing and inhibited scar formation through a paracrine mechanism. However, exosomes (Exo) are one of the most important paracrine factors. Whether exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs-Exo) have positive effects on scarless wound healing have not been reported yet. In this study, we examined the role of hAECs-Exo on wound healing in a rat model. We found that hAECs, which exhibit characteristics of both embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. hAECs-Exo ranged from 50 to 150 nm in diameter, and positive for exosomal markers CD9, CD63, CD81, Alix, TSG101 and HLA-G. Internalization of hAECs-Exo promoted the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. Moreover, the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) were partly abolished by the treatment of high concentration of hAECs-Exo (100 μg/mL), which may be through stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo animal experiments showed that hAECs-Exo improved the skin wound healing with well-organized collagen fibers. Taken together, These findings represent that hAECs-Exo can be used as a novel hope in cell-free therapy for scarless wound healing.

  20. No junctional communication between epithelial cells in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion gradients of morphogens have been inferred as a basis for the control of morphogenesis in hydra, and morphogenetic substances have been found which, on the basis of their molecular weight (MW), should be able to pass gap junctions. There have been several reports of the presence of gap...... junctions between epithelial cells of hydra. However, until now, there has been no report published on whether these junctions enable the epithelial cells to exchange molecules of small molecular weight, as has been described in other organisms. Therefore we decided to investigate the communicative...... properties of the junctional membranes by electrophysiological methods and by intracellular-dye iontophoresis. We report here that no electrotonic coupling is detectable between epithelial cells of Hydra attenuata in: (1) intact animals, (2) head-regenerating animals, (3) cell re-aggregates, and (4) hydra...

  1. High mobility group box 1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Statt, Sarah; Wu, Reen; Chang, Hao-Teng; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Wang, Chien-Neng; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Chen-Chen

    2016-01-07

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is implicated in bronchial remodeling and loss of lung function in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Previous studies showed the involvement of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in the pathology of chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases. However, the role of HMGB1 in EMT of human airway epithelial cells is still unclear. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to show that HMGB1 treatment regulated EMT-related gene expression in human primary-airway epithelial cells. The top five upregulated genes were SNAI2, FGFBP1, VIM, SPARC (osteonectin), and SERPINE1, while the downregulated genes included OCLN, TJP1 (ZO-1), FZD7, CDH1 (E-cadherin), and LAMA5. We found that HMGB1 induced downregulation of E-cadherin and ZO-1, and upregulation of vimentin mRNA transcription and protein translation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we observed that HMGB1 induced AKT phosphorylation, resulting in GSK3β inactivation, cytoplasmic accumulation, and nuclear translocation of β-catenin to induce EMT in human airway epithelial cells. Treatment with PI3K inhibitor (LY294006) and β-catenin shRNA reversed HMGB1-induced EMT. Moreover, HMGB1 induced expression of receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE), but not that of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 or TLR4, and RAGE shRNA inhibited HMGB1-induced EMT in human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGB1 induced EMT through RAGE and the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    escape senescence and acquire genomic changes. Nature 2001;409:633–7. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR. Raf-1- induced growth arrest in...p16INK4a. Cell 88:593–602. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16...Cycle 3, 244–246. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16-independent and

  3. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels...

  4. Montelukast suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells induced by eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Koa; Kainuma, Keigo; Toda, Masaaki; Harada, Etsuko; Chelakkot-Govindalayathila, Ayshwarya-Lakshmi; Roeen, Ziaurahman; Nagao, Mizuho; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Fujisawa, Takao; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2014-07-04

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a mechanism by which eosinophils can induce airway remodeling. Montelukast, an antagonist of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor, can suppress airway remodeling in asthma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether montelukast can ameliorate airway remodeling by blocking EMT induced by eosinophils. EMT induced was assessed using a co-culture system of human bronchial epithelial cells and human eosinophils or the eosinophilic leukemia cell lines, Eol-1. Montelukast inhibited co-culture associated morphological changes of BEAS-2b cells, decreased the expression of vimentin and collagen I, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. Montelukast mitigated the rise of TGF-β1 production and Smad3 phosphorylation. Co-culture of human eosinophils with BEAS-2B cells significantly enhanced the production of CysLTs compared with BEAS-2B cells or eosinophils alone. The increase of CysLTs was abolished by montelukast pre-treatment. Montelukast had similar effects when co-culture system of Eol-1 and BEAS-2B was used. This study showed that montelukast suppresses eosinophils-induced EMT of airway epithelial cells. This finding may explain the mechanism of montelukast-mediated amelioration of airway remodeling in bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The origin of epithelial neoplasms after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, M.J.; Cleef, P.H. van; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed five women, who have developed epithelial neoplasms after sex-mismatched stem cell transplants. Using in situ hybridization for sex chromosome-specific DNA probes and immunohistochemistry we identified the origin of the tumor cells. We conclude that none of the non-hematologic

  6. Effect of Helicobacter pylori on gastric epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Shatha; Lina, Taslima T; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium has cells with features that make them a powerful line of defense in innate mucosal immunity. Features that allow gastrointestinal epithelial cells to contribute in innate defense include cell barrier integrity, cell turnover, autophagy, and innate immune responses. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a spiral shape gram negative bacterium that selectively colonizes the gastric epithelium of more than half of the world’s population. The infection invariably becomes persistent due to highly specialized mechanisms that facilitate H. pylori’s avoidance of this initial line of host defense as well as adaptive immune mechanisms. The host response is thus unsuccessful in clearing the infection and as a result becomes established as a persistent infection promoting chronic inflammation. In some individuals the associated inflammation contributes to ulcerogenesis or neoplasia. H. pylori has an array of different strategies to interact intimately with epithelial cells and manipulate their cellular processes and functions. Among the multiple aspects that H. pylori affects in gastric epithelial cells are their distribution of epithelial junctions, DNA damage, apoptosis, proliferation, stimulation of cytokine production, and cell transformation. Some of these processes are initiated as a result of the activation of signaling mechanisms activated on binding of H. pylori to cell surface receptors or via soluble virulence factors that gain access to the epithelium. The multiple responses by the epithelium to the infection contribute to pathogenesis associated with H. pylori. PMID:25278677

  7. Endothelial protein C receptor in renal tubular epithelial cells and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays an important role within the protein C pathway in regulating coagulation and inflammation. It was reported that EPCR was expressed in large vessels, placenta, heart, liver and lung endothelial cell. However, there are a few studies concerned about renal epithelial cells.

  8. The role of epithelial cell adhesion molecule N-glycosylation on apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Liu, Xue; Gao, Jiujiao; Sun, Yan; Liu, Tingjiao; Yan, Qiu; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-03-01

    Glycosylation of cell surface proteins plays an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. It has been demonstrated that knockdown of epithelial cell adhesion molecule promoted apoptosis, inhibited cell proliferation, and caused cell-cycle arrest. In this study, we investigated whether and how N-glycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule influenced the apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We applied the N-glycosylation mutation epithelial cell adhesion molecule plasmid to express deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule and then to study its function. Our results showed that deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation. Deglycosylation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule enhanced the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil, promoting apoptosis by downregulating the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and upregulating the expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Caspase 3 via the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings are important for a better understanding of epithelial cell adhesion molecule apoptosis regulation and suggest epithelial cell adhesion molecule as a potential target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Rapamycin Prolongs the Survival of Corneal Epithelial Cells in Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaz Gidfar; Farnoud Y. Milani; Milani, Behrad Y.; Xiang Shen; Medi Eslani; Ilham Putra; Michael J. Huvard; Hossein Sagha; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2017-01-01

    Rapamycin has previously been shown to have anti-aging effects in cells and organisms. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of rapamycin on primary human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation and cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of differentiation markers was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated ?-Galactosid...

  10. Oxidized alginate hydrogels as niche environments for corneal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Bernice; De Bank, Paul A; Luetchford, Kim A; Acosta, Fernando R; Connon, Che J

    2014-01-01

    Chemical and biochemical modification of hydrogels is one strategy to create physiological constructs that maintain cell function. The aim of this study was to apply oxidised alginate hydrogels as a basis for development of a biomimetic niche for limbal epithelial stem cells that may be applied to treating corneal dysfunction. The stem phenotype of bovine limbal epithelial cells (LEC) and the viability of corneal epithelial cells (CEC) were examined in oxidised alginate gels containing collagen IV over a 3-day culture period. Oxidation increased cell viability (P ≤ 0.05) and this improved further with addition of collagen IV (P ≤ 0.01). Oxidised gels presented larger internal pores (diameter: 0.2–0.8 µm) than unmodified gels (pore diameter: 0.05–0.1 µm) and were significantly less stiff (P ≤ 0.001), indicating that an increase in pore size and a decrease in stiffness contributed to improved cell viability. The diffusion of collagen IV from oxidised alginate gels was similar to that of unmodified gels suggesting that oxidation may not affect the retention of extracellular matrix proteins in alginate gels. These data demonstrate that oxidised alginate gels containing corneal extracellular matrix proteins can influence corneal epithelial cell function in a manner that may impact beneficially on corneal wound healing therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A Published byWiley Periodicals, Inc. Part A: 102A: 3393–3400, 2014. PMID:24142706

  11. Factors influencing the exfoliation of cervicovaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, J; Mikhail, M S; Palan, P R; Payraudeau, P H; Romney, S L

    1992-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate the association of smoking and exfoliation of cervicovaginal epithelial cells while controlling for other factors that may potentially influence cell exfoliation (e.g., presence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or koilocytes, the use of oral contraceptives, age, and the phase of the menstrual cycle). Cervicovaginal lavage specimens and epidemiologic questionnaires were obtained with informed consent from 190 women. The cervicovaginal lavage samples were processed to separate other contaminants. The number of squamous epithelial cells counted was expressed as cells per milliliter of lavage. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the number of exfoliated epithelial cells was significantly higher in smokers (p < 0.01) and also in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (p < 0.05). The other studied variables had no detectable effect. The findings suggest that smoking or the presence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia may induce an acceleration in the exfoliation of cervicovaginal epithelial cells. This may alter cell maturation and may be a factor in the oncogenic process.

  12. Cell-size distribution in epithelial tissue formation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafito, Alberto; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    How cell growth and proliferation are orchestrated in living tissues to achieve a given biological function is a central problem in biology. During development, tissue regeneration and homeostasis, cell proliferation must be coordinated by spatial cues in order for cells to attain the correct size and shape. Biological tissues also feature a notable homogeneity of cell size, which, in specific cases, represents a physiological need. Here, we study the temporal evolution of the cell-size distribution by applying the theory of kinetic fragmentation to tissue development and homeostasis. Our theory predicts self-similar probability density function (PDF) of cell size and explains how division times and redistribution ensure cell size homogeneity across the tissue. Theoretical predictions and numerical simulations of confluent non-homeostatic tissue cultures show that cell size distribution is self-similar. Our experimental data confirm predictions and reveal that, as assumed in the theory, cell division times scale like a power-law of the cell size. We find that in homeostatic conditions there is a stationary distribution with lognormal tails, consistently with our experimental data. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations show that the shape of the PDF depends on how the space inherited by apoptotic cells is redistributed and that apoptotic cell rates might also depend on size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Osmosignaling and volume regulation in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christina H; Bot, Alice G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Tilly, Ben C

    2007-01-01

    Most cells have to perform their physiological functions under a variable osmotic stress, which, because of the relatively high permeability of the plasma membrane for water, may result in frequent alterations in cell size. Intestinal epithelial cells are especially prone to changes in cell volume because of their high capacity of salt and water transport and the high membrane expression of various nutrient transporters. Therefore, to avoid excessive shrinkage or swelling, enterocytes, like most cell types, have developed efficient mechanisms to maintain osmotic balance. This chapter reviews selected model systems that can be used to investigate cell volume regulation in intestinal epithelial cells, with emphasis on the regulatory volume decrease, and the methods available to study the compensatory redistribution of (organic) osmolytes. In addition, a brief summary is presented of the pathways involved in osmosensing and osmosignaling in the intestine.

  14. Tiotropium attenuates IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia of human airway epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Bouwman, Susanne; van den Berge, Maarten; Hylkema, Machteld N.; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown that acetylcholine is both a neurotransmitter and acts as a local mediator, produced by airway cells including epithelial cells. In vivo studies have demonstrated an indirect role for acetylcholine in epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we aimed to investigate direct

  15. Nicotine transport in lung and non-lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Kamei, Hidetaka; Nagahiro, Machi; Kawami, Masashi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2017-11-01

    Nicotine is rapidly absorbed from the lung alveoli into systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, mechanism underlying nicotine transport in alveolar epithelial cells is not well understood to date. In the present study, we characterized nicotine uptake in lung epithelial cell lines A549 and NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Characteristics of [3H]nicotine uptake was studied using these cell lines. Nicotine uptake in A549 cells occurred in a time- and temperature-dependent manner and showed saturation kinetics, with a Km value of 0.31mM. Treatment with some organic cations such as diphenhydramine and pyrilamine inhibited nicotine uptake, whereas treatment with organic cations such as carnitine and tetraethylammonium did not affect nicotine uptake. Extracellular pH markedly affected nicotine uptake, with high nicotine uptake being observed at high pH up to 11.0. Modulation of intracellular pH with ammonium chloride also affected nicotine uptake. Treatment with valinomycin, a potassium ionophore, did not significantly affect nicotine uptake, indicating that nicotine uptake is an electroneutral process. For comparison, we assessed the characteristics of nicotine uptake in another lung epithelial cell line NCI-H441 and in non-lung epithelial cell lines HepG2 and MCF-7. Interestingly, these cell lines showed similar characteristics of nicotine uptake with respect to pH dependency and inhibition by various organic cations. The present findings suggest that a similar or the same pH-dependent transport system is involved in nicotine uptake in these cell lines. A novel molecular mechanism of nicotine transport is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibitory effects of ameloblastin on epithelial cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Noriko; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Kamegawa, Mariko; Matsukizono, Miho; Akebiyama, Yasuo; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2014-08-01

    Ameloblastin is an enamel matrix protein expressed in several tissues. Many potential mechanisms have been identified by which ameloblastin functions as an extracellular matrix protein. However, the biological effects of ameloblastin on gingival epithelial cells remain unclear. In the present study, we established a novel system to purify recombinant human ameloblastin and clarified its biological functions in epithelial cells in vitro. Recombinant human ameloblastin was isolated from COS-7 cells overexpressing HaloTag-fused human ameloblastin by the HaloTag system and then purified further by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. SCC-25 cells, derived from human oral squamous cell carcinoma, were treated with recombinant ameloblastin and then cell survival was assessed by a WST-1 assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry. The novel purification system allowed effective recovery of the recombinant ameloblastin proteins at a high purity. Recombinant ameloblastin protein was found to suppress the proliferation of SCC-25 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that ameloblastin treatment induced cell cycle arrest G1 phase. We developed a procedure for production of highly purified recombinant human ameloblastin. Biological analyses suggest that ameloblastin induces cell cycle arrest in epithelial cells and regulates the progression of periodontitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxidative Stress, Cell Death, and Other Damage to Alveolar Epithelial Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai A

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor in the development of various lung diseases, including pulmonary emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, and lung cancer. The mechanisms of these diseases include alterations in alveolar epithelial cells, which are essential in the maintenance of normal alveolar architecture and function. Following cigarette smoking, alterations in alveolar epithelial cells induce an increase in epithelial permeability, a decrease in surfactant production, the inappropriate production of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, and an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the most deleterious effect of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial cells is cell death, i.e., either apoptosis or necrosis depending on the magnitude of cigarette smoke exposure. Cell death induced by cigarette smoke exposure can largely be accounted for by an enhancement in oxidative stress. In fact, cigarette smoke contains and generates many reactive oxygen species that damage alveolar epithelial cells. Whether apoptosis and/or necrosis in alveolar epithelial cells is enhanced in healthy cigarette smokers is presently unclear. However, recent evidence indicates that the apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar endothelial cells is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, an important cigarette smoke-induced lung disease characterized by the loss of alveolar structures. This review will discuss oxidative stress, cell death, and other damage to alveolar epithelial cells induced by cigarette smoke.

  18. Receptor Activator of NF-κB Orchestrates Activation of Antiviral Memory CD8 T Cells in the Spleen Marginal Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Habbeddine

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The spleen plays an important role in protective immunity to bloodborne pathogens. Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs in the spleen marginal zone capture microbial antigens to trigger adaptive immune responses. Marginal zone macrophages (MZMs can also act as a replicative niche for intracellular pathogens, providing a platform for mounting the immune response. Here, we describe a role for RANK in the coordinated function of antigen-presenting cells in the spleen marginal zone and triggering anti-viral immunity. Targeted deletion of RANK results in the selective loss of CD169+ MZMs, which provide a niche for viral replication, while RANK signaling in DCs promotes the recruitment and activation of anti-viral memory CD8 T cells. These studies reveal a role for the RANKL/RANK signaling axis in the orchestration of protective immune responses in the spleen marginal zone that has important implications for the host response to viral infection and induction of acquired immunity.

  19. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-05-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices. Failure of most biomaterials originates from the inability to predict and control the influence of their surface properties on biological phenomena, particularly protein adsorption, and cellular behaviour, which subsequently results in unfavourable host response. Here, we introduce a surface-proteomic screening approach using a label-free mass spectrometry technique to decipher the adsorption profile of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on different biomaterials, and correlate it with cellular behaviour. We demonstrated that the way a biomaterial selectively interacts with specific ECM proteins of a given tissue seems to determine the interactions between the cells of that tissue and biomaterials. Accordingly, this approach can

  20. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...

  1. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    block alloactivation, had no inhibitory effect on RPE-mediated T-cell apoptotic responses in MHC class II-specific CD4+ T-cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells express FasL and induce TCR-independent apoptosis in activated human T cells through Fas-FasL interaction. Retinal pigment...... human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...

  2. Aneuploidy, oncogene amplification and epithelial to mesenchymal transition define spontaneous transformation of murine epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; McNeil, Nicole E; Yi, Ming; Nguyen, Quang-Tri; Hu, Yue; Wangsa, Danny; Mack, David L; Hummon, Amanda B; Case, Chanelle; Cardin, Eric; Stephens, Robert; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Human epithelial cancers are defined by a recurrent distribution of specific chromosomal aneuploidies, a trait less typical for murine cancer models induced by an oncogenic stimulus. After prolonged culture, mouse epithelial cells spontaneously immortalize, transform and become tumorigenic. We assessed genome and transcriptome alterations in cultures derived from bladder and kidney utilizing spectral karyotyping, array CGH, FISH and gene expression profiling. The results show widespread aneuploidy, yet a recurrent and tissue-specific distribution of genomic imbalances, just as in human cancers. Losses of chromosome 4 and gains of chromosome 15 are common and occur early during the transformation process. Global gene expression profiling revealed early and significant transcriptional deregulation. Chromosomal aneuploidy resulted in expression changes of resident genes and consequently in a massive deregulation of the cellular transcriptome. Pathway interrogation of expression changes during the sequential steps of transformation revealed enrichment of genes associated with DNA repair, centrosome regulation, stem cell characteristics and aneuploidy. Genes that modulate the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and genes that define the chromosomal instability phenotype played a dominant role and were changed in a directionality consistent with loss of cell adhesion, invasiveness and proliferation. Comparison with gene expression changes during human bladder and kidney tumorigenesis revealed remarkable overlap with changes observed in the spontaneously transformed murine cultures. Therefore, our novel mouse models faithfully recapitulate the sequence of genomic and transcriptomic events that define human tumorigenesis, hence validating them for both basic and preclinical research.

  3. Apicobasal Polarity Controls Lymphocyte Adhesion to Hepatic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Reglero-Real

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery.

  4. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    by inducible nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS). NO as well as other ROS are potential DNA damaging agents. The aim was to determine the effect of long-term cytokine exposure on NO formation and DNA damage in epithelial cells. METHODS: A colonic cell line (HT29) was stimulated for 1-10 weeks with interferon...... stimulated cells had increased DNA instability (Pcytokine exposure induces an iNOS dependent up-regulation of ROS production and DNA instability. This mechanism...

  5. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Linthicum, Logan; DenBesten, Pamela K; Zhang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCl) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which was also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel.

  6. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Linthicum, Logan; DenBesten, Pamela K; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCl) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which was also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel. PMID:23538640

  7. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Renal epithelial cells can release ATP by vesicular fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi G Bjaelde

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Renal epithelial cells have the ability to release nucleotides as paracrine factors. In the intercalated cells of the collecting duct, ATP is released by connexin30 (cx30, which is selectively expressed in this cell type. However, ATP is released by virtually all renal epithelia and the aim of the present study was to identify possible alternative nucleotide release pathways in a renal epithelial cell model. We used MDCK (type1 cells to screen for various potential ATP release pathways. In these cells, inhibition of the vesicular H+-ATPases (bafilomycin reduced both the spontaneous and hypotonically (80%-induced nucleotide release. Interference with vesicular fusion using N-ethylamide markedly reduced the spontaneous nucleotide release, as did interference with trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus (brefeldin A1 and vesicular transport (nocodazole. These findings were substantiated using a siRNA directed against SNAP-23, which significantly reduced spontaneous ATP release. Inhibition of pannexin and connexins did not affect the spontaneous ATP release in this cell type, which consists of ∼90% principal cells. TIRF-microscopy of either fluorescently-labeled ATP (MANT-ATP or quinacrine-loaded vesicles, revealed that spontaneous release of single vesicles could be promoted by either hypoosmolality (50% or ionomycin. This vesicular release decreased the overall cellular fluorescence by 5.8% and 7.6% respectively. In summary, this study supports the notion that spontaneous and induced ATP release can occur via exocytosis in renal epithelial cells.

  9. AM251 Suppresses Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyo Yoshinaga

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of renal tubular epithelial cells is one of the causative mechanisms of kidney fibrosis. In our study, we screened lipophilic compounds using a lipid library including approximately 200 lipids to identify those that suppressed EMT induced by a transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 stimulus. Initial screening was performed with the immortalized HK-2 renal tubule epithelial cell line. The most promising compounds were further tested in RPTEC primary renal tubule epithelial cells. We found that the synthetic lipid AM251 suppressed two hallmark events associated with EMT, the upregulation of collagen 1A1 (COL1A1 and downregulation of E-cadherin. Though AM251 is known to act as an antagonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 and an agonist for the G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GRP55, the suppression of EMT by AM251 was not mediated through either receptor. Microarray analyses revealed that AM251 inhibited induction of several EMT transcription factors such as SNAIL1, which is the key inducer of EMT, and the AP-1 transcription factors FOSB and JUNB. Activation of SMAD2/3 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK was inhibited by AM251, with greater inhibition of the latter, indicating that AM251 acted upstream of SMAD/p38 MAPK in the TGF-β signaling pathway. Our findings regarding the effects of AM251 on the TGF-β signaling pathway may inform development of a novel therapeutic agent suppressing EMT, thus preventing kidney fibrosis.

  10. Sodium selectivity of semicircular canal duct epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbidge Donald G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by semicircular canal duct (SCCD epithelial cells is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of vestibular endolymph. It was previously shown that the epithelial cells could absorb Na+ under control of a glucocorticoid hormone (dexamethasone and the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride. The most commonly-observed target of amiloride is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, comprised of the three subunits α-, β- and γ-ENaC. However, other cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive in a similar concentration range. The aim of this study was to determine whether SCCD epithelial cells absorb only Na+ or also K+ through an amiloride-sensitive pathway. Parasensory K+ absorption could contribute to regulation of the transduction current through hair cells, as found to occur via vestibular transitional cells [S. H. Kim and D. C. Marcus. Regulation of sodium transport in the inner ear. Hear.Res. doi:10.1016/j.heares.2011.05.003, 2011]. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6197, whole-cell patch clamp and transepithelial recordings in primary cultures of rat SCCD. α-, β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present. The selectivity of the amiloride-sensitive transepithelial and cell membrane currents was observed in Ussing chamber and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. The cell membrane currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, but the Na+ selectivity disappeared when the cells were cultured on impermeable supports. Transepithelial currents across SCCD were also carried exclusively by Na+. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride-sensitive absorptive flux of SCCD mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel, likely αβγ-ENaC. These epithelial cells therefore absorb only Na+ via the amiloride-sensitive pathway and do not provide a parasensory K+ efflux from the

  11. Cancer Stem Cells, Epithelial to Mesenchymal Markers, and Circulating Tumor Cells in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind; Meijer, Coby; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Boersma-van Ek, Wytske; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of markers of cancer stem cells and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in small cell lung cancer is not known. We retrospectively studied these markers in the biopsy tissue of patients with small cell lung cancer and correlated them with overall survival and the strongest

  12. Nerve Invasion by Epithelial Cells in Benign Breast Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jan Chan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve invasion by glandular epithelial cells in a lesion is usually regarded as invasive carcinoma. However, some benign conditions in the pancreas, prostate, breast and other organs may show involvement of nerve bundles by benign epithelial cells. We report an 18-year-old female with nerve invasion in benign breast disease. The lesion in her right breast revealed fibrocystic changes with ductal hyperplasia and stromal sclerosis. Perineural and intraneural involvement by bland-looking small ducts lined by 2 layers of cells including an outer layer of myoepithelial cells were found, suggestive of benign nerve invasion. There was no evidence of malignant cells in any of the sections. The patient remains well after 31 months of follow-up. About 44 cases of nerve invasion in benign breast diseases have been reported in the literature. It is necessary to carefully evaluate nerve involvement in breast lesions to avoid over-diagnosis and inappropriate operation.

  13. [STR genotyping from trace epithelial cells on fountain pen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Mei, Shan-Zong; Li, Yong-Hong; Feng, Yan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Yue

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of STR genotyping from trace epithelial cells on fountain pen and to discuss the impact of conservation time on DNA typing. Seven fountain pens were separately used by each of the 17 volunteers 20 minutes per day for a month and then were preserved on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28. DNA was extracted from the epithelial cells on fountain pen by silicon bead and was genotyped by Identifier kit. The corresponding control samples were buccal swabs of the above volunteers. The detectable numbers of loci were counted for assessment. There were statistically significant differences in the DNA genotyping by detectable numbers of gene loci between buccal swabs and epithelial cells on fountain pen of different conservation times (P fountain pen preserved on day 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, 28 and the corresponding oral swabs were also statistically significant (P fountain pen if the tests were performed within 24 hours. The trace epithelial cells on fountain pen can be used as biological samples for personal identification, but the conservation time would have influence on the results of DNA genotyping.

  14. Membrane dynamics and the regulation of epithelial cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, JM; Maier, O; van IJzendoorn, SCD; Hoekstra, D

    2003-01-01

    Plasma membranes of epithelial cells consist of two domains, an apical and a basolateral domain, the surfaces of which differ in composition. The separation of these domains by a tight junction and the fact that specific transport pathways exist for intracellular communication between these domains

  15. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Jayanta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1 that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cell culture attributes, we built a revised analogue (ISEA2 to increase overlap between analogue and cell culture traits. Both analogues used agent-based, discrete event methods. A set of axioms determined ISEA behaviors; together, they specified the analogue's operating principles. A new experimentation framework enabled tracking relative axiom use and roles during simulated cystogenesis along with establishment of the consequences of their disruption. Results ISEA2 consistently produced convex cystic structures in a simulated embedded culture. Axiom use measures provided detailed descriptions of the analogue's dynamic phenotype. Dysregulating key cell death and division axioms led to disorganized structures. Adhering to either axiom less than 80% of the time caused ISEA1 to form easily identified morphological changes. ISEA2 was more robust to identical dysregulation. Both dysregulated analogues exhibited characteristics that resembled those associated with an in vitro model of early glandular epithelial cancer. Conclusion We documented the causal chains of events, and their relative roles, responsible for simulated cystogenesis. The results stand as an early hypothesis–a theory–of how individual MDCK cell actions give rise to consistently roundish, cystic organoids.

  16. The Role of SnoN and Ski in Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Deng

    2007-01-01

    .... Higher level of Ski/SnoN is found in transformed mammary epithelial cells. Ski/SnoN might play a role in regulation of the transformation of mammary epithelial cell by antagonizing TGF signaling pathway...

  17. Nasal epithelial cells can act as a physiological surrogate for paediatric asthma studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendran Thavagnanam

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Differentiated paediatric epithelial cells can be used to study the role of epithelial cells in asthma. Nasal epithelial cells are easier to obtain and may act as a surrogate for bronchial epithelium in asthma studies. We assessed the suitability of nasal epithelium from asthmatic children to be a surrogate for bronchial epithelium using air-liquid interface cultures. METHODS: Paired nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatic children (n = 9 were differentiated for 28 days under unstimulated and IL-13-stimulated conditions. Morphological and physiological markers were analysed using immunocytochemistry, transepithelial-electrical-resistance, Quantitative Real-time-PCR, ELISA and multiplex cytokine/chemokine analysis. RESULTS: Physiologically, nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic children exhibit similar cytokine responses to stimulation with IL-13 compared with paired bronchial epithelial cells. Morphologically however, nasal epithelial cells differed significantly from bronchial epithelial cells from asthmatic patients under unstimulated and IL-13-stimulated conditions. Nasal epithelial cells exhibited lower proliferation/differentiation rates and lower percentages of goblet and ciliated cells when unstimulated, while exhibiting a diminished and varied response to IL-13. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that morphologically, nasal epithelial cells would not be a suitable surrogate due to a significantly lower rate of proliferation and differentiation of goblet and ciliated cells. Physiologically, nasal epithelial cells respond similarly to exogenous stimulation with IL-13 in cytokine production and could be used as a physiological surrogate in the event that bronchial epithelial cells are not available.

  18. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Orchestrating Lean Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jens Ove; Mikkelsen, Hans; Andersen, Jesper Rank

    2008-01-01

    The notion of Lean Manufacturing is not merely confined to a set of well defined techniques, but represents a broad approach to managing a company. Working with lean entails many aspects, such as production planning and control, production engineering, product development, supply chain......, and organizational issues. To become effective, many functional areas and departments must be involved. At the same time companies are embedded in a dynamic environment. The aim of the paper is to propose a comprehensive approach to better implementation of lean initiatives, based on two empirical studies. The paper...... will discuss how a concerted effort can be staged taking into account the interdependencies among individual improvement initiatives. The notion of orchestration will be introduced, and several means for orchestration will be presented. Critical behavioral issues for lean implementation will be discussed....

  20. Biomechanics of epithelial cell islands analyzed by modeling and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Coburn, Luke; Noppe, Adrian; Caldwell, Benjamin J; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Roberts, Anthony P; Yap, Alpha S; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A

    2016-01-01

    We generated a new computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell islands that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include both cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of protrusions (and traction forces) that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell-cell junctions (and monolayer stress) is not homogeneous across the island. Instead it is higher at the island center and scales up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Moreover, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce mechanical crosstalk between both cell-cell and cell substrate adhesion systems. We found that an i...

  1. In Vivo Tagging of Lung Epithelial Cells To Define the Early Steps of Tumor Cell Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0184 TITLE: In Vivo Tagging of Lung Epithelial Cells To Define the Early Steps of Tumor Cell Dissemination PRINCIPAL...Sep 2013 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In Vivo Tagging of Lung Epithelial Cells To Define the Early Steps of Tumor Cell...understand the early events that accompany invasive behavior in vivo , we proposed to develop a lineage-labeling system to detect and isolate cells of lung

  2. Cytotoxic Effect of Lipophilic Bismuth Dimercaptopropanol Nanoparticles on Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; Badireddy, Appala Raju; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Francisco, Contreras-Cordero Juan; Israel, Martinez-Gonzalez Gustavo; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Chellam, Shankararaman; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles have many interesting properties to be applied in biomedical and medicinal sectors, however their safety in humans have not been comprehensively investigated. The objective of this research was to determine the cytotoxic effect of bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles (BisBAL NPs) on epithelial cells. The nanoparticles are composed of 18.7 nm crystallites on average and have a rhombohedral structure, agglomerating into chains-like or clusters of small nanoparticles. Based on MTT viability assay and fluorescence microscopy, cytotoxicity was not observed on monkey kidney cells after growing with 5 µM of BisBAL NPs for 24 h. Employing same techniques, identical results were obtained with human epithelial cells (HeLa), showing a not strain-dependent phenomenon. The absence of toxic effects on epithelial cells growing with BisBAL NPs was corroborated with long-time experiments (24-72 hrs.), showing no difference in comparison with growing control (cells without nanoparticles). Further, genotoxicity assays, comet assay and fluorescent microscopy and electrophoresis in bromide-stained agarose gel revealed no damage to genomic DNA of MA104 cells after 24 h. of exposition to BisBAL NPs. Finally, the effect of bismuth nanoparticles on protein synthesis was studied in cells growing with BisBAL NPs for 24 h. SDS-PAGE assays showed no difference between treated and untreated cells, suggesting that BisBAL NPs did not interfere with protein synthesis. Hence BisBAL NPs do not appear to exert cytotoxic effects suggesting their biological compatibility with epithelial cells.

  3. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang, E-mail: wenfang64@hotmail.com; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: syzi960@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Melanosome Motility in Fish Retinal Pigment Epithelial (RPE) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Smith, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Several model systems have been developed to investigate mechanism and regulation of intracellular organelle motility. The fish retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell represents a novel yet simple system for the study of organelle motility. Primary cultures of dissociated RPE cells are easily prepared and amenable to motility studies. In vivo, melanin-containing pigment granules (melanosomes) within fish RPE migrate distances up to 100 μm in response to light flux. When dissociated from the epithelial layer and cultured in vitro, RPE cells attach to the substrate with the apical projections extending radially from the central cell body. Melanosomes can be chemically triggered to aggregate or disperse throughout the projections, and are easily observed using phase contrast microscopy. Melanosome migration in RPE apical projections is dependent on actin filaments, and thus renders this model system useful for investigations of actin-dependent organelle motility.

  6. File list: DNS.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: His.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Lng.20.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Lng.05.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Lng.10.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.Lng.20.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: DNS.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 Unclassified Breast Mammary epithelia...l cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Unc.Brs.10.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Unc.Brs.20.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 TFs and others Breast Mammary epithel...ial cells SRX424872,SRX330635,SRX330636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Lng.50.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells hg19 Histone Lung Tracheal epithelial ce...lls http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.50.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Lng.05.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Lng.05.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Lung Tracheal epitheli...al cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Lng.05.AllAg.Tracheal_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  8. In vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on aligned nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-12-01

    Esophagus is a complex, hollow organ consisting of epithelial cells in the inner mucosal layer and smooth muscle cells in the outer muscle layer. In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on the aligned nanofibrous scaffold made of PHBV, PHBV-gelatin, PCL and PCL-gelatin developed through electrospinning using rotating drum collector. Epithelial cells were labeled with cell tracker green while the smooth muscle cells were labeled with cell tracker red. Labeled cells were seeded on the aligned nanofibers matrices and tracked using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells attach, extend, and proliferate over these nanofibrous matrices. Confocal z-sectioning shows that epithelial and smooth muscle cells tend to separate into two distinct layers on a single nanofiber system mimicking the in vivo anatomy. Cell viability assay showed that both types of cells are viable and also interact with each other. The functional gene expression of respective cell types demonstrates that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells are phenotypically as well as functionally active when they were co-cultured. Thus the study highlighted that aligned nanofibrous scaffolds could be potential alternative graft for esophageal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Smad2 overexpression enhances adhesion of gingival epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Shoichi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Yamashiro, Keisuke; Shimoe, Masayuki; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Ugawa, Yuki; Kochi, Shinsuke; Ideguchi, Hidetaka; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2016-11-01

    Gingival epithelial cells play an important role in preventing the initiation of periodontitis, by their hemidesmosomal adhesion to the tooth root surface. Adhesion requires integrin-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions that are intricately regulated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. However, the mechanisms underlying the interplay between adhesion molecules and TGF-β, especially the respective roles of Smad2 and Smad3, remain elusive. In this study, we examined the effects of Smad overexpression on gingival epithelial cell adhesion and expression profiles of integrin and ECM-related genes. Human gingival epithelial cells immortalized by the SV40 T-antigen were transfected with Smad2- and Smad3-overexpression vectors. A cell adhesion assay involving fluorescence detection of attached cells was performed using the ArrayScan imaging system. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the kinetics of integrin and ECM gene expression. In vitro and in vivo localization of adhesion molecules was examined by immunofluorescence analysis. By using SB431542, a specific inhibitor of the TGF-β type I receptor, Smad2/3 signaling was confirmed to be dominant in TGF-β1-induced cell adhesion. The Smad2-transfectant demonstrated higher potency for cell adhesion and integrin expression (α2, α5, β4, and β6) than the Smad3-transfectant, whereas little or no change in ECM expression was observed in either transfectant. Moreover, the gingival epithelium of transgenic mice that overexpressed Smad2 driven by the keratin 14 promoter showed increased integrin α2 expression. These findings indicate the crucial role of Smad2 in increased adhesion of gingival epithelial cells via upregulation of integrin α2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of TGF-β on ocular surface epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Maria Jesús; Calder, Virginia; Corrales, Rosa M; García-Vázquez, Carmen; Narayanan, Srihari; Herreras, José M; Stern, Michael E; Calonge, Margarita; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia

    2013-02-01

    A role for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in the pathogenesis of some ocular surface diseases has been proposed. We determined if secretion of TGF-β and expression of TGF-β receptors RI, RII, and RIII by human ocular surface epithelial cells were modified under inflammatory conditions. We also determined how these cells responded to TGF-β. A human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell line and a conjunctival epithelial cell line (IOBA-NHC) were exposed to TGF-β1 and -β2 and to proinflammatory cytokines. TGF-β receptor mRNAs were analyzed by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in both cell lines, and in conjunctival, limbal, and corneal epithelial cells from post-mortem human specimens. Expression of TGF-β receptors and pSMAD2/SMAD2 were determined by Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Secretion of TGF-β isoforms, cytokine/chemokine, and metalloproteinases (MMPs) were analyzed in cell supernatants by immunobead-based assays. Secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) secretion was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TGF-β isoform and receptor gene expression was determined by RT-PCR in conjunctival epithelium of dry eye (DE) patients and healthy subjects. Our results showed that TGF-β RI expression was down-regulated with IL-4 exposure, whereas TGF-β RII and TGF-β2 were upregulated by TNF-α in HCE cells. TGF-β RIII receptor expression was upregulated in IOBA-NHC cells by TNF-α and IFN-γ. SMAD2 phosphorylation occurred in HCE and IOBA-NHC cells after TGF-β treatment. TGF-β significantly up- and down-regulated secretion of several cytokines/chemokines by both cell lines and MMP by HCE cells. TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 were upregulated and TGF-β RIII mRNA was down-regulated in DE conjunctival epithelium. These results show that TGF-β plays an important role in directing local inflammatory responses in ocular surface epithelial cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Acrolein stimulates eicosanoid release from bovine airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doupnik, C.A.; Leikauf, G.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Injury to the airway mucosa after exposure to environmental irritants is associated with pulmonary inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. To better understand the relationships between mediator release and airway epithelial cell injury during irritant exposures, we studied the effects of acrolein, a low-molecular-weight aldehyde found in cigarette smoke, on arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Confluent airway epithelial cell monolayers, prelabeled with (3H)arachidonic acid, released significant levels of 3H activity when exposed (20 min) to 100 microM acrolein. (3H)arachidonic acid products were resolved using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions the released 3H activity coeluted predominantly with the cyclooxygenase product, prostaglandin (PG) E2. After exposure to acrolein, significant peaks in 3H activity coeluted with the lipoxygenase products 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) and 15-HETE, as well as with PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. Dose-response relationships for acrolein-induced release of immunoreactive PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from unlabeled epithelial monolayers demonstrated 30 microM acrolein as the threshold dose, with 100 microM acrolein inducing nearly a fivefold increase in both PGF2 alpha and PGE2. Cellular viability after exposure to 100 microM acrolein, determined by released lactate dehydrogenase activity, was not affected until exposure periods were greater than or equal to 2 h. These results implicate the airway epithelial cell as a possible source of eicosanoids after exposure to acrolein.

  12. Estradiol increases mucus synthesis in bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Tam

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial mucus hypersecretion and mucus plugging are prominent pathologic features of chronic inflammatory conditions of the airway (e.g. asthma and cystic fibrosis and in most of these conditions, women have worse prognosis compared with male patients. We thus investigated the effects of estradiol on mucus expression in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells from female donors grown at an air liquid interface (ALI. Treatment with estradiol in physiological ranges for 2 weeks caused a concentration-dependent increase in the number of PAS-positive cells (confirmed to be goblet cells by MUC5AC immunostaining in ALI cultures, and this action was attenuated by estrogen receptor beta (ER-β antagonist. Protein microarray data showed that nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT in the nuclear fraction of NHBE cells was increased with estradiol treatment. Estradiol increased NFATc1 mRNA and protein in ALI cultures. In a human airway epithelial (1HAE0 cell line, NFATc1 was required for the regulation of MUC5AC mRNA and protein. Estradiol also induced post-translational modification of mucins by increasing total fucose residues and fucosyltransferase (FUT-4, -5, -6 mRNA expression. Together, these data indicate a novel mechanism by which estradiol increases mucus synthesis in the human bronchial epithelium.

  13. Human retinal pigment epithelial cell-induced apoptosis in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Wiencke, A K; la Cour, M

    1998-01-01

    human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can induce apoptosis in activated T cells. METHODS: Fas ligand (FasL) expression was detected by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Cultured RPE cells were cocultured with T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes for 6 hours to 2 days. Induction...... of apoptosis was detected by 7-amino-actinomycin D and annexin V staining. RESULTS: Retinal pigment epithelial cells expressed FasL and induced apoptosis in activated Fas+ T cells. Blocking of Fas-FasL interaction with antibody strongly inhibited RPE-mediated T-cell apoptosis. Retinal pigment epithelial cells...... induced apoptosis in several activated T-cell populations and T-cell lines, including T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-CD3-negative T-cell lines. In contrast, RPE cells induced little or no apoptosis in resting peripheral T cells. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies, which...

  14. Alveolar epithelial type II cell: defender of the alveolus revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fehrenbach Heinz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1977, Mason and Williams developed the concept of the alveolar epithelial type II (AE2 cell as a defender of the alveolus. It is well known that AE2 cells synthesise, secrete, and recycle all components of the surfactant that regulates alveolar surface tension in mammalian lungs. AE2 cells influence extracellular surfactant transformation by regulating, for example, pH and [Ca2+] of the hypophase. AE2 cells play various roles in alveolar fluid balance, coagulation/fibrinolysis, and host defence. AE2 cells proliferate, differentiate into AE1 cells, and remove apoptotic AE2 cells by phagocytosis, thus contributing to epithelial repair. AE2 cells may act as immunoregulatory cells. AE2 cells interact with resident and mobile cells, either directly by membrane contact or indirectly via cytokines/growth factors and their receptors, thus representing an integrative unit within the alveolus. Although most data support the concept, the controversy about the character of hyperplastic AE2 cells, reported to synthesise profibrotic factors, proscribes drawing a definite conclusion today.

  15. On the Sulfation and Methylation of Catecholestrogens in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hui, Ying; Yasuda, Shin; Liu, Ming-Yih; Wu, Yi-yong; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2008-01-01

    .... The present study was designed to examine the role of sulfation in the metabolism of CEs. MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF 10A human mammary epithelial cells were metabolically labeled with [35S...

  16. Generation of stratified squamous epithelial progenitor cells from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yoshida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Application of induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells in regenerative medicine will bypass ethical issues associated with use of embryonic stem cells. In addition, patient-specific IPS cells can be useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of genetic disorders, drug screening, and tailor-made medicine. However, in order to apply iPS cells to mitotic tissue, induction of tissue stem cells that give rise to progeny of the target organ is required. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We induced stratified epithelial cells from mouse iPS cells by co-culture with PA6 feeder cells (SDIA-method with use of BMP4. Clusters of cells positive for the differentiation markers KRT1 or KRT12 were observed in KRT14-positive colonies. We successfully cloned KRT14 and p63 double-positive stratified epithelial progenitor cells from iPS-derived epithelial cells, which formed stratified epithelial sheets consisting of five- to six-polarized epithelial cells in vitro. When these clonal cells were cultured on denuded mouse corneas, a robust stratified epithelial layer was observed with physiological cell polarity including high levels of E-cadherin, p63 and K15 expression in the basal layer and ZO-1 in the superficial layer, recapitulating the apico-basal polarity of the epithelium in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that KRT14 and p63 double-positive epithelial progenitor cells can be cloned from iPS cells in order to produce polarized multilayer epithelial cell sheets.

  17. Generation of Stratified Squamous Epithelial Progenitor Cells from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Satoru; Yasuda, Miyuki; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Yoko; Yoshida, Tetsu; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Tsubota, Kazuo; Okano, Hideyuki; Shimmura, Shigeto

    2011-01-01

    Background Application of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in regenerative medicine will bypass ethical issues associated with use of embryonic stem cells. In addition, patient-specific IPS cells can be useful to elucidate the pathophysiology of genetic disorders, drug screening, and tailor-made medicine. However, in order to apply iPS cells to mitotic tissue, induction of tissue stem cells that give rise to progeny of the target organ is required. Methodology/Principal Findings We induced stratified epithelial cells from mouse iPS cells by co-culture with PA6 feeder cells (SDIA-method) with use of BMP4. Clusters of cells positive for the differentiation markers KRT1 or KRT12 were observed in KRT14-positive colonies. We successfully cloned KRT14 and p63 double-positive stratified epithelial progenitor cells from iPS-derived epithelial cells, which formed stratified epithelial sheets consisting of five- to six-polarized epithelial cells in vitro. When these clonal cells were cultured on denuded mouse corneas, a robust stratified epithelial layer was observed with physiological cell polarity including high levels of E-cadherin, p63 and K15 expression in the basal layer and ZO-1 in the superficial layer, recapitulating the apico-basal polarity of the epithelium in vivo. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that KRT14 and p63 double-positive epithelial progenitor cells can be cloned from iPS cells in order to produce polarized multilayer epithelial cell sheets. PMID:22174914

  18. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Blume

    Full Text Available The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL-8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4-6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms.

  19. Hepatic stellate cells promote upregulation of epithelial cell adhesion molecule and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in hepatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Teruya; Shiraha, Hidenori; Sawahara, Hiroaki; Uchida, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Yasuto; Iwamuro, Masaya; Kataoka, Junro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Kuwaki, Takeshi; Onishi, Hideki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takaki, Akinobu; Nouso, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-09-01

    Microenvironment plays an important role in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness of cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is known as a tumor stemness marker of HCC. To investigate the relationship between microenvironment and stemness, we performed an in vitro co-culture assay. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) were co-cultured with the TWNT-1 immortalized hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which create a microenvironment with HCC. Cell proliferation ability was analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM) and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, while migration ability was assessed by a wound healing assay. Expression of EpCAM was analyzed by immunoblotting and FCM. HCC cell lines were co-cultured with TWNT-1 treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for TGF-β and HB-EGF; we then analyzed proliferation, migration ability and protein expression using the methods described above. Proliferation ability was unchanged in HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Migration ability was increased in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, HuH-7 and PLC/PRF/5) directly (216.2±67.0, 61.0±22.0, 124.0±66.2 and 51.5±40.3%) and indirectly (102.5±22.0, 84.6±30.9, 86.1±25.7 and 73.9±29.7%) co-cultured with TWNT-1 compared with the HCC uni-culture. Immunoblot analysis revealed increased EpCAM expression in the HCC cell lines co-cultured with TWNT-1. Flow cytometry revealed that the population of E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ and EpCAM-positive cells increased and accordingly, EMT and stemness in the HCC cell line were activated. These results were similar in the directly and indirectly co-cultured samples, indicating that humoral factors were at play. Conversely, HCC cell lines co-cultured with siRNA‑treated TWNT-1 showed decreased migration ability, a decreased population of EpCAM-positive and E-cadherin-/N-cadherin+ cells. Taken together, humoral factors secreted from TWNT-1

  20. Neoplastic transformation of human thyroid epithelial cells by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko

    Neoplastic transformation of human thyroid epithelial cells has been investigated following exposure to ionizing radiation in vitro. The effects of radiation type, irradiation regime, and postirradiation passaging were examined using a human thyroid epithelial cell line, designated HToriS, which was previously immortalized with SV40 genome. Exponentially growing HToriS cells were irradiated with graded doses of 137 Cs gamma- and 238pu alpha-irradiation. Cells were irradiated with either a single or multiple doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy gamma-radiation, or single doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, or 1.5 Gy gamma-radiation. Following passaging, the cells were transplanted into the athymic nude mice, and the animals were screened for tumour formation. Statistically significant increases in tumour incidence were obtained with both gamma- and alpha-irradiation and with both single and multiple irradiation regimes as compared with the un-irradiated group. Regardless of radiation type and or radiation regime there appears to be a trend, with increasing doses of radiation, in which tumour incidence increases and reaches a maximum, after which the tumour incidence decreases. Tumours were characterized by histopathological examination as undifferentiated carcinomas. Investigation of expression time following irradiation demonstrated that post-irradiation passaging, generally regarded as a critical step for expression of radiation-induced DNA damage, was not a prerequisite for the neoplastic conversion of irradiated cells with this system. Cell lines were established from the tumours and their identification and characterization carried out. All cell lines established were determined to be derived from the parent HTori3 cells by DNA fingerprinting, karyotype analysis, cytokeratin staining, and SV40 large T-antigen staining. Tumorigenicity of the cell lines was confirmed by retransplantation. Comparison of the morphology in vitro showed that the tumour cell lines retained the

  1. Small molecule mediated proliferation of primary retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Jonathan G; Elliott, Jimmy; Deshmukh, Vishal; de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Shen, Weijun; Tremblay, Matthew S; Peters, Eric C; Cho, Charles Y; Lu, Bin; Girman, Sergej; Wang, Shaomei; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-07-19

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells form a monolayer adjacent to the retina and play a critical role in the visual light cycle. Degeneration of RPE cells results in retinal disorders such as age-related macular degeneration. Cell transplant strategies have potential therapeutic value for such disorders; however, risks associated with an inadequate supply of donor cells limit their therapeutic success. The identification of factors that proliferate RPE cells ex vivo could provide a renewable source of cells for transplantation. Here, we report that a small molecule (WS3) can reversibly proliferate primary RPE cells isolated from fetal and adult human donors. Following withdrawal of WS3, RPE cells differentiate into a functional monolayer, as exhibited by their expression of mature RPE genes and phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Furthermore, chemically expanded RPE cells preserve vision when transplanted into dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a well-established model of retinal degeneration.

  2. Osmoregulation of chloride channels in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Lim (Christina)

    2008-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The plasma membrane of mammalian cells is formed by two layers of lipids (lipid bilayer), primarily phospholipids, glycolipids and cholesterol, in which many different proteins are embedded. Phospholipid consists of a glycerol backbone esterified to fatty acids

  3. Transforming growth factor beta-1 induces snail transcription factor in epithelial cell lines: mechanisms for epithelial mesenchymal transitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peinado, Hector; Quintanilla, Miguel; Cano, Amparo

    2003-01-01

    .... We show here that transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta1) induces Snail expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions by a mechanism dependent on the MAPK signaling pathway...

  4. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: II. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor Versus Ghost Cell Odontogenic Tumors Derived from Calcifying Odontogenic Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Suk Keun; Kim, Yeon Sook

    2014-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors (CEOTs) and ghost cell odontogenic tumors (GCOTs) are characteristic odontogenic origin epithelial tumors which produce calcifying materials from transformed epithelial tumor cells. CEOT is a benign odontogenic tumor composed of polygonal epithelial tumor cells that show retrogressive calcific changes, amyloid-like deposition, and clear cytoplasm. Differentially, GCOTs are a group of transient tumors characterized by ghost cell presence, which comprise...

  5. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-10-13

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

  6. Windows Terminal Servers Orchestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiec, Sebastian; Gaspar, Ricardo; Smith, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Windows Terminal Servers provide application gateways for various parts of the CERN accelerator complex, used by hundreds of CERN users every day. The combination of new tools such as Puppet, HAProxy and Microsoft System Center suite enable automation of provisioning workflows to provide a terminal server infrastructure that can scale up and down in an automated manner. The orchestration does not only reduce the time and effort necessary to deploy new instances, but also facilitates operations such as patching, analysis and recreation of compromised nodes as well as catering for workload peaks.

  7. Orchestrating with Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiniry, Joseph Roland; Martinez, Josu

    2012-01-01

    of the units under composition. Orc is an executable language, and in the Orc system, units are realized as methods implemented in the Java programming language. Since Java methods' behavior can be formally specified with the Java Modeling Language (JML), then the behavior of an Orc program can be reasoned......Our domain of interest is self-healing systems. We wish to reason about the behavior of statically and dynamically composed systems. The orchestration language Orc permits one to write programs that compose such systems. Unfortunately, Orc's semantics make no assumptions about the behavior...

  8. Serratia marcescens is injurious to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, John B; Boisen, Nadia; Lindsay, Brianna; Santiago, Araceli; Ouma, Collins; Ombok, Maurice; Fields, Barry; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea causes substantial morbidity and mortality in children in low-income countries. Although numerous pathogens cause diarrhea, the etiology of many episodes remains unknown. Serratia marcescens is incriminated in hospital-associated infections, and HIV/AIDS associated diarrhea. We have recently found that Serratia spp. may be found more commonly in the stools of patients with diarrhea than in asymptomatic control children. We therefore investigated the possible enteric pathogenicity of S. marcescens in vitro employing a polarized human colonic epithelial cell (T84) monolayer. Infected monolayers were assayed for bacterial invasion, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), cytotoxicity, interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. We observed significantly greater epithelial cell invasion by S. marcescens compared to Escherichia coli strain HS (p = 0.0038 respectively). Cell invasion was accompanied by reduction in TEER and secretion of IL-8. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) extracellular concentration rapidly increased within a few hours of exposure of the monolayer to S. marcescens. Scanning electron microscopy of S. marcescens-infected monolayers demonstrated destruction of microvilli and vacuolization. Our results suggest that S. marcescens interacts with intestinal epithelial cells in culture and induces dramatic alterations similar to those produced by known enteric pathogens.

  9. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis, and function of the intestinal epithelial stem cell marker Bmi1 in pig intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C-M; Yan, H-C; Fu, H-L; Xu, G-F; Wang, X-Q

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we cloned the full-length cDNA of the pig Bmi1 gene (BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene), which has been indicated as an intestinal epithelial stem cell (IESC) marker in other mammals. This paper provides the first report of the function of Bmi1 in pig intestinal epithelial cells and a brief description of its underlying mechanism. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends technology was used to clone the complete pig Bmi1 sequence, and a Bmi1-pcDNA3.1 vector was constructed for transfection into an intestinal porcine epithelial cell line (IPEC-1). The proliferation ability of the cells was estimated using the MTT assay and the EdU incorporation method at different time points after seeding. Cell cycle information was detected by flow cytometry. The mRNA abundances of cell cycle-related genes were also measured. The results indicated that the pig Bmi1 cDNA is 3,193 bp in length and consists of a 981 bp open reading frame, a 256 bp 5´ untranslated region (UTR), and a 1,956 bp 3' UTR. The transcript contains no signal peptides, and there are no transmembrane regions in the pig Bmi1 coded protein, which has a total of 326 AA. The overexpression of the pig Bmi1 in the IPEC-1 cells led to increased cell proliferation and a lower percentage of cells in the G1 and S phases (P cells in the G2 phase (P 0.05). Our data suggested that pig Bmi1 can increase the proliferation of IPEC-1 cells by promoting the G1/S transition and the overall cell cycle process.

  10. Protective Effects of Trehalose on the Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Aragona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Aim of the present work was to evaluate the effects of the trehalose on the corneal epithelium undergoing alcohol delamination. Methods. Twelve patients undergoing laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK were consecutively included in the study. The right eyes were pretreated with 3% trehalose eye drops, whilst left eyes were used as control. Epithelial specimens were processed for cells vitality assessment, apoptosis, and light and transmission electron microscopy; a morphometric analysis was performed in both groups. Results. In both trehalose-untreated eyes (TUE and trehalose-treated eyes (TTE, the percentage of vital cells was similar and no apoptotic cells were observed. In TUE, the corneal epithelium showed superficial cells with reduced microfolds, wing cells with vesicles and dilated intercellular spaces, and dark basal cells with vesicles and wide clefts. In TTE, superficial and wing cells were better preserved, and basal cells were generally clear with intracytoplasmatic vesicles. The morphometric analysis showed statistically significant differences between the two groups: the TTE epithelial height was higher, the basal cells showed larger area and clearer cytoplasm. The distribution of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes was significantly different between the groups. Conclusions. Trehalose administration better preserved morphological and morphometric features of alcohol-treated corneal epithelium, when compared to controls.

  11. The origin of stroma surrounding epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, Tomoko; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Fumio; Nishimura, Sadako; Tanaka, Hideo; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Iguchi, Yoko; Yamagami, Wataru; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stroma is thought to play an important role in tumor behavior, including invasion or metastasis and response to therapy. Cancer stroma is generally thought either to be non-neoplastic cells, including tissue-marrow or bone-marrow-derived fibroblasts, or to originate in epithelial mesenchymal transition of cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the status of the p53 gene in both the cancer cells and the cancer stroma in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) to elucidate the origin of the stroma. Samples from 16 EOC patients were included in this study. Tumor cells and adjacent nontumor stromal cells were microdissected and DNA was extracted separately. We analyzed p53 sequences (exons 5-8) of both cancer and stromal tissues in all cases. Furthermore, we examined p53 protein expression in all cases. Mutations in p53 were detected in 9 of the 16 EOCs: in 8 of these cases, the mutations were detected only in cancer cells. In 1 case, the same mutation (R248Q) was detected in both cancer and stromal tissues, and p53 protein expression was detected in both the cancer cells and the cancer stroma. Most cancer stroma in EOC is thought to originate from non-neoplastic cells, but some parts of the cancer stroma might originate from cancer cells.

  12. CCL20, (gamma)(delta) T cells, and IL-22 in corneal epithelial healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    After corneal epithelial abrasion, leukocytes and platelets rapidly enter the corneal stroma, and CCR6 (+) IL-17(+) gamma delta T cells migrate into the epithelium. Gamma delta T-cell-deficient (TCRd(-/-)) mice have significantly reduced inflammation and epithelial wound healing. Epithelial CCL20 mR...

  13. Irsogladine maleate regulates gap junctional intercellular communication-dependent epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Ryo; Nomura, Kazuaki; Kakuki, Takuya; Takano, Ken-Ichi; Kohno, Takayuki; Konno, Takumi; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo; Kojima, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium of the human nasal mucosa acts as the first physical barrier that protects against inhaled substances and pathogens. Irsogladine maleate (IM) is an enhancer of gastric mucosal protective factors via upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC is thought to participate in the formation of functional tight junctions. However, the effects of IM on GJIC and the epithelial barrier in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) remain unknown. To investigate the effects of IM on GJIC and the tight junctional barrier in HNECs, primary cultures of HNECs transfected with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-HNECs) were treated with IM and the GJIC inhibitors oleamide and 18β-GA. Some cells were pretreated with IM before treatment with TLR3 ligand poly(I:C) to examine whether IM prevented the changes via TLR3-mediated signal pathways. In hTERT-HNECs, GJIC blockers reduced the expression of tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7, occludin, tricellulin, and JAM-A. IM induced GJIC activity and enhanced the expression of claudin-1, -4, and JAM-A at the protein and mRNA levels with an increase of barrier function. GJIC blockers prevented the increase of the tight junction proteins induced by IM. Furthermore, IM prevented the reduction of JAM-A but not induction of IL-8 and TNF-α induced by poly(I:C). In conclusion, IM can maintain the GJIC-dependent tight junctional barrier via regulation of GJIC in upper airway nasal epithelium. Therefore, it is possible that IM may be useful as a nasal spray to prevent the disruption of the epithelial barrier by viral infections and exposure to allergens in human nasal mucosa.

  14. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhua DENG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  15. [Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-02-20

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  16. Primary mouse small intestinal epithelial cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, T.; Clevers, H.

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in adult mammals. We have recently shown that Lgr5 (Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor) is expressed in intestinal stem cells by an in vivo genetic lineage tracing strategy. In the past, extensive efforts have

  17. [Adhesion of clinical Candida albicans isolate to buccal epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, A

    1999-01-01

    Mucosal adherence and germ tube formation are considered to be important virulence factors of C. albicans. Adherence is a precondition for colonisation and invasion. We investigated 11 clinical isolates (among them 5 cases recovered from oesophageal thrush) for quantification of the two characteristics and correlated the results with clinical data. Adherence was measured on buccal epithelial cells and the continuous flow culture was used for quantification of germ tube formation. Adherence of strains recovered from clinically, culturally and serologically confirmed oesophageal thrush adhered stronger to buccal epithelial cells than isolates from patients with heavy colonisation without signs of candidosis. Strains with stronger adherence showed a significantly faster and an increased germ tube formation in the continuous flow culture. Strains from oesophageal thrush therefore show a more marked expression of the investigated virulence factors. Therefore a good adherence is a necessity for infection of the oesophagus by C. albicans. The preferential isolation of C. albicans from oesophageal thrush (> 90%) supports this assumption.

  18. Interaction between submicron COD crystals and renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Yang, Ru-E

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the adhesion characteristics between submicron calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with a size of 150 ± 50 nm and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero cells) before and after damage, and to discuss the mechanism of kidney stone formation. Vero cells were oxidatively injured by hydrogen peroxide to establish a model of injured cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe Vero-COD adhesion. Inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry was used to quantitatively measure the amount of adhered COD microcrystals. Nanoparticle size analyzer and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to measure the change in the zeta potential on the Vero cell surface and the change in osteopontin expression during the adhesion process, respectively. The level of cell injury was evaluated by measuring the changes in malonaldehyde content, and cell viability during the adhesion process. The adhesion capacity of Vero cells in the injury group to COD microcrystals was obviously stronger than that of Vero cells in the control group. After adhesion to COD, cell viability dropped, both malonaldehyde content and cell surface zeta potential increased, and the fluorescence intensity of osteopontin decreased because the osteopontin molecules were successfully covered by COD. Submicron COD further damaged the cells during the adhesion process, especially for Vero cells in the control group, leading to an elevated amount of attached microcrystals. Submicron COD can further damage injured Vero cells during the adhesion process. The amount of attached microcrystals is proportional to the degree of cell damage. The increased amount of microcrystals that adhered to the injured epithelial cells plays an important role in the formation of early-stage kidney stones.

  19. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  20. Ivermectin inhibits growth of Chlamydia trachomatis in epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Pettengill

    Full Text Available Ivermectin is currently approved for treatment of both clinical and veterinary infections by nematodes, including Onchocerca cervicalis in horses and Onchocerca volvulus in humans. However, ivermectin has never been shown to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Here we show that ivermectin also inhibits infection of epithelial cells by the bacterial pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis, at doses that could be envisioned clinically for sexually-transmitted or ocular infections by Chlamydia.

  1. Expression of ICAM-1 in colon epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Sørensen, Susanne; Seidelin, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Studies have suggested that in ulcerative colitis (UC), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration of leukocytes toward the colonic epithelium. A suitable in vitro model of chronic colonic inflammation does not exist, and the role of the epithelium is based on monolayers...... of cancer cells. Conflicting results exist on epithelial ICAM-1 expression, and the aim of this study was to compare the expression in various models of colonic epithelium....

  2. Continuous cytokine exposure of colonic epithelial cells induces DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2005-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the intestinal tract are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. As an example ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with a production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including nitrogen monoxide (NO), which is produced in high amounts by inducibl...... nitrogen oxide synthase (iNOS). NO as well as other ROS are potential DNA damaging agents. The aim was to determine the effect of long-term cytokine exposure on NO formation and DNA damage in epithelial cells....

  3. Stretch induces cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, N E; Schroeder, M A; Limper, A H; Hubmayr, R D

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, causing edema and alveolar inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in this inflammatory response. We postulated that cyclic cell stretch upregulates the production and release of IL-8 by human alveolar epithelium in the absence of structural cell damage or paracrine stimulation. To test this hypothesis, alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells) were cultured on a deformable silicoelastic membrane. When stretched by 30% for up to 48 h, the cells released 49 +/- 34% more IL-8 (P static controls. Smaller deformations (20% stretch) produced no consistent increase in IL-8. Stretch of 4 h duration increased IL-8 gene transcription fourfold above baseline. Stretch had no effect on cell proliferation, cell viability as assessed by (51)Cr release assay, or the release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We conclude that deformation per se can trigger inflammatory signaling and that alveolar epithelial cells may be active participants in the alveolitis associated with ventilator-induced lung injury.

  4. Isolation, separation, and characterization of epithelial and connective cells from rat palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terranova, Victor Paul [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial and connective tissue cells were isolated from rat palate by sequential collagenase, hyaluronidase and trypsin digestion of the extracellular matrix. Differences between the two populations were noted with respect to total cell protein, total cell water, proline uptake and incorporation, percent collagen synthesized, effects of parathyroid hormone, metabolism of D-valine and cell density. Basal epithelial cells were subsequently separated from the heterogeneous epithelial cell population on shallow linear density gradients by velocity centrifugation. The type of collagen synthesized by the basal epithelial cells was compared to the type of collagen synthesized by the connective tissue cells by means of labeled amino acid incorporation ratios. Cells isolated from the epithelial and connective tissue were compared. From these studies it can be concluded that epithelial and connective tissue cells can be isolated from rat palate as viable and distinct populations with respect to the biochemical parameters examined. Furthermore, subpopulations can be separated and biochemically characterized.

  5. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Yaghi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations.

  6. Transplantation of Airway Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells: A Future for Cell-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to cure disease through replacement of malfunctioning cells. Although the tissue stem cell (TSC) is thought to be the optimal therapeutic cell, transplantation of TSC/progenitor cell mixtures has saved lives. We previously purified the mouse tracheobronchial epithelial TSCs and reported that in vitro amplification generated numerous TSCs. However, these cultures also contained TSC-derived progenitor cells and TSC repurification by flow cytometry compromised TSC self-renewal. These limitations prompted us to determine if a TSC/progenitor cell mixture would repopulate the injured airway epithelium. We developed a cell transplantation protocol and demonstrate that transplanted mouse and human tracheobronchial epithelial TSC/progenitor cell mixtures are 20-25% of airway epithelial cells, actively contribute to epithelial repair, and persist for at least 43 days. At 2 weeks after transplantation, TSCs/progenitor cells differentiated into the three major epithelial cell types: basal, secretory, and ciliated. We conclude that cell therapy that uses adult tracheobronchial TSCs/progenitor cells is an effective therapeutic option.

  7. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (ECAM1) is required in the maintenance of corneal epithelial barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinzi; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Shuhong; Xia, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Corneal epithelial barrier integrity is critical in the maintenance of the corneal homeostasis. The corneal barrier dysfunction may be associated with the pathogenesis of a number of eye diseases. In this study, we assessed the expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (ECAM1) in human corneal epithelial cells (HCE). The epithelial barrier function of the corneal epithelial monolayer was determined in Transwells. We found that the HCE cells expressed ECAM1. Knockdown of ECAM1 markedly compromised the HCE monolayer barrier function. A complex of ECAM1, claudin1, and occludin was detected in the HCE monolayers, which was not detected in the ECAM1-null HCE monolayers. Exposure to the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-13, inhibited the expression of ECAM1 in HCE cells and compromised the barrier function, which was prevented in the HCE monolayer with the ECAM1 overexpression. In conclusion, ECAM1 is required in the formation of the tight junction complex and maintaining the corneal epithelial barrier function. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Rho GTPases and regulation of cell migration and polarization in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Hou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Epithelial cell migration is required for regeneration of tissues and can be defective in a number of ocular surface diseases. This study aimed to determine the expression pattern of Rho family small G-proteins in human corneal epithelial cells to test their requirement in directional cell migration. METHODS: Rho family small G-protein expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Dominant-inhibitory constructs encoding Rho proteins or Rho protein targeting small interfering RNA were transfected into human corneal epithelial large T antigen cells, and wound closure rate were evaluated by scratch wounding assay, and a complementary non-traumatic cell migration assay. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to study cell polarization and to assess Cdc42 downstream effector. RESULTS: Cdc42, Chp, Rac1, RhoA, TC10 and TCL were expressed in human corneal epithelial cells. Among them, Cdc42 and TCL were found to significantly affect cell migration in monolayer scratch assays. These results were confirmed through the use of validated siRNAs directed to Cdc42 and TCL. Scramble siRNA transfected cells had high percentage of polarized cells than Cdc42 or TCL siRNA transfected cells at the wound edge. We showed that the Cdc42-specific effector p21-activated kinase 4 localized predominantly to cell-cell junctions in cell monolayers, but failed to translocate to the leading edge in Cdc42 siRNA transfected cells after monolayer wounding. CONCLUSION: Rho proteins expressed in cultured human corneal epithelial cells, and Cdc42, TCL facilitate two-dimensional cell migration in-vitro. Although silencing of Cdc42 and TCL did not noticeably affect the appearance of cell adhesions at the leading edge, the slower migration of these cells indicates both GTP-binding proteins play important roles in promoting cell movement of human corneal epithelial cells.

  9. Distinct Upstream Role of Type I IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived and Epithelial Resident Cells for Concerted Recruitment of Ly-6Chi Monocytes and NK Cells via CCL2-CCL3 Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdenebileg Uyangaa

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN-I-dependent orchestrated mobilization of innate cells in inflamed tissues is believed to play a critical role in controlling replication and CNS-invasion of herpes simplex virus (HSV. However, the crucial regulators and cell populations that are affected by IFN-I to establish the early environment of innate cells in HSV-infected mucosal tissues are largely unknown. Here, we found that IFN-I signaling promoted the differentiation of CCL2-producing Ly-6Chi monocytes and IFN-γ/granzyme B-producing NK cells, whereas deficiency of IFN-I signaling induced Ly-6Clo monocytes producing CXCL1 and CXCL2. More interestingly, recruitment of Ly-6Chi monocytes preceded that of NK cells with the levels peaked at 24 h post-infection in IFN-I-dependent manner, which was kinetically associated with the CCL2-CCL3 cascade response. Early Ly-6Chi monocyte recruitment was governed by CCL2 produced from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC-derived leukocytes, whereas NK cell recruitment predominantly depended on CC chemokines produced by resident epithelial cells. Also, IFN-I signaling in HSC-derived leukocytes appeared to suppress Ly-6Ghi neutrophil recruitment to ameliorate immunopathology. Finally, tissue resident CD11bhiF4/80hi macrophages and CD11chiEpCAM+ dendritic cells appeared to produce initial CCL2 for migration-based self-amplification of early infiltrated Ly-6Chi monocytes upon stimulation by IFN-I produced from infected epithelial cells. Ultimately, these results decipher a detailed IFN-I-dependent pathway that establishes orchestrated mobilization of Ly-6Chi monocytes and NK cells through CCL2-CCL3 cascade response of HSC-derived leukocytes and epithelium-resident cells. Therefore, this cascade response of resident-to-hematopoietic-to-resident cells that drives cytokine-to-chemokine-to-cytokine production to recruit orchestrated innate cells is critical for attenuation of HSV replication in inflamed tissues.

  10. Quantitative imaging of epithelial cell scattering identifies specific inhibitors of cell motility and cell-cell dissociation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerke, D.; le Duc, Q.; Blonk, I.; Kerstens, A.; Spanjaard, E.; Machacek, M.; Danuser, G.; de Rooij, J.

    2012-01-01

    The scattering of cultured epithelial cells in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a model system that recapitulates key features of metastatic cell behavior in vitro, including disruption of cell-cell adhesions and induction of cell migration. We have developed image analysis tools that

  11. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Abbas; Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Donovan, Prudence; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2017-02-01

    The prospect of using endothelial progenitors is currently hampered by their low engraftment upon transplantation. We report that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), independent of source and age, improve the engraftment of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). MSC coculture altered ECFC appearance to an elongated mesenchymal morphology with reduced proliferation. ECFC primed via MSC contact had reduced self-renewal potential, but improved capacity to form tube structures in vitro and engraftment in vivo Primed ECFCs displayed major differences in transcriptome compared to ECFCs never exposed to MSCs, affecting genes involved in the cell cycle, up-regulating of genes influencing mesenchymal transition, adhesion, extracellular matrix. Inhibition of NOTCH signaling, a potential upstream regulator of mesenchymal transition, in large part modulated this gene expression pattern and functionally reversed the mesenchymal morphology of ECFCs. The collective results showed that primed ECFCs survive better and undergo a mesenchymal transition that is dependent on NOTCH signaling, resulting in significantly increased vasculogenic potential.-Shafiee, A., Patel, J., Wong, H. Y., Donovan, P., Hutmacher, D. W., Fisk, N. M., Khosrotehrani, K. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling. © FASEB.

  12. Prion infection of epithelial Rov cells is a polarized event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Sophie; Sabuncu, Elifsu; Delaunay, Jean-Louis; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier

    2004-07-01

    During prion infections, the cellular glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein PrP is converted into a conformational isoform. This abnormal conformer is thought to recruit and convert the normal cellular PrP into a likeness of itself and is proposed to be the infectious agent. We investigated the distribution of the PrP protein on the surface of Rov cells, an epithelial cell line highly permissive to prion multiplication, and we found that PrP is primarily expressed on the apical side. We further show that prion transmission to Rov cells is much more efficient if infectivity contacts the apical side, indicating that the apical and basolateral sides of Rov cells are not equally competent for prion infection and adding prions to the list of the conventional infectious agents (viruses and bacteria) that infect epithelial cells in a polarized manner. These data raise the possibility that apically expressed PrP may be involved in this polarized process of infection. This would add further support for a crucial role of PrP at the cell surface in prion infection of target cells.

  13. Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Deng,Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara ce...

  14. Slugging their way to immortality: driving mammary epithelial cells into a stem cell-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soady, Kelly; Smalley, Matthew J

    2012-09-10

    Delineating the molecular factors that define and maintain the mammary stem cell state is vital for understanding normal development and tumourigenesis. A recent study by Guo and colleagues identifies two master transcriptional regulators of mammary stem cells, Slug and Sox9, ectopic expression of which confers stem cell attributes on differentiated mammary epithelial cells. Slug and Sox9 expression was also shown to determine in vivo metastatic potential of human breast cancer cell lines. Understanding these factors in the context of normal lineage differentiation is an important step toward elucidating the mammary epithelial cell hierarchy and the origins of cancer stem cells.

  15. Transdifferentiation of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells into Epithelial-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Abelardo; Kilani, Ruhangiz T.; Carr, Nicholas; Brown, Erin; Ghahary, Aziz

    2007-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells have the potential to transdifferentiate into unexpected peripheral cells. We hypothesize that circulating bone marrow-derived stem cells might have the capacity to transdifferentiate into epithelial-like cells and release matrix metalloproteinase-1-modulating factors such as 14-3-3ς for dermal fibroblasts. We have characterized a subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that develops an epithelial-like profile. Our findings show that these cells develop epithelial-like morphology and express 14-3-3ς and keratin-5, -8 as early as day 7 and day 21, respectively. When compared with control, conditioned media collected from PBMCs in advanced epithelial-like differentiation (cultures on days 28, 35, and 42) increased the matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts (P ≤ 0.01). The depletion of 14-3-3ς from these conditioned media by immunoprecipitation reduced the effect by 39.5% (P value, 0.05). Therefore, the releasable 14-3-3ς from PBMC-derived epithelial-like cells is involved in this process. Our findings provide new insights into the PBMC transdifferentiation to generate epithelial-like cells and subsequently release of 14-3-3ς that will disclose new therapeutic alternatives for different dermal clinical settings. PMID:17717137

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Epithelial Transition Induced by Renal Tubular Cells-Derived Extracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Chiabotto

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal-epithelial interactions play an important role in renal tubular morphogenesis and in maintaining the structure of the kidney. The aim of this study was to investigate whether extracellular vesicles (EVs produced by human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs may induce mesenchymal-epithelial transition of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the phenotype and the RNA content of EVs and we evaluated the in vitro uptake and activity of EVs on MSCs. MicroRNA (miRNA analysis suggested the possible implication of the miR-200 family carried by EVs in the epithelial commitment of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were incubated with EVs, or RPTEC-derived total conditioned medium, or conditioned medium depleted of EVs. As a positive control, MSCs were co-cultured in a transwell system with RPTECs. Epithelial commitment of MSCs was assessed by real time PCR and by immunofluorescence analysis of cellular expression of specific mesenchymal and epithelial markers. After one week of incubation with EVs and total conditioned medium, we observed mesenchymal-epithelial transition in MSCs. Stimulation with conditioned medium depleted of EVs did not induce any change in mesenchymal and epithelial gene expression. Since EVs were found to contain the miR-200 family, we transfected MSCs using synthetic miR-200 mimics. After one week of transfection, mesenchymal-epithelial transition was induced in MSCs. In conclusion, miR-200 carrying EVs released from RPTECs induce the epithelial commitment of MSCs that may contribute to their regenerative potential. Based on experiments of MSC transfection with miR-200 mimics, we suggested that the miR-200 family may be involved in mesenchymal-epithelial transition of MSCs.

  17. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  18. Larazotide acetate promotes tight junction assembly in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Shobha; Tripathi, Amit; Tamiz, Amir P; Alkan, Sefik S; Pandey, Niranjan B

    2012-05-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) control paracellular permeability and apical-basolateral polarity of epithelial cells. Dysregulated permeability is associated with pathological conditions, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease. TJ formation is dependent on E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and actin rearrangement, and is regulated by the Rho family GTPase and aPKC signaling pathways. Larazotide acetate, an 8-mer peptide and TJ modulator, inhibits TJ disassembly and dysfunction caused by endogenous and exogenous stimuli in intestinal epithelial cells. Here, we examined the effect of larazotide acetate on de novo TJ assembly using 2 different model systems. In MDCK cells, larazotide acetate promoted TJ assembly in a calcium switch assay. Larazotide acetate also promoted actin rearrangement, and junctional distribution of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, claudins, and E-cadherin. Larazotide acetate promoted TJ maturation and decreased paracellular permeability in "leaky" Caco-2 cells. Taken together, our data indicate that larazotide acetate enhances TJ assembly and barrier function by promoting actin rearrangement and redistribution of TJ and AJ proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tissuelike 3D Assemblies of Human Broncho-Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissuelike assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells have been developed for use in in vitro research on infection of humans by respiratory viruses. The 2D monolayer HBE cell cultures heretofore used in such research lack the complex cell structures and interactions characteristic of in vivo tissues and, consequently, do not adequately emulate the infection dynamics of in-vivo microbial adhesion and invasion. In contrast, the 3D HBE TLAs are characterized by more-realistic reproductions of the geometrical and functional complexity, differentiation of cells, cell-to-cell interactions, and cell-to-matrix interactions characteristic of human respiratory epithelia. Hence, the 3D HBE TLAs are expected to make it possible to perform at least some of the research in vitro under more-realistic conditions, without need to infect human subjects. The TLAs are grown on collagen-coated cyclodextran microbeads under controlled conditions in a nutrient liquid in the simulated microgravitational environment of a bioreactor of the rotating- wall-vessel type. Primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells are used as a foundation matrix, while adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cells are used as the overlying component. The beads become coated with cells, and cells on adjacent beads coalesce into 3D masses. The resulting TLAs have been found to share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelia including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The differentiation of the cells in these TLAs into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues is confirmed by the presence of compounds, including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium marker compounds, and by the production of tissue mucin. In a series of initial infection tests, TLA cultures were inoculated with human respiratory syncytial viruses and parainfluenza type 3 viruses. Infection was confirmed by photomicrographs that

  20. Inflammation and the Intestinal Barrier: Leukocyte–Epithelial Cell Interactions, Cell Junction Remodeling, and Mucosal Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luissint, Anny-Claude; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract is lined by a single layer of columnar epithelial cells that forms a dynamic, permeable barrier allowing for selective absorption of nutrients, while restricting access to pathogens and food-borne antigens. Precise regulation of epithelial barrier function is therefore required for maintaining mucosal homeostasis and depends, in part, on barrier-forming elements within the epithelium and a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory factors in the mucosa. Pathologic states, such as inflammatory bowel disease, are associated with a leaky epithelial barrier, resulting in excessive exposure to microbial antigens, recruitment of leukocytes, release of soluble mediators, and ultimately mucosal damage. An inflammatory microenvironment affects epithelial barrier properties and mucosal homeostasis by altering the structure and function of epithelial intercellular junctions through direct and indirect mechanisms. We review our current understanding of complex interactions between the intestinal epithelium and immune cells, with a focus on pathologic mucosal inflammation and mechanisms of epithelial repair. We discuss leukocyte–epithelial interactions, as well as inflammatory mediators that affect the epithelial barrier and mucosal repair. Increased knowledge of communication networks between the epithelium and immune system will lead to tissue-specific strategies for treating pathologic intestinal inflammation. PMID:27436072

  1. Resting B cells as a transfer vehicle for Epstein-Barr virus infection of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon-Lowe, C D; Neuhierl, B; Baldwin, G; Rickinson, A B; Delecluse, H-J

    2006-05-02

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an orally transmitted herpesvirus, efficiently targets B lymphocytes through binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350 to the complement receptor CD21. How the virus accesses epithelial cells is less well understood, because such cells are largely resistant to infection with cell-free virus in vitro. Here, we show that, after binding to primary B cells, most Epstein-Barr virions are not internalized but remain on the B cell surface and from there can transfer efficiently to CD21-negative epithelial cells, increasing epithelial infection by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold compared with cell-free virus. Transfer infection is associated with the formation of B cell-epithelial conjugates with gp350/CD21 complexes focused at the intercellular synapse; transfer involves the gp85 and gp110 viral glycoproteins but is independent of gp42, the HLA class II ligand that is essential for B cell entry. Therefore, through efficient binding to the B cell surface, EBV has developed a means of simultaneously accessing both lymphoid and epithelial compartments; in particular, infection of pharyngeal epithelium by orally transmitted virus becomes independent of initial virus replication in the B cell system.

  2. Quiescent epithelial cell rests of Malassez can differentiate into ameloblast-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmura, Yuka; Tsuchiya, Shuhei; Hata, Ken-Ichiro; Honda, Masaki J

    2008-12-01

    Epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) are quiescent epithelial remnants of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) that are involved in the formation of tooth roots. After completion of crown formation, HERS are converted from cervical loop cells, which have the potential to generate enamel for tooth crown formation. Cervical loop cells have the potential to differentiate into ameloblasts. Generally, no new ameloblasts can be generated from HERS, however this study demonstrated that subcultured ERM can differentiate into ameloblast-like cells and generate enamel-like tissues in combination with dental pulp cells at the crown formation stage. Porcine ERM were obtained from periodontal ligament tissue by explant culture and were subcultured with non-serum medium. Thereafter, subcultured ERM were expanded on 3T3-J2 feeder cell layers until the tenth passage. The in vitro mRNA expression pattern of the subcultured ERM after four passages was found to be different from that of enamel organ epithelial cells and oral gingival epithelial cells after the fourth passage using the same expansion technique. When subcultured ERM were combined with subcultured dental pulp cells, ERM expressed cytokeratin14 and amelogenin proteins in vitro. In addition, subcultured ERM combined with primary dental pulp cells seeded onto scaffolds showed enamel-like tissues at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Moreover, positive staining for amelogenin was observed in the enamel-like tissues, indicating the presence of well-developed ameloblasts in the implants. These results suggest that ERM can differentiate into ameloblast-like cells.

  3. Astrocytes: Orchestrating synaptic plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pittà, M; Brunel, N; Volterra, A

    2016-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity of a preexisting connection between two neurons to change in strength as a function of neural activity. Because synaptic plasticity is the major candidate mechanism for learning and memory, the elucidation of its constituting mechanisms is of crucial importance in many aspects of normal and pathological brain function. In particular, a prominent aspect that remains debated is how the plasticity mechanisms, that encompass a broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, come to play together in a concerted fashion. Here we review and discuss evidence that pinpoints to a possible non-neuronal, glial candidate for such orchestration: the regulation of synaptic plasticity by astrocytes. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidjanin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Grdina, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Woloschak, G.E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  5. Characterization of biomaterial-free cell sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Dong Won; Kim, Yun Hee; Koh, Ah Young; Lee, Hyun Ju; Wee, Won Ryang; Jeon, Saewha; Kim, Mee Kum

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the characteristics of biomaterial-free sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells without fibrin support, in vitro and after transplantation to limbal-deficient models. Human oral mucosal epithelial cells and limbal epithelial cells were cultured for 2 weeks, and the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) rates were compared. Markers of stem cells (p63), cell proliferation (Ki-67) and epithelial differentiation (cytokeratin; K1, K3, K4, K13) were observed in colonies and in biomaterial-free sheets. Biomaterial-free sheets which had been detached with 1% dispase or biomaterial-free sheets generated by fibrin support were transplanted to 12 limbal-deficient rabbit models. In vitro cell viability, in vivo stability and cytokeratin characteristics of biomaterial-free sheets were compared with those of sheets formed by fibrin-coated culture 1 week after transplantation. Mean CFE rate was significantly higher in human oral mucosal epithelial cells (44.8%) than in human limbal epithelial cells(17.7%). K3 and K4 were well expressed in both colonies and sheets. Biomaterial-free sheets had two to six layers of stratified cells and showed an average of 79.8% viable cells in the sheets after detachment. Cytokeratin expressions of biomaterial-free sheets were comparable to those of sheets cultured by fibrin support, in limbal-deficient models. Both p63 and Ki-67 were well expressed in colonies, isolated sheets and sheets transplanted to limbal-deficient models. Our results suggest that biomaterial-free sheets cultured from human oral mucosal epithelial cells without fibrin support can be an alternative option for cell therapy in use for the treatment of limbal-deficient diseases. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Metabolic orchestration between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment as a co-evolutionary source of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer: a therapeutic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Boyun; Song, Yong Sang

    2014-11-01

    Our group reported a significant association between hexokinase II overexpression and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer, suggesting that aerobic glycolysis in the so-called Warburg effect might contribute to cancer progression. However, a growing body of evidence indicates contradictory findings with regard to the Warburg effect, such as high mitochondrial activity in highly invasive tumors and low ATP contribution of glycolysis in ovarian cancer. As a solution for the dilemma of the Warburg effect, the "reverse Warburg effect" was proposed in which aerobic glycolysis might occur in the stromal compartment of the tumor rather than in the cancer cells, indicating that the glycolytic tumor stroma feed the cancer cells through a type of symbiotic relationship. The reverse Warburg effect acting on the relationship between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts has evolved into dynamic interplay between cancer cells and multiple tumor stromal compartments, including cancer-associated fibroblasts, the extracellular matrix, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, adipocytes, and tumor-associated macrophages. Peritoneal cavities including ascites and the omentum also form a unique environment that is highly receptive for carcinomatosis in the advanced stages of ovarian cancer. The complicated but ingeniously orchestrated stroma-mediated cancer metabolism in ovarian cancer provides great heterogeneity in tumors with chemoresistance, which makes the disease thus far difficult to cure by single stromal-targeting agents. This review will discuss the experimental and clinical evidence of the cross-talk between cancer cells and various components of tumor stroma in terms of heterogeneous chemoresistance with focal points for therapeutic intervention in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crossroads of Wnt and Hippo in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernascone, Ilenia; Martin-Belmonte, Fernando

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial tissues undergo constant growth and differentiation during embryonic development and to replace damaged tissue in adult organs. These processes are governed by different signaling pathways that ultimately control the expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, patterning, and death. One essential pathway is Wnt, which controls tubulogenesis in several epithelial organs. Recently, Wnt has been closely linked to other signaling pathways, such as Hippo, that orchestrate proliferation and apoptosis to control organ size. There is evidence that epithelial cell junctions may sequester the transcription factors that act downstream of these signaling pathways, which would represent an important aspect of their functional regulation and their influence on cell behavior. Here, we review the transcriptional control exerted by the Wnt and Hippo signaling pathways during epithelial growth, patterning, and differentiation and recent advances in understanding of the regulation and crosstalk of these pathways in epithelial tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of epithelial immunity by IL-17 family cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Rajita; Rutz, Sascha; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2012-07-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells function as both a physical barrier and as immune sentinels against environmental challenges, such as microbial pathogens, allergens and stress. The crosstalk between epithelial cells and leukocytes is essential for orchestrating proper immune responses during host defense. Interleukin (IL)-17 family cytokines are important players in regulating innate epithelial immune responses. Although IL-17A and IL-17F promote antibacterial and antifungal responses, IL-17E is essential for defense against parasitic infections. Emerging data indicate that another member of this family, IL-17C, specifically regulates epithelial immunity. IL-17C production serves as an immediate defense mechanism by epithelial cells, utilizing an autocrine mechanism to promote antibacterial responses at barrier surfaces. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Only Two Can Tango: Mast Cells Displace Epithelial Cells to Dance with ILC2s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchery, Tiffany; Harris, Nicola L

    2017-05-16

    Mast cells have been implicated in protective immunity to helminth infection, but the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this issue of Immunity, Shimokawa et al., 2017 report that mast cells are a bridge linking dying epithelial cells with effector type 2 innate lymphoid cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Epithelial Cell Inflammasomes in Intestinal Immunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C. Lei-Leston

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, such as NOD-like receptors (NLRs, sense conserved microbial signatures, and host danger signals leading to the coordination of appropriate immune responses. Upon activation, a subset of NLR initiate the assembly of a multimeric protein complex known as the inflammasome, which processes pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediates a specialized form of cell death known as pyroptosis. The identification of inflammasome-associated genes as inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility genes implicates a role for the inflammasome in intestinal inflammation. Despite the fact that the functional importance of inflammasomes within immune cells has been well established, the contribution of inflammasome expression in non-hematopoietic cells remains comparatively understudied. Given that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC act as a barrier between the host and the intestinal microbiota, inflammasome expression by these cells is likely important for intestinal immune homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammasome plays a key role in shaping epithelial responses at the host–lumen interface with many inflammasome components highly expressed by IEC. Recent studies have exposed functional roles of IEC inflammasomes in mucosal immune defense, inflammation, and tumorigenesis. In this review, we present the main features of the predominant inflammasomes and their effector mechanisms contributing to intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. We also discuss existing controversies in the field and open questions related to their implications in disease. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of intestinal inflammasome signaling could hold therapeutic potential for clinical translation.

  11. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo.To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo.Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  12. Aldose reductase inhibition prevents metaplasia of airway epithelial cells.

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    Umesh C S Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Goblet cell metaplasia that causes mucus hypersecretion and obstruction in the airway lumen could be life threatening in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-13 mediate the transformation of airway ciliary epithelial cells to mucin-secreting goblet cells in acute as well as chronic airway inflammatory diseases. However, no effective and specific pharmacologic treatment is currently available. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which aldose reductase (AR regulates the mucus cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: Metaplasia in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC was induced by a Th2 cytokine, IL-13, without or with AR inhibitor, fidarestat. After 48 h of incubation with IL-13 a large number of SAEC were transformed into goblet cells as determined by periodic acid-schiff (PAS-staining and immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Mucin5AC. Further, IL-13 significantly increased the expression of Mucin5AC at mRNA and protein levels. These changes were significantly prevented by treatment of the SAEC with AR inhibitor. AR inhibition also decreased IL-13-induced expression of Muc5AC, Muc5B, and SPDEF, and phosphorylation of JAK-1, ERK1/2 and STAT-6. In a mouse model of ragweed pollen extract (RWE-induced allergic asthma treatment with fidarestat prevented the expression of IL-13, phosphorylation of STAT-6 and transformation of epithelial cells to goblet cells in the lung. Additionally, while the AR-null mice were resistant, wild-type mice showed goblet cell metaplasia after challenge with RWE. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that exposure of SAEC to IL-13 caused goblet cell metaplasia, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. Administration of fidarestat to mice prevented RWE-induced goblet cell metaplasia and AR null mice were largely resistant to allergen induced changes in the lung. Thus our results indicate that AR inhibitors

  13. Aldose reductase inhibition prevents metaplasia of airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Umesh C S; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Ramana, Kota V; Boldogh, Istvan; Srivastava, Satish K

    2010-12-28

    Goblet cell metaplasia that causes mucus hypersecretion and obstruction in the airway lumen could be life threatening in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-13 mediate the transformation of airway ciliary epithelial cells to mucin-secreting goblet cells in acute as well as chronic airway inflammatory diseases. However, no effective and specific pharmacologic treatment is currently available. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which aldose reductase (AR) regulates the mucus cell metaplasia in vitro and in vivo. Metaplasia in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) was induced by a Th2 cytokine, IL-13, without or with AR inhibitor, fidarestat. After 48 h of incubation with IL-13 a large number of SAEC were transformed into goblet cells as determined by periodic acid-schiff (PAS)-staining and immunohistochemistry using antibodies against Mucin5AC. Further, IL-13 significantly increased the expression of Mucin5AC at mRNA and protein levels. These changes were significantly prevented by treatment of the SAEC with AR inhibitor. AR inhibition also decreased IL-13-induced expression of Muc5AC, Muc5B, and SPDEF, and phosphorylation of JAK-1, ERK1/2 and STAT-6. In a mouse model of ragweed pollen extract (RWE)-induced allergic asthma treatment with fidarestat prevented the expression of IL-13, phosphorylation of STAT-6 and transformation of epithelial cells to goblet cells in the lung. Additionally, while the AR-null mice were resistant, wild-type mice showed goblet cell metaplasia after challenge with RWE. The results show that exposure of SAEC to IL-13 caused goblet cell metaplasia, which was significantly prevented by AR inhibition. Administration of fidarestat to mice prevented RWE-induced goblet cell metaplasia and AR null mice were largely resistant to allergen induced changes in the lung. Thus our results indicate that AR inhibitors such as fidarestat could be developed as therapeutic agents to

  14. Immunoregulation by airway epithelial cells (AECs against respiratory virus infection

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    Yan YAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory tract is primary contact site of the body and environment, and it is ventilated by 10-20 thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbes, which contain the disease-causing pathogens. Airway epithelial cells (AECs are known to have innate sensor functions, which are similar to the "professional" immune cells, such as alveolar macrophage and sub- or intra-epithelial dendritic cells (DCs. Thus AECs are able to detect invading microbial danger including different types of respiratory viruses, and mount a potent host response, for example, activating type Ⅰ interferon signaling pathway genes. To avoid chronic inflammation and maintain the immunological homeostasis, the pulmonary system has developed intrinsic mechanisms to control local immune responses. Most recently, the role of AECs in control of local immunity has gained much attention, as 1 AECs express the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene Ⅰ (RIG-I-like receptor, and so on, thus AECs are equipped to participate in innate detection of microbial encounter; 2 To keep immunological homeostasis in the respiratory tract, AECs behave not only as innate immune sensors but also as immune modulators in parallel, through modulating the sensitivity of innate immune sensing of both AECs per se and sub- or intra-epithelial immune cells; 3 Loss of modularity capacity of AECs might be involved in the development of chronic airway diseases. In present review, how the AECs act will be intensively discussed in response to respiratory viruses and modulate the local immunity through cis- and trans-factors (direct and indirect factors, as well as the consequence of impairment of this control of local immunity, in the development and exacerbation of airway diseases, such as acute and chronic rhinosinusitis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.10.02

  15. Btbd7 is essential for region-specific epithelial cell dynamics and branching morphogenesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daley, William P; Matsumoto, Kazue; Doyle, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis of developing organs requires coordinated but poorly understood changes in epithelial cell-cell adhesion and cell motility. We report that Btbd7 is a crucial regulator of branching morphogenesis in vivo. Btbd7 levels are elevated in peripheral cells of branching epithelial...... end buds, where it enhances cell motility and cell-cell adhesion dynamics. Genetic ablation of Btbd7 in mice disrupts branching morphogenesis of salivary gland, lung, and kidney. Btbd7 knockout results in more tightly packed outer bud cells, which display stronger E-cadherin localization, reduced cell...... dynamics of cell adhesion and motility during epithelial branching morphogenesis....

  16. The Cinnamon-derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondrak, Georg T.; Villeneuve, Nicole F.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Bause, Alexandra S.; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Donna D.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA), the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE) prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29) and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC), CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit). CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:20657484

  17. The Cinnamon-Derived Dietary Factor Cinnamic Aldehyde Activates the Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Response in Human Epithelial Colon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Thomas Wondrak

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major cause of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent research suggests that pharmacological intervention using dietary factors that activate the redox sensitive Nrf2/Keap1-ARE signaling pathway may represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of human cancer including CRC. In our search for dietary Nrf2 activators with potential chemopreventive activity targeting CRC, we have focused our studies on trans-cinnamic aldehyde (cinnamaldeyde, CA, the key flavor compound in cinnamon essential oil. Here we demonstrate that CA and an ethanolic extract (CE prepared from Cinnamomum cassia bark, standardized for CA content by GC-MS analysis, display equipotent activity as inducers of Nrf2 transcriptional activity. In human colon cancer cells (HCT116, HT29 and non-immortalized primary fetal colon cells (FHC, CA- and CE-treatment upregulated cellular protein levels of Nrf2 and established Nrf2 targets involved in the antioxidant response including heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, catalytic subunit. CA- and CE-pretreatment strongly upregulated cellular glutathione levels and protected HCT116 cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced genotoxicity and arsenic-induced oxidative insult. Taken together our data demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived food factor CA is a potent activator of the Nrf2-orchestrated antioxidant response in cultured human epithelial colon cells. CA may therefore represent an underappreciated chemopreventive dietary factor targeting colorectal carcinogenesis.

  18. The transport pathways of polymer nanoparticles in MDCK epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Jia, Zengrong; Du, Wenwen; Yu, Chao; Fan, Yuchen; Dai, Wenbing; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Epithelial cell membranes as the typical biological barrier constitute the prime obstacle for the transport of therapeutic agents including nanomedicines. The previous studies on the interaction between nanomedicines and cells are mostly emphasized on cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking, but seldom on epithelial cells, although more and more oral nanomedicines are available now. In an attempt to clarify the transport pathways of nanomedicines in epithelial cells, the different molecular mechanisms among endocytosis, exocytosis and transcytosis processes were carefully studied and compared here using a kind of polymer nanoparticles (PNs) and MDCK epithelial cells as models. As the result, their similarity and difference were demonstrated. The similarities among all the three processes included the mediation of lipid rafts, the involvement of some protein kinases such as protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and the existence of multiple pathways. However, the difference among these processes was very significant, including different pathways, and especially the disparate effects of lipid rafts and protein kinases for different processes. The endocytosis involved both lipid raft and clathrin mechanisms but no macropinocytosis, via the invagination of membrane but no pore formation, the exocytosis contained ER/Golgi and Golgi/PM pathways, and transcytosis included AEE/CE/BSE and Golgi/BSE pathways. The roles of lipid rafts on endocytosis were positive but that on exocytosis and transcytosis was negative. The impacts of PTK and PKC on endocytosis were positive, while the influences of PTK, PKC and P13K on AEE/CE/BSE, as well as PTK and P13K on Golgi/BSE transcytosis pathways were negative. Moreover, the discrepancy between inward and outward transport of PNs elucidated an interesting fact that the endocytosis was rather easy and outward transport including exocytosis and transcytosis was rather

  19. Limbal stem cells: Central concepts of corneal epithelial homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinny J; Ismail, Salim; Sherwin, Trevor

    2014-09-26

    A strong cohort of evidence exists that supports the localisation of corneal stem cells at the limbus. The distinguishing characteristics of limbal cells as stem cells include slow cycling properties, high proliferative potential when required, clonogenicity, absence of differentiation marker expression coupled with positive expression of progenitor markers, multipotency, centripetal migration, requirement for a distinct niche environment and the ability of transplanted limbal cells to regenerate the entire corneal epithelium. The existence of limbal stem cells supports the prevailing theory of corneal homeostasis, known as the XYZ hypothesis where X represents proliferation and stratification of limbal basal cells, Y centripetal migration of basal cells and Z desquamation of superficial cells. To maintain the mass of cornea, the sum of X and Y must equal Z and very elegant cell tracking experiments provide strong evidence in support of this theory. However, several recent studies have suggested the existence of oligopotent stem cells capable of corneal maintenance outside of the limbus. This review presents a summary of data which led to the current concepts of corneal epithelial homeostasis and discusses areas of controversy surrounding the existence of a secondary stem cell reservoir on the corneal surface.

  20. Native and synthetic scaffolds for limbal epithelial stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kim N; Bobba, Samantha; Richardson, Alexander; Park, Mijeong; Watson, Stephanie L; Wakefield, Denis; Di Girolamo, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a complex blinding disease of the cornea, which cannot be treated with conventional corneal transplants. Instead, a stem cell (SC) graft is required to replenish the limbal epithelial stem cell (LESC) reservoir, which is ultimately responsible for regenerating the corneal epithelium. Current therapies utilize limbal tissue biopsies that harbor LESCs as well as tissue culture expanded cells. Typically, this tissue is placed on a scaffold that supports the formation of corneal epithelial cell sheets, which are then transferred to diseased eyes. A wide range of biological and synthetic materials have been identified as carrier substrates for LESC, some of which have been used in the clinic, including amniotic membrane, fibrin, and silicon hydrogel contact lenses, each with their own advantages and limitations. This review will provide a brief background of LSCD, focusing on bio-scaffolds that have been utilized in limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) and materials that are being developed as potentially novel therapeutics for patients with this disease. The outcome of patients with corneal blindness that receive stem cell grafts to restore eye health and correct vision varies considerably and may be due to the different biological and synthetic scaffolds used to deliver these cells to the ocular surface. This review will highlight the positive attributes and limitations of the myriad of carriers developed for clinical use as well as those that are being trialled in pre-clinical models. The overall focus is on developing a standardized therapy for patients, however due to the multiple causes of corneal blindness, a personal regenerative medicine approach may be the best option. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PAX8 expression in ovarian surface epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Emily; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Gayther, Simon A; Lawrenson, Kate

    2015-07-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC) is usually diagnosed at a late stage and is associated with poor prognosis. Understanding early stage disease biology is essential in developing clinical biomarkers to detect HGSOC earlier. While recent studies indicate that HGSOCs arise from fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells, a considerable body of evidence suggests that HGSOC can also arise from ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSECs). PAX8 is overexpressed in HGSOCs and expressed in fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells, but there are conflicting reports about PAX8 expression in OSECs. The purposes of this study were to comprehensively characterize PAX8 expression in a large series of OSECs and to investigate the role of PAX8 in early HGSOC development. PAX8 protein expression was analyzed in the OSECs of 27 normal ovaries and 7 primary OSEC cultures using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescent cytochemistry. PAX8 messenger RNA expression was quantified in 66 primary OSEC cultures. Cellular transformation was evaluated in OSECs expressing a PAX8 construct. PAX8 was expressed by 44% to 71% of OSECs. Calretinin and E-cadherin were frequently coexpressed with PAX8. Expression of PAX8 in OSECs decreased cellular migration (P = .028), but had no other effects on cellular transformation. In addition, PAX8 expression was significantly increased (P = .003) in an in vitro stepwise model of neoplastic transformation. In conclusion, PAX8 is frequently expressed by OSECs, and endogenous levels of PAX8 expression are non-transforming. These data indicate that in OSECs, PAX8 expression may represent a normal state and that OSECs may represent an origin of HGSOCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Tiotropium attenuates IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia of human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Loes E M; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Bos, I Sophie T; Bouwman, Susanne; van den Berge, Maarten; Hylkema, Machteld N; Meurs, Herman; Kerstjens, Huib A M; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-07-01

    It has been shown that acetylcholine is both a neurotransmitter and acts as a local mediator, produced by airway cells including epithelial cells. In vivo studies have demonstrated an indirect role for acetylcholine in epithelial cell differentiation. Here, we aimed to investigate direct effects of endogenous non-neuronal acetylcholine on epithelial cell differentiation. Human airway epithelial cells from healthy donors were cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI). Cells were exposed to the muscarinic antagonist tiotropium (10 nM), interleukin (IL)-13 (1, 2 and 5 ng/mL), or a combination of IL-13 and tiotropium, during or after differentiation at the ALI. Human airway epithelial cells expressed all components of the non-neuronal cholinergic system, suggesting acetylcholine production. Tiotropium had no effects on epithelial cell differentiation after air exposure. Differentiation into goblet cells was barely induced after air exposure. Therefore, IL-13 (1 ng/mL) was used to induce goblet cell metaplasia. IL-13 induced MUC5AC-positive cells (5-fold) and goblet cells (14-fold), as assessed by histochemistry, and MUC5AC gene expression (105-fold). These effects were partly prevented by tiotropium (47-92%). Goblet cell metaplasia was induced by IL-13 in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited by tiotropium. In addition, tiotropium reversed goblet cell metaplasia induced by 2 weeks of IL-13 exposure. IL-13 decreased forkhead box protein A2 (FoxA2) expression (1.6-fold) and increased FoxA3 (3.6-fold) and SAM-pointed domain-containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF) (5.2-fold) expression. Tiotropium prevented the effects on FoxA2 and FoxA3, but not on SPDEF. We demonstrate that tiotropium has no effects on epithelial cell differentiation after air exposure, but inhibits and reverses IL-13-induced goblet cell metaplasia, possibly via FoxA2 and FoxA3. This indicates that non-neuronal acetylcholine contributes to goblet cell differentiation by a direct effect

  3. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  4. Ouabain Increases Gap Junctional Communication in Epithelial Cells

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    Arturo Ponce

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The finding that endogenous ouabain acts as a hormone prompted efforts to elucidate its physiological function. In previous studies, we have shown that 10 nM ouabain (i.e., a concentration within the physiological range modulates cell-cell contacts such as tight junctions and apical/basolateral polarity. In this study, we examined whether 10 nM ouabain affects another important cell-cell feature: gap junction communication (GJC. Methods: We employed two different approaches: 1 analysis of the cell-to-cell diffusion of neurobiotin injected into a particular MDCK cell (epithelial cells from dog kidneys in a confluent monolayer by counting the number of neighboring cells reached by the probe and 2 measurement of the electrical capacitance. Results: We found that 10 nM ouabain increase GJC by 475% within 1 hour. The Na+-K+-ATPase acts as a receptor of ouabain. In previous works we have shown that ouabain activates c-Src and ERK1/2 in 1 hour; in the present study we show that the inhibition of these proteins block the effect of ouabain on GJC. This increase in GJC does not require synthesis of new protein components, because the inhibitors cycloheximide and actinomycin D did not affect this phenomenon. Using silencing assays we also demonstrate that this ouabain-induced enhancement of GJC involves connexins 32 and 43. Conclusion: Ouabain 10 nM increases GJC in MDCK cells.

  5. CELL AUTONOMOUS REQUIREMENTS FOR DLG-1 FOR LENS EPITHELIAL CELL STRUCTURE AND FIBER CELL MORPHOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Charlene; Yamben, Idella F.; Shatadal, Shalini; Waldof, Malinda; Robinson, Michael L.; Griep, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Cell polarity and adhesion are thought to be key determinants in organismal development. In Drosophila, discs large (dlg) has emerged as an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, adhesion and polarity. Herein, we investigated the role of the mouse homolog of dlg (Dlg-1) in the development of the mouse ocular lens. Tissue specific ablation of Dlg-1 throughout the lens early in lens development led to an expansion and disorganization of the epithelium that correlated with changes in the distribution of adhesion and polarity factors. In the fiber cells differentiation defects were observed. These included alterations in cell structure and the disposition of cell adhesion/cytoskeletal factors, delay in denucleation, and reduced levels of α-catenin, pERK1/2 and MIP26. These fiber cell defects were recapitulated when Dlg-1 was disrupted only in fiber cells. These results suggest that Dlg-1 acts in a cell autonomous manner to regulate epithelial cell structure and fiber cell differentiation. PMID:19623611

  6. Cell-autonomous requirements for Dlg-1 for lens epithelial cell structure and fiber cell morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Charlene; Yamben, Idella F; Shatadal, Shalini; Waldof, Malinda; Robinson, Michael L; Griep, Anne E

    2009-09-01

    Cell polarity and adhesion are thought to be key determinants in organismal development. In Drosophila, discs large (dlg) has emerged as an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, adhesion, and polarity. Herein, we investigated the role of the mouse homolog of dlg (Dlg-1) in the development of the mouse ocular lens. Tissue-specific ablation of Dlg-1 throughout the lens early in lens development led to an expansion and disorganization of the epithelium that correlated with changes in the distribution of adhesion and polarity factors. In the fiber cells, differentiation defects were observed. These included alterations in cell structure and the disposition of cell adhesion/cytoskeletal factors, delay in denucleation, and reduced levels of alpha-catenin, pERK1/2, and MIP26. These fiber cell defects were recapitulated when Dlg-1 was disrupted only in fiber cells. These results suggest that Dlg-1 acts in a cell autonomous manner to regulate epithelial cell structure and fiber cell differentiation. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Pellino-1 Selectively Regulates Epithelial Cell Responses to Rhinovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Julie A.; Prince, Lynne R.; Parker, Lisa C.; Stokes, Clare A.; de Bruin, Harold G.; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H.; Whyte, Moira K.

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates responses to a human pathogen, rhinovirus minor group serotype 1B (RV-1B). Knockdown of Pellino-1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was associated with impaired production of innate immune cytokines such as CXCL8 from human primary bronchial epithelial cells in response to RV-1B, without impairment in production of antiviral interferons (IFN), and without loss of control of viral replication. Pellino-1 actions were likely to be independent of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) regulation, since Pellino-1 knockdown in primary epithelial cells did not alter responses to IL-1 but did inhibit responses to poly(I·C), a Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) activator that does not signal via IRAK-1 to engender a response. These data indicate that Pellino-1 represents a novel target that regulates responses of human airways to human viral pathogens, independently of IRAK signaling. Neutralization of Pellino-1 may therefore provide opportunities to inhibit potentially harmful neutrophilic inflammation of the airways induced by respiratory viruses, without loss of control of the underlying viral infection. PMID:22514342

  8. AGE-RAGE interaction in the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition of human lens epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Cibin T; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2016-08-01

    Basement membrane (BM) proteins accumulate chemical modifications with age. One such modification is glycation, which results in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In a previous study, we reported that AGEs in the human lens capsule (BM) promote the TGFβ2-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells, which we proposed as a mechanism for posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract formation. In this study, we investigated the role of a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT in a human lens epithelial cell line (FHL124). RAGE was present in FHL124 cells, and its levels were unaltered in cells cultured on either native or AGE-modified BM or upon treatment with TGFβ2. RAGE overexpression significantly enhanced the TGFβ2-mediated EMT responses in cells cultured on AGE-modified BM compared with the unmodified matrix. In contrast, treatment of cells with a RAGE antibody or EN-RAGE (an endogenous ligand for RAGE) resulted in a significant reduction in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT response. This was accompanied by a reduction in TGFβ2-mediated Smad signaling and ROS generation. These results imply that the interaction of matrix AGEs with RAGE plays a role in the TGFβ2-mediated EMT of lens epithelial cells and suggest that the blockade of RAGE could be a strategy to prevent PCO and other age-associated fibrosis.

  9. Y-27632, a ROCK Inhibitor, Promoted Limbal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Corneal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chin Sun

    Full Text Available Transplantation of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial cells is proven effective in restoring limbal stem cell deficiency. The present study aimed to investigate the promoting effect of Y-27632 on limbal epithelial cell proliferation. Limbal explants isolated from human donor eyes were expanded three weeks on culture dishes and outgrowth of epithelial cells was subsequently subcultured for in vitro experiments. In the presence of Y-27632, the ex vivo limbal outgrowth was accelerated, particularly the cells with epithelial cell-like morphology. Y-27632 dose-dependently promoted the proliferation of in vitro cultured human limbal epithelial cells as examined by phase contrast microscopy and luminescent cell-viability assay 30 hours after the treatment. The colony forming efficacy determined 7 days after the treatment was enhanced by Y-27632 also in a dose-dependent manner. The number of p63- or Ki67-positive cells was dose-dependently increased in Y-27632-treated cultures as detected by immunofluorescent staining and western blotanalysis. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometric method revealed an increase in S-phase proliferating cells. The epithelial woundclosure rate was shown to be faster in experimental group received topical treatment withY-27632 than the sham control using a rat corneal wounding model. These resultsdemonstrate that Y-27632 can promote both the ex vivo and in vitro proliferation oflimbal epithelial cell proliferation. The in vivo enhanced epithelial wound healingfurther implies that the Y-27632 may act as a new strategy for treating limbal stem cell deficiency.

  10. Cigarette smoke suppresses Bik to cause epithelial cell hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebratu, Yohannes A; Schwalm, Kurt; Smith, Kevin R; Schuyler, Mark; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2011-06-01

    Aberrant regulation of airway epithelial cell numbers in airways leads to increased mucous secretions in chronic lung diseases such as chronic bronchitis. Because the Bcl-2 family of proteins is crucial for airway epithelial homeostasis, identifying the players that reduce cigarette smoke (CS)-induced mucous cell metaplasia can help to develop effective therapies. To identify the Bcl-2 family of proteins that play a role in reducing CS-induced mucous cell metaplasia. We screened for dysregulated expression of the Bcl-2 family members. We identified Bik to be significantly reduced in bronchial brushings of patients with chronic epithelial cell hyperplasia compared with nondiseased control subjects. Reduced Bik but increased MUC5AC mRNA levels were also detected when normal human airway epithelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to CS or when autopsy tissues from former smokers with and without chronic bronchitis were compared. Similarly, exposure of C57Bl/6 mice to CS resulted in increased numbers of epithelial and mucous cells per millimeter of basal lamina, along with reduced Bik but increased Muc5ac expression, and this change was sustained even when mice were allowed to recover in filtered air for 8 weeks. Restoring Bik expression significantly suppressed CS-induced mucous cell metaplasia in differentiated primary HAEC cultures and in airways of mice in vivo. Bik blocked nuclear translocation of phospho-ERK1/2 to induce apoptosis of HAECs. The conserved Leu61 within Bik and ERK1/2 activation were essential to induce cell death in hyperplastic mucous cells. These studies show that CS suppresses Bik expression to block airway epithelia cell death and thereby increases epithelial cell hyperplasia in chronic bronchitis.

  11. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule: More than a Carcinoma Marker and Adhesion Molecule

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J; de Leij, Lou M.F.H; Harmsen, Martin C

    2007-01-01

    From the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326...

  12. Invasion of epithelial cells by Trichinella spiralis: in vitro observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romarís F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for many years that Trichinella spiralis initiates infection by penetrating the columnar epithelium of the small intestine, however, the mechanisms used by the parasite in the establishment of its intramulticellular niche in the intestine are unknown. The recent demonstration that invasion also occurs in vitro when infective larvae of T. spiralis are inoculated onto cultures of epithelial cells provides a model that allows the direct observation of the process by which the parasite recognizes, invades and migrates within the epithelium. The finding that penetration of the cell membrane or Induction of plasma membrane wounds by larvae do not always result in invasion argue in favor of some kind of host-parasite communication in successful invasion. In this sense, the in vitro model of invasion provides a readily manipulated and controlled system to investigate both parasite, and host cell requirements for invasion.

  13. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection induces intestinal epithelial cell autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Fengna; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Kong, Xiangfeng; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2014-06-25

    The morbidity and mortality in piglets caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in large economic losses to the swine industry, but the precise pathogenesis of ETEC-associated diseases remains unknown. Intestinal epithelial cell autophagy serves as a host defense against pathogens. We found that ETEC induced autophagy, as measured by both the increased punctae distribution of GFP-LC3 and the enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Inhibiting autophagy resulted in decreased survival of IPEC-1 cells infected with ETEC. ETEC triggered autophagy in IPEC-1 cells through a pathway involving the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-09-15

    We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Shahid; Radakovic, Zoran S; De La Torre, Carola M; Chronis, Demosthenis; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Holbein, Julia; Matera, Christiane; Hütten, Marion; Gutbrod, Philipp; Anjam, Muhammad Shahzad; Rozanska, Elzbieta; Habash, Samer; Elashry, Abdelnaser; Sobczak, Miroslaw; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, Thomas; Mitchum, Melissa G; Grundler, Florian M W

    2015-10-13

    Sedentary plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are biotrophs that cause significant losses in agriculture. Parasitism is based on modifications of host root cells that lead to the formation of a hypermetabolic feeding site (a syncytium) from which nematodes withdraw nutrients. The host cell cycle is activated in an initial cell selected by the nematode for feeding, followed by activation of neighboring cells and subsequent expansion of feeding site through fusion of hundreds of cells. It is generally assumed that nematodes manipulate production and signaling of the plant hormone cytokinin to activate cell division. In fact, nematodes have been shown to produce cytokinin in vitro; however, whether the hormone is secreted into host plants and plays a role in parasitism remained unknown. Here, we analyzed the spatiotemporal activation of cytokinin signaling during interaction between the cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, and Arabidopsis using cytokinin-responsive promoter:reporter lines. Our results showed that cytokinin signaling is activated not only in the syncytium but also in neighboring cells to be incorporated into syncytium. An analysis of nematode infection on mutants that are deficient in cytokinin or cytokinin signaling revealed a significant decrease in susceptibility of these plants to nematodes. Further, we identified a cytokinin-synthesizing isopentenyltransferase gene in H. schachtii and show that silencing of this gene in nematodes leads to a significant decrease in virulence due to a reduced expansion of feeding sites. Our findings demonstrate the ability of a plant-parasitic nematode to synthesize a functional plant hormone to manipulate the host system and establish a long-term parasitic interaction.

  16. Molecular evidence for rhesus lymphocryptovirus infection of epithelial cells in immunosuppressed rhesus macaques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutok, JL; Klumpp, S; Simon, M; MacKey, JJ; Nguyen, V; Middeldorp, J.M.; Aster, JC; Wang, F

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains

  17. Interactions of virulent and avirulent leptospires with primary cultures of renal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballard, S A; Williamson, M; Adler, B

    1986-01-01

    copenhageni did not adhere to epithelial cells at all within the experimental period of 24 h. The saprophytic Leptospira biflexa serovar patoc became attached non-specifically to inert glass surfaces as well as to the cells. The adhesion of leptospires to epithelial cells was not inhibited by homologous...

  18. WU Polyomavirus in Respiratory Epithelial Cells from Lung Transplant Patient with Job Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Siebrasse, Erica A.; Pastrana, Diana V.; Nguyen, Nang L.; Wang, Annie; Roth, Mark J.; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; McDyer, John; Buck, Christopher B.; Wang, David,

    2015-01-01

    We detected WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample from lungs transplanted into a recipient with Job syndrome by using immunoassays specific for the WUPyV viral protein 1. Co-staining for an epithelial cell marker identified most WUPyV viral protein 1?positive cells as respiratory epithelial cells.

  19. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  20. C-phycocyanin suppresses transforming growth factor-β1-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition in human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarayan, Dhamotharan; Rajarajan, Dheeran; Ayyanar, Sivanantham; Palanichamy, Rajaguru; Subbiah, Rajasekaran

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process through which epithelial cells undergo multiple biochemical changes, causing them to differentiate into a mesenchymal-cell phenotype. This process has been shown to contribute to the development of fibrotic diseases. C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a phycobiliprotein extracted from Spirulina platensis. This study was done to investigate the effect of C-PC on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT and an EMT associated proliferation in human epithelial cell lines. Human adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 and breast cancer cell line, MCF-7 were treated with TGF-β1, and EMT-related genes expression, cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest were examined. C-PC suppressed the EMT as assessed by reduced expression of vimentin, type-1-collagen and fibronectin, and increased E-cadherin expression in TGF-β1 treated cells. Further, TGF-β1 treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phase in A549 cells. However, TGF-β1-mediated cell cycle arrest was significantly reversed by combined treatment with C-PC. The overall data suggested that C-PC suppresses TGF- β1-induced EMT and warrants further in vivo studies for future evaluation of C-PC as a potential antifibrotic agent. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  1. Three-dimensional cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal "model organism" for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal's lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic "functional differentiation" unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines--essentially those we use in our laboratory

  2. The hedgehog pathway gene shifted functions together with the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway to orchestrate germ cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Deshpande

    Full Text Available The Drosophila embryonic gonad is assembled from two distinct cell types, the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs and the Somatic Gonadal Precursor cells (SGPs. The PGCs form at the posterior of blastoderm stage embryos and are subsequently carried inside the embryo during gastrulation. To reach the SGPs, the PGCs must traverse the midgut wall and then migrate through the mesoderm. A combination of local repulsive cues and attractive signals emanating from the SGPs guide migration. We have investigated the role of the hedgehog (hh pathway gene shifted (shf in directing PGC migration. shf encodes a secreted protein that facilitates the long distance transmission of Hh through the proteoglycan matrix after it is released from basolateral membranes of Hh expressing cells in the wing imaginal disc. shf is expressed in the gonadal mesoderm, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that it is required for PGC migration. Previous studies have established that the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway plays a pivotal role in generating the PGC attractant both by the SGPs and by other tissues when hmgcr is ectopically expressed. We show that production of this PGC attractant depends upon shf as well as a second hh pathway gene gγ1. Further linking the PGC attractant to Hh, we present evidence indicating that ectopic expression of hmgcr in the nervous system promotes the release/transmission of the Hh ligand from these cells into and through the underlying mesodermal cell layer, where Hh can contact migrating PGCs. Finally, potentiation of Hh by hmgcr appears to depend upon cholesterol modification.

  3. A parasitic nematode releases cytokinin that controls cell division and orchestrates feeding site formation in host plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Siddique, S.; Radakovic, Z.S.; De La Torre, C.M.; Chronis, D.; Novák, Ondřej; Ramireddy, E.; Holbein, J.; Matera, C.; Hutten, M.; Gutbrod, P.; Anjam, M.S.; Rozanska, E.; Habash, S.; Elashry, A.; Sobczak, M.; Kakimoto, T.; Strnad, Miroslav; Schmülling, T.; Mitchum, M.G.; Grundler, F.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 41 (2015), s. 12669-12674 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cell cycle * cytokinin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  4. Sharp-Wave Ripples Orchestrate the Induction of Synaptic Plasticity during Reactivation of Place Cell Firing Patterns in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef H.L.P. Sadowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Place cell firing patterns reactivated during hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs in rest or sleep are thought to induce synaptic plasticity and thereby promote the consolidation of recently encoded information. However, the capacity of reactivated spike trains to induce plasticity has not been directly tested. Here, we show that reactivated place cell firing patterns simultaneously recorded from CA3 and CA1 of rat dorsal hippocampus are able to induce long-term potentiation (LTP at synapses between CA3 and CA1 cells but only if accompanied by SWR-associated synaptic activity and resulting dendritic depolarization. In addition, we show that the precise timing of coincident CA3 and CA1 place cell spikes in relation to SWR onset is critical for the induction of LTP and predictive of plasticity generated by reactivation. Our findings confirm an important role for SWRs in triggering and tuning plasticity processes that underlie memory consolidation in the hippocampus during rest or sleep.

  5. Sharp-Wave Ripples Orchestrate the Induction of Synaptic Plasticity during Reactivation of Place Cell Firing Patterns in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Josef H.L.P.; Jones, Matthew W.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Place cell firing patterns reactivated during hippocampal sharp-wave ripples (SWRs) in rest or sleep are thought to induce synaptic plasticity and thereby promote the consolidation of recently encoded information. However, the capacity of reactivated spike trains to induce plasticity has not been directly tested. Here, we show that reactivated place cell firing patterns simultaneously recorded from CA3 and CA1 of rat dorsal hippocampus are able to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) at synapses between CA3 and CA1 cells but only if accompanied by SWR-associated synaptic activity and resulting dendritic depolarization. In addition, we show that the precise timing of coincident CA3 and CA1 place cell spikes in relation to SWR onset is critical for the induction of LTP and predictive of plasticity generated by reactivation. Our findings confirm an important role for SWRs in triggering and tuning plasticity processes that underlie memory consolidation in the hippocampus during rest or sleep. PMID:26904941

  6. FOXO responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis in epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Sztukowska, Maryta; Ojo, Akintunde; Scott, David A.; Wang, Huizhi; Lamont, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Porphyromonas gingivalis is a prominent periodontal, and emerging systemic, pathogen that redirects host cell signalling pathways and modulates innate immune responses. In this study, we show that P. gingivalis infection induces the dephosphorylation and activation of forkhead box-O (FOXO)1, 3 and 4 in gingival epithelial cells. In addition, immunofluorescence showed that FOXO1 accumulated in the nucleus of P. gingivalis-infected cells. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that transcription of genes involved in protection against oxidative stress (Cat, Sod2, Prdx3), inflammatory responses (IL1β) and anti-apoptosis (Bcl-6) was induced by P. gingivalis, while small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of FOXO1 suppressed the transcriptional activation of these genes. P. gingivalis-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and inhibition of apoptosis were also impeded by FOXO1 knockdown. Neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetyl-l-cysteine blocked the activation of FOXO1 by P. gingivalis and concomitantly suppressed the activation of oxidative stress responses, anti-apoptosis programmes and IL-β production. Inhibition of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) either pharmacologically or by siRNA, reduced FOXO1 activation and downstream FOXO1-dependent gene regulation in response to P. gingivalis. The results indicate that P. gingivalis-induced ROS activate FOXO transcription factors through JNK signalling, and that FOXO1 controls oxidative stress responses, inflammatory cytokine production and cell survival. These data position FOXO as an important signalling node in the epithelial cell–P. gingivalis interaction, with particular relevance to cell fate and dysbiotic host responses. PMID:25958948

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  8. Ferritinophagy drives uropathogenic Escherichia coli persistence in bladder epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle A; Mysorekar, Indira U

    2016-05-03

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling pathway, which in many cases, protects host cells from infections by degrading pathogens. However, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs), persist within the urinary tract epithelium (urothelium) by forming reservoirs within autophagosomes. Iron is a critical nutrient for both host and pathogen, and regulation of iron availability is a key host defense against pathogens. Iron homeostasis depends on the shuttling of iron-bound ferritin to the lysosome for recycling, a process termed ferritinophagy (a form of selective autophagy). Here, we demonstrate for the first time that UPEC shuttles with ferritin-bound iron into the autophagosomal and lysosomal compartments within the urothelium. Iron overload in urothelial cells induces ferritinophagy in an NCOA4-dependent manner causing increased iron availability for UPEC, triggering bacterial overproliferation and host cell death. Addition of even moderate levels of iron is sufficient to increase and prolong bacterial burden. Furthermore, we show that lysosomal damage due to iron overload is the specific mechanism causing host cell death. Significantly, we demonstrate that host cell death and bacterial burden can be reversed by inhibition of autophagy or inhibition of iron-regulatory proteins, or chelation of iron. Together, our findings suggest that UPEC persist in host cells by taking advantage of ferritinophagy. Thus, modulation of iron levels in the bladder may provide a therapeutic avenue to controlling UPEC persistence, epithelial cell death, and recurrent UTIs.

  9. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Asta Björk; Dirks, Roeland W; Vrolijk, Johannes; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M; Tanke, Hans J; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E; Szuhai, Karoly

    2010-05-21

    In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission) depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in three mammalian epithelial cell lines, HeLa, MCF 10A, and the p53-deficient mouse mammary tumor cell line KP-7.7, by time-lapse imaging. Centrin1-EGFP and alpha-Tubulin-mCherry were co-expressed in the cells to visualize respectively the centrioles and microtubules. Here we report that separated centrioles that migrate from the cell pole are very mobile during cytokinesis and their movements can be characterized as 1) along the nuclear envelope, 2) irregular, and 3) along microtubules forming the spindle axis. Centriole movement towards the intercellular bridge was only seen occasionally and was highly cell-line dependent. These findings show that centrioles are highly mobile during cytokinesis and suggest that the repositioning of a centriole to the intercellular bridge is not essential for controlling abscission. We suggest that centriole movements are microtubule dependent and that abscission is more dependent on other mechanisms than positioning of centrioles.

  10. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanke Hans J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in three mammalian epithelial cell lines, HeLa, MCF 10A, and the p53-deficient mouse mammary tumor cell line KP-7.7, by time-lapse imaging. Centrin1-EGFP and α-Tubulin-mCherry were co-expressed in the cells to visualize respectively the centrioles and microtubules. Results Here we report that separated centrioles that migrate from the cell pole are very mobile during cytokinesis and their movements can be characterized as 1 along the nuclear envelope, 2 irregular, and 3 along microtubules forming the spindle axis. Centriole movement towards the intercellular bridge was only seen occasionally and was highly cell-line dependent. Conclusions These findings show that centrioles are highly mobile during cytokinesis and suggest that the repositioning of a centriole to the intercellular bridge is not essential for controlling abscission. We suggest that centriole movements are microtubule dependent and that abscission is more dependent on other mechanisms than positioning of centrioles.

  11. Engineering human renal epithelial cells for transplantation in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Vita; Colter, David C; Dhanaraj, Sridevi; Fornoni, Alessia; Ricordi, Camillo; Pileggi, Antonello; Tomei, Alice A

    2017-10-01

    Cellular transplantation may treat several human diseases by replacing damaged cells and/or providing a local source of trophic factors promoting regeneration. We utilized human renal epithelial cells (hRECs) isolated from cadaveric donors as a cell model. For efficacious implementation of hRECs for treatment of kidney diseases, we evaluated a novel encapsulation strategy for immunoisolation of hRECs and lentiviral transduction of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as model gene for genetic engineering of hRECs to secrete desired trophic factors. In specific, we determined whether encapsulation through conformal coating and/or GFP transduction of hRECs allowed preservation of cell viability and of their trophic factor secretion. To that end, we optimized cultures of hRECs and showed that aggregation in three-dimensional spheroids significantly preserved cell viability, proliferation, and trophic factor secretion. We also showed that both wild type and GFP-engineered hRECs could be efficiently encapsulated within conformal hydrogel coatings through our fluid dynamic platform and that this resulted in further improvement of cell viability and trophic factors secretion. Our findings may lay the groundwork for future therapeutics based on transplantation of genetically engineered human primary cells for treatment of diseases affecting kidneys and potentially other tissues. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical characterization of epithelial cells implanted in the flap-stroma interface of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lizhong; Kato, Takuji; Toshida, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shinji; Murakami, Akira

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the expression of extracellular matrix collagens and their relationship to corneal opacities after implantation of epithelial cells in the flap-stroma corneal interface. A corneal flap was made on rabbit eyes, and epithelial cells, mechanically scraped from tissue surrounding the flap, were implanted beneath the flap. The corneas were harvested 1, 3, 7, and 30 days following surgery. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed. The expression and localization of types I, III, and IV collagens and gelatinase A were determined. Slit-lamp examination showed corneal opacity in the area where the epithelial cells were implanted. Histological study revealed clusters of epithelial cells between the flap and stromal interface. One week and 1 month after the implantation, intense immunoreactivity for collagen type IV was detected at the perimeters of the intrastromal epithelial islands, but not in the interface outside the implanted epithelial cells. Weak positive staining for gelatinase A was detected in the implanted epithelial cells and surrounding keratocytes. The heavy deposition of collagen type IV surrounding the implanted epithelial cells indicated that it might be an essential component of the interface haze observed in patients following laser in situ Keratomileusis. Gelatinase A may also play a role in the regulation of stromal remodeling after epithelial ingrowth.

  13. Human Alveolar Epithelial Cell Injury Induced by Cigarette Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Beata; Messier, Elise M.; Chu, Hong Wei; Mason, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke (CS) is a highly complex mixture and many of its components are known carcinogens, mutagens, and other toxic substances. CS induces oxidative stress and cell death, and this cell toxicity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in human alveolar epithelial type I-like (ATI-like) cells. These are isolated type II cells that are differentiating toward the type I cell phenotype in vitro and have lost many type II cell markers and express type I cell markers. ATI-like cells were more sensitive to CSE than alveolar type II cells, which maintained their differentiated phenotype in vitro. We observed disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis and necrosis that were detected by double staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide or Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide and TUNEL assay after treatment with CSE. We also detected caspase 3 and caspase 7 activities and lipid peroxidation. CSE induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased expression of Nrf2, HO-1, Hsp70 and Fra1. Moreover, we found that Nrf2 knockdown sensitized ATI-like cells to CSE and Nrf2 overexpression provided protection against CSE-induced cell death. We also observed that two antioxidant compounds N-acetylcysteine and trolox protected ATI-like cells against injury by CSE. Conclusions Our study indicates that Nrf2 activation is a major factor in cellular defense of the human alveolar epithelium against CSE-induced toxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, antioxidant agents that modulate Nrf2 would be expected to restore antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes and to prevent CS-related lung injury and perhaps lessen the development of emphysema. PMID:22163265

  14. Ion transport in epithelial spheroids derived from human airway cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P S; Frederiksen, O; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1999-01-01

    -CF nasal polyps developed free-floating, monolayered epithelial spheres, with the apical, ciliated cell membrane facing the bath and the basolateral cell membrane pointing toward a fluid-filled lumen. Microelectrode impalement of both non-CF and CF spheroids revealed lumen-positive transepithelial...... electrical potential differences (PDs) that were inhibited by amiloride, indicating that the spheroids were inflated due to amiloride-sensitive Na+ absorption followed by water. Transformation to a Cl- secretory state was achieved by addition of ATP to the bath, leading to the development of a diphenylamine......-2-carboxylate-sensitive PD. A cAMP-induced increase in PD was seen in non-CF spheroids only. In response to hydrocortisone treatment, Na+ transport reflected by amiloride-sensitive PD increased and more so in CF than in non-CF spheres. We concluded that this preparation is a useful model...

  15. The Inside Story of Shigella Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayol, Nathalie; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to other invasive pathogens that reside into host cells in a parasitic mode, Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades the colonic mucosa but does not penetrate further to survive into deeper tissues. Instead, Shigella invades, replicates, and disseminates within the colonic mucosa. Bacterial invasion and spreading in intestinal epithelium lead to the elicitation of inflammatory responses responsible for the tissue destruction and shedding in the environment for further infection of other hosts. In this article, we highlight specific features of the Shigella arsenal of virulence determinants injected by a type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) that point to the targeting of intestinal epithelial cells as a discrete route of invasion during the initial event of the infectious process. PMID:24086068

  16. Stromal–epithelial cell interactions and alteration of branching morphogenesis in macromastic mammary glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Aimei; Wang, Guohua; Yang, Jie; Xu, Qijun; Yuan, Quan; Yang, Yanqing; Xia, Yun; Guo, Ke; Horch, Raymund E; Sun, Jiaming

    2014-01-01

    True macromastia is a rare but disabling condition characterized by massive breast growth. The aetiology and pathogenic mechanisms for this disorder remain largely unexplored because of the lack of in vivo or in vitro models. Previous studies suggested that regulation of epithelial cell growth and development by oestrogen was dependent on paracrine growth factors from the stroma. In this study, a co-culture model containing epithelial and stromal cells was used to investigate the interactions of these cells in macromastia. Epithelial cell proliferation and branching morphogenesis were measured to assess the effect of macromastic stromal cells on epithelial cells. We analysed the cytokines secreted by stromal cells and identified molecules that were critical for effects on epithelial cells. Our results indicated a significant increase in cell proliferation and branching morphogenesis of macromastic and non-macromastic epithelial cells when co-cultured with macromastic stromal cells or in conditioned medium from macromastic stromal cells. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a key factor in epithelial–stromal interactions of macromastia-derived cell cultures. Blockade of HGF with neutralizing antibodies dramatically attenuated epithelial cell proliferation in conditioned medium from macromastic stromal cells. The epithelial–stromal cell co-culture model demonstrated reliability for studying interactions of mammary stromal and epithelial cells in macromastia. In this model, HGF secreted by macromastic stromal cells was found to play an important role in modifying the behaviour of co-cultured epithelial cells. This model allows further studies to investigate basic cellular and molecular mechanisms in tissue from patients with true breast hypertrophy. PMID:24720804

  17. Oxidant-induced corticosteroid unresponsiveness in human bronchial epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Irene; van Oosterhout, Antoon; Kliphuis, Nathalie; Jonker, Marnix; Hoffmann, Roland; Telenga, Eef; Klooster, Karin; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; ten Hacken, Nick; Postma, Dirkje; van den Berge, Maarten

    Background We hypothesised that increased oxidative stress, as present in the airways of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, induces epithelial damage and reduces epithelial responsiveness to suppressive effects of corticosteroids on proinflammatory cytokine production

  18. Foxc2 influences alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Mayoko; Morishima, Masae; Shimizu, Kazuhiko; Morikawa, Shunichi; Heglind, Mikael; Enerbäck, Sven; Ezaki, Taichi; Tamaoki, Jun

    2017-08-01

    FOXC2, a forkhead transcriptional factor, is a candidate gene for congenital heart diseases and lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome and yellow nail syndrome; however, there are no reports on Foxc2 and the development of the lung. We have identified lung abnormalities in Foxc2-knockout embryos during investigation of cardiac development. The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological characteristics during lung development using ICR-Foxc2 knockout lungs. Mutant fetuses at embryonic days 10.5-18.5 were obtained from mating of Foxc2+/- mice and then analyzed. Notably, Foxc2-knockout lungs appeared parenchymatous and much smaller than those of the wild-type littermates. In the Foxc2 knockout lungs, the capillary beds remained distant from the alveolar epithelium until the late stages, the number of type2 alveolar cells per alveolar progenitor cell was lower and the type1 alveolar cells were thicker in Foxc2 knockout mice. In contrast, Foxc2 expression was only detected in the mesenchyme of the lung buds at E10.5, and it disappeared at E11.5 in Foxc2-LacZ knockin mice. Furthermore, the expression of Lef1 was significantly inhibited in E11.5 lungs. All of these results suggest that the abnormalities in Foxc2 knockout mice may involve maldifferentiation of alveolar epithelial cells and capillary vessel endothelial-alveolar epithelial approach as well as lymph vessel malformation. This is the first report about relationship between Foxc2 and lung development. This animal model might provide an important clue for elucidating the mechanism of lung development and the cause of respiratory diseases. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. The role of limbal stem cells in corneal epithelial maintenance: testing the dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Harminder S; Miri, Ammar; Alomar, Thaer; Yeung, Aaron M; Said, Dalia G

    2009-05-01

    To study and characterize the epithelial cells in patients with a central "island" of normal epithelial cells surrounded with 360 degrees of clinically apparent limbal stem cell (SC) deficiency with conjunctivalization of the limbus and peripheral cornea. Observational, prospective, consecutive case series. Five human subjects (8 eyes) who presented with total limbal SC deficiency in 1 or both eyes with a central area of normal corneal epithelial cells. Clinical slit-lamp examination, aided with fluorescein staining, for evidence of conjunctivalization and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the conjunctivalized limbus and peripheral cornea and the normal central corneal epithelium. Long term survival of normal stratified corneal epithelial cell sheet in the presence of total limbal SC deficiency. In all 8 eyes the diagnosis of limbal SC deficiency was confirmed by clinical and IVCM examination. The conjunctivalized area extended circumferentially along the entire limbus, seen clinically by the presence of fluorescein staining cells, epithelial irregularity, and vascularization and by IVCM showing bright conjunctival epithelial cells, superficial and deep blood vessels, and goblet cells. The central corneal epithelial cells had a normal appearance with polygonal superficial cells, well-defined wing cells, and smaller basal cells. The central "islands" of normal epithelial cells remained unchanged over the mean follow-up period of 60 months (range, 8-12 years). The existence and survival of a healthy sheet of corneal epithelial cells over the follow-up period, in the presence of clinically apparent total limbal SC deficiency, suggests a limited role of limbal epithelial SC in physiologic homeostasis of the corneal epithelium. The authors have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed on this article.

  20. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  1. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  2. Human Airway Epithelial Cells Direct Significant Rhinovirus Replication in Monocytic Cells by Enhancing ICAM1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lizarraga, Rosa; Chen, Yin

    2017-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the major cause of common cold, and it also plays a significant role in asthma and asthma exacerbation. The airway epithelium is the primary site of RV infection and production. In contrast, monocytic cells (e.g., monocytes and macrophages) are believed to be nonpermissive for RV replication. Instead, RV has been shown to modulate inflammatory gene expressions in these cells via a replication-independent mechanism. In the study presented here, replication of RV16 (a major-group RV) was found to be significantly enhanced in monocytes when it was cocultivated with airway epithelial cells. This effect appeared to be mediated by secretory components from epithelial cells, which stimulated RV16 replication and significantly elevated the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines. The lack of such an effect on RV1A, a minor-group RV that enters the cell by a different receptor, suggests that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), the receptor for major-group RVs, may be involved. Indeed, conditioned media from epithelial cells significantly increased ICAM1 expression in monocytes. Consistently, ICAM1 overexpression and ICAM1 knockdown enhanced and blocked RV production, respectively, confirming the role of ICAM1 in this process. Thus, this is the first report demonstrating that airway epithelial cells direct significant RV16 replication in monocytic cells via an ICAM1-dependent mechanism. This finding will open a new avenue for the study of RV infection in airway disease and its exacerbation.

  3. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  4. Drug permeation across intestinal epithelial cells using porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2011-04-01

    Mesoporous silicon particles hold great potential in improving the solubility of otherwise poorly soluble drugs. To effectively translate this feature into the clinic, especially via oral or parenteral administration, a thorough understanding of the interactions of the micro- and nanosized material with the physiological environment during the delivery process is required. In the present study, the behaviour of thermally oxidized porous silicon particles of different sizes interacting with Caco-2 cells (both non-differentiated and polarized monolayers) was investigated in order to establish their fate in a model of intestinal epithelial cell barrier. Particle interactions and TNF-α were measured in RAW 264.7 macrophages, while cell viabilities, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels, together with transmission electron microscope images of the polarized monolayers, were assessed with both the Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results showed a concentration and size dependent influence on cell viability and ROS-, NO- and TNF-α levels. There was no evidence of the porous nanoparticles crossing the Caco-2 cell monolayers, yet increased permeation of the loaded poorly soluble drug, griseofulvin, was shown. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantopoulos Andreas G

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV, the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling.

  6. Quantitation of human mammary epithelial antigens in cells cultured from normal and cancerous breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1981-02-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay technique was developed to quantitate the level of human breast celltype specific antigens on cells from normal breast and from various established cell lines of breast and nonbreast origins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed four major proteinaceous components (150,000; 75,000; 60,000; and 48,000) in human milk fat globule membranes that were used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit antimammary epithelial cell antibody. Antisera obtained were rendered specific by absorptions and were able to recognize three specific mammary epithelial components of the breast epithelial cell. Human mammary epithelial (HME) antigen expression was highest (1290 ng/10(6) cells) in normal breast epithelial cells from primary cultures of normal breasts. Lower levels (range: 955 to 330 ng/10(6) cells) were found in breast epithelial cells from cell lines established from cancerous breast tissue. Cells of nonbreast origins as well as fibroblasts from breast gave much lower values (less than 30 ng/10(6) cells). On treatment, with trypsin, of two breast epithelial cell lines (MDA-MB-157 and MCF-7) 80 to 85% of their HME antigen expression was lost, suggesting that a majority of these breast antigens reside on the cell surface.

  7. Activated alveolar epithelial cells initiate fibrosis through autocrine and paracrine secretion of connective tissue growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jibing; Velikoff, Miranda; Canalis, Ernesto; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Kim, Kevin K

    2014-04-15

    Fibrogenesis involves a pathological accumulation of activated fibroblasts and extensive matrix remodeling. Profibrotic cytokines, such as TGF-β, stimulate fibroblasts to overexpress fibrotic matrix proteins and induce further expression of profibrotic cytokines, resulting in progressive fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a profibrotic cytokine that is indicative of fibroblast activation. Epithelial cells are abundant in the normal lung, but their contribution to fibrogenesis remains poorly defined. Profibrotic cytokines may activate epithelial cells with protein expression and functions that overlap with the functions of active fibroblasts. We found that alveolar epithelial cells undergoing TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal transition in vitro were also capable of activating lung fibroblasts through production of CTGF. Alveolar epithelial cell expression of CTGF was dramatically reduced by inhibition of Rho signaling. CTGF reporter mice demonstrated increased CTGF promoter activity by lung epithelial cells acutely after bleomycin in vivo. Furthermore, mice with lung epithelial cell-specific deletion of CTGF had an attenuated fibrotic response to bleomycin. These studies provide direct evidence that epithelial cell activation initiates a cycle of fibrogenic effector cell activation during progressive fibrosis. Therapy targeted at epithelial cell production of CTGF offers a novel pathway for abrogating this progressive cycle and limiting tissue fibrosis.

  8. Epithelialization of mouse ovarian tumor cells originating in the fallopian tube stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Choi, Pui-Wah; Trachtenberg, Alexander J; Ng, Allen C; Kuo, Winston P; Ng, Shu-Kay; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Matzuk, Martin M; Berkowitz, Ross S; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-10-04

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancer and is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. Recent studies have suggested that fallopian tube fimbriae can be the origin of cells for high-grade serous subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). A mouse HGSOC model with conditional Dicer-Pten double knockout (Dicer-Pten DKO) developed primary tumors, intriguingly, from the fallopian tube stroma. We examined the growth and epithelial phenotypes of the Dicer-Pten DKO mouse tumor cells contributable by each gene knockout. Unlike human ovarian epithelial cancer cells that expressed full-length E-cadherin, the Dicer-Pten DKO stromal tumor cells expressed cleaved E-cadherin fragments and metalloproteinase 2, a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Although the Dicer-Pten DKO tumor cells lost the expression of mature microRNAs as expected, they showed high levels of tRNA fragment expression and enhanced AKT activation due to the loss of PTEN function. Introduction of a Dicer1-expressing construct into the DKO mouse tumor cells significantly reduced DNA synthesis and the cell growth rate, with concurrent diminished adhesion and ZO1 epithelial staining. Hence, it is likely that the loss of Dicer promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition in fallopian tube stromal cells, and in conjunction with Pten loss, further promoted cell proliferation and epithelial-like tumorigenesis.

  9. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Anshu; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli; Chakraborti, Anuradha; Ghosh, Sujata

    2017-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging enteric pathogen causing diarrhoeal diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease caused by this organism is still suboptimal. Studies have indicated that enteric bacteria induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in host intestinal epithelial cells might play a vital role in the pathogenesis caused by these organisms. In this study an attempt was made to assess EAEC-induced apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in human intestinal epithelial cell lines. INT-407 and HCT-15 cells were infected with EAEC-T8 (clinical isolate) as well as plasmid cured variant of EAEC-T8 (EAEC-pT8). Propidium iodide staining was done to select the time of infection and the incubation period of the infected culture. Apoptosis was further assessed in EAEC infected both the cell lines by annexin-V-FLUOS & propidium iodide, cell death detection ELISA, DNA strand breaks and microscopic analysis. Further, the DNA content of the EAEC-infected cells at different phases of cell cycle was also monitored. We have found that EAEC could induce apoptosis in human small intestinal as well as colonic epithelial cell lines, which was assessed by the expression of phosphatidylserine on host cell surface, internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA and microscopic analysis of the characteristic apoptotic features of these cells. EAEC was also found to arrest cells at S phase and G2-M phase of the cell cycle. EAEC-T8 could induce maximum apoptosis and cell cycle modulation in both small intestinal and colonic epithelial cells. Further, we have observed that the plasmid of this organism had maximum contribution to these processes. The outcome of this study has undoubtedly led to a better understanding of the basic mechanism of pathogenesis caused by EAEC.

  10. Culture of Oral Mucosal Epithelial Cells for the Purpose of Treating Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utheim, Tor Paaske; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Sehic, Amer

    2016-03-01

    The cornea is critical for normal vision as it allows allowing light transmission to the retina. The corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial cells (LEC), which are located in the periphery of the cornea, the limbus. Damage or disease involving LEC may lead to various clinical presentations of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). Both severe pain and blindness may result. Transplantation of cultured autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheet (CAOMECS) represents the first use of a cultured non-limbal autologous cell type to treat this disease. Among non-limbal cell types, CAOMECS and conjunctival epithelial cells are the only laboratory cultured cell sources that have been explored in humans. Thus far, the expression of p63 is the only predictor of clinical outcome following transplantation to correct LSCD. The optimal culture method and substrate for CAOMECS is not established. The present review focuses on cell culture methods, with particular emphasis on substrates. Most culture protocols for CAOMECS used amniotic membrane as a substrate and included the xenogeneic components fetal bovine serum and murine 3T3 fibroblasts. However, it has been demonstrated that tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheet grafts can be successfully fabricated using temperature-responsive culture surfaces and autologous serum. In the studies using different substrates for culture of CAOMECS, the quantitative expression of p63 was generally poorly reported; thus, more research is warranted with quantification of phenotypic data. Further research is required to develop a culture system for CAOMECS that mimics the natural environment of oral/limbal/corneal epithelial cells without the need for undefined foreign materials such as serum and feeder cells.

  11. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in cultured middle ear epithelial cells of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, S; Hamamura, N; Hirakawa, K; Yajin, K

    1996-01-01

    Primary cultures of middle ear epithelium from the guinea pig were successfully established on type I collagen coated dishes. To characterize cellular outgrowth, antibodies to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen were used as a marker for spreading cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A number of migrating epithelial cells positively stained for proliferating cell nuclear antigen after 7 and 14 days in culture. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to evaluate the localization pattern of this antigen, and the fluorescence intensity was quantified in different areas of the migrating epithelial sheet after various times in culture. Two distinct areas proved to be major sites of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. One was at the edge of the tissue explants from which multilayered epithelial cells had begun to migrate. The other was along the margin of the outgrowth, where the cells often had elongated shapes and were aligned in rows. The cells in both areas were identified as nonciliated cells; ciliated cells in the outgrowth showed little staining. We hypothesized that the outgrowth cells in this experiment might be identical to the migrating cells usually observed in renewing epithelia after injury. This model may provide a simple and reproducible method of evaluating the regenerative ability of the middle ear epithelium.

  12. N-cadherin identifies human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells by in vitro stem cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong P T; Xiao, L; Deane, James A; Tan, Ker-Sin; Cousins, Fiona L; Masuda, Hirotaka; Sprung, Carl N; Rosamilia, Anna; Gargett, Caroline E

    2017-11-01

    Is there a specific surface marker that identifies human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells with adult stem cell activity using in vitro assays? N-cadherin isolates clonogenic, self-renewing human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells with high proliferative potential that differentiate into cytokeratin+ gland-like structures in vitro and identifies their location in some cells of gland profiles predominantly in basalis endometrium adjacent to the myometrium. Human endometrium contains a small population of clonogenic, self-renewing epithelial cells with high proliferative potential that differentiate into large gland-like structures, but their identity and location is unknown. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1) distinguishes the epithelium of basalis from functionalis and is a marker of human post-menopausal (Post-M) endometrial epithelium. Prospective observational study of endometrial epithelial cells obtained from hysterectomy samples taken from 50 pre-menopausal (Pre-M) and 24 Post-M women, of which 4 were from women who had taken daily estradiol valerate 2 mg/day for 8 weeks prior. Gene profiling was used to identify differentially expressed surface markers between fresh EpCAM (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule)-magnetic bead-selected basalis-like epithelial cells from Post-M endometrium compared with predominantly functionalis epithelial cells from Pre-M endometrium and validated by qRT-PCR. In vitro clonogenicity and self-renewal assays were used to assess the stem/progenitor cell properties of magnetic bead-sorted N-cadherin+ and N-cadherin- epithelial cells. The cellular identity, location and phenotype of N-cadherin+ cells was assessed by dual colour immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for cytokeratin, proliferative status (Ki-67), ERα, SSEA-1, SOX9 and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers on full thickness human endometrium. CDH2 (N-cadherin gene) was one of 11 surface molecules highly expressed in Post-M compared to

  13. Differential nephron HO-1 expression following glomerular epithelial cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Prasun K; Reddy, Sreenivas; Sharma, Mukut; Lianos, Elias A

    2006-01-01

    In proteinuria of glomerular origin there is upregulation of heme-oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme of heme degradation, in the nephron in a segment-specific manner. To better characterize this phenomenon, we employed a model of proteinuria resulting from disruption of the glomerular capillary permeability barrier to protein by administration of the glomerular epithelial cell toxin puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) to rats. In this model, we assessed nephron distribution of the expression of the inducible HO isoform, HO-1, and the role of free radicals in modulating HO-1 expression. Rats were injected with either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) or PAN or the spin trap free radical stabilizer alpha-phenyl-N-tert butyl nitrone (PBN), or with both PAN and PBN. Ten days following the PAN injection, urine protein, creatinine, nitric oxide (NO) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) were measured. Kidney sections and protein lysates were assessed for changes in HO-1 expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. In control animals (DMSO or PBN alone) there was no proteinuria and very weak or absent HO-1 staining in nephron segments. PAN treatment induced proteinuria and increased urine MDA excretion. In these animals, there was a robust HO-1 expression mainly in tubules and in glomerular parietal but not visceral epithelial cells. Unilateral ureteral obstruction to interrupt glomerular filtration in animals treated with PAN abrogated tubular HO-1 expression in the kidney ipsilateral to the obstruction. Administration of PBN to PAN-treated animals reduced proteinuria and MDA excretion while it markedly augmented tubular HO-1 expression. This augmentation was prominent in tubular cells of the inner cortex/outer medulla. These observations indicate that upregulation of nephron HO-1 following disruption of the glomerular permeability barrier occurs at sites downstream of this barrier and is mediated by a filtered HO-1 inducer(s). Scavenging of free radicals potentiates

  14. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  15. Effects of putrescine, cadaverine, spermine, spermidine and beta-phenylethylamine on cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusi, Eleonora; Baldi, Antonella; Cheli, Federica

    2008-01-01

    A bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME-UV1) and three-dimensional collagen primary bovine organoids were used to evaluate the effects of cadaverine, putrescine, spermine, spermicline and beta-phenylethylamine on mammary epithelial cells. Each biogenic amine was diluted in several concentratio...

  16. File list: ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX396750,SRX031066,SRX031214 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.50.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells mm9 All antigens Breast Mammary epithelia...SRX031066,SRX031214,SRX396750 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Brs.05.AllAg.Mammary_epithelial_cells.bed ...

  18. The effect of calprotectin on TSLP and IL-25 production from airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Kato

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: These results indicate that calprotectin enhances the allergen-induced Th2-type inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells via the secretion of TSLP and IL-25, and that calprotectin secreted by the epithelial cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of ECRS.

  19. the genetic and molecular basis of bacterial invasion of epithelial cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    HB101 the ability to invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells from S. typhi Ty2. At the end of their experiment three invasion-positive recombinant cosmids were isolated and restriction endonuclease analyses showed a 33-kilobase region of identity. Transmission electron microscopy of the epithelial cells invaded by ...

  20. Blue Light Induces Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Free Radical Production in Epithelial Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard F. Godley; Farrukh A. Shamsi; Fong-Qi Liang; Stuart G. Jarrett; Sallyanne Davies; Mike Boulton

    2005-01-01

    .... To test the hypothesis that blue light is toxic to non-pigmented epithelial cells, confluent cultures of human primary retinal epithelial cells were exposed to visible light (390–550 nm at 2.8 milliwatts/cm 2 ) for up to 6 h...

  1. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Yan [Jiangsu Centers for Diseases Prevention and Control, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qin, Jizheng [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China); Han, Xiaodong, E-mail: hanxd@nju.edu.cn [Immunology and Reproductive Biology Laboratory, Medical College of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  2. Human retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibit proliferation and IL2R expression of activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaestel, Charlotte G; Jørgensen, Annette; Nielsen, Mette

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells on activated T cells. Activated T cells were cocultured with adult and foetal human RPE cells whereafter apoptosis and proliferation were determined by flow cytometry and (3)H......-Thymidine incorporation assay, respectively. T cells and RPE cells were cultured directly together or in a transwell system for determination of the effect of cell contact. The importance of cell surface molecules was examined by application of a panel of blocking antibodies (CD2, CD18, CD40, CD40L, CD54, CD58...

  3. Effect of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu W

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhu,1,* Yan Wu,2,* Yi-Fang Meng,1 Jin-Yu Wang,1 Ming Xu,1 Jian-Jun Tao,1 Jiong Lu1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Changshu No 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The First People’s Hospital of Kunshan Affiliated with Jiangsu University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is now one of the leading causes of blindness in the elderly population. The antioxidative effects of curcumin on aging retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells are still unclear. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate the effects of curcumin on aging RPE cells. A pulsed H2O2 exposure aging model was adopted. Aging RPE cells were treated with curcumin 20 µM, 40 µM, and 80 µM. Apoptosis of RPE cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration was detected using a specific probe and apoptosis-associated proteins were detected by Western blot. Expression of oxidative biomarkers, including superoxide dismutase, maleic dialdehyde, and glutathione, was detected commercially available assay kits. Compared with normal cells, lower cell viability, higher apoptosis rates, and more severe oxidation status were identified in the aging RPE cell model. Curcumin improved cell viability and decreased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Further, curcumin had a significant influence on expression of apoptosis-associated proteins and oxidative stress biomarkers. In conclusion, treatment with curcumin was able to regulate proliferation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in aging RPE cells. Accordingly, application of curcumin may be a novel strategy to protect against age-related change in AMD. Keywords: curcumin, retinal pigment epithelium, apoptosis, age-related macular degeneration

  4. The scale of substratum topographic features modulates proliferation of corneal epithelial cells and corneal fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Liliensiek, S.J.; Campbell, S.; Nealey, P. F.; Murphy, C J

    2006-01-01

    The cornea is a complex tissue composed of different cell types, including corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes. Each of these cell types are directly exposed to rich nanoscale topography from the basement membrane or surrounding extracellular matrix. Nanoscale topography has been shown to influence cell behaviors, including orientation, alignment, differentiation, migration, and proliferation. We investigated whether proliferation of SV40-transformed human corneal epithelial cells (SV40-...

  5. Proteomic analysis of ovarian cancer cells during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) reveals mechanisms of cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Mariana Lopes; Palma, Camila de Souza; Thomé, Carolina Hassibe; Lanfredi, Guilherme Pauperio; Poersch, Aline; Faça, Vitor Marcel

    2017-01-16

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a well-orchestrated process that culminates with loss of epithelial phenotype and gain of a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. EMT enhances cancer cell invasiveness and drug resistance, favoring metastasis. Dysregulation of transcription factors, signaling pathways, miRNAs and growth factors including EGF, TGF-beta and HGF can trigger EMT. In ovarian cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior. Here, the ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line Caov-3 was induced to EMT with EGF in order to identify specific mechanisms controlled by this process. Caov-3 cells induced to EMT were thoroughly validated and a combination of subcellular proteome enrichment, GEL-LC-MS/MS and SILAC strategy allowed consistent proteome identification and quantitation. Protein network analysis of differentially expressed proteins highlighted regulation of metabolism and cell cycle. Activation of relevant signaling pathways, such as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/Erk MAPK, in response to EGF-induced EMT was validated. Also, EMT did not affected the proliferation rate of Caov-3 cells, but led to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase regulated by increased levels of p21Waf1/Cip1, independently of p53. Furthermore, a decrease in G1 and G2 checkpoint proteins was observed, supporting the involvement of EGF-induced EMT in cell cycle control. Cancer is a complex multistep process characterized by accumulation of several hallmarks including epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which promotes cellular and microenvironmental changes resulting in invasion and migration to distant sites, favoring metastasis. EMT can be triggered by different extracellular stimuli, including growth factors such as EGF. In ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, overexpression of the EGFR family is associated with more aggressive clinical behavior, increasing mortality rate caused by metastasis. Our proteomic data, together

  6. Gene expression correlations in human cancer cell lines define molecular interaction networks for epithelial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Kurt W; Zeeberg, Barry M; Reinhold, William C; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute's CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1); interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3); interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP); transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2); epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2); epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B); epithelial Ca(+2) signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY); terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2); maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3). The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets.

  7. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB

  8. Human amniotic epithelial cells express specific markers of nerve cells and migrate along the nerve fibers in the corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Hui, Guozhen; Lu, Yi; Liu, Tianjin; Huang, Qin; Guo, Lihe

    2012-01-05

    Human amniotic epithelial cells were isolated from a piece of fresh amnion. Using immunocytochemical methods, we investigated the expression of neuronal phenotypes (microtubule-associated protein-2, glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin) in human amniotic epithelial cells. The conditioned medium of human amniotic epithelial cells promoted the growth and proliferation of rat glial cells cultured in vitro, and this effect was dose-dependent. Human amniotic epithelial cells were further transplanted into the corpus striatum of healthy adult rats and the grafted cells could integrate with the host and migrate 1-2 mm along the nerve fibers in corpus callosum. Our experimental findings indicate that human amniotic epithelial cells may be a new kind of seed cells for use in neurograft.

  9. [TAK1 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of lens epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, N; Tang, X; Yuan, X Y; Song, H; Li, J

    2016-04-11

    Transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) is thought to play a key role in the initiation of Smad-independent TGF-β signaling. This study investigated the role of TAK1 in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) lens epithelial cells. TAK1 was overexpressed in the HLE B-3 cell line by transfecting TAK1-pcDNA3 and TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1)-pcDNA3 plasmids. The expression levels of TAK1, phospho-TAK1, E-cadherin, and fibronectin were detected by Western blot analysis and immunocytofluorescence to analyze the effects of overexpression. The levels of α-SMA and type I collagen were analyzed by real-time PCR. Quantitative data were analyzed by Student's t test or one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (multiple comparisons using LSD test). Western blot analysis showed in the TAK1-pcDNA3 plasmids group, expression of TAK1 proteins (1.00±0.03) with a maximum upregulation of approximately 80% at 24 h than it was in the control group (0.19±0.09)(t=8.02, P< 0.01); Western blot analysis showed in the TAB1-pcDNA3 plasmids group, expression of TAB1 proteins (1.00±0.02) with a maximum upregulation of approximately 78% at 24 h than it was in the control group (0.22±0.08)(t=7.63, P<0.01). The levels of E-cadherin/Beta-actin had significant differences among control, overexpression of TAK1 together with TAB1, overexpression of TAK1, and overexpression of TAB1 (1.00±0.02, 0.12±0.03, 0.98±0.09, 0.92±0.08;F=31.03, P<0.01). The levels of fibronectin/Beta-actin had significant differences among control, overexpression of TAK1 together with TAB1, overexpression of TAK1, and overexpression of TAB1 (0.11±0.03, 1.00±0.05, 0.16±0.04, 0.21±0.05;F=35.12, P<0.01). Overexpression of TAK1 with TAB1 resulted in upregulated expression of fibronectin, and downregulated expression of E-cadherin. The expression of E-cadherin was increased and the expression of fibronectin was decreased by TAK1 siRNA and TAK1 chemical inhibitors in the presence of TGF-β2. These data

  10. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  11. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  12. File list: ALL.Utr.05.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: ALL.Utr.50.AllAg.Fallopian_tube_secretory_epithelial_cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. Crystalline structure of pulverized dental calculus induces cell death in oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin, S M; Yoshimura, A; Montenegro Raudales, J L; Ozaki, Y; Higuchi, K; Ukai, T; Kaneko, T; Miyazaki, T; Latz, E; Hara, Y

    2017-11-20

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit attached to the tooth surface. We have shown that cellular uptake of dental calculus triggers nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation, leading to the processing of the interleukin-1β precursor into its mature form in mouse and human phagocytes. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome also induced a lytic form of programmed cell death, pyroptosis, in these cells. However, the effects of dental calculus on other cell types in periodontal tissue have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental calculus can induce cell death in oral epithelial cells. HSC-2 human oral squamous carcinoma cells, HOMK107 human primary oral epithelial cells and immortalized mouse macrophages were exposed to dental calculus or 1 of its components, hydroxyapatite crystals. For inhibition assays, the cells were exposed to dental calculus in the presence or absence of cytochalasin D (endocytosis inhibitor), z-YVAD-fmk (caspase-1 inhibitor) or glyburide (NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor). Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and staining with propidium iodide. Tumor necrosis factor-α production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral epithelial barrier function was examined by permeability assay. Dental calculus induced cell death in HSC-2 cells, as judged by LDH release and propidium iodide staining. Dental calculus also induced LDH release from HOMK107 cells. Following heat treatment, dental calculus lost its capacity to induce tumor necrosis factor-α in mouse macrophages, but could induce LDH release in HSC-2 cells, indicating a major role of inorganic components in cell death. Hydroxyapatite crystals also induced cell death in both HSC-2 and HOMK107 cells, as judged by LDH release, indicating the capacity of crystal particles to induce cell death. Cell death induced by dental

  16. In vitro culture characteristics of corneal epithelial, endothelial, and keratocyte cells in a native collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwin, E J; Hubel, A

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered collagen sponge as a substrate for the culture of human corneal cells. To that end, human kerotocyte, epithelial, and endothelial cells were cultured separately on collagen sponges composed of native fibrillar collagen with a pore size of approximately 0.1 mm. Co-culture experiments were also performed (epithelial/endothelial and epithelial/keratocyte cultures). Proliferation of keratocytes and matrix production was assessed. The morphology of the epithelial and endothelial cell cultures was characterized by histology and scanning electron microscopy. Keratocytes cultured on collagen sponges exhibited increased matrix synthesis over time as well as proliferation and repopulation of the matrix. Epithelial and endothelial cells showed the ability to migrate over the collagen sponge. The thickness of the epithelial layer was influenced by soluble factors produced by endothelial cells. The morphology of the bottom layer of epithelial cells was influenced by the presence of keratocytes in the culture. These studies indicate that human corneal cells exhibit normal cell phenotype when cultured individually on an engineered collagen sponge matrix and co-culture of different cell types in the cornea can influence cell behavior.

  17. Generation of corneal epithelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from human dermal fibroblast and corneal limbal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuhei Hayashi

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can be established from somatic cells. However, there is currently no established strategy to generate corneal epithelial cells from iPS cells. In this study, we investigated whether corneal epithelial cells could be differentiated from iPS cells. We tested 2 distinct sources: human adult dermal fibroblast (HDF-derived iPS cells (253G1 and human adult corneal limbal epithelial cells (HLEC-derived iPS cells (L1B41. We first established iPS cells from HLEC by introducing the Yamanaka 4 factors. Corneal epithelial cells were successfully induced from the iPS cells by the stromal cell-derived inducing activity (SDIA differentiation method, as Pax6(+/K12(+ corneal epithelial colonies were observed after prolonged differentiation culture (12 weeks or later in both the L1B41 and 253G1 iPS cells following retinal pigment epithelial and lens cell induction. Interestingly, the corneal epithelial differentiation efficiency was higher in L1B41 than in 253G1. DNA methylation analysis revealed that a small proportion of differentially methylated regions still existed between L1B41 and 253G1 iPS cells even though no significant difference in methylation status was detected in the specific corneal epithelium-related genes such as K12, K3, and Pax6. The present study is the first to demonstrate a strategy for corneal epithelial cell differentiation from human iPS cells, and further suggests that the epigenomic status is associated with the propensity of iPS cells to differentiate into corneal epithelial cells.

  18. The effect of hydroxybenzoate calcium compounds in inducing cell death in epithelial breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M Merghani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxybenzoate (HB compounds have shown their significance in inducing apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and cancer cell lines, including HT-1080. The current study focuses on assessing the effects of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxybenzoate calcium (HBCa compounds on MCF-10A, MDA-MB231 and MCF-7 epithelial breast cell lines. The HBCa-treated cells were examined using annexin V, to measure apoptosis in the three epithelial breast cell lines, after 48 h of treatment. The results indicated that 0.5 and 2.5 mmol/L of HBCa induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of cell death in normal MCF-10A cells was found to be significantly less (p = 0.0003–0.0068, in comparison to the malignant cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7. HBCa compounds were also found to cause cell cycle arrest in the epithelial breast cells at G1/G0. Furthermore, HBCa compounds induced the upregulation of apoptotic proteins (p53, p21, Bax and caspase-3, as well as the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, which may suggest that apoptosis is induced via the intrinsic pathway.

  19. Cytotoxic effects of curcumin in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margrit Hollborn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. CONCLUSION: It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as

  20. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  1. Static Stretch Induces Active Morphological Remodeling and Functional Impairment of Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ren, Yanhong; Zhan, Qingyuan; Hu, Qinghua; Sun, Bing; Yang, Chun; Wang, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Background: Static stretch is frequently observed in the lung. Both static stretch and cyclic stretch can induce cell death and Na /K -ATPase trafficking, but stretch-induced alveolar epithelial cell (AEC...

  2. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  3. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tacrolimus Modulates TGF-β Signaling to Induce Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bennett

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process which describes the trans-differentiation of epithelial cells into motile mesenchymal cells, is pivotal in stem cell behavior, development and wound healing, as well as contributing to disease processes including fibrosis and cancer progression. Maintenance immunosuppression with calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs has become routine management for renal transplant patient, but unfortunately the nephrotoxicity of these drugs has been well documented. HK-2 cells were exposed to Tacrolimus (FK506 and EMT markers were assessed by RT PCR and western blot. FK506 effects on TGF-β mRNA were assessed by RT PCR and TGF-β secretion was measured by ELISA. The impact of increased TGF-β secretion on Smad signaling pathways was investigated. The impact of inhibition of TGF-β signaling on EMT processes was assessed by scratch-wound assay. The results presented in this study suggest that FK506 initiates EMT processes in the HK-2 cell line, with altered expression of epithelial and myofibroblast markers evident. Additionally, the study demonstrates that FK506 activation of the TGF-β/ SMAD pathways is an essential step in the EMT process. Overall the results demonstrate that EMT is heavily involved in renal fibrosis associated with CNI nephrotoxicity.

  5. Proliferation of cultured mouse choroid plexus epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basam Z Barkho

    Full Text Available The choroid plexus (ChP epithelium is a multifunctional tissue found in the ventricles of the brain. The major function of the ChP epithelium is to produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF that bathes and nourishes the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to the CSF, ChP epithelial cells (CPECs produce and secrete numerous neurotrophic factors that support brain homeostasis, such as adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Accordingly, damage and dysfunction to CPECs are thought to accelerate and intensify multiple disease phenotypes, and CPEC regeneration would represent a potential therapeutic approach for these diseases. However, previous reports suggest that CPECs rarely divide, although this has not been extensively studied in response to extrinsic factors. Utilizing a cell-cycle reporter mouse line and live cell imaging, we identified scratch injury and the growth factors insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF as extrinsic cues that promote increased CPEC expansion in vitro. Furthermore, we found that IGF-1 and EGF treatment enhances scratch injury-induced proliferation. Finally, we established whole tissue explant cultures and observed that IGF-1 and EGF promote CPEC division within the intact ChP epithelium. We conclude that although CPECs normally have a slow turnover rate, they expand in response to external stimuli such as injury and/or growth factors, which provides a potential avenue for enhancing ChP function after brain injury or neurodegeneration.

  6. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  7. Metabolic detoxication pathways for sterigmatocystin in primary tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, Odile; Puel, Olivier; Botterel, Françoise; Pean, Michel; Khoufache, Khaled; Costa, Jean-Marc; Delaforge, Marcel; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-11-15

    Human health effects of inhaled mycotoxins remain poorly documented, despite the large amounts present in bioaerosols. Among these mycotoxins, sterigmatocystin is one of the most prevalent. Our aim was to study the metabolism and cellular consequences of sterigmatocystin once it is in contact with the airway epithelium. Metabolites were analyzed first in vitro, using recombinant P450 1A1, 1A2, 2A6, 2A13, and 3A4 enzymes, and subsequently in porcine tracheal epithelial cell (PTEC) primary cultures at an air-liquid interface. Expressed enzymes and PTECs were exposed to sterigmatocystin, uniformly enriched with (13)C to confirm the relationship between sterigmatocystin and metabolites. Induction of the expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes upon sterigmatocystin exposure was examined by real-time quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Incubation of 50 μM sterigmatocystin with recombinant P450 1A1 led to the formation of three metabolites: monohydroxy-sterigmatocystin (M1), dihydroxy-sterigmatocystin (M2), and one glutathione adduct (M3), the latter after the formation of a transient epoxide. Recombinant P450 1A2 also led to M1 and M3. P450 3A4 led to only M3. In PTEC, 1 μM sterigmatocystin metabolism resulted in a glucuro conjugate (M4) mainly excreted at the basal side of cells. If PTEC were treated with β-naphthoflavone prior to sterigmatocystin incubation, two other products were detected, i.e., a sulfo conjugate (M5) and a glucoro conjugate (M6) of hydroxy-sterigmatocystin. Exposure of PTEC for 24 h to 1 μM sterigmatocystin induced an 18-fold increase in the mRNA levels of P450 1A1, without significantly induced 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activity. These data suggest that sterigmatocystin is mainly detoxified and is unable to produce significant amounts of reactive epoxide metabolites in respiratory cells. However, sterigmatocystin increases the P450 1A1 mRNA levels with unknown long-term consequences. These in vitro results obtained in

  8. "Epithelial Cell TRPV1-Mediated Airway Sensitivity as a Mechanism for Respiratory Symptoms Associated with Gulf War Illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    with TRP activation-mediated synthesis of NGF leading to further sensitization of sensory afferents and epithelial cells suggests a mechanism by which......samples, we will use the bronchial epithelial cells for challenges with capsaicinoid ligand. The bronchial epithelial cells obtained from study subjects

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  17. Effects of Weaning on Intestinal Upper Villus Epithelial Cells of Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaocheng; Tan, Bie; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal upper villus epithelial cells represent the differentiated epithelial cells and play key role in digesting and absorbing lumenal nutrients. Weaning stress commonly results in a decrease in villus height and intestinal dysfunction in piglets. However, no study have been conducted to test the effects of weaning on the physiology and functions of upper villus epithelial cells. A total of 40 piglets from 8 litters were weaned at 14 days of age and one piglet from each litter was killed at 0 d (w0d), 1 d (w1d), 3 d (w3d), 5 d (w5d), and 7 d (w7d) after weaning, respectively. The upper villus epithelial cells in mid-jejunum were isolated using the distended intestinal sac method. The expression of proteins in upper villus epithelial cells was analyzed using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification or Western blotting. The expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, Golgi vesicle transport, protein amino acid glycosylation, secretion by cell, transmembrane transport, ion transport, nucleotide catabolic process, translational initiation, and epithelial cell differentiation and apoptosis, was mainly reduced during the post-weaning period, and these processes may be regulated by mTOR signaling pathway. These results indicated that weaning inhibited various cellular processes in jejunal upper villus epithelial cells, and provided potential new directions for exploring the effects of weaning on the functions of intestine and improving intestinal functions in weaning piglets. PMID:27022727

  18. Sequestration of human cytomegalovirus by human renal and mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twite, Nicolas [Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); Andrei, Graciela [Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven (Belgium); Kummert, Caroline [ImmuneHealth, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); Donner, Catherine [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Erasme Hospital, Route de Lennik 808, 1070 Brussels (Belgium); Perez-Morga, David [Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology, Institut de Biologie et Médecine Moléculaires, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); De Vos, Rita [Pathology Department, U.Z. Leuven, Minderbroedersstraat 12, Leuven (Belgium); Snoeck, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Snoeck@Rega.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, KU Leuven (Belgium); Marchant, Arnaud, E-mail: arnaud.marchant@ulb.ac.be [Institute for Medical Immunology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium); ImmuneHealth, Rue A. Bolland 8, B-6041 Charleroi (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Urine and breast milk represent the main routes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission but the contribution of renal and mammary epithelial cells to viral excretion remains unclear. We observed that kidney and mammary epithelial cells were permissive to HCMV infection and expressed immediate early, early and late antigens within 72 h of infection. During the first 24 h after infection, high titers of infectious virus were measured associated to the cells and in culture supernatants, independently of de novo synthesis of virus progeny. This phenomenon was not observed in HCMV-infected fibroblasts and suggested the sequestration and the release of HCMV by epithelial cells. This hypothesis was supported by confocal and electron microscopy analyses. The sequestration and progressive release of HCMV by kidney and mammary epithelial cells may play an important role in the excretion of the virus in urine and breast milk and may thereby contribute to HCMV transmission. - Highlights: • Primary renal and mammary epithelial cells are permissive to HCMV infection. • HCMV is sequestered by epithelial cells and this phenomenon does not require viral replication. • HCMV sequestration by epithelial cells is reduced by antibodies and IFN-γ.

  19. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jung Ar [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Sil [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang-Ho [Department of Pathology, Pochon CHA University, College of Medicine, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jung, E-mail: khj57@yuhs.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young Do, E-mail: ydy1130@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  20. Effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of murine cornea limbal epithelial progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Liu, Han-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of mouse corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Mouse corneal epithelial cells(MCEs) were cultured in normoxia (210mL/L O(2) and 50mL/L CO(2)) and hypoxia (20mL/L O(2) and 50mL/L CO(2)), respectively. Colony forming efficiency (CFE) and cell proliferation were determined. The expression of corneal epithelial progenitor cell marker p63 and K19 was investigated by immunostaining. Normoxic colonies were smaller compared with colonies formed in hypoxia. CFE was (12.50±1.50)% in hypoxic cultures, which was similar compared with normoxia cultures [(11.13±1.86)%, P>0.05)]. Cell proliferation was enhanced in hypoxia. Progenitor markers p63 and K19 were expressed in most cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Murine limbal epithelial progenitor cells can be efficiently expanded in hypoxic conditions.

  1. Contraction and elongation: Mechanics underlying cell boundary deformations in epithelial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yusuke

    2017-06-01

    The cell-cell boundaries of epithelial cells form cellular frameworks at the apical side of tissues. Deformations in these boundaries, for example, boundary contraction and elongation, and the associated forces form the mechanical basis of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In this review, using data from recent Drosophila studies on cell boundary contraction and elongation, I provide an overview of the mechanism underlying the bi-directional deformations in the epithelial cell boundary, that are sustained by biased accumulations of junctional and apico-medial non-muscle myosin II. Moreover, how the junctional tensions exist on cell boundaries in different boundary dynamics and morphologies are discussed. Finally, some future perspectives on how recent knowledge about single cell boundary-level mechanics will contribute to our understanding of epithelial tissue morphogenesis are discussed. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  3. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates intestinal epithelial cell morphology and polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxin Yu

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a vital role in regulating cell lineage differentiation during development and maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the intestine. In normal intestine, KLF4 is predominantly expressed in the differentiated epithelial cells. It has been identified as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. KLF4 knockout mice demonstrated a decrease in number of goblet cells in the colon, and conditional ablation of KLF4 from the intestinal epithelium led to altered epithelial homeostasis. However, the role of KLF4 in differentiated intestinal cells and colon cancer cells, as well as the mechanism by which it regulates homeostasis and represses tumorigenesis in the intestine is not well understood. In our study, KLF4 was partially depleted in the differentiated intestinal epithelial cells by a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase. We found a significant increase in the number of goblet cells in the KLF4-deleted small intestine, suggesting that KLF4 is not only required for goblet cell differentiation, but also required for maintaining goblet cell numbers through its function in inhibiting cell proliferation. The number and position of Paneth cells also changed. This is consistent with the KLF4 knockout study using villin-Cre [1]. Through immunohistochemistry (IHC staining and statistical analysis, we found that a stem cell and/or tuft cell marker, DCAMKL1, and a proliferation marker, Ki67, are affected by KLF4 depletion, while an enteroendocrine cell marker, neurotensin (NT, was not affected. In addition, we found KLF4 depletion altered the morphology and polarity of the intestinal epithelial cells. Using a three-dimensional (3D intestinal epithelial cyst formation assay, we found that KLF4 is essential for cell polarity and crypt-cyst formation in human colon cancer cells. These findings suggest that, as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, KLF4 affects intestinal epithelial cell

  4. Trichomonas vaginalis Contact-Dependent Cytolysis of Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Gila; Ryan, Christopher M.; Secor, W. Evan

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is an extracellular protozoan parasite that binds to the epithelium of the human urogenital tract during infection. In this study, we examined the propensities of 26 T. vaginalis strains to bind to and lyse prostate (BPH-1) and ectocervical (Ect1) epithelium and to lyse red blood cells (RBCs). We found that only three of the strains had a statistically significant preference for either BPH-1 (MSA1103) or Ect1 (LA1 and MSA1123). Overall, we observed that levels of adherence are highly variable among strains, with a 12-fold range of adherence on Ect1 cells and a 45-fold range on BPH-1 cells. Cytolysis levels displayed even greater variability, from no detectable cytolysis to 80% or 90% cytolysis of Ect1 and BPH-1, respectively. Levels of adherence and cytolysis correlate for weakly adherent/cytolytic strains, and a threshold of attachment was found to be necessary to trigger cytolysis; however, this threshold can be reached without inducing cytolysis. Furthermore, cytolysis was completely blocked when we prevented attachment of the parasites to host cells while allowing soluble factors complete access. We demonstrate that hemolysis was a rare trait, with only 4 of the 26 strains capable of lysing >20% RBCs with a 1:30 parasite/RBC ratio. Hemolysis also did not correlate with adherence to or cytolysis of either male (BPH-1)- or female (Ect1)-derived epithelial cell lines. Our results reveal that despite a broad range of pathogenic properties among different T. vaginalis strains, all strains show strict contact-dependent cytolysis. PMID:23429535

  5. Frequent gene dosage alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhkanen, Hanna; Anttila, Maarit; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Heinonen, Seppo; Juhola, Matti; Helisalmi, Seppo; Kataja, Vesa; Mannermaa, Arto

    2006-09-15

    Stromal cells are an active and integral part of epithelial neoplasms. We have previously observed allelic imbalance on chromosome 3p21 in both stromal and epithelial cells of ovarian tumors. This study was designed to explore gene dosage alterations throughout human chromosomes from stromal and epithelial cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Thirteen stromal and 24 epithelial samples, microdissected from epithelial ovarian carcinomas, were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique. Analysis covered 110 cancer related genes. Frequent genetic alterations were detected both in the stroma and epithelium of ovarian carcinomas. The mean number of altered genes per tumor was 10.8 in stroma and 23.6 in epithelium. In the stroma, the mean number of gains was 6.6 and of losses 4.2 and in the epithelium 13.7 and 9.9. The high number of changes associated with advanced tumor stage (p = 0.035) and death due to ovarian cancer (p = 0.032). The most frequent alteration was the deletion of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC) on chromosome 18q21.3 in 62% of samples. Loss of DCC was related to endometrioid subtype (p = 0.033). Large chromosomal aberrations were detected on the basis of alterations in adjacent genes. Most importantly, 38 genes showed similar genetic alterations (gain-gain or loss-loss) in stromal and epithelial compartments of 11 tumor pairs. Thus, frequent genetic alterations in stromal cells of epithelial ovarian carcinomas resembled those of malignant epithelial cells and may indicate a common precursor cell type. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may generate transformed cancer cells and modify the tumor microenvironment with distinct properties.

  6. Permissiveness of bovine epithelial cells from lung, intestine, placenta and udder for infection with Coxiella burnetii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Bonkowski, Katharina; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Germon, Pierre; Rainard, Pascal; Hambruch, Nina; Pfarrer, Christiane; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Menge, Christian

    2017-04-12

    Ruminants are the main source of human infections with the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella (C.) burnetii. Infected animals shed high numbers of C. burnetii by milk, feces, and birth products. In goats, shedding by the latter route coincides with C. burnetii replication in epithelial (trophoblast) cells of the placenta, which led us to hypothesize that epithelial cells are generally implicated in replication and shedding of C. burnetii. We therefore aimed at analyzing the interactions of C. burnetii with epithelial cells of the bovine host (1) at the entry site (lung epithelium) which govern host immune responses and (2) in epithelial cells of gut, udder and placenta decisive for the quantity of pathogen excretion. Epithelial cell lines [PS (udder), FKD-R 971 (small intestine), BCEC (maternal placenta), F3 (fetal placenta), BEL-26 (lung)] were inoculated with C. burnetii strains Nine Mile I (NMI) and NMII at different cultivation conditions. The cell lines exhibited different permissiveness for C. burnetii. While maintaining cell viability, udder cells allowed the highest replication rates with formation of large cell-filling Coxiella containing vacuoles. Intestinal cells showed an enhanced susceptibility to invasion but supported C. burnetii replication only at intermediate levels. Lung and placental cells also internalized the bacteria but in strikingly smaller numbers. In any of the epithelial cells, both Coxiella strains failed to trigger a substantial IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α response. Epithelial cells, with mammary epithelial cells in particular, may therefore serve as a niche for C. burnetii replication in vivo without alerting the host's immune response.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Transmigrates at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions, Exploiting Sites of Cell Division and Senescent Cell Extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve systemic infection, bacterial pathogens must overcome the critical and challenging step of transmigration across epithelial barriers. This is particularly true for opportunistic pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an agent which causes nosocomial infections. Despite extensive study, details on the mechanisms used by this bacterium to transmigrate across epithelial tissues, as well as the entry sites it uses, remain speculative. Here, using real-time microscopy and a model epithelial barrier, we show that P. aeruginosa employs a paracellular transmigration route, taking advantage of altered cell-cell junctions at sites of cell division or when senescent cells are expelled from the cell layer. Once a bacterium transmigrates, it is followed by a cohort of bacteria using the same entry point. The basal compartment is then invaded radially from the initial penetration site. Effective transmigration and propagation require type 4 pili, the type 3 secretion system (T3SS and a flagellum, although flagellum-deficient bacteria can occasionally invade the basal compartment from wounded areas. In the basal compartment, the bacteria inject the T3SS toxins into host cells, disrupting the cytoskeleton and focal contacts to allow their progression under the cells. Thus, P. aeruginosa exploits intrinsic host cell processes to breach the epithelium and invade the subcellular compartment.

  8. Supporting cells eliminate dying sensory hair cells to maintain epithelial integrity in the avian inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jonathan E; Daudet, Nicolas; Warchol, Mark E; Gale, Jonathan E

    2010-09-15

    Epithelial homeostasis is essential for sensory transduction in the auditory and vestibular organs of the inner ear, but how it is maintained during trauma is poorly understood. To examine potential repair mechanisms, we expressed β-actin-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the chick inner ear and used live-cell imaging to study how sensory epithelia responded during aminoglycoside-induced hair cell trauma. We found that glial-like supporting cells used two independent mechanisms to rapidly eliminate dying hair cells. Supporting cells assembled an actin cable at the luminal surface that extended around the pericuticular junction and constricted to excise the stereocilia bundle and cuticular plate from the hair cell soma. Hair bundle excision could occur within 3 min of actin-cable formation. After bundle excision, typically with a delay of up to 2-3 h, supporting cells engulfed and phagocytosed the remaining bundle-less hair cell. Dual-channel recordings with β-actin-EGFP and vital dyes revealed phagocytosis was concurrent with loss of hair cell integrity. We conclude that supporting cells repaired the epithelial barrier before hair cell plasmalemmal integrity was lost and that supporting cell activity was closely linked to hair cell death. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 did not prevent bundle excision but prolonged phagocytic engulfment and resulted in hair cell corpses accumulating within the epithelium. Our data show that supporting cells not only maintain epithelial integrity during trauma but suggest they may also be an integral part of the hair cell death process itself.

  9. [Construction of human mucosa oral epithelial cell lines overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase gene mediated by lentivirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Zeng; Xiaodong, Qin; Xiangyi, He; Chunxiao, Che; Xiao, Zhang; Siyu, Xie; Guijun, Sun; Lihe, Wang

    2016-10-01

    To construct a cell line of oral mucosa epithelial cells that stably express human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) by lentiviral vectors, approaches for the establishment of stable and efficient immortalized oral mucosa epithelial cell lines were explored. Whole RNA was extracted from 293T cells. The hTERT gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into the lentiviral vector as pLVX-puro-hTERT. The lentivirus particles were successfully packaged and used to infect primary oral epithelial cells. The positive cell clones were selected by puromycin. Finally, the expression of hTERT was examined by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The sequencing results confirmed the construction of the recombinant lentivirus pLVX-puro-hTERT. The morphology of infected cells was similar to that of normal oral mucosal epithelial cells, with a cobble stone-like appearance. The qRT-PCR and Western blot results showed that hTERT was overexpressed in infected cells compared with the normal group (Poral epithelial cell line with stable expression of hTERT was successfully established by the lentivirus, which provides an experimental basis for the establishment of a highly efficient and stable oral epithelial immortalized cell line.

  10. Renal epithelial cells produce and spread HIV-1 via T-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Maria; Balakumaran, Bala; Chen, Ping; Negri, Donatella R M; Cara, Andrea; Chen, Benjamin K; Klotman, Mary E

    2014-10-23

    Increasing evidence supports the role of the kidney as a reservoir for HIV-1. In-vitro co-cultivation of HIV-infected T cells with renal tubule epithelial (RTE) cells results in virus transfer to the latter, whereas cell-free virus infection is inefficient. We further characterized the fate of HIV-1 after it is internalized in renal epithelial cells. Primary or immortalized CD4 cells were infected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing replication competent HIV-1. HIV-1 transfer from T cells to RTE cells was carried out in a co-culture system and evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. HIV-1 integration in renal cells was evaluated by Alu-PCR and the production of infectious particles was assessed by p24-ELISA and TZM-bl assay. HIV-infected renal cells were used as donor cells in a co-culture system to evaluate their ability to transfer the virus back to T cells. Renal cells become productively infected by HIV-1 and multiple copies of HIV-1 can be transferred from infected T cells to renal cells. Two separate cell populations were identified among infected renal cells based on reporter gene GFP expression level (low vs. high), only the high showing sensitivity to azidothymidine and ritonavir. Co-cultivation of HIV-1-infected renal cells with noninfected T cells resulted in HIV-1 transmission to T cells, supporting bidirectional exchange of virus between T cells and kidney-derived cells. Persistent expression and generation of infectious virus in renal cells required HIV integration. These results support the kidney as a potential reservoir where virus is exchanged between interstitial T cells and RTE cells. 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  11. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Beerling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells may adapt transient and reversible states. Here, we have tested the existence and role of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in metastasis of mammary tumors without artificially modifying EMT regulators. In these tumors, we found by intravital microscopy that the motile tumor cells have undergone EMT, while their epithelial counterparts were not migratory. Moreover, we found that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity renders any EMT-induced stemness differences, as reported previously, irrelevant for metastatic outgrowth, because mesenchymal cells that arrive at secondary sites convert to the epithelial state within one or two divisions, thereby obtaining the same stem cell potential as their arrived epithelial counterparts. We conclude that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity supports migration but additionally eliminates stemness-enhanced metastatic outgrowth differences.

  12. Interaction of the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus with lung epithelial cells

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    Nir eOsherov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic environmental mold that can cause severe allergic responses in atopic individuals and poses a life-threatening risk for severely immunocompromised patients. Infection is caused by inhalation of fungal spores (conidia into the lungs. The initial point of contact between the fungus and the host is a monolayer of lung epithelial cells. Understanding how these cells react to fungal contact is crucial to elucidating the pathobiology of Aspergillus-related disease states. The experimental systems, both in vitro and in vivo, used to study these interactions, are described. Distinction is made between bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. The experimental findings suggest that lung epithelial cells are more than just innocent bystanders or a purely physical barrier against infection. They can be better described as an active extension of our innate immune system, operating as a surveillance mechanism that can specifically identify fungal spores and activate an offensive response to block infection. This response includes the internalization of adherent conidia and the release of cytokines, antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species. In the case of allergy, lung epithelial cells can dampen an over-reactive immune response by releasing anti-inflammatory compounds such as kinurenine. This review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the interaction of A. fumigatus with lung epithelial cells. A better understanding of the interactions between A. fumigatus and lung epithelial cells has therapeutic implications, as stimulation or inhibition of the epithelial response may alter disease outcome.

  13. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  14. Isolation and characterization of stromal progenitor cells from ascites of patients with epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Chih-Ming

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At least one-third of epithelial ovarian cancers are associated with the development of ascites containing heterogeneous cell populations, including tumor cells, inflammatory cells, and stromal elements. The components of ascites and their effects on the tumor cell microenvironment remain poorly understood. This study aimed to isolate and characterize stromal progenitor cells from the ascites of patients with epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma (EOA. Methods Seventeen ascitic fluid samples and 7 fresh tissue samples were collected from 16 patients with EOA. The ascites samples were then cultured in vitro in varying conditions. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were used to isolate and characterize 2 cell populations with different morphologies (epithelial type and mesenchymal type deriving from the ascites samples. The in vitro cell culture model was established using conditional culture medium. Results The doubling times of the epithelial type and mesenchymal type cells were 36 h and 48 h, respectively, indicating faster growth of the epithelial type cells compared to the mesenchymal type cells. Cultured in vitro, these ascitic cells displayed the potential for self-renewal and long-term proliferation, and expressed the typical cancer stem/progenitor cell markers CD44high, CD24low, and AC133+. These cells also demonstrated high BMP-2, BMP4, TGF-β, Rex-1, and AC133 early gene expression, and expressed EGFR, integrin α2β1, CD146, and Flt-4, which are highly associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. The epithelial type cells demonstrated higher cytokeratin 18 and E-cadherin expression than the mesenchymal type cells. The mesenchymal type cells, in contrast, demonstrated higher AC133, CD73, CD105, CD117, EGFR, integrin α2β1, and CD146 surface marker expression than the epithelial type cells. Conclusion The established culture system provides an in vitro model for the selection of drugs that target cancer

  15. Isolation and characterization of stromal progenitor cells from ascites of patients with epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chih-Ming; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Hsiao, Chih-Chiang; Chien, Tsai-Yen; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2012-02-14

    At least one-third of epithelial ovarian cancers are associated with the development of ascites containing heterogeneous cell populations, including tumor cells, inflammatory cells, and stromal elements. The components of ascites and their effects on the tumor cell microenvironment remain poorly understood. This study aimed to isolate and characterize stromal progenitor cells from the ascites of patients with epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma (EOA). Seventeen ascitic fluid samples and 7 fresh tissue samples were collected from 16 patients with EOA. The ascites samples were then cultured in vitro in varying conditions. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were used to isolate and characterize 2 cell populations with different morphologies (epithelial type and mesenchymal type) deriving from the ascites samples. The in vitro cell culture model was established using conditional culture medium. The doubling times of the epithelial type and mesenchymal type cells were 36 h and 48 h, respectively, indicating faster growth of the epithelial type cells compared to the mesenchymal type cells. Cultured in vitro, these ascitic cells displayed the potential for self-renewal and long-term proliferation, and expressed the typical cancer stem/progenitor cell markers CD44(high), CD24(low), and AC133(+). These cells also demonstrated high BMP-2, BMP4, TGF-β, Rex-1, and AC133 early gene expression, and expressed EGFR, integrin α2β1, CD146, and Flt-4, which are highly associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. The epithelial type cells demonstrated higher cytokeratin 18 and E-cadherin expression than the mesenchymal type cells. The mesenchymal type cells, in contrast, demonstrated higher AC133, CD73, CD105, CD117, EGFR, integrin α2β1, and CD146 surface marker expression than the epithelial type cells. The established culture system provides an in vitro model for the selection of drugs that target cancer-associated stromal progenitor cells, and for the development of ovarian

  16. STAT3 in Epithelial Cells Regulates Inflammation and Tumor Progression to Malignant State in Colon

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    Andrew V. Nguyen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is an important risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer; however, the mechanism of tumorigenesis especially tumor progression to malignancy in the inflamed colon is still unclear. Our study shows that epithelial signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, persistently activated in inflamed colon, is not required for inflammation-induced epithelial overproliferation and the development of early-stage tumors; however, it is essential for tumor progression to advanced malignancy. We found that one of the mechanisms that epithelial STAT3 regulates in tumor progression might be to modify leukocytic infiltration in the large intestine. Activation of epithelial STAT3 promotes the infiltration of the CD8+ lymphocyte population but inhibits the recruitment of regulatory T (Treg lymphocytes. The loss of Stat3 in epithelial cells promoted the expression of cytokines/chemokines including CCL19, CCL28, and RANTES, which are known to be able to recruit Treg lymphocytes. Linked to these changes was the pathway mediated by sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate kinases, which is activated in colonic epithelial cells in inflamed colon with functional STAT3 but not in epithelial cells deleted of STAT3. Our data suggest that epithelial STAT3 plays a critical role in inflammation-induced tumor progression through regulation of leukocytic recruitment especially the infiltration of Treg cells in the large intestine.

  17. Stem Cell Factor Expression after Renal Ischemia Promotes Tubular Epithelial Survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, Geurt; Stroo, Ingrid; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Weening, Jan J.; Leemans, Jaklien C.; Florquin, Sandrine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia leads to apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells and results in decreased renal function. Tissue repair involves re-epithelialization of the tubular basement membrane. Survival of the tubular epithelium following ischemia is therefore important in the successful regeneration

  18. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE EPITHELIAL CELLS AND SAPROPHYTES IN SPUTUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, M

    1917-02-01

    1. Microscopical examination of sputum that has been washed with isotonic salt solution indicates its source. Sputum from above the vocal cords contains polygonal flat epithelial cells and numerous species of non-pathogenic microorganisms. Sputum from below the cords is clear of saprophytes, although it sometimes contains bronchoalveolar cuboidal cells. 2. The source of the sputum can be determined by the erythrocytes and the bacilli that are contained in it, and the site of the lesion can also be ascertained. 3. In every instance I found erythrocytes in the pulmonary sputum after severe pulmonary hemorrhage. 4. Six of the cases of laryngeal affection referred to in the presentpaper had had no subjective symptoms, but microscopical examination showed tubercle bacilli in the laryngeal sputum. All the six cases were examined by Dr. Tanaka and were found to have tuberculous lesions in the larynx. In the laryngeal sputum of most cases of laryngeal tuberculosis with symptoms, tubercle bacilli have been frequently demonstrated, while in some cases contaminated laryngeal sputum was obtained only after a long series of examinations. 5. Microscopical examination of the sputum plays a significant part in the diagnosis of tuberculosis.

  19. Graphene-induced apoptosis in lung epithelial cells through EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Ming; Bangalore, Preeti; Chen, Eric Y.; Lu, David; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Suh, Andrew; Gehring, Matthew; Cangco, John P.; Garcia, Santiago G.; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2017-07-01

    Expanding interest in nanotechnology applied to electronic and biomedical fields has led to fast-growing development of various nanomaterials. Graphene is a single-atom thick, two-dimensional sheet of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms with unique physical and chemical properties. Recently, graphene has been used in many studies on electronics, photonics, composite materials, energy generation and storage, sensors, and biomedicine. However, the current health risk assessment for graphene has been relatively limited and inconclusive. This study evaluated the toxicity effects of graphene on the airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, which represents the first barrier of the human body to interact with airborne graphene particles. Our result showed that graphene can induce the cellular Ca2+ by phospholipase C (PLC) associated pathway by activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Subsequently, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptors activate the release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ stores. Those Ca2+ signals further trigger the calcium-regulated apoptosis in the cell. Furthermore, the stimulation can cause EGFR upregulation, which have been demonstrated to associate with diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cardiovascular diseases. This study highlights the additional health risk considering that it can function as a contributing factor for other respiratory diseases.

  20. Thymic Epithelial Cell Development and Its Dysfunction in Human Diseases

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    Lina Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are the key components in thymic microenvironment for T cells development. TECs, composed of cortical and medullary TECs, are derived from a common bipotent progenitor and undergo a stepwise development controlled by multiple levels of signals to be functionally mature for supporting thymocyte development. Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR family members including the receptor activator for NFκB (RANK, CD40, and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR cooperatively control the thymic medullary microenvironment and self-tolerance establishment. In addition, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, Wnt, and Notch signals are essential for establishment of functional thymic microenvironment. Transcription factors Foxn1 and autoimmune regulator (Aire are powerful modulators of TEC development, differentiation, and self-tolerance. Dysfunction in thymic microenvironment including defects of TEC and thymocyte development would cause physiological disorders such as tumor, infectious diseases, and autoimmune diseases. In the present review, we will summarize our current understanding on TEC development and the underlying molecular signals pathways and the involvement of thymus dysfunction in human diseases.

  1. Nanoceria have no genotoxic effect on human lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierscionek, Barbara K; Yasseen, Akeel A [School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine, BT52 1SA (United Kingdom); Li, Yuebin; Schachar, Ronald A; Chen, Wei [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States); Colhoun, Liza M, E-mail: b.pierscionek@ulster.ac.uk, E-mail: weichen@uta.edu [Centre for Vision and Vascular Sciences, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Grosvenor Road, Belfast, BT12 6BA (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-22

    There are no treatments for reversing or halting cataract, a disease of the structural proteins in the eye lens, that has associations with other age-related degenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of cataract and associated conditions is increasing as the average age of the population rises. Protein folding diseases are difficult to assess in vivo as proteins and their age-related changes are assessed after extraction. Nanotechnology can be used to investigate protein changes in the intact lens as well as for a potential means of drug delivery. Nanoparticles, such as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) which have antioxidant properties, may even be used as a means of treating cataract directly. Prior to use in treatments, nanoparticle genotoxicity must be tested to assess the extent of any DNA or chromosomal damage. Sister chromatid exchanges were measured and DNA damage investigated using the alkaline COMET assay on cultured human lens epithelial cells, exposed to 5 and 10 {mu}g ml{sup -1} of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nanoceria). Nanoceria at these dosages did not cause any DNA damage or significant increases in the number of sister chromatid exchanges. The absence of genotoxic effects on lens cells suggests that nanoceria, in the doses and exposures tested in this study, are not deleterious to the eye lens and have the potential for use in studying structural alterations, in developing non-surgical cataract treatments and in investigating other protein folding diseases.

  2. Hakai reduces cell-substratum adhesion and increases epithelial cell invasion

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    Rodríguez-Rigueiro Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamic regulation of cell-cell adhesions is crucial for developmental processes, including tissue formation, differentiation and motility. Adherens junctions are important components of the junctional complex between cells and are necessary for maintaining cell homeostasis and normal tissue architecture. E-cadherin is the prototype and best-characterized protein member of adherens junctions in mammalian epithelial cells. Regarded as a tumour suppressor, E-cadherin loss is associated with poor prognosis in carcinoma. The E3 ubiquitin-ligase Hakai was the first reported posttranslational regulator of the E-cadherin complex. Hakai specifically targetted E-cadherin for internalization and degradation and thereby lowered epithelial cell-cell contact. Hakai was also implicated in controlling proliferation, and promoted cancer-related gene expression by increasing the binding of RNA-binding protein PSF to RNAs encoding oncogenic proteins. We sought to investigate the possible implication of Hakai in cell-substratum adhesions and invasion in epithelial cells. Methods Parental MDCK cells and MDCK cells stably overexpressing Hakai were used to analyse cell-substratum adhesion and invasion capabilities. Western blot and immunofluoresecence analyses were performed to assess the roles of Paxillin, FAK and Vinculin in cell-substratum adhesion. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-substratum adhesion was studied using two proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin and MG132. To study the molecular mechanisms controlling Paxillin expression, MDCK cells expressing E-cadherin shRNA in a tetracycline-inducible manner was employed. Results Here, we present evidence that implicate Hakai in reducing cell-substratum adhesion and increasing epithelial cell invasion, two hallmark features of cancer progression and metastasis. Paxillin, an important protein component of the cell-matrix adhesion, was completely absent from focal adhesions and

  3. Phenotypic analyses of limbal epithelial cell cultures derived from donor corneoscleral rims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Z; Apel, A J; Harkin, D G

    2001-06-01

    Grafted cultures of limbal epithelial cells aid repair of the corneal epithelium, but their phenotype is unclear. In this study, the phenotype of cultures that were similar in age to those used clinically were analysed. Limbal epithelial cells were isolated from donor corneoscleral rims and grown in various media, including those designed for keratinocytes. Successful cultures in each medium developed predominantly small (10 microm) tightly packed cells. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting revealed expression of keratins 3, 14 and 19. Expression of these keratins in situ was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Basal limbal epithelial cells were positive for keratins 14 and 19, and suprabasal cells were positive for keratin 3. However intense staining for keratin 14 was also observed at the inner cut edge of corneoscleral rims. These findings demonstrate the potential importance of keratins 14 and 19 as markers of epithelial cell differentiation in the human cornea.

  4. Generation of Alveolar Epithelial Spheroids via Isolated Progenitor Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Shimpei Gotoh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No methods for isolating induced alveolar epithelial progenitor cells (AEPCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have been reported. Based on a study of the stepwise induction of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs, we identified carboxypeptidase M (CPM as a surface marker of NKX2-1+ “ventralized” anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs in vitro and in fetal human and murine lungs. Using SFTPC-GFP reporter hPSCs and a 3D coculture system with fetal human lung fibroblasts, we showed that CPM+ cells isolated from VAFECs differentiate into AECs, demonstrating that CPM is a marker of AEPCs. Moreover, 3D coculture differentiation of CPM+ cells formed spheroids with lamellar-body-like structures and an increased expression of surfactant proteins compared with 2D differentiation. Methods to induce and isolate AEPCs using CPM and consequently generate alveolar epithelial spheroids would aid human pulmonary disease modeling and regenerative medicine.

  5. Polar release of pathogenic Old World hantaviruses from renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautkrämer, Ellen; Lehmann, Maik J; Bollinger, Vanessa; Zeier, Martin

    2012-11-30

    Epithelio- and endotheliotropic viruses often exert polarized entry and release that may be responsible for viral spread and dissemination. Hantaviruses, mostly rodent-borne members of the Bunyaviridae family infect epithelial and endothelial cells of different organs leading to organ dysfunction or even failure. Endothelial and renal epithelial cells belong to the target cells of Old World hantavirus. Therefore, we examined the release of hantaviruses in several renal epithelial cell culture models. We used Vero cells that are commonly used in hantavirus studies and primary human renal epithelial cells (HREpC). In addition, we analyzed MDCKII cells, an epithelial cell line of a dog kidney, which represents a widely accepted in vitro model of polarized monolayers for their permissiveness for hantavirus infection. Vero C1008 and primary HREpCs were grown on porous-support filter inserts for polarization. Monolayers were infected with hantavirus Hantaan (HTNV) and Puumala (PUUV) virus. Supernatants from the apical and basolateral chamber of infected cells were analyzed for the presence of infectious particles by re-infection of Vero cells. Viral antigen and infectious particles of HTNV and PUUV were exclusively detected in supernatants collected from the apical chamber of infected Vero C1008 cells and HREpCs. MDCKII cells were permissive for hantavirus infection and polarized MDCKII cells released infectious hantaviral particles from the apical surface corresponding to the results of Vero and primary human epithelial cells. Pathogenic Old World hantaviruses are released from the apical surface of different polarized renal epithelial cells. We characterized MDCKII cells as a suitable polarized cell culture model for hantavirus infection studies.

  6. Polar release of pathogenic Old World hantaviruses from renal tubular epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krautkrämer Ellen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelio- and endotheliotropic viruses often exert polarized entry and release that may be responsible for viral spread and dissemination. Hantaviruses, mostly rodent-borne members of the Bunyaviridae family infect epithelial and endothelial cells of different organs leading to organ dysfunction or even failure. Endothelial and renal epithelial cells belong to the target cells of Old World hantavirus. Therefore, we examined the release of hantaviruses in several renal epithelial cell culture models. We used Vero cells that are commonly used in hantavirus studies and primary human renal epithelial cells (HREpC. In addition, we analyzed MDCKII cells, an epithelial cell line of a dog kidney, which represents a widely accepted in vitro model of polarized monolayers for their permissiveness for hantavirus infection. Results Vero C1008 and primary HREpCs were grown on porous-support filter inserts for polarization. Monolayers were infected with hantavirus Hantaan (HTNV and Puumala (PUUV virus. Supernatants from the apical and basolateral chamber of infected cells were analyzed for the presence of infectious particles by re-infection of Vero cells. Viral antigen and infectious particles of HTNV and PUUV were exclusively detected in supernatants collected from the apical chamber of infected Vero C1008 cells and HREpCs. MDCKII cells were permissive for hantavirus infection and polarized MDCKII cells released infectious hantaviral particles from the apical surface corresponding to the results of Vero and primary human epithelial cells. Conclusions Pathogenic Old World hantaviruses are released from the apical surface of different polarized renal epithelial cells. We characterized MDCKII cells as a suitable polarized cell culture model for hantavirus infection studies.

  7. Human amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-gang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and functional reconstruction after central nervous system injury is a major medical and social challenge. An increasing number of researchers are attempting to use neural stem cells combined with artificial scaffold materials, such as fibroin, for nerve repair. However, such approaches are challenged by ethical and practical issues. Amniotic tissue, a clinical waste product, is abundant, and amniotic epithelial cells are pluripotent, have low immunogenicity, and are not the subject of ethical debate. We hypothesized that amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffolds would be conducive to the repair of spinal cord injury. To test this, we isolated and cultured amniotic epithelial cells, and constructed complexes of these cells and silk fibroin scaffolds. Implantation of the cell-scaffold complex into a rat model of spinal cord injury resulted in a smaller glial scar in the damaged cord tissue than in model rats that received a blank scaffold, or amniotic epithelial cells alone. In addition to a milder local immunological reaction, the rats showed less inflammatory cell infiltration at the transplant site, milder host-versus-graft reaction, and a marked improvement in motor function. These findings confirm that the transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells combined with silk fibroin scaffold can promote the repair of spinal cord injury. Silk fibroin scaffold can provide a good nerve regeneration microenvironment for amniotic epithelial cells.

  8. A novel method for isolation of epithelial cells from ovine esophagus for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheiner, Tanja; Kuess, Anna; Dye, Julian; Saxena, Amulya K

    2014-01-01

    The yield of a critical number of basal epithelial cells with high mitotic rates from native tissue is a challenge in the field of tissue engineering. There are many protocols that use enzymatic methods for isolation of epithelial cells with unsatisfactory results for tissue engineering. This study aimed to develop a protocol for isolating a sufficient number of epithelial cells with a high Proliferating Index from ovine esophagus for tissue engineering applications. Esophageal mucosa was pretreated with dispase-collagenase solution and plated on collagen-coated culture dishes. Distinction of the various types of epithelial cells and developmental stages was done with specific primary antibodies to Cytokeratins and to Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). Up to approximately 8100 epithelial cells/mm2 of mucosa tissue were found after one week of migration. Cytokeratin 14 (CK 14) was positive identified in cells even after 83 days. At the same time the Proliferating Index was 71%. Our protocol for isolation of basal epithelial cells was successful to yield sufficient numbers of cells predominantly with proliferative character and without noteworthy negative enzymatic affection. The results at this study offer the possibility of generation critical cell numbers for tissue engineering applications.

  9. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-01-27

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients.

  10. Effects of matrix stiffness on epithelial to mesenchymal transition-like processes of endometrial epithelial cells: Implications for the pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Darcha, Claude; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Canis, Michel

    2017-03-17

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial glands and stroma within extrauterine sites. Our previous study revealed an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like process in red peritoneal endometriosis, whereas membrane localization of E-cadherin was well maintained in epithelial cells of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Here we show that endometrial epithelial cells (EEE) grown on polyacrylamide gel substrates (PGS) of 2 kilopascal (kPa), a soft matrix, initiate a partial EMT-like process with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) stimulation. Increasing matrix stiffness with TGF-β1 stimulation reduced the number of cell-cell contacts. Cells that retained cell-cell contacts showed decreased expression of E-cadherin and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) to cell-cell junctions. Few deep endometriotic epithelial cells (DEE) grown on 30-kPa PGS, which may mimic in vivo tissue compliance of DIE, retained localization of E-cadherin to cell-cell junctions with TGF-β1 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis showed no phosphorylated Smad 2/3 nuclear localization in E-cadherin+ epithelial cells of DIE. We hypothesize that EEE may undergo an EMT-like process after attachment of endometrium to peritoneum in a TGF-β1-rich microenvironment. However, TGF-β1 signaling may be absent in DIE, resulting in a more epithelial cell-like phenotype in a rigid microenvironment.

  11. MAIT cells detect and efficiently lyse bacterially-infected epithelial cells.

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    Lionel Le Bourhis

    Full Text Available Mucosal associated invariant T cells (MAIT are innate T lymphocytes that detect a large variety of bacteria and yeasts. This recognition depends on the detection of microbial compounds presented by the evolutionarily conserved major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC class I molecule, MR1. Here we show that MAIT cells display cytotoxic activity towards MR1 overexpressing non-hematopoietic cells cocultured with bacteria. The NK receptor, CD161, highly expressed by MAIT cells, modulated the cytokine but not the cytotoxic response triggered by bacteria infected cells. MAIT cells are also activated by and kill epithelial cells expressing endogenous levels of MRI after infection with the invasive bacteria Shigella flexneri. In contrast, MAIT cells were not activated by epithelial cells infected by Salmonella enterica Typhimurium. Finally, MAIT cells are activated in human volunteers receiving an attenuated strain of Shigella dysenteriae-1 tested as a potential vaccine. Thus, in humans, MAIT cells are the most abundant T cell subset able to detect and kill bacteria infected cells.

  12. MUC-1-/ESA+ progenitor cells in normal, benign and malignant human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xinquan; Li, Huixiang; Xu, Kejia; Nesland, Jahn M; Suo, Zhenhe

    2009-11-01

    The existence of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells has been demonstrated in MUC-1-/ESA+ subpopulations of breast epithelial cells. However, knowledge about the expression and localization in benign and malignant breast lesions is unknown. Using a double-staining immunohistochemistry method, we investigated MUC-1-/ESA+ cells in 10 normal breast tissues, 49 cases with fibrocystic disease, 40 fibroadenomas, 36 invasive ductal carcinomas and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468. In normal breast tissues MUC-1-/ESA+ cells were mainly found in the suprabasal layer, but under the apical surface of the duct/alveolus. In the hyperplastic areas of fibrocystic disease, the number of this subpopulation of cells was higher than that in hypoplastic areas and in fibroadenomas. In invasive ductal carcinoma, the MMUC-1-/ESA+ cells were heterogeneously present in different carcinoma nests. In the MCF-7 cell line most cells were MUC-1-/ESA+, and in the MDA-MB-468 cell line MUC-1-/ESA+ cells and MUC-1-/ESA+ cells were almost equal. Our results show that the MUC-1-/ESA+ subpopulation increases in fibrocystic disease within the hyperplastic areas, and varies in benign and malignant breast tumours, indicating that breast carcinogenesis may develop from malignant changes of normal MUC-1-/ESA+ cells.

  13. Modeling nanoparticle–alveolar epithelial cell interactions under breathing conditions using captive bubble surfactometry

    OpenAIRE

    Schürch, David; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Clift, Martin J D; Raemy, David; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Gehr, Peter; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Many advances have been made in recent years in cell culture models of the epithelial barrier of the lung from simple monolayers to complex 3-D systems employing different cell types. However, the vast majority of these models still present a static air–liquid interface which is unrealistic given the dynamic nature of breathing. We present here a method where epithelial lung cells are integrated into a system, the captive bubble surfactometer, which allows the cyclical compression and expansi...

  14. Cigarette Smoke Decreases Innate Responses of Epithelial Cells to Rhinovirus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Eddleston, Jane; Lee, Rachel U.; Doerner, Astrid M; Herschbach, Jack; Zuraw, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is associated with a significant increase in the risk for respiratory viral infections. The airway epithelium is the primary target for both cigarette smoke and respiratory viral infection. We investigated the effects of cigarette smoke on the response of airway epithelial cells to rhinovirus infection. We found that pre-exposure of BEAS-2B cells or primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEs) to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) reduced the induction of mRN...

  15. Transcriptomic response of goat mammary epithelial cells to Mycoplasma agalactiae challenge – a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogorevc, Jernej; Mihevc, Sonja Prpar; Hedegaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma agalactiae (Ma) is one of the main aetiological agents of intramammary infections in small ruminants, causing contagious agalactia. To better understand the underlying disease patterns a primary goat mammary epithelial cell (pgMEC) culture was established from the mammary tissue......, steroid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis signalling, transcription regulation, and cell cycle regulation. Based on the results we suggest that mammary epithelial cells in vivo contribute to the immune system by the induced expression of cytokines and other chemotactic agents, activation...

  16. Choroid plexus epithelial monolayers ? a cell culture model from porcine brain

    OpenAIRE

    Reichel Valeska; Baehr Carsten; Fricker Gert

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The goal of the present study was to develop an in vitro choroid plexus (CP) epithelial cell culture model for studying transport of protein-mediated drug secretion from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and vice versa. Methods Cells were isolated by mechanical and enzymatic treatment of freshly isolated porcine plexus tissue. Epithelial cell monolayers were grown and CSF secretion and transepithelial resistance were determined. The expression of f-actin as well as the ch...

  17. Growth of normal mouse vaginal epithelial cells in and on collagen gels.

    OpenAIRE

    Iguchi, T.; Uchima, F D; Ostrander, P L; Bern, H A

    1983-01-01

    Sustained growth in primary culture of vaginal epithelial cells from ovariectomized adult BALB/cCrgl mice embedded within or seeded on collagen gel matrix was achieved in a serum-free medium composed of Ham's F-12 medium/Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, 1:1 (vol/vol), supplemented with insulin, bovine serum albumin fraction V, epidermal growth factor, cholera toxin, and transferrin. Three-dimensional growth of vaginal epithelial cells occurred inside the collagen gel matrix. Cell numbers i...

  18. Trafficking of chlamydial antigens to the endoplasmic reticulum of infected epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, David K.; Wyrick, Priscilla B.

    2008-01-01

    Confinement of the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis to a membrane-bound vacuole, termed an inclusion, within infected epithelial cells neither prevents secretion of chlamydial antigens into the host cytosol nor protects chlamydiae from innate immune detection. However, the details leading to chlamydial antigen presentation are not clear. By immunoelectron microscopy of infected endometrial epithelial cells and in isolated cell secretory compartments, chlamydial major out...

  19. Snail involves in the transforming growth factor β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition of retinal pigment epithelial cells.

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    Hui Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The proliferation of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells resulting from an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT plays a key role in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, which leads to complex retinal detachment and the loss of vision. Genes of Snail family encode the zinc finger transcription factors that have been reported to be essential in EMT during embryonic development and cancer metastasis. However, the function of Snail in RPE cells undergoing EMT is largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transforming growth factor beta(TGF-β-1 resulted in EMT in human RPE cells (ARPE-19, which was characterized by the expected decrease in E-cadherin and Zona occludin-1(ZO-1 expression, and the increase in fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression, as well as the associated increase of Snail expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, TGF-β1 treatment caused a significant change in ARPE-19 cells morphology, with transition from a typical epithelial morphology to mesenchymal spindle-shaped. More interestingly, Snail silencing significantly attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT in ARPE-19 cells by decreasing the mesenchymal markers fibronectin and a-SMA and increasing the epithelial marker E-cadherin and ZO-1. Snail knockdown could effectively suppress ARPE-19 cell migration. Finally, Snail was activated in epiretinal membranes from PVR patients. Taken together, Snail plays very important roles in TGF-β-1-induced EMT in human RPE cells and may contribute to the development of PVR. SIGNIFICANCE: Snail transcription factor plays a critical role in TGF-β1-induced EMT in human RPE cells, which provides deep insight into the pathogenesis of human PVR disease. The specific inhibition of Snail may provide a new approach to treat and prevent PVR.

  20. Propolis inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human alveolar epithelial cells via PPARγ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hui-Fang; Chang-Chien, Pei-Wen; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Wang, Jiu-Yao

    2013-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) may contribute to airway remodeling in severe asthma and fibrotic lung diseases. Studies have shown that extracts from propolis protect chemical-induced cardiac and liver fibrosis in animals. This study assesses the inhibitory effect of propolis on TGF-β1-induced EMT in serum-deprived A549 cells (human AECs). Experimental results show progressive cell morphological changes, decreased E-cadherin, increased N-cadherin production, intracellular F-actin rearrangement, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and increased cell motility with increasing TGF-β1 concentration. A549 cells pretreated with propolis and then treated with TGF-β1 for 24 h regained epithelial cell morphology, decreased the production of N-cadherin and ROS, and had reduced motility. Propolis prevents the effects of TGF-β1-induced Smad2 and AKT activation pathways and Snail expression. Moreover, propolis pretreatment may prevent the TGF-β1-induced down-regulation of nuclear hormone receptors and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) protein in A549 cells, whose effect was blocked by adding PPARγ antagonist, GW9662. Two active components of propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and pinocembrin (PIN), only had partial effects on TGF-β1-induced EMT in A549 cells. The results of this study suggest that natural propolis extracts may prevent TGF-β1-induced EMT in immortalized type II AECs via multiple inhibitory pathways, which may be clinically applied in the prevention and/or treatment of EMT-related fibrotic diseases as well as airway remodeling in chronic asthma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Helicobacter pylori induces cell migration and invasion through casein kinase 2 in gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeo Song; Lee, Do Yeon; Yu, Da Yeon; Kim, Shin; Lee, Yong Chan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is causally linked with gastric carcinogenesis. Virulent H. pylori strains deliver bacterial CagA into gastric epithelial cells. Induction of high motility and an elongated phenotype is considered to be CagA-dependent process. Casein kinase 2 plays a critical role in carcinogenesis through signaling pathways related to the epithelial mesenchymal transition. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of H. pylori infection on the casein kinase 2-mediated migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells. AGS or MKN28 cells as human gastric epithelial cells and H. pylori strains Hp60190 (ATCC 49503, CagA(+)) and Hp8822 (CagA(-)) were used. Cells were infected with H. pylori at multiplicity of infection of 100 : 1 for various times. We measured in vitro kinase assay to examine casein kinase 2 activity and performed immunofluorescent staining to observe E-cadherin complex. We also examined β-catenin transactivation through promoter assay and MMP7 expression by real-time PCR and ELISA. H. pylori upregulates casein kinase 2 activity and inhibition of casein kinase 2 in H. pylori-infected cells profoundly suppressed cell invasiveness and motility. We confirmed that casein kinase 2 mediates membranous α-catenin depletion through dissociation of the α-/β-catenin complex in H. pylori-infected cells. We also found that H. pylori induces β-catenin nuclear translocation and increases MMP7 expressions mediated through casein kinase 2. We show for the first time that CagA(+) H. pylori upregulates cellular invasiveness and motility through casein kinase 2. The demonstration of a mechanistic interplay between H. pylori and casein kinase 2 provides important insights into the role of CagA(+) H. pylori in the gastric cancer invasion and metastasis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mucous and ciliated cell metaplasia in epithelial linings of odontogenic inflammatory and developmental cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Yasunori; Oikawa, Yuko; Furuya, Izuru; Satoh, Masanobu; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2005-06-01

    The incidence of mucous and ciliated cells in epithelial linings was examined among odontogenic inflammatory cysts (radicular cysts) and developmental cysts (dentigerous and primordial cysts). Mucous cells were found in 20.8% of all cysts examined, while ciliated cells were found in 11.4%; however, ciliated cells were always accompanied by mucous cells. The incidence of mucous cells in radicular cysts and dentigerous cysts and that of ciliated cells in radicular cysts was higher in the maxilla than in the mandible, while the incidence of mucous cells in primordial cysts and that of ciliated cells in dentigerous cysts and primordial cysts was higher in the mandible than in the maxilla. The present results regarding mucous cells and ciliated cells in the epithelial linings of intraosseous odontogenic cysts indicate a metaplasic origin, but the cause and biological significance of this phenomenon is not known. Mucous cells were present in the surface layer of epithelial linings, and intraepithelial gland-like structures lined with mucous cells were observed in the hyperplastic regions of epithelial linings of several radicular and dentigerous cysts. Such gland-like structures lined by mucous cells in the thickened epithelial lining, which have not been demonstrated previously, resembled the glandular structures of "glandular odontogenic cysts".

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy stimulates endogenous host progenitor cells to improve colonic epithelial regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sémont

    Full Text Available Patients who undergo pelvic radiotherapy may develop severe and chronic complications resulting from gastrointestinal alterations. The lack of curative treatment highlights the importance of novel and effective therapeutic strategies. We thus tested the therapeutic benefit of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC treatment and proposed molecular mechanisms of action. MSC efficacy was tested in an experimental model of radiation-induced severe colonic ulceration histologically similar to that observed in patients. In this model, MSC from bone marrow were administered intravenously, immediately or three weeks (established lesions after irradiation. MSC therapy reduces radiation-induced colonic ulceration and increases animal survival. MSC treatment induces therapeutic efficacy whatever the time of cell infusion. Infused-MSC engraft in the colon but also increase endogenous MSC mobilization in blood that have lasting benefits over time. In vitro analysis demonstrates that the MSC effect is mediated by paracrine mechanisms through the non-canonical WNT (Wingless integration site pathway. In irradiated rat colons, MSC treatment increases the expression of the non-canonical WNT4 ligand by epithelial cells. The epithelial regenerative process is improved after MSC injection by stimulation of colonic epithelial cells positive for SOX9 (SRY-box containing gene 9 progenitor/stem cell markers. This study demonstrates that MSC treatment induces stimulation of endogenous host progenitor cells to improve the regenerative process and constitutes an initial approach to arguing in favor of the use of MSC to limit/reduce colorectal damage induced by radiation.

  4. Curcumin and anthocyanin inhibit pepsin-mediated cell damage and carcinogenic changes in airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Tina L; Pearson, Amy C S; Wells, Clive W; Stoner, Gary D; Johnston, Nikki

    2013-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is associated with inflammatory and neoplastic airway diseases. Gastric pepsin internalized by airway epithelial cells during reflux contributes to oxidative stress, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Several plant extracts and compounds inhibit digestive enzymes and inflammatory or neoplastic changes to the esophagus in models of gastroesophageal reflux. This study examined the potential of chemoprotective phytochemicals to inhibit peptic activity and mitigate pepsin-mediated damage of airway epithelial cells. Cultured human laryngeal and hypopharyngeal epithelial cells were pretreated with curcumin (10 micromol/L), ecabet sodium (125 microg/mL), and anthocyanin-enriched black-raspberry extract (100 microg/mL) 30 minutes before treatment with pepsin (0.1 mg/mL; 1 hour; pH 7). Controls were treated with media pH 7 or pepsin pH 7 without phytochemicals. Cell damage and proliferative changes were assessed by electron microscopy, cell count, thymidine analog incorporation, and real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Pepsin inhibition was determined by in vitro kinetic assay. Micromolar concentrations of curcumin, ecabet sodium, and black-raspberry extract inhibited peptic activity and pepsin-induced mitochondrial damage and hyperproliferation. Curcumin abrogated pepsin-mediated depression of tumor suppressor gene expression and altered the subcellular localization of pepsin following endocytosis. Several phytochemicals inhibit the pepsin-mediated cell damage underlying inflammatory or neoplastic manifestations of LPR. Dietary supplementation or adjunctive therapy with phytochemicals may represent novel preventive or therapeutic strategies for LPR-attributed disease.

  5. Cellular Heterogeneity in the Mouse Esophagus Implicates the Presence of a Nonquiescent Epithelial Stem Cell Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. DeWard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Because the esophageal epithelium lacks a defined stem cell niche, it is unclear whether all basal epithelial cells in the adult esophagus are functionally equivalent. In this study, we showed that basal cells in the mouse esophagus contained a heterogeneous population of epithelial cells, similar to other rapidly cycling tissues such as the intestine or skin. Using a combination of cell-surface markers, we separated primary esophageal tissue into distinct cell populations that harbored differences in stem cell potential. We also used an in vitro 3D organoid assay to demonstrate that Sox2, Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling regulate esophageal self-renewal. Finally, we labeled proliferating basal epithelial cells in vivo to show differing cell-cycle profiles and proliferation kinetics. Based on our results, we propose that a nonquiescent stem cell population resides in the basal epithelium of the mouse esophagus.

  6. Differential effects of activated human renal epithelial cells on T-cell migration.

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    Martijn W H J Demmers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs are one of the main targets of inflammatory insults during interstitial nephritis and kidney transplant rejection. While Th1 cells are know to be essential in the pathogenesis of rejection, the role of Th17 is still under debate. We hypothesize that TECs modulate the outcome of rejection process by production of distinct chemokines and cytokines that determine the attraction of different T-cell subsets. Therefore, we studied differential effects of activated human renal epithelial cells on T-cell migration. METHODS: Human primary TECs were stimulated by IFN-γ and TNF-α in vitro. Chemokines and cytokines produced by activated TECs were measured using Luminex or ELISA. Chemotaxis assay was performed using activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells composed of CD4+CXCR3+ and CD4+CCR6+ T cells migrating towards stimulated and unstimulated TECs. RESULTS: While activated TECs secreted abundant amounts of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, the T helper cell differentiation cytokines IL-1β, IL-12p70, IL-23 or TGF-β1 were not produced. The production of Th1 chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10 and CCL5 were significantly upregulated after TEC stimulation. In contrast, Th17 chemokine CCL20 could not be detected. Finally, activated TECs attracted significantly higher numbers of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells as compared to unstimulated TECs. No migration of CD4+CCR6+ T cells could be observed. CONCLUSION: Activated primary renal tubular epithelial cells do not attract Th17 cells nor produce cytokines promoting Th17 cell differentiation in our experimental system mimicking the proinflammatory microenvironment of rejection.

  7. Enteric glial cells and their role in the intestinal epithelial barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-Bo; Li, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-28

    The intestinal epithelium constitutes a physical and functional barrier between the external environment and the host organism. It is formed by a continuous monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells maintained together by intercellular junctional complex, limiting access of pathogens, toxins and xenobiotics to host tissues. Once this barrier integrity is disrupted, inflammatory disorders and tissue injury are initiated and perpetuated. Beneath the intestinal epithelial cells lies a population of astrocyte-like cells that are known as enteric glia. The morphological characteristics and expression markers of these enteric glia cells were identical to the astrocytes of the central nervous system. In the past few years, enteric glia have been demonstrated to have a trophic and supporting relationship with intestinal epithelial cells. Enteric glia lesions and/or functional defects can be involved in the barrier dysfunction. Besides, factors secreted by enteric glia are important for the regulation of gut barrier function. Moreover, enteric glia have an important impact on epithelial cell transcriptome and induce a shift in epithelial cell phenotype towards increased cell adhesion and cell differentiation. Enteric glia can also preserve epithelial barrier against intestinal bacteria insult. In this review, we will describe the current body of evidence supporting functional roles of enteric glia on intestinal barrier.

  8. Autotaxin induces lung epithelial cell migration through lysoPLD activity-dependent and -independent pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; He, Donghong; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Zhong, Mintao; Salgia, Ravi; Morris, Andrew J.; Smyth, Susan S.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Lung cell migration is a crucial step for re-epithelialization that in turn is essential for remodeling and repair after lung injury. We hypothesize that secreted autotaxin (ATX), which exhibits lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, stimulates lung epithelial cell migration through lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) generation-dependent and -independent pathways. Release of endogenous ATX protein and activity was detected in lung epithelial cell culture medium. ATX with V5 tag (ATX-V5) overexpressed conditional medium had higher LPA levels compared to control medium and stimulated cell migration through Gαi-coupled LPA receptors, cytoskeleton rearrangement, phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin at the leading edge of migrating cells. Inhibition of PKCδ attenuated ATX-V5 overexpressed conditional medium-mediated phosphorylation of cortactin. In addition, a recombinant ATX mutant, lacking lysoPLD activity, or heat-inactived ATX also induced lung epithelial cell migration. Extracelluar ATX bound to LPA receptor and integrin β4 complex on A549 cell surface. Finally, intratracheal administration of lipopolysaccharide into mouse airway induced ATX release and LPA production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggested a significant role for ATX in lung epithelial cell migration and remodeling through its ability to induce LPA production-mediated phosphorylation of PKCδ and cortactin. In addition we also demonstrated assocation of ATX with epithelial cell surface LPA receptor and integrin β4. PMID:21696367

  9. Alternaria extract activates autophagy that induces IL-18 release from airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Hiroki; Okazaki, Shintaro; Hayashi, Hisako; Kawakita, Akiko; Hosoki, Koa; Yasutomi, Motoko; Sur, Sanjiv; Ohshima, Yusei

    2015-09-04

    Alternaria alternata is a major outdoor allergen that causes allergic airway diseases. Alternaria extract (ALT-E) has been shown to induce airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 and thereby initiate Th2-type responses. We investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in IL-18 release from ALT-E-stimulated airway epithelial cells. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were stimulated with ALT-E in the presence of different inhibitors of autophagy or caspases. IL-18 levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. The numbers of autophagosomes, an LC3-I to LC3-II conversion, and p62 degradation were determined by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. 3-methyladenine and bafilomycin, which inhibit the formation of preautophagosomal structures and autolysosomes, respectively, suppressed ALT-E-induced IL-18 release by cells, whereas caspase 1 and 8 inhibitors did not. ALT-E-stimulation increased autophagosome formation, LC-3 conversion, and p62 degradation in airway epithelial cells. LPS-stimulation induced the LC3 conversion in A549 cells, but did not induce IL-18 release or p62 degradation. Unlike LPS, ALT-E induced airway epithelial cells to release IL-18 via an autophagy dependent, caspase 1 and 8 independent pathway. Although autophagy has been shown to negatively regulate canonical inflammasome activity in TLR-stimulated macrophages, our data indicates that this process is an unconventional mechanism of IL-18 secretion by airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Kopp

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  11. Helicobacter pylori protein JHP0290 exhibits proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects in gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Tavares

    Full Text Available The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric epithelial cell proliferation, apoptosis and signaling pathways contributes to the development of infection-associated diseases. Here we report that JHP0290, which is a poorly functionally characterized protein from H. pylori, regulates multiple responses in human gastric epithelial cells. The differential expression and release of JHP0290 homologues was observed among H. pylori strains. JHP0290 existed in monomeric and dimeric forms in H. pylori cell extracts and culture broth. Recombinant purified JHP0290 (rJHP0290 also showed monomeric and dimeric forms, whereas the rJHP0290 C162A mutant exhibited only a monomeric form. The dimeric form of the protein was found to bind more efficiently to gastric epithelial cells than the monomeric form. The exposure of gastric epithelial cells to rJHP0290 induced proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Faster progression into the cell cycle was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells. Furthermore, we detected an anti-apoptotic effect of rJHP0290 in gastric epithelial cells when the cells were treated with rJHP0290 in combination with Camptothecin (CPT, which is an inducer of apoptosis. CPT-induced caspase 3 activation was significantly reduced in the presence of rJHP0290. In addition, the activation of ERK MAPK and the transcription factor NFκB was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells lines. Our results suggest that JHP0290 may affect H. pylori-induced gastric diseases via the regulation of gastric epithelial cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways.

  12. Comparison of culture media for ex vivo cultivation of limbal epithelial progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Renata Ruoco; Cristovam, Priscila Cardoso; Martins, Caio Marques; Covre, Joyce Luciana; Sobrinho, Juliana Aparecida; Ricardo, José Reinaldo da Silva; Hazarbassanov, Rossen Myhailov; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa; Belfort, Rubens; Nishi, Mauro; Gomes, José Álvaro Pereira

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of three culture media for growth, proliferation, differentiation, and viability of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial progenitor cells. Limbal epithelial progenitor cell cultures were established from ten human corneal rims and grew on plastic wells in three culture media: supplemental hormonal epithelial medium (SHEM), keratinocyte serum-free medium (KSFM), and Epilife. The performance of culturing limbal epithelial progenitor cells in each medium was evaluated according to the following parameters: growth area of epithelial migration; immunocytochemistry for adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding cassette member 2 (ABCG2), p63, Ki67, cytokeratin 3 (CK3), and vimentin (VMT) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for CK3, ABCG2, and p63, and cell viability using Hoechst staining. Limbal epithelial progenitor cells cultivated in SHEM showed a tendency to faster migration, compared to KSFM and Epilife. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that proliferated cells in the SHEM had lower expression for markers related to progenitor epithelial cells (ABCG2) and putative progenitor cells (p63), and a higher percentage of positive cells for differentiated epithelium (CK3) when compared to KSFM and Epilife. In PCR analysis, ABCG2 expression was statistically higher for Epilife compared to SHEM. Expression of p63 was statistically higher for Epilife compared to SHEM and KSFM. However, CK3 expression was statistically lower for KSFM compared to SHEM. Based on our findings, we concluded that cells cultured in KSFM and Epilife media presented a higher percentage of limbal epithelial progenitor cells, compared to SHEM.

  13. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki [Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  14. Intracellular localization of the extracellular matrix enzyme lysyl oxidase in polarized epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Matthias K.; Csiszar, Katalin

    2007-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports novel functions for lysyl oxidase (LOX) beyond its traditional role in initiating crosslinkages in collagen and elastin within the extracellular matrix. These novel roles are particularly relevant during the transition of malignant epithelial cells towards a migratory and invasive phenotype. However, knowledge on cellular and matrix functions of LOX has been generated almost exclusively in mesenchymal cell types. But it is becoming increasingly evident that these cell types are not adequate to address these novel and highly significant roles for LOX in epithelial tissues. In this initial report, we demonstrate that active LOX is expressed by polarized MDCK II kidney and MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, we show evidence for the presence of mature LOX in the cytoplasm and establish these cell lines as models for epithelial LOX studies. PMID:17074474

  15. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Witherden, Deborah A; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body - namely, the epidermis and the intestine - and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal and intestinal γδ T cell repertoires.

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of the antimicrobial peptide plectasin against Staphylococcus aureus in infected epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Smart, Simon; Franzyk, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    intracellularly in Calu-3 epithelial cells and in THP-1 cells, whereas A549 cells did not show significant uptake of nanoparticles. Overall, encapsulation of plectasin into PLGA-based nanoparticles appears to be a viable strategy to improve the efficacy of plectasin against infections in epithelial tissues....... epithelial cells might thus be a promising approach to combat such infections. In this work, plectasin, which is a cationic AMP of the defensin class, was encapsulated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles using the double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanoparticles displayed...... high plectasin encapsulation efficiency (71-90%) and mediated release of the peptide over 24h. The antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using bronchiolar epithelial Calu-3 cell monolayers infected with S. aureus. The plectasin-loaded nanoparticles displayed...

  17. Ovarian enzymatically active stromal cells can be a promoter of ovarian surface epithelial tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhangjuan

    2011-09-01

    Surface epithelial tumors (SETs) are the most common neoplasms of the ovary. They are traditionally thought derived from the ovarian surface or, as a recent hypothesis suggests, from various sources outside of ovary. Enzymatically active stromal cells (EASCs) are scattered in stroma of ovary, and characterized by their steroid-producing ability. With my observation of the increased EASCs near the epithelial cells of SETs, I hypothesize the epithelial cells of SETs can cause the increase of EASCs by converse adjacent stromal cells to EASCs; and EASCs, as a positive feedback, can prompt the proliferation of their neighbouring epithelial cells of SETs by secreting steroid hormone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate cancer cells specifically reorganize epithelial cell-fibroblast communication through proteoglycan and junction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Klein, George; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2017-01-02

    Microenvironment and stromal fibroblasts are able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation both through secreted signaling molecules and direct cell-cell interactions but molecular mechanisms of these effects remain unclear. In this study, we investigated a role of cell-cell contact-related molecules (protein ECM components, proteoglycans (PGs) and junction-related molecules) in intercellular communications between the human TERT immortalized fibroblasts (BjTERT fibroblasts) and normal (PNT2) or cancer (LNCaP, PC3, DU145) prostate epithelial cells. It was shown that BjTERT-PNT2 cell coculture resulted in significant decrease of both BjTERT and PNT2 proliferation rates and reorganization of transcriptional activity of cell-cell contact-related genes in both cell types. Immunocytochemical staining revealed redistribution of DCN and LUM in PNT2 cells and significant increase of SDC1 at the intercellular contact zones between BjTERT and PNT2 cells, suggesting active involvement of the PGs in cell-cell contacts and contact inhibition of cell proliferation. Unlike to PNT2 cells, PC3 cells did not respond to BjTERT in terms of PGs expression, moderately increased transcriptional activity of junctions-related genes (especially tight junction) and failed to establish PC3-BjTERT contacts. At the same time, PC3 cells significantly down-regulated junctions-related genes (especially focal adhesions and adherens junctions) in BjTERT fibroblasts resulting in visible preference for homotypic PC3-PC3 over heterotypic PC3-BjTERT contacts and autonomous growth of PC3 clones. Taken together, the results demonstrate that an instructing role of fibroblasts to normal prostate epithelial cells is revoked by cancer cells through deregulation of proteoglycans and junction molecules expression and overall disorganization of fibroblast-cancer cell communication.

  19. Concise review: the relevance of human stem cell-derived organoid models for epithelial translational medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Robert E; Giangreco, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial organ remodeling is a major contributing factor to worldwide death and disease, costing healthcare systems billions of dollars every year. Despite this, most fundamental epithelial organ research fails to produce new therapies and mortality rates for epithelial organ diseases remain unacceptably high. In large part, this failure in translating basic epithelial research into clinical therapy is due to a lack of relevance in existing preclinical models. To correct this, new models are required that improve preclinical target identification, pharmacological lead validation, and compound optimization. In this review, we discuss the relevance of human stem cell-derived, three-dimensional organoid models for addressing each of these challenges. We highlight the advantages of stem cell-derived organoid models over existing culture systems, discuss recent advances in epithelial tissue-specific organoids, and present a paradigm for using organoid models in human translational medicine. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Airway epithelial cells produce neurotrophins and promote the survival of eosinophils during allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Christian; Islamian, Ariyan Pirayesh; Renz, Harald; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas

    2006-04-01

    Eosinophil-epithelial cell interactions make a major contribution to asthmatic airway inflammation. Nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and other members of the neurotrophin family, originally defined as a class of neuronal growth factors, are now recognized to support the survival and activation of immune cells. Neurotrophin levels are increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during allergic asthma. We sought to investigate the role of neurotrophins as inflammatory mediators in eosinophil-epithelial cell interactions during the allergic immune response. Neurotrophin expression in the lung was investigated by means of immunohistochemistry and ELISA in a mouse model of chronic experimental asthma. Coculture experiments were performed with airway epithelial cells and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophils. Neurotrophin levels increased continuously during chronic allergic airway inflammation, and airway epithelial cells were the major source of NGF and BDNF within the inflamed lung. Epithelial neurotrophin production was upregulated by IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and T(H)2 cytokines. Lung eosinophils expressed the BDNF and NGF receptors tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, and coculture with airway epithelial cells resulted in enhanced epithelial neurotrophin production, as well as in prolonged survival of eosinophils. Eosinophil survival was completely abolished in the presence of the neurotrophin receptor Trk antagonist K252a. During allergic inflammation, airway epithelial cells express increased amounts of NGF and BDNF that promote the survival of tissue eosinophils. Controlling epithelial neurotrophin production might be an important therapeutic target to prevent allergic airway eosinophilia. Attenuating the release of inflammatory mediators from the activated airway epithelium will become an important strategy to disrupt the pathogenesis of chronic allergic asthma.

  1. Downregulation of integrin β4 decreases the ability of airway epithelial cells to present antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Liu

    Full Text Available Airway epithelial cells have been demonstrated to be accessory antigen presentation cells (APC capable of activating T cells and may play an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation of asthma. In asthmatic airways, loss of expression of the adhesion molecule integrin β4 (ITGB4 and an increase in Th2 inflammation bias has been observed in our previous study. Given that ITGB4 is engaged in multiple signaling pathways, we studied whether disruption of ITGB4-mediated cell adhesion may contribute to the adaptive immune response of epithelial cells, including their ability to present antigens, induce the activate and differentiate of T cells. We silenced ITGB4 expression in bronchial epithelial cells with an effective siRNA vector and studied the effects of ITGB4 silencing on the antigen presentation ability of airway epithelial cells. T cell proliferation and cytokine production was investigated after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Surface expression of B7 homologs and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II was also detected after ITGB4 was silenced. Our results demonstrated that silencing of ITGB4 resulted in impaired antigen presentation processes and suppressed T cell proliferation. Meanwhile, decrease in Th1 cytokine production and increase in Th17 cytokine production was induced after co-culturing with ITGB4-silenced epithelial cells. Moreover, HLA-DR was decreased and the B7 homologs expression was different after ITGB4 silencing. Overall, this study suggested that downregulation of ITGB4 expression in airway epithelial cells could impair the antigen presentation ability of these cells, which further regulate airway inflammation reaction in allergic asthma.

  2. Three-dimensional Mammary Epithelial Cell Morphogenesis Model for Analysis of TGFß Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Juliet; Luo, Kunxin

    2016-01-01

    Culturing mammary epithelial cells in laminin-rich extracellular matrices (three dimensional or 3D culture) offers significant advantages over that in the conventional two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture system in that it takes into considetation the impact of extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment on the proliferation, survival, and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. When grown in the 3D culture, untransformed mammary epithelial cells undergo morphogenesis to form a multicellular and polarized acini-like structure that functionally mimics the differentiated alveoli in the pregnancy mammary gland. This process is subjected to regulation by many growth factors and cytokines. The transforming growth factor-ß (TGFß) is a multipotent cytokine that regulates multiple aspects of development and tumorigenesis. In addition to its effects on epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation, it is also a potent regulator of the cell-matrix interaction. Thus, the 3D culture model may recapitulate the complex in vivo epithelial cell microenvironment and allow us to fully evaluate the role of TGFß signaling in multiple aspects of normal and cancerous cell behavior. In this chapter we provide detailed protocols for growing mammary epithelial cells in the 3D Matrigel for analysis of signaling pathways.

  3. Oct4+ stem/progenitor swine lung epithelial cells are targets for influenza virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mahesh; Goyal, Sagar M; Saif, Yehia M

    2012-06-01

    We isolated stem/progenitor epithelial cells from the lungs of 4- to 6-week-old pigs. The epithelial progenitor colony cells were surrounded by mesenchymal stromal cells. The progenitor epithelial colony cells expressed stem cell markers such as octamer binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1), as well as the epithelial markers pancytokeratin, cytokeratin-18, and occludin, but not mesenchymal (CD44, CD29, and CD90) and hematopoietic (CD45) markers. The colony cells had extensive self-renewal potential and had the capacity to undergo differentiation to alveolar type I- and type II-like pneumocytes. Additionally, these cells expressed sialic acid receptors and supported the active replication of influenza virus, which was accompanied by cell lysis. The lysis of progenitor epithelial cells by influenza virus may cause a marked reduction in the potential of progenitor cells for self renewal and for their ability to differentiate into specialized cells of the lung. These observations suggest the possible involvement of lung stem/progenitor cells in influenza virus infection.

  4. [The influence of lentivirus-miRNA-184 on epithelial-mesenchcymal transition of human lens epithelial cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Hui

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the influence of miRNA-184 on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of human lens epithelial cells (HLEC) induced by TGF-beta2 in vitro. Experimental study. Recombinant plasmid of pL/IRES/GFP-miR-184 was constructed and used to produce the lentivirus. The lentivirus was used to transduce the HLEC which was in the process of EMT induced by transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). The real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (QRT-PCR) was used to analyze E-cadherin (CDH1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), vimentin (VIM) expression at RNA levels during interval of 0 h, 6 h and 24 h after transduction, in comparison with that of control group. Statistical analysis method was single factor variance analysis. The expression level of epithelial marker gene CDH1 in the miRNA-184 transduced group maintains relatively stable during 24h interval, while it goes down in the control group. The expression level of mesenchymal cell marker gene VIM, α-SMA in the miRNA-184 transduced group maintain relatively stable, while it goes up in the control group. The results of statistical analysis showed a statistically significant difference between miRNA-184 transduced group and control group (P184 lentivirus-mediated HLEC can inhibit the occurrence of EMT.

  5. Transport pathways of solid lipid nanoparticles across Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Gui-Hong; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Sun, Jihong; Du, Yong-Zhong; You, Jian; Yuan, Hong

    2014-10-06

    An understanding of drug delivery system transport across epithelial cell monolayer is very important for improving the absorption and bioavailability of the drug payload. The mechanisms of epithelial cell monolayer transport for various nanocarriers may differ significantly due to their variable components, surface properties, or diameter. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), conventionally formed by lipid materials, have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their excellent biocompatibility and high oral bioavailability. However, there have been few reports about the mechanisms of SLNs transport across epithelial cell monolayer. In this study, the molecular mechanisms utilized by SLNs of approximately 100 nm in diameter crossing intestinal epithelial monolayer were carefully studied using a simulative intestinal epithelial monolayer formed by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. The results demonstrated that SLNs transportation did not induce a significant change on tight junction structure. We found that the endocytosis of SLNs into the epithelial cells was energy-dependent and was significantly greater than nanoparticle exocytosis. The endocytosis of SLNs was found to be rarely mediated via macropinocytosis, as confirmed by the addition of 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA) as an inhibitory agent, and mainly depended on lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated pathways. After SLNs was internalized into MDCK cells, lysosome was one of the main destinations for these nanoparticles. The exocytosis study indicated that the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, and microtubules played important roles in the transport of SLNs out of MDCK cells. The transcytosis study indicated that only approximately 2.5% of the total SLNs was transported from the apical side to the basolateral side. For SLNs transportation in MDCK cell monolayer, greater transport (approximately 4-fold) was observed to the apical side than to the basolateral side. Our

  6. O-antigen delays lipopolysaccharide recognition and impairs antibacterial host defense in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia U Duerr

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although Toll-like receptor (TLR 4 signals from the cell surface of myeloid cells, it is restricted to an intracellular compartment and requires ligand internalization in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs. Yet, the functional consequence of cell-type specific receptor localization and uptake-dependent lipopolysaccharide (LPS recognition is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a strikingly delayed activation of IECs but not macrophages by wildtype Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica sv. (S. Typhimurium as compared to isogenic O-antigen deficient mutants. Delayed epithelial activation is associated with impaired LPS internalization and retarded TLR4-mediated immune recognition. The O-antigen-mediated evasion from early epithelial innate immune activation significantly enhances intraepithelial bacterial survival in vitro and in vivo following oral challenge. These data identify O-antigen expression as an innate immune evasion mechanism during apical intestinal epithelial invasion and illustrate the importance of early innate immune recognition for efficient host defense against invading Salmonella.

  7. The effect of caffeine on renal epithelial cells from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belibi, Franck A; Wallace, Darren P; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Christensen, Marcy; Reif, Gail; Grantham, Jared J

    2002-01-01

    ...':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). This study examined the extent to which caffeine may stimulate the production of cAMP by cyst epithelial cells, thereby adversely increasing proliferation and fluid secretion...

  8. Regulation of antiapoptotic and cytoprotective pathways in colonic epithelial cells in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease involving the colon resulting in bloody diarrhea and increased risk of colorectal cancer in certain patient subgroups. Increased apoptosis in the epithelial cell layer causes increased permeability, especially during flares; this leads...

  9. Epithelial cell proliferative activity of Barrett's esophagus : methodology and correlation with traditional cancer risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Ganesh, S; Kuipers, EJ; De Jager-Krikken, A; Karrenbeld, A; Harms, Geert; Sluiter, WJ; Koudstaal, J; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition, due to chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Effective antireflux therapy may diminish cancer risk. To evaluate this option an intermediate marker is needed. We developed a methodology for measurement of epithelial cell proliferative activity of

  10. Particle retention by respiratory epithelial cells is associated with persistent biological effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological effect of particles on respiratory epithelial cells involves, in part, the generation of an oxidative stress and a consequent cascade of reactions culminating in inflammatory mediator release. Whether there is either an immediate, transitory activation or a persist...

  11. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans adhesion to buccal epithelial cells by an aqueous extract of Thymus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, M; Sallal, A-K; Darmani, H

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an extract of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) on the growth of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and the adhesion of this bacterium to human buccal epithelial cells. Different concentrations of an aqueous extract of thyme were prepared and the effects investigated on growth of S. mutans. Furthermore, the effect of these extracts on adhesion of S. mutans to buccal epithelial cells was also investigated and compared with the effects of chlorhexidine digluconate. The data revealed that exposure of S. mutans to thyme extract showed a time and concentration-dependent decrease in bacterial viability. The greatest effect was observed when S. mutans had been exposed to 20% thyme extract for a period of 48 h which resulted in 96% inhibition of bacterial growth. Furthermore, the adhesion of S. mutans to buccal epithelial cells was also reduced when either buccal epithelial cells or S. mutans had been pre-incubated with different concentrations of aqueous thyme extracts (83-98% and 75-89% inhibition respectively). There was also greater reduction in the adherence of bacterial cells to buccal epithelial cells after mouth rinsing with 20% aqueous thyme extract compared to rinsing with chlorhexidine digluconate (45% and 89% inhibition of bacterial adhesion respectively). The diminished adherence of S. mutans to buccal epithelial cells after exposure to various concentrations of aqueous thyme extract as well as the antimicrobial properties of this plant may have clinical relevance.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the epithelial cell death induced by the oral mitis group of streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Okahashi

    Full Text Available Members of the mitis group of streptococci are normal inhabitants of the commensal flora of the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. Some mitis group species, such as Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus sanguinis, are primary colonizers of the human oral cavity. Recently, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 produced by S. oralis is cytotoxic to human macrophages, suggesting that streptococcus-derived H2O2 may act as a cytotoxin. Since epithelial cells provide a physical barrier against pathogenic microbes, we investigated their susceptibility to infection by H2O2-producing streptococci in this study. Infection by S. oralis and S. sanguinis was found to stimulate cell death of Detroit 562, Calu-3 and HeLa epithelial cell lines at a multiplicity of infection greater than 100. Catalase, an enzyme that catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, inhibited S. oralis cytotoxicity, and H2O2 alone was capable of eliciting epithelial cell death. Moreover, S. oralis mutants lacking the spxB gene encoding pyruvate oxidase, which are deficient in H2O2 production, exhibited reduced cytotoxicity toward Detroit 562 epithelial cells. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that both S. oralis and H2O2 induced interleukin-6 production in Detroit 562 epithelial cells. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 is cytotoxic to epithelial cells, and promotes bacterial evasion of the host defense systems in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tracts.

  13. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  14. Hypoxia is a key regulator of limbal epithelial stem cell growth and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Chris Bath; Yang, Sufang; Muttuvelu, Danson V.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the growth and differentiation of limbal epithelial stem cell cultures could be controlled through manipulation of the oxygen tension. Limbal epithelial cells were isolated from corneoscleral disks, and cultured using either feeder cells in a growth......, progression through cell cycle, colony forming efficiency (CFE), and expression of stem cell (ABCG2 and p63α) and differentiation (CK3) markers was determined throughout the culture period of up to 18 days. Low oxygen levels favored a stem cell phenotype with a lower proliferative rate, high CFE......, and a relatively higher expression of ABCG2 and p63α, while higher levels of oxygen led not only to decreased CFE but also to increased proportion of differentiated cells positive for CK3. Hypoxic cultures may thus potentially improve stem cell grafts for cultured limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET)....

  15. Altered expression of epithelial cell surface glycoconjugates and intermediate filaments at the margins of mucosal wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Grøn, B; Mandel, U

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in cell to cell adhesion are necessary to enable the type of cell movements that are associated with epithelial wound healing and malignant invasion. Several studies of transformed cells have related epithelial cell movement to changes in the cell surface expression of the carbohydrate...... structures represented by the ABO blood group antigens and, in particular, by Lewis antigens and their biosynthetic precursors. To study further the relationship between cell surface carbohydrates and keratinocyte cell movement, experimental wounds were created in human oral mucosa and examined......-T antigen. The changes induced by wounding in the expression of collagen IV, laminin gamma2-chain (laminin-5), and laminin alpha5-chain were similar to those found in skin wounds and served to define the region of epithelial movement. This region was found to show a marked increase in staining for both...

  16. Active Vertex Model for cell-resolution description of epithelial tissue mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Daniel L; Henkes, Silke; Weijer, Cornelis J; Sknepnek, Rastko

    2017-06-01

    We introduce an Active Vertex Model (AVM) for cell-resolution studies of the mechanics of confluent epithelial tissues consisting of tens of thousands of cells, with a level of detail inaccessible to similar methods. The AVM combines the Vertex Model for confluent epithelial tissues with active matter dynamics. This introduces a natural description of the cell motion and accounts for motion patterns observed on multiple scales. Furthermore, cell contacts are generated dynamically from positions of cell centres. This not only enables efficient numerical implementation, but provides a natural description of the T1 transition events responsible for local tissue rearrangements. The AVM also includes cell alignment, cell-specific mechanical properties, cell growth, division and apoptosis. In addition, the AVM introduces a flexible, dynamically changing boundary of the epithelial sheet allowing for studies of phenomena such as the fingering instability or wound healing. We illustrate these capabilities with a number of case studies.

  17. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  18. Autonomous immunity in mucosal epithelial cells: fortifying the barrier against infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Karen F; Herzberg, Mark C

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells express an autonomous innate immune response that controls the overgrowth of invaded bacteria, mitigates the harmful effects of the bacteria carried within, and does not rely on other external arms of the immune response. Epithelial cell autonomous innate immunity "respects" the social biology of invading bacteria to achieve symbiosis, and is the primary protective mechanism against pathogens. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Promotes Pulmonary Epithelial Cell Senescence and Is Associated with COPD Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-Ho; Chand, Hitendra S; Bruse, Shannon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Royer, Christopher; McDonald, Jacob; Qualls, Clifford; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Lin, Yong; Mallampalli, Rama; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Nyunoya, Toru

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is consistent in humans and animal models of COPD and to investigate the role of this protein in lung epithelial cells. CTGF in lung epithelial cells of ex-smokers with COPD was compared with ex-smokers without COPD by immunofluorescence. A total of twenty C57Bl/6 mice and sixteen non-human primates (NHPs) were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks. Ten mice of these CS-exposed mice and eight of the CS-exposed NHPs were infected with H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV), while the remaining ten mice and eight NHPs were mock-infected with vehicle as control. Both mRNA and protein expression of CTGF in lung epithelial cells of mice and NHPs were determined. The effects of CTGF overexpression on cell proliferation, p16 protein, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity were examined in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). In humans, CTGF expression increased with increasing COPD severity. We found that protein expression of CTGF was upregulated in lung epithelial cells in both mice and NHPs exposed to CS and infected with IAV compared to those exposed to CS only. When overexpressed in HBECs, CTGF accelerated cellular senescence accompanied by p16 accumulation. Both CTGF and p16 protein expression in lung epithelia are positively associated with the severity of COPD in ex-smokers. These findings show that CTGF is consistently expressed in epithelial cells of COPD lungs. By accelerating lung epithelial senescence, CTGF may block regeneration relative to epithelial cell loss and lead to emphysema.

  20. Roles of Epstein-Barr virus glycoproteins gp350 and gp25 in the infection of human epithelial cells.

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    Maruo, S; Yang, L; Takada, K

    2001-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various epithelial malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric carcinoma, and causes oral hairy leukoplakia, a productive EBV infection of the differentiated epithelium of the tongue. However, it is not clear by what mechanism EBV infects epithelial cells. We generated a recombinant EBV that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein in order to monitor EBV entrance into epithelial cells quickly and quantitatively. Using this monitoring system, we examined the roles of gp350 and gp25 in EBV infection of epithelial cells by utilizing soluble forms of the gp350 and gp25 proteins. EBV infection of three of four examined epithelial cell lines, 293, NU-GC-3 and Lovo, was almost completely blocked by pretreatment of cells with a soluble form of gp350 (designated gp350Ig), and this blockage was dependent on the CD21-binding region of gp350. On the other hand, infection of the other epithelial cell line, AGS, was not inhibited at all by pretreatment with gp350Ig. Moreover, we found that a soluble form of gp25 (designated gp25Ig) preferentially bound to epithelial cells rather than B cells, and pretreatment of cells with gp25Ig substantially blocked EBV infection of some epithelial cells. These results indicate the existence of two distinct pathways in EBV infection of epithelial cells, a gp350-dependent pathway and a gp350-independent pathway, and that gp25 can play a role in the infection of some epithelial cells.

  1. Auxin induces cell proliferation in an experimental model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernaro, Valeria; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Leonello, Giuseppa; Buemi, Antoine; Kohnke, Franz Heinrich; Villari, Antonino; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the main auxin produced by plants and plays a key role in the plant growth and development. This hormone is also present in humans where it is considered as a uremic toxin deriving from tryptophan metabolism. However, beyond this peculiar aspect, the involvement of auxin in human pathophysiology has not been further investigated. Since it is a growth hormone, we evaluated its proliferative properties in an in vitro model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells. We employed an experimental model of renal tubular epithelial cells belonging to the LLC-PK1 cell line that is derived from the kidney of healthy male pig. Growth effects of auxin against LLC-PK1 cell lines were determined by a rapid colorimetric assay. Increasing concentrations of auxin (to give a final concentration from 1 to 1000 ng/mL) were added and microplates were incubated for 72 h. Each auxin concentration was assayed in four wells and repeated four times. Cell proliferation significantly increased, compared to control cells, 72 h after addition of auxin to cultured LLC-PK1 cells. Statistically significant values were observed when 100 ng/mL (p auxin influences cell growth not only in plants, where its role is well documented, but also in mammalian cell lines. This observation opens new scenarios in the field of tissue regeneration and may stimulate a novel line of research aiming at investigating whether this hormone really influences human physiology and pathophysiology and in particular, kidney regeneration.

  2. GM-CSF produced by nonhematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa.

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    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2013-02-15

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, as well as dendritic cell differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn's disease in humans and colitis in murine models has mainly been considered to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF-deficient (GM-CSF(-/-)) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type mice, caused marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF(-/-) mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF(-/-) mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Nonhematopoietic cells, and not myeloid cells, produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury, as revealed by bone marrow chimera and dendritic cell-depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell-produced GM-CSF has a novel nonredundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium.

  3. Glycosylation of Candida albicans cell wall proteins is critical for induction of innate immune responses and apoptosis of epithelial cells.

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    Jeanette Wagener

    Full Text Available C. albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen of humans, causing local and superficial mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Given that the key structure mediating host-C. albicans interactions is the fungal cell wall, we aimed to identify features of the cell wall inducing epithelial responses and be associated with fungal pathogenesis. We demonstrate here the importance of cell wall protein glycosylation in epithelial immune activation with a predominant role for the highly branched N-glycosylation residues. Moreover, these glycan moieties induce growth arrest and apoptosis of epithelial cells. Using an in vitro model of oral candidosis we demonstrate, that apoptosis induction by C. albicans wild-type occurs in early stage of infection and strongly depends on intact cell wall protein glycosylation. These novel findings demonstrate that glycosylation of the C. albicans cell wall proteins appears essential for modulation of epithelial immunity and apoptosis induction, both of which may promote fungal pathogenesis in vivo.

  4. [Airborne fine particle decreases the cell viability and induces inflammation in human bronchial epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhicong; Luo, Xianyang; Cai, Chengfu; Xu, Jian; Zhuang, Guoshun

    2017-09-28

    To investigate the effects of airborne fine particle on cell viability and inflammation in human bronchial epithelial cells.
 Methods: Atmospheric PM2.5 samples were collected by PM2.5 sampler. PM2.5 morphology was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were treated with PM2.5 at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200, 400, 800 μg/mL) for 12, 24 or 48 hours, and the cell activity were evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). The mRNA expression levels of (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor,GM-CSF) and TNF-α were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Western blot was used to detect the protein expressions of GM-CSF and TNF-α.
 Results: According to SEM, the shape of PM2.5 varied, and the diameter was different and mostly equal to or less than 2.5 μm. CCK-8 assay showed that different concentrations of PM2.5 exposure for 12 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours resulted in loss of cell viability of BEAS-2B cells (P<0.05). Different concentrations of PM2.5 increased the mRNA and protein expression of GM-CSF and TNF-α, and the higher concentration of PM2.5 induced higher expression, which have statistical significant difference between the groups (P<0.05).
 Conclusion: Atmospheric PM2.5 can cause inflammatory response in human bronchial epithelial cells. They can reduce cell viability, which may be related to the PM2.5 trigger and aggravation of bronchopulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  5. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  6. The keratin-binding protein Albatross regulates polarization of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masahiko; Inoko, Akihito; Shiromizu, Takashi; Nakayama, Masanori; Zou, Peng; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Yuko; Izawa, Ichiro; Sasoh, Mikio; Uji, Yukitaka; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Kiyono, Tohru; Inagaki, Masaki

    2008-10-06

    The keratin intermediate filament network is abundant in epithelial cells, but its function in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is unclear. Here, we show that Albatross complexes with Par3 to regulate formation of the apical junctional complex (AJC) and maintain lateral membrane identity. In nonpolarized epithelial cells, Albatross localizes with keratin filaments, whereas in polarized epithelial cells, Albatross is primarily localized in the vicinity of the AJC. Knockdown of Albatross in polarized cells causes a disappearance of key components of the AJC at cell-cell borders and keratin filament reorganization. Lateral proteins E-cadherin and desmoglein 2 were mislocalized even on the apical side. Although Albatross promotes localization of Par3 to the AJC, Par3 and ezrin are still retained at the apical surface in Albatross knockdown cells, which retain intact microvilli. Analysis of keratin-deficient epithelial cells revealed that keratins are required to stabilize the Albatross protein, thus promoting the formation of AJC. We propose that keratins and the keratin-binding protein Albatross are important for epithelial cell polarization.

  7. Temperature-sensitive SV40-immortalized rat middle ear epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Katsuhiro; Kim, Youngki; Paparella, Michael M; Lin, Jizhen

    2004-12-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of middle ear epithelial cells are essential in both normal and diseased middle ears. The normal situation involves physiologic growth and renewal of the epithelium, and the diseased situation involves pathological changes of the epithelium such as mucous cell metaplasia and ciliated cell proliferation in otitis media. In this study, we used a temperature-sensitive large T antigen (the SV40 mutant) to transduce and immortalize the primary culture of middle ear epithelial cells. SV40-immortalized middle ear epithelial cells have been cultured for more than 50 passages and are stable morphologically. Their nonimmortalized parent cells died at the second passage. Immortalized middle ear epithelial cells carrying the SV40 mutant show a monolayer, cobblestonelike morphology. The cell line expresses characteristic middle ear mucosal molecules such as mucins, keratins, and collagens. It also responds to temperature changes; namely, cells proliferate at 33 degrees C, when the SV40 antigen is active, and differentiate at 39 degrees C, when the SV40 antigen is inactive. Therefore, we conclude that a temperature-sensitive middle ear epithelial cell line has successfully been established.

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects of embelin in A549 cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Seung; Cho, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Yumi; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kwanil; Jung, Hee-Jae; Jang, Hyeung-Jin

    2018-02-01

    Allergic asthma is the most common type in asthma, which is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the lung. In this study, we investigated whether embelin (Emb), the major component of Ardisia japonica BL. (AJB), exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on allergic asthma via inhibition of NF-κB activity using A549 cells and asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Inflammation was induced in A549 cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, by IL-1β (10 ng/ml) treatment for 4 h. The effects of Emb on NF-κB activity and COX-2 protein expression in inflamed airway epithelial cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues were analyzed via western blot. The secretion levels of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines, including IL-4, 6, 9, 13, TNF-α and eotaxin, were measured by a multiplex assay. Emb significantly blocked NF-κB activity in IL-1β-treated A549 cells and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. COX-2 expression was also reduced in both IL-1β-treated A549 cells and asthmatic tissues Emb application. Emb significantly reduced the secretion of IL-4, IL-6 and eotaxin in human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues by inhibiting activity of NF-κB. The results of this study suggest that Emb may be used as an anti-inflammatory agent via inhibition of NF-κB and related cytokines.

  9. SPLUNC1 regulation in airway epithelial cells: role of toll-like receptor 2 signaling

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    Smith Sean

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory infections including Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp contribute to various chronic lung diseases. We have shown that mouse short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1 protein was able to inhibit Mp growth. Further, airway epithelial cells increased SPLUNC1 expression upon Mp infection. However, the mechanisms underlying SPLUNC1 regulation remain unknown. In the current study, we investigated if SPLUNC1 production following Mp infection is regulated through Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 signaling. Methods Airway epithelial cell cultures were utilized to reveal the contribution of TLR2 signaling including NF-κB to SPLUNC1 production upon bacterial infection and TLR2 agonist stimulation. Results Mp and TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 increased SPLUNC1 expression in tracheal epithelial cells from wild type, but not TLR2-/- BALB/c mice. RNA interference (short-hairpin RNA of TLR2 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells under air-liquid interface cultures significantly reduced SPLUNC1 levels in Mp-infected or Pam3CSK4-treated cells. Inhibition and activation of NF-κB pathway decreased and increased SPLUNC1 production in airway epithelial cells, respectively. Conclusions Our data for the first time suggest that airway epithelial TLR2 signaling is pivotal in mycoplasma-induced SPLUNC1 production, thus improving our understanding of the aberrant SPLUNC1 expression in airways of patients suffering from chronic lung diseases with bacterial infections.

  10. Polarity, cell division, and out-of-equilibrium dynamics control the growth of epithelial structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Puliafito, Alberto; Shewan, Annette M.; Yu, Wei; Combes, Alexander N.; Little, Melissa H.; Chianale, Federica; Primo, Luca; Serini, Guido; Mostov, Keith E.; Celani, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The growth of a well-formed epithelial structure is governed by mechanical constraints, cellular apico-basal polarity, and spatially controlled cell division. Here we compared the predictions of a mathematical model of epithelial growth with the morphological analysis of 3D epithelial structures. In both in vitro cyst models and in developing epithelial structures in vivo, epithelial growth could take place close to or far from mechanical equilibrium, and was determined by the hierarchy of time-scales of cell division, cell–cell rearrangements, and lumen dynamics. Equilibrium properties could be inferred by the analysis of cell–cell contact topologies, and the nonequilibrium phenotype was altered by inhibiting ROCK activity. The occurrence of an aberrant multilumen phenotype was linked to fast nonequilibrium growth, even when geometric control of cell division was correctly enforced. We predicted and verified experimentally that slowing down cell division partially rescued a multilumen phenotype induced by altered polarity. These results improve our understanding of the development of epithelial organs and, ultimately, of carcinogenesis. PMID:24145168

  11. ADAM17 deletion in thymic epithelial cells alters aire expression without affecting T cell developmental progression.

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    David M Gravano

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells are critical for normal T cell development. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are important stromal niche cells that provide essential growth factors, cytokines, and present self-antigens to developing thymocytes. The identification of genes that mediate cellular crosstalk in the thymus is ongoing. One candidate gene, Adam17, encodes a metalloprotease that functions by cleaving the ectodomain of several transmembrane proteins and regulates various developmental processes. In conventional Adam17 knockout mice, a non-cell autonomous role for ADAM17 in adult T cell development was reported, which strongly suggested that expression of ADAM17 in TECs was required for normal T cell development. However, knockdown of Adam17 results in multisystem developmental defects and perinatal lethality, which has made study of the role of Adam17 in specific cell types difficult. Here, we examined T cell and thymic epithelial cell development using a conditional knockout approach.We generated an Adam17 conditional knockout mouse in which floxed Adam17 is deleted specifically in TECs by Cre recombinase under the control of the Foxn1 promoter. Normal T cell lineage choice and development through the canonical αβ T cell stages was observed. Interestingly, Adam17 deficiency in TECs resulted in reduced expression of the transcription factor Aire. However, no alterations in the patterns of TEC phenotypic marker expression and thymus morphology were noted.In contrast to expectation, our data clearly shows that absence of Adam17 in TECs