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Sample records for epidermal homeostasis control

  1. A novel role of RASSF9 in maintaining epidermal homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Mei Lee

    Full Text Available The physiological role of RASSF9, a member of the Ras-association domain family (RASSF, is currently unclear. Here, we report a mouse line in which an Epstein-Barr virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 transgene insertion has created a 7.2-kb chromosomal deletion, which abolished RASSF9 gene expression. The RASSF9-null mice exhibited interesting phenotypes that resembled human ageing, including growth retardation, short lifespan, less subcutaneous adipose layer and alopecia. In the wild-type mice, RASSF9 is predominantly expressed in the epidermal keratinocytes of skin, as determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. In contrast, RASSF9-/- mice presented a dramatic change in epithelial organization of skin with increased proliferation and aberrant differentiation as detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays and immunofluorescence analyses. Furthermore, characteristic functions of RASSF9-/- versus wild type (WT mouse primary keratinocytes showed significant proliferation linked to a reduction of p21Cip1 expression under growth or early differentiation conditions. Additionally, in RASSF9-/- keratinocytes there was a drastic down-modulation of terminal differentiation markers, which could be rescued by infection with a recombinant adenovirus, Adv/HA-RASSF9. Our results indicate a novel and significant role of RASSF9 in epidermal homeostasis.

  2. Palmitoylation regulates epidermal homeostasis and hair follicle differentiation.

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    Pleasantine Mill

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Palmitoylation is a key post-translational modification mediated by a family of DHHC-containing palmitoyl acyl-transferases (PATs. Unlike other lipid modifications, palmitoylation is reversible and thus often regulates dynamic protein interactions. We find that the mouse hair loss mutant, depilated, (dep is due to a single amino acid deletion in the PAT, Zdhhc21, resulting in protein mislocalization and loss of palmitoylation activity. We examined expression of Zdhhc21 protein in skin and find it restricted to specific hair lineages. Loss of Zdhhc21 function results in delayed hair shaft differentiation, at the site of expression of the gene, but also leads to hyperplasia of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE and sebaceous glands, distant from the expression site. The specific delay in follicle differentiation is associated with attenuated anagen propagation and is reflected by decreased levels of Lef1, nuclear beta-catenin, and Foxn1 in hair shaft progenitors. In the thickened basal compartment of mutant IFE, phospho-ERK and cell proliferation are increased, suggesting increased signaling through EGFR or integrin-related receptors, with a parallel reduction in expression of the key differentiation factor Gata3. We show that the Src-family kinase, Fyn, involved in keratinocyte differentiation, is a direct palmitoylation target of Zdhhc21 and is mislocalized in mutant follicles. This study is the first to demonstrate a key role for palmitoylation in regulating developmental signals in mammalian tissue homeostasis.

  3. Three-component homeostasis control

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    Xu, Jin; Hong, Hyunsuk; Jo, Junghyo

    2014-03-01

    Two reciprocal components seem to be sufficient to maintain a control variable constant. However, pancreatic islets adapt three components to control glucose homeostasis. They are α (secreting glucagon), β (insulin), and δ (somatostatin) cells. Glucagon and insulin are the reciprocal hormones for increasing and decreasing blood glucose levels, while the role of somatostatin is unknown. However, it has been known how each hormone affects other cell types. Based on the pulsatile hormone secretion and the cellular interactions, this system can be described as coupled oscillators. In particular, we used the Landau-Stuart model to consider both amplitudes and phases of hormone oscillations. We found that the presence of the third component, δ cell, was effective to resist under glucose perturbations, and to quickly return to the normal glucose level once perturbed. Our analysis suggested that three components are necessary for advanced homeostasis control.

  4. Protein synthesis controls phosphate homeostasis.

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    Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element assimilated largely as orthophosphate (Pi). Cells respond to Pi starvation by importing Pi from their surroundings. We now report that impaired protein synthesis alone triggers a Pi starvation response even when Pi is plentiful in the extracellular milieu. In the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium , this response entails phosphorylation of the regulatory protein PhoB and transcription of PhoB-dependent Pi transporter genes and is eliminated upon stimulation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. When protein synthesis is impaired due to low cytoplasmic magnesium (Mg 2+ ), Salmonella triggers the Pi starvation response because ribosomes are destabilized, which reduces ATP consumption and thus free cytoplasmic Pi. This response is transient because low cytoplasmic Mg 2+ promotes an uptake in Mg 2+ and a decrease in ATP levels, which stabilizes ribosomes, resulting in ATP consumption and Pi increase, thus ending the response. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of protein synthesis also elicited a Pi starvation response in the bacterium Escherichia coli and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Our findings identify a regulatory connection between protein synthesis and Pi homeostasis that is widespread in nature. © 2018 Pontes and Groisman; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Epidermal Homeostasis and Radiation Responses in a Multiscale Tissue Modeling Framework

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    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of skin is lined with several thin layers of epithelial cells that are maintained throughout life time by a small population of stem cells. High dose radiation exposures could injure and deplete the underlying proliferative cells and induce cutaneous radiation syndrome. In this work we propose a multiscale computational model for skin epidermal dynamics that links phenomena occurring at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation indexes comparable to observations in unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments. At the sub-cellular level, several recently published Wnt signaling controlled cell-cycle models are applied and the roles of key components and parameters are analyzed. Based on our simulation results, we demonstrate that a moderate increase of proliferation rate for the survival proliferative cells is sufficient to fully repopulate the area denuded by high dose radiation, as long as the integrity of underlying basement membrane is maintained. Our work highlights the importance of considering proliferation kinetics as well as the spatial organization of tissues when conducting in vivo investigations of radiation responses. This integrated model allow us to test the validity of several basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on skin.

  6. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

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    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  7. Epidermal Expression and Regulation of Interleukin-33 during Homeostasis and Inflammation: Strong Species Differences.

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    Sundnes, Olav; Pietka, Wojciech; Loos, Tamara; Sponheim, Jon; Rankin, Andrew L; Pflanz, Stefan; Bertelsen, Vibeke; Sitek, Jan C; Hol, Johanna; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Khnykin, Denis

    2015-07-01

    IL-33 is a novel IL-1 family member with a putative role in inflammatory skin disorders and a complex biology. Therefore, recent conflicting data regarding its function in experimental models justify a close assessment of its tissue expression and regulation. Indeed, we report here that there are strong species differences in the expression and regulation of epidermal IL-33. In murine epidermis, IL-33 behaved similar to an alarmin, being constitutively expressed in keratinocyte nuclei and rapidly lost during acute inflammation. By contrast, human and porcine IL-33 were weakly expressed or absent in keratinocytes of noninflamed skin but induced during acute inflammation. To this end, we observed that expression of IL-33 in human keratinocytes but not murine keratinocytes was strongly induced by IFN-γ, and this upregulation completely depended on the presence of EGFR ligands. Accordingly, IFN-γ increased the expression of IL-33 in the basal layers of the epidermis in human ex vivo skin cultures only, despite good evidence of IFN-γ activity in cultures from both species. Together these findings demonstrate that a full understanding of IL-33 function in clinical settings must take species-specific differences into account.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor-induced activato protein 1 activity controls density-dependent growht inhibition in normal rat kidney fibroblasts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornberg, J.J.; Dekker, H.; Peters, P.H.J.; Langerak, P.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Lankelma, J.; Zoelen, E.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Density-dependent growth inhibition secures tissue homeostasis. Dysfunction of the mechanisms, which regulate this type of growth control is a major cause of neoplasia. In confluent normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor levels decline, ultimately rendering these

  9. BLIMP1 Is Required for Postnatal Epidermal Homeostasis but Does Not Define a Sebaceous Gland Progenitor under Steady-State Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kretzschmar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available B-lymphocyte-induced nuclear maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1 was previously reported to define a sebaceous gland (SG progenitor population in the epidermis. However, the recent identification of multiple stem cell populations in the hair follicle junctional zone has led us to re-evaluate its function. We show, in agreement with previous studies, that BLIMP1 is expressed by postmitotic, terminally differentiated epidermal cells within the SG, interfollicular epidermis, and hair follicle. Epidermal overexpression of c-Myc results in loss of BLIMP1+ cells, an effect modulated by androgen signaling. Epidermal-specific deletion of Blimp1 causes multiple differentiation defects in the epidermis in addition to SG enlargement. In culture, BLIMP1+ sebocytes have no greater clonogenic potential than BLIMP1− sebocytes. Finally, lineage-tracing experiments reveal that, under steady-state conditions, BLIMP1-expressing cells do not divide. Thus, rather than defining a sebocyte progenitor population, BLIMP1 functions in terminally differentiated cells to maintain homeostasis in multiple epidermal compartments.

  10. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

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    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  11. CNS-targets in control of energy and glucose homeostasis.

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    Kleinridders, André; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2009-12-01

    The exceeding efforts in understanding the signals initiated by nutrients and hormones in the central nervous system (CNS) to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis have largely revolutionized our understanding of the neurocircuitry in control of peripheral metabolism. The ability of neurons to sense nutrients and hormones and to adopt a coordinated response to these signals is of crucial importance in controlling food intake, energy expenditure, glucose and lipid metabolism. Anatomical lesion experiments, pharmacological inhibition of signaling pathways, and, more recently, the analysis of conditional mouse mutants with modifications of hormone and nutrient signaling in defined neuronal populations have broadened our understanding of these complex neurocircuits. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of the CNS in sensing and transmitting nutritional and hormonal signals to control energy and glucose homeostasis and aims to define them as potential novel drug targets for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Shavenbaby couples patterning to epidermal cell shape control.

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    Hélène Chanut-Delalande

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that developmental programs act during embryogenesis to determine animal morphogenesis. How these developmental cues produce specific cell shape during morphogenesis, however, has remained elusive. We addressed this question by studying the morphological differentiation of the Drosophila epidermis, governed by a well-known circuit of regulators leading to a stereotyped pattern of smooth cells and cells forming actin-rich extensions (trichomes. It was shown that the transcription factor Shavenbaby plays a pivotal role in the formation of trichomes and underlies all examined cases of the evolutionary diversification of their pattern. To gain insight into the mechanisms of morphological differentiation, we sought to identify shavenbaby's downstream targets. We show here that Shavenbaby controls epidermal cell shape, through the transcriptional activation of different classes of cellular effectors, directly contributing to the organization of actin filaments, regulation of the extracellular matrix, and modification of the cuticle. Individual inactivation of shavenbaby's targets produces distinct trichome defects and only their simultaneous inactivation prevent trichome formation. Our data show that shavenbaby governs an evolutionarily conserved developmental module consisting of a set of genes collectively responsible for trichome formation, shedding new light on molecular mechanisms acting during morphogenesis and the way they can influence evolution of animal forms.

  13. Ets transcription factor GABP controls T cell homeostasis and immunity.

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    Luo, Chong T; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice U; Do, Mytrang H; Bivona, Michael R; Toure, Ahmed; Kang, Davina; Xie, Yuchen; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2017-10-20

    Peripheral T cells are maintained in the absence of vigorous stimuli, and respond to antigenic stimulation by initiating cell cycle progression and functional differentiation. Here we show that depletion of the Ets family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP) in T cells impairs T-cell homeostasis. In addition, GABP is critically required for antigen-stimulated T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptome and genome-wide GABP-binding site analyses identify GABP direct targets encoding proteins involved in cellular redox balance and DNA replication, including the Mcm replicative helicases. These findings show that GABP has a nonredundant role in the control of T-cell homeostasis and immunity.

  14. Thyroid hormone and the central control of homeostasis.

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    Warner, Amy; Mittag, Jens

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. More recently, it was shown that the hormone also modulates these systems by actions on the central autonomic control. Recent studies that either manipulated thyroid hormone signalling in anatomical areas of the brain or analysed seasonal models with an endogenous fluctuation in hypothalamic thyroid hormone levels revealed that the hormone controls energy turnover. However, most of these studies did not progress beyond the level of anatomical nuclei; thus, the neuronal substrates as well as the molecular mechanisms remain largely enigmatic. This review summarises the evidence for a role of thyroid hormone in the central autonomic control of peripheral homeostasis and advocates novel strategies to address thyroid hormone action in the brain on a cellular level.

  15. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

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    Smith, John K.

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 and leptin. It provides an insight as to how high intensity exercise may improve homeostatic control in overweight and obese subjects. Finally, it provides suggestions as to how further progress can be made in controlling the current pandemic of obesity and diabetes.

  16. Homeostasis control of building environment using sensor agent robot

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    Nagahama, Eri; Mita, Akira

    2012-04-01

    A human centered system for building is demanded to meet variety of needs due to the diversification and maturation of society. Smart buildings and smart houses have been studied to satisfy this demand. However, it is difficult for such systems to respond flexibly to unexpected events and needs that are caused by aging and complicate emotion changes. With this regards, we suggest "Biofied Buildings". The goal for this research is to realize buildings that are safer, more comfortable and more energy-efficient by embedding adaptive functions of life into buildings. In this paper, we propose a new control system for building environments, focused on physiological adaptation, particularly homeostasis, endocrine system and immune system. Residents are used as living sensors and controllers in the control loop. A sensor agent robot is used to acquire resident's discomfort feeling, and to output hormone-like signals to activate devices to control the environments. The proposed system could control many devices without establishing complicated scenarios. Results obtained from some simulations and the demonstration experiments using an LED lighting system showed that the proposed system were able to achieve robust and stable control of environments without complicated scenarios.

  17. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances.

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    Hauck, Markus

    2008-05-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+), but not of Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe(2+) or Zn(2+) have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu(2+) and Mn(2+) uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens.

  18. An epidermal microRNA regulates neuronal migration through control of the cellular glycosylation state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael Egebjerg; Snieckute, Goda; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    An appropriate balance in glycosylation of proteoglycans is crucial for their ability to regulate animal development. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA mir-79, an ortholog of mammalian miR-9, controls sugar-chain homeostasis by targeting two proteins in the proteoglycan bio...... that impinges on a LON-2/glypican pathway and disrupts neuronal migration. Our results identify a regulatory axis controlled by a conserved microRNA that maintains proteoglycan homeostasis in cells....

  19. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

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    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  20. Metabolic sensing neurons and the control of energy homeostasis.

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    Levin, Barry E

    2006-11-30

    The brain and periphery carry on a constant conversation; the periphery informs the brain about its metabolic needs and the brain provides for these needs through its control of somatomotor, autonomic and neurohumoral pathways involved in energy intake, expenditure and storage. Metabolic sensing neurons are the integrators of a variety of metabolic, humoral and neural inputs from the periphery. Such neurons, originally called "glucosensing", also respond to fatty acids, hormones and metabolites from the periphery. They are integrated within neural pathways involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Unlike most neurons, they utilize glucose and other metabolites as signaling molecules to regulate their membrane potential and firing rate. For glucosensing neurons, glucokinase acts as the rate-limiting step in glucosensing while the pathways that mediate responses to metabolites like lactate, ketone bodies and fatty acids are less well characterized. Many metabolic sensing neurons also respond to insulin and leptin and other peripheral hormones and receive neural inputs from peripheral organs. Each set of afferent signals arrives with different temporal profiles and by different routes and these inputs are summated at the level of the membrane potential to produce a given neural firing pattern. In some obese individuals, the relative sensitivity of metabolic sensing neurons to various peripheral inputs is genetically reduced. This may provide one mechanism underlying their propensity to become obese when exposed to diets high in fat and caloric density. Thus, metabolic sensing neurons may provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity.

  1. Metal homeostasis in Hypogymnia physodes is controlled by lichen substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the lichen substances produced by the epiphytic lichen Hypogymnia physodes control the intracellular uptake of divalent transition metals. Incubating lichen thalli with and without their natural content of lichen substances with metal solutions showed that the lichen substances of H. physodes selectively inhibit the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not of Fe 2+ and Zn 2+ . Such behavior is ecologically beneficial, as ambient concentrations of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ in precipitation and bark are known to limit the abundance of H. physodes, whereas limiting effects of Fe 2+ or Zn 2+ have never been found. This suggests that increasing the Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ tolerance stimulated the evolution of lichen substances in H. physodes. The depsidone physodalic acid is apparently most effective at reducing Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ uptake among the seven lichen substances produced by H. physodes. Probably lichen substances play a general role in the metal homeostasis of lichens. - Lichen substances in Hypogymnia physodes specifically reduce the uptake of Cu 2+ and Mn 2+ , but not Fe 2+ or Zn 2+

  2. Multilevel control of glucose homeostasis by adenylyl cyclase 8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoux, Matthieu; Vacher, Pierre; Papin, Julien; Picard, Alexandre; Kostrzewa, Elzbieta; Devin, Anne; Gaitan, Julien; Limon, Isabelle; Kas, Martien J.; Magnan, Christophe; Lang, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Nutrient homeostasis requires integration of signals generated by glucose metabolism and hormones. Expression of the calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase ADCY8 is regulated by glucose and the enzyme is capable of integrating signals from multiple pathways. It may thus have an

  3. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    John K. Smith

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones...

  4. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Leon J.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we

  5. Mechanisms of Cell Polarity-Controlled Epithelial Homeostasis and Immunity in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunder, Leon J; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard; van IJzendoorn, Sven C D

    2017-07-05

    Intestinal epithelial cell polarity is instrumental to maintain epithelial homeostasis and balance communications between the gut lumen and bodily tissue, thereby controlling the defense against gastrointestinal pathogens and maintenance of immune tolerance to commensal bacteria. In this review, we highlight recent advances with regard to the molecular mechanisms of cell polarity-controlled epithelial homeostasis and immunity in the human intestine. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. [Progress in epidermal stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Juan; Wang, You-Liang; Yang, Xiao

    2010-03-01

    Mammalian skin epidermis contains different epidermal stem cell pools which contribute to the homeostasis and repair of skin epithelium. Epidermal stem cells possess two essential features common to all stem cells: self-renewal and differentiation. Disturbing the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of epidermal stem cell often causes tumors or other skin diseases. Epidermal stem cell niches provide a special microenvironment that maintains a balance of stem cell quiescence and activity. This review primarily concentrates on the following points of the epidermal stem cells: the existing evidences, the self-renewal and differentiation, the division pattern, the signal pathways regulating self-renewal and differentiation, and the microenvironment (niche) and macroenvironment maintaining the homeostasis of stem cells.

  7. Renal Control of Calcium, Phosphate, and Magnesium Homeostasis

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    Chonchol, Michel; Levi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are multivalent cations that are important for many biologic and cellular functions. The kidneys play a central role in the homeostasis of these ions. Gastrointestinal absorption is balanced by renal excretion. When body stores of these ions decline significantly, gastrointestinal absorption, bone resorption, and renal tubular reabsorption increase to normalize their levels. Renal regulation of these ions occurs through glomerular filtration and tubular reabsorption and/or secretion and is therefore an important determinant of plasma ion concentration. Under physiologic conditions, the whole body balance of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium is maintained by fine adjustments of urinary excretion to equal the net intake. This review discusses how calcium, phosphate, and magnesium are handled by the kidneys. PMID:25287933

  8. Tight junction regulates epidermal calcium ion gradient and differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, Masumi; Maeda, Tetsuo; Oba, Ai; Yamamoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We disrupted epidermal tight junction barrier in reconstructed epidermis. → It altered Ca 2+ distribution and consequentially differentiation state as well. → Tight junction should affect epidermal homeostasis by maintaining Ca 2+ gradient. -- Abstract: It is well known that calcium ions (Ca 2+ ) induce keratinocyte differentiation. Ca 2+ distributes to form a vertical gradient that peaks at the stratum granulosum. It is thought that the stratum corneum (SC) forms the Ca 2+ gradient since it is considered the only permeability barrier in the skin. However, the epidermal tight junction (TJ) in the granulosum has recently been suggested to restrict molecular movement to assist the SC as a secondary barrier. The objective of this study was to clarify the contribution of the TJ to Ca 2+ gradient and epidermal differentiation in reconstructed human epidermis. When the epidermal TJ barrier was disrupted by sodium caprate treatment, Ca 2+ flux increased and the gradient changed in ion-capture cytochemistry images. Alterations of ultrastructures and proliferation/differentiation markers revealed that both hyperproliferation and precocious differentiation occurred regionally in the epidermis. These results suggest that the TJ plays a crucial role in maintaining epidermal homeostasis by controlling the Ca 2+ gradient.

  9. The Membrane-anchored Serine Protease Prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) Supports Epidermal Development and Postnatal Homeostasis Independent of Its Enzymatic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Diane E; Szabo, Roman; Friis, Stine

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored serine protease prostasin (CAP1/PRSS8) is part of a cell surface proteolytic cascade that is essential for epithelial barrier formation and homeostasis. Here, we report the surprising finding that prostasin executes these functions independent of its own enzymatic activity. ...

  10. Control of Immune Cell Homeostasis and Function by lncRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowel, Walter K; Kotzin, Jonathan J; McCright, Sam J; Neal, Vanessa D; Henao-Mejia, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    The immune system is composed of diverse cell types that coordinate responses to infection and maintain tissue homeostasis. In each of these cells, extracellular cues determine highly specific epigenetic landscapes and transcriptional profiles to promote immunity while maintaining homeostasis. New evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation in mammals. Thus, lncRNAs have emerged as key regulatory molecules of immune cell gene expression programs in response to microbial and tissue-derived cues. We review here how lncRNAs control the function and homeostasis of cell populations during immune responses, emphasizing the diverse molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs tune highly contextualized transcriptional programs. In addition, we discuss the new challenges faced in interrogating lncRNA mechanisms and function in the immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees helps deactivate phenolics in nectar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanglin; He, Jianzhong; Fu, Wenjun

    2005-06-01

    Honey bees have a highly developed nest homeostasis, for example, maintaining low CO2 levels and stable nest temperatures at 35°C.We investigate the role of nest homeostasis in deactivating phenolic compounds present in the nectar of Aloe littoralis. We show that the phenolic content in nectar was reduced (from 0.65% to 0.49%) after nectar was incubated in a nest of Apis cerana, and that it was reduced still more (from 0.65% to 0.37%) if nectar was mixed with hypopharyngeal gland proteins (HGP) of worker bees before being placed inside a nest. HGP had little effect on samples outside a nest, indicating that nest conditions are necessary for HGP to deactivate phenolics in nectar. Consequently, the highly controlled nest homeostasis of honey bees facilitates direct deactivation of phenolics in nectar, and plays a role in the action of HGP as well.

  12. The hypothalamic clock and its control of glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The everyday life of mammals, including humans, exhibits many behavioral, physiological and endocrine oscillations. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms is contained in the central nervous system (CNS). The output of the CNS clock not only controls daily rhythms in sleep/wake (or

  13. Phosphate homeostasis in Bartter syndrome: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Alberto; Viganò, Cristina; Provero, Maria Cristina; Barretta, Francesco; Albisetti, Alessandra; Tedeschi, Silvana; Scicchitano, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G

    2014-11-01

    Bartter patients may be hypercalciuric. Additional abnormalities in the metabolism of calcium, phosphate, and calciotropic hormones have occasionally been reported. The metabolism of calcium, phosphate, and calciotropic hormones was investigated in 15 patients with Bartter syndrome and 15 healthy subjects. Compared to the controls, Bartter patients had significantly reduced plasma phosphate {mean [interquartile range]:1.29 [1.16-1.46] vs. 1.61 [1.54-1.67] mmol/L} and maximal tubular phosphate reabsorption (1.16 [1.00-1.35] vs. 1.41 [1.37-1.47] mmol/L) and significantly increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) level (6.1 [4.5-7.7] vs. 2.8 [2.2-4.4] pmol/L). However, patients and controls did not differ in blood calcium, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin levels. In patients, an inverse correlation (P Bartter patients.

  14. CART neurons in the arcuate nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area exert differential controls on energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Lau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART codes for a pivotal neuropeptide important in the control of appetite and energy homeostasis. However, limited understanding exists for the defined effector sites underlying CART function, as discrepant effects of central CART administration have been reported. Methods: By combining Cart-cre knock-in mice with a Cart adeno-associated viral vector designed using the flip-excision switch (AAV-FLEX technology, specific reintroduction or overexpression of CART selectively in CART neurons in the arcuate nucleus (Arc and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA, respectively, was achieved. The effects on energy homeostasis control were investigated. Results: Here we show that CART neuron-specific reintroduction of CART into the Arc and LHA leads to distinct effects on energy homeostasis control. Specifically, CART reintroduction into the Arc of otherwise CART-deficient Cartcre/cre mice markedly decreased fat mass and body weight, whereas CART reintroduction into the LHA caused significant fat mass gain and lean mass loss, but overall unaltered body weight. The reduced adiposity in ArcCART;Cartcre/cre mice was associated with an increase in both energy expenditure and physical activity, along with significantly decreased Npy mRNA levels in the Arc but with no change in food consumption. Distinctively, the elevated fat mass in LHACART;Cartcre/cre mice was accompanied by diminished insulin responsiveness and glucose tolerance, greater spontaneous food intake, and reduced energy expenditure, which is consistent with the observed decrease of brown adipose tissue temperature. This is also in line with significantly reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (Th and notably increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (Crh mRNA expressions in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Conclusions: Taken together, these results identify catabolic and anabolic effects of CART in the Arc and LHA, respectively, demonstrating for

  15. VEGF, FGF-2 and TGFβ expression in the normal and regenerating epidermis of geckos: implications for epidermal homeostasis and wound healing in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Noeline; Petrik, James J; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2018-05-01

    The skin is a bilayered organ that serves as a key barrier between an organism and its environment. In addition to protecting against microbial invasion, physical trauma and environmental damage, skin participates in maintaining homeostasis. Skin is also capable of spontaneous self-repair following injury. These functions are mediated by numerous pleiotrophic growth factors, including members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) families. Although growth factor expression has been well documented in mammals, particularly during wound healing, for groups such as reptiles less is known. Here, we investigate the spatio-temporal pattern of expression of multiple growth factors in normal skin and following a full-thickness cutaneous injury in the representative lizard Eublepharis macularius, the leopard gecko. Unlike mammals, leopard geckos can heal cutaneous wounds without scarring. We demonstrate that before, during and after injury, keratinocytes of the epidermis express a diverse panel of growth factor ligands and receptors, including: VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and phosphorylated VEGFR2; FGF-2 and FGFR1; and phosphorylated SMAD2, TGFβ1, and activin βA. Unexpectedly, only the tyrosine kinase receptors VEGFR1 and FGFR1 were dynamically expressed, and only during the earliest phases of re-epithelization; otherwise all the proteins of interest were constitutively present. We propose that the ubiquitous pattern of growth factor expression by keratinocytes is associated with various roles during tissue homeostasis, including protection against ultraviolet photodamage and coordinated body-wide skin shedding. © 2018 Anatomical Society.

  16. Exposure to carbon ions triggers pro-inflammatory signals, changes in homeostasis and epidermal tissue organization to a similar extent as photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma eSimoniello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing application of charged particles in radiotherapy requires a deeper understanding of early and late side effects occurring in skin, which is exposed in all radiation treatments. We measured cellular and molecular changes related to the early inflammatory response of human skin irradiated with carbon ions, in particular cell death induction and changes in differentiation and proliferation of epidermal cells during the first days after exposure.Model systems for human skin from healthy donors of different complexity, i.e. keratinocytes, co-culture of skin cells, 3D skin equivalent and skin explants, were used to investigate the alterations induced by carbon ions (spread-out Bragg-peak, dose averaged LET 100 keV/µm in comparison to X-ray and UV-B exposure. After exposure to ionizing radiation, in none of the model systems apoptosis/necrosis was observed. Carbon ions triggered inflammatory signalling and accelerated differentiation of keratinocytes to a similar extent as X-rays at the same doses. High doses of carbon ions were more effective than X-rays in reducing proliferation and inducing abnormal differentiation. In contrast, changes identified following low dose exposure (≤ 0.5 Gy were induced more effectively after X-ray exposure, i.e. enhanced proliferation and change in the polarity of basal cells.

  17. CHIP regulates aquaporin-2 quality control and body water homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qi; Moeller, Hanne B.; Stevens, Donté A.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of the kidney distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) is highlighted by various water and electrolyte disorders that arise when the unique transport properties of these segments are disturbed. Despite this critical role, little is known about which proteins...... by vasopressin; interacts with aquaporin-2 (AQP2), Hsp70, and Hsc70; and can directly ubiquitylate the water channel AQP2 in vitro. shRNA knockdown of CHIP in CCD cells increased AQP2 protein t1/2 and reduced AQP2 ubiquitylation, resulting in greater levels of AQP2 andphosphorylatedAQP2.CHIP knockdown increased...... the plasma membrane abundance of AQP2 in these cells. Compared with wild-type controls, CHIP knockout mice or novel CRISPR/Cas9 mice without CHIPE3 ligase activity had greater AQP2 abundance and altered renal water handling, with decreased water intake and urine volume, alongside higher urine osmolality. We...

  18. A multi-scale model of hepcidin promoter regulation reveals factors controlling systemic iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Casanovas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic iron homeostasis involves a negative feedback circuit in which the expression level of the peptide hormone hepcidin depends on and controls the iron blood levels. Hepcidin expression is regulated by the BMP6/SMAD and IL6/STAT signaling cascades. Deregulation of either pathway causes iron-related diseases such as hemochromatosis or anemia of inflammation. We quantitatively analyzed how BMP6 and IL6 control hepcidin expression. Transcription factor (TF phosphorylation and reporter gene expression were measured under co-stimulation conditions, and the promoter was perturbed by mutagenesis. Using mathematical modeling, we systematically analyzed potential mechanisms of cooperative and competitive promoter regulation by the transcription factors, and experimentally validated the model predictions. Our results reveal that hepcidin cross-regulation primarily occurs by combinatorial transcription factor binding to the promoter, whereas signaling crosstalk is insignificant. We find that the presence of two BMP-responsive elements enhances the steepness of the promoter response towards the iron-sensing BMP signaling axis, which promotes iron homeostasis in vivo. IL6 co-stimulation reduces the promoter sensitivity towards the BMP signal, because the SMAD and STAT transcription factors compete for recruiting RNA polymerase to the transcription start site. This may explain why inflammatory signals disturb iron homeostasis in anemia of inflammation. Taken together, our results reveal why the iron homeostasis circuit is sensitive to perturbations implicated in disease.

  19. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    TCR and cytokine receptor signaling play key roles in the complex homeostatic mechanisms that maintain a relative stable number of T cells throughout life. Despite the homeostatic mechanisms, a slow decline in naive T cells is typically observed with age. The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif...... controls TCR down-regulation and plays a central role in fine-tuning TCR expression and signaling in T cells. In this study, we show that the age-associated decline of naive T cells is strongly accelerated in CD3gammaLLAA knock-in mice homozygous for a double leucine to alanine mutation in the CD3gamma di......-leucine-based motif, whereas the number of memory T cells is unaffected by the mutation. This results in premature T cell population senescence with a severe dominance of memory T cells and very few naive T cells in middle-aged to old CD3gamma mutant mice. The reduced number of naive T cells in CD3gamma mutant mice...

  20. Homeostasis lighting control based on relationship between lighting environment and human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Risa; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Although each person has own preferences, living spaces which can respond to various preferences and needs have not become reality. Focusing on the lighting environments which influence on the impression of living spaces, this research aims to offer comfortable lighting environments for each resident by a flexible control. This research examines the relationship between lighting environments and human behaviors considering colored lights. In accord with the relationship, this research proposes an illuminance-color control system which flexibly changes spatial environments responding to human conditions. Firstly, the psychological evaluation was conducted in order to build human models for various environments. As a result, preferred lighting environments for each examinee were determined for particular behaviors. Moreover, satisfaction levels of lighting environments were calculated by using seven types of impression of the environments as parameters. The results were summarized as human models. Secondly, this research proposed "Homeostasis Lighting Control System", which employs the human models. Homeostasis lighting control system embodies the algorithm of homeostasis, which is one of the functions of the physiological adaptation. Human discomfort feelings are obtained automatically by the sensor agent robot. The system can offer comfortable lighting environments without controlling environments by residents autonomously based on the information from the robot. This research takes into accounts both illuminance and color. The robot communicates with the server which contains human models, then the system corresponds to individuals. Combining these three systems, the proposed system can effectively control the lighting environment. At last, the feasibility of the proposed system was verified by simulation experiments.

  1. Practical homeostasis lighting control system using sensor agent robots for office space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokiwa, Momoko; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    The comfortable space can be changed by season, age, physical condition and the like. However, the current systems are not able to resolve them absolutely. This research proposes the Homeostasis lighting control system based on the mechanism of biotic homeostasis for making the algorithms of apparatus control. Homeostasis are kept by the interaction of the three systems, endocrine system, immune system, and nervous system[1]. By the gradual reaction in the endocrine system, body's protective response in the immune system, and the electrical reaction in the nerve system, we can keep the environments against variable changes. The new lighting control system utilizes this mechanism. Firstly, we focused on legibility and comfort in the office space to construct the control model learning from the endocrine and immune systems. The mechanism of the endocrine system is used for ambient lights in the space is used considering circadian rhythm for comfort. For the legibility, the immune system is used to control considering devices near the human depending on the distance between the human. Simulations and the demonstration were conducted to show the feasibility. Finally, the nerve system was intruded to enhance the system.

  2. Embryonic maturation of epidermal Merkel cells is controlled by a redundant transcription factor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, Carolina N; Bardot, Evan S; Valdes, Victor J; Santoriello, Francis J; Ezhkova, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Merkel cell-neurite complexes are located in touch-sensitive areas of the mammalian skin and are involved in recognition of the texture and shape of objects. Merkel cells are essential for these tactile discriminations, as they generate action potentials in response to touch stimuli and induce the firing of innervating afferent nerves. It has been shown that Merkel cells originate from epidermal stem cells, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms of their development are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed Merkel cell differentiation during development and found that it is a temporally regulated maturation process characterized by a sequential activation of Merkel cell-specific genes. We uncovered key transcription factors controlling this process and showed that the transcription factor Atoh1 is required for initial Merkel cell specification. The subsequent maturation steps of Merkel cell differentiation are controlled by cooperative function of the transcription factors Sox2 and Isl1, which physically interact and work to sustain Atoh1 expression. These findings reveal the presence of a robust transcriptional network required to produce functional Merkel cells that are required for tactile discrimination. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Dynein and EFF-1 control dendrite morphology by regulating the localization pattern of SAX-7 in epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ting; Liang, Xing; Wang, Xiang-Ming; Shen, Kang

    2017-12-01

    Our previous work showed that the cell adhesion molecule SAX-7 forms an elaborate pattern in Caenorhabditis elegans epidermal cells, which instructs PVD dendrite branching. However, the molecular mechanism forming the SAX-7 pattern in the epidermis is not fully understood. Here, we report that the dynein light intermediate chain DLI-1 and the fusogen EFF-1 are required in epidermal cells to pattern SAX-7. While previous reports suggest that these two molecules act cell-autonomously in the PVD, our results show that the disorganized PVD dendritic arbors in these mutants are due to the abnormal SAX-7 localization patterns in epidermal cells. Three lines of evidence support this notion. First, the epidermal SAX-7 pattern was severely affected in dli-1 and eff-1 mutants. Second, the abnormal SAX-7 pattern was predictive of the ectopic PVD dendrites. Third, expression of DLI-1 or EFF-1 in the epidermis rescued both the SAX-7 pattern and the disorganized PVD dendrite phenotypes, whereas expression of these molecules in the PVD did not. We also show that DLI-1 functions cell-autonomously in the PVD to promote distal branch formation. These results demonstrate the unexpected roles of DLI-1 and EFF-1 in the epidermis in the control of PVD dendrite morphogenesis. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway required for immune homeostasis is neurally controlled by arrestin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2012-09-28

    In response to pathogen infection, the host innate immune system activates microbial killing pathways and cellular stress pathways that need to be balanced because insufficient or excessive immune responses have deleterious consequences. Recent studies demonstrate that two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans control immune homeostasis. To investigate further how GPCR signaling controls immune homeostasis at the organismal level, we studied arrestin-1 (ARR-1), which is the only GPCR adaptor protein in C. elegans. The results indicate that ARR-1 is required for GPCR signaling in ASH, ASI, AQR, PQR, and URX neurons, which control the unfolded protein response and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway required for innate immunity. ARR-1 activity also controlled immunity through ADF chemosensory and AFD thermosensory neurons that regulate longevity. Furthermore, we found that although ARR-1 played a key role in the control of immunity by AFD thermosensory neurons, it did not control longevity through these cells. However, ARR-1 partially controlled longevity through ADF neurons.

  5. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Casein kinase 1 regulates sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) to control sterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookheart, Rita T; Lee, Chih-Yung S; Espenshade, Peter J

    2014-01-31

    Sterol homeostasis is tightly controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor that is highly conserved from fungi to mammals. In fission yeast, SREBP functions in an oxygen-sensing pathway to promote adaptation to decreased oxygen supply that limits oxygen-dependent sterol synthesis. Low oxygen stimulates proteolytic cleavage of the SREBP homolog Sre1, generating the active transcription factor Sre1N that drives expression of sterol biosynthetic enzymes. In addition, low oxygen increases the stability and DNA binding activity of Sre1N. To identify additional signals controlling Sre1 activity, we conducted a genetic overexpression screen. Here, we describe our isolation and characterization of the casein kinase 1 family member Hhp2 as a novel regulator of Sre1N. Deletion of Hhp2 increases Sre1N protein stability and ergosterol levels in the presence of oxygen. Hhp2-dependent Sre1N degradation by the proteasome requires Hhp2 kinase activity, and Hhp2 binds and phosphorylates Sre1N at specific residues. Our results describe a role for casein kinase 1 as a direct regulator of sterol homeostasis. Given the role of mammalian Hhp2 homologs, casein kinase 1δ and 1ε, in regulation of the circadian clock, these findings may provide a mechanism for coordinating circadian rhythm and lipid metabolism.

  7. Exercise and Glycemic Control: Focus on Redox Homeostasis and Redox-Sensitive Protein Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Stepto, Nigel K.; Levinger, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    Physical inactivity, excess energy consumption, and obesity are associated with elevated systemic oxidative stress and the sustained activation of redox-sensitive stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Sustained SAPK activation leads to aberrant insulin signaling, impaired glycemic control, and the development and progression of cardiometabolic disease. Paradoxically, acute exercise transiently increases oxidative stress and SAPK signaling, yet postexercise glycemic control and skeletal muscle function are enhanced. Furthermore, regular exercise leads to the upregulation of antioxidant defense, which likely assists in the mitigation of chronic oxidative stress-associated disease. In this review, we explore the complex spatiotemporal interplay between exercise, oxidative stress, and glycemic control, and highlight exercise-induced reactive oxygen species and redox-sensitive protein signaling as important regulators of glucose homeostasis. PMID:28529499

  8. Central control of glucose homeostasis: the brain--endocrine pancreas axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorens, B

    2010-10-01

    A large body of data gathered over the last decades has delineated the neuronal pathways that link the central nervous system with the autonomic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, which controls alpha- and beta-cell secretion activity and mass. These are important regulatory functions that are certainly keys for preserving the capacity of the endocrine pancreas to control glucose homeostasis over a lifetime. Identifying the cells involved in controlling the autonomic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, in response to nutrient, hormonal and environmental cues and how these cues are detected to activate neuronal activity are important goals of current research. Elucidation of these questions may possibly lead to new means for preserving or restoring defects in insulin and glucagon secretion associated with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Miller

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism, demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in

  10. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Miles; Hafner, Marc; Sontag, Eduardo; Davidsohn, Noah; Subramanian, Sairam; Purnick, Priscilla E M; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation, and

  11. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  12. Hepatic CREB3L3 controls whole-body energy homeostasis and improves obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Tokushige, Naoko; Tezuka, Hitomi; Mikami, Motoki; Iwata, Wakiko; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kiwata, Shiori; Fujimoto, Yuri; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Danno, Hirosuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masako; Kawakami, Yasushi; Urayama, Osamu; Sone, Hirohito; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the liver is the key to maintaining systemic energy homeostasis during starvation. The membrane-bound transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3) has been reported to be activated during fasting and to regulate triglyceride metabolism. Here, we show that CREB3L3 confers a wide spectrum of metabolic responses to starvation in vivo. Adenoviral and transgenic overexpression of nuclear CREB3L3 induced systemic lipolysis, hepatic ketogenesis, and insulin sensitivity with increased energy expenditure, leading to marked reduction in body weight, plasma lipid levels, and glucose levels. CREB3L3 overexpression activated gene expression levels and plasma levels of antidiabetic hormones, including fibroblast growth factor 21 and IGF-binding protein 2. Amelioration of diabetes by hepatic activation of CREB3L3 was also observed in several types of diabetic obese mice. Nuclear CREB3L3 mutually activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α promoter in an autoloop fashion and is crucial for the ligand transactivation of PPARα by interacting with its transcriptional regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α. CREB3L3 directly and indirectly controls fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and its plasma level, which contributes at least partially to the catabolic effects of CREB3L3 on systemic energy homeostasis in the entire body. Therefore, CREB3L3 is a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes.

  13. Homeostasis 5: nurses as external agents of control in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, John; McVicar, Andrew

    Breast cancer is caused by a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. Healthcare practitioners need to understand cellular activities to appreciate the physiological basis of health (homeostasis), the pathophysiological basis of illness and the physiological rationale of healthcare. Cells are the 'basic unit of life' (Clancy and McVicar, 2011a). This article describes normal cell division and the anatomy and physiology of the breast and, using a case study, will show how breast cancer is a homeostatic imbalance of cell division. There are analogies between the components of homeostasis and the components of the nursing (healthcare) process (Clancy and McVicar, 2011b) in the condition of breast cancer. After reading this article, nurses should be able to: understand that breast cancer is a cellular hence chemical imbalance that causes uncontrollable mitotic division of breast cells; understand how the cell cycle of cancer cells differs from that of normal cells; identify nature-nurture interactions involved in the aetiology of breast cancer; understand that when caring for people with breast cancer, health professionals including oncology nurses are acting as external agents of homeostatic control as the patient 'recovers' from breast cancer, and also to some extent when reducing signs and symptoms, hence quality of life, by providing palliative care.

  14. Homeostasis in leaf water potentials on leeward and windward sides of desert shrub crowns: water loss control vs. high hydraulic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iogna, Patricia A; Bucci, Sandra J; Scholz, Fabián G; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in morphophysiological leaf traits in response to wind was studied in two dominant shrub species of the Patagonian steppe, used as model systems for understanding effects of high wind speed on leaf water relations and hydraulic properties of small woody plants. Morpho-anatomical traits, hydraulic conductance and conductivity and water relations in leaves of wind-exposed and protected crown sides were examined during the summer with nearly continuous high winds. Although exposed sides of the crowns were subjected to higher wind speeds and air saturation deficits than the protected sides, leaves throughout the crown had similar minimum leaf water potential (ΨL). The two species were able to maintain homeostasis in minimum ΨL using different physiological mechanisms. Berberis microphylla avoided a decrease in the minimum ΨL in the exposed side of the crown by reducing water loss by stomatal control, loss of cell turgor and low epidermal conductance. Colliguaja integerrima increased leaf water transport efficiency to maintain transpiration rates without increasing the driving force for water loss in the wind-exposed crown side. Leaf physiological changes within the crown help to prevent the decrease of minimum ΨL and thus contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis, assuring the hydraulic integrity of the plant under unfavorable conditions. The responses of leaf traits that contribute to mechanical resistance (leaf mass per area and thickness) differed from those of large physiological traits by exhibiting low phenotypic plasticity. The results of this study help us to understand the unique properties of shrubs which have different hydraulic architecture compared to trees.

  15. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  16. Importance of the gut-brain axis in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migrenne, Stéphanie; Marsollier, Nicolas; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, Céline; Magnan, Christophe

    2006-12-01

    Adult mammals finely match glucose production to glucose utilization, thus allowing glycaemia to be maintained in a physiological range of 0.8-1.2mg/dl whatever the energetic status of the mammal (i.e. fed or fasted, rested or exercised). To accomplish this, peripheral signals originating from the gut 'inform' the central nervous system, which in turn is able to monitor the status of both peripheral glucose stores and ongoing fuel availability. Indeed, both secretion and action of hormones regulating endogenous glucose production and utilization are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. These gut signals are either hormonal (e.g. glucagon-like peptide-1, ghrelin and cholecystokinine) or neuronal (e.g. afferent vagus nerve fibres). Recent data, combined with the development of incretin analogues for treatment of diabetes, highlight the importance of the gut-brain axis, especially glucagon-like peptide-1 and ghrelin, in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  17. The importance of being subtle: small changes in calcium homeostasis control cognitive decline in normal aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toescu, E.C.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 6, - (2007), s. 267-273 ISSN 1474-9718 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Aging * Ca homeostasis * Cognitive decline Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.854, year: 2007

  18. Polyamines control of cation transport across plant membranes: implications for ion homeostasis and abiotic stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are unique polycationic metabolites, controlling a variety of vital functions in plants, including growth and stress responses. Over the last two decades a bulk of data was accumulated providing explicit evidence that polyamines play an essential role in regulating plant membrane transport. The most straightforward example is a blockage of the two major vacuolar cation channels, namely slow (SV) and fast (FV) activating ones, by the micromolar concentrations of polyamines. This effect is direct and fully reversible, with a potency descending in a sequence Spm(4+) > Spd(3+) > Put(2+). On the contrary, effects of polyamines on the plasma membrane (PM) cation and K(+)-selective channels are hardly dependent on polyamine species, display a relatively low affinity, and are likely to be indirect. Polyamines also affect vacuolar and PM H(+) pumps and Ca(2+) pump of the PM. On the other hand, catabolization of polyamines generates H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydroxyl radicals. Export of polyamines to the apoplast and their oxidation there by available amine oxidases results in the induction of a novel ion conductance and confers Ca(2+) influx across the PM. This mechanism, initially established for plant responses to pathogen attack (including a hypersensitive response), has been recently shown to mediate plant responses to a variety of abiotic stresses. In this review we summarize the effects of polyamines and their catabolites on cation transport in plants and discuss the implications of these effects for ion homeostasis, signaling, and plant adaptive responses to environment.

  19. Pancreatic polypeptide controls energy homeostasis via Npy6r signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Loh, Kim; Lin, Shu; Lau, Jackie; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Yanchuan; Berning, Britt A; Enriquez, Ronaldo; Driessler, Frank; Macia, Laurence; Khor, Ee Cheng; Qi, Yue; Baldock, Paul; Sainsbury, Amanda; Herzog, Herbert

    2014-01-07

    Y-receptors control energy homeostasis, but the role of Npy6 receptors (Npy6r) is largely unknown. Young Npy6r-deficient (Npy6r(-/-)) mice have reduced body weight, lean mass, and adiposity, while older and high-fat-fed Npy6r(-/-) mice have low lean mass with increased adiposity. Npy6r(-/-) mice showed reduced hypothalamic growth hormone releasing hormone (Ghrh) expression and serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels relative to WT. This is likely due to impaired vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where we found Npy6r coexpressed in VIP neurons. Peripheral administration of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) increased Fos expression in the SCN, increased energy expenditure, and reduced food intake in WT, but not Npy6r(-/-), mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal (i.p.) PP injection increased hypothalamic Ghrh mRNA expression and serum IGF-1 levels in WT, but not Npy6r(-/-), mice, an effect blocked by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VPAC) receptors antagonism. Thus, PP-initiated signaling through Npy6r in VIP neurons regulates the growth hormone axis and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular control of steady-state dendritic cell maturation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Gianna Elena; Ma, Averil

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized sentinels responsible for coordinating adaptive immunity. This function is dependent upon coupled sensitivity to environmental signs of inflammation and infection to cellular maturation-the programmed alteration of DC phenotype and function to enhance immune cell activation. Although DCs are thus well equipped to respond to pathogens, maturation triggers are not unique to infection. Given that immune cells are exquisitely sensitive to the biological functions of DCs, we now appreciate that multiple layers of suppression are required to restrict the environmental sensitivity, cellular maturation, and even life span of DCs to prevent aberrant immune activation during the steady state. At the same time, steady-state DCs are not quiescent but rather perform key functions that support homeostasis of numerous cell types. Here we review these functions and molecular mechanisms of suppression that control steady-state DC maturation. Corruption of these steady-state operatives has diverse immunological consequences and pinpoints DCs as potent drivers of autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  1. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A; Vemuri, Mohan C; Boucher, Shayne E; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Kerr, Candace

    2013-02-01

    The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemistry of epidermal stem cells☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard L.; Adhikary, Gautam; Balasubramanian, Sivaprakasam; Rorke, Ellen A.; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Boucher, Shayne E.; Bickenbach, Jackie R.; Kerr, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidermis is an important protective barrier that is essential for maintenance of life. Maintaining this barrier requires continuous cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, these processes must be balanced to produce a normal epidermis. The stem cells of the epidermis reside in specific locations in the basal epidermis, hair follicle and sebaceous glands and these cells are responsible for replenishment of this tissue. Scope of review A great deal of effort has gone into identifying protein epitopes that mark stem cells, in identifying stem cell niche locations, and in understanding how stem cell populations are related. We discuss these studies as they apply to understanding normal epidermal homeostasis and skin cancer. Major conclusions An assortment of stem cell markers have been identified that permit assignment of stem cells to specific regions of the epidermis, and progress has been made in understanding the role of these cells in normal epidermal homeostasis and in conditions of tissue stress. A key finding is the multiple stem cell populations exist in epidermis that give rise to different structures, and that multiple stem cell types may contribute to repair in damaged epidermis. General significance Understanding epidermal stem cell biology is likely to lead to important therapies for treating skin diseases and cancer, and will also contribute to our understanding of stem cells in other systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Stem Cells. PMID:22820019

  3. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E; Williams, Andrew H; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2012-09-18

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  4. The CNS glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The gut-brain axis plays a key role in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In response to luminal stimulation of macronutrients and microbiota-derived metabolites (secondary bile acids and short chain fatty acids), glucagon-like peptides (GLP-1 and -2) are cosecreted from endocrine L cells in the gut and coreleased from preproglucagonergic neurons in the brain stem. Glucagon-like peptides are proposed as key mediators for bariatric surgery-improved glycemic control and energy balance. Little is known about the GLP-2 receptor (Glp2r)-mediated physiological roles in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet Glp1r has been studied extensively. This review will highlight the physiological relevance of the central nervous system (CNS) Glp2r in the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis and focuses on cellular mechanisms underlying the CNS Glp2r-mediated neural circuitry and intracellular PI3K signaling pathway. New evidence (obtained from Glp2r tissue-specific KO mice) indicates that the Glp2r in POMC neurons is essential for suppressing feeding behavior, gastrointestinal motility, and hepatic glucose production. Mice with Glp2r deletion selectively in POMC neurons exhibit hyperphagic behavior, accelerated gastric emptying, glucose intolerance, and hepatic insulin resistance. GLP-2 differentially modulates postsynaptic membrane excitability of hypothalamic POMC neurons in Glp2r- and PI3K-dependent manners. GLP-2 activates the PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling pathway in POMC neurons by Glp2r-p85α interaction. Intracerebroventricular GLP-2 augments glucose tolerance, suppresses glucose production, and enhances insulin sensitivity, which require PI3K (p110α) activation in POMC neurons. Thus, the CNS Glp2r plays a physiological role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis. This review will also discuss key questions for future studies. PMID:24990862

  5. Control of Homeostasis and Dendritic Cell Survival by the GTPase RhoA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuai; Dislich, Bastian; Brakebusch, Cord H

    2015-01-01

    11b(-)CD8(+) and CD11b(+)Esam(hi) DC subsets, whereas CD11b(+)Esam(lo) DCs were not affected in conditional RhoA-deficient mice. Proteome analyses revealed a defective prosurvival pathway via PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt1)/Bcl-2-associated death promoter in the absence of RhoA. Taken together, our...... findings identify RhoA as a central regulator of DC homeostasis, and its deletion decreases DC numbers below critical thresholds for immune protection and homeostasis, causing aberrant compensatory DC proliferation....

  6. Bach2 Controls Homeostasis of Eosinophils by Restricting the Type-2 Helper Function of T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuki; Kato, Hiroki; Ebina-Shibuya, Risa; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-03-01

    Bach2 is a transcription factor which represses its target genes and plays important roles in the differentiation of B and T lymphoid cells. Bach2-deficient (KO) mice develop severe pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, which is associated with increased numbers of granulocytes and T cells. Bach2 is essential for the regulation of T cells, but its role in the regulation of granulocytes is not clear. Here, we observed increased numbers of eosinophils but not neutrophils in the bone marrow, spleen, peripheral blood, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of Bach2 KO mice compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice. Upon co-transplantation of the bone marrow cells from CD45.2 Bach2 KO and CD45.1/CD45.2 double-positive WT mice to irradiated WT CD45.1/CD45.2 mice, the reconstituted numbers of eosinophils were similar between Bach2 KO and WT cells. These results showed that the deficiency of Bach2 in eosinophils did not directly drive the differentiation of eosinophils. To investigate the effect of Bach2 KO CD4 + T cells upon eosinophils, we analyzed Rag2/Bach2-double deficient (dKO) mice which lack lymphocytes including CD4 + T cells. Rag2/Bach2 dKO mice did not show any increase in the numbers of eosinophils. Importantly, Bach2 KO mice showed an increase of interleukin-5 (Il-5) in the sera compared with WT mice. These results suggest that up-regulated functions of CD4 + T cells including secretion of Il-5 resulted in proliferation and/or migration to peripheral tissues of eosinophils in Bach2 KO mice. We propose that Bach2 controls homeostasis of eosinophils via restricting the production of Il-5 in CD4 + T cells.

  7. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  8. MicroRNA-orchestrated pathophysiologic control in gut homeostasis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    The intestine represents the largest and most elaborate immune system organ, in which dynamic and reciprocal interplay among numerous immune and epithelial cells, commensal microbiota, and external antigens contributes to establishing both homeostatic and pathologic conditions. The mechanisms that sustain gut homeostasis are pivotal in maintaining gut health in the harsh environment of the gut lumen. Intestinal epithelial cells are critical players in creating the mucosal platform for interplay between host immune cells and luminal stress inducers. Thus, knowledge of the epithelial interface between immune cells and the luminal environment is a prerequisite for a better understanding of gut homeostasis and pathophysiologies such as inflammation. In this review, we explore the importance of the epithelium in limiting or promoting gut inflammation (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease). We also introduce recent findings on how small RNAs such as microRNAs orchestrate pathophysiologic gene regulation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 263-269].

  9. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Joseph S; Xu, Yong; Hill, Jennifer W

    2011-07-01

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucose and insulin responsiveness. The preponderance of evidence indicates that the brain is the master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and that hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in particular play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance. This review discusses the neuronal crosstalk between the hypothalamus, autonomic nervous system, and tissues associated with the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, and how hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling are integral to maintaining normal glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Central insulin and leptin-mediated autonomic control of glucose homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Joseph S.; Xu, Yong; Hill, Jennifer W.

    2011-01-01

    Largely as a result of rising obesity rates, the incidence of type 2 diabetes is escalating rapidly. Type 2 diabetes results from multi-organ dysfunctional glucose metabolism. Recent publications have highlighted hypothalamic insulin- and adipokine-sensing as a major determinant of peripheral glucose and insulin responsiveness. The preponderance of evidence indicates that the brain is the master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and that hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling in particular...

  11. Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Potential During Homeostasis, Aging, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell decline is an important cellular driver of aging-associated pathophysiology in multiple tissues. Epigenetic regulation is central to establishing and maintaining stem cell function, and emerging evidence indicates that epigenetic dysregulation contributes to the altered potential of stem cells during aging. Unlike terminally differentiated cells, the impact of epigenetic dysregulation in stem cells is propagated beyond self; alterations can be heritably transmitted to differentiated progeny, in addition to being perpetuated and amplified within the stem cell pool through self-renewal divisions. This review focuses on recent studies examining epigenetic regulation of tissue-specific stem cells in homeostasis, aging, and aging-related disease. PMID:26046761

  12. Influence of the Hfq and Crc global regulators on the control of iron homeostasis in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hevia, Dione L; Yuste, Luis; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2018-04-30

    Metabolically versatile bacteria use catabolite repression control to select their preferred carbon sources, thus optimizing carbon metabolism. In pseudomonads, this occurs through the combined action of the proteins Hfq and Crc, which form stable tripartite complexes at target mRNAs, inhibiting their translation. The activity of Hfq/Crc is antagonised by small RNAs of the CrcZ family, the amounts of which vary according to carbon availability. The present work examines the role of Pseudomonas putida Hfq protein under conditions of low-level catabolite repression, in which Crc protein would have a minor role since it is sequestered by CrcZ/CrcY. The results suggest that, under these conditions, Hfq remains operative and plays an important role in iron homeostasis. In this scenario, Crc appears to participate indirectly by helping CrcZ/CrcY to control the amount of free Hfq in the cell. Iron homeostasis in pseudomonads relies on regulatory elements such as the Fur protein, the PrrF1-F2 sRNAs, and several extracytoplasmic sigma factors. Our results show that the absence of Hfq is paralleled by a reduction in PrrF1-F2 small RNAs. Hfq thus provides a regulatory link between iron and carbon metabolism, coordinating the iron supply to meet the needs of the enzymes operational under particular nutritional regimes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sensing the fuels: glucose and lipid signaling in the CNS controlling energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sabine D; Könner, A Christine; Brüning, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is capable of gathering information on the body's nutritional state and it implements appropriate behavioral and metabolic responses to changes in fuel availability. This feedback signaling of peripheral tissues ensures the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The hypothalamus is a primary site of convergence and integration for these nutrient-related feedback signals, which include central and peripheral neuronal inputs as well as hormonal signals. Increasing evidence indicates that glucose and lipids are detected by specialized fuel-sensing neurons that are integrated in these hypothalamic neuronal circuits. The purpose of this review is to outline the current understanding of fuel-sensing mechanisms in the hypothalamus, to integrate the recent findings in this field, and to address the potential role of dysregulation in these pathways in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  15. Control of plant phosphate homeostasis by inositol pyrophosphates and the SPX domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji-Yul; Ried, Martina K; Hothorn, Michael; Poirier, Yves

    2018-02-01

    Proteins containing a SPX domain are involved in phosphate (Pi) homeostasis, including Pi transport and adaptation to Pi deficiency. The SPX domain harbors a basic surface binding Pi at low affinity and inositol pyrophosphates (PP-InsPs) at high affinity. Genetic and biochemical studies revealed that PP-InsPs serve as ligands for the SPX domain. Residues in the PHO1 SPX domain involved in PP-InsPs binding are critical for its Pi export activity, and the interaction between SPX proteins and the PHR1 transcription factor, which results in PHR1 inactivation, is promoted by PP-InsPs. Changes in PP-InsPs levels in response to Pi deficiency may thus contribute to the adaptation of plants to stress via the modulation of the activity of SPX-containing proteins and their interactors. Modulating PP-InsP levels or the affinity/specificity of the SPX domain for PP-InsP could potentially be used to engineer crops to maintain high yield under reduced Pi fertilizer input. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcium Homeostasis and ER Stress in Control of Autophagy in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a basic catabolic process, serving as an internal engine during responses to various cellular stresses. As regards cancer, autophagy may play a tumor suppressive role by preserving cellular integrity during tumor development and by possible contribution to cell death. However, autophagy may also exert oncogenic effects by promoting tumor cell survival and preventing cell death, for example, upon anticancer treatment. The major factors influencing autophagy are Ca2+ homeostasis perturbation and starvation. Several Ca2+ channels like voltage-gated T- and L-type channels, IP3 receptors, or CRAC are involved in autophagy regulation. Glucose transporters, mainly from GLUT family, which are often upregulated in cancer, are also prominent targets for autophagy induction. Signals from both Ca2+ perturbations and glucose transport blockage might be integrated at UPR and ER stress activation. Molecular pathways such as IRE 1-JNK-Bcl-2, PERK-eIF2α-ATF4, or ATF6-XBP 1-ATG are related to autophagy induced through ER stress. Moreover ER molecular chaperones such as GRP78/BiP and transcription factors like CHOP participate in regulation of ER stress-mediated autophagy. Autophagy modulation might be promising in anticancer therapies; however, it is a context-dependent matter whether inhibition or activation of autophagy leads to tumor cell death.

  17. Effects of probiotics and antibiotics on the intestinal homeostasis in a computer controlled model of the large intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Ateequr

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic associated diarrhea and Clostridium difficile infection are frequent complications of broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Probiotic bacteria are used as therapeutic and preventive agents in these disorders, but the exact functional mechanisms and the mode of action are poorly understood. The effects of clindamycin and the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (containing the 8 bacterial strains Streptococcus thermophilus, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium infantis, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus consecutively or in combination were investigated and compared to controls without therapy using a standardized human fecal microbiota in a computer-controlled in vitro model of large intestine. Microbial metabolites (short chain fatty acids, lactate, branched chain fatty acids, and ammonia and the intestinal microbiota were analyzed. Results Compared to controls and combination therapy, short chain fatty acids and lactate, but also ammonia and branched chain fatty acids, were increased under probiotic therapy. The metabolic pattern under combined therapy with antibiotics and probiotics had the most beneficial and consistent effect on intestinal metabolic profiles. The intestinal microbiota showed a decrease in several indigenous bacterial groups under antibiotic therapy, there was no significant recovery of these groups when the antibiotic therapy was followed by administration of probiotics. Simultaneous application of anti- and probiotics had a stabilizing effect on the intestinal microbiota with increased bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Conclusions Administration of VSL#3 parallel with the clindamycin therapy had a beneficial and stabilizing effect on the intestinal metabolic homeostasis by decreasing toxic metabolites and protecting the endogenic microbiota from destruction. Probiotics could be a reasonable

  18. Neuronal SH2B1 is essential for controlling energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Decheng; Zhou, Yingjiang; Morris, David; Li, Minghua; Li, Zhiqin; Rui, Liangyou

    2007-02-01

    SH2B1 (previously named SH2-B), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, binds via its Src homology 2 (SH2) domain to a variety of protein tyrosine kinases, including JAK2 and the insulin receptor. SH2B1-deficient mice are obese and diabetic. Here we demonstrated that multiple isoforms of SH2B1 (alpha, beta, gamma, and/or delta) were expressed in numerous tissues, including the brain, hypothalamus, liver, muscle, adipose tissue, heart, and pancreas. Rat SH2B1beta was specifically expressed in neural tissue in SH2B1-transgenic (SH2B1(Tg)) mice. SH2B1(Tg) mice were crossed with SH2B1-knockout (SH2B1(KO)) mice to generate SH2B1(TgKO) mice expressing SH2B1 only in neural tissue but not in other tissues. Systemic deletion of the SH2B1 gene resulted in metabolic disorders in SH2B1(KO) mice, including hyperlipidemia, leptin resistance, hyperphagia, obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Neuron-specific restoration of SH2B1beta not only corrected the metabolic disorders in SH2B1(TgKO) mice, but also improved JAK2-mediated leptin signaling and leptin regulation of orexigenic neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus. Moreover, neuron-specific overexpression of SH2B1 dose-dependently protected against high-fat diet-induced leptin resistance and obesity. These observations suggest that neuronal SH2B1 regulates energy balance, body weight, peripheral insulin sensitivity, and glucose homeostasis at least in part by enhancing hypothalamic leptin sensitivity.

  19. Identification of SLURP-1 as an epidermal neuromodulator explains the clinical phenotype of Mal de Meleda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimienti, Fabrice; Hogg, Ronald C; Plantard, Laure

    2003-01-01

    alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are present in keratinocytes. These results identify SLURP-1 as a secreted epidermal neuromodulator which is likely to be essential for both epidermal homeostasis and inhibition of TNF-alpha release by macrophages during wound healing. This explains both...

  20. Hybrid Enhanced Epidermal SpaceSuit Design Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Joseph M.

    A Space suit that does not rely on gas pressurization is a multi-faceted problem that requires major stability controls to be incorporated during design and construction. The concept of Hybrid Epidermal Enhancement space suit integrates evolved human anthropomorphic and physiological adaptations into its functionality, using commercially available bio-medical technologies to address shortcomings of conventional gas pressure suits, and the impracticalities of MCP suits. The prototype HEE Space Suit explored integumentary homeostasis, thermal control and mobility using advanced bio-medical materials technology and construction concepts. The goal was a space suit that functions as an enhanced, multi-functional bio-mimic of the human epidermal layer that works in attunement with the wearer rather than as a separate system. In addressing human physiological requirements for design and construction of the HEE suit, testing regimes were devised and integrated into the prototype which was then subject to a series of detailed tests using both anatomical reproduction methods and human subject.

  1. Dynamic optimal control of homeostasis: an integrative system approach for modeling of the central nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, N A; Giuseppin, M L; Verrips, C T

    2000-01-01

    The theory of dynamic optimal metabolic control (DOMC), as developed by Giuseppin and Van Riel (Metab. Eng., 2000), is applied to model the central nitrogen metabolism (CNM) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CNM represents a typical system encountered in advanced metabolic engineering. The CNM is the source of the cellular amino acids and proteins, including flavors and potentially valuable biomolecules; therefore, it is also of industrial interest. In the DOMC approach the cell is regarded as an optimally controlled system. Given the metabolic genotype, the cell faces a control problem to maintain an optimal flux distribution in a changing environment. The regulation is based on strategies and balances feedback control of homeostasis and feedforward regulation for adaptation. The DOMC approach is an integrative, holistic approach, not based on mechanistic descriptions and (therefore) not biased by the variation present in biochemical and molecular biological data. It is an effective tool to structure the rapidly increasing amount of data on the function of genes and pathways. The DOMC model is used successfully to predict the responses of pulses of ammonia and glutamine to nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of a wild-type strain and a glutamine synthetase-negative mutant. The simulation results are validated with experimental data.

  2. Gibberellin homeostasis and plant height control by EUI and a role for gibberellin in root gravity responses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhu, Yongyou; Peng, Yu; Yan, Dawei; Li, Qun; Wang, Jianjun; Wang, Linyou; He, Zuhua

    2008-03-01

    The rice Eui (ELONGATED UPPERMOST INTERNODE) gene encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that deactivates bioactive gibberellins (GAs). In this study, we investigated controlled expression of the Eui gene and its role in plant development. We found that Eui was differentially induced by exogenous GAs and that the Eui promoter had the highest activity in the vascular bundles. The eui mutant was defective in starch granule development in root caps and Eui overexpression enhanced starch granule generation and gravity responses, revealing a role for GA in root starch granule development and gravity responses. Experiments using embryoless half-seeds revealed that RAmy1A and GAmyb were highly upregulated in eui aleurone cells in the absence of exogenous GA. In addition, the GA biosynthesis genes GA3ox1 and GA20ox2 were downregulated and GA2ox1 was upregulated in eui seedlings. These results indicate that EUI is involved in GA homeostasis, not only in the internodes at the heading stage, but also in the seedling stage, roots and seeds. Disturbing GA homeostasis affected the expression of the GA signaling genes GID1 (GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF 1), GID2 and SLR1. Transgenic RNA interference of the Eui gene effectively increased plant height and improved heading performance. By contrast, the ectopic expression of Eui under the promoters of the rice GA biosynthesis genes GA3ox2 and GA20ox2 significantly reduced plant height. These results demonstrate that a slight increase in Eui expression could dramatically change rice morphology, indicating the practical application of the Eui gene in rice molecular breeding for a high yield potential.

  3. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  4. Epidermal hydration levels in rosacea patients improve after minocycline therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ní Raghallaigh, S

    2013-12-06

    Patients with rosacea frequently report increased skin sensitivity, with features suggestive of an abnormal stratum corneum (SC) permeability barrier. Sebum, pH and hydration levels influence epidermal homeostasis. The correlation of the change in these parameters with clinically effective treatment has not been previously analysed.

  5. Extracellular Matrix as a Regulator of Epidermal Stem Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermnykh, Elina; Kalabusheva, Ekaterina; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina

    2018-03-27

    Epidermal stem cells reside within the specific anatomic location, called niche, which is a microenvironment that interacts with stem cells to regulate their fate. Regulation of many important processes, including maintenance of stem cell quiescence, self-renewal, and homeostasis, as well as the regulation of division and differentiation, are common functions of the stem cell niche. As it was shown in multiple studies, extracellular matrix (ECM) contributes a lot to stem cell niches in various tissues, including that of skin. In epidermis, ECM is represented, primarily, by a highly specialized ECM structure, basement membrane (BM), which separates the epidermal and dermal compartments. Epidermal stem cells contact with BM, but when they lose the contact and migrate to the overlying layers, they undergo terminal differentiation. When considering all of these factors, ECM is of fundamental importance in regulating epidermal stem cells maintenance, proper mobilization, and differentiation. Here, we summarize the remarkable progress that has recently been made in the research of ECM role in regulating epidermal stem cell fate, paying special attention to the hair follicle stem cell niche. We show that the destruction of ECM components impairs epidermal stem cell morphogenesis and homeostasis. A deep understanding of ECM molecular structure as well as the development of in vitro system for stem cell maintaining by ECM proteins may bring us to developing new approaches for regenerative medicine.

  6. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular...... fluid output (assessed by lithium clearance) and excretion rates. The present study examined the reason for these increases. The first series of experiments showed that one cause is volume overloading. This can occur if the servo system is activated from the start, i.e., during the establishment...... not seen when blood samples are replaced with the animal's own red blood cells resuspended in isotonic saline. When these pitfalls are avoided, servo-controlled sodium and fluid replacement is a reliable technique that makes it possible to study the effects of natriuretic and/or diuretic stimuli without...

  7. Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss and Polymorphisms in Iron Homeostasis Genes: New Insights from a Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Castiglione

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even if various pathophysiological events have been proposed as explanations, the putative cause of sudden hearing loss remains unclear. Objectives. To investigate and to reveal associations (if any between the main iron-related gene variants and idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design. Case-control study. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients (median age 63.65 years; range 10–92 were compared with 400 healthy control subjects. The following genetic variants were investigated: the polymorphism c.−8CG in the promoter of the ferroportin gene (FPN1; SLC40A1, the two isoforms C1 and C2 (p.P570S of the transferrin protein (TF, the amino acidic substitutions p.H63D and p.C282Y in the hereditary hemochromatosis protein (HFE, and the polymorphism c.–582AG in the promoter of the HEPC gene, which encodes the protein hepcidin (HAMP. Results. The homozygous genotype c.−8GG of the SLC40A1 gene revealed an OR for ISSNHL risk of 4.27 (CI 95%, 2.65–6.89; P=0.001, being overrepresented among cases. Conclusions. Our study indicates that the homozygous genotype FPN1 −8GG was significantly associated with increased risk of developing sudden hearing loss. These findings suggest new research should be conducted in the field of iron homeostasis in the inner ear.

  8. Nitric oxide–mediated regulation of ferroportin-1 controls macrophage iron homeostasis and immune function in Salmonella infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Schleicher, Ulrike; Schroll, Andrea; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Ludwiczek, Susanne; Talasz, Heribert; Brandacher, Gerald; Moser, Patrizia L.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Fang, Ferric C.; Bogdan, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible NO synthase 2 (NOS2) affects cellular iron homeostasis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and implications for NOS2-dependent pathogen control are incompletely understood. In this study, we found that NO up-regulated the expression of ferroportin-1 (Fpn1), the major cellular iron exporter, in mouse and human cells. Nos2−/− macrophages displayed increased iron content due to reduced Fpn1 expression and allowed for an enhanced iron acquisition by the intracellular bacterium Salmonella typhimurium. Nos2 gene disruption or inhibition of NOS2 activity led to an accumulation of iron in the spleen and splenic macrophages. Lack of NO formation resulted in impaired nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) expression, resulting in reduced Fpn1 transcription and diminished cellular iron egress. After infection of Nos2−/− macrophages or mice with S. typhimurium, the increased iron accumulation was paralleled by a reduced cytokine (TNF, IL-12, and IFN-γ) expression and impaired pathogen control, all of which were restored upon administration of the iron chelator deferasirox or hyperexpression of Fpn1 or Nrf2. Thus, the accumulation of iron in Nos2−/− macrophages counteracts a proinflammatory host immune response, and the protective effect of NO appears to partially result from its ability to prevent iron overload in macrophages PMID:23630227

  9. Smartphone-controlled optogenetically engineered cells enable semiautomatic glucose homeostasis in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiawei; Xue, Shuai; Yu, Guiling; Yu, Yuanhuan; Yang, Xueping; Bai, Yu; Zhu, Sucheng; Yang, Linfeng; Yin, Jianli; Wang, Yidan; Liao, Shuyong; Guo, Sanwei; Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin; Ye, Haifeng

    2017-04-26

    With the increasingly dominant role of smartphones in our lives, mobile health care systems integrating advanced point-of-care technologies to manage chronic diseases are gaining attention. Using a multidisciplinary design principle coupling electrical engineering, software development, and synthetic biology, we have engineered a technological infrastructure enabling the smartphone-assisted semiautomatic treatment of diabetes in mice. A custom-designed home server SmartController was programmed to process wireless signals, enabling a smartphone to regulate hormone production by optically engineered cells implanted in diabetic mice via a far-red light (FRL)-responsive optogenetic interface. To develop this wireless controller network, we designed and implanted hydrogel capsules carrying both engineered cells and wirelessly powered FRL LEDs (light-emitting diodes). In vivo production of a short variant of human glucagon-like peptide 1 (shGLP-1) or mouse insulin by the engineered cells in the hydrogel could be remotely controlled by smartphone programs or a custom-engineered Bluetooth-active glucometer in a semiautomatic, glucose-dependent manner. By combining electronic device-generated digital signals with optogenetically engineered cells, this study provides a step toward translating cell-based therapies into the clinic. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Servo-control of water and sodium homeostasis during renal clearance measurements in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Klaus; Shirley, David G

    2007-01-01

    Servo-controlled fluid and sodium replacement during clearance studies is used in order to prevent loss of body fluid and sodium following diuretic/natriuretic procedures. However, even under control conditions, the use of this technique is sometimes associated with increases in proximal tubular fluid output (assessed by lithium clearance) and excretion rates. The present study examined the reason for these increases. The first series of experiments showed that one cause is volume overloading. This can occur if the servo system is activated from the start, i.e., during the establishment of a suitably high urine flow rate by constant infusion of hypotonic glucose solution. The second series of experiments showed that replacement of blood samples with donor blood can also lead to increases in fractional lithium excretion and accompanying increases in water and sodium excretion, a problem not seen when blood samples are replaced with the animal's own red blood cells resuspended in isotonic saline. When these pitfalls are avoided, servo-controlled sodium and fluid replacement is a reliable technique that makes it possible to study the effects of natriuretic and/or diuretic stimuli without interference from unwanted changes in extracellular volume. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortijo, Cedric; Gouzi, Mathieu; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal.......5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased...

  12. [Nutrient sensing by the gastro-intestinal nervous system and control of energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Mithieux

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal nerves are crucial in the sensing of nutrients and hormones and its translation in terms of control of food intake. Major macronutrients like glucose and proteins are sensed by the extrinsic nerves located around the portal vein walls, which signal to the brain and account for the satiety phenomenon they promote. Glucose is sensed in the portal vein by neurons expressing the glucose receptor SGLT3, which activates the main regions of the brain involved in the control of food intake. Proteins indirectly act on food intake by inducing intestinal gluconeogenesis and its sensing by the portal glucose sensor. The mechanism involves a prior antagonism by peptides of the μ-opioid receptors present in the portal vein nervous system and a reflex arc with the brain inducing intestinal gluconeogenesis. In a comparable manner, short chain fatty acids produced from soluble fibers act via intestinal gluconeogenesis to exert anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. In the case of propionate, the mechanism involves a prior activation of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR3 present in the portal nerves and a reflex arc initiating intestinal gluconeogenesis. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  13. Controlling Mast Cell Activation and Homeostasis: Work Influenced by Bill Paul That Continues Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Caslin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are tissue resident, innate immune cells with heterogenous phenotypes tuned by cytokines and other microenvironmental stimuli. Playing a protective role in parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, mast cells are also known for their role in the pathogenesis of allergy, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we review factors controlling mast cell activation, with a focus on receptor signaling and potential therapies for allergic disease. Specifically, we will discuss our work with FcεRI and FγR signaling, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 treatment, and Stat5. We conclude with potential therapeutics for allergic disease. Much of these efforts have been influenced by the work of Bill Paul. With many mechanistic targets for mast cell activation and different classes of therapeutics being studied, there is reason to be hopeful for continued clinical progress in this area.

  14. Controlling Mast Cell Activation and Homeostasis: Work Influenced by Bill Paul That Continues Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caslin, Heather L; Kiwanuka, Kasalina N; Haque, Tamara T; Taruselli, Marcela T; MacKnight, H Patrick; Paranjape, Anuya; Ryan, John J

    2018-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue resident, innate immune cells with heterogenous phenotypes tuned by cytokines and other microenvironmental stimuli. Playing a protective role in parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections, mast cells are also known for their role in the pathogenesis of allergy, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. Here, we review factors controlling mast cell activation, with a focus on receptor signaling and potential therapies for allergic disease. Specifically, we will discuss our work with FcεRI and FγR signaling, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 treatment, and Stat5. We conclude with potential therapeutics for allergic disease. Much of these efforts have been influenced by the work of Bill Paul. With many mechanistic targets for mast cell activation and different classes of therapeutics being studied, there is reason to be hopeful for continued clinical progress in this area.

  15. Effects of Wnt3a on proliferation and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Liwei; Zhou Jiaxi; Peng Sha; Li Juxue; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui

    2008-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells maintain development and homeostasis of mammalian epidermis throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the proliferation and differentiation of epidermal stem cells are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of Wnt3a and Wnt/β-catenin signaling on proliferation and differentiation of human fetal epidermal stem cells. We found both Wnt3a and active β-catenin, two key members of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling, were expressed in human fetal epidermis and epidermal stem cells. In addition, Wnt3a protein can promote proliferation and inhibit differentiation of epidermal stem cells in vitro culture. Our results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays important roles in human fetal skin development and homeostasis, which also provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis in human epidermis

  16. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  17. Maize source leaf adaptation to nitrogen deficiency affects not only nitrogen and carbon metabolism but also control of phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Urte; Mascher, Martin; Colmsee, Christian; Scholz, Uwe; Bräutigam, Andrea; Fahnenstich, Holger; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Crop plant development is strongly dependent on the availability of nitrogen (N) in the soil and the efficiency of N utilization for biomass production and yield. However, knowledge about molecular responses to N deprivation derives mainly from the study of model species. In this article, the metabolic adaptation of source leaves to low N was analyzed in maize (Zea mays) seedlings by parallel measurements of transcriptome and metabolome profiling. Inbred lines A188 and B73 were cultivated under sufficient (15 mM) or limiting (0.15 mM) nitrate supply for up to 30 d. Limited availability of N caused strong shifts in the metabolite profile of leaves. The transcriptome was less affected by the N stress but showed strong genotype- and age-dependent patterns. N starvation initiated the selective down-regulation of processes involved in nitrate reduction and amino acid assimilation; ammonium assimilation-related transcripts, on the other hand, were not influenced. Carbon assimilation-related transcripts were characterized by high transcriptional coordination and general down-regulation under low-N conditions. N deprivation caused a slight accumulation of starch but also directed increased amounts of carbohydrates into the cell wall and secondary metabolites. The decrease in N availability also resulted in accumulation of phosphate and strong down-regulation of genes usually involved in phosphate starvation response, underlining the great importance of phosphate homeostasis control under stress conditions.

  18. Molecular control of copper homeostasis in filamentous fungi: increased expression of a metallothionein gene during aging of Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbeck, N B; Borghouts, C; Hamann, A; Specke, V; Osiewacz, H D

    2001-01-01

    The lifespan of the ascomycete Podospora anserina was previously demonstrated to be significantly increased in a copper-uptake mutant, suggesting that copper is a potential stressor involved in degenerative processes. In order to determine whether changes in copper stress occur in the cells during normal aging of cultures, we cloned and characterized a gene coding for a component of the molecular machinery involved in the control of copper homeostasis. This gene, PaMt1, is a single-copy gene that encodes a metallothionein of 26 amino acids. The coding sequence of PaMt1 is interrupted by a single intron. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a high degree of sequence identity to metallothioneins of the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa and the basidiomycete Agaricus bisporus, and to the N-terminal portion of mammalian metallothioneins. Levels of PaMt1 transcript increase in response to elevated amounts of copper in the growth medium and during aging of wild-type cultures. In contrast, in the long-lived mutant grisea, transcript levels first increase but then decrease again. The ability of wild-type cultures to respond to exogenous copper stress via the induction of PaMt1 transcription is not affected as they grow older.

  19. Regrowing the Adult Brain: NF-κB Controls Functional Circuit Formation and Tissue Homeostasis in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielski, Yvonne; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Heimann, Peter; Holzberg, Magdalena; Werner, Hendrikje; Leske, Oliver; Püschel, Andreas W.; Memet, Sylvie; Heumann, Rolf; Israel, Alain; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22312433

  20. Planar Cell Polarity Controls Pancreatic Beta Cell Differentiation and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Cortijo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity (PCP refers to the collective orientation of cells within the epithelial plane. We show that progenitor cells forming the ducts of the embryonic pancreas express PCP proteins and exhibit an active PCP pathway. Planar polarity proteins are acquired at embryonic day 11.5 synchronously to apicobasal polarization of pancreas progenitors. Loss of function of the two PCP core components Celsr2 and Celsr3 shows that they control the differentiation of endocrine cells from polarized progenitors, with a prevalent effect on insulin-producing beta cells. This results in a decreased glucose clearance. Loss of Celsr2 and 3 leads to a reduction of Jun phosphorylation in progenitors, which, in turn, reduces beta cell differentiation from endocrine progenitors. These results highlight the importance of the PCP pathway in cell differentiation in vertebrates. In addition, they reveal that tridimensional organization and collective communication of cells are needed in the pancreatic epithelium in order to generate appropriate numbers of endocrine cells.

  1. Perfluoroalkyl acids-induced liver steatosis: Effects on genes controlling lipid homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Kaberi P.; Wood, Carmen R.; Lin, Mimi T.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Lau, Christopher; Wallace, Kendall B.; Corton, J. Christopher; Abbott, Barbara D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Structurally diverse PFAAs induced fatty liver and increased TG accumulation in mouse. • Genes of lipid synthesis and degradation were increased after exposure to PFAAs. • PFAAs did not inhibit either mitochondrial fatty acid transport or β-oxidation directly. - Abstract: Persistent presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in the environment is due to their extensive use in industrial and consumer products, and their slow decay. Biochemical tests in rodent demonstrated that these chemicals are potent modifiers of lipid metabolism and cause hepatocellular steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism of PFAAs interference with lipid metabolism remains to be elucidated. Currently, two major hypotheses are that PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids and/or they affect the transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in liver. To determine the ability of structurally-diverse PFAAs to cause steatosis, as well as to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, wild-type (WT) and PPARα-null mice were treated with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), or perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), by oral gavage for 7 days, and their effects were compared to that of PPARα agonist WY-14643 (WY), which does not cause steatosis. Increases in liver weight and cell size, and decreases in DNA content per mg of liver, were observed for all compounds in WT mice, and were also seen in PPARα-null mice for PFOA, PFNA, and PFHxS, but not for WY. In Oil Red O stained sections, WT liver showed increased lipid accumulation in all treatment groups, whereas in PPARα-null livers, accumulation was observed after PFNA and PFHxS treatment, adding to the burden of steatosis observed in control (untreated) PPARα-null mice. Liver triglyceride (TG) levels were elevated in WT mice by all PFAAs and in PPARα-null mice only by PFNA. In vitro β-oxidation of palmitoyl carnitine by isolated rat

  2. Carnosine and anserine homeostasis in skeletal muscle and heart is controlled by β‐alanine transamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancquaert, Laura; Baba, Shahid P.; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Stautemas, Jan; Stegen, Sanne; Barbaresi, Silvia; Chung, Weiliang; Boakye, Adjoa A.; Hoetker, J. David; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Delanghe, Joris; Vanheel, Bert; Veiga‐da‐Cunha, Maria; Derave, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Key points Using recombinant DNA technology, the present study provides the first strong and direct evidence indicating that β‐alanine is an efficient substrate for the mammalian transaminating enzymes 4‐aminobutyrate‐2‐oxoglutarate transaminase and alanine‐glyoxylate transaminase.The concentration of carnosine and anserine in murine skeletal and heart muscle depends on circulating availability of β‐alanine, which is in turn controlled by degradation of β‐alanine in liver and kidney.Chronic oral β‐alanine supplementation is a popular ergogenic strategy in sports because it can increase the intracellular carnosine concentration and subsequently improve the performance of high‐intensity exercises. The present study can partly explain why the β‐alanine supplementation protocol is so inefficient, by demonstrating that exogenous β‐alanine can be effectively routed toward oxidation. Abstract The metabolic fate of orally ingested β‐alanine is largely unknown. Chronic β‐alanine supplementation is becoming increasingly popular for improving high‐intensity exercise performance because it is the rate‐limiting precursor of the dipeptide carnosine (β‐alanyl‐l‐histidine) in muscle. However, only a small fraction (3–6%) of the ingested β‐alanine is used for carnosine synthesis. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the putative contribution of two β‐alanine transamination enzymes, namely 4‐aminobutyrate‐2‐oxoglutarate transaminase (GABA‐T) and alanine‐glyoxylate transaminase (AGXT2), to the homeostasis of carnosine and its methylated analogue anserine. We found that, when transfected into HEK293T cells, recombinant mouse and human GABA‐T and AGXT2 are able to transaminate β‐alanine efficiently. The reaction catalysed by GABA‐T is inhibited by vigabatrin, whereas both GABA‐T and AGXT2 activity is inhibited by aminooxyacetic acid (AOA). Both GABA‐T and AGXT2 are highly expressed in the mouse liver and

  3. Seizure control through genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Pumilio in Drosophila: a key component of neuronal homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hsiang Lin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a significant disorder for which approximately one-third of patients do not respond to drug treatments. Next-generation drugs, which interact with novel targets, are required to provide a better clinical outcome for these individuals. To identify potential novel targets for antiepileptic drug (AED design, we used RNA sequencing to identify changes in gene transcription in two seizure models of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The first model compared gene transcription between wild type (WT and bangsenseless1 (parabss, a gain-of-function mutant in the sole fly voltage-gated sodium channel (paralytic. The second model compared WT with WT fed the proconvulsant picrotoxin (PTX. We identified 743 genes (FDR≤1% with significant altered expression levels that are common to both seizure models. Of these, 339 are consistently upregulated and 397 downregulated. We identify pumilio (pum to be downregulated in both seizure models. Pum is a known homeostatic regulator of action potential firing in both flies and mammals, achieving control of neuronal firing through binding to, and regulating translation of, the mRNA transcripts of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav. We show that maintaining expression of pum in the CNS of parabss flies is potently anticonvulsive, whereas its reduction through RNAi-mediated knockdown is proconvulsive. Using a cell-based luciferase reporter screen, we screened a repurposed chemical library and identified 12 compounds sufficient to increase activity of pum. Of these compounds, we focus on avobenzone, which significantly rescues seizure behaviour in parabss flies. The mode of action of avobenzone includes potentiation of pum expression and mirrors the ability of this homeostatic regulator to reduce the persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (INaP in an identified neuron. This study reports a novel approach to suppress seizure and highlights the mechanisms of neuronal homeostasis as potential targets for next

  4. Toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Frederick A; Mudgil, Adarsh Vijay; Rosmarin, David M

    2007-02-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an unpredictable, life-threatening drug reaction associated with a 30% mortality. Massive keratinocyte apoptosis is the hallmark of TEN. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes appear to be the main effector cells and there is experimental evidence for involvement of both the Fas-Fas ligand and perforin/granzyme pathways. Optimal treatment for these patients remains to be clarified. Discontinuation of the offending drug and prompt referral to a burn unit are generally agreed upon steps. Beyond that, however, considerable controversy exists. Evidence both pro and con exists for the use of IVIG, systemic corticosteroid, and other measures. There is also evidence suggesting that combination therapies may be of value. All the clinical data, however, is anecdotal or based on observational or retrospective studies. Definitive answers are not yet available. Given the rarity of TEN and the large number of patients required for a study to be statistically meaningful, placebo controlled trials are logistically difficult to accomplish. The absence of an animal model further hampers research into this condition. This article reviews recent data concerning clinical presentation, pathogenesis and treatment of TEN. At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should have acquired a more comprehensive knowledge of our current understanding of the classification, clinical presentation, etiology, pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of TEN.

  5. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  6. Age-dependent transition from cell-level to population-level control in murine intestinal homeostasis revealed by coalescence analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Hu

    Full Text Available In multi-cellular organisms, tissue homeostasis is maintained by an exquisite balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This equilibrium can be achieved either at the single cell level (a.k.a. cell asymmetry, where stem cells follow strict asymmetric divisions, or the population level (a.k.a. population asymmetry, where gains and losses in individual stem cell lineages are randomly distributed, but the net effect is homeostasis. In the mature mouse intestinal crypt, previous evidence has revealed a pattern of population asymmetry through predominantly symmetric divisions of stem cells. In this work, using population genetic theory together with previously published crypt single-cell data obtained at different mouse life stages, we reveal a strikingly dynamic pattern of stem cell homeostatic control. We find that single-cell asymmetric divisions are gradually replaced by stochastic population-level asymmetry as the mouse matures to adulthood. This lifelong process has important developmental and evolutionary implications in understanding how adult tissues maintain their homeostasis integrating the trade-off between intrinsic and extrinsic regulations.

  7. Fatty acids are required for epidermal permeability barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao-Qiang, M; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1993-08-01

    The permeability barrier is mediated by a mixture of ceramides, sterols, and free fatty acids arranged as extracellular lamellar bilayers in the stratum corneum. Whereas prior studies have shown that cholesterol and ceramides are required for normal barrier function, definitive evidence for the importance of nonessential fatty acids is not available. To determine whether epidermal fatty acid synthesis also is required for barrier homeostasis, we applied 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase, after disruption of the barrier by acetone or tape stripping. TOFA inhibits epidermal fatty acid by approximately 50% and significantly delays barrier recovery. Moreover, coadministration of palmitate with TOFA normalizes barrier recovery, indicating that the delay is due to a deficiency in bulk fatty acids. Furthermore, TOFA treatment also delays the return of lipids to the stratum corneum and results in abnormalities in the structure of lamellar bodies, the organelle which delivers lipid to the stratum corneum. In addition, the organization of secreted lamellar body material into lamellar bilayers within the stratum corneum interstices is disrupted by TOFA treatment. Finally, these abnormalities in lamellar body and stratum corneum membrane structure are corrected by coapplication of palmitate with TOFA. These results demonstrate a requirement for bulk fatty acids in barrier homeostasis. Thus, inhibiting the epidermal synthesis of any of the three key lipids that form the extracellular, lipid-enriched membranes of the stratum corneum results in an impairment in barrier homeostasis.

  8. Signalling in the epidermis: the E2F cell cycle regulatory pathway in epidermal morphogenesis, regeneration and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Iordanka A; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Dagnino, Lina

    2005-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer in the skin, and it is the first line of defence against the environment. The epidermis also provides a barrier against loss of fluids and electrolytes, which is crucial for life. Essential in the maintenance of this tissue is its ability to continually self-renew and regenerate after injury. These two characteristics are critically dependent on the ability of the principal epidermal cell type, the keratinocyte, to proliferate and to respond to differentiation cues. Indeed, the epidermis is a multilayered tissue composed of keratinocyte stem cells and their differentiated progeny. Central for the control of cell proliferation is the E2F transcription factor regulatory network. This signaling network also includes cyclins, cdk, cdk inhibitors and the retinoblastoma (pRb) family of proteins. The biological importance of the E2F/pRb pathway is emphasized by the fact that a majority of human tumours exhibit alterations that disrupt the ability of pRb proteins to inhibit E2F, leading to permanent activation of the latter. Further, E2F is essential for normal epidermal regeneration after injury. Other member of the E2F signaling pathway are also involved in epidermal development and pathophysiology. Thus, whereas the pRb family of proteins is essential for epidermal morphogenesis, abnormal regulation of cyclins and E2F proteins results in tumorgenesis in this tissue. In this review, we discuss the role of each member of this important growth regulatory network in epidermal formation, homeostasis and carcinogenesis.

  9. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Boer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  10. Influence of epidermal growth factor on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Peter Skov; Boesby, S.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats was investigated. After a 70% hepatectomy in rats, the concentration of epidermal growth factor in portal venous blood was unchanged compared with unoperated controls. However, small amounts of epidermal...... growth factor could be identified in portal venous blood after intestinal instillation of epidermal growth factor. Brunner's glands and the submandibular glands secrete epidermal growth factor. Extirpation of Brunner's glands decreased liver regeneration, whereas removal of the submandibular glands had...... no effect on liver regeneration. Epidermal growth factor antiserum reduced liver regeneration significantly. Oral or s.c. administration of epidermal growth factor had no effect on liver regeneration, whereas epidermal growth factor enhanced the effect of insulin and glucagon on liver regeneration...

  11. Correlation between familial cancer history and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Taiwanese never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Po-Chung; Cheng, Yun-Chung

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Cigarette smoking remains a prominent risk factor, but lung cancer incidence has been increasing in never smokers. Genetic abnormalities including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations predominate in never smoking lung cancer patients. Furthermore, familial aggregations of patients with these mutations reflect heritable susceptibility to lung cancer. The correlation between familial cancer history and EGFR mutations in never smokers with lung cancer requires investigation. This was a retrospective case-control study that evaluated the prevalence of EGFR mutations in lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Never smokers with lung cancer treated at a hospital in Taiwan between April 2012 and May 2014 were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Exclusion criteria involved patients without records of familial cancer history or tumor genotype. This study included 246 never smokers with lung cancer. The study population mainly involved never smoking women with a mean age of 60 years, and the predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma. Lung cancer patients with familial cancer history had an increased prevalence of EGFR mutations compared to patients without family history [odds ratio (OR): 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3-10.6; Pnon-pulmonary cancers (OR: 5.0; 95% CI: 2.5-10.0; Pnever smoking lung cancer patients with familial cancer history. Moreover, a sizable proportion of never smoking cancer patients harbored these mutations. These observations have implications for the treatment of lung cancer in never smokers.

  12. Possible autocrine loop of the epidermal growth factor system in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia treated with finasteride: a placebo-controlled randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, N.; Møller-Ernst Jensen, K.; Lund, L.

    2002-01-01

    To analyse the expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) system in prostate tissue and secretions obtained from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) treated with or without finasteride (which primarily targets the androgen-sensitive secretory epithelial cells in the prostate......, with little effect on basal epithelial and stromal cells)....

  13. The yeast protein kinase Sch9 adjusts V-ATPase assembly/disassembly to control pH homeostasis and longevity in response to glucose availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wilms

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The conserved protein kinase Sch9 is a central player in the nutrient-induced signaling network in yeast, although only few of its direct substrates are known. We now provide evidence that Sch9 controls the vacuolar proton pump (V-ATPase to maintain cellular pH homeostasis and ageing. A synthetic sick phenotype arises when deletion of SCH9 is combined with a dysfunctional V-ATPase, and the lack of Sch9 has a significant impact on cytosolic pH (pHc homeostasis. Sch9 physically interacts with, and influences glucose-dependent assembly/disassembly of the V-ATPase, thereby integrating input from TORC1. Moreover, we show that the role of Sch9 in regulating ageing is tightly connected with V-ATPase activity and vacuolar acidity. As both Sch9 and the V-ATPase are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, it will be interesting to further clarify their cooperative action on the cellular processes that influence growth and ageing.

  14. The transcription factor Jdp2 controls bone homeostasis and antibacterial immunity by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Vandenbon, Alexis; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kondo, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Standley, Daron; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2012-12-14

    Jdp2 is an AP-1 family transcription factor that regulates the epigenetic status of histones. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Jdp2 is involved in osteoclastogenesis. However, the roles of Jdp2 in vivo and its pleiotropic functions are largely unknown. Here we generated Jdp2(-/-) mice and discovered its crucial roles not only in bone metabolism but also in differentiation of neutrophils. Jdp2(-/-) mice exhibited osteopetrosis resulting from impaired osteoclastogenesis. Jdp2(-/-) neutrophils were morphologically normal but had impaired surface expression of Ly6G, bactericidal function, and apoptosis. We also found that ATF3 was an inhibitor of neutrophil differentiation and that Jdp2 directly suppresses its expression via inhibition of histone acetylation. Strikingly, Jdp2(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection. Thus, Jdp2 plays pivotal roles in in vivo bone homeostasis and host defense by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  16. Matriptase zymogen supports epithelial development, homeostasis and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Stine; Tadeo, Daniel; Le-Gall, Sylvain M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Matriptase is a membrane serine protease essential for epithelial development, homeostasis, and regeneration, as well as a central orchestrator of pathogenic pericellular signaling in the context of inflammatory and proliferative diseases. Matriptase is an unusual protease in that its...... previously reported for transgenic mice mis-expressing wildtype epidermal matriptase. Equally surprising, mice engineered to express only zymogen-locked endogenous matriptase, unlike matriptase null mice, were viable, developed epithelial barrier function, and regenerated the injured epithelium. Compatible...

  17. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit e controls intracellular calcium homeostasis by regulation of cav1.2 surface expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Buda

    Full Text Available Inappropriate surface expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+channels (CaV in pancreatic ß-cells may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. First, failure to increase intracellular Ca(2+ concentrations at the sites of exocytosis impedes insulin release. Furthermore, excessive Ca(2+ influx may trigger cytotoxic effects. The regulation of surface expression of CaV channels in the pancreatic β-cells remains unknown. Here, we used real-time 3D confocal and TIRFM imaging, immunocytochemistry, cellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation and electrophysiology to study trafficking of L-type CaV1.2 channels upon β-cell stimulation. We found decreased surface expression of CaV1.2 and a corresponding reduction in L-type whole-cell Ca(2+ currents in insulin-secreting INS-1 832/13 cells upon protracted (15-30 min stimulation. This internalization occurs by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and could be prevented by microtubule or dynamin inhibitors. eIF3e (Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E is part of the protein translation initiation complex, but its effect on translation are modest and effects in ion channel trafficking have been suggested. The factor interacted with CaV1.2 and regulated CaV1.2 traffic bidirectionally. eIF3e silencing impaired CaV1.2 internalization, which resulted in an increased intracellular Ca(2+ load upon stimulation. These findings provide a mechanism for regulation of L-type CaV channel surface expression with consequences for β-cell calcium homeostasis, which will affect pancreatic β-cell function and insulin production.

  18. Commonly Employed African Neonatal Skin Care Products Compromise Epidermal Function in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Lee, Dale; Hill, Zelee; Elias, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal mortality is much higher in the developing world than in developed countries. Infections are a major cause of neonatal death, particularly in preterm infants, in whom defective epidermal permeability barrier function facilitates transcutaneous pathogen invasion. The objective was to determine whether neonatal skin care products commonly used in Africa benefit or compromise epidermal functions in murine skin. After twice-daily treatment of 6- to 8-week-old hairless mice with each skin care product for 3 days, epidermal permeability barrier function, skin surface pH, stratum corneum hydration, and barrier recovery were measured using a multiprobe adapter system physiology monitor. For products showing some benefits in these initial tests, the epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis was assessed 1 and 5 hours after a single application to acutely disrupted skin. All of the skin care products compromised basal permeability barrier function and barrier repair kinetics. Moreover, after 3 days of treatment, most of the products also reduced stratum corneum hydration while elevating skin surface pH to abnormal levels. Some neonatal skin care products that are widely used in Africa perturb important epidermal functions, including permeability barrier homeostasis in mice. Should these products have similar effects on newborn human skin, they could cause a defective epidermal permeability barrier, which can increase body fluid loss, impair thermoregulation, and contribute to the high rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality seen in Africa. Accordingly, alternative products that enhance permeability barrier function should be identified, particularly for use in preterm infants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Shrimp hemocyte homeostasis-associated protein (PmHHAP) interacts with WSSV134 to control apoptosis in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apitanyasai, Kantamas; Amparyup, Piti; Charoensapsri, Walaiporn; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2018-05-01

    Hemocyte homeostasis-associated protein (PmHHAP) was first identified as a viral-responsive gene, due to a high upregulation in transcription following white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Functional studies using RNA interference have suggested that PmHHAP is involved in hemocyte homeostasis by controlling apoptosis during WSSV infection. In this study, the role of PmHHAP in host-viral interactions was further investigated. Yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that PmHHAP binds to an anti-apoptosis protein, WSSV134. The viral protein WSSV134 is a late protein of WSSV, expressed 24 h post infection (hpi). Gene silencing of WSSV134 in WSSV-infected shrimp resulted in a reduction of the expression level of the viral replication marker genes VP28, wsv477, and ie-1, which suggests that WSSV134 is likely involved in viral propagation. However, co-silencing of PmHHAP and WSSV134 counteracted the effects on WSSV infection, which implies the importance of the host-pathogen interaction between PmHHAP and WSSV134 in WSSV infection. In addition, caspase 3/7 activity was noticeably induced in the PmHHAP and WSSV134 co-silenced shrimp upon WSSV infection. Moreover, PmHHAP and WSSV134 inhibited caspase-induced activation of PmCasp in vitro in a non-competitive manner. Taken together, these results suggest that PmHHAP and WSSV134 play a role in the host-pathogen interaction and work concordantly to control apoptosis in WSSV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. INTRACELLULAR Ca2+ HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahdevi Nandar Kurniawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ signaling functions to regulate many cellular processes. Dynamics of Ca2+ signaling or homeostasis is regulated by the interaction between ON and OFF reactions that control Ca2+ flux in both the plasma membrane and internal organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria. External stimuli activate the ON reactions, which include Ca2+ into the cytoplasm either through channels in the plasma membrane or from internal storage like in ER. Most of the cells utilize both channels/sources, butthere area few cells using an external or internal source to control certain processes. Most of the Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm adsorbed to the buffer, while a smaller part activate effect or to stimulate cellular processes. Reaction OFF is pumping of cytoplasmic Ca2+ using a combination mechanism of mitochondrial and others. Changes in Ca2+ signal has been detected in various tissues isolated from animals induced into diabetes as well as patients with diabetes. Ca2+ signal interference is also found in sensory neurons of experimental animals with diabetes. Ca2+ signaling is one of the main signaling systems in the cell.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation of Epidermal Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Role in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabita N. Saldanha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As an actively renewable tissue, changes in skin architecture are subjected to the regulation of stem cells that maintain the population of cells responsible for the formation of epidermal layers. Stems cells retain their self-renewal property and express biomarkers that are unique to this population. However, differential regulation of the biomarkers can initiate the pathway of terminal cell differentiation. Although, pockets of non-clarity in stem cell maintenance and differentiation in skin still exist, the influence of epigenetics in epidermal stem cell functions and differentiation in skin homeostasis and wound healing is clearly evident. The focus of this review is to discuss the epigenetic regulation of confirmed and probable epidermal stem cell biomarkers in epidermal stratification of normal skin and in diseased states. The role of epigenetics in wound healing, especially in diseased states of diabetes and cancer, will also be conveyed.

  2. TMBIM3/GRINA is a novel unfolded protein response (UPR) target gene that controls apoptosis through the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rivera, D; Armisén, R; Colombo, A; Martínez, G; Eguiguren, A L; Díaz, A; Kiviluoto, S; Rodríguez, D; Patron, M; Rizzuto, R; Bultynck, G; Concha, M L; Sierralta, J; Stutzin, A; Hetz, C

    2012-06-01

    Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif-containing (TMBIM)-6, also known as BAX-inhibitor 1 (BI-1), is an anti-apoptotic protein that belongs to a putative family of highly conserved and poorly characterized genes. Here we report the function of TMBIM3/GRINA in the control of cell death by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Tmbim3 mRNA levels are strongly upregulated in cellular and animal models of ER stress, controlled by the PERK signaling branch of the unfolded protein response. TMBIM3/GRINA synergies with TMBIM6/BI-1 in the modulation of ER calcium homeostasis and apoptosis, associated with physical interactions with inositol trisphosphate receptors. Loss-of-function studies in D. melanogaster demonstrated that TMBIM3/GRINA and TMBIM6/BI-1 have synergistic activities against ER stress in vivo. Similarly, manipulation of TMBIM3/GRINA levels in zebrafish embryos revealed an essential role in the control of apoptosis during neuronal development and in experimental models of ER stress. These findings suggest the existence of a conserved group of functionally related cell death regulators across species beyond the BCL-2 family of proteins operating at the ER membrane.

  3. The control of epidermal stem cells (holoclones) in the treatment of massive full-thickness burns with autologous keratinocytes cultured on fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, G; Ranno, R; Stracuzzi, G; Bondanza, S; Guerra, L; Zambruno, G; Micali, G; De Luca, M

    1999-09-27

    Cell therapy is an emerging therapeutic strategy aimed at replacing or repairing severely damaged tissues with cultured cells. Epidermal regeneration obtained with autologous cultured keratinocytes (cultured autografts) can be life-saving for patients suffering from massive full-thickness burns. However, the widespread use of cultured autografts has been hampered by poor clinical results that have been consistently reported by different burn units, even when cells were applied on properly prepared wound beds. This might arise from the depletion of epidermal stem cells (holoclones) in culture. Depletion of holoclones can occur because of (i) incorrect culture conditions, (ii) environmental damage of the exposed basal layer of cultured grafts, or (iii) use of new substrates or culture technologies not pretested for holoclone preservation. The aim of this study was to show that, if new keratinocyte culture technologies and/or "delivery systems" are proposed, a careful evaluation of epidermal stem cell preservation is essential for the clinical performance of this life-saving technology. Fibrin was chosen as a potential substrate for keratinocyte cultivation. Stem cells were monitored by clonal analysis using the culture system originally described by Rheinwald and Green as a reference. Massive full-thickness burns were treated with the composite allodermis/cultured autograft technique. We show that: (i) the relative percentage of holoclones, meroclones, and paraclones is maintained when keratinocytes are cultivated on fibrin, proving that fibrin does not induce clonal conversion and consequent loss of epidermal stem cells; (ii) the clonogenic ability, growth rate, and long-term proliferative potential are not affected by the new culture system; (iii) when fibrin-cultured autografts bearing stem cells are applied on massive full-thickness burns, the "take" of keratinocytes is high, reproducible, and permanent; and (iv) fibrin allows a significant reduction of the cost

  4. Effects of trans fatty acids on glucose homeostasis: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials123

    OpenAIRE

    Aronis, Konstantinos N; Khan, Sami M; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although evidence from cohort studies has suggested that trans fatty acid (TFA) consumption may be associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded conflicting results.

  5. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  6. The homeostasis solution – Mechanical homeostasis in architecturally homeostatic buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lin-Shu; Ma, Peizheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Architectural homeostatic buildings (AHBs) make sense because of the laws of physics. • However, high efficiency can be obtained only with AHBs and equipment considered as systems. • Mechanical homeostasis facilitates AHB-equipment system synergy with heat extraction. • Entropically speaking a building needs neither energy nor a fixed amount of heat, but its homeostatic existence. • Homeostatic buildings can reduce building energy consumption from 80% to 90%. - Abstract: We already know, for energy-saving potential, the necessary architectural features in well-designed buildings: high performance building envelope, sufficient interior thermal mass, and hydronic-network activated radiant surfaces for cooling and heating. Buildings with these features may be referred to as architecturally homeostatic buildings (AHBs); such a building-system is thermally semi-autonomous in the sense that its temperature variation stays within a certain range even without conditioning equipment, and, with conditioning equipment in operation, its thermal regulation is handled by its hydronic heat-distribution-network for controlling the temperature level of the building. At the present time conventional HVAC equipment is used for maintaining the heat-distribution-network: this arrangement, however, has resulted in great energy saving only for AHBs with accessible natural water bodies. In operation of general AHBs, a case is made here for a new kind of mechanical equipment having the attribute of mechanical homeostasis (MH). MH is a new energy transformation concept in a triadic framework. Superlative energy efficiency is predicted as a result of combined improvements in higher triadCOPs and lower total (inducted + removed) heat rates—evincing existence of synergy in architectural and mechanical homeostasis, which together will be referred to as the homeostasis solution.

  7. Root plasma membrane transporters controlling K+/Na+ homeostasis in salt-stressed bBarley1[C][W

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhonghua; Pottosin, Igor I.; Cuin, Tracey A.

    2007-01-01

    are well combined to withstand saline conditions. These mechanisms include: (1) better control of membrane voltage so retaining a more negative membrane potential; (2) intrinsically higher H1 pump activity; (3) better ability of root cells to pump Na1 from the cytosol to the external medium; and (4) higher......Plant salinity tolerance is a polygenic trait with contributions from genetic, developmental, and physiological interactions, in addition to interactions between the plant and its environment. In this study, we show that in salt-tolerant genotypes of barley (Hordeum vulgare), multiple mechanisms...... of the cytosolic K1-to-Na1 ratio being a key determinant of plant salinity tolerance, and suggest multiple pathways of controlling that important feature in salt-tolerant plants....

  8. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  9. TRP channels in calcium homeostasis: from hormonal control to structure-function relationship of TRPV5 and TRPV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goor, Mark K C; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van der Wijst, Jenny

    2017-06-01

    Maintaining plasma calcium levels within a narrow range is of vital importance for many physiological functions. Therefore, calcium transport processes in the intestine, bone and kidney are tightly regulated to fine-tune the rate of absorption, storage and excretion. The TRPV5 and TRPV6 calcium channels are viewed as the gatekeepers of epithelial calcium transport. Several calciotropic hormones control the channels at the level of transcription, membrane expression, and function. Recent technological advances have provided the first near-atomic resolution structural models of several TRPV channels, allowing insight into their architecture. While this field is still in its infancy, it has increased our understanding of molecular channel regulation and holds great promise for future structure-function studies of these ion channels. This review will summarize the mechanisms that control the systemic calcium balance, as well as extrapolate structural views to the molecular functioning of TRPV5/6 channels in epithelial calcium transport. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Neuronal regulation of homeostasis by nutrient sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tony K T

    2010-04-01

    In type 2 diabetes and obesity, the homeostatic control of glucose and energy balance is impaired, leading to hyperglycemia and hyperphagia. Recent studies indicate that nutrient-sensing mechanisms in the body activate negative-feedback systems to regulate energy and glucose homeostasis through a neuronal network. Direct metabolic signaling within the intestine activates gut-brain and gut-brain-liver axes to regulate energy and glucose homeostasis, respectively. In parallel, direct metabolism of nutrients within the hypothalamus regulates food intake and blood glucose levels. These findings highlight the importance of the central nervous system in mediating the ability of nutrient sensing to maintain homeostasis. Futhermore, they provide a physiological and neuronal framework by which enhancing or restoring nutrient sensing in the intestine and the brain could normalize energy and glucose homeostasis in diabetes and obesity.

  11. Role of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the control of body fluid homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.A.F.; Andrade-Franzé, G.M.F.; De Paula, P.M.; De Luca, L.A. Jr.; Menani, J.V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Patologia, Faculdade de Odontologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-10

    Central α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors and the pontine lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) are involved in the control of sodium and water intake. Bilateral injections of moxonidine (α{sub 2}-adrenergic/imidazoline receptor agonist) or noradrenaline into the LPBN strongly increases 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by a combined treatment of furosemide plus captopril. Injection of moxonidine into the LPBN also increases hypertonic NaCl and water intake and reduces oxytocin secretion, urinary sodium, and water excreted by cell-dehydrated rats, causing a positive sodium and water balance, which suggests that moxonidine injected into the LPBN deactivates mechanisms that restrain body fluid volume expansion. Pretreatment with specific α{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonists injected into the LPBN abolishes the behavioral and renal effects of moxonidine or noradrenaline injected into the same area, suggesting that these effects depend on activation of LPBN α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors. In fluid-depleted rats, the palatability of sodium is reduced by ingestion of hypertonic NaCl, limiting intake. However, in rats treated with moxonidine injected into the LPBN, the NaCl palatability remains high, even after ingestion of significant amounts of 0.3 M NaCl. The changes in behavioral and renal responses produced by activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN are probably a consequence of reduction of oxytocin secretion and blockade of inhibitory signals that affect sodium palatability. In this review, a model is proposed to show how activation of α{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in the LPBN may affect palatability and, consequently, ingestion of sodium as well as renal sodium excretion.

  12. Role of α2-adrenoceptors in the lateral parabrachial nucleus in the control of body fluid homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.A.F.; Andrade-Franzé, G.M.F.; De Paula, P.M.; De Luca, L.A. Jr.; Menani, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    Central α 2 -adrenoceptors and the pontine lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) are involved in the control of sodium and water intake. Bilateral injections of moxonidine (α 2 -adrenergic/imidazoline receptor agonist) or noradrenaline into the LPBN strongly increases 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by a combined treatment of furosemide plus captopril. Injection of moxonidine into the LPBN also increases hypertonic NaCl and water intake and reduces oxytocin secretion, urinary sodium, and water excreted by cell-dehydrated rats, causing a positive sodium and water balance, which suggests that moxonidine injected into the LPBN deactivates mechanisms that restrain body fluid volume expansion. Pretreatment with specific α 2 -adrenoceptor antagonists injected into the LPBN abolishes the behavioral and renal effects of moxonidine or noradrenaline injected into the same area, suggesting that these effects depend on activation of LPBN α 2 -adrenoceptors. In fluid-depleted rats, the palatability of sodium is reduced by ingestion of hypertonic NaCl, limiting intake. However, in rats treated with moxonidine injected into the LPBN, the NaCl palatability remains high, even after ingestion of significant amounts of 0.3 M NaCl. The changes in behavioral and renal responses produced by activation of α 2 -adrenoceptors in the LPBN are probably a consequence of reduction of oxytocin secretion and blockade of inhibitory signals that affect sodium palatability. In this review, a model is proposed to show how activation of α 2 -adrenoceptors in the LPBN may affect palatability and, consequently, ingestion of sodium as well as renal sodium excretion

  13. The effect of enriched chicory inulin on liver enzymes, calcium homeostasis and hematological parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Javid, Ahmad Zare; Dehghan, Parvin

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetic mellitus (T2DM) as one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality is associated with immune system disturbances and metabolic abnormalities. In the current study we aimed to evaluate the effects of enriched chicory inulin supplementation on liver enzymes, serum calcium and phosphorous concentrations and hematological parameters in patients with T2DM. Forty-six diabetic females patients were randomly allocated into intervention (n=27) and control (n=22) groups. Subjects in the intervention group received a daily dose of 10g of chicory and subjects in control group received a placebo for two months. Anthropometric variables, glucose homeostasis, hematological parameters and metabolic indices including serum alanine aminotransfersae (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium and phosphorous as well as creatinine concentrations, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and blood pressure were assessed at the beginning and end of the trial. Significant reductions in fasting serum glucose (FSG), Hb A1C, AST and ALP concentrations were observed in chicory-treated group. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were also reduced in chicory-treated group. Serum calcium significantly increased after chicory supplementation but no change in placebo treated group has been occurred (P=0.014). Supplementation with enriched chicory for two months significantly reduced hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values (Pliver function tests, blood pressure and reduction in hematologic risk factors of diabetes in female patients with T2DM. Further studies in both genders are needed to generalize these findings to total population. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Time-dependent effect of orchidectomy on vascular nitric oxide and thromboxane A2 release. Functional implications to control cell proliferation through activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta del Campo

    Full Text Available This study analyzes whether the release of nitric oxide (NO and thromboxane A2 (TXA2 depends on the time lapsed since gonadal function is lost, and their correlation with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. For this purpose, aortic and mesenteric artery segments from control and 6-weeks or 5-months orchidectomized rats were used to measure NO and TXA2 release. The results showed that the basal and acetylcholine (ACh-induced NO release were decreased 6 weeks post-orchidectomy both in aorta and mesenteric artery, but were recovered 5 months thereafter up to levels similar to those found in arteries from control rats. The basal and ACh-induced TXA2 release increased in aorta and mesenteric artery 6 weeks post-orchidectomy, and was maintained at high levels 5 months thereafter. Since we previously observed that orchidectomy, which decreased testosterone level, enlarged the muscular layer of mesenteric arteries, the effect of testosterone on VSMC proliferation was analyzed. The results showed that treatment of cultured VSMC with testosterone downregulated mitogenic signaling pathways initiated by the ligand-dependent activation of the EGFR. In contrast, the EGFR pathways were constitutively active in mesenteric arteries of long-term orchidectomized rats. Thus, the exposure of mesenteric arteries from control rats to epidermal growth factor (EGF induced the activation of EGFR signaling pathways. However, the addition of EGF to arteries from orchidectomized rats failed to induce a further activation of these pathways. In conclusion, this study shows that the release of NO depends on the time lapsed since the gonadal function is lost, while the release of TXA2 is already increased after short periods post-orchidectomy. The alterations in these signaling molecules could contribute to the constitutive activation of the EGFR and its downstream signaling pathways after long period

  15. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Jane Barkla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte and facultative CAM plant Mesembryathemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples was used to identify 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR. Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na and Cl ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggest large alterations in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum epidermal bladder cells.

  16. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples identified 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR). Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggests large alterations in M. crystallinum epidermal bladder cells.

  17. Single cell-type comparative metabolomics of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    One of the remarkable adaptive features of the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum are the specialized modified trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) which cover the leaves, stems, and peduncle of the plant. They are present from an early developmental stage but upon salt stress rapidly expand due to the accumulation of water and sodium. This particular plant feature makes it an attractive system for single cell type studies, with recent proteomics and transcriptomics studies of the EBC establishing that these cells are metabolically active and have roles other than sodium sequestration. To continue our investigation into the function of these unusual cells we carried out a comprehensive global analysis of the metabolites present in the EBC extract by gas chromatography Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and identified 194 known and 722 total molecular features. Statistical analysis of the metabolic changes between control and salt-treated samples identified 352 significantly differing metabolites (268 after correction for FDR). Principal components analysis provided an unbiased evaluation of the data variance structure. Biochemical pathway enrichment analysis suggested significant perturbations in 13 biochemical pathways as defined in KEGG. More than 50% of the metabolites that show significant changes in the EBC, can be classified as compatible solutes and include sugars, sugar alcohols, protein and non-protein amino acids, and organic acids, highlighting the need to maintain osmotic homeostasis to balance the accumulation of Na+ and Cl− ions. Overall, the comparison of metabolic changes in salt treated relative to control samples suggests large alterations in M. crystallinum epidermal bladder cells. PMID:26113856

  18. AUTOIMMUNE EPIDERMAL BLISTERING DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune bullous skin diseases (ABDs are uncommon, potentially fatal diseases of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with deposits of autoantibodies and complement against distinct molecules of the epidermis and dermal/epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ. These autoantibodies lead to a loss in skin molecular integrity, which manifests clinically as formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus vulgaris, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis. The pioneering work of Ernst H. Beutner, Ph.D. and Robert E. Jordon, M.D. confirmed the autoimmune nature of these diseases. Walter F. Lever, M.D. contributed significantly to our understanding of the histopathologic features of these diseases. Walter Lever, M.D. and Ken Hashimoto, M.D. contributed electron microscopic studies of these diseases, especially in pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. In bullous pemphigoid (BP, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the BMZ. Classic EBA demonstrates extensive skin fragility; DH is commonly associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and manifests clinically with pruritic papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The clinical spectrum of bullous pemphigoid includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo-like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy, and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a „cluster of jewels”-like pattern in childhood (chronic bullous disease of childhood and is more clinically heterogeneous in adulthood. Many of the autoantigens in these disorders are known and have been well characterized. ABDs may be influenced by both genetic and exogenous factors. The diagnoses of

  19. Homeostasis, inflammation, and disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Maya E; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-02-26

    While modernization has dramatically increased lifespan, it has also witnessed the increasing prevalence of diseases such as obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Such chronic, acquired diseases result when normal physiologic control goes awry and may thus be viewed as failures of homeostasis. However, while nearly every process in human physiology relies on homeostatic mechanisms for stability, only some have demonstrated vulnerability to dysregulation. Additionally, chronic inflammation is a common accomplice of the diseases of homeostasis, yet the basis for this connection is not fully understood. Here we review the design of homeostatic systems and discuss universal features of control circuits that operate at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. We suggest a framework for classification of homeostatic signals that is based on different classes of homeostatic variables they report on. Finally, we discuss how adaptability of homeostatic systems with adjustable set points creates vulnerability to dysregulation and disease. This framework highlights the fundamental parallels between homeostatic and inflammatory control mechanisms and provides a new perspective on the physiological origin of inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain glucose sensing, counterregulation, and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Nell; Dallaporta, Michel; Thorens, Bernard

    2007-08-01

    Neuronal circuits in the central nervous system play a critical role in orchestrating the control of glucose and energy homeostasis. Glucose, beside being a nutrient, is also a signal detected by several glucose-sensing units that are located at different anatomical sites and converge to the hypothalamus to cooperate with leptin and insulin in controlling the melanocortin pathway.

  1. Autophagy-related protein Vps34 controls the homeostasis and function of antigen cross-presenting CD8α+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Vrajesh V; Pabbisetty, Sudheer K; Wu, Lan; Sebzda, Eric; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Jianhua; Van Kaer, Luc

    2017-08-01

    The class III PI3K Vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) plays a role in both canonical and noncanonical autophagy, key processes that control the presentation of antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) to naive T lymphocytes. We generated DC-specific Vps34 -deficient mice to assess the contribution of Vps34 to DC functions. We found that DCs from these animals have a partially activated phenotype, spontaneously produce cytokines, and exhibit enhanced activity of the classic MHC class I and class II antigen-presentation pathways. Surprisingly, these animals displayed a defect in the homeostatic maintenance of splenic CD8α + DCs and in the capacity of these cells to cross-present cell corpse-associated antigens to MHC class I-restricted T cells, a property that was associated with defective expression of the T-cell Ig mucin (TIM)-4 receptor. Importantly, mice deficient in the Vps34-associated protein Rubicon, which is critical for a noncanonical form of autophagy called "Light-chain 3 (LC3)-associated phagocytosis" (LAP), lacked such defects. Finally, consistent with their defect in the cross-presentation of apoptotic cells, DC-specific Vps34 -deficient animals developed increased metastases in response to challenge with B16 melanoma cells. Collectively, our studies have revealed a critical role of Vps34 in the regulation of CD8α + DC homeostasis and in the capacity of these cells to process and present antigens associated with apoptotic cells to MHC class I-restricted T cells. Our findings also have important implications for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of Vps34 for therapeutic purposes.

  2. Homeostasis of peripheral CD4+ T cells: IL-2R alpha and IL-2 shape a population of regulatory cells that controls CD4+ T cell numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Legrand, Nicolas; Papiernik, Martine; Freitas, António A.

    2002-01-01

    We show that the lymphoid hyperplasia observed in IL-2Ralpha- and IL-2-deficient mice is due to the lack of a population of regulatory cells essential for CD4 T cell homeostasis. In chimeras reconstituted with bone marrow cells from IL-2Ralpha-deficient donors, restitution of a population of

  3. Functional Role of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 in the Regulation of Melanogenesis and Epidermal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Changsheng; Yang, Shanshan; Fan, Ruiwen; Ji, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Junzhen; Liu, Xuexian; Hu, Shuaipeng; Xie, Jianshan; Liu, Yu; Gao, Wenjun; Wang, Haidong; Yao, Jianbo; Smith, George W; Herrid, Muren

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian integumentary system plays important roles in body homeostasis, and dysfunction of melanogenesis or epidermal development may lead to a variety of skin diseases, including melanoma. Skin pigmentation in humans and coat color in fleece-producing animals are regulated by many genes. Among them, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and paired-box 3 (PAX3) are at the top of the cascade and regulate activities of many important melanogenic enzymes. Here, we report fo...

  4. Immune sensitization against epidermal antigens in polymorphous light eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Amaro, R.; Baranda, L.; Salazar-Gonzalez, J.F.; Abud-Mendoza, C.; Moncada, B.

    1991-01-01

    To get further insight into the pathogenesis of polymorphous light eruption, we studied nine patients with polymorphous light eruption and six healthy persons. Two skin biopsy specimens were obtained from each person, one from previously ultraviolet light-irradiated skin and another one from unirradiated skin. An epidermal cell suspension, skin homogenate, or both were prepared from each specimen. Autologous cultures were made with peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated skin homogenate and peripheral blood mononuclear cells combined with irradiated or unirradiated epidermal cell suspension. Cell proliferation was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. The response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to unirradiated epidermal cells or unirradiated skin homogenate was similar in both patients and controls. However, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with polymorphous light eruption showed a significantly increased proliferative response to both irradiated epidermal cells and irradiated skin homogenate. Our results indicate that ultraviolet light increases the stimulatory capability of polymorphous light eruption epidermal cells in a unidirectional mixed culture with autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This suggests that an immune sensitization against autologous ultraviolet light-modified skin antigens occurs in polymorphous light eruption

  5. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  6. Evolution of dinosaur epidermal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Paul M; Evans, David C; Campione, Nicolás E

    2015-06-01

    Spectacularly preserved non-avian dinosaurs with integumentary filaments/feathers have revolutionized dinosaur studies and fostered the suggestion that the dinosaur common ancestor possessed complex integumentary structures homologous to feathers. This hypothesis has major implications for interpreting dinosaur biology, but has not been tested rigorously. Using a comprehensive database of dinosaur skin traces, we apply maximum-likelihood methods to reconstruct the phylogenetic distribution of epidermal structures and interpret their evolutionary history. Most of these analyses find no compelling evidence for the appearance of protofeathers in the dinosaur common ancestor and scales are usually recovered as the plesiomorphic state, but results are sensitive to the outgroup condition in pterosaurs. Rare occurrences of ornithischian filamentous integument might represent independent acquisitions of novel epidermal structures that are not homologous with theropod feathers. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Adding a Piece to the Leaf Epidermal Cell Shape Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Wells, Darren M; Bennett, Malcolm J

    2017-11-06

    The jigsaw puzzle-shaped pavement cells in the leaf epidermis collectively function as a load-bearing tissue that controls organ growth. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Majda et al. (2017) shed light on how the jigsaw shape can arise from localized variations in wall stiffness between adjacent epidermal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen dependency of epidermal growth factor receptor binding and DNA synthesis of rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Tetsuro; Terajima, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Akira

    1997-01-01

    Background/Aims: Changes in oxygen availability modulate replicative responses in several cell types, but the effects on hepatocyte replication remain unclear. We have studied the effects of transient nonlethal hypoxia on epidermal growth factor receptor binding and epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis of rat hepatocytes. Methods: Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture supernatant, intracellular adenosine triphosphate content, 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding, epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression, and 3 H-thymidine incorporation were compared between hepatocytes cultured in hypoxia and normoxia. Results: Hypoxia up to 3 h caused no significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in the culture supernatant, while intracellular adenosine triphosphate content decreased time-dependently and was restored to normoxic levels by reoxygenation (nonlethal hypoxia). Concomitantly, 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding to hepatocytes decreased time-dependently (to 54.1% of normoxia) and was restored to control levels by reoxygenation, although 125 I-insulin specific binding was not affected. The decrease in 125 I-epidermal growth factor specific binding was explained by the decrease in the number or available epidermal growth factor receptors (21.37±3.08 to 12.16±1.42 fmol/10 5 cells), while the dissociation constant of the receptor was not affected. The change in the number of available receptors was not considered to be due to receptor degradation-resynthesis, since immuno-detection of the epidermal growth factor receptor revealed that the receptor protein expression did not change during hypoxia and reoxygenation, and since neither actinomycin D nor cycloheximide affected the recovery of 125 I-epidermal growth factor binding by reoxygenation. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor-induced DNA synthesis after hypoxia (to 75.4% of normoxia by 3 h hypoxia) paralleled the decrease in 125 I-epidermal growth factor binding

  9. Etanercept therapy for toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Andrea; Abeni, Damiano; Bergamo, Fabio; Ricci, Francesco; Didona, Dario; Didona, Biagio

    2014-08-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a severe and potentially lethal drug reaction for which no standard treatment is available. To describe a case series of patients with TEN treated with a single dose of etanercept. We observed 10 consecutive patients with TEN. For each patient, we recorded the presence of comorbidities and all the drugs recently started (ie, in the last month). In all cases, 50 mg of etanercept was administered in a single subcutaneous injection. The clinical severity of disease was computed using the SCORe of Toxic Epidermal Necrosis (SCORTEN) scale. Using the probabilities of death linked to each level of SCORTEN score, we calculated the expected probability of death in our patients. Healing was defined as complete reepithelialization, and a time to healing curve was then obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. All patients promptly responded to treatment, reaching complete reepithelialization without complications or side effects. The median time to healing was 8.5 days. This is a small, uncontrolled case series. These preliminary results suggest the possibility that tumor necrosis factor-alfa may be an effective target for control of TEN, a dangerous skin condition for which no effective cure has yet been found. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells.Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional.The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  11. Possible role of epidermal keratinocytes in the construction of acupuncture meridians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Tsutsumi, Moe

    2014-04-01

    Acupuncture meridians consist of a network of acupuncture points on the skin, stimulation of which is well established to have a variety of physiological effects. We have previously demonstrated that epidermal keratinocytes contain multiple sensory systems for temperature, mechanical stimuli, electric potentials and other stimuli. These sensory systems generate changes in the calcium-ion concentration in the epidermis, so epidermal keratinocytes can generate spatially-localized electro-physiological patterns in the skin. We have previously demonstrated signaling between epidermal keratinocytes and peripheral nerve systems. Therefore, stimuli sensed by epidermal keratinocytes might be transferred to the unmyelinated nerve fibers that are known to exist in the epidermis and, thence, to the spinal cord and brain. We propose that epidermal keratinocytes form an information-gathering network in the skin and that this network plays a key role in whole-body homeostasis in response to the changing environment. We also hypothesize that this network corresponds to the acupuncture meridians. As supporting examples, we present some striking calcium propagation patterns observed in cultured human keratinocytes after adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) stimulation. These results support the ideas that keratinocytes can generate spatially-restricted signaling patterns after environmental stimulation and that the cultures might be in-vitro models of meridians as an information-gathering network in skin. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Concise Review: Wnt Signaling Pathways in Skin Development and Epidermal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Anthony; Lang, Christopher; Lien, Wen-Hui

    2018-01-01

    Mammalian skin and its appendages constitute the integumentary system forming a barrier between the organism and its environment. During development, skin epidermal cells divide rapidly and stratify into a multilayered epithelium, as well as invaginate downward in the underlying mesenchyme to form hair follicles (HFs). In postnatal skin, the interfollicular epidermal (IFE) cells continuously proliferate and differentiate while HFs undergo cycles of regeneration. Epidermal regeneration is fueled by epidermal stem cells (SCs) located in the basal layer of the IFE and the outer layer of the bulge in the HF. Epidermal development and SC behavior are mainly regulated by various extrinsic cues, among which Wnt-dependent signaling pathways play crucial roles. This review not only summarizes the current knowledge of Wnt signaling pathways in the regulation of skin development and governance of SCs during tissue homeostasis, but also discusses the potential crosstalk of Wnt signaling with other pathways involved in these processes. Stem Cells 2018;36:22-35. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Ageing and water homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Jordan, Jens; Jacob, Giris; Ketch, Terry; Shannon, John R.; Biaggioni, Italo

    2002-01-01

    This review outlines current knowledge concerning fluid intake and volume homeostasis in ageing. The physiology of vasopressin is summarized. Studies have been carried out to determine orthostatic changes in plasma volume and to assess the effect of water ingestion in normal subjects, elderly subjects, and patients with dysautonomias. About 14% of plasma volume shifts out of the vasculature within 30 minutes of upright posture. Oral ingestion of water raises blood pressure in individuals with impaired autonomic reflexes and is an important source of noise in blood pressure trials in the elderly. On the average, oral ingestion of 16 ounces (473ml) of water raises blood pressure 11 mmHg in elderly normal subjects. In patients with autonomic impairment, such as multiple system atrophy, strikingly exaggerated pressor effects of water have been seen with blood pressure elevations greater than 75 mmHg not at all uncommon. Ingestion of water is a major determinant of blood pressure in the elderly population. Volume homeostasis is importantly affected by posture and large changes in plasma volume may occur within 30 minutes when upright posture is assumed.

  15. Night work and breast cancer risk defined by human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) and hormone receptor status: A population-based case-control study in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Koudou, Yves; Truong, Thérèse; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Guénel, Pascal

    Night work has been associated with risk of breast cancer but this association needs to be confirmed. Because breast cancer is an etiologically heterogeneous disease, we explored the association of night work with breast cancer subtypes defined by tumor status (positive of negative) for estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor-receptor 2 (HER2). Using the data from a case-control study in France including 975 cases and 1317 controls, we found that the odds ratios for ER+, PR+ or HER2+ breast cancers subtypes were significantly elevated, while no association with night shift work was observed for ER, PR or HER2-negative tumors. After stratification by menopausal status, the associations of night work with receptor-positive breast tumor subtypes were clearly seen in premenopausal women (odds ratios 2.04, 1.98 and 2.80, respectively) but did not appear in postmenopausal women. This study provides evidence that working at night may increase risk of ER, PR and HER2-positive subtypes of breast cancer particularly among premenopausal women.

  16. Epidermal growth factor in alkali-burned corneal epithelial wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Foster, C S

    1987-06-15

    We conducted a double-masked study to evaluate the effect of epidermal growth factor on epithelial wound healing and recurrent erosions in alkali-burned rabbit corneas. Epithelial wounds 10 mm in diameter healed completely under the influence of topical epidermal growth factor, whereas the control corneas did not resurface in the center. On reversal of treatment, the previously nonhealing epithelial defects healed when treated with topical epidermal growth factor eyedrops. Conversely, the epidermal growth factor-treated and resurfaced corneas developed epithelial defects when treatment was discontinued. Histopathologic examination disclosed hyperplastic epithelium growing over the damaged stroma laden with polymorphonuclear leukocytes when treated with epidermal growth factor eyedrops, but it did not adhere to the underlying tissue. Hydropic changes were seen intracellularly as well as between the epithelial cells and the stroma.

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor activation in glioblastoma through novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine kinases are important regulators of cellular homeostasis with tightly controlled catalytic activity. Mutations in kinase-encoding genes can relieve the autoinhibitory constraints on kinase activity, can promote malignant transformation, and appear to be a major determinant of response to kinase inhibitor therapy. Missense mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, for example, have recently been identified in patients who showed clinical responses to EGFR kinase inhibitor therapy.Encouraged by the promising clinical activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase inhibitors in treating glioblastoma in humans, we have sequenced the complete EGFR coding sequence in glioma tumor samples and cell lines. We identified novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain of EGFR in 13.6% (18/132 of glioblastomas and 12.5% (1/8 of glioblastoma cell lines. These EGFR mutations were associated with increased EGFR gene dosage and conferred anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity to NIH-3T3 cells. Cells transformed by expression of these EGFR mutants were sensitive to small-molecule EGFR kinase inhibitors.Our results suggest extracellular missense mutations as a novel mechanism for oncogenic EGFR activation and may help identify patients who can benefit from EGFR kinase inhibitors for treatment of glioblastoma.

  18. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate.

  19. A Physiologist's View of Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Harold; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Wright, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is a core concept necessary for understanding the many regulatory mechanisms in physiology. Claude Bernard originally proposed the concept of the constancy of the "milieu interieur," but his discussion was rather abstract. Walter Cannon introduced the term "homeostasis" and expanded Bernard's notion of…

  20. Influence of topical human epidermal growth factor on postkeratoplasty re-epithelialisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Dellaert; T.A. Casey; S. Wiffen; J. Gordon (Jocelynne); P. Johnson (Jürgen); A.J. Geerards (Annette); W.J. Rijneveld (Wilhelmina); L. Remeijer (Lies); W.H. Beekhuis (Houdijn); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To test the efficacy and safety of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) on corneal re-epithelialisation following penetrating keratoplasty. METHODS: A prospective, randomised, placebo controlled study was carried out in which patients were

  1. Multiple roles of integrin-linked kinase in epidermal development, maturation and pigmentation revealed by molecular profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Judah

    Full Text Available Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is an important scaffold protein that mediates a variety of cellular responses to integrin stimulation by extracellular matrix proteins. Mice with epidermis-restricted inactivation of the Ilk gene exhibit pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including impaired hair follicle morphogenesis, reduced epidermal adhesion to the basement membrane, compromised epidermal integrity, as well as wasting and failure to thrive leading to perinatal death. To better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms that cause such a broad range of alterations, we investigated the impact of Ilk gene inactivation on the epidermis transcriptome. Microarray analysis showed over 700 differentially regulated mRNAs encoding proteins involved in multiple aspects of epidermal function, including keratinocyte differentiation and barrier formation, inflammation, regeneration after injury, and fundamental epidermal developmental pathways. These studies also revealed potential effects on genes not previously implicated in ILK functions, including those important for melanocyte and melanoblast development and function, regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, and homeobox genes. This study shows that ILK is a critical regulator of multiple aspects of epidermal function and homeostasis, and reveals the previously unreported involvement of ILK not only in epidermal differentiation and barrier formation, but also in melanocyte genesis and function.

  2. Multiple roles of integrin-linked kinase in epidermal development, maturation and pigmentation revealed by molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judah, David; Rudkouskaya, Alena; Wilson, Ryan; Carter, David E; Dagnino, Lina

    2012-01-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an important scaffold protein that mediates a variety of cellular responses to integrin stimulation by extracellular matrix proteins. Mice with epidermis-restricted inactivation of the Ilk gene exhibit pleiotropic phenotypic defects, including impaired hair follicle morphogenesis, reduced epidermal adhesion to the basement membrane, compromised epidermal integrity, as well as wasting and failure to thrive leading to perinatal death. To better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms that cause such a broad range of alterations, we investigated the impact of Ilk gene inactivation on the epidermis transcriptome. Microarray analysis showed over 700 differentially regulated mRNAs encoding proteins involved in multiple aspects of epidermal function, including keratinocyte differentiation and barrier formation, inflammation, regeneration after injury, and fundamental epidermal developmental pathways. These studies also revealed potential effects on genes not previously implicated in ILK functions, including those important for melanocyte and melanoblast development and function, regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics, and homeobox genes. This study shows that ILK is a critical regulator of multiple aspects of epidermal function and homeostasis, and reveals the previously unreported involvement of ILK not only in epidermal differentiation and barrier formation, but also in melanocyte genesis and function.

  3. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Alkylating Agent-Induced NRF2 Blocks Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis via Control of Glutathione Pools and Protein Thiol Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C F; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2016-12-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis, and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival, an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione-ethyl-ester, decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 target overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1-mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 3000-14. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Alkylating agent induced NRF2 blocks endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis via control of glutathione pools and protein thiol homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Masamsetti, V. Pragathi; Loranc, Eva; Tonapi, Sonal S.; Gorthi, Aparna; Bernard, Xavier; Gonçalves, Rosângela Mayer; Moreira, José C. F.; Chen, Yidong; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Alkylating agents are a commonly used cytotoxic class of anticancer drugs. Understanding the mechanisms whereby cells respond to these drugs is key to identify means to improve therapy while reducing toxicity. By integrating genome-wide gene expression profiling, protein analysis and functional cell validation, we herein demonstrated a direct relationship between NRF2 and Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress pathways in response to alkylating agents, which is coordinated by the availability of glutathione (GSH) pools. GSH is essential for both drug detoxification and protein thiol homeostasis within the ER, thus inhibiting ER stress induction and promoting survival; an effect independent of its antioxidant role. NRF2 accumulation induced by alkylating agents resulted in increased GSH synthesis via GCLC/GCLM enzyme, and interfering with this NRF2 response by either NRF2 knockdown or GCLC/GCLM inhibition with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) caused accumulation of damaged proteins within the ER, leading to PERK-dependent apoptosis. Conversely, upregulation of NRF2, through KEAP1 depletion or NRF2-myc overexpression, or increasing GSH levels with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or glutathione-ethyl-ester (GSH-E), decreased ER stress and abrogated alkylating agents-induced cell death. Based on these results, we identified a subset of lung and head-and-neck carcinomas with mutations in either KEAP1 or NRF2/NFE2L2 genes that correlate with NRF2 targets overexpression and poor survival. In KEAP1 mutant cancer cells, NRF2 knockdown and GSH depletion increased cell sensitivity via ER stress induction in a mechanism specific to alkylating drugs. Overall, we show that the NRF2-GSH influence on ER homeostasis implicates defects in NRF2-GSH or ER stress machineries as affecting alkylating therapy toxicity. PMID:27638861

  6. Computer-assisted assessment of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 immunohistochemical assay in imaged histologic sections using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative analysis of positive controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Bonnie H; Ianosi-Irimie, Monica; Javidian, Parisa; Chen, Wenjin; Ganesan, Shridar; Foran, David J

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancers that overexpress the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are eligible for effective biologically targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab. However, accurately determining HER2 overexpression, especially in immunohistochemically equivocal cases, remains a challenge. Manual analysis of HER2 expression is dependent on the assessment of membrane staining as well as comparisons with positive controls. In spite of the strides that have been made to standardize the assessment process, intra- and inter-observer discrepancies in scoring is not uncommon. In this manuscript we describe a pathologist assisted, computer-based continuous scoring approach for increasing the precision and reproducibility of assessing imaged breast tissue specimens. Computer-assisted analysis on HER2 IHC is compared with manual scoring and fluorescence in situ hybridization results on a test set of 99 digitally imaged breast cancer cases enriched with equivocally scored (2+) cases. Image features are generated based on the staining profile of the positive control tissue and pixels delineated by a newly developed Membrane Isolation Algorithm. Evaluation of results was performed using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis. A computer-aided diagnostic approach has been developed using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative use of positive immunostaining controls. By incorporating internal positive controls into feature analysis a greater Area Under the Curve (AUC) in ROC analysis was achieved than feature analysis without positive controls. Evaluation of HER2 immunostaining that utilized membrane pixels, controls, and percent area stained showed significantly greater AUC than manual scoring, and significantly less false positive rate when used to evaluate immunohistochemically equivocal cases. It has been shown that by incorporating both a membrane isolation algorithm and analysis of known positive controls a computer-assisted diagnostic algorithm was

  7. Computer-assisted assessment of the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 immunohistochemical assay in imaged histologic sections using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative analysis of positive controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianosi-Irimie Monica

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancers that overexpress the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 are eligible for effective biologically targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab. However, accurately determining HER2 overexpression, especially in immunohistochemically equivocal cases, remains a challenge. Manual analysis of HER2 expression is dependent on the assessment of membrane staining as well as comparisons with positive controls. In spite of the strides that have been made to standardize the assessment process, intra- and inter-observer discrepancies in scoring is not uncommon. In this manuscript we describe a pathologist assisted, computer-based continuous scoring approach for increasing the precision and reproducibility of assessing imaged breast tissue specimens. Methods Computer-assisted analysis on HER2 IHC is compared with manual scoring and fluorescence in situ hybridization results on a test set of 99 digitally imaged breast cancer cases enriched with equivocally scored (2+ cases. Image features are generated based on the staining profile of the positive control tissue and pixels delineated by a newly developed Membrane Isolation Algorithm. Evaluation of results was performed using Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis. Results A computer-aided diagnostic approach has been developed using a membrane isolation algorithm and quantitative use of positive immunostaining controls. By incorporating internal positive controls into feature analysis a greater Area Under the Curve (AUC in ROC analysis was achieved than feature analysis without positive controls. Evaluation of HER2 immunostaining that utilized membrane pixels, controls, and percent area stained showed significantly greater AUC than manual scoring, and significantly less false positive rate when used to evaluate immunohistochemically equivocal cases. Conclusion It has been shown that by incorporating both a membrane isolation algorithm and analysis of known

  8. Mitochondrial Iron Transport and Homeostasis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshika eJain

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron (Fe is an essential nutrient for plants and although the mechanisms controlling iron uptake from the soil are relatively well understood, comparatively little is known about subcellular trafficking of iron in plant cells. Mitochondria represent a significant iron sink within cells, as iron is required for the proper functioning of respiratory chain protein complexes. Mitochondria are a site of Fe-S cluster synthesis, and possibly heme synthesis as well. Here we review recent insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling mitochondrial iron transport and homeostasis. We focus on the recent identification of a mitochondrial iron uptake transporter in rice and a possible role for metalloreductases in iron uptake by mitochondria. In addition, we highlight recent advances in mitochondrial iron homeostasis with an emphasis on the roles of frataxin and ferritin in iron trafficking and storage within mitochondria.

  9. Adaptive mechanisms of homeostasis disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Dobosiewicz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to preserve a permanent level of internal environment in a human organism, against internal and external factors, which could breach the consistency, can be define as homeostasis. Scientific proven influence on the homeostasis has the periodicity of biological processes, which is also called circadian rhythm. The effect of circadian rhythm is also to see in the functioning of autonomic nervous system and cardiovascular system. Sleep deprivation is an example of how the disorders in circadian rhythm could have the influence on the homeostasis.

  10. Guest editor's introduction: Energy homeostasis in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Energy homeostasis is achieved through neuroendocrine and metabolic control of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Traditionally, these controls have been studied in an unrealistic and narrow context. The appetite for food, for example, is most often assumed to be independent of other motivations, such as sexual desire, fearfulness, and competition. Furthermore, our understanding of all aspects of energy homeostasis is based on studying males of only a few species. The baseline control subjects are most often housed in enclosed spaces, with continuous, unlimited access to food. In the last century, this approach has generated useful information, but all the while, the global prevalence of obesity has increased and remains at unprecedented levels (Ogden et al., 2013, 2014). It is likely, however, that the mechanisms that control ingestive behavior were molded by evolutionary forces, and that few, if any vertebrate species evolved in the presence of a limitless food supply, in an enclosed 0.5 × 1 ft space, and exposed to a constant ambient temperature of 22+2 °C. This special issue of Hormones and Behavior therefore contains 9 review articles and 7 data articles that consider energy homeostasis within the context of other motivations and physiological processes, such as early development, sexual differentiation, sexual motivation, reproduction, seasonality, hibernation, and migration. Each article is focused on a different species or on a set of species, and most vertebrate classes are represented. Energy homeostasis is viewed in the context of the selection pressures that simultaneously molded multiple aspects of energy intake, storage, and expenditure. This approach yields surprising conclusions regarding the function of those traits and their underlying neuroendocrine mechanisms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Metabolic epidermal necrosis in two dogs with different underlying diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R; McNeil, P E; Evans, H; Srebernik, N

    1995-05-06

    Two dogs with metabolic epidermal necrosis had hyperkeratosis of the footpads accompanied by erythematous, erosive and crusting lesions affecting the muzzle, external genitalia, perineum and periocular regions. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed a superficial hydropic dermatitis with marked parakeratosis. Both dogs had high plasma activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase and high concentrations of glucose, and also a marked hypoaminoacidaemia. Despite these similarities, the cutaneous eruptions were associated with different underlying diseases. One dog had a pancreatic carcinoma which had metastasised widely; the primary tumour and the metastases showed glucagon immunoreactivity on immunocytochemical staining, and the dog's plasma glucagon concentration was markedly greater than that of control dogs. The other dog had diffuse hepatic disease; its plasma glucagon concentration was similar to that of control samples and cirrhosis was identified post mortem. Metabolic epidermal necrosis in dogs is a distinct cutaneous reaction pattern which may be associated with different underlying systemic diseases; however, the pathogenesis of the skin lesions remains unclear.

  12. Epidermal Overexpression of Xenobiotic Receptor PXR Impairs the Epidermal Barrier and Triggers Th2 Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elentner, Andreas; Schmuth, Matthias; Yannoutsos, Nikolaos; Eichmann, Thomas O; Gruber, Robert; Radner, Franz P W; Hermann, Martin; Del Frari, Barbara; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    The skin is in daily contact with environmental pollutants, but the long-term effects of such exposure remain underinvestigated. Many of these toxins bind and activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates genes central to xenobiotic metabolism. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of constitutive activation of PXR in the basal layer of the skin to mimic repeated skin exposure to noxious molecules. We designed a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses the human PXR gene linked to the herpes simplex VP16 domain under the control of the keratin 14 promoter. We show that transgenic mice display increased transepidermal water loss and elevated skin pH, abnormal stratum corneum lipids, focal epidermal hyperplasia, activated keratinocytes expressing more thymic stromal lymphopoietin, a T helper type 2/T helper type 17 skin immune response, and increased serum IgE. Furthermore, the cutaneous barrier dysfunction precedes development of the T helper type 2/T helper type 17 inflammation in transgenic mice, thereby mirroring the time course of atopic dermatitis development in humans. Moreover, further experiments suggest increased PXR signaling in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis when compared with healthy skin. Thus, PXR activation by environmental pollutants may compromise epidermal barrier function and favor an immune response resembling atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Sumi, Minako; Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuta, Koji; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC

  14. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Is Associated With Longer Local Control After Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Stage III Nonsquamous Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Horinouchi, Hidehito, E-mail: hhorinou@ncc.go.jp [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Katsui Taniyama, Tomoko; Nakamichi, Shinji; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sumi, Minako [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shiraishi, Kouya; Kohno, Takashi [Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furuta, Koh [Department of Clinical Laboratories, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tsuta, Koji [Department of Pathology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Tamura, Tomohide [Department of Thoracic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in patients with potentially curable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are eligible for definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between January 2001 and December 2010, we analyzed the EGFR mutational status in consecutive NSCLC patients who were treated by CRT. The response rate, relapse-free survival, 2-year relapse-free rate, initial relapse sites, and overall survival of the patients were investigated. Results: A total of 528 patients received CRT at our hospital during the study period. Of these, 274 were diagnosed as having nonsquamous NSCLC. Sufficient specimens for mutational analyses could be obtained from 198 of these patients. The proportion of patients with EGFR activating mutations was 17%. In addition to the well-known characteristics of patients carrying EGFR mutations (female, adenocarcinoma, and never/light smoker), the proportion of cases with smaller primary lesions (T1/2) was found to be higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with EGFR mutations showed similar response rate, relapse-free survival, and 2-year relapse-free rates as compared to patients with wild-type EGFR. Local relapses as the site of initial relapse occurred significantly less frequently in patients with EGFR mutation (4% vs 21%; P=.045). Patients with EGFR mutations showed longer local control (adjusted hazard ratio 0.49; P=.043). After disease progression, a majority of the patients with EGFR mutations received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (62%), and these patients showed longer postprogression survival than those with wild-type EGFR. Conclusions: Our study is the first to show radiosensitive biology of EGFR-mutated tumors in definitive CRT with curative intent. This finding could serve as a credible baseline estimate of EGFR-mutated population in stage III nonsquamous NSCLC.

  15. A mathematical model of brain glucose homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hidenori

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological fact that a stable level of brain glucose is more important than that of blood glucose suggests that the ultimate goal of the glucose-insulin-glucagon (GIG regulatory system may be homeostasis of glucose concentration in the brain rather than in the circulation. Methods In order to demonstrate the relationship between brain glucose homeostasis and blood hyperglycemia in diabetes, a brain-oriented mathematical model was developed by considering the brain as the controlled object while the remaining body as the actuator. After approximating the body compartmentally, the concentration dynamics of glucose, as well as those of insulin and glucagon, are described in each compartment. The brain-endocrine crosstalk, which regulates blood glucose level for brain glucose homeostasis together with the peripheral interactions among glucose, insulin and glucagon, is modeled as a proportional feedback control of brain glucose. Correlated to the brain, long-term effects of psychological stress and effects of blood-brain-barrier (BBB adaptation to dysglycemia on the generation of hyperglycemia are also taken into account in the model. Results It is shown that simulation profiles obtained from the model are qualitatively or partially quantitatively consistent with clinical data, concerning the GIG regulatory system responses to bolus glucose, stepwise and continuous glucose infusion. Simulations also revealed that both stress and BBB adaptation contribute to the generation of hyperglycemia. Conclusion Simulations of the model of a healthy person under long-term severe stress demonstrated that feedback control of brain glucose concentration results in elevation of blood glucose level. In this paper, we try to suggest that hyperglycemia in diabetes may be a normal outcome of brain glucose homeostasis.

  16. Metal ion transporters and homeostasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, N

    1999-01-01

    Transition metals are essential for many metabolic processes and their homeostasis is crucial for life. Aberrations in the cellular metal ion concentrations may lead to cell death and severe diseases. Metal ion transporters play a major role in maintaining the correct concentrations of the various metal ions in the different cellular compartments. Recent studies of yeast mutants revealed key elements in metal ion homeostasis, including novel transport systems. Several of the proteins discover...

  17. Toxic epidermal necrolysis successfully treated with etanercept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubinelli, Emanuela; Canzona, Flora; Tonanzi, Tiziano; Raskovic, Desanka; Didona, Biagio

    2009-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare and acute severe adverse reaction to drugs, characterised by massive apoptosis and widespread epidermal and mucosal detachment. Although no gold standard therapy exists, human i.v. immunoglobulins have recently been described as an effective treatment for this disease. We report a case of phenobarbital-induced TEN in a 59-year-old white woman where the epidermal detachment stopped 48 h after beginning the etanercept treatment with complete healing after 20 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of TEN successfully treated with etanercept.

  18. Evaluation of the Genetic and Nutritional Control of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes in a Novel Mouse Model on Chromosome 7: An Insight into Insulin Signaling and Glucose Homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Dhar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Obesity is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, accounting for 90-95% of all diabetes cases in the US. Human obesity is a complex trait and can be studied using appropriate mouse models. A novel polygenic mouse model for studying the genetic and environmental contributions to and the physiological ramifications of obesity and related phenotypes is found in specific lines of mice bred and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Heterozygous mice with a maternally inherited copy of two radiation-induced deletions in the p region of mouse chromosome 7, p23DFioD and p30PUb, have significantly greater body fat and show hyperinsulinemia compared to the wild-type. A single gene, Atp10c, maps to this critical region and codes for a putative aminophospholipid translocase. Biochemical and molecular studies were initiated to gain insight into obesity and glucose homeostasis in these animals and to study the biological role of Atp10c in creating these phenotypes. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were standardized for the heterozygous p23DFioD and control mice on a custom-made diet containing 20% protein, 70% carbohydrate, and 10% fat (kcal). Atp10c expression profiles were also generated using Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Heterozygous p23DFioD animals showed insulin resistance after receiving a dose of either 0.375 or 0.75 U/kg Illetin R insulin. RT-PCR data also shows differences in Atp10c expression in the mutants versus control mice. Using these standardized biochemical assays, future studies will further the understanding of genetic and nutritional controls of glucose homeostasis and obesity in animal models and subsequently in human populations.

  19. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    ...). An epidermal biosensor is a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  20. An Epidermal Biosensor for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    ...) An epidermal biosensor was conceived as a new approach for the early continuous, in vivo detection of the onset of disease by the using genetically modified skin cells to respond to molecules secreted by tumor cells...

  1. The Efficacy of Single-Agent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Biologically Selected Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guifang; Gao, Shunji; Sheng, Zhixin; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of first-generation single-agent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients with known EGFR mutation status, we undertook this pooled analysis. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, the Science Citation Index, and the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings. Out of 2,129 retrieved articles, 19 RCTs enrolling 2,016 patients with wild-type EGFR tumors and 1,034 patients with mutant EGFR tumors were identified. For these EGFR mutant patients, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy improved progression-free survival (PFS) over chemotherapy: the summary hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.41 (p well as chemotherapy in the first-line setting (HR = 1.65, p = 0.03) and in the second-/third-line setting (HR = 1.27, p = 0.006). No statistically significant difference was observed in terms of overall survival (OS). Using platinum-based doublet chemotherapy as a common comparator, indirect comparison showed the superior efficacy of single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy over EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 1.35 (1.03, 1.77), p = 0.03]. Additionally, a marginal trend towards the same direction was found in the OS analysis [HR = 1.16 (0.99, 1.35), p = 0.06]. Interestingly, for those EGFR wild-type tumors, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to EGFR-TKIs added to chemotherapy in PFS [HR = 0.38 (0.33, 0.44), p chemotherapy. However, single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy was inferior to chemotherapy in PFS for those EGFR wild-type patients. Single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy could improve PFS over the combination of EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy in these EGFR mutant patients. However, EGFR-TKIs combined with chemotherapy could provide additive PFS and OS benefit over single-agent EGFR-TKI therapy in those EGFR wild-type patients. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Epidermal growth factor in the rat prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Niels; Jørgensen, P E; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1998-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate.......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation in prostate epithelial and stromal cells in primary culture. This investigation was set up to characterize the time and spatial expression of EGF in the rat prostate....

  3. Foliar Epidermal Studies of Plants in Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Thakur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes foliar epidermal structure in 17 species belonging to 17 genera of the family Euphoprbiaceae. Anomocytic stomata is predominant, rarely they are anisocytic, paracytic on the same foliar surface with different combinations. Leaves are hypostomatic and rarely amphistomatic. The foliar surface is smooth, rarely striated. The foliar epidermal cell walls are straight or undulate. Distribution of stomata, stomatal index, stomatal frequency, stomatal size and other cell wall contours are described in detail.

  4. Epidermal Inclusion Cysts of The Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Motabar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal inclusion cysts are uncommon in the breast, but the consequences can besevere when these cysts occur in the breast parenchyma. Here,we report two suchcases. The patient in case 1 was an 37-year-old woman with a 3-cm palpable mass inthe right breast. Mammography revealed a round and smoothly outlined mass, whichindicated a benign tumor, and sonography showed an irregularly shaped and heterogeneoushypoechoic mass, fibroadenoma was suspected on the basis of clinical andimage findings, but excisional biopsy revealed an epidermal inclusion cyst. The patientin case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a 2.5-cm lesion in the left breast. Mammographyrevealed a round, dense, smoothly outlined mass, and sonography showeda well-defined, central hyperechoic mass. . Breast cancer was suspected on the basisof the sonographic findings and the age of the patient, but the resected specimen revealedan epidermal inclusion cyst. Although epidermal inclusion cysts are benign,occasionally they may play a role in the origin of squamous carcinoma of the breast. .Mammographic and sonographic features of an epidermal cyst may mimic a malignantlesion. Malignant change appears to occur more frequently in epidermal inclusioncysts in the mammary gland, compared to common epidermal inclusion cysts,and this may be associated with origination of mammary epidermal inclusion cystsfrom squamous metaplasia of the mammary duct epithelium.Epidermmoid inclusion cyst of the breast is potentially serious, although such cystsare rare, and differentiation from a malignant or benign breast tumor is required. Excisionis probably the most appropriate treatment, and can eliminate the possible riskof malignant transformation.

  5. Impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Krista A

    2016-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the most recent human trials that have examined the impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis. Our literature search retrieved one human trial of alternate day fasting, and three trials of Ramadan fasting published in the past 12 months. Current evidence suggests that 8 weeks of alternate day fasting that produces mild weight loss (4% from baseline) has no effect on glucose homeostasis. As for Ramadan fasting, decreases in fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance have been noted after 4 weeks in healthy normal weight individuals with mild weight loss (1-2% from baseline). However, Ramadan fasting may have little impact on glucoregulatory parameters in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who failed to observe weight loss. Whether intermittent fasting is an effective means of regulating glucose homeostasis remains unclear because of the scarcity of studies in this area. Large-scale, longer-term randomized controlled trials will be required before the use of fasting can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  6. MicroRNAs and Periodontal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X; Zhou, X; Trombetta-eSilva, J; Francis, M; Gaharwar, A K; Atsawasuwan, P; Diekwisch, T G H

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small RNAs that control gene expression in all aspects of eukaryotic life, primarily through RNA silencing mechanisms. The purpose of the present review is to introduce key miRNAs involved in periodontal homeostasis, summarize the mechanisms by which they affect downstream genes and tissues, and provide an introduction into the therapeutic potential of periodontal miRNAs. In general, miRNAs function synergistically to fine-tune the regulation of biological processes and to remove expression noise rather than by causing drastic changes in expression levels. In the periodontium, miRNAs play key roles in development and periodontal homeostasis and during the loss of periodontal tissue integrity as a result of periodontal disease. As part of the anabolic phase of periodontal homeostasis and periodontal development, miRNAs direct periodontal fibroblasts toward alveolar bone lineage differentiation and new bone formation through WNT, bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch signaling pathways. miRNAs contribute equally to the catabolic aspect of periodontal homeostasis as they affect osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function, either by directly promoting osteoclast activity or by inhibiting osteoclast signaling intermediaries or through negative feedback loops. Their small size and ability to target multiple regulatory networks of related sets of genes have predisposed miRNAs to become ideal candidates for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. To address the immense therapeutic potential of miRNAs and their antagomirs, an ever growing number of delivery approaches toward clinical applications have been developed, including nanoparticle carriers and secondary structure interference inhibitor systems. However, only a fraction of the miRNAs involved in periodontal health and disease are known today. It is anticipated that continued research will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the periodontal miRNA world, and a systematic

  7. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assessment in a case-control study: comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction performed by central laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, Frederick L; Achacoso, Ninah; Maddala, Tara; Shak, Steve; Quesenberry, Charles P; Goldstein, Lynn C; Gown, Allen M; Habel, Laurel A

    2010-10-01

    The optimal method to assess human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status remains highly controversial. Before reporting patient HER2 results, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines mandate that laboratories demonstrate ≥ 95% concordance to another approved laboratory or methodology. Here, we compare central laboratory HER2 assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using Oncotype DX in lymph node-negative, chemotherapy-untreated patients from a large Kaiser Permanente case-control study. Breast cancer specimens from the Kaiser-Genomic Health study were examined. Central FISH assessment of HER2 amplification and polysomy 17 was conducted by PhenoPath Laboratories (ratios > 2.2, 1.8 to 2.2, and < 1.8 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). HER2 expression by RT-PCR was conducted using Oncotype DX by Genomic Health (normalized expression units ≥ 11.5, 10.7 to < 11.5, and < 10.7 define HER2 positive, HER2 equivocal, and HER2 negative, respectively). Concordance analyses followed ASCO/CAP guidelines. HER2 concordance by central FISH and central RT-PCR was 97% (95% CI, 96% to 99%). Twelve percent (67 of 568 patients) and 11% (60 of 568 patients) of patients were HER2 positive by RT-PCR and FISH, respectively. HER2-positive patients had increased odds of dying from breast cancer compared with HER2-negative patients. Polysomy 17 was demonstrated in 12.5% of all patients and 33% of FISH-positive patients. Nineteen of 20 FISH-positive patients with polysomy 17 were also RT-PCR HER2 positive. Although not statistically significantly different, HER2-positive/polysomy 17 patients tended to have the worst prognosis, followed by HER2-positive/eusomic, HER2-negative/polysomy 17, and HER2-negative/eusomic patients. There is a high degree of concordance between central FISH and quantitative RT

  8. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  9. Evolution of the clonogenic potential of human epidermal stem/progenitor cells with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zobiri O

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Olivia Zobiri, Nathalie Deshayes, Michelle Rathman-JosserandDepartment of Biological Research, L'Oréal Advanced Research, Clichy Cedex, FranceAbstract: A number of clinical observations have indicated that the regenerative potential and overall function of the epidermis is modified with age. The epidermis becomes thinner, repairs itself less efficiently after wounding, and presents modified barrier function recovery. In addition, the dermal papillae flatten out with increasing age, suggesting a modification in the interaction between epidermal and dermal compartments. As the epidermal regenerative capacity is dependent upon stem and progenitor cell function, it is naturally of interest to identify and understand age-related changes in these particular keratinocyte populations. Previous studies have indicated that the number of stem cells does not decrease with age in mouse models but little solid evidence is currently available concerning human skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clonogenic potential of keratinocyte populations isolated from the epidermis of over 50 human donors ranging from 18 to 71 years old. The data indicate that the number of epidermal cells presenting high regenerative potential does not dramatically decline with age in human skin. The authors believe that changes in the microenvironment controlling epidermal basal cell activity are more likely to explain the differences in epidermal function observed with increasing age.Keywords: skin, epidermal stem cells, aging, colony-forming efficiency test

  10. [Enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of epidermal cells of HIV-infected patients in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, R P; Berger, S; Thomas, C A; Ottmann, O G; Ganser, A; Stille, W; Shah, P M

    1992-07-01

    Clinical observations show that the HIV infection is often associated with affections of the skin. In order to examine the involvement of the epidermal immune system in the HIV infection, we determined accessory cell function of epidermal cells from HIV-1-infected patients. For this we measured the proliferative response of enriched CD(4+)-T-lymphocytes from HIV-infected patients and noninfected controls to stimulation with anti-CD3 and IL-2 in the presence of epidermal cells; the enhancement of the response is dependent on the presence of functionally intact accessory cells. The capacity of epidermal cells to increase the anti-CD3-stimulated T-cell proliferative response was significantly enhanced in HIV patients (CDC III/IVA) as compared with noninfected donors. It is discussed, whether the increased activity of epidermal cells from HIV-infected patients may be responsible for several of the dermal lesions in the course of an HIV infection as due to an enhanced production and release of epidermal cell-derived cytokines.

  11. Attenuation fluctuations and local dermal reflectivity are indicators of immune cell infiltrate and epidermal hyperplasia in skin inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Choudhury, Niloy; Levitz, David; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven

    2012-02-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses responsible for skin homeostasis. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of psoriasis remains under investigated. To elucidate the spatial-temporal morphological evolution of psoriasis we undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to non-invasively document dermal alterations due to immune cell infiltration and epidermal hyperplasia in an Imiquimod (IMQ) induced model of psoriasis-like inflammation in DBA2/C57Bl6 hybrid mice. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a three parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(z) = ρ exp(-mu;z +ɛ(z)). Ensemble averaging of the fit parameters over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed that the local dermal reflectivity ρ, decreased significantly in response to 6 day IMQ treatment (p = 0.0001), as did the standard deviation of the attenuation fluctuation std(ɛ(z)), (p = 0.04), in comparison to cream controls and day 1 treatments. No significant changes were observed in the average dermal attenuation rate, μ. Our results suggest these label-free OCT-based metrics can be deployed to investigate new therapeutic targets in animal models as well as aid in clinical staging of psoriasis in conjunction with the psoriasis area and severity index.

  12. Beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion signalling is essential for epidermal progenitor cell expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piwko-Czuchra, Aleksandra; Koegel, Heidi; Meyer, Hannelore

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a major discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo results regarding the role of beta1 integrins in the maintenance of epidermal stem/progenitor cells. Studies of mice with skin-specific ablation of beta1 integrins suggested that epidermis can form and be maintained in thei...... of increased keratinocyte proliferation such as wound healing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that expression of beta1 integrins is critically important for the expansion of epidermal progenitor cells to maintain epidermal homeostasis....... that developed similar, but less severe defects than mice with beta1-deficient keratinocytes. Surprisingly we found that upon aging these abnormalities attenuated due to a rapid expansion of cells, which escaped or compensated for the down-regulation of beta1 integrin expression. A similar phenomenon...... was observed in aged mice with a complete, skin-specific ablation of the beta1 integrin gene, where cells that escaped Cre-mediated recombination repopulated the mutant skin in a very short time period. The expansion of beta1 integrin expressing keratinocytes was even further accelerated in situations...

  13. Beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion signalling is essential for epidermal progenitor cell expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Piwko-Czuchra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is a major discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo results regarding the role of beta1 integrins in the maintenance of epidermal stem/progenitor cells. Studies of mice with skin-specific ablation of beta1 integrins suggested that epidermis can form and be maintained in their absence, while in vitro data have shown a fundamental role for these adhesion receptors in stem/progenitor cell expansion and differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate this discrepancy we generated hypomorphic mice expressing reduced beta1 integrin levels on keratinocytes that developed similar, but less severe defects than mice with beta1-deficient keratinocytes. Surprisingly we found that upon aging these abnormalities attenuated due to a rapid expansion of cells, which escaped or compensated for the down-regulation of beta1 integrin expression. A similar phenomenon was observed in aged mice with a complete, skin-specific ablation of the beta1 integrin gene, where cells that escaped Cre-mediated recombination repopulated the mutant skin in a very short time period. The expansion of beta1 integrin expressing keratinocytes was even further accelerated in situations of increased keratinocyte proliferation such as wound healing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that expression of beta1 integrins is critically important for the expansion of epidermal progenitor cells to maintain epidermal homeostasis.

  14. Microneedle fractional radiofrequency increases epidermal hyaluronan and reverses age-related epidermal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Seo, Seong Rak; Yoon, Moon Soo; Song, Ji-Ye; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Sang Eun

    2016-02-01

    Skin aging results in physiological alterations in keratinocyte activities and epidermal function, as well as dermal changes. Yet, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause epidermal dysfunction during skin aging are not well understood. Recently, the role of epidermal hyaluronan (HA) as an active regulator of dynamic cellular processes is getting attention and alterations in HA metabolism are thought to be important in age-related epidermal dysfunction. Microneedle fractional radiofrequency (RF) has shown effects for improving cutaneous aging. However, little is known about the effects of fractional RF on the epidermal HA and epidermal function. We investigated the effect of microneedle fractional RF on the expression of epidermal HA in young and aged mice epidermis. We performed fractional RF on the dorsal skin of 30 8-week-old (young) hairless mice and 15 47-week-old (aged) C57BL/6J mice. Skin samples were collected on day 1, 3, and 7. HA content was measured by ELISA. Gene expressions of CD 44, HABP4, and HAS3 were measured using real time RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry for detection of HA, CD44, PCNA, and filaggrin were performed. HA content and the mRNA levels of HABP4, CD44, and HAS3 were upregulated in the epidermis of both young and aged mice after microneedle fractional RF treatment. The expression was increased from day 1 after treatment and increased expression persisted on day 7. Fractional RF treatment significantly increased PCNA and filaggrin expression only in the aged mice skin. Microneedle fractional RF increased epidermal HA and CD44 expression in both young and aged mice and reversed age-related epidermal dysfunction especially in aged mice, suggesting a new mechanism involved in the skin rejuvenation effect of microneedle fractional RF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Sensing the environment: regulation of local and global homeostasis by the skin's neuroendocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Skobowiat, Cezary; Zbytek, Blazej; Slominski, Radomir M; Steketee, Jeffery D

    2012-01-01

    Skin, the body's largest organ, is strategically located at the interface with the external environment where it detects, integrates, and responds to a diverse range of stressors including solar radiation. It has already been established that the skin is an important peripheral neuro-endocrine-immune organ that is tightly networked to central regulatory systems. These capabilities contribute to the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis. Specifically, epidermal and dermal cells produce and respond to classical stress neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, and hormones. Such production is stimulated by ultraviolet radiation (UVR), biological factors (infectious and noninfectious), and other physical and chemical agents. Examples of local biologically active products are cytokines, biogenic amines (catecholamines, histamine, serotonin, and N-acetyl-serotonin), melatonin, acetylocholine, neuropeptides including pituitary (proopiomelanocortin-derived ACTH, beta-endorphin or MSH peptides, thyroid-stimulating hormone) and hypothalamic (corticotropin-releasing factor and related urocortins, thyroid-releasing hormone) hormones as well as enkephalins and dynorphins, thyroid hormones, steroids (glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, sex hormones, 7-delta steroids), secosteroids, opioids, and endocannabinoids. The production of these molecules is hierarchical, organized along the algorithms of classical neuroendocrine axes such as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), hypothalamic-thyroid axis (HPT), serotoninergic, melatoninergic, catecholaminergic, cholinergic, steroid/secosteroidogenic, opioid, and endocannbinoid systems. Dysregulation of these axes or of communication between them may lead to skin and/ or systemic diseases. These local neuroendocrine networks are also addressed at restricting maximally the effect of noxious environmental agents to preserve local and consequently global homeostasis. Moreover, the skin-derived factors/systems can also activate cutaneous nerve

  16. Telomere Homeostasis: Interplay with Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donogh Maguire

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomere biology, a key component of the hallmarks of ageing, offers insight into dysregulation of normative ageing processes that accompany age-related diseases such as cancer. Telomere homeostasis is tightly linked to cellular metabolism, and in particular with mitochondrial physiology, which is also diminished during cellular senescence and normative physiological ageing. Inherent in the biochemistry of these processes is the role of magnesium, one of the main cellular ions and an essential cofactor in all reactions that use ATP. Magnesium plays an important role in many of the processes involved in regulating telomere structure, integrity and function. This review explores the mechanisms that maintain telomere structure and function, their influence on circadian rhythms and their impact on health and age-related disease. The pervasive role of magnesium in telomere homeostasis is also highlighted.

  17. [Glucose homeostasis and gut-brain connection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vadder, Filipe; Mithieux, Gilles

    2015-02-01

    Since the XIX(th) century, the brain has been known for its role in regulating food intake (via the control of hunger sensation) and glucose homeostasis. Further interest has come from the discovery of gut hormones, which established a clear link between the gut and the brain in regulating glucose and energy homeostasis. The brain has two particular structures, the hypothalamus and the brainstem, which are sensitive to information coming either from peripheral organs or from the gut (via circulating hormones or nutrients) about the nutritional status of the organism. However, the efforts for a better understanding of these mechanisms have allowed to unveil a new gut-brain neural axis as a key regulator of the metabolic status of the organism. Certain nutrients control the hypothalamic homeostatic function via this axis. In this review, we describe how the gut is connected to the brain via different neural pathways, and how the interplay between these two organs drives the energy balance. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  18. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Yuksel, Mahmut; Ozderin Ozin, Yasemin; Alisik, Murat; Erel, Ozcan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis in celiac disease and to examine the associate with celiac autoantibodies and gluten-free diet. METHODS Seventy three patients with celiac disease and 73 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. In both groups, thiol/disulphide homeostasis was examined with a new colorimetric method recently developed by Erel and Neselioglu. RESULTS In patients with celiac disease, native thiol (P = 0.027) and total thiol (P = 0.031) levels were lower, while disulphide (P < 0.001) level, disulphide/native thiol (P < 0.001) and disulphide/total thiol (P < 0.001) ratios were higher compared to the control group. In patients who do not comply with a gluten-free diet, disulphide/native thiol ratio was found higher compared to the patients who comply with the diet (P < 0.001). In patients with any autoantibody-positive, disulphide/native thiol ratio was observed higher compared to the patients with autoantibody-negative (P < 0.05). It is found that there is a negative correlation between celiac autoantibodies, and native thiol, total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratio, while a positive correlation is observed between disulphide, disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol levels. CONCLUSION This study is first in the literature which found that the patients with celiac disease the dynamic thiol/disulphide balance shifts through disulphide form compared to the control group. PMID:28533921

  19. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Bagus Boedi Iswanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD, which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC, which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs. In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft–processed PDC.

  20. Lipid Raft, Regulator of Plasmodesmal Callose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswanto, Arya Bagus Boedi; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2017-04-03

    A bstract: The specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts are enriched by sterols and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts facilitate cellular signal transduction by controlling the assembly of signaling molecules and membrane protein trafficking. Another specialized compartment of plant cells, the plasmodesmata (PD), which regulates the symplasmic intercellular movement of certain molecules between adjacent cells, also contains a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The dynamic permeability of plasmodesmata (PDs) is highly controlled by plasmodesmata callose (PDC), which is synthesized by callose synthases (CalS) and degraded by β-1,3-glucanases (BGs). In recent studies, remarkable observations regarding the correlation between lipid raft formation and symplasmic intracellular trafficking have been reported, and the PDC has been suggested to be the regulator of the size exclusion limit of PDs. It has been suggested that the alteration of lipid raft substances impairs PDC homeostasis, subsequently affecting PD functions. In this review, we discuss the substantial role of membrane lipid rafts in PDC homeostasis and provide avenues for understanding the fundamental behavior of the lipid raft-processed PDC.

  1. Sleep Homeostasis and Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202...circuit (a homeostat) that operates in concert with the circadian circuitry or does sleep drive accumulate everywhere in the brain? To answer these...neurons is capable of generating sleep drive. RNAi-mediated knockdown of insomniac in R2 neurons abolished sleep homeostasis without affecting baseline

  2. EPIDERMAL MORPHOLOGY OF WEST AFRICAN OKRA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    stem peels were obtained from a slight cut on the tenth internodes. Peels from fruit ... xia l su rfa ce. A b a xia l su rfa ce. Adaxial surface. Abaxial surface. L e n g th. (µ m. ) ..... Variations in epidermal cell shape of both adaxial and abaxial surfaces ...

  3. FOLIAR EPIDERMAL AND PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    alkaloid, saponin, inulin, cellulose, tannin and lignin; Eragrostis tremula tested negative for lignin and positive for cellulose, saponin and alkaloids while Axonopus compressus tested negative for lignin, but positive for alkaloid, saponin, inulin, cellulose and tannin respectively. Leaf epidermal studies help to determine ...

  4. Stevens Johnsons syndrom og toksisk epidermal nekrolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Zachariae, Claus; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute mucocutaneous diseases primarily due to drug intake. The diseases are characterised by the separation of epidermis from dermis which can be life-threatening. Mortality is often caused by sepsis and multiple organ failure. The most...

  5. γδ T cells in homeostasis and host defence of epithelial barrier tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten M; Witherden, Deborah A; Havran, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial surfaces line the body and provide a crucial interface between the body and the external environment. Tissue-resident epithelial γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in the epithelial tissues and are ideally positioned to carry out barrier surveillance and aid in tissue homeostasis and repair. In this Review, we focus on the intraepithelial γδ T cell compartment of the two largest epithelial tissues in the body - namely, the epidermis and the intestine - and provide a comprehensive overview of the crucial contributions of intraepithelial γδ T cells to tissue integrity and repair, host homeostasis and protection in the context of the symbiotic relationship with the microbiome and during pathogen clearance. Finally, we describe epithelium-specific butyrophilin-like molecules and briefly review their emerging role in selectively shaping and regulating epidermal and intestinal γδ T cell repertoires.

  6. Effects of topical application of aqueous solutions of hexoses on epidermal permeability barrier recovery rate after barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that hexose molecules influence the stability of phospholipid bilayers. Therefore, the effects of topical application of all 12 stereoisomers of dextro-hexose on the epidermal barrier recovery rate after barrier disruption were evaluated. Immediately after tape stripping, 0.1 m aqueous solution of each hexose was applied on hairless mouse skin. Among the eight dextro-aldohexoses, topical application of altose, idose, mannose and talose accelerated the barrier recovery, while allose, galactose, glucose and gulose had no effect. Among the four dextro-ketohexoses, psicose, fructose, sorbose and tagatose all accelerated the barrier recovery. As the effects of hexoses on the barrier recovery rate appeared within 1 h, the mechanism is unlikely to be genomic. Instead, these hexoses may influence phase transition of the lipid bilayers of lamellar bodies and cell membrane, a crucial step in epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Dynamic changes in nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotide content in normal human epidermal keratinocytes and their effect on retinoic acid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkas-Sarafova, Adriana; Markova, N.G.; Simon, M.

    2005-01-01

    The function of many enzymes that regulate metabolism and transcription depends critically on the nicotinamide pyridine dinucleotides. To understand the role of NAD(P)(H) in physiology and pathophysiology, it is imperative to estimate both their amount and ratios in a given cell type. In human epidermis and in cultured epidermal keratinocytes, we found that the total dinucleotide content is in the low millimolar range. The dinucleotide pattern changes during proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes in culture. Differences in the concentrations of NAD(P)(H) of 1.5- to 12-fold were observed. This resulted in alteration of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratio, which could impact the differential regulation of both transcriptional and metabolic processes. In support of this notion, we provide evidence that the two-step oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid, a nuclear hormone critical for epidermal homeostasis, can be regulated by the relative physiological amounts of the pyridine dinucleotides

  8. Dynamic thiol/disulfide homeostasis and effects of smoking on homeostasis parameters in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Selma; Demirseren, Duriye Deniz; Alisik, Murat; Aktas, Akin; Neselioglu, Salim; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-12-01

    Recently, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress have been suggested in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. The aim of this study to evaluate the thiol/disulfide homeostasis in patients with psoriasis. Ninety patients with psoriasis who did not receive any systemic treatment in the last six  months were included in the study. Seventy-six age and gender-matched healthy volunteers served as control group. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis was measured in venous blood samples obtained from patient and control groups. Native thiol and total thiol levels were significantly higher in patients than in control group. When thiol/disulfide hemostasis parameters and clinical and demographic characteristics were compared, a negative correlation was detected between native thiol and total thiol with age. The levels of total thiols had also negative correlation with PASI and duration of the disease. When we divided the patients into smokers and non-smokers, native thiol and total thiol levels were significantly higher in smokers than in controls, whereas native thiol and total thiol levels were comparable in non-smoker patients and controls. Thiol/disulfide balance shifted towards thiol in psoriasis patients and this may be responsible for increased keratinocyte proliferation in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  9. Protective Effect of HemoHIM on Epidermal Melanocytes in Ultraviolet-B irradiated Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae June [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Choon; Moon, Chang Jong; Kim, Sung Ho [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Jeongeup Campus of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jong Sik; Kim, Tae Hwan [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We induced the activation of melanocytes in the epidermis of C57BL/6 mice by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation, and observed the effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM, HH) on the formation, and decrease of UV-B-induced epidermal melanocytes. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated by UV-B 80 mJ:cm{sup -2} (0.5 mW:sec{sup -1}) daily for 7 days, and HH was intraperitoneally, orally or topically applied pre- or post-irradiation. For the estimation of change of epidermal melanocytes, light microscopic observation with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) stain was performed. Split epidermal sheets prepared from the ear of untreated mice exhibited 13∼15 melanocytes:mm{sup -2}, and one week after UV irradiation, the applied areas showed an increased number of strongly DOPA-positive melanocytes with stout dendrites. But intraperitoneal, oral or topical treatment with HH before each irradiation interrupted UV-B-induced pigmentation and resulted in a marked reduction in the number of epidermal melanocytes as compared to the number found in UV-B-irradiated, untreated control skin. The number and size of DOPA-positive epidermal melanocytes were also significantly decreased in intraperitoneally injected or topically applicated group after irradiation with HH at 3rd and 6th weeks after irradiation. The present study suggests the HH as inhibitor of UV-B-induced pigmentation, and depigmenting agent.

  10. Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salt stress induced ion accumulation, ion homeostasis, membrane injury and sugar contents in salt-sensitive rice ( Oryza sativa L. spp. indica ) roots under isoosmotic conditions. ... The accumulation of sugars in PT1 roots may be a primary salt-defense mechanism and may function as an osmotic control. Key words: ...

  11. TRPV5, the gateway to Ca2+ homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis in the body is tightly controlled, and is a balance between absorption in the intestine, excretion via the urine, and exchange from bone. Recently, the epithelial Ca2+ channel (TRPV5) has been identified as the gene responsible for the Ca2+ influx in epithelial cells of the renal

  12. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis.

  13. Peculiarities of plasma homeostasis in the patients with rectal cancer according to laser correlation spectroscopy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byilenko, O.A.; Bazhora, Yu.Yi.; Sokolov, V.M.; Andronov, D.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Laser correlation spectroscopy was used to investigate plasma homeostasis in 82 patients with rectal cancer. The spectra of the blood plasma from 21 donors of the transfusion station were used as the control. The blood plasma homeostasis changes reheated with laser correlation spectrometry in the patients with rectal cancer allow to use them for diagnosis of this pathology

  14. Atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Richard N; Ader, Marilyn

    2005-04-01

    Persistent reports have linked atypical antipsychotics with diabetes, yet causative mechanisms responsible for this linkage are unclear. Goals of this review are to outline the pathogenesis of nonimmune diabetes and to survey the available literature related to why antipsychotics may lead to this disease. We accessed the literature regarding atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis using PubMed. The search included English-language publications from 1990 through October 2004. Keywords used included atypical antipsychotics plus one of the following: glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance, obesity, or diabetes. In addition, we culled information from published abstracts from several national and international scientific meetings for the years 2001 through 2004, including the American Diabetes Association, the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. The latter search was necessary because of the paucity of well-controlled prospective studies. We examined publications with significant new data or publications that contributed to the overall comprehension of the impact of atypical antipsychotics on glucose metabolism. We favored original peer-reviewed articles and were less likely to cite single case studies and/or anecdotal information. Approximately 75% of the fewer than 150 identified articles were examined and included in this review. Validity of data was evaluated using the existence of peer-review status as well as our own experience with methodology described in the specific articles. The metabolic profile caused by atypical antipsychotic treatment resembles type 2 diabetes. These agents cause weight gain in treated subjects and may induce obesity in both visceral and subcutaneous depots, as occurs in diabetes. Insulin resistance, usually associated with obesity, occurs to varying degrees with different antipsychotics, although more comparative studies with direct assessment of resistance are

  15. [Central nervous system control of energy homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machleidt, F; Lehnert, H

    2011-03-01

    The brain is continuously supplied with information about the distribution and amount of energy stores from the body periphery. Endocrine, autonomic and cognitive-hedonic signals are centrally integrated and exert effects on the whole organism via anabolic and catabolic pathways. The adiposity signals insulin and leptin reflect the amount of body fat and are part of a negative feedback mechanism between the periphery and the central nervous system. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is the most important central nervous structure, which integrates this information. Furthermore, the CNS is able to directly measure and to respond to changes in the concentration of certain nutrients. In order to develop effective therapies for the treatment of disorders of energy balance the further elucidation of these neuro-biological processes is of crucial importance. This article provides an overview of the CNS regulation of metabolism and its underlying molecular mechanisms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor (EGF is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health.

  17. Mitochondrial redox biology and homeostasis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noctor, Graham; De Paepe, Rosine; Foyer, Christine H

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondria are key players in plant cell redox homeostasis and signalling. Earlier concepts that regarded mitochondria as secondary to chloroplasts as the powerhouses of photosynthetic cells, with roles in cell proliferation, death and ageing described largely by analogy to animal paradigms, have been replaced by the new philosophy of integrated cellular energy and redox metabolism involving mitochondria and chloroplasts. Thanks to oxygenic photosynthesis, plant mitochondria often operate in an oxygen- and carbohydrate-rich environment. This rather unique environment necessitates extensive flexibility in electron transport pathways and associated NAD(P)-linked enzymes. In this review, mitochondrial redox metabolism is discussed in relation to the integrated cellular energy and redox function that controls plant cell biology and fate.

  18. Epidermal CYP2 family cytochromes P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Liping; Hoffman, Susan M.G.; Keeney, Diane S.

    2004-01-01

    Skin is the largest and most accessible drug-metabolizing organ. In mammals, it is the competent barrier that protects against exposure to harmful stimuli in the environment and in the systemic circulation. Skin expresses many cytochromes P450 that have critical roles in exogenous and endogenous substrate metabolism. Here, we review evidence for epidermal expression of genes from the large CYP2 gene family, many of which are expressed preferentially in extrahepatic tissues or specifically in epithelia at the environmental interface. At least 13 CYP2 genes (CYP2A6, 2A7, 2B6, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1) are expressed in skin from at least some human individuals, and the majority of these genes are expressed in epidermis or cultured keratinocytes. Where epidermal expression has been localized in situ by hybridization or immunocytochemistry, CYP2 transcripts and proteins are most often expressed in differentiated keratinocytes comprising the outer (suprabasal) cell layers of the epidermis and skin appendages. The tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of CYP2 genes in the epidermis, and in other epithelia that interface with the environment, suggests important roles for at least some CYP2 gene products in the production and disposition of molecules affecting competency of the epidermal barrier

  19. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Brannelly

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection.

  20. CHF: circulatory homeostasis gone awry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Karl T; Burlew, Brad S; Davis, Richard C; Newman, Kevin P; D'Cruz, Ivan A; Hawkins, Ralph G; Wall, Barry M; Parker, Robert B

    2002-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is integral to salt and water retention, particularly by the kidneys. Over time, positive sodium balance leads first to intra- and then to extravascular volume expansion, with subsequent symptomatic heart failure. This report examines the role of the RAAS in regulating a less well recognized component essential to circulatory homeostasis--central blood volume. The regulation of central blood volume draws on integrative cardiorenal physiology and a key role played by the RAAS in its regulation. In presenting insights into the role of the RAAS in regulating central blood volume, this review also addresses other sodium-retaining states with a predisposition to edema formation, such as cirrhosis and nephrosis. (c)2002 CHF, Inc

  1. [Bone homeostasis and Mechano biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    The weight-bearing exercises help to build bones and to maintain them strength. Bone is constantly renewed by the balanced action of osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption both of which mainly occur at the bone surface. This restructuring process called "bone remodeling" is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. During bone remodeling, resorption by osteoclasts precedes bone formation by osteoblasts. Based on the osteocyte location within the bone matrix and the cellular morphology, it is proposed that osteocytes potentially contribute to the regulation of bone remodeling in response to mechanical and endocrine stimuli.

  2. Sex steroids and epidermal glands in two species of gekkonine lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, K W; Maderson, P F; Alexander, S A; Wong, K L

    1975-09-01

    In vivo and in vitro experiments on the endocrine relationships of epidermal glands in the tokay Gekko gecko, and the common house gecko Hemidactylus bowringii are reported. The results show that certain aspects of beta-gland differentiation involve a synergistic action between androgens and those hormones responsible for controlling the normal shedding cycle, while other aspects are solely under androgenic control. Pre-anal organ activity appears to be solely under androgenic control.

  3. Osmotic homeostasis and NKLy lymphoma cells radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishchenko, V.V.; Magda, I.N.

    1992-01-01

    In experiments with cells of ascites NKLy lymphoma differing in ploidy and position in the cell cycle, a study was made of the radiosensitivity, osmotic homeostasis peculiarities and thermoradiation changes in potassium content. It was shown that the resistance of osmotic homeostasis of NKLy cells to thermoradiation correlated with their radioresistance

  4. Mga2 transcription factor regulates an oxygen-responsive lipid homeostasis pathway in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burr, Risa; Stewart, Emerson V; Shao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    -binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipid homeostasis. In mammals, SREBP-2 controls cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas SREBP-1 controls triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SREBP-2 homolog Sre1 regulates sterol homeostasis....... In the absence of mga2, fission yeast exhibited growth defects under both normoxia and low oxygen conditions. Mga2 transcriptional targets were enriched for lipid metabolism genes, and mga2Δ cells showed disrupted triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis, most notably with an increase in fatty acid...

  5. αPIX Is a Trafficking Regulator that Balances Recycling and Degradation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Kortüm

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting is an essential control mechanism for signaling through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. We report here that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX, which modulates the activity of Rho-GTPases, is a potent bimodal regulator of EGFR trafficking. αPIX interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl, an enzyme that attaches ubiquitin to EGFR, thereby labelling this tyrosine kinase receptor for lysosomal degradation. We show that EGF stimulation induces αPIX::c-Cbl complex formation. Simultaneously, αPIX and c-Cbl protein levels decrease, which depends on both αPIX binding to c-Cbl and c-Cbl ubiquitin ligase activity. Through interaction αPIX sequesters c-Cbl from EGFR and this results in reduced EGFR ubiquitination and decreased EGFR degradation upon EGF treatment. However, quantitatively more decisive for cellular EGFR distribution than impaired EGFR degradation is a strong stimulating effect of αPIX on EGFR recycling to the cell surface. This function depends on the GIT binding domain of αPIX but not on interaction with c-Cbl or αPIX exchange activity. In summary, our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated function of αPIX as a strong promoter of EGFR recycling. We suggest that the novel recycling regulator αPIX and the degradation factor c-Cbl closely cooperate in the regulation of EGFR trafficking: uncomplexed αPIX and c-Cbl mediate a positive and a negative feedback on EGFR signaling, respectively; αPIX::c-Cbl complex formation, however, results in mutual inhibition, which may reflect a stable condition in the homeostasis of EGF-induced signal flow.

  6. The Interplay between Feedback and Buffering in Cellular Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Edward J; Ang, Jordan; Papachristodoulou, Antonis; Stan, Guy-Bart

    2017-11-22

    Buffering, the use of reservoirs of molecules to maintain concentrations of key molecular species, and negative feedback are the primary known mechanisms for robust homeostatic regulation. To our knowledge, however, the fundamental principles behind their combined effect have not been elucidated. Here, we study the interplay between buffering and negative feedback in the context of cellular homeostasis. We show that negative feedback counteracts slow-changing disturbances, whereas buffering counteracts fast-changing disturbances. Furthermore, feedback and buffering have limitations that create trade-offs for regulation: instability in the case of feedback and molecular noise in the case of buffering. However, because buffering stabilizes feedback and feedback attenuates noise from slower-acting buffering, their combined effect on homeostasis can be synergistic. These effects can be explained within a traditional control theory framework and are consistent with experimental observations of both ATP homeostasis and pH regulation in vivo. These principles are critical for studying robustness and homeostasis in biology and biotechnology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lifespan extension by preserving proliferative homeostasis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Biteau

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative processes are critical to maintain tissue homeostasis in high-turnover tissues. At the same time, proliferation of stem and progenitor cells has to be carefully controlled to prevent hyper-proliferative diseases. Mechanisms that ensure this balance, thus promoting proliferative homeostasis, are expected to be critical for longevity in metazoans. The intestinal epithelium of Drosophila provides an accessible model in which to test this prediction. In aging flies, the intestinal epithelium degenerates due to over-proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs and mis-differentiation of ISC daughter cells, resulting in intestinal dysplasia. Here we show that conditions that impair tissue renewal lead to lifespan shortening, whereas genetic manipulations that improve proliferative homeostasis extend lifespan. These include reduced Insulin/IGF or Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK signaling activities, as well as over-expression of stress-protective genes in somatic stem cell lineages. Interestingly, proliferative activity in aging intestinal epithelia correlates with longevity over a range of genotypes, with maximal lifespan when intestinal proliferation is reduced but not completely inhibited. Our results highlight the importance of the balance between regenerative processes and strategies to prevent hyperproliferative disorders and demonstrate that promoting proliferative homeostasis in aging metazoans is a viable strategy to extend lifespan.

  8. Reptured Epidermal Inclusion Cyst in the Axilla: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Soon; Kim, Hak Hee; Shin, Hee Jeong; Yang, Hye Rin; Sohn, Jeong Hee; Kwon, Gui Young; Gong, Gyung Yub

    2006-01-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts, the most common type of simple epithelial cyst, are typically well-encapsulated, subepidermal and mobile nodules. They may occur anywhere, but are mostly found on the scalp, face, neck, trunk, and back. Less than 10% of epidermal inclusion cysts occur on the extremities, and even fewer are found on the palms, soles, and breasts. If epidermal inclusion cysts rupture, foreign body reaction, granulomatous reaction or abscess formation could follow. We described here the sonographic findings of ruptured epidermal inclusion cyst of the right axilla in a 33-year-old woman who presented with a palpable axillary mass forming an inflammatory abscess

  9. Protein profiling of epidermal bladder cells from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar

    2012-09-01

    Plant epidermal trichomes are as varied in morphology as they are in function. In the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, specialized trichomes called epidermal bladder cells (EBC) line the surface of leaves and stems, and increase dramatically in size and volume upon plant salt-treatment. These cells have been proposed to have roles in plant defense and UV protection, but primarily in sodium sequestration and as water reservoirs. To gain further understanding into the roles of EBC, a cell-type-specific proteomics approach was taken in which precision single-cell sampling of cell sap from individual EBC was combined with shotgun peptide sequencing (LC-MS/MS). Identified proteins showed diverse biological functions and cellular locations, with a high representation of proteins involved in H(+)-transport, carbohydrate metabolism, and photosynthesis. The proteome of EBC provides insight into the roles of these cells in ion and water homeostasis and raises the possibility that they are photosynthetically active and functioning in Crassulacean acid metabolism. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Functional Role of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 in the Regulation of Melanogenesis and Epidermal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Changsheng; Yang, Shanshan; Fan, Ruiwen; Ji, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Junzhen; Liu, Xuexian; Hu, Shuaipeng; Xie, Jianshan; Liu, Yu; Gao, Wenjun; Wang, Haidong; Yao, Jianbo; Smith, George W; Herrid, Muren

    2017-10-23

    The mammalian integumentary system plays important roles in body homeostasis, and dysfunction of melanogenesis or epidermal development may lead to a variety of skin diseases, including melanoma. Skin pigmentation in humans and coat color in fleece-producing animals are regulated by many genes. Among them, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and paired-box 3 (PAX3) are at the top of the cascade and regulate activities of many important melanogenic enzymes. Here, we report for the first time that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an essential regulator of MITF and PAX3. Cdk5 knockdown in mice causes a lightened coat color, a polarized distribution of melanin and hyperproliferation of basal keratinocytes. Reduced expression of Keratin 10 (K10) resulting from Cdk5 knockdown may be responsible for an abnormal epidermal structure. In contrast, overexpression of Cdk5 in sheep (Ovis aries) only produces brown patches on a white background, with no other observable abnormalities. Collectively, our findings show that Cdk5 has an important functional role in the regulation of melanin production and transportation and in normal development of the integumentary system.

  11. Culture technique of rabbit primary epidermal keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marini M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The epidermis is the protective covering outer layer of the mammalian skin. The epidermal cells are stratified squamous epithelia which undergo continuous differentiation of loss and replacement of cells. Ninety per cent of epidermal cells consist of keratinocytes that are found in the basal layer of the stratified epithelium called epidermis. Keratinocytes are responsible for forming tight junctions with the nerves of the skin as well as in the process of wound healing. This article highlights the method of isolation and culture of rabbit primary epidermal keratinocytes in vitro. Approximately 2cm x 2cm oval shaped line was drawn on the dorsum of the rabbit to mark the surgical area. Then, the skin was carefully excised using a surgical blade and the target skin specimens harvested from the rabbits were placed in transport medium comprising of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM and 1% of antibiotic-antimycotic solution. The specimens were transferred into a petri dish containing 70% ethanol and washed for 5 min followed by a wash in 1 x Dulbecco’s Phosphate Buffered Saline (DBPS. Then, the skin specimens were placed in DMEM and minced into small pieces using a scalpel. The minced pieces were placed in a centrifuge tube containing 0.6% Dispase and 1% antibiotic-antimycotic solution overnight at 4°C in a horizontal orientation. The epidermis layer (whitish, semi-transparent was separated from the dermis (pink, opaque, gooey with the aid of curved forceps by fixing the dermis with one pair of forceps while detaching the epidermis with the second pair. The cells were cultured at a density of 4 x 104 cells/cm2 in culture flask at 37°C and 5% CO2. The cell morphology of the keratinocytes was analyzed using inverted microscope.

  12. Bioengineering a human plasma-based epidermal substitute with efficient grafting capacity and high content in clonogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexaline, Maia M; Trouillas, Marina; Nivet, Muriel; Bourreau, Emilie; Leclerc, Thomas; Duhamel, Patrick; Martin, Michele T; Doucet, Christelle; Fortunel, Nicolas O; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-01

    Cultured epithelial autografts (CEAs) produced from a small, healthy skin biopsy represent a lifesaving surgical technique in cases of full-thickness skin burn covering >50% of total body surface area. CEAs also present numerous drawbacks, among them the use of animal proteins and cells, the high fragility of keratinocyte sheets, and the immaturity of the dermal-epidermal junction, leading to heavy cosmetic and functional sequelae. To overcome these weaknesses, we developed a human plasma-based epidermal substitute (hPBES) for epidermal coverage in cases of massive burn, as an alternative to traditional CEA, and set up critical quality controls for preclinical and clinical studies. In this study, phenotypical analyses in conjunction with functional assays (clonal analysis, long-term culture, or in vivo graft) showed that our new substitute fulfills the biological requirements for epidermal regeneration. hPBES keratinocytes showed high potential for cell proliferation and subsequent differentiation similar to healthy skin compared with a well-known reference material, as ascertained by a combination of quality controls. This work highlights the importance of integrating relevant multiparameter quality controls into the bioengineering of new skin substitutes before they reach clinical development. This work involves the development of a new bioengineered epidermal substitute with pertinent functional quality controls. The novelty of this work is based on this quality approach. ©AlphaMed Press.

  13. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Is a Regulator of Epidermal Complement Component Expression and Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor in primary human lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xueyan; Hu Guoqiang; Tian Keli; Wang Mingyun

    1996-01-01

    Cell membranes were prepared from 12 human lung cancers for the study of the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). EGFR concentration was estimated by ligand binding studies using 125 I-radiolabeled EGF. The dissociation constants of the high affinity sites were identical, 1.48 nmol and 1.1 nmol in cancer and normal lung tissues, the EGFR contents were higher in lung cancer tissues (range: 2.25 to 19.39 pmol·g -1 membrane protein) than that in normal tissues from the same patients (range: 0.72 to 7.43 pmol·g -1 membrane protein). These results suggest that EGF and its receptor may play a role in the regulatory mechanisms in the control of lung cellular growth and tumor promotion

  15. Analysis of E2F factors during epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wing Y; Dagnino, Lina

    2005-01-01

    The multigene E2F family of transcription factors is central in the control of cell cycle progression. The expression and activity of E2F proteins is tightly regulated transcriptionally and posttranslationally as a function of the proliferation and differentiation status of the cell. In this chapter, we review protocols designed to determine E2F mRNA abundance in tissues by in situ hybridization techniques. The ability to culture primary epidermal keratinocytes and maintain them as either undifferentiated or terminally differentiated cells allows the biochemical and molecular characterization of changes in E2F expression and activity. Thus, we also discuss in detail methods to analyze E2F protein abundance by immunoblot and their ability to bind DNA in cultured cells using electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

  16. A Dual-Sensing Receptor Confers Robust Cellular Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Schramke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cells have evolved diverse mechanisms that maintain intracellular homeostasis in fluctuating environments. In bacteria, control is often exerted by bifunctional receptors acting as both kinase and phosphatase to regulate gene expression, a design known to provide robustness against noise. Yet how such antagonistic enzymatic activities are balanced as a function of environmental change remains poorly understood. We find that the bifunctional receptor that regulates K+ uptake in Escherichia coli is a dual sensor, which modulates its autokinase and phosphatase activities in response to both extracellular and intracellular K+ concentration. Using mathematical modeling, we show that dual sensing is a superior strategy for ensuring homeostasis when both the supply of and demand for a limiting resource fluctuate. By engineering standards, this molecular control system displays a strikingly high degree of functional integration, providing a reference for the vast numbers of receptors for which the sensing strategy remains elusive.

  17. Oxidative stress homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa C Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants can maintain growth and reproductive success by sensing changes in the environment and reacting through mechanisms at molecular, cellular, physiological and developmental levels. Each stress condition prompts a unique response although some overlap between the reactions to abiotic stress (drought, heat, cold, salt or high light and to biotic stress (pathogens does occur. A common feature in the response to all stresses is the onset of oxidative stress, through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. As hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are involved in stress signaling, a tight control in ROS homeostasis requires a delicate balance of systems involved in their generation and degradation. If the plant lacks the capacity to generate scavenging potential, this can ultimately lead to death. In grapevine, antioxidant homeostasis can be considered at whole plant levels and during the development cycle. The most striking example lies in berries and their derivatives, such as wine, with nutraceutical properties associated with their antioxidant capacity. Antioxidant homeostasis is tightly regulated in leaves, assuring a positive balance between photosynthesis and respiration, explaining the tolerance of many grapevine varieties to extreme environments.In this review we will focus on antioxidant metabolites, antioxidant enzymes, transcriptional regulation and cross-talk with hormones prompted by abiotic stress conditions. We will also discuss three situations that require specific homeostasis balance: biotic stress, the oxidative burst in berries at veraison and in vitro systems. The genetic plasticity of the antioxidant homeostasis response put in evidence by the different levels of tolerance to stress presented by grapevine varieties will be addressed. The gathered information is relevant to foster varietal adaptation to impending climate changes, to assist breeders in choosing the more adapted varieties and to suitable viticulture

  18. Post-female-circumcision clitoral epidermal inclusion cyst: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: complication, epidermal inclusion cyst, female circumcision. Pediatric Urology Division, Department of Urology, ... transplantation of the epidermis into the subcutaneous tissue with subsequent proliferation of epidermal ... The evolution of the practice of FGM, from being performed by traditional birth attendants to.

  19. Real-time three-dimensional imaging of epidermal splitting and removal by high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Marc; Draye, Jean Pierre; Verween, Gunther; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Verbeken, Gilbert; De Vos, Daniel; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Jemec, Gregor B E; Del Marmol, Véronique

    2014-10-01

    While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting and decellularization. Human skin samples were incubated with four different agents: Dispase II, NaCl 1 M, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100. Epidermal splitting, dermo-epidermal junction, acellularity and 3-D architecture of dermal matrices were evaluated by High-definition optical coherence tomography before and after incubation. Real-time 3-D HD-OCT assessment was compared with 2-D en face assessment by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). (Immuno) histopathology was used as control. HD-OCT imaging allowed real-time 3-D visualization of the impact of selected agents on epidermal splitting, dermo-epidermal junction, dermal architecture, vascular spaces and cellularity. RCM has a better resolution (1 μm) than HD-OCT (3 μm), permitting differentiation of different collagen fibres, but HD-OCT imaging has deeper penetration (570 μm) than RCM imaging (200 μm). Dispase II and NaCl treatments were found to be equally efficient in the removal of the epidermis from human split-thickness skin allografts. However, a different epidermal splitting level at the dermo-epidermal junction could be observed and confirmed by immunolabelling of collagen type IV and type VII. Epidermal splitting occurred at the level of the lamina densa with dispase II and above the lamina densa (in the lamina lucida) with NaCl. The 3-D architecture of dermal papillae and dermis was more affected by Dispase II on HD-OCT which corresponded with histopathologic (orcein staining) fragmentation of elastic fibres. With SDS treatment, the epidermal removal was incomplete as remnants of the epidermal basal cell layer remained attached to the basement membrane on the dermis. With Triton X-100 treatment

  20. Gut Homeostasis, Microbial Dysbiosis, and Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuyuan; Roy, Sabita

    2017-01-01

    Gut homeostasis plays an important role in maintaining animal and human health. The disruption of gut homeostasis has been shown to be associated with multiple diseases. The mutually beneficial relationship between the gut microbiota and the host has been demonstrated to maintain homeostasis of the mucosal immunity and preserve the integrity of the gut epithelial barrier. Currently, rapid progress in the understanding of the host-microbial interaction has redefined toxicological pathology of opioids and their pharmacokinetics. However, it is unclear how opioids modulate the gut microbiome and metabolome. Our study, showing opioid modulation of gut homeostasis in mice, suggests that medical interventions to ameliorate the consequences of drug use/abuse will provide potential therapeutic and diagnostic strategies for opioid-modulated intestinal infections. The study of morphine's modulation of the gut microbiome and metabolome will shed light on the toxicological pathology of opioids and its role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  1. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, fun...

  2. Herbal medicines that benefit epidermal permeability barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal permeability barrier function plays a critical role in regulating cutaneous functions. Hence, researchers have been searching for effective and affordable regimens to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function. In addition to topical stratum corneum lipids, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and liver X receptor ligands, herbal medicines have been proven to benefit epidermal permeability barrier function in both normal and diseased skin, including atopic dermatitis, glucocorticoid-induced skin damage, and UVB-damaged skin. The potential mechanisms by which herbal medicines improve the permeability barrier include stimulation of epidermal differentiation, lipid production, antimicrobial peptide expression, and antioxidation. Therefore, utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative approach to enhance epidermal permeability barrier function in order to prevent and/or treat skin disorders associated with permeability barrier abnormalities.

  3. Neuroimmune regulation during intestinal development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2017-02-01

    Interactions between the nervous system and immune system are required for organ function and homeostasis. Evidence suggests that enteric neurons and intestinal immune cells share common regulatory mechanisms and can coordinate their responses to developmental challenges and environmental aggressions. These discoveries shed light on the physiology of system interactions and open novel perspectives for therapy designs that target underappreciated neurological-immunological commonalities. Here we highlight findings that address the importance of neuroimmune cell units (NICUs) in intestinal development, homeostasis and disease.

  4. Engineering redox homeostasis to develop efficient alcohol-producing microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunhua; Zhao, Qiuwei; Li, Yin; Zhang, Yanping

    2017-06-24

    The biosynthetic pathways of most alcohols are linked to intracellular redox homeostasis, which is crucial for life. This crucial balance is primarily controlled by the generation of reducing equivalents, as well as the (reduction)-oxidation metabolic cycle and the thiol redox homeostasis system. As a main oxidation pathway of reducing equivalents, the biosynthesis of most alcohols includes redox reactions, which are dependent on cofactors such as NADH or NADPH. Thus, when engineering alcohol-producing strains, the availability of cofactors and redox homeostasis must be considered. In this review, recent advances on the engineering of cellular redox homeostasis systems to accelerate alcohol biosynthesis are summarized. Recent approaches include improving cofactor availability, manipulating the affinity of redox enzymes to specific cofactors, as well as globally controlling redox reactions, indicating the power of these approaches, and opening a path towards improving the production of a number of different industrially-relevant alcohols in the near future.

  5. Regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiermann, Christoph; Frenette, Paul S; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    The functions of blood cells extend well beyond the immune functions of leucocytes or the respiratory and hemostatic functions of erythrocytes and platelets. Seen as a whole, the bloodstream is in charge of nurturing and protecting all organs by carrying a mixture of cell populations in transit from one organ to another. To optimize these functions, evolution has provided blood and the vascular system that carries it with various mechanisms that ensure the appropriate influx and egress of cells into and from the circulation where and when needed. How this homeostatic control of blood is achieved has been the object of study for over a century, and although the major mechanisms that govern it are now fairly well understood, several new concepts and mediators have recently emerged that emphasize the dynamism of this liquid tissue. Here we review old and new concepts that relate to the maintenance and regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in blood and briefly discuss the mechanisms for platelets and red blood cells. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  7. Neuroimmune interaction and the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijden, Simon; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2018-01-01

    Many essential gastrointestinal functions, including motility, secretion, and blood flow, are regulated by the autonomic nervous system (ANS), both through intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. Recently identified neuroimmune mechanisms, in particular the interplay between enteric neurons and muscularis macrophages, are now considered to be essential for fine-tuning peristalsis. These findings shed new light on how intestinal immune cells can support enteric nervous function. In addition, both intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms control intestinal immune homeostasis in different layers of the intestine, mainly by affecting macrophage activation through neurotransmitter release. In this mini-review, we discuss recent insights on immunomodulation by intrinsic enteric neurons and extrinsic innervation, with a particular focus on intestinal macrophages. In addition, we discuss the relevance of these novel mechanisms for intestinal immune homeostasis in physiological and pathological conditions, mainly focusing on motility disorders (gastroparesis and postoperative ileus) and inflammatory disorders (colitis).

  8. Chatty Mitochondria: Keeping Balance in Cellular Protein Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topf, Ulrike; Wrobel, Lidia; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional cellular organelles that host many biochemical pathways including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Defective mitochondria pose a threat to cellular homeostasis and compensatory responses exist to curtail the source of stress and/or its consequences. The mitochondrial proteome comprises proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Disturbances in protein homeostasis may originate from mistargeting of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins. Defective protein import and accumulation of mistargeted proteins leads to stress that triggers translation alterations and proteasomal activation. These cytosolic pathways are complementary to the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) that aims to increase the capacity of protein quality control mechanisms inside mitochondria. They constitute putative targets for interventions aimed at increasing the fitness, stress resistance, and longevity of cells and organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chaperone-protease networks in mitochondrial protein homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    As essential organelles, mitochondria are intimately integrated into the metabolism of a eukaryotic cell. The maintenance of the functional integrity of the mitochondrial proteome, also termed protein homeostasis, is facing many challenges both under normal and pathological conditions. First, since mitochondria are derived from bacterial ancestor cells, the proteins in this endosymbiotic organelle have a mixed origin. Only a few proteins are encoded on the mitochondrial genome, most genes for mitochondrial proteins reside in the nuclear genome of the host cell. This distribution requires a complex biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins, which are mostly synthesized in the cytosol and need to be imported into the organelle. Mitochondrial protein biogenesis usually therefore comprises complex folding and assembly processes to reach an enzymatically active state. In addition, specific protein quality control (PQC) processes avoid an accumulation of damaged or surplus polypeptides. Mitochondrial protein homeostasis is based on endogenous enzymatic components comprising a diverse set of chaperones and proteases that form an interconnected functional network. This review describes the different types of mitochondrial proteins with chaperone functions and covers the current knowledge of their roles in protein biogenesis, folding, proteolytic removal and prevention of aggregation, the principal reactions of protein homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira-Cunha, Melissa; Newman, William G.; Siriwardena, Ajith K.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related death. The difficulty in detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage, aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapy all contribute to the high mortality. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in normal human tissues. It is a member of the tyrosine kinase family of growth factors receptors and is encoded by proto-oncogenes. Several studies have demonstrated that EGFR is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer. Over-expression correlates with more advanced disease, poor survival and the presence of metastases. Therefore, inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway is an attractive therapeutic target. Although several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with chemotherapy demonstrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor cell apoptosis and regression in xenograft models, these benefits remain to be confirmed. Multimodality treatment incorporating EGFR-inhibition is emerging as a novel strategy in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

  11. Setting sail for glucose homeostasis with the AKAP150-PP2B-anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2012-10-17

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, controlled by multiple protein phosphorylation events, is critical for the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Protein kinase A (PKA) is known to play a role in β cell physiology, but the role of its anchoring protein is not fully understood. Hinke et al (2012) illustrate the significance of A-kinase anchoring protein 150 in tethering protein phosphatase 2B to mediate nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion and thus modulate glucose homeostasis.

  12. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Xuemei Shi; Shaji Chacko; Feng Li; Depei Li; Douglas Burrin; Lawrence Chan; Xinfu Guan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Glucagon-like peptides are co-released from enteroendocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagon (PPG) neurons in the brainstem. PPG-derived GLP-1/2 are probably key neuroendocrine signals for the control of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether activation of PPG neurons per se modulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in vivo. Methods: We generated glucagon (Gcg) promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice and injected...

  13. Spatiotemporal Expression of p63 in Mouse Epidermal Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The embryonic surface ectoderm is a simple flat epithelium consisting of cells that express the cytokeratins K8/K18. Before stratification, K5/K14 expression substitutes K8/K18 expression, marking the event called epidermal commitment. Previous studies show that the transcription factor p63 plays an essential role in epidermal commitment. However, detailed expression information of p63 during early epidermal development in mice is still unclear. We systematically studied the expression pattern of p63 in mouse epidermal commitment, together with K8 and K5. We show that p63 expression could be detected as early as E8.5 in mouse embryos preceding epidermal commitment. p63 expression first appears near the newly formed somites and the posterior part of the embryo, further expanding to the whole embryonic surface with particular enrichment in the first branchial arches and the limb buds. ΔNp63 is the major class of isoforms expressed in this period. Relative expression intensity of p63 depends on the embryonic position. In summary, there is a sequential and regular expression pattern of K8, p63 and K5 in mouse epidermal commitment. Our study not only contributes to understanding the early events during epidermal development but also provides a basal tool to study the function of p63 in mammals.

  14. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Epidermal stem cells: location, potential and contribution to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, C A; Määttä, A

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal stem cells have been classically characterized as slow-cycling, long-lived cells that reside in discrete niches in the skin. Gene expression studies of niche-resident cells have revealed a number of stem cell markers and regulators, including the Wnt/beta-catenin, Notch, p63, c-Myc and Hedgehog pathways. A new study challenges the traditional developmental paradigm of slow-cycling stem cells and rapid-cycling transit amplifying cells in some epidermal regions, and there is mounting evidence to suggest that multi-lineage epidermal progenitors can be isolated from highly proliferative, non-niche regions. Whether there is a unique microenvironment surrounding these progenitors remains to be determined. Interestingly, cancer stem cells derived from epidermal tumours exist independent of the classic skin stem cell niche, yet also have stem cell properties, including multi-lineage differentiation. This review summarizes recent studies identifying the location and regulators of mouse and human epidermal stem cells and highlights the strategies used to identify cancer stem cells, including expression of normal epidermal stem cell markers, expression of cancer stem cell markers identified in other epidermal tumours and characterization of side-population tumour cells.

  16. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis-Like Lesions and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Possibly Triggered by Sulfasalazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Gül, Cigdem; Andersen, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    elevated ferritin, and muscle wasting. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made, and mycophenolate mofetil and systemic glucocorticoids brought this severe disease under control. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions and hemophagocytic syndrome have been reported as manifestations of systemic...... lupus erythematosus. This patient possibly had spondyloarthritis or an undifferentiated connective tissue disease at presentation, and we suggest, based on the timing of events, that sulfasalazine may have acted as a trigger of the severe disease manifestations....

  17. Oxide nanomembrane hybrids with enhanced mechano- and thermo-sensitivity for semitransparent epidermal electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjoon; Do, Kyungsik; Kim, Jaemin; Son, Donghee; Koo, Ja Hoon; Park, Jinkyung; Song, Jun-Kyul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Minbaek; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-05-01

    Oxide nanomembrane hybrids with enhanced mechano- and thermo-sensitivity for semitransparent epidermal electronics are developed. The use of nanomaterials (single wall nanotubes and silver nanoparticles) embedded in the oxide nanomembranes significantly enhances mechanical and thermal sensitivities. These mechanical and thermal sensors are utilized in wheelchair control and hypothermia detection, which are useful for patients with strokes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessing the in vivo impact of a gel sanitizer on the epidermal "barrier" dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique Silva; Sara Aguiar Silva; Hugo Ferreira; L. Monteiro Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Disease prevention and control depend on hand washing, in particular during epidemic surges (e.g. flu). The use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers is strongly recommended due to its high germicide effectiveness. However, its impact on skin physiology, especially on the barrier function, has not been determined, although most of the formulations include different humectants. This study evaluates the impact of a commercially available formulation on in vivo epidermal barrier dynamics. 13 young ad...

  19. Essential contribution of tumor-derived perlecan to epidermal tumor growth and angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinnong; Multhaupt, Hinke; Chan, En

    2004-01-01

    As a major heparan sulfate proteoglycan (PG) in basement membranes, perlecan has been linked to tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Here we produced epidermal tumors in immunocompromised rats by injection of mouse RT101 tumor cells. Tumor sections stained with species-specific perlecan...... factor. In vivo, antisense perlecan-transfected cells generated no tumors, whereas untransfected and vector-transfected cells formed tumors with obvious neovascularization, suggesting that tumor perlecan rather than host perlecan controls tumor growth and angiogenesis....

  20. Adopted orphans as regulators of inflammation, immunity and skeletal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipseiz, Natacha; Scholtysek, Carina; Culemann, Stephan; Krönke, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Adopted orphan nuclear receptors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and liver X receptors (LXRs), have emerged as key regulators of inflammation and immunity and likewise control skeletal homeostasis. These properties render them attractive targets for the therapy of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. This review summarises the current knowledge on the role of these families of receptors during innate and adaptive immunity as well as during the control of bone turnover and discuss the potential use of targeting these molecules during the treatment of chronic diseases such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis.

  1. Gut-Brain Glucose Signaling in Energy Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soty, Maud; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Rajas, Fabienne; Mithieux, Gilles

    2017-06-06

    Intestinal gluconeogenesis is a recently identified function influencing energy homeostasis. Intestinal gluconeogenesis induced by specific nutrients releases glucose, which is sensed by the nervous system surrounding the portal vein. This initiates a signal positively influencing parameters involved in glucose control and energy management controlled by the brain. This knowledge has extended our vision of the gut-brain axis, classically ascribed to gastrointestinal hormones. Our work raises several questions relating to the conditions under which intestinal gluconeogenesis proceeds and may provide its metabolic benefits. It also leads to questions on the advantage conferred by its conservation through a process of natural selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immune homeostasis, dysbiosis and therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C T; Sharma, V; Elmén, L; Peterson, S N

    2015-03-01

    The distal gut harbours ∼10(13) bacteria, representing the most densely populated ecosystem known. The functional diversity expressed by these communities is enormous and relatively unexplored. The past decade of research has unveiled the profound influence that the resident microbial populations bestow to host immunity and metabolism. The evolution of these communities from birth generates a highly adapted and highly personalized microbiota that is stable in healthy individuals. Immune homeostasis is achieved and maintained due in part to the extensive interplay between the gut microbiota and host mucosal immune system. Imbalances of gut microbiota may lead to a number of pathologies such as obesity, type I and type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammaging/immunosenscence in the elderly. In-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms that control homeostasis and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota represents an important step in our ability to reliably modulate the gut microbiota with positive clinical outcomes. The potential of microbiome-based therapeutics to treat epidemic human disease is of great interest. New therapeutic paradigms, including second-generation personalized probiotics, prebiotics, narrow spectrum antibiotic treatment and faecal microbiome transplantation, may provide safer and natural alternatives to traditional clinical interventions for chronic diseases. This review discusses host-microbiota homeostasis, consequences of its perturbation and the associated challenges in therapeutic developments that lie ahead. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  3. A treasure trove of hypothalamic neurocircuitries governing body weight homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Claudia R; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding.

  4. UVB-induced epidermal hyperproliferation is modified by a single, topical treatment with a mitosis inhibitory epidermal pentapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, W.M.; Elgjo, K.

    1990-01-01

    A single application of a water-miscible cream base containing the recently identified mitosis inhibitory epidermal pentapeptide pyroGlu-Glu-Asp-Ser-GlyOH (EPP) to hairless mouse skin is followed by a long-lasting period of reduced epidermal cell proliferation. To examine if a similar growth inhibition could be achieved in stimulated and rapidly proliferating epidermis, EPP was applied at two different concentrations, 0.005 or 0.02%, to hairless mouse skin immediately after exposure of the left flank to an erythemic dose of ultraviolet B light (UVB). This dose of UVB alone induces a sustained period of rapid epidermal cell proliferation, starting at about 18 h after the irradiation. Epidermal cell proliferation was followed from 18 to 54 h (0.005% cream) or from 18 to 30 h (0.02% cream) after the treatment by estimating the rate of G2-M cell flux (the mitotic rate) by means of Colcemid, and epidermal DNA synthesis by counting labeled cells after pulse-labeling with 3H-thymidine. The unirradiated side of the mice was used as reference. The results showed that topical treatment with a 0.02% EPP cream partially inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperproliferation, while the 0.005% EPP cream inhibited as well as stimulated the UVB-induced hyperproliferation. Thus, EPP is effective even in rapidly proliferating epidermal cell populations, but the outcome is obviously dose-dependent in this test system

  5. Effect of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    The effect of VIP and somatostatin on secretion of epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands was investigated in the rat. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide infused in doses of 10 and 100 ng/kg/h significantly increased epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate output......, but the concentrations did not change. Somatostatin infused at doses of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/kg/h against a background of VIP 100 ng/kg/h inhibited in dose-dependent fashion the stimulated epidermal growth factor and bicarbonate outputs from rat Brunner's gland pouches. Also basal secretion was inhibited...... growth factor and bicarbonate from Brunner's glands, an effect which is inhibited by somatostatin. A possible role for somatostatin in the control of Brunner's gland secretion is suggested....

  6. Effect of X-ray irradiation on morphophysiological reactions of epidermal melanophor cells in the larvae of Rana temporaria L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.V.; Kalistratova, E.N.; Kaluzhina, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics of physiological reactions of epidermal melanophors of larvae Rana temporaria L.. adapted to white and black backgrounds and irradiated with a dose of 700 R has been investigated. Ouring the first day after irradiation no day changes of melanophor index characteristic of intact tadpoles were discovered in whitebackground animals; melanophors preserve the aggregation state. Comparison of black background irradiated and control larvae didn't show confident differences in changes of their melanophor indices. Irradiation affects differently epidermal melanophors in the state of pigment dispersion and aggregation. It is suggested that pigment dispersion and aggregation in melanophor is realized at the expense of different cellular structures. It is shown that by the end of the experiment (21-st day) the amount of epidermal melanophor per surface unit is two times larger in black-ground larvae. General biological signaficance of revealed facts from the point of view of ontogenesis evolution is discussed

  7. Components of calcium homeostasis in Archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varecka, L.; Smigan, P.; Vancek, M.; Greksak, M.

    1998-01-01

    The cells of Archaea are interesting from several points of view. Among others there are: (a) the evolutionary relationship to procaryotes and eucaryotes and (b) the involvement of Na + and H + gradient in archaeal bio-energetics. The observations are presented which are devoted to the description of components of Ca 2+ homeostasis, an apparatus is vital for both procaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, in obligate anaerobe Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. This is, after the demonstration of the ATP-dependent Ca 2+ transport in Halobacterium halobium membrane vesicles, the first complex description of processes of Ca 2+ homeostasis in Archaea. The Ca 2+ influx and efflux was measured using radionuclide 4 5 Ca 2+ . The experiment were performed under strictly anaerobic conditions. The measurement of the membrane potential by means of 3 H-tetraphenyl phosphonium chloride showed that the presence of Na + depolarized the membrane from -110 to -60 mV. The growth of M. thermoautotrophicum and methanogenesis was suppressed but nor arrested by the presence EGTA suggesting that the Ca 2+ homeostasis may be involved in controlling these cellular functions. The results indicate the presence of three components involved in establishing the Ca 2+ homeostasis in cell of M. thermoautotrophicum. The first is the Ca 2+ -carrier mediating the CA 2+ influx driven by the proton motive force or the membrane potential. The Ca 2+ efflux is mediated by two transport systems, Na + /Ca 2+ and H + /Ca 2+ anti-porters. The evidence for the presence of the Ca 2+ -transporting ATPase was not obtained so far. (authors)

  8. The membrane stress response buffers lethal effects of lipid disequilibrium by reprogramming the protein homeostasis network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Guillaume; Shui, Guanghou; Kim, Woong; McAlister, Graeme C; Ismail, Nurzian; Gygi, Steven P; Wenk, Markus R; Ng, Davis T W

    2012-10-12

    Lipid composition can differ widely among organelles and even between leaflets of a membrane. Lipid homeostasis is critical because disequilibrium can have disease outcomes. Despite their importance, mechanisms maintaining lipid homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we establish a model system to study the global effects of lipid imbalance. Quantitative lipid profiling was integral to monitor changes to lipid composition and for system validation. Applying global transcriptional and proteomic analyses, a dramatically altered biochemical landscape was revealed from adaptive cells. The resulting composite regulation we term the "membrane stress response" (MSR) confers compensation, not through restoration of lipid composition, but by remodeling the protein homeostasis network. To validate its physiological significance, we analyzed the unfolded protein response (UPR), one facet of the MSR and a key regulator of protein homeostasis. We demonstrate that the UPR maintains protein biogenesis, quality control, and membrane integrity-functions otherwise lethally compromised in lipid dysregulated cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with minoxidil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoui, Lamis R; Chahine-Chakhtoura, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    Minoxidil is a direct-acting peripheral vasodilator for the treatment of symptomatic hypertension, or refractory hypertension associated with target organ damage, that is not manageable with a diuretic and two other antihypertensive drugs. The most frequent adverse events associated with minoxidil include hypertrichosis and cardiovascular events related to its powerful antihypertensive effect, and less frequently, rashes, bullous eruptions, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS). Evidence suggests that SJS and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are variants of a single disease with common causes and mechanisms, but differing severities. Epidermal detachment is mild in SJS, moderate in overlap SJS-TEN, and severe (> 30% of body surface area) in TEN. We describe a case of minoxidil-associated SJS that evolved into fatal TEN. A 69-year-old African-American woman with a history of chronic kidney disease was admitted to the hospital for a cerebrovascular accident and uncontrolled hypertension. On hospital day 12, oral minoxidil was added to her drug regimen. On day 23, she developed a maculopapular rash on her face that gradually diffused to her chest and back. Vesicles and papular lesions extended to her extremities and mucosal membranes; results of a skin biopsy revealed SJS. A positive Nikolsky's sign (blisters spread on application of pressure) was detected. On days 27-31, diffuse bullae developed with rash exacerbation. Skin detachment exceeded 30% and was consistent with TEN. The patient died on day 39. An evaluation of the causality and time course suggested that minoxidil was the most likely culpable drug, with a Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score indicating that the likelihood of the association was possible (score of 3). The mechanism of this reaction has not been well elucidated. It may be related to an impaired clearance of the minoxidil metabolite, or an immune stimulation resulting in apoptosis and epidermis destruction. To our knowledge, this

  10. Matriptase/MT-SP1 is required for postnatal survival, epidermal barrier function, hair follicle development, and thymic homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Karin; Haudenschild, Christian C; Szabo, Roman

    2002-01-01

    of Matriptase/MT-SP1 also seriously affected hair follicle development resulting in generalized follicular hypoplasia, absence of erupted vibrissae, lack of vibrissal hair canal formation, ingrown vibrissae, and wholesale abortion of vibrissal follicles. Furthermore, Matriptase/MT-SP1-deficiency resulted...... in dramatically increased thymocyte apoptosis, and depletion of thymocytes. This study demonstrates that Matriptase/MT-SP1 has pleiotropic functions in the development of the epidermis, hair follicles, and cellular immune system....

  11. Is It Hot in Here? Thermoregulation and Homeostasis through an Exercise Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lewis G.; Breslin, Angela; Ross, Emma Z.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis, the control of an internal environment to maintain stable, relatively constant conditions, is a key concept in physiology. In endothermic species, including humans ("Homo sapiens"), the control of body temperature is fundamental to the control of a suitable internal environment. To help regulate core body temperature, the…

  12. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis-Like Lesions and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Possibly Triggered by Sulfasalazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Krabbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient with arthritis of the large joints, bilateral sacroiliitis, and positive anti-SSA and anti-dsDNA antibody, who received sulfasalazine and shortly thereafter became critically ill. He developed toxic epidermal necrolysis, hemolytic anemia, lymphopenia, markedly elevated ferritin, and muscle wasting. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made, and mycophenolate mofetil and systemic glucocorticoids brought this severe disease under control. Toxic epidermal necrolysis-like lesions and hemophagocytic syndrome have been reported as manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. This patient possibly had spondyloarthritis or an undifferentiated connective tissue disease at presentation, and we suggest, based on the timing of events, that sulfasalazine may have acted as a trigger of the severe disease manifestations.

  13. Effect of head-irradiation upon epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing in the adrenalectomized mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Koshi

    1977-01-01

    Epidermal mitotic activity during wound healing was estimated both in the adrenalectomized, head-irradiated mice and in the adrenalectomized, non-irradiated mice, and was compared with those obtained previously from the unoperated, head-irradiated mice. It was found that head-irradiation caused a mitotic depression to a much smaller extent in the adrenalectomized mice than it did in the unoperated mice, though adrenalectomy itself had exerted a great inhibitory effect upon the mitosis induced by an injury. Whether this abscopal effect of head-irradiation upon the mitotic activity was mediated via the adrenals, and whether in the adrenalectomized mice the head-irradiation acted to increase epidermal response to injury, making the mitotic pattern of adrenalectomized mice to come near that of control mice were discussed. (auth.)

  14. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REVIEW. Introduction. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal ... that affect the skin and mucous membranes. ... Open Access article distributed under the terms of the .... pathogenic components are removed from plasma. The.

  15. Epidermal and dermal integumentary structures of ankylosaurian dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Victoria M; Burns, Michael E; Bell, Phil R; Currie, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosaurian dinosaurs are most notable for their abundant and morphologically diverse osteoderms, which would have given them a spiky appearance in life. Isolated osteoderms are relatively common and provide important information about the structure of the ankylosaur dermis, but fossilized impressions of the soft-tissue epidermis of ankylosaurs are rare. Nevertheless, well-preserved integument exists on several ankylosaur fossils that shows osteoderms were covered by a single epidermal scale, but one or many millimeter-sized ossicles may be present under polygonal, basement epidermal scales. Evidence for the taxonomic utility of ankylosaurid epidermal scale architecture is presented for the first time. This study builds on previous osteological work that argues for a greater diversity of ankylosaurids in the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta than has been traditionally recognized and adds to the hypothesis that epidermal skin impressions are taxonomically relevant across diverse dinosaur clades. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. "Cut-and-paste" manufacture of multiparametric epidermal electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Nanshu; Yang, Shixuan; Wang, Pulin

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal electronics is a class of noninvasive and unobstructive skin-mounted, tattoo-like sensors and electronics capable of vital sign monitoring and establishing human-machine interface. The high cost of manpower, materials, vacuum equipment, and photolithographic facilities associated with its manufacture greatly hinders the widespread use of disposable epidermal electronics. Here we report a cost and time effective, completely dry, benchtop "cut-and-paste" method for the freeform and portable manufacture of multiparametric epidermal sensor systems (ESS) within minutes. This versatile method works for all types of thin metal and polymeric sheets and is compatible with any tattoo adhesives or medical tapes. The resulting ESS are multimaterial and multifunctional and have been demonstrated to noninvasively but accurately measure electrophysiological signals, skin temperature, skin hydration, as well as respiratory rate. In addition, planar stretchable coils exploiting double-stranded serpentine design have been successfully applied as wireless, passive epidermal strain sensors.

  17. Predicting human epidermal melanin concentrations for different skin tones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available epidermal melanin concentrations for different skin tones JE Smit 1 , AE Karsten 2 , RW Sparrow 1 1 CSIR Biosciences, Pretoria, South Africa 2 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa Author e-mail address: KSmit...

  18. Epidermal Nevus Syndrome Associated with Brain Malformations and Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at Juntendo University and Tokyo Women’s Medical University, Japan; and University of California, San Francisco, Ca, report a male infant with epidermal nevus syndrome associated with brainstem and cerebellar malformations and neonatal medulloblastoma.

  19. Neuronal and molecular mechanisms of sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlea, Jeffrey M

    2017-12-01

    Sleep is necessary for survival, and prolonged waking causes a homeostatic increase in the need for recovery sleep. Homeostasis is a core component of sleep regulation and has been tightly conserved across evolution from invertebrates to man. Homeostatic sleep regulation was first identified among insects in cockroaches several decades ago, but the characterization of sleep rebound in Drosophila melanogaster opened the use of insect model species to understand homeostatic functions and regulation of sleep. This review describes circuits in two neuropil structures, the central complex and mushroom bodies, that influence sleep homeostasis and neuromodulatory systems that influence the accrual of homeostatic sleep need. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical homeostasis regulating adipose tissue volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedman Paul

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The total body adipose tissue volume is regulated by hormonal, nutritional, paracrine, neuronal and genetic control signals, as well as components of cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions. There are no known locally acting homeostatic mechanisms by which growing adipose tissue might adapt its volume. Presentation of the hypothesis Mechanosensitivity has been demonstrated by mesenchymal cells in tissue culture. Adipocyte differentiation has been shown to be inhibited by stretching in vitro, and a pathway for the response has been elucidated. In humans, intermittent stretching of skin for reconstructional purposes leads to thinning of adipose tissue and thickening of epidermis – findings matching those observed in vitro in response to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, protracted suspension of one leg increases the intermuscular adipose tissue volume of the limb. These findings may indicate a local homeostatic adipose tissue volume-regulating mechanism based on movement-induced reduction of adipocyte differentiation. This function might, during evolution, have been of importance in confined spaces, where overgrowth of adipose tissue could lead to functional disturbance, as for instance in the turtle. In humans, adipose tissue near muscle might in particular be affected, for instance intermuscularly, extraperitoneally and epicardially. Mechanical homeostasis might also contribute to protracted maintainment of soft tissue shape in the face and neck region. Testing of the hypothesis Assessment of messenger RNA-expression of human adipocytes following activity in adjacent muscle is planned, and study of biochemical and volumetric adipose tissue changes in man are proposed. Implications of the hypothesis The interpretation of metabolic disturbances by means of adipose tissue might be influenced. Possible applications in the head and neck were discussed.

  1. Heterogeneity and plasticity of epidermal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepeler, Troels; Page, Mahalia E; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is an integral part of our largest organ, the skin, and protects us against the hostile environment. It is a highly dynamic tissue that, during normal steady-state conditions, undergoes constant turnover. Multiple stem cell populations residing in autonomously maintained compartments...... facilitate this task. In this Review, we discuss stem cell behaviour during normal tissue homeostasis, regeneration and disease within the pilosebaceous unit, an integral structure of the epidermis that is responsible for hair growth and lubrication of the epithelium. We provide an up-to-date view...... of the pilosebaceous unit, encompassing the heterogeneity and plasticity of multiple discrete stem cell populations that are strongly influenced by external cues to maintain their identity and function....

  2. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, Hugo J.; Price, Charles A.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C.; Franks, Peter J.; Veneklaas, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A long?standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of ...

  3. A synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramide improves skin barrier functions from diversely perturbed epidermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Myoung Jin; Nam, Jin Ju; Lee, Eun Ok; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Chang Seo

    2016-10-01

    Omega-hydroxyceramides (ω-OH-Cer) play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. ω-OH-Cer are the primary lipid constituents of the corneocyte lipid envelope (CLE) covalently attached to the outer surface of the cornified envelope linked to involucrin to become bound form lipids in stratum corneum (SC). CLE becomes a hydrophobic impermeable layer of matured corneocyte preventing loss of natural moisturizing factor inside the corneocytes. More importantly, CLE may also play an important role in the formation of proper orientation of intercellular lipid lamellar structure by interdigitating with the intercellular lipids in a comb-like fashion. Abnormal barrier conditions associated with atopic dermatitis but also UVB-irradiated skins are known to have lowered level of bound lipids, especially ω-OH-Cer, which indicate that ω-OH-Cer play an important role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. In this study, protective effects of a novel synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramides (ω-OH-phytoceramide) on skin barrier function were investigated. Epidermal barrier disruption was induced by UVB irradiation, tape-stripping in hairless mouse and human skin. Protective effect of damaged epidermis was evaluated using the measurement of transepidermal water loss and cohesion of SC. Increased keratinocyte differentiation was verified using cultured keratinocyte through western blot. Results clearly demonstrated that a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide enhanced the integrity of SC and accelerated the recovery of damaged skin barrier function by stimulating differentiation process. In a conclusion, a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide treatment improved epidermal homeostasis in several disrupted conditions.

  4. Epidermal growth factor treatment decreases mortality and is associated with improved gut integrity in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jessica A; Clark, Andrew T; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a cytoprotective peptide that has healing effects on the intestinal mucosa. We sought to determine whether systemic administration of EGF after the onset of sepsis improved intestinal integrity and decreased mortality. FVB/N mice were subjected to either sham laparotomy or 2 x 23 cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Septic mice were further randomized to receive injection of either 150 microg kg(-1) d(-1) (i.p.) EGF or 0.9% saline (i.p.). Circulating EGF levels were decreased after CLP compared with sham animals but were unaffected by giving exogenous EGF treatment. In contrast, intestinal EGF levels increased after CLP and were further augmented by exogenous EGF treatment. Intestinal EGF receptor was increased after CLP, whether assayed by immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, or Western blot, and exogenous EGF treatment decreased intestinal EGF receptor. Villus length decreased 2-fold between sham and septic animals, and EGF treatment resulted in near total restitution of villus length. Sepsis decreased intestinal proliferation and increased intestinal apoptosis. This was accompanied by increased expression of the proapoptotic proteins Bid and Fas-associated death domain, as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 cip1/waf Epidermal growth factor treatment after the onset of sepsis restored both proliferation and apoptosis to levels seen in sham animals and normalized expression of Bid, Fas-associated death domain, and p21 cip1/waf . To determine whether improvements in gut homeostasis were associated with a decrease in sepsis-induced mortality, septic mice with or without EGF treatment after CLP were followed 7 days for survival. Mortality decreased from 60% to 30% in mice treated with EGF after the onset of sepsis (P < 0.05). Thus, EGF may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of sepsis in part due to its ability to protect intestinal integrity.

  5. Epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I upregulate the expression of the epidermal growth factor system in rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bor, M V; Sørensen, B S; Vinter-Jensen, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Both epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I play a role in connection with the liver. In the present study, the possible interaction of these two growth factor systems was studied by investigating the effect of epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor...... I treatment on the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor, and its activating ligands, transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor. METHODS: Fifty-five male rats received no treatment, human recombinant epidermal growth factor or human recombinant insulin-like growth.......8+/-1.6 fmol/mg protein epidermal growth factor and 144+/-22 fmol/mg protein transforming growth factor-alpha. Both epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I treatment increased the expression of mRNA for transforming growth factor-alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor, as well...

  6. Gut commensal flora: tolerance and homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rescigno, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Commensal microorganisms are not ignored by the intestinal immune system. Recent evidence shows that commensals actively participate in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis by interacting with intestinal epithelial cells and delivering tolerogenic signals that are transmitted to the underlying cells of the immune system.

  7. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic beta Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 932838 ISSN 1942-0900 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : beta cells * reactive oxygen species homeostasis * mitochondria Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2012

  8. Calcium homeostasis in fly photoreceptor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler, J

    2002-01-01

    In fly photoreceptor cells, two processes dominate the Ca2+ homeostasis: light-induced Ca2+ influx through members of the TRP family of ion channels, and Ca2+ extrusion by Na+/Ca2+ exchange.Ca2+ release from intracellular stores is quantitatively insignificant. Both, the light-activated channels and

  9. Effectiveness of carnosine on disturbed electrolytes homeostasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... of the cells to cisplatin may result from the interaction of specific proteins with ..... respiration, which is similar to uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (Binet ... cellular ion homeostasis with decreased cellular K+ content, increased ... of sodium and hydrogen ions will take place passively. Also, magnesium ...

  10. Pharmacological modulation of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2018-01-10

    Mitochondria are pivotal organelles in calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling and signalling, constituting intracellular checkpoints for numerous processes that are vital for cell life. Alterations in mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis have been linked to a variety of pathological conditions and are critical in the aetiology of several human diseases. Efforts have been taken to harness mitochondrial Ca 2+ transport mechanisms for therapeutic intervention, but pharmacological compounds that direct and selectively modulate mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis are currently lacking. New avenues have, however, emerged with the breakthrough discoveries on the genetic identification of the main players involved in mitochondrial Ca 2+ influx and efflux pathways and with recent hints towards a deep understanding of the function of these molecular systems. Here, we review the current advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis and its contribution to physiology and human disease. We also introduce and comment on the recent progress towards a systems-level pharmacological targeting of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  11. Molecular monitoring of equine joint homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic joint disorders are a major cause of impaired mobility and loss of quality of life in both humans and horses. Regardless of the primary insult, any joint disorder is characterized by an upset in normal joint homeostasis, the balance between tissue anabolism and catabolism that is normally

  12. The effect of metformin on glucose homeostasis during moderate exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Merethe; Palsøe, Marie K.; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the role of metformin on glucose kinetics during moderate exercise. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Before, during, and after a 45-min bout of exercise at 60% VO2max, glucose kinetics were determined by isotope tracer technique in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus....... CONCLUSIONS: Metformin has a positive effect on glucose homeostasis during exercise....... with metformin treatment (DM2+Met) or without metformin treatment (DM2) and in healthy control subjects (CON) matched for BMI and age. Glucoregulatory hormones and metabolites were measured throughout the study. RESULTS: Plasma glucose concentration was unchanged during exercise in CON but decreased in DM2...

  13. Organelle communication: signaling crossroads between homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; López-Crisosto, Camila; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Chiong, Mario; Hill, Joseph A; Simmen, Thomas; Quest, Andrew F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    Cellular organelles do not function as isolated or static units, but rather form dynamic contacts between one another that can be modulated according to cellular needs. The physical interfaces between organelles are important for Ca2+ and lipid homeostasis, and serve as platforms for the control of many essential functions including metabolism, signaling, organelle integrity and execution of the apoptotic program. Emerging evidence also highlights the importance of organelle communication in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cancer, skeletal and cardiac muscle dysfunction. Here, we provide an overview of the current literature on organelle communication and the link to human pathologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lysosome-related organelles as mediators of metal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-10-10

    Metal ion assimilation is essential for all forms of life. However, organisms must properly control the availability of these nutrients within the cell to avoid inactivating proteins by mismetallation. To safeguard against an imbalance between supply and demand in eukaryotes, intracellular compartments contain metal transporters that load and unload metals. Although the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana are well established locales for the storage of copper, zinc, iron, and manganese, related compartments are emerging as important mediators of metal homeostasis. Here we describe these compartments and review their metal transporter complement. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Hypothalamic neurones governing glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppari, R

    2015-06-01

    The notion that the brain directly controls the level of glucose in the blood (glycaemia) independent of its known action on food intake and body weight has been known ever since 1849. That year, the French physiologist Dr Claude Bernard reported that physical puncture of the floor of the fourth cerebral ventricle rapidly leads to an increased level of sugar in the blood (and urine) in rabbits. Despite this important discovery, it took approximately 150 years before significant efforts aimed at understanding the underlying mechanism of brain-mediated control of glucose metabolism were made. Technological developments allowing for genetically-mediated manipulation of selected molecular pathways in a neurone-type-specific fashion unravelled the importance of specific molecules in specific neuronal populations. These neuronal pathways govern glucose metabolism in the presence and even in the absence of insulin. Also, a peculiarity of these pathways is that certain biochemically-defined neurones govern glucose metabolism in a tissue-specific fashion. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. TMEM45A Is Dispensable for Epidermal Morphogenesis, Keratinization and Barrier Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Hayez

    Full Text Available TMEM45A gene encodes an initially uncharacterized predicted transmembrane protein. We previously showed that this gene is highly expressed in keratinocytes where its expression correlates with keratinization, suggesting a role in normal epidermal physiology. To test this hypothesis, we generated TMEM45A knockout mice and found that these mice develop without any evident phenotype. The morphology of the epidermis assessed by histology and by labelling differentiation markers in immunofluorescence was not altered. Toluidine blue permeability assay showed that the epidermal barrier develops normally during embryonic development. We also showed that depletion of TMEM45A in human keratinocytes does not alter their potential to form in vitro 3D-reconstructed epidermis. Indeed, epidermis with normal morphogenesis were generated from TMEM45A-silenced keratinocytes. Their expression of differentiation markers quantified by RT-qPCR and evidenced by immunofluorescence labelling as well as their barrier function estimated by Lucifer yellow permeability were similar to the control epidermis. In summary, TMEM45A gene expression is dispensable for epidermal morphogenesis, keratinization and barrier formation. If this protein plays a role in the epidermis, its experimental depletion can possibly be compensated by other proteins in the two experimental models analyzed in this study.

  17. TGM5 mutations impact epidermal differentiation in acral peeling skin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigors, Manuela; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Cobzaru, Cristina; Schwieger-Briel, Agnes; Suárez, Jose; Faletra, Flavio; Aho, Heikki; Mäkelä, Leeni; Kern, Johannes S; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Has, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder characterized by acral blistering and peeling of the outermost layers of the epidermis. It is caused by mutations in the gene for transglutaminase 5, TGM5. Here, we report on clinical and molecular findings in 11 patients and extend the TGM5 mutation database by four, to our knowledge, previously unreported mutations: p.M1T, p.L41P, p.L214CfsX15, and p.S604IfsX9. The recurrent mutation p.G113C was found in 9 patients, but also in 3 of 100 control individuals in a heterozygous state, indicating that APSS might be more widespread than hitherto expected. Using quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence analysis, we demonstrate that expression and distribution of several epidermal differentiation markers and corneodesmosin (CDSN) is altered in APSS keratinocytes and skin. Although the expression of transglutaminases 1 and 3 was not changed, we found an upregulation of keratin 1, keratin 10, involucrin, loricrin, and CDSN, probably as compensatory mechanisms for stabilization of the epidermal barrier. Our results give insights into the consequences of TGM5 mutations on terminal epidermal differentiation.

  18. Frozen allogeneic human epidermal cultured sheets for the cure of complicated leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Flores, Y J; Kuri-Harcuch, W

    1999-08-01

    Skin ulcers due to venous stasis or diabetes are common among the elderly and are difficult to treat. Repeated applications of cell-based products have been reported to result in cure or improvement of leg ulcers of small size in a fraction of patients. To examine the effects of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures for the treatment of acute and chronic ulcers. We treated a series of 10 consecutive patients with leg ulcers of different etiology and duration with frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures stored frozen and thawed for 5-10 minutes at room temperature before application. Three patients had ulcers with exposed Achilles or extensor tendon. The ulcers treated were as large as 160 cm2 in area and of up to 20-years' duration. After preliminary preparation of the wounds by debridement to remove necrotic tissue and application of silver sulfadiazine to control infection, thawed cultures were applied biweekly from 2 to 15 times depending on the size and complexity of the ulcer. All ulcers healed, including those with tendon exposure. After the first few applications, granulation tissue formed in the ulcer bed and on exposed tendons, and epidermal healing took place through proliferation and migration of cells from the margins of the wound. The time required for complete healing ranged from 1 to 31 weeks after the first application. The use of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures is a safe and effective treatment for venous or diabetic ulcers, even those with tendon exposure. It seems possible that any leg ulcer will be amenable to successful treatment by this method.

  19. Epidermal growth factor and growth in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a dose-dependent thickening of the epidermis in suckling mice. The cellular mechanisms underlying this thickening were analyzed by measuring the effect of EGF on the cell-cycle. Neonatal mice were given daily injections of either 2ug EGF/g body weight/day or an equivalent volume of saline, and on the seventh day received a single injection of 3 H-thymidine. At various times the mice were perfused with fixative; 1um sections of skin were stained with a modification of Harris' hematoxylin and were autoradiographed. The sections were analyzed using three methods based on the dependence on time after injection of 3 H-thymidine of: frequency of labelled mitoses, labelling index, and reciprocal grains/nucleus. It was found that EGF caused a two-fold increase in the cell production rate. The effect of exogenous EGF on the morphology of gastric mucosa and incisors of suckling mice was also studied. The gastric mucosa appeared thicker in EGF-treated animals, but the effect was not statistically significant. In contrast to its effect on epidermis and gastric mucosa, EGF caused a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the size of the incisors. Because the mouse submandibular salivary gland is the major source of EGF the effect of sialoadenectomy on female reproductive functions was examined. Ablation of the submandibular gland had no effect on: length of estrus cycle, ability of the female to produce litters, length of the gestation period, litter size, and weight of the litter at birth. There was also no effect on survival of the offspring or on age at which the eyelids separated

  20. Renal content and output of epidermal growth factor in long-term adrenergic agonist-treated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates the renal and urinary levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rats under long-term treatment with alpha- or beta-adrenergic agonists. Urine samples were obtained on days 7, 14 and 21, and renal tissue samples on day 21. EGF was quantified by ELISA and tissue sections were...... material in the distal tubules. Concomitantly, reduced levels of EGF and EGF mRNA were observed, and also the urinary levels of EGF were reduced. Together, these observations indicate alpha-adrenergic treatment to affect the distal tubules. Treatment with the beta-adrenergic agonist did not change...... fractional kidney weight, but initially the urinary excretion of EGF was reduced. The data add further evidence to the suggestion that activity of the sympathetic nervous system influences renal homeostasis of EGF, either directly or indirectly through renal histopathological changes....

  1. Intracellular calcium homeostasis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brini, Marisa; Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) is a universal carrier of biological information: it controls cell life from its origin at fertilization to its end in the process of programmed cell death. Ca(2+) is a conventional diffusible second messenger released inside cells by the interaction of first messengers with plasma membrane receptors. However, it can also penetrate directly into cells to deliver information without the intermediation of first or second messengers. Even more distinctively, Ca(2+) can act as a first messenger, by interacting with a plasma membrane receptor to set in motion intracellular signaling pathways that involve Ca(2+) itself. Perhaps the most distinctive property of the Ca(2+) signal is its ambivalence: while essential to the correct functioning of cells, Ca(2+) becomes an agent that mediates cell distress, or even (toxic) cell death, if its concentration and movements inside cells are not carefully tuned. Ca(2+) is controlled by reversible complexation to specific proteins, which could be pure Ca(2+) buffers, or which, in addition to buffering Ca(2+), also decode its signal to pass it on to targets. The most important actors in the buffering of cell Ca(2+) are proteins that transport it across the plasma membrane and the membrane of the organelles: some have high Ca(2+) affinity and low transport capacity (e.g., Ca(2+) pumps), others have opposite properties (e.g., the Ca(2+) uptake system of mitochondria). Between the initial event of fertilization, and the terminal event of programmed cell death, the Ca(2+) signal regulates the most important activities of the cell, from the expression of genes, to heart and muscle contraction and other motility processes, to diverse metabolic pathways involved in the generation of cell fuels.

  2. A role of the adaptive immune system in glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronsart, Laura L; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, including the adaptive immune response, has recently been recognized as having a significant role in diet-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to determine if the adaptive immune system also functions in maintaining physiological glucose homeostasis in the absence of diet-induced disease. SCID mice and immunocompetent control animals were phenotypically assessed for variations in metabolic parameters and cytokine profiles. Additionally, the glucose tolerance of SCID and immunocompetent control animals was assessed following introduction of a high-fat diet. SCID mice on a normal chow diet were significantly insulin resistant relative to control animals despite having less fat mass. This was associated with a significant increase in the innate immunity-stimulating cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), and MCP3. Additionally, the SCID mouse phenotype was exacerbated in response to a high-fat diet as evidenced by the further significant progression of glucose intolerance. These results support the notion that the adaptive immune system plays a fundamental biological role in glucose homeostasis, and that the absence of functional B and T cells results in disruption in the concentrations of various cytokines associated with macrophage proliferation and recruitment. Additionally, the absence of functional B and T cells is not protective against diet-induced pathology.

  3. Temporal aspects of copper homeostasis and its crosstalk with hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola ePeñarrubia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To cope with the dual nature of copper as being essential and toxic for cells, plants temporarily adapt the expression of copper homeostasis components to assure its delivery to cuproproteins while avoiding the interference of potential oxidative damage derived from both copper uptake and photosynthetic reactions during light hours. The circadian clock participates in the temporal organization of coordination of plant nutrition adapting metabolic responses to the daily oscillations. This timely control improves plant fitness and reproduction and holds biotechnological potential to drive increased crop yields. Hormonal pathways, including those of abscisic acid, gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, and jasmonates are also under direct clock and light control, both in mono and dicotyledons. In this review, we focus on copper transport in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the presumable role of hormones in metal homeostasis matching nutrient availability to growth requirements and preventing metal toxicity. The presence of putative hormone-dependent regulatory elements in the promoters of copper transporters genes suggests hormonal regulation to match special copper requirements during plant development. Spatial and temporal processes that can be affected by hormones include the regulation of copper uptake into roots, intracellular trafficking and compartmentalisation, and long-distance transport to developing vegetative and reproductive tissues. In turn, hormone biosynthesis and signalling are also influenced by copper availability, which suggests reciprocal regulation subjected to temporal control by the central oscillator of the circadian clock. This transcriptional regulatory network, coordinates environmental and hormonal signalling with developmental pathways to allow enhanced micronutrient acquisition efficiency.

  4. Health related quality of life of women in TEACH, a randomised placebo controlled adjuvant trial of lapatinib in early stage Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (HER2) overexpressing breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Frances M; Smith, Ian E; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate health related quality of life (HRQOL) in TEACH, a phase III randomized placebo controlled trial of 12 months of adjuvant lapatinib in HER2 positive (HER2+) early breast cancer which demonstrated marginal benefit in disease-free survival. METHODS: Women on TEACH completed...... (physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role emotional and mental health), and in patients discontinuing therapy. A five-point change was deemed a Minimally Clinically Important Difference (MCID). Response analysis compared the proportion of patients...... significant incidences of diarrhoea and rash in lapatinib treated patients. At six months, women receiving lapatinib had more significant reductions (p placebo) in social functioning. Early treatment discontinuations were more frequent on lapatinib (32% versus 18%), and were associated with more...

  5. Oral mucosa: an alternative epidermic cell source to develop autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes from diabetic subjects

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    Daniela GUZMÁN-URIBE

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral mucosa has been highlighted as a suitable source of epidermal cells due to its intrinsic characteristics such as its higher proliferation rate and its obtainability. Diabetic ulcers have a worldwide prevalence that is variable (1%-11%, meanwhile treatment of this has been proven ineffective. Tissue-engineered skin plays an important role in wound care focusing on strategies such autologous dermal-epidermal substitutes. Objective The aim of this study was to obtain autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes from oral mucosa from diabetic subjects as a first step towards a possible clinical application for cases of diabetic foot. Material and Methods Oral mucosa was obtained from diabetic and healthy subjects (n=20 per group. Epidermal cells were isolated and cultured using autologous fibrin to develop dermal-epidermal in vitro substitutes by the air-liquid technique with autologous human serum as a supplement media. Substitutes were immunocharacterized with collagen IV and cytokeratin 5-14 as specific markers. A Student´s t- test was performed to assess the differences between both groups. Results It was possible to isolate epidermal cells from the oral mucosa of diabetic and healthy subjects and develop autologous dermal-epidermal skin substitutes using autologous serum as a supplement. Differences in the expression of specific markers were observed and the cytokeratin 5-14 expression was lower in the diabetic substitutes, and the collagen IV expression was higher in the diabetic substitutes when compared with the healthy group, showing a significant difference. Conclusion Cells from oral mucosa could be an alternative and less invasive source for skin substitutes and wound healing. A difference in collagen production of diabetic cells suggests diabetic substitutes could improve diabetic wound healing. More research is needed to determine the crosstalk between components of these skin substitutes and damaged tissues.

  6. Association of epidermal growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor polymorphisms with the risk of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the population of North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Aiqiang; Zhang, Li; Yan, Tao; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Xiaopan; Zhu, Xilin; Ma, Juan; Li, Ke; Li, Hui; Liu, Ying

    2013-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common solid malignant tumor occurring worldwide that leads to the third largest cause of death compared to other cancers. Genetic and environmental factors are involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can stimulate the proliferation of epidermal and epithelial cells. The EGF signal pathway has a relationship with the growth of the embryo, tissue repairing, and tumorigenesis. In this study, 416 patients with hepatitis B virus infection (HBV)-related HCC and 645 individuals who had never been infected with HBV of the Chinese Han population were enrolled. Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whose minor allele frequency >20% in the EGF and EGFR genes, were genotyped to examine their associations with hepatocarcinogenesis. Genotyping experiments were carried out using TaqMan. There were significant differences in genotype distributions (p=0.005) and allele frequencies (p=0.001, odds ratio [OR]=1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.15-1.79) of rs11569017 in the EGF gene between the HCC and control groups. After binary logistic regression to determine independent factors for susceptibility to HCC under an additive model, rs11569017 was still independently associated with the susceptibility to HCC (p=0.021, OR=1.48, 95% CI=1.06-2.07), but no significant differences in other SNPs were found. Additionally, the haplotype T-G constructed by rs11569017 and rs4444903 of the EGF gene might increase the risk of HBV-related HCC (p=0.002, OR=1.44, 95% CI=1.15-1.82). The rs11569017 T allele was associated with susceptibility to HBV-related HCC.

  7. Radiotherapy and receptor of epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deberne, M.

    2009-01-01

    The expression level of the receptor of the epidermal growth factor is in correlation with the tumor cells radiosensitivity. An overexpression of the E.G.F.R. is often present in the bronchi cancer, epidermoid carcinomas of the O.R.L. sphere, esophagus, uterine cervix, and anal duct but also in the rectum cancers and glioblastomas. At the clinical level, the E.G.F.R. expression is in correlation with an unfavourable prognosis after radiotherapy in numerous tumoral localizations. In the rectum cancers it is an independent prognosis factor found in multifactorial analysis: increase of the rate of nodes and local recurrence when the E.G.F.R. is over expressed. In the uterine cervix cancers, the survival is is negatively affected in multifactorial analysis by the E.G.F.R. membranes expression level. At the therapy level, the development of anti E.G.F.R. targeted therapies (tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies) opens a new therapy field at radio-sensitivity potentiality. The irradiation makes an activation of the E.G.F.R. way that would be partially responsible of the post irradiation tumoral repopulation. This activation leads the phosphorylation of the PI3 kinase ways and M.A.P. kinase ones, then the Akt protein one that acts an apoptotic modulator part. It has been shown that blocking the E.G.F.R. way acts on three levels: accumulation of ells in phase G1, reduction of the cell repair and increasing of apoptosis. he inhibition of post irradiation action of the E.G.F.R. signal way is a factor explaining the ionizing radiation - anti E.G.F.R. synergy. The preclinical data suggest that the E.G.F.R. blocking by the monoclonal antibodies is more important than the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A first positive randomized study with the cetuximab, published in 2006 in the epidermoid carcinomas of the O.R.L. sphere lead to its authorization on the market with the radiotherapy for this localization. The use of cetuximab in other indication with or in

  8. Glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Beneficial effects of supplementation with microalgae Chlorella vulgaris: A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Sadeghi, Zahra; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Vaghef-Mehrabany, Elnaz; Aliashrafi, Soodabeh

    2017-08-01

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) is reported to improve dyslipidemia and hypertension; however, its effect on inflammatory biomarkers and insulin resistance has not been noticed thus far. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a hepatic symptom of metabolic syndrome is strongly associated with insulin resistance and inflammation. In the current interventional trial, we aimed to study the effects of C. vulgaris supplementation on glucose homeostasis, insulin resistance and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with NAFLD. Seventy NAFLD patients confirmed by ultra-sonographic findings were randomly assigned into intervention group (four 300 mg tablets of C. vulgaris) or placebo group (four 300 mg tablets of placebos) for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, liver enzymes, fasting serum glucose (FSG), insulin, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were assessed and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) score for insulin resistance was estimated before and after the intervention. Anthropometric measurements decreased significantly in both group (p vulgaris - treated group compared to placebo group. Serum concentrations of liver enzymes, FSG and hs-CRP also significantly decreased and serum insulin concentration and HOMA score increased significantly only in C. vulgaris-treated group (P vulgaris supplementation could be considered as an adjunctive therapy to decrease weight and improve glycemic status and reducing hs-CRP as well as improving liver function in patients with NAFLD. 201202233320N7. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. [Quantity research on epidermal growth factor in saliva and epidermal growth factor receptor in biopsy samples of recurrent aphthous ulcer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yang; Zhang, Gang; Lin, Mei

    2008-02-01

    To examine the change of epidermal growth factor (EGF) concentration in saliva of recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU) patients during the ulcerous and interval period and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in ulcer biopsy samples. ECF data of the samples, which were 27 saliva samples from RAU gained not only in the ulcerous period but also in interval period and 33 ones from normal persons, were acquired through enzyme linked immunosorhent assay (ELISA) and EGF standard curve. ECFR-RNA date of RAU biopsies, which were 31 biopsy samples from RAU got during the ulcerous period and 35 ones from normal persons, were surveyed by QF-RT-PCR. All RAU samples were obtained under the same level, which were the whole patients were minor aphthous ulcers and their ulcers occurred not over the first four days. All patients and normal persons were selected seriously under the rule of physical situations without any other diseases and histories of using medicines. The EGF concentration of saliva in RAU group at ulcer occurrence was higher than that in the interval period and the normal control with a significant test (F = 3.24, P ulcer occurrence was higher than the normal control with a significant test (t = 3.15, P ulcer occasion of RAU patients could be related with the decreasing of EGF in saliva during interval period, and that the ulcer sell-cure of RAU patients would be contributed to

  10. Neutrophils in Homeostasis, Immunity, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolás-Ávila, José Ángel; Adrover, José M; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2017-01-17

    Neutrophils were among the first leukocytes described and visualized by early immunologists. Prominent effector functions during infection and sterile inflammation classically placed them low in the immune tree as rapid, mindless aggressors with poor regulatory functions. This view is currently under reassessment as we uncover new aspects of their life cycle and identify transcriptional and phenotypic diversity that endows them with regulatory properties that extend beyond their lifetime in the circulation. These properties are revealing unanticipated roles for neutrophils in supporting homeostasis, as well as complex disease states such as cancer. We focus this review on these emerging functions in order to define the true roles of neutrophils in homeostasis, immunity, and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Homeostasis as the Mechanism of Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Torday

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis is conventionally thought of merely as a synchronic (same time servo-mechanism that maintains the status quo for organismal physiology. However, when seen from the perspective of developmental physiology, homeostasis is a robust, dynamic, intergenerational, diachronic (across-time mechanism for the maintenance, perpetuation and modification of physiologic structure and function. The integral relationships generated by cell-cell signaling for the mechanisms of embryogenesis, physiology and repair provide the needed insight to the scale-free universality of the homeostatic principle, offering a novel opportunity for a Systems approach to Biology. Starting with the inception of life itself, with the advent of reproduction during meiosis and mitosis, moving forward both ontogenetically and phylogenetically through the evolutionary steps involved in adaptation to an ever-changing environment, Biology and Evolution Theory need no longer default to teleology.

  13. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Reato

    Full Text Available The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG. A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  14. The liver in regulation of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishi, Gautam; Subramaniam, V Nathan

    2017-09-01

    The liver is one of the largest and most functionally diverse organs in the human body. In addition to roles in detoxification of xenobiotics, digestion, synthesis of important plasma proteins, gluconeogenesis, lipid metabolism, and storage, the liver also plays a significant role in iron homeostasis. Apart from being the storage site for excess body iron, it also plays a vital role in regulating the amount of iron released into the blood by enterocytes and macrophages. Since iron is essential for many important physiological and molecular processes, it increases the importance of liver in the proper functioning of the body's metabolism. This hepatic iron-regulatory function can be attributed to the expression of many liver-specific or liver-enriched proteins, all of which play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review focuses on these proteins and their known roles in the regulation of body iron metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The Commensal Microbiota Drives Immune Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Finlay, Barton Brett

    2012-01-01

    For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use t...

  16. Molecular monitoring of equine joint homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    de Grauw, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic joint disorders are a major cause of impaired mobility and loss of quality of life in both humans and horses. Regardless of the primary insult, any joint disorder is characterized by an upset in normal joint homeostasis, the balance between tissue anabolism and catabolism that is normally maintained by resident articular cells. This upset is often fuelled by a local inflammatory response in the synovial membrane and the articular cartilage. Our current understanding of the pathogenesi...

  17. THE WORLD VIEW, IDENTITY AND SOCIOCULTUR HOMEOSTASIS

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    Marina Yur’evna Neronova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the relationship between the phenomenon of world view and sociocultural identity both individuals and the community as a whole. The research is being carried out in the context of current crisis of world view accepted in so-called art Nouveau era. This paper also presents the identity crisis typical for modern civilized societies. A new notion of sociocultural homeostasis is introduced in connection with analyzable phenomena and their mutual relations.Purpose. Study of the relationship between the phenomenon of the world view and sociocultural identity as a structural and functional mechanism.Methodology. Phenomenological and systematic methods with the elements of historical method were employed. Cultural analysis is based on using both axiological and phenomenological approach, and also the elements of semiotic approach.Results. The dependence of identity on the world view is revealed (or is being revealed?, the phenomenon of sociocultural homeostasis is singled out (or is being singled out in the capacity of the mechanism setting up the correspondence in the contradictory unity between the world view as a subjective image and concrete reality as an objective part of this contradictory. The analysis of sociocultural homeostasis is carried out (or is being carried out and the conclusion is being drown that instability of the latter leads to serious problems in the identification of both individuals and communities as a whole. Besides, (moreover the relationship between the legitimacy level of the world view and stability of sociocultural homeostasis is established. (is being established.Practical implications: the system of education.

  18. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression...... or mutations to their phosphorylation sites cause dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Our work identifies the Orm proteins as critical mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis and raises the possibility that sphingolipid misregulation contributes to the development of childhood asthma....

  19. Interactions Between Epidermal Keratinocytes, Dendritic Epidermal T-Cells, and Hair Follicle Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarinath, Krithika; Dutta, Abhik; Hegde, Akshay; Pincha, Neha; Gund, Rupali; Jamora, Colin

    2018-06-13

    The interplay of immune cells and stem cells in maintaining skin homeostasis and repair is an exciting new frontier in cutaneous biology. With the growing appreciation of the importance of this new crosstalk comes the requirement of methods to interrogate the molecular underpinnings of these leukocyte-stem cell interactions. Here we describe how a combination of FACS, cellular coculture assays, and conditioned media treatments can be utilized to advance our understanding of this emerging area of intercellular communication between immune cells and stem cells.

  20. Regulation of energy homeostasis via GPR120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhiko eIchimura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Free fatty acids (FFAs are fundamental units of key nutrients. FFAs exert various biological functions, depending on the chain length and degree of desaturation. Recent studies have shown that several FFAs act as ligands of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, activate intracellular signaling and exert physiological functions via these GPCRs. GPR120 (also known as free fatty acid receptor 4, FFAR4 is activated by unsaturated medium- to long-chain FFAs and has a critical role in various physiological homeostasis mechanisms such as incretin hormone secretion, food preference, anti-inflammation and adipogenesis. Recent studies showed that a lipid sensor GPR120 has a key role in sensing dietary fat in white adipose tissue and regulates the whole body energy homeostasis in both humans and rodents. Genetic study in human identified the loss-of-functional mutation of GPR120 associated with obesity and insulin resistance. In addition, dysfunction of GPR120 has been linked as a novel risk factor for diet-induced obesity. This review aims to provide evidence from the recent development in physiological function of GPR120 and discusses its functional roles in regulation of energy homeostasis and its potential as drug targets.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Trent and zinc homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Corey B; Harrison, Mark D; Huygens, Flavia

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative pathogen and the major cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. The mechanisms that P. aeruginosa strains use to regulate intracellular zinc have an effect on infection, antibiotic resistance and the propensity to form biofilms. However, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa strains of variable infectivity has not been compared. In this study, zinc homeostasis in P. aeruginosa Trent, a highly infectious clinical strain, was compared to that of a laboratory P. aeruginosa strain, ATCC27853. Trent was able to tolerate higher concentrations of additional zinc in rich media than ATCC27853. Further, pre-adaptation to additional zinc enhanced the growth of Trent at non-inhibitory concentrations but the impact of pre-adaption on the growth of ATCC27853 under the same conditions was minimal. The results establish clear differences in zinc-induced responses in Trent and ATCC27853, and how zinc homeostasis can be a promising target for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis patients. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  3. Deregulation of epidermal stem cell niche contributes to pathogenesis of non-healing venous ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Aron G.; Vukelic, Sasa; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is maintained by epidermal stem cells (ESC) that reside in distinct niches and contribute to homeostasis and wound closure. Keratinocytes at the non-healing edges of venous ulcers (VUs) are healing-incompetent, hyper-proliferative and non-migratory suggesting deregulation of ESCs. To date genes which regulate ESC niches have been studied in mice only. Utilizing microarray analysis of VU non-healing edges, we identified changes in expression of genes harboring regulation of ESCs and their fate. In a prospective clinical study of ten VUs, we confirmed suppression of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor and GATA binding protein3 as well as inhibitors of DNA-binding proteins 2 and 4. We also found decreased levels of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3, nuclear presence of ß-catenin and overexpression of its transcriptional target, c-myc indicating activation of the Wnt pathway. Additionally, we found down-regulation of leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains protein 1, a gene important for maintaining ESCs in a quiescent state, and absence of keratin 15, a marker of the basal stem cell compartment suggesting local depletion of ESCs. Our study shows that loss of genes important for regulation of ESCs and their fate along with activation of ß-catenin and c-myc in the VU may contribute to ESC deprivation and a hyper-proliferative, non-migratory, healing incapable wound edge. PMID:24635172

  4. Physiological epidermal growth factor concentrations activate high affinity receptors to elicit calcium oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Marquèze-Pouey

    Full Text Available Signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF is crucial in tissue development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. EGF is mitogenic at picomolar concentrations and is known to bind its receptor on high affinity binding sites depending of the oligomerization state of the receptor (monomer or dimer. In spite of these observations, the cellular response induced by EGF has been mainly characterized for nanomolar concentrations of the growth factor, and a clear definition of the cellular response to circulating (picomolar concentrations is still lacking. We investigated Ca2+ signaling, an early event in EGF responses, in response to picomolar doses in COS-7 cells where the monomer/dimer equilibrium is unaltered by the synthesis of exogenous EGFR. Using the fluo5F Ca2+ indicator, we found that picomolar concentrations of EGF induced in 50% of the cells a robust oscillatory Ca2+ signal quantitatively similar to the Ca2+ signal induced by nanomolar concentrations. However, responses to nanomolar and picomolar concentrations differed in their underlying mechanisms as the picomolar EGF response involved essentially plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that are not activated by internal Ca2+ store depletion, while the nanomolar EGF response involved internal Ca2+ release. Moreover, while the picomolar EGF response was modulated by charybdotoxin-sensitive K+ channels, the nanomolar response was insensitive to the blockade of these ion channels.

  5. Physiological epidermal growth factor concentrations activate high affinity receptors to elicit calcium oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquèze-Pouey, Béatrice; Mailfert, Sébastien; Rouger, Vincent; Goaillard, Jean-Marc; Marguet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF) is crucial in tissue development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. EGF is mitogenic at picomolar concentrations and is known to bind its receptor on high affinity binding sites depending of the oligomerization state of the receptor (monomer or dimer). In spite of these observations, the cellular response induced by EGF has been mainly characterized for nanomolar concentrations of the growth factor, and a clear definition of the cellular response to circulating (picomolar) concentrations is still lacking. We investigated Ca2+ signaling, an early event in EGF responses, in response to picomolar doses in COS-7 cells where the monomer/dimer equilibrium is unaltered by the synthesis of exogenous EGFR. Using the fluo5F Ca2+ indicator, we found that picomolar concentrations of EGF induced in 50% of the cells a robust oscillatory Ca2+ signal quantitatively similar to the Ca2+ signal induced by nanomolar concentrations. However, responses to nanomolar and picomolar concentrations differed in their underlying mechanisms as the picomolar EGF response involved essentially plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that are not activated by internal Ca2+ store depletion, while the nanomolar EGF response involved internal Ca2+ release. Moreover, while the picomolar EGF response was modulated by charybdotoxin-sensitive K+ channels, the nanomolar response was insensitive to the blockade of these ion channels.

  6. The under-appreciated promiscuity of the epidermal growth factor receptor family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Kennedy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3 and ERBB4 function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signalling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance towards targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies.

  7. Genetically induced cell death in bulge stem cells reveals their redundancy for hair and epidermal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Iwona; Oeztuerk-Winder, Feride; Humphreys, Peter; Frye, Michaela

    2015-03-01

    Adult mammalian epidermis contains multiple stem cell populations in which quiescent and more proliferative stem and progenitor populations coexist. However, the precise interrelation of these populations in homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we blocked the contribution of quiescent keratin 19 (K19)-expressing bulge stem cells to hair follicle formation through genetic ablation of the essential histone methyltransferase Setd8 that is required for the maintenance of adult skin. Deletion of Setd8 eliminated the contribution of bulge cells to hair follicle regeneration through inhibition of cell division and induction of cell death, but the growth and morphology of hair follicles were unaffected. Furthermore, ablation of Setd8 in the hair follicle bulge blocked the contribution of K19-postive stem cells to wounded epidermis, but the wound healing process was unaltered. Our data indicate that quiescent bulge stem cells are dispensable for hair follicle regeneration and epidermal injury in the short term and support the hypothesis that quiescent and cycling stem cell populations are equipotent. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  8. Real-time three-dimensional imaging of epidermal splitting and removal by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, Marc; Draye, Jean Pierre; Verween, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting and decell......While real-time 3-D evaluation of human skin constructs is needed, only 2-D non-invasive imaging techniques are available. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential of high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) for real-time 3-D assessment of the epidermal splitting...... before and after incubation. Real-time 3-D HD-OCT assessment was compared with 2-D en face assessment by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). (Immuno) histopathology was used as control. HD-OCT imaging allowed real-time 3-D visualization of the impact of selected agents on epidermal splitting, dermo......-epidermal junction, dermal architecture, vascular spaces and cellularity. RCM has a better resolution (1 μm) than HD-OCT (3 μm), permitting differentiation of different collagen fibres, but HD-OCT imaging has deeper penetration (570 μm) than RCM imaging (200 μm). Dispase II and NaCl treatments were found...

  9. Neonatal hyperthyroidism impairs epinephrine-provoked secretion of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor in mouse saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, J; Landel, C P

    1986-07-01

    We examined long-term effects of neonatal hyperthyroidism on salivary secretions of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor in male and female mice at the age of 31 days. Hyperthyroidism was induced by thyroxine (T4) injections (0.4 microgram/g body weight/day) during days 0-6. Littermate control mice were treated with vehicle. T4 treatment did not alter the amounts of protein secreted into saliva but hormone administration induced alteration in the types of protein secreted. T4 treatment decreased the contents of both nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor secreted into the saliva. A Sephadex G-200 column chromatographic profile revealed the presence of two distinct nerve growth factor immunoreactive peaks, while epidermal growth factor immunoreactivity predominantly eluted as a single low molecular weight form. T4 treatment did not alter the molecular nature of their secretion, but the treatment decreased their contents. These results indicate an impairment in salivary secretion of nerve growth factor and epidermal growth factor long after T4 treatment has been discontinued.

  10. Agent-Based Modeling of Mitochondria Links Sub-Cellular Dynamics to Cellular Homeostasis and Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Dalmasso

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles that supply energy for cellular biochemistry through oxidative phosphorylation. Within a cell, hundreds of mobile mitochondria undergo fusion and fission events to form a dynamic network. These morphological and mobility dynamics are essential for maintaining mitochondrial functional homeostasis, and alterations both impact and reflect cellular stress states. Mitochondrial homeostasis is further dependent on production (biogenesis and the removal of damaged mitochondria by selective autophagy (mitophagy. While mitochondrial function, dynamics, biogenesis and mitophagy are highly-integrated processes, it is not fully understood how systemic control in the cell is established to maintain homeostasis, or respond to bioenergetic demands. Here we used agent-based modeling (ABM to integrate molecular and imaging knowledge sets, and simulate population dynamics of mitochondria and their response to environmental energy demand. Using high-dimensional parameter searches we integrated experimentally-measured rates of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, and using sensitivity analysis we identified parameter influences on population homeostasis. By studying the dynamics of cellular subpopulations with distinct mitochondrial masses, our approach uncovered system properties of mitochondrial populations: (1 mitochondrial fusion and fission activities rapidly establish mitochondrial sub-population homeostasis, and total cellular levels of mitochondria alter fusion and fission activities and subpopulation distributions; (2 restricting the directionality of mitochondrial mobility does not alter morphology subpopulation distributions, but increases network transmission dynamics; and (3 maintaining mitochondrial mass homeostasis and responding to bioenergetic stress requires the integration of mitochondrial dynamics with the cellular bioenergetic state. Finally, (4 our model suggests sources of, and stress conditions

  11. Inhibition of epidermal cell proliferation by borderline rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, W [Freiburg Univ.; Daikeler, G

    1976-08-01

    Treatment of guinea pig flanks with very soft x-rays (borderline rays) directly caused a partial block of epidermal DNA synthesis which had been determined by measuring the /sup 3/H-Tdr incorporation. Higher doses and repeated applications would undoubtedly cause lasting damage to the tissue. The enhanced epidermal DNA synthesis which is sometimes observed should not be misinterpreted as a sign of a directly biopositive utilisation of the quantum energy supplied. Rather, it is a secondary repair process following initial phases of depression. A reparative increase in DNA synthesis may also occur as a primary process if the radiation is almost completely absorbed above the germinative layer.

  12. Epidermal growth factor in mammary glands and milk from rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba

    1993-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is one of the major growth-promoting agents in milk. Using immunohistochemistry we localized EGF in the mammary glands of lactating rats to the luminal border of the secretory cells. Following proteolytic pretreatment of the histological sections, the EGF-immunoreact......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is one of the major growth-promoting agents in milk. Using immunohistochemistry we localized EGF in the mammary glands of lactating rats to the luminal border of the secretory cells. Following proteolytic pretreatment of the histological sections, the EGF...

  13. The emerging role of lysosomes in copper homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Elena V; Polishchuk, Roman S

    2016-09-01

    The lysosomal system operates as a focal point where a number of important physiological processes such as endocytosis, autophagy and nutrient sensing converge. One of the key functions of lysosomes consists of regulating the metabolism/homeostasis of metals. Metal-containing components are carried to the lysosome through incoming membrane flows, while numerous transporters allow metal ions to move across the lysosome membrane. These properties enable lysosomes to direct metal fluxes to the sites where metal ions are either used by cellular components or sequestered. Copper belongs to a group of metals that are essential for the activity of vitally important enzymes, although it is toxic when in excess. Thus, copper uptake, supply and intracellular compartmentalization have to be tightly regulated. An increasing number of publications have indicated that these processes involve lysosomes. Here we review studies that reveal the expanding role of the lysosomal system as a hub for the control of Cu homeostasis and for the regulation of key Cu-dependent processes in health and disease.

  14. Chronic social stress leads to altered sleep homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olini, Nadja; Rothfuchs, Iru; Azzinnari, Damiano; Pryce, Christopher R; Kurth, Salome; Huber, Reto

    2017-06-01

    Disturbed sleep and altered sleep homeostasis are core features of many psychiatric disorders such as depression. Chronic uncontrollable stress is considered an important factor in the development of depression, but little is known on how chronic stress affects sleep regulation and sleep homeostasis. We therefore examined the effects of chronic social stress (CSS) on sleep regulation in mice. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were implanted for electrocortical recordings (ECoG) and underwent either a 10-day CSS protocol or control handling (CON). Subsequently, ECoG was assessed across a 24-h post-stress baseline, followed by a 4-h sleep deprivation, and then a 20-h recovery period. After sleep deprivation, CSS mice showed a blunted increase in sleep pressure compared to CON mice, as measured using slow wave activity (SWA, electroencephalographic power between 1-4Hz) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Vigilance states did not differ between CSS and CON mice during post-stress baseline, sleep deprivation or recovery, with the exception of CSS mice exhibiting increased REM sleep during recovery sleep. Behavior during sleep deprivation was not affected by CSS. Our data provide evidence that CSS alters the homeostatic regulation of sleep SWA in mice. In contrast to acute social stress, which results in a faster SWA build-up, CSS decelerates the homeostatic build up. These findings are discussed in relation to the causal contribution of stress-induced sleep disturbance to depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Prion protein modulates glucose homeostasis by altering intracellular iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Ajay; Singh, Neena

    2018-04-26

    The prion protein (PrP C ), a mainly neuronal protein, is known to modulate glucose homeostasis in mouse models. We explored the underlying mechanism in mouse models and the human pancreatic β-cell line 1.1B4. We report expression of PrP C on mouse pancreatic β-cells, where it promoted uptake of iron through divalent-metal-transporters. Accordingly, pancreatic iron stores in PrP knockout mice (PrP -/- ) were significantly lower than wild type (PrP +/+ ) controls. Silencing of PrP C in 1.1B4 cells resulted in significant depletion of intracellular (IC) iron, and remarkably, upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT2 and insulin. Iron overloading, on the other hand, resulted in downregulation of GLUT2 and insulin in a PrP C -dependent manner. Similar observations were noted in the brain, liver, and neuroretina of iron overloaded PrP +/+ but not PrP -/- mice, indicating PrP C -mediated modulation of insulin and glucose homeostasis through iron. Peripheral challenge with glucose and insulin revealed blunting of the response in iron-overloaded PrP +/+ relative to PrP -/- mice, suggesting that PrP C -mediated modulation of IC iron influences both secretion and sensitivity of peripheral organs to insulin. These observations have implications for Alzheimer's disease and diabetic retinopathy, known complications of type-2-diabetes associated with brain and ocular iron-dyshomeostasis.

  16. Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobes in the Study of Metal Homeostasis in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punshon, T.; Guerinot, M.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: This Botanical Briefing reviews the application of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobes to the plant sciences; how the technique has expanded our knowledge of metal(loid) homeostasis, and how it can be used in the future. Scope: The use of SXRF microspectroscopy and microtomography in research on metal homeostasis in plants is reviewed. The potential use of SXRF as part of the ionomics toolbox, where it is able to provide fundamental information on the way that plants control metal homeostasis, is recommended. Conclusions: SXRF is one of the few techniques capable of providing spatially resolved in-vivo metal abundance data on a sub-micrometre scale, without the need for chemical fixation, coating, drying or even sectioning of samples. This gives researchers the ability to uncover mechanisms of plant metal homeostasis that can potentially be obscured by the artefacts of sample preparation. Further, new generation synchrotrons with smaller beam sizes and more sensitive detection systems will allow for the imaging of metal distribution within single living plant cells. Even greater advances in our understanding of metal homeostasis in plants can be gained by overcoming some of the practical boundaries that exist in the use of SXRF analysis.

  17. Bone morphogenetic proteins in inflammation, glucose homeostasis and adipose tissue energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grgurevic, Lovorka; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schulz, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    implicated in pancreas development as well as control of adult glucose homeostasis. Lastly, we review the recently recognized role of BMPs in brown adipose tissue formation and their consequences for energy expenditure and adiposity. In summary, BMPs play a pivotal role in metabolism beyond their role...... homeostasis (anaemia, hemochromatosis) and oxidative damage. The second and third parts of this review focus on BMPs in the development of metabolic pathologies such as type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. The pancreatic beta cells are the sole source of the hormone insulin and BMPs have recently been...

  18. Signalling from the periphery to the brain that regulates energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Suk; Seeley, Randy J; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2018-04-01

    The CNS regulates body weight; however, we still lack a clear understanding of what drives decisions about when, how much and what to eat. A vast array of peripheral signals provides information to the CNS regarding fluctuations in energy status. The CNS then integrates this information to influence acute feeding behaviour and long-term energy homeostasis. Previous paradigms have delegated the control of long-term energy homeostasis to the hypothalamus and short-term changes in feeding behaviour to the hindbrain. However, recent studies have identified target hindbrain neurocircuitry that integrates the orchestration of individual bouts of ingestion with the long-term regulation of energy balance.

  19. Hormonal homeostasis in lung cancer patients under combined and radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotova, I.A.; Firsova, P.P.; Matveenko, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radioimmunoassay of hormonal homeostasis was performed in 200 lung cancer patients before and after combined and radiation treatment and in 25 healthy subjects (controls). The study showed an increase in the basal level of hormones of pituitary - adrenal system matched by a decline in thyroid function. Adequate combined and radiation treatment brought hormone levels to normal. Hormonal disorders accompanying recurrence were identical to those registered at disease onset. In some cases, changes in hormonal homeostasis developed as early as 3-6 months prior to clinically manifest recurrences or dissemination

  20. Negative regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling plays an essential role in the homeostasis of the intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Amlan; Wilmanski, Jeanette; Forsman, Huamei; Hrncir, Tomas; Hao, Liming; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2010-01-01

    A healthy intestinal tract is characterized by controlled homeostasis due to the balanced interaction between commensal bacteria and the host mucosal immune system. Human and animal model studies have supported the hypothesis that breakdown of this homeostasis may underlie the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). However it is not well understood how intestinal microflora stimulate the intestinal mucosal immune system and how such activation is regulated. Using a spontaneous, c...

  1. [Zinc signaling : a novel regulatory system on bone homeostasis, and immune and allergic responses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Toshiyuki; Nishida, Keigo; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hojyo, Shintaro

    2012-11-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that is required for proliferation, differentiation, and variety of cellular functions, and unbalanced homeostasis of Zn ion (Zn(2 + )) results in health problems such as abnormal bone formation and immunodeficiency. Recent studies have shed light on important roles of Zn(2 + )as a signaling mediator, called Zn signal. Zn(2 + )homeostasis is regulated through Zn transporters and cation channels. Advances of genetic and molecular approaches have revealed that Zn signal regulates mammalian physiology and pathogenesis. We will address that Zn signal undoubtedly contributes to our health, by highlighting it in bone homeostasis and immune regulation, and discuss that the "Zn signal axis" selectively controls intracellular signal transduction to fine-tune cellular functions.

  2. Preserved dopaminergic homeostasis and dopamine-related behaviour in hemizygous TH-Cre mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Annika Højrup Runegaard; Jensen, Kathrine L; Fitzpatrick, Ciarán M

    2017-01-01

    assessment of the dopaminergic system in hemizygous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre mice in comparison to wild-type (WT) controls. Our data show that TH-Cre mice display preserved dopaminergic homeostasis with unaltered levels of TH and dopamine as well as unaffected dopamine turnover in striatum. TH-Cre mice...

  3. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucagon-like peptides are co-released from enteroendocrine L cells in the gut and preproglucagon (PPG) neurons in the Brainstem. PPG-derived GLP-1/2 are probably key neuroendocrine signals for the control of energy balance and glucose Homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine whethe...

  4. Micromorphology and development of the epicuticular structure on the epidermal cell of ginseng leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyounghwan Lee

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The outwardly projected cuticle and epidermal cell wall (i.e., an epicuticular wrinkle acts as a major barrier to block out sunlight in ginseng leaves. The small vesicles in the peripheral region of epidermal cells may suppress the cuticle and parts of epidermal wall, push it upward, and consequently contribute to the formation of the epicuticular structure.

  5. Retrospective Study of Epidermal Parasitic Skin Diseases amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: A ten year retrospective study (1997-2006) was undertaken to determine the prevalence of. Epidermal Parasitic Skin Diseases (EPSD) among out-patients from the skin diseases hospital in Maiduguri, Borno state. Out of 10,000 out-patients examined during the study period, 3527(35.27%) where infected with ...

  6. An immunologic approach to induction of epidermal growth factor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) in pharmacologic doses is able to induce growth and development in the fetus and the newborn. To investigate the opposite situation, the effects of insufficient amounts of EGF during development, we wanted to establish an in vivo model with a state of EGF deficiency....

  7. Clinical Studies on conformal radiotherapy combined with epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effect of conformal radiotherapy combined with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) in the second-line treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 316 patients attending Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital affiliated to Tongji University, were divided ...

  8. Assessment of the Developmental Toxicity of Epidermal Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) is involved in reproductive developmental toxicity, using the embryonic stem cell test (EST), as well as ascertain how EGF influences embryonic development. Methods: To predict developmental toxicity on the basis of reducing cell viability and inhibition of ...

  9. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. With immunohistochemistry (IHC), breast cancer is classified into four groups based on IHC profile of estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) expression, positive (+) and/or ...

  10. Gastric luminal epidermal growth factor is affected by diet | Iputo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Diet is an area of major interest to those investigating the causes of cancer of the oesophagus in the Transkei. This study looked at the associations between intragastric epidermal growth factor level, diet and intragastric pH. Setting and subjects. A dietary survey was co-ordinated with studies of gastric luminal ...

  11. Inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal naevus: Report of three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epidermal naevi are congenital harmatomas that arise from embryonal ectodermal cells. The inflammatory linear verrucous variant is rare and presents with disturbing symptoms. In blacks the classical erythema is not common but pruritus and discharge are the commonest features. Methods and results: We ...

  12. Identification of grazed grasses using epidermal characters | R ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of anatomical features of the abaxial epidermis of grasses is discussed for the identification of fragments of epidermis present in samples of rumen. The reliability of this technique, and the variation of the epidermal characters in two widely distributed species of grass, is given. A "Key" to identity certain genera of ...

  13. Improvement of arbutin trans-epidermal delivery using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the ability of radiofrequency (RF) microporation to promote trans-epidermal delivery of arbutin. Methods: To investigate the enhancing effect of RF microchannels on skin permeation of arbutin, in vitro skin permeability studies were performed with RF microporation-treated Hartley albino guinea pig skin ...

  14. The commensal microbiota drives immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claire eArrieta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, microbes have coexisted with eukaryotic cells at the mucosal surfaces of vertebrates in a complex, yet usually harmonious symbiosis. An ever-expanding number of reports describe how eliminating or shifting the intestinal microbiota has profound effects on the development and functionality of the mucosal and systemic immune systems. Here, we examine some of the mechanisms by which bacterial signals affect immune homeostasis. Focusing on the strategies that microbes use to keep our immune system healthy, as opposed to trying to correct the immune imbalances caused by dysbiosis, may prove to be a more astute and efficient way of treating immune-mediated disease.

  15. Diuretics and disorders of calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieff, Marvin; Bushinsky, David A

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics commonly are administered in disorders of sodium balance. Loop diuretics inhibit the Na-K-2Cl transporter and also increase calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of hypercalcemia. Thiazide diuretics block the thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, and can decrease calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease bicarbonate absorption and the resultant metabolic acidosis can increase calcium excretion. Their use can promote nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. This review will address the use of diuretics on disorders of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Epicutaneous aeroallergen sensitization in atopic dermatitis infants - determining the role of epidermal barrier impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boralevi, F; Hubiche, T; Léauté-Labrèze, C; Saubusse, E; Fayon, M; Roul, S; Maurice-Tison, S; Taïeb, A

    2008-02-01

    Sensitization to atopens is an early phenomenon that overlaps with the onset of atopic dermatitis (AD) in infancy. Early epidermal barrier impairment may facilitate the epicutaneous penetration of atopens. To correlate transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and aeroallergen sensitization in infants with AD. In this cross-sectional study we enrolled 59 AD children and 30 controls aged 3-12 months. Transepidermal water loss in uninvolved skin, specific immunoglobulin E, atopy patch test (APT) and skin prick tests were performed with respect to seven aeroallergens, i.e., Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, cat, dog, birch pollen, ambrosia, and cockroach. Environmental conditions were assessed by a questionnaire, and the house dust mite (HDM) concentration was determined in dust samples. Eighty-nine percent of AD infants had a positive APT vs one out of eleven controls. AD infants had a significantly higher mean TEWL than controls (27.4 vs 11.1 g/m(2)/h, P cats, and dogs at home. This study confirms the high prevalence of delayed sensitization to indoor and outdoor aeroallergens in AD infants, and shows that the higher the TEWL, the higher the prevalence of sensitization to aeroallergens. These data are in favor of a major role of a constitutive epidermal barrier impairment in determining early atopen sensitization in infants with AD.

  17. Macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Calum C; Mowat, Allan McI

    2014-01-01

    The intestine contains the largest pool of macrophages in the body which are essential for maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the face of the microbiota and the constant need for epithelial renewal but are also important components of protective immunity and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, defining the biological roles of intestinal macrophages has been impeded by problems in defining the phenotype and origins of different populations of myeloid cells in the mucosa. Here, we discuss how multiple parameters can be used in combination to discriminate between functionally distinct myeloid cells and discuss the roles of macrophages during homeostasis and how these may change when inflammation ensues. We also discuss the evidence that intestinal macrophages do not fit the current paradigm that tissue-resident macrophages are derived from embryonic precursors that self-renew in situ, but require constant replenishment by blood monocytes. We describe our recent work demonstrating that classical monocytes constantly enter the intestinal mucosa and how the environment dictates their subsequent fate. We believe that understanding the factors that drive intestinal macrophage development in the steady state and how these may change in response to pathogens or inflammation could provide important insights into the treatment of IBD. PMID:24942685

  18. Innate immunity orchestrates adipose tissue homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Wei; Wei, Li-Na

    2017-06-23

    Obesity is strongly associated with multiple diseases including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, fatty liver disease, neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, etc. Adipose tissue (AT), mainly brown AT (BAT) and white AT (WAT), is an important metabolic and endocrine organ that maintains whole-body homeostasis. BAT contributes to non-shivering thermogenesis in a cold environment; WAT stores energy and produces adipokines that fine-tune metabolic and inflammatory responses. Obesity is often characterized by over-expansion and inflammation of WAT where inflammatory cells/mediators are abundant, especially pro-inflammatory (M1) macrophages, resulting in chronic low-grade inflammation and leading to insulin resistance and metabolic complications. Macrophages constitute the major component of innate immunity and can be activated as a M1 or M2 (anti-inflammatory) phenotype in response to environmental stimuli. Polarized M1 macrophage causes AT inflammation, whereas polarized M2 macrophage promotes WAT remodeling into the BAT phenotype, also known as WAT browning/beiging, which enhances insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. This review will discuss the regulation of AT homeostasis in relation to innate immunity.

  19. Air pollution particles and iron homeostasis | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The mechanism underlying biological effects of particles deposited in the lung has not been defined. Major Conclusions: A disruption in iron homeostasis follows exposure of cells to all particulate matter including air pollution particles. Following endocytosis, functional groups at the surface of retained particle complex iron available in the cell. In response to a reduction in concentrations of requisite iron, a functional deficiency can result intracellularly. Superoxide production by the cell exposed to a particle increases ferrireduction which facilitates import of iron with the objective being the reversal of the metal deficiency. Failure to resolve the functional iron deficiency following cell exposure to particles activates kinases and transcription factors resulting in a release of inflammatory mediators and inflammation. Tissue injury is the end product of this disruption in iron homeostasis initiated by the particle exposure. Elevation of available iron to the cell precludes deficiency of the metal and either diminishes or eliminates biological effects.General Significance: Recognition of the pathway for biological effects after particle exposure to involve a functional deficiency of iron suggests novel therapies such as metal supplementation (e.g. inhaled and oral). In addition, the demonstration of a shared mechanism of biological effects allows understanding the common clinical, physiological, and pathological presentation fol

  20. CART in the Regulation of Appetite and Energy Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie eLau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART has been the subject of significant interest for over a decade. Work to decipher the detailed mechanism of CART function has been hampered by the lack of specific pharmacological tools like antagonists and the absence of a specific CART receptor(s. However, extensive research has been devoted to elucidate the role of the CART peptide and it is now evident that CART is a key neurotransmitter and hormone involved in the regulation of diverse biological processes, including food intake, maintenance of body weight, reward and addiction, stress response, psychostimulant effects and endocrine functions1,2. In this review, we focus on knowledge gained on CART’s role in controlling appetite and energy homeostasis, and also address certain species differences between rodents and humans.

  1. Delineating the regulation of energy homeostasis using hypothalamic cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellhauser, Leigh; Gojska, Nicole M; Belsham, Denise D

    2015-01-01

    Attesting to its intimate peripheral connections, hypothalamic neurons integrate nutritional and hormonal cues to effectively manage energy homeostasis according to the overall status of the system. Extensive progress in the identification of essential transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms regulating the controlled expression and actions of hypothalamic neuropeptides has been identified through the use of animal and cell models. This review will introduce the basic techniques of hypothalamic investigation both in vivo and in vitro and will briefly highlight the key advantages and challenges of their use. Further emphasis will be place on the use of immortalized models of hypothalamic neurons for in vitro study of feeding regulation, with a particular focus on cell lines proving themselves most fruitful in deciphering fundamental basics of NPY/AgRP, Proglucagon, and POMC neuropeptide function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe, Gabi; Fotiadou, Elisavet H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range. PMID:23365787

  3. TSH and Thyrotropic Agonists: Key Actors in Thyroid Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes W. Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the reader with an overview of our current knowledge of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid feedback from a cybernetic standpoint. Over the past decades we have gained a plethora of information from biochemical, clinical, and epidemiological investigation, especially on the role of TSH and other thyrotropic agonists as critical components of this complex relationship. Integrating these data into a systems perspective delivers new insights into static and dynamic behaviour of thyroid homeostasis. Explicit usage of this information with mathematical methods promises to deliver a better understanding of thyrotropic feedback control and new options for personalised diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and targeted therapy, also by permitting a new perspective on the conundrum of the TSH reference range.

  4. Yorkie regulates epidermal wound healing in Drosophila larvae independently of cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chang-Ru; Anderson, Aimee E; Burra, Sirisha; Jo, Juyeon; Galko, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Yorkie (Yki), the transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo signaling pathway, has well-characterized roles in balancing apoptosis and cell division during organ growth control. Yki is also required in diverse tissue regenerative contexts. In most cases this requirement reflects its well-characterized roles in balancing apoptosis and cell division. Whether Yki has repair functions outside of the control of cell proliferation, death, and growth is not clear. Here we show that Yki and Scalloped (Sd) are required for epidermal wound closure in the Drosophila larval epidermis. Using a GFP-tagged Yki transgene we show that Yki transiently translocates to some epidermal nuclei upon wounding. Genetic analysis strongly suggests that Yki interacts with the known wound healing pathway, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not with Platelet Derived Growth Factor/Vascular-Endothelial Growth Factor receptor (Pvr). Yki likely acts downstream of or parallel to JNK signaling and does not appear to regulate either proliferation or apoptosis in the larval epidermis during wound repair. Analysis of actin structures after wounding suggests that Yki and Sd promote wound closure through actin regulation. In sum, we found that Yki regulates an epithelial tissue repair process independently of its previously documented roles in balancing proliferation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing the in vivo impact of a gel sanitizer on the epidermal "barrier" dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Disease prevention and control depend on hand washing, in particular during epidemic surges (e.g. flu. The use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers is strongly recommended due to its high germicide effectiveness. However, its impact on skin physiology, especially on the barrier function, has not been determined, although most of the formulations include different humectants. This study evaluates the impact of a commercially available formulation on in vivo epidermal barrier dynamics. 13 young adult subjects (21.6 ± 2.6 years old were selected after informed consent. Subjects were asked to apply a commercially available alcohol gel sanitizer to one hand for 15 days. TEWL absolute values were measured on days 1, 8 and 15 and a plastic occlusion stress test (POST applied. Evaporation half-life (t1/2 evap and dynamic water mass (DWM values increased significantly on day 15 on the treated hand compared to the control hand suggesting that, in the present experimental conditions, the regular use of an alcohol-based gel sanitizer does changes the epidermal barrier. This study also confirms the usefulness of this kinetic model to detect subtle changes on in vivo TEWL dynamics.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Homeostasis as Regulators of Stem Cell Fate and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Darren Q; Suda, Toshio

    2018-07-10

    The precise role and impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stem cells, which are essential for lifelong tissue homeostasis and regeneration, remain of significant interest to the field. The long-term regenerative potential of a stem cell compartment is determined by the delicate balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, all of which can be influenced by ROS levels. Recent Advances: The past decade has seen a growing appreciation for the importance of ROS and redox homeostasis in various stem cell compartments, particularly those of hematopoietic, neural, and muscle tissues. In recent years, the importance of proteostasis and mitochondria in relation to stem cell biology and redox homeostasis has garnered considerable interest. Here, we explore the reciprocal relationship between ROS and stem cells, with significant emphasis on mitochondria as a core component of redox homeostasis. We discuss how redox signaling, involving cell-fate determining protein kinases and transcription factors, can control stem cell function and fate. We also address the impact of oxidative stress on stem cells, especially oxidative damage of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. We further discuss ROS management in stem cells, and present recent evidence supporting the importance of mitochondrial activity and its modulation (via mitochondrial clearance, biogenesis, dynamics, and distribution [i.e., segregation and transfer]) in stem cell redox homeostasis. Therefore, elucidating the intricate links between mitochondria, cellular metabolism, and redox homeostasis is envisioned to be critical for our understanding of ROS in stem cell biology and its therapeutic relevance in regenerative medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  7. Enteric Virome Sensing-Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Rebecca N; Krug, Anne B; Eisenächer, Katharina

    2018-03-23

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  8. Bim: guardian of tissue homeostasis and critical regulator of the immune system, tumorigenesis and bone biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Toru; Tanaka, Sakae

    2011-08-01

    One of the most important roles of apoptosis is the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Impairment of apoptosis leads to a number of pathological conditions. In response to apoptotic signals, various proteins are activated in a pathway and signal-specific manner. Recently, the pro-apoptotic molecule Bim has attracted increasing attention as a pivotal regulator of tissue homeostasis. The Bim expression level is strictly controlled in both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. This control is dependent on cell, tissue and apoptotic stimuli. The phenotype of Bim-deficient mice is a systemic lupus erythematosus-like autoimmune disease with an abnormal accumulation of hematopoietic cells. Bim is thus a critical regulator of hematopoietic cells and immune system. Further studies have revealed the critical roles of Bim in various normal and pathological conditions, including bone homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The current understanding of Bim signaling and roles in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis is reviewed in this paper, focusing on the immune system, bone biology and tumorigenesis to illustrate the diversified role of Bim.

  9. CREBH Maintains Circadian Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating Hepatic Glycogenolysis and Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunbae; Zheng, Ze; Walker, Paul D; Kapatos, Gregory; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-07-15

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a liver-enriched, endoplasmic reticulum-tethered transcription factor known to regulate the hepatic acute-phase response and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrate that CREBH functions as a circadian transcriptional regulator that plays major roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. The proteolytic cleavage and posttranslational acetylation modification of CREBH are regulated by the circadian clock. Functionally, CREBH is required in order to maintain circadian homeostasis of hepatic glycogen storage and blood glucose levels. CREBH regulates the rhythmic expression of the genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, including liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1), and the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC). CREBH interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) to synergize its transcriptional activities in hepatic gluconeogenesis. The acetylation of CREBH at lysine residue 294 controls CREBH-PPARα interaction and synergy in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. CREBH deficiency leads to reduced blood glucose levels but increases hepatic glycogen levels during the daytime or upon fasting. In summary, our studies revealed that CREBH functions as a key metabolic regulator that controls glucose homeostasis across the circadian cycle or under metabolic stress. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Enteric Virome Sensing—Its Role in Intestinal Homeostasis and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca N. Metzger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs sensing commensal microorganisms in the intestine induce tightly controlled tonic signaling in the intestinal mucosa, which is required to maintain intestinal barrier integrity and immune homeostasis. At the same time, PRR signaling pathways rapidly trigger the innate immune defense against invasive pathogens in the intestine. Intestinal epithelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the intestine and the gut-associated lymphoid tissues are critically involved in sensing components of the microbiome and regulating immune responses in the intestine to sustain immune tolerance against harmless antigens and to prevent inflammation. These processes have been mostly investigated in the context of the bacterial components of the microbiome so far. The impact of viruses residing in the intestine and the virus sensors, which are activated by these enteric viruses, on intestinal homeostasis and inflammation is just beginning to be unraveled. In this review, we will summarize recent findings indicating an important role of the enteric virome for intestinal homeostasis as well as pathology when the immune system fails to control the enteric virome. We will provide an overview of the virus sensors and signaling pathways, operative in the intestine and the mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which can sense viruses and shape the intestinal immune response. We will discuss how these might interact with resident enteric viruses directly or in context with the bacterial microbiome to affect intestinal homeostasis.

  11. Preoperative octreotide therapy and surgery in acromegaly: associations between glucose homeostasis and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helseth, R; Carlsen, S M; Bollerslev, J; Svartberg, J; Øksnes, M; Skeie, S; Fougner, S L

    2016-02-01

    In acromegaly, high GH/IGF-1 levels associate with abnormal glucose metabolism. Somatostatin analogs (SSAs) reduce GH and IGF-1 but inhibit insulin secretion. We studied glucose homeostasis in de novo patients with acromegaly and changes in glucose metabolism after treatment with SSA and surgery. In this post hoc analysis from a randomized controlled trial, 55 de novo patients with acromegaly, not using antidiabetic medication, were included. Before surgery, 26 patients received SSAs for 6 months. HbA1c, fasting glucose, and oral glucose tolerance test were performed at baseline, after SSA pretreatment and at 3 months postoperative. Area under curve of glucose (AUC-G) was calculated. Glucose homeostasis was compared to baseline levels of GH and IGF-1, change after SSA pretreatment, and remission both after SSA pretreatment and 3 months postoperative. In de novo patients, IGF-1/GH levels did not associate with baseline glucose parameters. After SSA pretreatment, changes in GH/IGF-1 correlated positively to change in HbA1c levels (both p acromegaly, disease activity did not correlate with glucose homeostasis. Surgical treatment of acromegaly improved glucose metabolism in both cured and not cured patients, while SSA pretreatment led to deterioration in glucose homeostasis in patients not achieving biochemical control.

  12. Serotonin 2C receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Eric D; Liu, Chen; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Liu, Tiemin; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Charlotte E; Vianna, Claudia R; Williams, Kevin W; Xu, Yong; Elmquist, Joel K

    2013-12-01

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor agonists on energy and glucose homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking serotonin 2C receptors (Htr2c) specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons had normal body weight but developed glucoregulatory defects including hyperinsulinemia, hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Moreover, these mice did not show anorectic responses to serotonergic agents that suppress appetite and developed hyperphagia and obesity when they were fed a high-fat/high-sugar diet. A requirement of serotonin 2C receptors in POMC neurons for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis was further demonstrated when Htr2c loss was induced in POMC neurons in adult mice using a tamoxifen-inducible POMC-cre system. These data demonstrate that serotonin 2C receptor-expressing POMC neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis and implicate POMC neurons as the target for the effect of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on weight-loss induction and improved glycemic control.

  13. TAM Receptor Signaling in Immune Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothlin, Carla V.; Carrera-Silva, Eugenio A.; Bosurgi, Lidia; Ghosh, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs)—TYRO3, AXL, and MERTK—together with their cognate agonists GAS6 and PROS1 play an essential role in the resolution of inflammation. Deficiencies in TAM signaling have been associated with chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Three processes regulated by TAM signaling may contribute, either independently or collectively, to immune homeostasis: the negative regulation of the innate immune response, the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the restoration of vascular integrity. Recent studies have also revealed the function of TAMs in infectious diseases and cancer. Here, we review the important milestones in the discovery of these RTKs and their ligands and the studies that underscore the functional importance of this signaling pathway in physiological immune settings and disease. PMID:25594431

  14. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Interference between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, A N; Catty, P; Charbonnier, P; Cuillel, M; Mintz, E; Moulis, J M; Niviere, V; Choudens, S Ollagnier de; Garcia, C Aude; Candeias, S; Chevallet, M; Collin-Faure, V; Lelong, C; Luche, S; Rabilloud, T; Casanova, A; Herlin-Boime, N; Douki, T; Ravanat, J L; Sauvaigo, S

    2011-01-01

    The TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) are now produced abundantly and widely used in a variety of consumer products. Due to the important increase in the production of TiO 2 -NPs, potential widespread exposure of humans and environment may occur during both the manufacturing process and final use. Therefore, the potential toxicity of TiO 2 -NPs on human health and environment has attracted particular attention. Unfortunately, the results of the large number of studies on the toxicity of TiO 2 -NPs differ significantly, mainly due to an incomplete characterization of the used nanomaterials in terms of size, shape and crystalline structure and to their unknown state of agglomeration/aggregation. The purpose of our project entitled NanoBioMet is to investigate if interferences between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis could be observed and to study the toxicity mechanisms of TiO 2 -NPs with well-characterized physicochemical parameters, using proteomic and molecular approaches. A perturbation of metal homeostasis will be evaluated upon TiO 2 -NPs exposure which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, oxidative stress consequences such as DNA damage and lipid peroxidation will be studied. The toxicity of TiO 2 -NPs of different sizes and crystalline structures will be evaluated both in prokaryotic (E. coli) and eukaryotic cells (A549 human pneumocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes). First results of the project will be presented concerning the dispersion of TiO 2 -NPs in bacterial medium, proteomic studies on total extracts of macrophages and genotoxicity on pneumocytes.

  16. The epidermal biosynthesis of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beadle, P.C.

    1977-01-01

    An attempt has been made to calculate the rate of ultraviolet absorption by 7-dehydrocholesterol, provitamin D 3 , in the epidermis as a function of latitude, season and skin type, in the hope that it will provide an upper-limit estimate of the epidermal vitamin production. The results indicate that a significant fraction of the total epidermal production may occur in the stratum corneum with figures of 15 and 31% being found for non-pigmented and pigmented epidermises, respectively. Total production in negroid epidermis is predicted to be about 40% of that in the caucasian one and the latitudinal variation is greater than the seasonal variation, in agreement with the behaviour of the available solar ultraviolet. Overall production rates were sufficiently high for it to be unnecessary to invoke an enhanced absorption mechanism for the provitamin, although the results do indicate that there may be a risk of deficient production above about 40 0 N. (author)

  17. Steroid hormone and epidermal growth factor receptors in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, D J; Goldsmith, K G; Ricciardelli, C; Skinner, J M; Tilley, W D; Marshall, V R

    1989-11-01

    A prospective study of steroid hormone and epidermal growth factor receptor expression in 57 meningiomas is presented. Scatchard analysis of radioligand binding identified 20% of meningiomas as expressing classical oestrogen receptors (ER) at levels below that normally accepted for positivity, the remainder being negative. ER could not be visualized in any meningioma using immunocytochemistry. Alternatively, 74% of meningiomas demonstrated the presence of progesterone receptors (PR) by Scatchard analysis, the specificity of which could not be attributed to glucocorticoid or androgen receptors. Confirmation of classical PR presence was determined by immunocytochemical staining. The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was demonstrated in 100% of meningiomas using immunocytochemical staining. These data are reviewed in the context of previously reported results and are discussed in relation to the potential for medical therapy as an adjunct to surgery.

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of epidermal growth factor in rat and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide which stimulates cell mitotic activity and differentiation, has a cytoprotective effect on the gastroduodenal mucosa, and inhibits gastric acid secretion. The immunohistochemical localization of EGF in the Brunner's glands and the submandibular glands is...... antisera against human urinary EGF worked in rat as well as man. EGF was found only in cells with an exocrine function.......Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide which stimulates cell mitotic activity and differentiation, has a cytoprotective effect on the gastroduodenal mucosa, and inhibits gastric acid secretion. The immunohistochemical localization of EGF in the Brunner's glands and the submandibular glands...... is well documented. The localization of EGF in other tissues is still unclarified. In the present study, the immunohistochemical localization of EGF in tissues from rat, man and a 20 week human fetus were investigated. In man and rat, immunoreaction was found in the submandibular glands, the serous glands...

  19. Expression of PML tumor suppressor in A 431 cells reduces cellular growth by inhibiting the epidermal growth factor receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallian, S.; Chang, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the promyelocytic leukemia, PML, protein functions as a cellular and growth suppressor. Transient expression of PML was also found to repress the activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene promoter. In this study we have examined the effects of PML on A431 cells, which express a high level of + protein. The PML gene was introduced into the cells using the adenovirus-mediated gene transfer system. Western blot analysis on the extracts from the cells expressing PML showed a significant repression in the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor protein. The cells were examined for growth and DNA synthesis. The data showed a marked reduction in both growth and DNA synthesis rate in the cells expressing PML compared with the control cells. Furthermore, in comparison with the controls, the cells expressing PML were found to be more in G1 phase, fewer in S and about the same number in the G2/M phase. This data clearly demonstrated that the repression of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in A 431 cells by PML was associated with inhibition of cell growth and alteration of the cell cycle distribution, suggesting a novel mechanism for the known growth inhibitory effects of PML

  20. Grafting of human epidermal cells, presence and perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smetana, Karel; Dvořánková, B.; Labský, Jiří; Vacík, Jiří; Holíková, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 1 (2001), s. 1-6 ISSN 0036-5327 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/00/1310; GA AV ČR IBS4050005; GA MZd ND6340; GA MŠk LN00A065; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : cell therapy-keratinocyte-epidermal stem cell * skin defect Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  1. Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near-field communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghyun; Banks, Anthony; Cheng, Huanyu; Xie, Zhaoqian; Xu, Sheng; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Liu, Zhuangjian; Gutruf, Philipp; Huang, Xian; Wei, Pinghung; Liu, Fei; Li, Kan; Dalal, Mitul; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang; Gupta, Sanjay; Paik, Ungyu; Rogers, John A

    2015-02-25

    Epidermal electronics with advanced capabilities in near field communications (NFC) are presented. The systems include stretchable coils and thinned NFC chips on thin, low modulus stretchable adhesives, to allow seamless, conformal contact with the skin and simultaneous capabilities for wireless interfaces to any standard, NFC-enabled smartphone, even under extreme deformation and after/during normal daily activities. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Expression and analysis of exogenous proteins in epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnino, Lina; Ho, Ernest; Chang, Wing Y

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we review protocols for transient transfection of primary keratinocytes. The ability to transfect primary epidermal cells regardless of their differentiation status allows the biochemical and molecular characterization of multiple proteins. We review methods to analyze exogenous protein abundance in transfected keratinocytes by immunoblot and immunoprecipitation. We also present protocols to determine the subcellular distribution of these proteins by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy approaches.

  3. A review of toxic epidermal necrolysis management in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kinoshita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a severe adverse drug reaction characterized by necrosis of the epidermis. Its incidence is approximately 1 per million a year and average mortality rate is high at 25–50%. TEN has a flu-like prodrome, followed by atypical, targetoid erythematous or purpuric macules on the skin. These macules coalesce to form flaccid blisters that slough off as areas of epidermal necrosis. Drugs such as allopurinol, sulfonamides, and carbamazepine are the most common causes. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B*15:02 in Asians being administered carbamazepine and the HLA-B*58:01 antigen in patients of all ethnicities being administered allopurinol are known to be high-risk factors. Rapid diagnosis, discontinuation of the causative drug, and supportive treatment are essential for better prognosis and improvement of sequelae. Till now, systemic corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins have been used as the most common active interventions; however, no gold standard has been established. In Japan, physicians follow a unique diagnostic criteria and treatment guideline to improve the diagnosis rate and streamline treatments. This may be a contributing factor for the lower mortality rate (14.3%. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroids, immunoglobulins, and plasmapheresis may have been beneficial as well. In Japan, TEN is defined as an epidermal detachment of over 10% of the body surface area (BSA, while the globally accepted definition established by Bastuji-Garin describes it as an epidermal detachment of over 30% of the BSA. In Japanese individuals, HLA-A*02:06, HLA-A*02:07, HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*51:01 may be linked to higher risks of TEN.

  4. "Cut-and-Paste" Manufacture of Multiparametric Epidermal Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shixuan; Chen, Ying-Chen; Nicolini, Luke; Pasupathy, Praveenkumar; Sacks, Jacob; Su, Becky; Yang, Russell; Sanchez, Daniel; Chang, Yao-Feng; Wang, Pulin; Schnyer, David; Neikirk, Dean; Lu, Nanshu

    2015-11-04

    Multifunctional epidermal sensor systems (ESS) are manufactured with a highly cost and time effective, benchtop, and large-area "cut-and-paste" method. The ESS made out of thin and stretchable metal and conductive polymer ribbons can be noninvasively laminated onto the skin surface to sense electrophysiological signals, skin temperature, skin hydration, and respiratory rate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Epidermal growth in the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, B.D.; St Aubin, D.J.; Geraci, J.R.; Brown, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Epidermal growth in two mature female bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, was investigated by following the movement of a cohort of tritiated thymidine-labeled epidermal cells for 59 days. The majority of the cells migrated in a cluster which was estimated to reach the skin surface in 73 days. The authors calculate that the outermost cell layer is sloughed 12 times per day. Turnover time and sloughing rate are estimated to be 1.7 times longer and 8.5 times faster than the respective values for epidermal cell kinetics in humans. This apparent inconsistency of slow transit time and rapid sloughing rate is reconciled by the convoluted structure of the stratum germinativum in the dolphin which results in a ratio of germinatival to superficial cells of 876:1. The stratum germinativum of dolphin epidermis appears to lack morphologically distinct, spatially segregated subpopulations of anchoring and stem cells. Dolphin epidermis has a large capacity for cell population, relatively long turnover time, and rapid sloughing rate. The adaptive advantages of these characteristics are discussed

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayalu S.L. Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the expression pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in urinary bladder cancer and its association with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, epidermal growth factor (EGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and high risk human papilloma virus (HPV types 16 and 18. Materials and Methods : Thirty cases of urothelial carcinoma were analyzed. EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 expressions in the tissue were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. For HPV, DNA from tissue samples was extracted and detection of HPV was done by PCR technique. Furthermore, evaluation of different intracellular molecules associated with EGFR signaling pathways was performed by the western blot method using lysates from various cells and tissues. Results : In this study, the frequencies of immunopositivity for EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 were 23%, 60%, 47%, and 80%, respectively. No cases were positive for HPV-18, whereas HPV-16 was detected in 10% cases. Overall, expression of EGFR did not show any statistically significant association with the studied parameters. However, among male patients, a significant association was found only between EGFR and HER2. Conclusions : Overexpression of EGFR and/or HER2, two important members of the same family of growth factor receptors, was observed in a considerable proportion of cases. Precise knowledge in this subject would be helpful to formulate a rational treatment strategy in patients with urinary bladder cancer.

  7. Epidermal growth in the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, B.D.; St. Aubin, D.J.; Geraci, J.R.; Brown, W.R.

    1985-07-01

    Epidermal growth in two mature female bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, was investigated by following the movement of a cohort of tritiated thymidine-labeled epidermal cells for 59 days. The majority of the cells migrated in a cluster which was estimated to reach the skin surface in 73 days. The authors calculate that the outermost cell layer is sloughed 12 times per day. Turnover time and sloughing rate are estimated to be 1.7 times longer and 8.5 times faster than the respective values for epidermal cell kinetics in humans. This apparent inconsistency of slow transit time and rapid sloughing rate is reconciled by the convoluted structure of the stratum germinativum in the dolphin which results in a ratio of germinatival to superficial cells of 876:1. The stratum germinativum of dolphin epidermis appears to lack morphologically distinct, spatially segregated subpopulations of anchoring and stem cells. Dolphin epidermis has a large capacity for cell population, relatively long turnover time, and rapid sloughing rate. The adaptive advantages of these characteristics are discussed.

  8. Optimal allocation of leaf epidermal area for gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Hugo J; Price, Charles A; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Dekker, Stefan C; Franks, Peter J; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2016-06-01

    A long-standing research focus in phytology has been to understand how plants allocate leaf epidermal space to stomata in order to achieve an economic balance between the plant's carbon needs and water use. Here, we present a quantitative theoretical framework to predict allometric relationships between morphological stomatal traits in relation to leaf gas exchange and the required allocation of epidermal area to stomata. Our theoretical framework was derived from first principles of diffusion and geometry based on the hypothesis that selection for higher anatomical maximum stomatal conductance (gsmax ) involves a trade-off to minimize the fraction of the epidermis that is allocated to stomata. Predicted allometric relationships between stomatal traits were tested with a comprehensive compilation of published and unpublished data on 1057 species from all major clades. In support of our theoretical framework, stomatal traits of this phylogenetically diverse sample reflect spatially optimal allometry that minimizes investment in the allocation of epidermal area when plants evolve towards higher gsmax . Our results specifically highlight that the stomatal morphology of angiosperms evolved along spatially optimal allometric relationships. We propose that the resulting wide range of viable stomatal trait combinations equips angiosperms with developmental and evolutionary flexibility in leaf gas exchange unrivalled by gymnosperms and pteridophytes. © 2016 The Authors New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Impaired striatal Akt signaling disrupts dopamine homeostasis and increases feeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Speed

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address "food-abuse" disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT. Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake.We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia.Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie "food-abuse" disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular model, thus, explains how even short-term exposure to "the fast food

  10. Vitamin D signaling in intestinal innate immunity and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Vassil; White, John H

    2017-09-15

    The lumen of the gut hosts a plethora of microorganisms that participate in food assimilation, inactivation of harmful particles and in vitamin synthesis. On the other hand, enteric flora, a number of food antigens, and toxins are capable of triggering immune responses causing inflammation, which, when unresolved, may lead to chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is important, therefore, to contain the gut bacteria within the lumen, control microbial load and composition, as well as ensure adequate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic threats. There is growing evidence that vitamin D signaling has impacts on all these aspects of intestinal physiology, contributing to healthy enteric homeostasis. VD was first discovered as the curative agent for nutritional rickets, and its classical actions are associated with calcium absorption and bone health. However, vitamin D exhibits a number of extra-skeletal effects, particularly in innate immunity. Notably, it stimulates production of pattern recognition receptors, anti-microbial peptides, and cytokines, which are at the forefront of innate immune responses. They play a role in sensing the microbiota, in preventing excessive bacterial overgrowth, and complement the actions of vitamin D signaling in enhancing intestinal barrier function. Vitamin D also favours tolerogenic rather than inflammogenic T cell differentiation and function. Compromised innate immune function and overactive adaptive immunity, as well as defective intestinal barrier function, have been associated with IBD. Importantly, observational and intervention studies support a beneficial role of vitamin D supplementation in patients with Crohn's disease, a form of IBD. This review summarizes the effects of vitamin D signaling on barrier integrity and innate and adaptive immunity in the gut, as well as on microbial load and composition. Collectively, studies to date reveal that vitamin D signaling has widespread effects

  11. Local iron homeostasis in the breast ductal carcinoma microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Oriana; Porto, Graça; Rêma, Alexandra; Faria, Fátima; Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Silva, Paula; Martins da Silva, Berta; Lopes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    While the deregulation of iron homeostasis in breast epithelial cells is acknowledged, iron-related alterations in stromal inflammatory cells from the tumor microenvironment have not been explored. Immunohistochemistry for hepcidin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1) and ferritin (FT) was performed in primary breast tissues and axillary lymph nodes in order to dissect the iron-profiles of epithelial cells, lymphocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, breast carcinoma core biopsies frozen in optimum cutting temperature (OCT) compound were subjected to imaging flow cytometry to confirm FPN1 expression in the cell types previously evaluated and determine its cellular localization. We confirm previous results by showing that breast cancer epithelial cells present an ‘iron-utilization phenotype’ with an increased expression of hepcidin and TFR1, and decreased expression of FT. On the other hand, lymphocytes and macrophages infiltrating primary tumors and from metastized lymph nodes display an ‘iron-donor’ phenotype, with increased expression of FPN1 and FT, concomitant with an activation profile reflected by a higher expression of TFR1 and hepcidin. A higher percentage of breast carcinomas, compared to control mastectomy samples, present iron accumulation in stromal inflammatory cells, suggesting that these cells may constitute an effective tissue iron reservoir. Additionally, not only the deregulated expression of iron-related proteins in epithelial cells, but also on lymphocytes and macrophages, are associated with clinicopathological markers of breast cancer poor prognosis, such as negative hormone receptor status and tumor size. The present results reinforce the importance of analyzing the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer, extending the contribution of immune cells to local iron homeostasis in the tumor microenvironment context

  12. Effects of Taurine Supplementation on Neuronal Excitability and Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem; El Hilali, Fatiha; Rotondo, Salvatore; Sidime, Francoise

    2017-01-01

    In this study we examined the role of chronic taurine supplementation on plasma glucose homeostasis and brain excitability through activation of the insulin receptor. FVB/NJ male mice were supplemented with taurine in drinking water (0.05% w/v) for 4 weeks and subjected to a glucose tolerance test (7.5 mg/kg BW) after 12 h fasting. We found that taurine-fed mice were slightly hypoglycemic prior to glucose injection and showed significantly reduced plasma glucose at 30 and 60 min post-glucose injection when compared to control mice. Previously, we reported that taurine supplementation induces biochemical changes that target the GABAergic system. Those studies show that taurine-fed mice are hyperexcitable, have reduced GABA A receptors expression and increased GAD and somatostatin expression in the brain. In this study, we found that taurine-fed mice had a significant increase in insulin receptor (IR) immuno-reactivity in the pancreas and all brain regions examined. At the mRNA level, we found that the IR showed differential regional expression. Surprisingly, we found that neurons express the gene for insulin and that taurine had a significant role in regulating insulin gene expression. We propose that increased insulin production and secretion in taurine-fed mice cause an increase activation of the central IR and may be partially responsible for the increased neuronal excitability observed in taurine supplemented mice. Furthermore, the high levels of neuronal insulin expression and its regulation by taurine implicates taurine in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis.

  13. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Wells, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels

  14. A Formal Explication of the Concept of Family Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Shlomo; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Presents three articles discussing the concept of family homeostasis and the related concepts of family rules and family feedback. Includes a reply by Paul Dell citing the need for family therapy to go beyond homeostasis and further comments by Ariel, Carel, and Tyano. (JAC)

  15. Development and Validation of the Homeostasis Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny L.; Price, Rebecca M.; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Martinková, Patrícia; Cliff, William; Michael, Joel; Modell, Harold; Wright, Ann

    2017-01-01

    We present the Homeostasis Concept Inventory (HCI), a 20-item multiple-choice instrument that assesses how well undergraduates understand this critical physiological concept. We used an iterative process to develop a set of questions based on elements in the Homeostasis Concept Framework. This process involved faculty experts and undergraduate…

  16. Delineating Molecular Mechanisms of Squamous Tissue Homeostasis and Neoplasia: Focus on p63

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. King

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models have informed us that p63 is critical for normal epidermal development and homeostasis. The p53/p63/p73 family is expressed as multiple protein isoforms due to a combination of alternative promoter usage and C-terminal alternative splicing. These isoforms can mimic or interfere with one another, and their balance ultimately determines biological outcome in a context-dependent manner. While not frequently mutated, p63, and in particular the ΔNp63 subclass, is commonly overexpressed in human squamous cell cancers. In vitro keratinocytes and murine transgenic and transplantation models have been invaluable in elucidating the contribution of altered p63 levels to cancer development, and studies have identified the roles for ΔNp63 isoforms in keratinocyte survival and malignant progression, likely due in part to their transcriptional regulatory function. These findings can be extended to human cancers; for example, the novel recognition of NFκB/c-Rel as a downstream effector of p63 has identified a role for NFκB/c-Rel in human squamous cell cancers. These models will be critical in enhancing the understanding of the specific molecular mechanisms of cancer development and progression.

  17. A conceptual framework for homeostasis: development and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Michael, Joel; Cliff, William; Wright, Ann; Modell, Harold

    2016-01-01

    We have developed and validated a conceptual framework for understanding and teaching organismal homeostasis at the undergraduate level. The resulting homeostasis conceptual framework details critical components and constituent ideas underlying the concept of homeostasis. It has been validated by a broad range of physiology faculty members from community colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, research universities, and medical schools. In online surveys, faculty members confirmed the relevance of each item in the framework for undergraduate physiology and rated the importance and difficulty of each. The homeostasis conceptual framework was constructed as a guide for teaching and learning of this critical core concept in physiology, and it also paves the way for the development of a concept inventory for homeostasis. PMID:27105740

  18. A conceptual framework for homeostasis: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Michael, Joel; Cliff, William; Wright, Ann; Modell, Harold

    2016-06-01

    We have developed and validated a conceptual framework for understanding and teaching organismal homeostasis at the undergraduate level. The resulting homeostasis conceptual framework details critical components and constituent ideas underlying the concept of homeostasis. It has been validated by a broad range of physiology faculty members from community colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, research universities, and medical schools. In online surveys, faculty members confirmed the relevance of each item in the framework for undergraduate physiology and rated the importance and difficulty of each. The homeostasis conceptual framework was constructed as a guide for teaching and learning of this critical core concept in physiology, and it also paves the way for the development of a concept inventory for homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  19. A new vesicle trafficking regulator CTL1 plays a crucial role in ion homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi-Qun; Chen, Jiu-Geng; Chen, Zi-Ru; An, Dong; Lv, Qiao-Yan; Han, Mei-Ling; Wang, Ya-Ling; Salt, David E; Chao, Dai-Yin

    2017-12-01

    Ion homeostasis is essential for plant growth and environmental adaptation, and maintaining ion homeostasis requires the precise regulation of various ion transporters, as well as correct root patterning. However, the mechanisms underlying these processes remain largely elusive. Here, we reported that a choline transporter gene, CTL1, controls ionome homeostasis by regulating the secretory trafficking of proteins required for plasmodesmata (PD) development, as well as the transport of some ion transporters. Map-based cloning studies revealed that CTL1 mutations alter the ion profile of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the phenotypes associated with these mutations are caused by a combination of PD defects and ion transporter misregulation. We also established that CTL1 is involved in regulating vesicle trafficking and is thus required for the trafficking of proteins essential for ion transport and PD development. Characterizing choline transporter-like 1 (CTL1) as a new regulator of protein sorting may enable researchers to understand not only ion homeostasis in plants but also vesicle trafficking in general.

  20. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  1. Association between the epidermal growth factor gene and intelligence in major depression patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wen-min; Zhang, Ke-ran; Zhang, Juan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2010-06-01

    To study the association between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene and intelligence in patients with major depression. Intelligence measurement using Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) was performed on 120 unrelated patients with major depression and 46 control subjects. Blood was collected from all subjects for extraction of genomic DNA. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the EGF gene were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI- TOF-MS). Mean scores of both score lang and score task, two subtests in WAIS, differed significantly between major depression patients and controls (Pintelligence in patients with major depression. Genetic variation in the EGF gene may increase the susceptibility of major depression.

  2. Epidermal growth factor and lung development in the offspring of the diabetic rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    2000-01-01

    Fetuses of diabetic mothers who were exposed to excessive glucose show delayed maturation. Under these conditions, altered growth factor expression or signaling may have important regulatory influences. We examined the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in lung development and maternal diabetes...... in the rat. In order to evaluate the possible role of glucose for the expression of EGF and the growth of lung tissue, we performed in vitro studies with organotypic cultures of fetal alveolar cells obtained from control rats. Compared to pups of normal rats, the newborn rats of untreated diabetic rats had...... and was associated with a reduced intensity of surfactant protein A-IR. The only difference observed between pups of treated diabetic rats and controls was a decrease in the lung weight:body weight ratio. In organotypic cultures, the presence of 13 mmol/L glucose in the cell media increased immunoreactive staining...

  3. The role of biological clock in glucose homeostasis 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Chrościcki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the biological clock is based on a rhythmic expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes. As a result of their transcripto-translational associations, endogenous rhythms in the synthesis of key proteins of various physiological and metabolic processes are created. The major timekeeping mechanism for these rhythms exists in the central nervous system. The master circadian clock, localized in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, regulates multiple metabolic pathways, while feeding behavior and metabolite availability can in turn regulate the circadian clock. It is also suggested that in the brain there is a food entrainable oscillator (FEO or oscillators, resulting in activation of both food anticipatory activity and hormone secretion that control digestion processes. Moreover, most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks. Maintenance of the glucose homeostasis is particularly important for the proper function of the body, as this sugar is the main source of energy for the brain, retina, erythrocytes and skeletal muscles. Thus, glucose production and utilization are synchronized in time. The hypothalamic excited orexin neurons control energy balance of organism and modulate the glucose production and utilization. Deficiency of orexin action results in narcolepsy and weight gain, whereas glucose and amino acids can affect activity of the orexin cells. Large-scale genetic studies in rodents and humans provide evidence for the involvement of disrupted clock gene expression rhythms in the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In general, the current lifestyle of the developed modern societies disturbs the action of biological clock. 

  4. Regulation of T Cell Homeostasis and Responses by Pten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan H. Newton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The generation of lipid products catalyzed by PI3K is critical for normal T cell homeostasis and a productive immune response. PI3K can be activated in response to antigen receptor, costimulatory, cytokine and chemokine signals. Moreover, dysregulation of this pathway frequently occurs in T cell lymphomas and is implicated in lymphoproliferative autoimmune disease. Akt acts as a central mediator of PI3K signals, downstream of which is the mTOR pathway, controlling cell growth and metabolism. Members of the Foxo family of transcription factors are also regulated by Akt, thus linking control over homing and migration of T cells, as well cell cycle entry, apoptosis, and DNA damage and oxidative stress responses, to PI3K signaling. PTEN, first identified as a tumor suppressor gene, encodes a lipid phosphatase that, by catalyzing the reverse of the PI3K reaction, directly opposes PI3K signaling. However, PTEN may have other functions as well, and recent reports have suggested roles for PTEN as a tumor suppressor independent of its effects on PI3K signaling. Through the use of models in which Pten is deleted specifically in T cells, it is becoming increasingly clear that control over autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis by PTEN involves multi-faceted functions of this molecule at multiple stages of T cell development.

  5. UVB radiation generates sunburn pain and affects skin by activating epidermal TRPV4 ion channels and triggering endothelin-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carlene; Cevikbas, Ferda; Pasolli, H Amalia; Chen, Yong; Kong, Wei; Kempkes, Cordula; Parekh, Puja; Lee, Suk Hee; Kontchou, Nelly-Ange; Yeh, Iwei; Ye, Iwei; Jokerst, Nan Marie; Fuchs, Elaine; Steinhoff, Martin; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2013-08-20

    At our body surface, the epidermis absorbs UV radiation. UV overexposure leads to sunburn with tissue injury and pain. To understand how, we focus on TRPV4, a nonselective cation channel highly expressed in epithelial skin cells and known to function in sensory transduction, a property shared with other transient receptor potential channels. We show that following UVB exposure mice with induced Trpv4 deletions, specifically in keratinocytes, are less sensitive to noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli than control animals. Exploring the mechanism, we find that epidermal TRPV4 orchestrates UVB-evoked skin tissue damage and increased expression of the proalgesic/algogenic mediator endothelin-1. In culture, UVB causes a direct, TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) response in keratinocytes. In mice, topical treatment with a TRPV4-selective inhibitor decreases UVB-evoked pain behavior, epidermal tissue damage, and endothelin-1 expression. In humans, sunburn enhances epidermal expression of TRPV4 and endothelin-1, underscoring the potential of keratinocyte-derived TRPV4 as a therapeutic target for UVB-induced sunburn, in particular pain.

  6. In vitro transformation of primary cultures of neonatal BALB/c mouse epidermal cells with ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthaswamy, H.N.; Kripke, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Primary epidermal cultures from neonatal BALB/c mice were used to study the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet radiation in vitro. These cultures were irradiated once through a Falcon plastic dish cover with an FS40 sunlamp [ultraviolet B, lambda approximately 290 to 400 nm] for various lengths of time and maintained for 8 to 12 weeks without subculturing. During this period, most of the cells in the untreated control showed signs of morphological differentiation and eventually died. The cultures irradiated with ultraviolet B radiation also behaved in the same manner except that, in some dishes, small populations of surviving cells began to proliferate and developed into morphologically distinct foci. Seven long-term cell lines were derived from these ultraviolet-irradiated primary epidermal cell cultures. Six of these cell lines produced tumors when injected s.c. into normal and/or immunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. These tumorigenic cell lines lacked definitive characteristics of differentiated epidermal cells, but the cells possessed intermediate junctions, suggesting that they were of epithelial origin. Some of these in vitro-transformed cell lines appeared to be highly antigenic inasmuch as they grew preferentially in immunosuppressed BALB/c mice as compared to their growth in normal syngeneic recipients

  7. Examination of tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA) photoallergy using in vitro photohapten-modified Langerhans cell-enriched epidermal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerberick, G.F.; Ryan, C.A.; Von Bargen, E.C.; Stuard, S.B.; Ridder, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    Lymphocytes from BALB/c mice photosensitized in vivo to tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA) were investigated to determine whether they could be stimulated to proliferate when cultured with Langerhans cell-enriched cultured epidermal cells (LC-EC) photohapten-modified in vitro with TCSA + UVA radiation. Cultured LC-EC were photohapten-modified in vitro by irradiation in TCSA-containing medium using a 1000-watt solar simulator equipped with filters to deliver primarily UVA radiation (320-400 nm). Lymphocytes from TCSA-photosensitized mice were incubated with LC-EC that had been treated in vitro with 0.1 mM TCSA and 2 J/cm2 UVA radiation (TCSA + UVA). Responder lymphocytes demonstrated a significant increase in their blastogenesis response compared to lymphocytes that were incubated with LC-EC irradiated with UVA prior to treatment with TCSA (UVA/TCSA) or with LC-EC that had received no treatment. Lymphocytes from naive mice or mice photosensitized with musk ambrette (MA) demonstrated a significantly lower response to LC-EC modified with TCSA + UVA, indicating the specificity of the response. Maximum blastogenesis response was achieved when LC-EC were treated with 0.1 mM TCSA and a UVA radiation dose of at least 0.5 J/cm2. Epidermal cells depleted of LC by treatment with anti-Ia antibody plus complement or by an adherence procedure were unable to stimulate this blastogenesis response. Epidermal cells treated in vitro with TCSA + UVA demonstrated enhanced fluorescence compared to control cells. The fluorescence observed was not restricted to any specific epidermal cell type; however, fluorescence microscopy studies revealed that dendritic Ia-positive cells, presumably LC, were also TCSA fluorescent

  8. Epidermal hydrogen peroxide is not increased in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailaie, Mohammad Z

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that the loss of the epidermal melanocytes in vitiligo is basically due to excessive oxidative stress. Previous research work described abnormal elevation of the absolute concentration of the epidermal hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) in lesional and non-lesional skin of vitiligo. Based on this finding, our primary research objective was to use this feature as a screening marker in individuals at a great risk of developing vitiligo. Ninety-six patients of non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) of varying durations, skin phototypes, and treatment modalities (psoralen UVA-, narrow band UVB-treated) were recruited for this study. Raman spectroscopic measurements, using an external probehead, of the lesional and non-lesional skin were obtained, and the resulting spectra were analyzed using the Opus software package of the MultiRam spectrometer and the intensity of the peak at 875 cm -1 that represents the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 was calculated. Contrary to previous reports, in patients of skin phototype IV, the absolute concentrations of H 2 O 2 in non-lesional and lesional NSV of all groups were non-significantly decreased compared to normal control. In patients of NSV of skin phototype V, the decrease in the absolute concentrations of H 2 O 2 was not significant in the untreated group, and a slight non-significant increase in the NBUVB-treated group was noted. However, in the PUVA-treated group, the non-lesional skin demonstrated significant increase in the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 , whereas the lesional skin showed only a slight non-significant increase compared to normal control. In NSV patients of skin phototype VI who were previously treated with PUVA, the non-lesional skin showed a slight non-significant increase in the absolute concentration of H 2 O 2 ; however, the lesional skin showed a marked significant decrease compared to normal control and the non-lesional skin. Thereof, one can conclude that the epidermal H 2 O 2 is not

  9. Gravity and positional homeostasis of the cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nace, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of gravity upon cytoplasmic aggregates of the size present in eggs and upon cells is investigated. An expression is developed to describe the tendency of torque to rotate the egg and reorganize its constituents. This expression provides the net torque resulting from buoyancy and gravity acting upon a dumbbell-shaped cell, with heavy and light masses at either end and floating in a medium. Torques of approximately 2.5 x 10 to the -13th to 0.85 dyne-cm are found to act upon cells ranging from 6.4 microns to 31 mm (chicken egg). It is noted that cells must expend energy to maintain positional homeostasis against gravity, as demonstrated by results from Skylab 3, where tissue cultures used 58 percent more glucose on earth than in space. The implications for developmental biology, physiology, genetics, and evolution are discussed. It is argued that at the cellular and tissue levels the concept of gravity receptors may be unnecessary.

  10. Modulation of immune homeostasis by commensal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Littman, Dan R.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria form a resident community that has co-evolved with the mammalian host. In addition to playing important roles in digestion and harvesting energy, commensal bacteria are crucial for the proper functioning of mucosal immune defenses. Most of these functions have been attributed to the presence of large numbers of “innocuous” resident bacteria that dilute or occupy niches for intestinal pathogens or induce innate immune responses that sequester bacteria in the lumen, thus quenching excessive activation of the mucosal immune system. However it has recently become obvious that commensal bacteria are not simply beneficial bystanders, but are important modulators of intestinal immune homeostasis and that the composition of the microbiota is a major factor in pre-determining the type and robustness of mucosal immune responses. Here we review specific examples of individual members of the microbiota that modify innate and adaptive immune responses, and we focus on potential mechanisms by which such species-specific signals are generated and transmitted to the host immune system. PMID:21215684

  11. [Contribution of the kidney to glucose homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2013-09-01

    The kidney is involved in glucose homeostasis through three major mechanisms: renal gluconeogenesis, renal glucose consumption, and glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubule. Glucose reabsorption is one of the most important physiological functions of the kidney, allowing full recovery of filtered glucose, elimination of glucose from the urine, and prevention of calorie loss. Approximately 90% of the glucose is reabsorbed in the S1 segment of the proximal tubule, where glucose transporter-2 (GLUT2) and sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) are located, while the remaining 10% is reabsorbed in the S3 segment by SGLT1 and GLUT1 transporters. In patients with hyperglycemia, the kidney continues to reabsorb glucose, thus maintaining hyperglycemia. Most of the renal glucose reabsorption is mediated by SGLT2. Several experimental and clinical studies suggest that pharmacological blockade of this transporter might be beneficial in the management of hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition and protein energy homeostasis in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boirie, Yves; Morio, Béatrice; Caumon, Elodie; Cano, Noël J

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy homeostasis is a major determinant of healthy aging. Inadequate nutritional intakes and physical activity, together with endocrine disturbances are associated with of sarcopenia and frailty. Guidelines from scientific societies mainly address the quantitative aspects of protein and energy nutrition in elderly. Besides these quantitative aspects of protein load, perspective strategies to promote muscle protein synthesis and prevent sarcopenia include pulse feeding, the use of fast proteins and the addition of leucine or citrulline to dietary protein. An integrated management of sarcopenia, taking into account the determinants of muscle wasting, i.e. nutrition, physical activity, anabolic factors such as androgens, vitamin D and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids status, needs to be tested in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. The importance of physical activity, specifically resistance training, is emphasized, not only in order to facilitate muscle protein anabolism but also to increase appetite and food intake in elderly people at risk of malnutrition. According to present data, healthy nutrition in elderly should respect the guidelines for protein and energy requirement, privilege a Mediterranean way of alimentation, and be associated with a regular physical activity. Further issues relate to the identification of the genetics determinants of protein energy wasting in elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  14. Human corpus luteum: presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and binding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyagari, R.R.; Khan-Dawood, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors are present in many reproductive tissues but have not been demonstrated in the human corpus luteum. To determine the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and its binding characteristics, we carried out studies on the plasma cell membrane fraction of seven human corpora lutea (days 16 to 25) of the menstrual cycle. Specific epidermal growth factor receptors were present in human corpus luteum. Insulin, nerve growth factor, and human chorionic gonadotropin did not competitively displace epidermal growth factor binding. The optimal conditions for corpus luteum-epidermal growth factor receptor binding were found to be incubation for 2 hours at 4 degrees C with 500 micrograms plasma membrane protein and 140 femtomol 125 I-epidermal growth factor per incubate. The number (mean +/- SEM) of epidermal growth factor binding sites was 12.34 +/- 2.99 X 10(-19) mol/micrograms protein; the dissociation constant was 2.26 +/- 0.56 X 10(-9) mol/L; the association constant was 0.59 +/- 0.12 X 10(9) L/mol. In two regressing corpora lutea obtained on days 2 and 3 of the menstrual cycle, there was no detectable specific epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity. Similarly no epidermal growth factor receptor binding activity could be detected in ovarian stromal tissue. Our findings demonstrate that specific receptors for epidermal growth factor are present in the human corpus luteum. The physiologic significance of epidermal growth factor receptors in human corpus luteum is unknown, but epidermal growth factor may be involved in intragonadal regulation of luteal function

  15. HaCaT Keratinocytes and Primary Epidermal Keratinocytes Have Different Transcriptional Profiles of Cornified Envelope-Associated Genes to T Helper Cell Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Tae Jin; Lee, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ai-Young; Noh, Minsoo

    2012-01-01

    HaCaT cells are the immortalized human keratinocytes and have been extensively used to study the epidermal homeostasis and its pathophysiology. T helper cells play a role in various chronic dermatological conditions and they can affect skin barrier homeostasis. To evaluate whether HaCaT cells can be used as a model cell system to study abnormal skin barrier development in various dermatologic diseases, we analyzed the gene expression profile of epidermal differentiation markers of HaCaT cells in response to major T helper (Th) cell cytokines, such as IFNγ, IL-4, IL-17A and IL-22. The gene transcriptional profile of cornified envelope-associated proteins, such as filaggrin, loricrin, involucrin and keratin 10 (KRT10), in HaCaT cells was generally different from that in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs). This suggests that HaCaT cells have a limitation as a model system to study the pathophysiological mechanism associated with the Th cell cytokine-dependent changes in cornified envelope-associated proteins which are essential for normal skin barrier development. In contrast, the gene transcription profile change of human β2-defensin (HBD2) in response to IFNγ, IL-4 or IL-17A in HaCaT cells was consistent with the expression pattern of NHKs. IFNγ also up-regulated transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) gene transcription in both HaCaT cells and NHKs. As an alternative cell culture system for NHKs, HaCaT cells can be used to study molecular mechanisms associated with abnormal HBD2 and TGM2 expression in response to IFNγ, IL-4 or IL-17A. PMID:24116291

  16. The Role of Follicular Fluid Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tola, Esra Nur; Köroğlu, Nadiye; Ergin, Merve; Oral, Hilmi Baha; Turgut, Abdülkadir; Erel, Özcan

    2018-04-04

    Oxidative stress is suggested as a potential triggering factor in the etiopathogenesis of Polycystic ovary syndrome related infertility. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis, a recently oxidative stress marker, is one of the antioxidant mechanism in human which have critical roles in folliculogenesis and ovulation. The aim of our study is to investigate follicular fluid thiol/disulphide homeostasis in the etiopathogenesis of Polycystic ovary syndrome and to determine its' association with in vitro fertilization outcome. The study procedures were approved by local ethic committee. Cross sectional design Methods: Follicular fluid of twenty-two Polycystic ovary syndrome women and twenty ovulatory controls undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment were recruited. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was analyzed via a novel spectrophotometric method. Follicular native thiol levels were found to be lower in Polycystic ovary syndrome group than non- Polycystic ovary syndrome group (p=0.041) as well as native thiol/total thiol ratio (pPolycystic ovary syndrome group (pPolycystic ovary syndrome patients was found. A positive predictive effect of native thiol on fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome group was also found (p=0.03, β=0.45, 95% CI=0.031-0.643). Deterioration in thiol/disulphide homeostasis, especially elevated disulphide levels could be one of the etiopathogenetic mechanism in Polycystic ovary syndrome. Increased native thiol levels is related to fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome patients and also positive predictor marker of fertilization rate among Polycystic ovary syndrome patients. Improvement of thiol/disulphide homeostasis could be of importance in the treatment of Polycystic ovary syndrome to increase in vitro fertilization success in Polycystic ovary syndrome.

  17. Arctigenin induced gallbladder cancer senescence through modulating epidermal growth factor receptor pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingdi; Cai, Shizhong; Zuo, Bin; Gong, Wei; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhou, Di; Weng, Mingzhe; Qin, Yiyu; Wang, Shouhua; Liu, Jun; Ma, Fei; Quan, Zhiwei

    2017-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer have not been fully elucidated. The expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor were examined in 100 matched pairs of gallbladder cancer tissues. A positive correlation between high epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels and poor prognosis was observed in gallbladder cancer tissues. Pharmacological inhibition or inhibition via RNA interference of epidermal growth factor receptor induced cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer cells. The antitumor effect of arctigenin on gallbladder cancer cells was primarily achieved by inducing cellular senescence. In gallbladder cancer cells treated with arctigenin, the expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor significantly decreased. The analysis of the activity of the kinases downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor revealed that the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway was significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the cellular senescence induced by arctigenin could be reverted by pcDNA-epidermal growth factor receptor. Arctigenin also potently inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts, which was accompanied by the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and induction of senescence. This study demonstrates arctigenin could induce cellular senescence in gallbladder cancer through the modulation of epidermal growth factor receptor pathway. These data identify epidermal growth factor receptor as a key regulator in arctigenin-induced gallbladder cancer senescence.

  18. The surging role of Chromogranin A in cardiovascular homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Together with Chromogranin B and Secretogranins, Chromogranin A (CGA) is stored in secretory (chromaffin) granules of the diffuse neuroendocrine system and released with noradrenalin and adrenalin. Co-stored within the granule together with neuropeptideY, cardiac natriuretic peptide hormones, several prohormones and their proteolytic enzymes, CGA is a multifunctional protein and a major marker of the sympatho-adrenal neuroendocrine activity. Due to its partial processing to several biologically active peptides, CGA appears an important pro-hormone implicated in relevant modulatory actions on endocrine, cardiovascular, metabolic, and immune systems through both direct and indirect sympatho-adrenergic interactions. As a part of this scenario, we here illustrate the emerging role exerted by the full-length CGA and its three derived fragments, i.e. Vasostatin 1, catestatin and serpinin, in the control of circulatory homeostasis with particular emphasis on their cardio-vascular actions under both physiological and physio-pathological conditions. The Vasostatin 1- and catestatin-induced cardiodepressive influences are achieved through anti-beta-adrenergic-NO-cGMP signalling, while serpinin acts like beta1-adrenergic agonist through AD-cAMP-independent NO signalling. On the whole, these actions contribute to wide our knowledge regarding the sympatho-chromaffin control of the cardiovascular system and its highly integrated “whip-brake” networks.

  19. Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarlen, Peter; Wells, Jerry M; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-05-01

    The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels of success. Composition of microbiota, probiotic strain identity, and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Here, we review the mechanisms of immunomodulating capacities of specific probiotic strains, the responses they can induce in the host, and how microbiota and genetic differences between individuals may co-influence host responses and immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of CDX2 in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2011-01-01

    a causal role in a large number of diseases and developmental disorders. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronically inflamed mucosa caused by dysregulation of the intestinal immune homeostasis. The aetiology of IBD is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors......, including luminal bacteria. The Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2) is critical in early intestinal differentiation and has been implicated as a master regulator of the intestinal homeostasis and permeability in adults. When expressed, CDX2 modulates a diverse set of processes including...... of the intestinal homeostasis and further to reveal its potential role in inflammation....

  1. Radiologic Findings of Epidermal Cysts in the Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Chung, Jae Joon; Park, Kyoung Seuk; Park, Su Mi

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasonographic (US) or computer tomography (CT) findings of surgically proven epidermal cysts in the trunk, and to compare the echogenicity of cysts with internal contents. Forty-five patients were retrospectively evaluated. US and CT findings of epidermal cysts were assessed in regard to location, size, shape, number, echogenicity, posterior sound enhancement, internal density, septa, mural nodule and calcification, perilesional infiltration, contrast enhancement, and internal contents. All 45 patients (M:F=29:16; US in 26, CT in 19) had only one cyst, and they were located in the buttocks (n=19), back (n=13), inguinal (n=4), posterior neck (n=3), perineum (n=2), abdominal wall (n=2), presternal (n=1), and axilla (n=1). Of 26 patients who underwent US, there were 8 cases of homogeneously hypoechoic mass (30.8%), 8 of inhomogeneously hypoechoic mass (30.8%), 7 of homogeneously hypoechoic mass with internal hypoechoic lines and echogenic spots (26.9%) and 3 of homogeneously hypoechoic mass with internal echogenic spots (11.5%). Posterior sound enhancement was noted in 21 patients (80.8%). Of 19 patients who underwent CT, there were 14 cases of simple cyst (73.7%) and 5 of abscess-like lesion (26.3%). Overlying skin thickening (n=13), contrast enhancement of cystic wall (n=11), perilesional infiltration (n=7), and internal septa (n=6) were demonstrated. The internal contents of the cysts were keratinous (n=27, 60.0%) or greasy (n=15, 33.3%) material. There was no statistical significance between the echogenicity of the cysts and the internal contents (p > 0.2). Epidermal cysts showed homogeneous or inhomogeneous hypoechoic mass with posterior sound enhancement on US. There was no relationship between the echogenicity of the cysts and the internal contents. In the case of ruptured cyst, an abscess-like lesion with wall enhancement and perilesional infiltration was noted on CT scan

  2. Exudative epidermitis in pigs caused by toxigenic Staphylococcus chromogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter; Daugaard, Lise; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    2005-02-25

    Staphylococcus chromogenes is closely related to Staphylococcus hyicus, which is recognised as the causative agent of exudative epidermitis (EE) in pigs. S. chromogenes is part of the normal skin flora of pigs, cattle and poultry and has so far been considered non-pathogenic to pigs. A strain of S. chromogenes producing exfoliative toxin type B, ExhB, was identified by the use of a multiplex PCR specific for the exfoliative toxins from S. hyicus. The exfoliative toxin from S. chromogenes reacted in immunoblot analysis with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to ExhB from S. hyicus and had an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa. Sequencing the gene encoding the exfoliative toxin from S. chromogenes revealed that the molecular weight of the toxin with the signal peptide and the mature toxin was 30,553 and 26,694 Da, respectively. Comparison of the exhB genes from S. chromogenes strain VA654 and S. hyicus strain 1289D-88 showed differences in seven base pairs of the DNA sequences and in two amino acid residues in the deduced amino acid sequences. Pigs were experimentally inoculated with S. chromogenes strain VA654. By clinical observations and histopathological evaluation of the skin alterations, all pigs revealed development of generalized exudative epidermitis. No toxin producing S. hyicus was isolated from the pigs and all ExhB-positive bacterial isolates were identified as S. chromogenes. This confirmed that the disease-causing agent was the inoculated S. chromogenes strain VA654. The results of this study show that S. chromogenes may cause exudative epidermitis in pigs.

  3. Impact of estradiol, estrogen receptor subtype-selective agonists and genistein on energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Weigt, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is dramatically increasing and thus constitutes a major risk factor for developing chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular diseases, and certain forms of cancer. High-caloric nutrition and a lack of physical activity are the main contributing factors for this global epidemic. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are recognized to be involved in many processes related to the control of energy homeostasis. In my studies, I investigated the impac...

  4. Evaluation of dynamic serum thiol/disulfide homeostasis in locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Hizal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer is one the most diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. As an indicator of antioxidant capacity thiol/disulfide homeostasis regulates detoxification, cell signal mechanisms, apoptosis, transcription and antioxidant defense mechanisms. Disregulation of thiol/disulfide homeostasis identified in other cancer types by recent data. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the thiol/disulfide homeostasis in advanced gastric cancer patients. Methods: The patients who diagnosed with gastric cancer and healthy control subjects were included to study. Serum samples for the thiol-disulphide test were obtained at the time of diagnosis. Thiol-disulphide homeostasis tests were measured by the automated spectrophotometric method. Thiol-disulphide homeostasis was also measured according to clinical and laboratory features. Results: Thirty newly diagnosed advanced gastric adenocarcinoma patients and 28 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The native thiol (NT and total thiol (TT levels of patients' group were significantly lower compared with controls (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001. In the CEA high (≥5.4 ng/ml group, DS/NT ratio were higher compared with CEA low (<5.4 ng/ml group (p = 0.024. In CA.19-9 high (≥28.3 kU/L group, both DS and DS/NT ratio were significantly higher compared with a CA19-9 low(<28.3 kU/L group (p < 0.05 both. The correlation between CEA and DS levels was also significant (p = 0.02. There was also a positive correlation between CEA levels and DS/NT ratio (p = 0.01. Conclusion: Derangements of thiol/disulfide homeostasis may have a role in gastric cancer pathogenesis and the higher level of oxidative stress may relate to extensive and aggressiveness of the advanced disease. The diagnostic and prognostic values of thiol/disulfide products need to identify with further studies. Keywords: Thiol, Disulfide, Oxidative stress, Gastric cancer, Metastatic

  5. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Control of cytokinin and auxin homeostasis in cyanobacteria and algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Eva; Kubeš, Martin; Dobrev, Petre; Přibyl, Pavel; Šimura, J.; Zahajská, Lenka; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Novák, Ondřej; Motyka, Václav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 1 (2017), s. 151-166 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S; GA ČR GA15-22322S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : solid-phase extraction * performance liquid-chromatography * yucca flavin monooxygenases * tandem mass-spectrometry * abscisic-acid * arabidopsis-thaliana * indole-3-acetic-acid iaa * endogenous cytokinins * chlorella-vulgaris * phenylacetic acid * Cytokinin * auxin * cyanobacteria * algae * metabolism * cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase * cytokinin 2-methylthioderivatives * trans-zeatin * indole-3-acetic acid * tRNA Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  7. Emerging role of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in therapy for advanced malignancy: focus on NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.

    2004-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy regimens have emerged as the standard approach in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a 2-month increase in median survival after platinum-based therapy vs. best supportive care, and an absolute 10% improvement in the 1-year survival rate. Just as importantly, cytotoxic therapy has produced benefits in symptom control and quality of life. Newer agents, including the taxanes, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, and irinotecan, have expanded our therapeutic options in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Despite their contributions, we have reached a therapeutic plateau, with response rates seldom exceeding 30-40% in cooperative group studies and 1-year survival rates stable between 30% and 40%. It is doubtful that substituting one agent for another in various combinations will lead to any further improvement in these rates. The thrust of current research has focused on targeted therapy, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition is one of the most promising clinical strategies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors currently under investigation include the small molecules gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) and erlotinib (Tarceva, OSI-774), as well as monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab (IMC-225, Erbitux). Agents that have only begun to undergo clinical evaluation include CI-1033, an irreversible pan-erbB tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and PKI166 and GW572016, both examples of dual kinase inhibitors (inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor and Her2). Preclinical models have demonstrated synergy for all these agents in combination with either chemotherapy or radiotherapy, leading to great enthusiasm regarding their ultimate contribution to lung cancer therapy. However, serious clinical challenges persist. These include the identification of the optimal dose(s); the proper integration of these agents into popular, established cytotoxic regimens; and the selection of the optimal setting(s) in which

  8. Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Lars E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. Both are rare, with TEN and SJS affecting approximately 1or 2/1,000,000 annually, and are considered medical emergencies as they are potentially fatal. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Currently, TEN and SJS are considered to be two ends of a spectrum of severe epidermolytic adverse cutaneous drug reactions, differing only by their extent of skin detachment. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the aetiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Genetic susceptibility to SJS and TEN is likely as exemplified by the strong association observed in Han Chinese between a genetic marker, the human leukocyte antigen HLA-B*1502, and SJS induced by carbamazepine. Diagnosis relies mainly on clinical signs together with the histological analysis of a skin biopsy showing typical full-thickness epidermal necrolysis due to extensive keratinocyte apoptosis. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS. Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, evaluation of the prognosis

  9. Renal origin of rat urinary epidermal growth factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    The origin of rat urinary epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been investigated. Unilateral nephrectomy decreased the concentration, total output of EGF and EGF/creatinine ratio by approximately 50%, while the output of creatinine was unchanged. Removal of the submandibular glands and duodenal...... Brunner's glands, organs known to produce EGF, had no influence on the output of EGF in urine. Renal clearance of EGF exceeded that of creatinine, and after bilateral nephrectomy or bilateral ligation of the ureters, the concentration of creatinine in serum increased, while the concentration of EGF...

  10. Isolation and In Vitro Characterization of Epidermal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Kasper S; Andersen, Marianne Stemann; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2017-01-01

    flow cytometry. Using markers that define the spatial origin of epidermal cells, it is possible to interrogate the specific characteristics of subpopulations of cells based on their in vivo credentials. Here, we describe how to isolate, culture, and characterize keratinocytes from murine back and tail......Colony-forming assays represent prospective methods, where cells isolated from enzymatically dissociated tissues or from tissue cultures are assessed for their proliferative capacity in vitro. Complex tissues such as the epithelial component of the skin (the epidermis) are characterized...

  11. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human endometrial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Ottesen, B

    1993-01-01

    Little data exist on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-Rs) in human endometrial cancer. EGF-R status was studied in 65 patients with endometrial carcinomas and in 26 women with nonmalignant postmenopausal endometria, either inactive/atrophic endometrium or adenomatous...... hyperplasia. EGF-R was identified on frozen tissue sections by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique with a monoclonal antibody against the external domain of the EGF-R. Seventy-one percent of the carcinomas expressed positive EGF-R immunoreactivity. In general, staining was most prominent...

  12. Acyl-CoA binding protein and epidermal barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Neess, Ditte; Færgeman, Nils J

    2014-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species and mammalian tissues investigated. It binds acyl-CoA esters with high specificity and affinity and is thought to act as an intracellular transporter of acyl-CoA esters between different...... includes tousled and greasy fur, development of alopecia and scaling of the skin with age. Furthermore, epidermal barrier function is compromised causing a ~50% increase in transepidermal water loss relative to that of wild type mice. Lipidomic analyses indicate that this is due to significantly reduced...

  13. Radiosensitivity of normal human epidermal cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, R.; Potten, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    Using an in vitro culture system the authors have derived #betta#-radiation survival curves over a dose range 0-8 Gy for the clonogenic cells of normal human epidermis. The culture system used allows the epidermal cells to stratify and form a multi-layered sheet of keratinizing cells. The cultures appear to be a very good model for epidermis in vivo. The survival curves show a population which is apparently more sensitive than murine epidermis in vivo. It remains unclear whether this is an intrinsic difference between the species or is a consequence of the in vitro cultivation of the human cells. (author)

  14. Calcium homeostasis modulator (CALHM) ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongming; Tanis, Jessica E; Taruno, Akiyuki; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1), formerly known as FAM26C, was recently identified as a physiologically important plasma membrane ion channel. CALHM1 and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog, CLHM-1, are regulated by membrane voltage and extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). In the presence of physiological [Ca(2+)]o (∼1.5 mM), CALHM1 and CLHM-1 are closed at resting membrane potentials but can be opened by strong depolarizations. Reducing [Ca(2+)]o increases channel open probability, enabling channel activation at negative membrane potentials. Together, voltage and Ca(2+) o allosterically regulate CALHM channel gating. Through convergent evolution, CALHM has structural features that are reminiscent of connexins and pannexins/innexins/LRRC8 (volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC)) gene families, including four transmembrane helices with cytoplasmic amino and carboxyl termini. A CALHM1 channel is a hexamer of CALHM1 monomers with a functional pore diameter of ∼14 Å. CALHM channels discriminate poorly among cations and anions, with signaling molecules including Ca(2+) and ATP able to permeate through its pore. CALHM1 is expressed in the brain where it plays an important role in cortical neuron excitability induced by low [Ca(2+)]o and in type II taste bud cells in the tongue that sense sweet, bitter, and umami tastes where it functions as an essential ATP release channel to mediate nonsynaptic neurotransmitter release. CLHM-1 is expressed in C. elegans sensory neurons and body wall muscles, and its genetic deletion causes locomotion defects. Thus, CALHM is a voltage- and Ca(2+) o-gated ion channel, permeable to large cations and anions, that plays important roles in physiology.

  15. Maintaining homeostasis by decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph W Korn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms need to maintain energetic homeostasis. For many species, this implies taking actions with delayed consequences. For example, humans may have to decide between foraging for high-calorie but hard-to-get, and low-calorie but easy-to-get food, under threat of starvation. Homeostatic principles prescribe decisions that maximize the probability of sustaining appropriate energy levels across the entire foraging trajectory. Here, predictions from biological principles contrast with predictions from economic decision-making models based on maximizing the utility of the endpoint outcome of a choice. To empirically arbitrate between the predictions of biological and economic models for individual human decision-making, we devised a virtual foraging task in which players chose repeatedly between two foraging environments, lost energy by the passage of time, and gained energy probabilistically according to the statistics of the environment they chose. Reaching zero energy was framed as starvation. We used the mathematics of random walks to derive endpoint outcome distributions of the choices. This also furnished equivalent lotteries, presented in a purely economic, casino-like frame, in which starvation corresponded to winning nothing. Bayesian model comparison showed that--in both the foraging and the casino frames--participants' choices depended jointly on the probability of starvation and the expected endpoint value of the outcome, but could not be explained by economic models based on combinations of statistical moments or on rank-dependent utility. This implies that under precisely defined constraints biological principles are better suited to explain human decision-making than economic models based on endpoint utility maximization.

  16. Relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system: Dose response of the epidermal, microvascular, and dermal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    This presentation lists gross and histologic changes produced by irradiation of the skin that have been quantified. It examines available cell kinetic radiobiological and morphological variables to identify interactions that occur between component populations. The dose response data of the hair and epidermal, fibrocytic, and endothelial cell populations are examined and a rank ordering is attempted. The contribution of the radiosensitivity of these populations to defining the dose tolerance of the skin is discussed. Future clinical needs are considered. The intent is to quantify or define tissue population changes in the irradiated skin so that the data may serve as guidelines to aid the radiation therapist to select therapy schedules that preserve skin function while improving cancer control

  17. Enhancement of intestinal growth in neonatal rats by epidermal growth factor in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berseth, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Breast milk has been shown to enhance neonatal intestinal growth. Because epidermal growth factor (EGF) is present in the milk of various mammalian species, the hypothesis was tested that EGF in rodent milk mediates, in part, the breast milk-enhanced intestinal growth in neonatal rat. Fifty-eight rat pups fed artificial formal that contained 1.2, 3.0, and 6.0 μg/ml EGF for 39 h had greater incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA and DNA content of intestine than 29 pups fed unsupplemented formula. Pups fed EGF for 5 days had significantly greater body weight, intestinal weight, length, and DNA content than control pups. Conversely, pups fed pooled rat milk containing rabbit-derived antibody to EGF for 39 h had intestines of lower weight that contained less DNA than animals fed rat milk containing normal rabbit serum. EGF appears to mediate, in part, breast milk-enhanced neonatal intestinal growth

  18. A protective effect of epidermal powder immunization in a mouse model of equine herpesvirus-1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takashi; McGregor, Martha; Chu, Qili; Chen, Dexiang; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of epidermal powder immunization (EPI) against equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) infection, we prepared a powder vaccine in which formalin-inactivated virions were embedded in water-soluble, sugar-based particles. A PowderJect device was used to immunize mice with the powder vaccine via their abdominal skin. We found that twice-immunized mice were protected against challenge with the wild-type virus. This protective effect was equivalent to or better than that observed in mice immunized with other types of vaccines, including a gene gun-mediated DNA vaccine containing the glycoprotein D (gD) gene or conventional inactivated virus vaccines introduced via intramuscular or intranasal injections. These findings indicate that the powder vaccine is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, either alone or as a part of prime-boost vaccination strategies

  19. Calcium homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation: role of vitamin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    skinned but also even Caucasian women tend to go into vitamin D deficiency during ... homeostasis in this phase of life is still controversial. Studies are .... calcium balance in lactating women. .... work on vitamin D. In general these authors.

  20. Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and chronic enteropathy. Marisa da Fonseca Ferreira, Arielle Elizabeth Ann Aylor, Richard John Mellanby, Susan Mary Campbell, Adam George Gow ...

  1. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde; Forman, Henry Jay

    2016-08-01

    The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve "reactive oxygen species" rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles (parahormesis). In summary

  2. Association of SSTR2 Polymorphisms and Glucose Homeostasis Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Beth S.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Xue, Bingzhong; Proctor, Alexandria; Ziegler, Julie T.; Haffner, Steven M.; Norris, Jill M.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the influence of somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2) polymorphisms on measures of glucose homeostasis in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS). SSTR2 is a G-protein?coupled receptor that, in response to somatostatin, mediates inhibition of insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone release and thus may affect glucose homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the gene were chosen using a SNP de...

  3. Redox homeostasis: The Golden Mean of healthy living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ursini

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion that electrophiles serve as messengers in cell signaling is now widely accepted. Nonetheless, major issues restrain acceptance of redox homeostasis and redox signaling as components of maintenance of a normal physiological steady state. The first is that redox signaling requires sudden switching on of oxidant production and bypassing of antioxidant mechanisms rather than a continuous process that, like other signaling mechanisms, can be smoothly turned up or down. The second is the misperception that reactions in redox signaling involve “reactive oxygen species” rather than reaction of specific electrophiles with specific protein thiolates. The third is that hormesis provides protection against oxidants by increasing cellular defense or repair mechanisms rather than by specifically addressing the offset of redox homeostasis. Instead, we propose that both oxidant and antioxidant signaling are main features of redox homeostasis. As the redox shift is rapidly reversed by feedback reactions, homeostasis is maintained by continuous signaling for production and elimination of electrophiles and nucleophiles. Redox homeostasis, which is the maintenance of nucleophilic tone, accounts for a healthy physiological steady state. Electrophiles and nucleophiles are not intrinsically harmful or protective, and redox homeostasis is an essential feature of both the response to challenges and subsequent feedback. While the balance between oxidants and nucleophiles is preserved in redox homeostasis, oxidative stress provokes the establishment of a new radically altered redox steady state. The popular belief that scavenging free radicals by antioxidants has a beneficial effect is wishful thinking. We propose, instead, that continuous feedback preserves nucleophilic tone and that this is supported by redox active nutritional phytochemicals. These nonessential compounds, by activating Nrf2, mimic the effect of endogenously produced electrophiles

  4. Cellular Links between Neuronal Activity and Energy Homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Pavan K.; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity, astrocytic responses to this activity, and energy homeostasis are linked together during baseline, conscious conditions, and short-term rapid activation (as occurs with sensory or motor function). Nervous system energy homeostasis also varies during long-term physiological conditions (i.e., development and aging) and with adaptation to pathological conditions, such as ischemia or low glucose. Neuronal activation requires increased metabolism (i.e., ATP generation) which lea...

  5. Human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogenes promote mouse ear regeneration by increasing the rate of wound re-epithelization and epidermal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Concepción; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Oktaba, Katarzyna; Ocádiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Gariglio, Patricio; Covarrubias, Luis

    2008-12-01

    Mammals have limited regeneration capacity. We report here that, in transgenic mice (Tg(bK6-E6/E7)), the expression of the E6/E7 oncogenes of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) under the control of the bovine keratin 6 promoter markedly improves the mouse's capacity to repair portions of the ear after being wounded. Increased repair capacity correlates with an increased number of epidermal proliferating cells. In concordance with the expected effects of the E6 and E7 oncogenes, levels of p53 decreased and those of p16 in epidermal cells increased. In addition, we observed that wound re-epithelization proceeded faster in transgenic than in wild-type animals. After the initial re-epithelization, epidermal cell migration from the intact surrounding tissue appears to be a major contributor to the growing epidermis, especially in the repairing tissue of transgenic mice. We also found that there is a significantly higher number of putative epidermal stem cells in Tg(bK6-E6/E7) than in wild-type mice. Remarkably, hair follicles and cartilage regenerated within the repaired ear tissue, without evidence of tumor formation. We propose that the ability to regenerate ear portions is limited by the capacity of the epidermis to repair itself and grow.

  6. Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis in inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tayyebi Meibodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis presents with perinuclear vacuolization of the keratinocytes in spinous and granular layers, keratinocytes with ill-defined limits, which leads to a reticulate appearance of the epidermis, an increased number of variously shaped and sized basophilic keratohyalin granules and the same sized eosinophilic trichohyalin granules, at any level of epidermis, mainly in the stratum granulosum, and compact hyperkeratosis. This minor reactive pathologic reaction pattern of skin is found in large variety of diseases. This paper is the first case report of such pattern in inflammatory linear verrucous epidermal nevus. Our case is of a 23-year-old man with pruritic verrucous lesions of trunk and extremities initiated since 13 years ago. Physical examination revealed white linear hyperkeratotic lesions, some of them on erythematous background and also classic epidermal nevus. No skeletal, ophthalmic, and nervous system involvement was detected. Microscopic study of pruritic verrucous lesions showed psoriasiform acanthosis, mild papillomatous, hyperkeratosis, and epidermolytic hyperkeratotic changes in hair follicles and acrosyrinx accompanied with moderate perivascular inflammation.

  7. Flexible pH-Sensing Hydrogel Fibers for Epidermal Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayol, Ali; Akbari, Mohsen; Zilberman, Yael; Comotto, Mattia; Lesha, Emal; Serex, Ludovic; Bagherifard, Sara; Chen, Yu; Fu, Guoqing; Ameri, Shideh Kabiri; Ruan, Weitong; Miller, Eric L; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Sonkusale, Sameer; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Epidermal pH is an indication of the skin's physiological condition. For example, pH of wound can be correlated to angiogenesis, protease activity, bacterial infection, etc. Chronic nonhealing wounds are known to have an elevated alkaline environment, while healing process occurs more readily in an acidic environment. Thus, dermal patches capable of continuous pH measurement can be used as point-of-care systems for monitoring skin disorder and the wound healing process. Here, pH-responsive hydrogel fibers are presented that can be used for long-term monitoring of epidermal wound condition. pH-responsive dyes are loaded into mesoporous microparticles and incorporated into hydrogel fibers using a microfluidic spinning system. The fabricated pH-responsive microfibers are flexible and can create conformal contact with skin. The response of pH-sensitive fibers with different compositions and thicknesses are characterized. The suggested technique is scalable and can be used to fabricate hydrogel-based wound dressings with clinically relevant dimensions. Images of the pH-sensing fibers during real-time pH measurement can be captured with a smart phone camera for convenient readout on-site. Through image processing, a quantitative pH map of the hydrogel fibers and the underlying tissue can be extracted. The developed skin dressing can act as a point-of-care device for monitoring the wound healing process. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Extraordinarily Stretchable All-Carbon Collaborative Nanoarchitectures for Epidermal Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Yichen

    2017-06-16

    Multifunctional microelectronic components featuring large stretchability, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and broad sensing range have attracted a huge surge of interest with the fast developing epidermal electronic systems. Here, the epidermal sensors based on all-carbon collaborative percolation network are demonstrated, which consist 3D graphene foam and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) obtained by two-step chemical vapor deposition processes. The nanoscaled CNT networks largely enhance the stretchability and SNR of the 3D microarchitectural graphene foams, endowing the strain sensor with a gauge factor as high as 35, a wide reliable sensing range up to 85%, and excellent cyclic stability (>5000 cycles). The flexible and reversible strain sensor can be easily mounted on human skin as a wearable electronic device for real-time and high accuracy detecting of electrophysiological stimuli and even for acoustic vibration recognition. The rationally designed all-carbon nanoarchitectures are scalable, low cost, and promising in practical applications requiring extraordinary stretchability and ultrahigh SNRs.

  9. Steven johnsons syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri ram Anne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the etiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS. Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, identification and interruption of the culprit drug, specialized supportive care ideally in an intensive care unit, and consideration of immunomodulating agents such as high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

  10. Extraordinarily Stretchable All-Carbon Collaborative Nanoarchitectures for Epidermal Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Yichen; Shen, Jie; Dai, Ziyang; Zang, Xiaoxian; Dong, Qiuchun; Guan, Guofeng; Li, Lain-Jong; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional microelectronic components featuring large stretchability, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and broad sensing range have attracted a huge surge of interest with the fast developing epidermal electronic systems. Here, the epidermal sensors based on all-carbon collaborative percolation network are demonstrated, which consist 3D graphene foam and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) obtained by two-step chemical vapor deposition processes. The nanoscaled CNT networks largely enhance the stretchability and SNR of the 3D microarchitectural graphene foams, endowing the strain sensor with a gauge factor as high as 35, a wide reliable sensing range up to 85%, and excellent cyclic stability (>5000 cycles). The flexible and reversible strain sensor can be easily mounted on human skin as a wearable electronic device for real-time and high accuracy detecting of electrophysiological stimuli and even for acoustic vibration recognition. The rationally designed all-carbon nanoarchitectures are scalable, low cost, and promising in practical applications requiring extraordinary stretchability and ultrahigh SNRs.

  11. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient

  12. Extraction of high-quality epidermal RNA after ammonium thiocyanate-induced dermo-epidermal separation of 4 mm human skin biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Anders; Thomassen, Mads; Clemmensen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    To obtain a separation of the epidermal and dermal compartments to examine compartment specific biological mechanisms in the skin, we incubated 4 mm human skin punch biopsies in ammonium thiocyanate. We wanted to test (i) the histological quality of the dermo-epidermal separation obtained...... by different incubation times; (ii) the amount and quality of extractable epidermal RNA and (iii) its impact on sample RNA expression profiles assessed by large-scale gene expression microarray analysis in both normal and inflamed skin. At 30-min incubation, the split between dermis and epidermis...... and almost completely separated from the dermis of 4 mm skin biopsies by 30 min incubation in 3.8% ammonium thiocyanate combined with curettage of the dermal surface, producing high-quality RNA suitable for transcriptional analysis. Our refined method of dermo-epidermal separation will undoubtedly prove...

  13. The emergence of environmental homeostasis in complex ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Dyke

    Full Text Available The Earth, with its core-driven magnetic field, convective mantle, mobile lid tectonics, oceans of liquid water, dynamic climate and abundant life is arguably the most complex system in the known universe. This system has exhibited stability in the sense of, bar a number of notable exceptions, surface temperature remaining within the bounds required for liquid water and so a significant biosphere. Explanations for this range from anthropic principles in which the Earth was essentially lucky, to homeostatic Gaia in which the abiotic and biotic components of the Earth system self-organise into homeostatic states that are robust to a wide range of external perturbations. Here we present results from a conceptual model that demonstrates the emergence of homeostasis as a consequence of the feedback loop operating between life and its environment. Formulating the model in terms of Gaussian processes allows the development of novel computational methods in order to provide solutions. We find that the stability of this system will typically increase then remain constant with an increase in biological diversity and that the number of attractors within the phase space exponentially increases with the number of environmental variables while the probability of the system being in an attractor that lies within prescribed boundaries decreases approximately linearly. We argue that the cybernetic concept of rein control provides insights into how this model system, and potentially any system that is comprised of biological to environmental feedback loops, self-organises into homeostatic states.

  14. The vagal innervation of the gut and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Gianluca; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-08-01

    The central nervous system interacts dynamically with the immune system to modulate inflammation through humoral and neural pathways. Recently, in animal models of sepsis, the vagus nerve (VN) has been proposed to play a crucial role in the regulation of the immune response, also referred to as the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The VN, through release of acetylcholine, dampens immune cell activation by interacting with α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recent evidence suggests that the vagal innervation of the gastrointestinal tract also plays a major role controlling intestinal immune activation. Indeed, VN electrical stimulation potently reduces intestinal inflammation restoring intestinal homeostasis, whereas vagotomy has the reverse effect. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding concerning the mechanisms and effects involved in the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in the gastrointestinal tract. Deeper investigation on this counter-regulatory neuroimmune mechanism will provide new insights in the cross-talk between the nervous and immune system leading to the identification of new therapeutic targets to treat intestinal immune disease.

  15. The Food and Drug Addiction Epidemic: Targeting Dopamine Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Panayotis K; Wang, Gene-Jack; Febo, Marcelo; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Modestino, Edward Justin; Braverman, Eric R; Baron, David; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Gold, Mark S

    2018-02-12

    Obesity is damaging the lives of more than 300 million people worldwide and maintaining a healthy weight using popular weight loss tactics remains a very difficult undertaking. Managing the obesity problem seems within reach, as better understanding develops, of the function of our genome in drug/nutrient responses. Strategies indicated by this understanding of nutriepigenomics and neurogenetics in the treatment and prevention of metabolic syndrome and obesity include moderation of mRNA expression by DNA methylation, and inhibition of histone deacetylation. Based on an individual's genetic makeup, deficient metabolic pathways can be targeted epigenetically by, for example, the provision of dietary supplementation that includes phytochemicals, vitamins, and importantly functional amino acids. Also, the chromatin structure of imprinted genes that control nutrients during fetal development can be modified. Pathways affecting dopamine signaling, molecular transport and nervous system development are implicated in these strategies. Obesity is a subtype of Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) and these new strategies in the treatment and prevention of obesity target improved dopamine function. It is not merely a matter of gastrointestinal signaling linked to hypothalamic peptides, but alternatively, finding novel ways to improve ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic function and homeostasis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. A role for clock genes in sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The timing and quality of both sleep and wakefulness are thought to be regulated by the interaction of two processes. One of these two processes keeps track of the prior sleep-wake history and controls the homeostatic need for sleep while the other sets the time-of-day that sleep preferably occurs. The molecular pathways underlying the latter, circadian process have been studied in detail and their key role in physiological time-keeping has been well established. Analyses of sleep in mice and flies lacking core circadian clock gene proteins have demonstrated, however, that besides disrupting circadian rhythms, also sleep homeostatic processes were affected. Subsequent studies revealed that sleep loss alters both the mRNA levels and the specific DNA-binding of the key circadian transcriptional regulators to their target sequences in the mouse brain. The fact that sleep loss impinges on the very core of the molecular circadian circuitry might explain why both inadequate sleep and disrupted circadian rhythms can similarly lead to metabolic pathology. The evidence for a role for clock genes in sleep homeostasis will be reviewed here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Campetelli, German; Basualdo, Marta; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    According to the World Health Organization there are over 220 million people in the world with diabetes and 3.4 million people died in 2004 as a consequence of this pathology. Development of an artificial pancreas would allow to restore control of blood glucose by coupling an infusion pump to a continuous glucose sensor in the blood. The design of such a device requires the development and application of mathematical models which represent the gluco-regulatory system. Models developed by other research groups describe very well the gluco-regulatory system but have a large number of mathematical equations and require complex methodologies for the estimation of its parameters. In this work we propose a mathematical model to study the homeostasis of glucose and insulin in healthy rats. The proposed model consists of three differential equations and 8 parameters that describe the variation of: blood glucose concentration, blood insulin concentration and amount of glucose in the intestine. All parameters were obtained by setting functions to the values of glucose and insulin in blood obtained after oral glucose administration. In vivo and in silico validations were performed. Additionally, a qualitative analysis has been done to verify the aforementioned model. We have shown that this model has a single, biologically consistent equilibrium point. This model is a first step in the development of a mathematical model for the type I diabetic rat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The emergence of environmental homeostasis in complex ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, James G; Weaver, Iain S

    2013-01-01

    The Earth, with its core-driven magnetic field, convective mantle, mobile lid tectonics, oceans of liquid water, dynamic climate and abundant life is arguably the most complex system in the known universe. This system has exhibited stability in the sense of, bar a number of notable exceptions, surface temperature remaining within the bounds required for liquid water and so a significant biosphere. Explanations for this range from anthropic principles in which the Earth was essentially lucky, to homeostatic Gaia in which the abiotic and biotic components of the Earth system self-organise into homeostatic states that are robust to a wide range of external perturbations. Here we present results from a conceptual model that demonstrates the emergence of homeostasis as a consequence of the feedback loop operating between life and its environment. Formulating the model in terms of Gaussian processes allows the development of novel computational methods in order to provide solutions. We find that the stability of this system will typically increase then remain constant with an increase in biological diversity and that the number of attractors within the phase space exponentially increases with the number of environmental variables while the probability of the system being in an attractor that lies within prescribed boundaries decreases approximately linearly. We argue that the cybernetic concept of rein control provides insights into how this model system, and potentially any system that is comprised of biological to environmental feedback loops, self-organises into homeostatic states.

  19. Hypothalamic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis.

  20. Maintenance of the adult Drosophila intestine: all roads lead to homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zheng; Lucchetta, Elena; Rafel, Neus; Ohlstein, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critical in tissues with high turnover such as the intestinal epithelium. The intestinal epithelium is under constant cellular assault due to its digestive functions and its function as a barrier to chemical and bacterial insults. The resulting high rate of cellular turnover necessitates highly controlled mechanisms of regeneration to maintain the integrity of the tissue over the lifetime of the organism. Transient increase in stem cell proliferation is a commonly used and elaborate mechanism to ensure fast and efficient repair of the gut. However, tissue repair is not limited to regulating ISC proliferation, as emerging evidence demonstrates that the Drosophila intestine uses multiple strategies to ensure proper tissue homeostasis that may also extend to other tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Juan; Zerbinatti, Celina; Zhan, Yan; Kolber, Benedict J; Herz, Joachim; Muglia, Louis J; Bu, Guojun

    2011-01-11

    Obesity is a growing epidemic characterized by excess fat storage in adipocytes. Although lipoprotein receptors play important roles in lipid uptake, their role in controlling food intake and obesity is not known. Here we show that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis. Conditional deletion of the Lrp1 gene in the brain resulted in an obese phenotype characterized by increased food intake, decreased energy consumption, and decreased leptin signaling. LRP1 directly binds to leptin and the leptin receptor complex and is required for leptin receptor phosphorylation and Stat3 activation. We further showed that deletion of the Lrp1 gene specifically in the hypothalamus by Cre lentivirus injection is sufficient to trigger accelerated weight gain. Together, our results demonstrate that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1, which is critical in lipid metabolism, also regulates food intake and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

  2. Lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a growing epidemic characterized by excess fat storage in adipocytes. Although lipoprotein receptors play important roles in lipid uptake, their role in controlling food intake and obesity is not known. Here we show that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1 regulates leptin signaling and energy homeostasis. Conditional deletion of the Lrp1 gene in the brain resulted in an obese phenotype characterized by increased food intake, decreased energy consumption, and decreased leptin signaling. LRP1 directly binds to leptin and the leptin receptor complex and is required for leptin receptor phosphorylation and Stat3 activation. We further showed that deletion of the Lrp1 gene specifically in the hypothalamus by Cre lentivirus injection is sufficient to trigger accelerated weight gain. Together, our results demonstrate that the lipoprotein receptor LRP1, which is critical in lipid metabolism, also regulates food intake and energy homeostasis in the adult central nervous system.

  3. Neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase in central nervous system regulates body weight and energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Viola; Willershäuser, Monja; Herzer, Silke; Rozman, Jan; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Meldner, Sascha; Rothermel, Ulrike; Kaden, Sylvia; Roth, Fabian C; Waldeck, Clemens; Gretz, Norbert; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Draguhn, Andreas; Klingenspor, Martin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Jennemann, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons are main regulators of energy homeostasis. Neuronal function essentially depends on plasma membrane-located gangliosides. The present work demonstrates that hypothalamic integration of metabolic signals requires neuronal expression of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS; UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase). As a major mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) metabolic control, we demonstrate that GCS-derived gangliosides interacting with leptin receptors (ObR) in the neuronal membrane modulate leptin-stimulated formation of signaling metabolites in hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, ganglioside-depleted hypothalamic neurons fail to adapt their activity (c-Fos) in response to alterations in peripheral energy signals. Consequently, mice with inducible forebrain neuron-specific deletion of the UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase gene (Ugcg) display obesity, hypothermia, and lower sympathetic activity. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated Ugcg delivery to the arcuate nucleus (Arc) significantly ameliorated obesity, specifying gangliosides as seminal components for hypothalamic regulation of body energy homeostasis.

  4. Role of orexins in the central and peripheral regulation of glucose homeostasis: Evidences & mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Monika; Kumar, Raghuvansh; Krishan, Pawan

    2018-04-01

    Orexins (A & B), neuropeptides of hypothalamic origin, act through G-protein coupled receptors, orexin 1 receptor (OX 1 R) and orexin 2 receptor (OX 2 R). The wide projection of orexin neurons in the hypothalamic region allows them to interact with the other neurons and regulate food intake, emotional status, sleep wake cycle and energy metabolism. The autonomic nervous system plays an important regulatory role in the energy metabolism as well as glucose homeostasis. Orexin neurons are also under the control of GABAergic neurons. Emerging preclinical as well as clinical research has reported the role of orexins in the glucose homeostasis since orexins are involved in hypothalamic metabolism circuitry and also rely on sensing peripheral metabolic signals such as gut, adipose derived and pancreatic peptides. Apart from the hypothalamic origin, integration and control in various physiological functions, peripheral origin in wide organs, raises the possibility of use of orexins as a therapeutic biomarker in the management of metabolic disorders. The present review focuses the central as well as peripheral roles of orexins in the glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Periostin contributes to epidermal hyperplasia in psoriasis common to atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Arima

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Periostin plays an important role during epidermal hyperplasia in IMQ-induced skin inflammation, independently of the IL-23–IL-17/IL-22 axis. Periostin appears to be a mediator for epidermal hyperplasia that is common to AD and psoriasis.

  6. Enrichment of unlabeled human Langerhans cells from epidermal cell suspensions by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, M. B.; Wormmeester, J.; Kapsenberg, M. L.; Bos, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    In this report we introduce an alternative procedure for enrichment of human epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) from epidermal cell suspensions of normal skin. By means of discontinuous Ficoll-Metrizoate density gradient centrifugation, a fraction containing high numbers of viable, more than 80% pure

  7. Deregulation of ocular nucleotide homeostasis in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukovaara, Sirpa; Sandholm, Jouko; Aalto, Kristiina; Liukkonen, Janne; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Yegutkin, Gennady G

    2017-02-01

    Clear signaling roles for ATP and adenosine have been established in all tissues, including the eye. The magnitude of signaling responses is governed by networks of enzymes; however, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of purinergic signaling in the eye. By employing thin-layer chromatographic assays with 3 H-labeled substrates, this study aimed to evaluate the role of nucleotide homeostasis in the pathogenesis of vitreoretinal diseases in humans. We have identified soluble enzymes ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73, adenylate kinase-1, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase in the vitreous fluid that control active cycling between pro-inflammatory ATP and anti-inflammatory adenosine. Strikingly, patients with proliferative form of diabetic retinopathy (DR) had higher adenylate kinase activity and ATP concentration, when compared to non-proliferative DR eyes and non-diabetic controls operated for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, macular hole, and pucker. The non-parametric correlation analysis revealed positive correlations between intravitreal adenylate kinase and concentrations of ATP, ADP, and other angiogenic (angiopoietins-1 and -2), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β1), and proteolytic (matrix metalloproteinase-9) factors but not erythropoietin and VEGF. Immunohistochemical staining of postmortem human retina additionally revealed selective expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 on the rod-and-cone-containing photoreceptor cells. Collectively, these findings provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms that influence purinergic signaling in diseased eye and open up new possibilities in the development of enzyme-targeted therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenylate kinase-1 circulate in human vitreous fluid. Adenylate kinase activity is high in diabetic eyes with proliferative retinopathy. Diabetic eyes display higher intravitreal ATP/ADP ratio than non-diabetic controls. Soluble adenylate

  8. Leptin and insulin pathways in POMC and AgRP neurons that modulate energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Luis; Horvath, Tamas L

    2012-01-01

    With the steady rise in the prevalence of obesity and its associated diseases, research aimed at understanding the mechanisms that regulate and control whole body energy homeostasis has gained new interest. Leptin and insulin, two anorectic hormones, have key roles in the regulation of body weight and energy homeostasis, as highlighted by the fact that several obese patients develop resistance to these hormones. Within the brain, the hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and agouti-related protein neurons have been identified as major targets of leptin and insulin action. Many studies have attempted to discern the individual contributions of various components of the principal pathways that mediate the central effects of leptin and insulin. The aim of this review is to discuss the latest findings that might shed light on, and lead to a better understanding of, energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In addition, recently discovered targets and mechanisms that mediate hormonal action in the brain are highlighted. PMID:23146889

  9. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from epidermal DNA and nonsemiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis following ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G.T.; Trosko, J.E.; Shapas, B.G.; Boutwell, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Pyrimidine dimer production and excision in epidermal DNA were studied at five different dose levels of ultraviolet light in the skin of intact mice. Dimer production increased with dose up to 50,400 ergs/sq mm. Approximately 30 percent of the thymine-containing dimers were excised by 24 hr after irradiation at three lower dose levels of ultraviolet light. Nonsemiconservative DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin was shown to continue for at least 18 hr. The rate of nonsemiconservative replication decreased with time, but did so slowly. The initial rates of nonsemiconservative replication increased with ultraviolet light dose levels up to about 4200 ergs/sq mm, after which the initial rates were decreased. Semiconservative epidermal DNA synthesis was shown to be inhibited by hydroxyurea, but hydroxyurea had no effect on ultraviolet light-induced nonsemiconservative DNA replication. The observed pyrimidine dimer excision and nonsemiconservative DNA replication suggest that in the intact mouse the cells of the epidermis are capable of DNA excision repair after ultraviolet irradiation of mouse skin

  10. Cellular copper homeostasis: current concepts on its interplay with glutathione homeostasis and its implication in physiology and human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ashima; Chakraborty, Kaustav; Shukla, Aditya

    2017-10-18

    Copper is a trace element essential for almost all living organisms. But the level of intracellular copper needs to be tightly regulated. Dysregulation of cellular copper homeostasis leading to various diseases demonstrates the importance of this tight regulation. Copper homeostasis is regulated not only within the cell but also within individual intracellular compartments. Inactivation of export machinery results in excess copper being redistributed into various intracellular organelles. Recent evidence suggests the involvement of glutathione in playing an important role in regulating copper entry and intracellular copper homeostasis. Therefore interplay of both homeostases might play an important role within the cell. Similar to copper, glutathione balance is tightly regulated within individual cellular compartments. This review explores the existing literature on the role of glutathione in regulating cellular copper homeostasis. On the one hand, interplay of glutathione and copper homeostasis performs an important role in normal physiological processes, for example neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, perturbation of the interplay might play a key role in the pathogenesis of copper homeostasis disorders.

  11. Evolution of Cell Size Homeostasis and Growth Rate Diversity during Initial Surface Colonization of Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Calvin K; Kim, Alexander J; Santos, Giancarlo S; Lai, Peter Y; Lee, Stella Y; Qiao, David F; Anda, Jaime De; Young, Thomas D; Chen, Yujie; Rowe, Annette R; Nealson, Kenneth H; Weiss, Paul S; Wong, Gerard C L

    2016-09-06

    Cell size control and homeostasis are fundamental features of bacterial metabolism. Recent work suggests that cells add a constant size between birth and division ("adder" model). However, it is not known how cell size homeostasis is influenced by the existence of heterogeneous microenvironments, such as those during biofilm formation. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use diverse energy sources on a range of surfaces via extracellular electron transport (EET), which can impact growth, metabolism, and size diversity. Here, we track bacterial surface communities at single-cell resolution to show that not only do bacterial motility appendages influence the transition from two- to three-dimensional biofilm growth and control postdivisional cell fates, they strongly impact cell size homeostasis. For every generation, we find that the average growth rate for cells that stay on the surface and continue to divide (nondetaching population) and that for cells that detach before their next division (detaching population) are roughly constant. However, the growth rate distribution is narrow for the nondetaching population, but broad for the detaching population in each generation. Interestingly, the appendage deletion mutants (ΔpilA, ΔmshA-D, Δflg) have significantly broader growth rate distributions than that of the wild type for both detaching and nondetaching populations, which suggests that Shewanella appendages are important for sensing and integrating environmental inputs that contribute to size homeostasis. Moreover, our results suggest multiplexing of appendages for sensing and motility functions contributes to cell size dysregulation. These results can potentially provide a framework for generating metabolic diversity in S. oneidensis populations to optimize EET in heterogeneous environments.

  12. Penile epidermal inclusion cyst: a late complication of penile girth enhancement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Park, Nam Cheol; Park, Sung Woo; Jern, Tae Kyung; Choi, Kyung-Un

    2008-09-01

    Epidermal inclusion cysts are benign lesions that can develop in any part of the body. However, the finding of an epidermal inclusion cyst in the penis is rare. The aim of this article was to present the management of a case of a penile epidermal inclusion cyst that occurred because of late complications of a penile girth enhancement surgery. A 52-year-old man presented with a painless, slowly growing mass in the penis, which was first noted after a penile girth enhancement surgery 20 years ago. A cystic mobile mass about 2 cm in depth was found surrounding the coronal sulcus. Excision of the mass was performed for diagnosis and treatment. There was no communication with the urethra. The pathological diagnosis was an epidermal inclusion cyst of the penis. A penile epidermal inclusion cyst in adult men is rare. It can develop after an inadequate procedure for penile girth enhancement, and should be treated by complete resection.

  13. Transforming growth factor-β2 and endotoxin interact to regulate homeostasis via interleukin-8 levels in the immature intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per Torp; Østergaard, Mette Viberg

    2014-01-01

    A balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signals from the milk and microbiota controls intestinal homeostasis just after birth, and an optimal balance is particularly important for preterm neonates that are sensitive to necrotizing enterocolis (NEC). We suggest that the intestinal cytokine IL...

  14. Carboxy terminal peptide of type I procollagen and epidermal growth factor in patients with different viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lihong; Gong Shoujun; Li Guangming; Li Yebing; Xu Bin

    2001-01-01

    The author observed the serum levels of carboxy terminal peptide of type I procollagen (PICP) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the patients with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis. The serum PICP and EGF were detected in 164 cases by RIA. The results indicated that two indexes increased significantly in patients with severe chronic hepatitis, chronic persistent hepatitis and post hepatitis cirrhosis compared with normal control (P 0.05). The results showed that detection of serum PICP and EGF may be valuable diagnostic markers to assess the degree of liver inflammation and fibrosis in viral liver diseases

  15. CLD1/SRL1 modulates leaf rolling by affecting cell wall formation, epidermis integrity and water homeostasis in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Qiang; Zhang, Min-Juan; Gan, Peng-Fei; Qiao, Lei; Yang, Shuai-Qi; Miao, Hai; Wang, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Mao-Mao; Liu, Wen-Ting; Li, Hai-Feng; Shi, Chun-Hai; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2017-12-01

    Leaf rolling is considered as one of the most important agronomic traits in rice breeding. It has been previously reported that SEMI-ROLLED LEAF 1 (SRL1) modulates leaf rolling by regulating the formation of bulliform cells in rice (Oryza sativa); however, the regulatory mechanism underlying SRL1 has yet to be further elucidated. Here, we report the functional characterization of a novel leaf-rolling mutant, curled leaf and dwarf 1 (cld1), with multiple morphological defects. Map-based cloning revealed that CLD1 is allelic with SRL1, and loses function in cld1 through DNA methylation. CLD1/SRL1 encodes a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that modulates leaf rolling and other aspects of rice growth and development. The cld1 mutant exhibits significant decreases in cellulose and lignin contents in secondary cell walls of leaves, indicating that the loss of function of CLD1/SRL1 affects cell wall formation. Furthermore, the loss of CLD1/SRL1 function leads to defective leaf epidermis such as bulliform-like epidermal cells. The defects in leaf epidermis decrease the water-retaining capacity and lead to water deficits in cld1 leaves, which contribute to the main cause of leaf rolling. As a result of the more rapid water loss and lower water content in leaves, cld1 exhibits reduced drought tolerance. Accordingly, the loss of CLD1/SRL1 function causes abnormal expression of genes and proteins associated with cell wall formation, cuticle development and water stress. Taken together, these findings suggest that the functional roles of CLD1/SRL1 in leaf-rolling regulation are closely related to the maintenance of cell wall formation, epidermal integrity and water homeostasis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reelin is a large secreted protein of the extracellular matrix that has been proposed to participate to the etiology of schizophrenia. During development, reelin is crucial for the correct cytoarchitecture of laminated brain structures and is produced by a subset of neurons named Cajal-Retzius. After birth, most of these cells degenerate and reelin expression persists in postnatal and adult brain. The phenotype of neurons that bind secreted reelin and whether the continuous secretion of reelin is required for physiological functions at postnatal stages remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Combining immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches, we first report that two distinct patterns of reelin expression are present in cultured hippocampal neurons. We show that in hippocampal cultures, reelin is secreted by GABAergic neurons displaying an intense reelin immunoreactivity (IR. We demonstrate that secreted reelin binds to receptors of the lipoprotein family on neurons with a punctate reelin IR. Secondly, using calcium imaging techniques, we examined the physiological consequences of reelin secretion blockade. Blocking protein secretion rapidly and reversibly changes the subunit composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs to a predominance of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Addition of recombinant or endogenously secreted reelin rescues the effects of protein secretion blockade and reverts the fraction of NR2B-containing NMDARs to control levels. Therefore, the continuous secretion of reelin is necessary to control the subunit composition of NMDARs in hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the heterogeneity of reelin immunoreactivity correlates with distinct functional populations: neurons synthesizing and secreting reelin and/or neurons binding reelin. Furthermore, we show that continuous reelin secretion is a strict requirement to maintain the composition of NMDARs. We propose

  17. Tissue remodeling induced by hypersecreted epidermal growth factor and amphiregulin in the airway after an acute asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yukinori; Orihara, Kanami; Takamasu, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Akio; Gon, Yasuhiro; Saito, Hirohisa; Ra, Chisei; Okayama, Yoshimichi

    2009-11-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) and amphiregulin, may play key roles in tissue remodeling in asthma. However, the kinetics of EGF and amphiregulin secretion in the airway after an acute asthma attack and the effect of prolonged airway exposure to these ligands on airway remodeling are unknown. To measure the EGF and amphiregulin concentrations in sputa obtained from patients with asthma under various conditions, and to examine the effects of EGF and amphiregulin on the proliferation or differentiation of airway structural cells. Epidermal growth factor and amphiregulin levels were measured by ELISA in sputum specimens collected from 14 hospitalized children with asthma during an acute asthma attack, 13 stable outpatients with asthma, 8 healthy control children, and 7 children with respiratory tract infections. The effects of EGF and amphiregulin on the proliferation and/or differentiation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC), and normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) were examined. The sputum levels of EGF were significantly higher for about a week after an acute asthma attack compared with the levels in stable subjects with asthma and control subjects. In contrast, upregulation of amphiregulin in the sputa of patients with asthma was observed only during the acute attack. EGF caused proliferation of NHBE, BSMC, and NHLF, whereas amphiregulin induced proliferation of only NHBE. Prolonged exposure of NHBE to EGF and amphiregulin induced mucous cell metaplasia in an IL-13-independent manner. Acute asthma attacks are associated with hypersecretion of EGF and amphiregulin in the airway. Recurrent acute attacks may aggravate airway remodeling.

  18. Reduced epidermal thickness, nerve degeneration and increased pain-related behavior in rats with diabetes type 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boric, Matija; Skopljanac, Ivan; Ferhatovic, Lejla; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Banozic, Adriana; Puljak, Livia

    2013-11-01

    To examine the mechanisms contributing to pain genesis in diabetic neuropathy, we investigated epidermal thickness and number of intraepidermal nerve fibers in rat foot pad of the animal model of diabetes type 1 and type 2 in relation to pain-related behavior. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Diabetes type 1 was induced with intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and diabetes type 2 was induced with a combination of STZ and high-fat diet. Control group for diabetes type 1 was fed with regular laboratory chow, while control group for diabetes type 2 received high-fat diet. Body weights and blood glucose levels were monitored to confirm induction of diabetes. Pain-related behavior was analyzed using thermal (hot, cold) and mechanical stimuli (von Frey fibers, number of hyperalgesic responses). Two months after induction of diabetes, glabrous skin samples from plantar surface of the both hind paws were collected. Epidermal thickness was evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Intraepidermal nerve fibers quantification was performed after staining skin with polyclonal antiserum against protein gene product 9.5. We found that induction of diabetes type 1 and type 2 causes significant epidermal thinning and loss of intraepidermal nerve fibers in a rat model, and both changes were more pronounced in diabetes type 1 model. Significant increase of pain-related behavior two months after induction of diabetes was observed only in a model of diabetes type 1. In conclusion, animal models of diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 could be used in pharmacological studies, where cutaneous changes could be used as outcome measures for predegenerative markers of neuropathies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of carnosine on disturbed electrolytes homeostasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to assess the effect of well known antioxidant carnosine on disturbed plasma and intraerythrocytes electrolytes and Na+-K+-ATPase activity by cisplatin. 24 male albino Wistar rats were selected and divided into 4 groups: Group I = untreated control; Group II = cisplatin control (received cisplatin at a dose of 3 mg/ ...

  20. Perforated Sigmoid Diverticulitis in the Presence of Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Heye

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though the incidence of toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is low, it is also associated with a high mortality rate. The condition predominantly affects the skin, but may also affect the gastrointestinal tract, dramatically increasing mortality. We present a case of perforated sigmoid diverticulitis in the presence of TEN. The patient was taking medication, known to be a risk factor, and presented an affected total body surface area and temporal development similar to previously reported cases of TEN. Characteristic abdominal symptoms, however, were missing. Gastrointestinal involvement in TEN appears to be a poor prognostic factor; medical staff must therefore be alert to patients with TEN who complain of abdominal discomfort. The exact pathogenesis, however, remains unclear.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Crosstalks in Liver Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berasain, Carmen; Latasa, María Ujue; Urtasun, Raquel; Goñi, Saioa; Elizalde, María; Garcia-Irigoyen, Oihane; Azcona, María; Prieto, Jesús; Ávila, Matías A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex multistep process in which many different molecular pathways have been implicated. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic agents, and the new targeted therapies are meeting with limited success. Interreceptor crosstalk and the positive feedback between different signaling systems are emerging as mechanisms of targeted therapy resistance. The identification of such interactions is therefore of particular relevance to improve therapeutic efficacy. Among the different signaling pathways activated in hepatocarcinogenesis the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) system plays a prominent role, being recognized as a “signaling hub” where different extracellular growth and survival signals converge. EGFR can be transactivated in response to multiple heterologous ligands through the physical interaction with multiple receptors, the activity of intracellular kinases or the shedding of EGFR-ligands. In this article we review the crosstalk between the EGFR and other signaling pathways that could be relevant to liver cancer development and treatment

  2. Epidermal segmentation in high-definition optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Annan; Cheng, Jun; Yow, Ai Ping; Wall, Carolin; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Tey, Hong Liang; Liu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Epidermis segmentation is a crucial step in many dermatological applications. Recently, high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) has been developed and applied to imaging subsurface skin tissues. In this paper, a novel epidermis segmentation method using HD-OCT is proposed in which the epidermis is segmented by 3 steps: the weighted least square-based pre-processing, the graph-based skin surface detection and the local integral projection-based dermal-epidermal junction detection respectively. Using a dataset of five 3D volumes, we found that this method correlates well with the conventional method of manually marking out the epidermis. This method can therefore serve to effectively and rapidly delineate the epidermis for study and clinical management of skin diseases.

  3. Exudative epidermitis in pigs caused by toxigenic Staphylococcus chromogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter; Daugaard, Lise

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcus chromogenes is closely related to Staphylococcus hyicus, which is recognised as the causative agent of exudative epidermitis (EE) in pigs. S. chromogenes is part of the normal skin flora of pigs, cattle and poultry and has so far been considered non-pathogenic to pigs. A strain of S....... chromogenes producing exfoliative toxin type B, ExhB, was identified by the use of a multiplex PCR specific for the exfoliative toxins from S. hyicus. The exfoliative toxin from S. chromogenes reacted in immunoblot analysis with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to ExhB from S. hyicus and had...... an apparent molecular weight of 30 kDa. Sequencing the gene encoding the exfoliative toxin from S. chromogenes revealed that the molecular weight of the toxin with the signal peptide and the mature toxin was 30,553 and 26,694 Da, respectively. Comparison of the exhB genes from S. chromogenes strain VA654...

  4. EPIDERMAL CHARACTERS OF BACCHARIS (ASTERACEAE SPECIES USED IN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FREIRE SUSANA E.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A morphological study of 38 species of Baccharis used in traditional medicinewas carried out to provide some epidermal characters that will contribute to theknowledge of the genus. The present study revealed: 1 seven different types oftrichomes: conical, aseptate fl agellate, fi liform fl agellate, 1-armed, 2-4-armed,bulbiferous fl agellate, and glandular biseriate; 2 that 28 of the total of 38 specieshave trichomes in tufts; 3 six different types of stomata: anomocytic, anisocytic,cyclocytic, actinocytic, tetracytic, and staurocytic; 4 that some trichome types,such as 2-4-armed (B. dracunculifolia and aseptate fl agellate branched (B. trinervis,show a high diagnostic value; 5 that the stomata types can be used to differentiatespecies with similar trichomes type (e.g. B. trimera and B. articulata.Illustrations of the studied characters are provided.

  5. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G

    1999-01-01

    Eps15 was originally identified as a substrate for the kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Eps15 has a tripartite structure comprising a NH2-terminal portion, which contains three EH domains, a central putative coiled-coil region, and a COOH-terminal domain containing...... multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Aspartate-Proline-Phenylalanine. A pool of Eps15 is localized at clathrin coated pits where it interacts with the clathrin assembly complex AP-2 and a novel AP-2 binding protein, Epsin. Perturbation of Eps15 and Epsin function inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis...... of EGF and transferrin, demonstrating that both proteins are components of the endocytic machinery. Since the family of EH-containing proteins is implicated in various aspects of intracellular sorting, biomolecular strategies aimed at interfering with these processes can now be envisioned...

  6. Effect of glucocorticoids and gamma radiation on epidermal Langerhans cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belsito, D.V.; Baer, R.L.; Thorbecke, G.J.; Gigli, I.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of 750 rads of gamma radiation on the rate of return of epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) following suppressive doses of topical glucorticoids was studied in guinea pigs. Gamma radiation alone had no effect on the LC as assessed by staining for cell membrane ATPase activity and Ia antigen. It did, however, delay the expected return of Ia but not ATPase surface markers on the LC after perturbation with glucocorticoids. The delayed return of surface Ia antigen is possibly related to a radiation-induced defect in the production of a required lymphokine and/or in intracellular Ia transport. Although our data do not rule out a cytolytic effect of steroids on the LC, they do strongly suggest that, at least in part, glucocorticoids act on the LC by altering cell surface characteristics

  7. Collagen sheet dressings for cutaneous lesions of toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is associated with a significant mortality of 30-50% and long-term sequelae. Treatment includes early admission to a burn unit, where management with precise fluid, electrolyte, protein, and energy supplementation, moderate mechanical ventilation, and expert wound care can be provided. Specific treatment with immunosuppressive drugs or immunoglobulins did not show an improved outcome in most studies and remains controversial. We have treated the cutaneous lesions of seven patients of TEN with collagen sheet dressings and have found a significant reduction in morbidity. The sheets are a one-time dressing, easy to apply and they reduce fluid loss, prevent infection, reduce pain, avoid repeated dressings and gradually peal off as the underlying lesions heal.

  8. Epidermal differential impedance sensor for conformal skin hydration monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Liu, Yuhao; Rogers, John A

    2012-12-01

    We present the design and use of an ultrathin, stretchable sensor system capable of conformal lamination onto the skin, for precision measurement and spatial mapping of levels of hydration. This device, which we refer to as a class of 'epidermal electronics' due to its 'skin-like' construction and mode of intimate integration with the body, contains miniaturized arrays of impedance-measurement electrodes arranged in a differential configuration to compensate for common-mode disturbances. Experimental results obtained with different frequencies and sensor geometries demonstrate excellent precision and accuracy, as benchmarked against conventional, commercial devices. The reversible, non-invasive soft contact of this device with the skin makes its operation appealing for applications ranging from skin care, to athletic monitoring to health/wellness assessment.

  9. Toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with deflazacort therapy with nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Chae Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a drug-related fatal disease. Extensive necrosis of the epidermis can lead to serious complications. This report describes two cases of TEN, associated with deflazacort (DFZ, in two boys, aged 4 years and 14 years, with nephrotic syndrome (NS. The 14-year-old male teenager received DFZ following NS relapse. After 17 days, pruritic papules appeared on the lower extremities. Another case involved a 4-year-old boy receiving DFZ and enalapril. After a 41-day DFZ treatment period, erythematous papules appeared on the palms and soles. Within 3 days, both boys developed widespread skin lesions (>50% and were admitted to the intensive care unit for resuscitative and supportive treatment. The patients showed improvement after intravenous immunoglobulin-G therapy. Owing to the rapid, fatal course of TEN, clinicians need to be aware of the adverse effects of this drug when treating cases of NS.

  10. [Impact of wet work on epidermal barrier (tewl and stratum corneum hydration) and skin viscoelasticity in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Świcrczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota; Świerczyńska-Machura, Dominika; Kręcisz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are prone to develop hand eczema due to occupational exposure to irritants, including wet work. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of wet work on selected skin properties, reflecting epidermal barrier function--transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration--and additionally skin viscoelasticity, in nurses. Study subjects included 90 nurses employed in hospital wards. Measurements were carried out within the dorsal aspect of the dominant hand, using a Cutometer MPA 580 equipped with Tewameter TM 300 and Corneometer CM 825 (Courage & Khazaka, Germany) probes. Examina- tions took place on hospital premises. Similar measurements were performed in the control group of females non-exposed to irritants. In the examined group of nurses, mean TEWL was 15.5 g/h/m2 and was higher than in the control group (12.99 g/h/m2). After rejecting the extreme results, the difference between the groups proved to be statistically significant (p hydration was lower in the examined group (37.915) compared with the control group (40.05), but the difference was not sta tistically significant. Also results of viscoelasticity assessment showed no significant differences between studied groups. The results of the assessment of skin biophysical properties show that wet work exerts a moderately adverse impact on skin condition. A higher TEWL value and a lower stratum corneum hydration in workers exposed to irritants reflect an adverse impact of these factors on the epidermal barrier function.

  11. Dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis in patients with basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirseren, Duriye Deniz; Cicek, Cagla; Alisik, Murat; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol; Aktaş, Akın; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to measure and compare the dynamic thiol/disulphide homeostasis of patients with basal cell carcinoma and healthy subjects with a newly developed and original method. Thirty four patients attending our outpatient clinic and clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as nodular basal cell carcinoma, and age and gender matched 30 healthy individuals have been involved in the study. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis tests have been measured with a novel automatic spectrophotometric method developed and the results have been compared statistically. Serum native thiol and disulphide levels in the patient and control group show a considerable variance statistically (p = 0.028, 0.039, respectively). Total thiol levels do not reveal a considerable variation (p = 0.094). Disulphide/native thiol ratios and native thiol/total thiol ratios also show a considerable variance statistically (p = 0.012, 0.013, 0.010, respectively). Thiol disulphide homeostasis in patients with basal cell carcinoma alters in the way that disulphide gets lower and thiols get higher. Thiol/disulphide level is likely to have a role in basal cell carcinoma pathogenesis.

  12. Metabolic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: Bioenergetics, Redox Homeostasis and Central Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Jacome, Maria S; Lei, Shulei; Hernandez-Franco, Pablo; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the accumulation of protein inclusions (Lewy bodies) are the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is triggered by genetic alterations, environmental/occupational exposures and aging. However, the exact molecular mechanisms linking these PD risk factors to neuronal dysfunction are still unclear. Alterations in redox homeostasis and bioenergetics (energy failure) are thought to be central components of neurodegeneration that contribute to the impairment of important homeostatic processes in dopaminergic cells such as protein quality control mechanisms, neurotransmitter release/metabolism, axonal transport of vesicles and cell survival. Importantly, both bioenergetics and redox homeostasis are coupled to neuro-glial central carbon metabolism. We and others have recently established a link between the alterations in central carbon metabolism induced by PD risk factors, redox homeostasis and bioenergetics and their contribution to the survival/death of dopaminergic cells. In this review, we focus on the link between metabolic dysfunction, energy failure and redox imbalance in PD, making an emphasis in the contribution of central carbon (glucose) metabolism. The evidence summarized here strongly supports the consideration of PD as a disorder of cell metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deletion of Lkb1 in Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurons Impairs Peripheral Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A.; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J.; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D.; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L.; Giese, K. Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L.; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca2+-calmodulin–dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. RESULTS Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons. PMID:21266325

  14. NPY modulates PYY function in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Nguyen, A D; Lee, I-C J; Yulyaningsih, E; Riepler, S J; Stehrer, B; Enriquez, R F; Lin, S; Shi, Y-C; Baldock, P A; Sainsbury, A; Herzog, H

    2012-08-01

    Both the neuronal-derived neuropeptide Y (NPY) and the gut hormone peptide YY (PYY) have been implicated in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. However, despite similar affinities for the same Y receptors, the co-ordinated actions of these two peptides in energy and glucose homeostasis remain largely unknown. To investigate the mechanisms and possible interactions between PYY with NPY in the regulation of these processes, we utilized NPY/PYY single and double mutant mouse models and examined parameters of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. PYY(-/-) mice exhibited increased fasting-induced food intake, enhanced fasting and oral glucose-induced serum insulin levels, and an impaired insulin tolerance, - changes not observed in NPY(-/-) mice. Interestingly, whereas PYY deficiency-induced impairment in insulin tolerance remained in NPY(-/-) PYY(-/-) mice, effects of PYY deficiency on fasting-induced food intake and serum insulin concentrations at baseline and after the oral glucose bolus were absent in NPY(-/-) PYY(-/-) mice, suggesting that NPY signalling may be required for PYY's action on insulin secretion and fasting-induced hyperphagia. Moreover, NPY(-/-) PYY(-/-) , but not NPY(-/-) or PYY(-/-) mice had significantly decreased daily food intake, indicating interactive control by NPY and PYY on spontaneous food intake. Furthermore, both NPY(-/-) and PYY(-/-) mice showed significantly reduced respiratory exchange ratio during the light phase, with no additive effects observed in NPY(-/-) PYY(-/-) mice, indicating that NPY and PYY may regulate oxidative fuel selection via partly shared mechanisms. Overall, physical activity and energy expenditure, however, are not significantly altered by NPY and PYY single or double deficiencies. These findings show significant and diverse interactions between NPY and PYY signalling in the regulation of different aspects of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Deletion of Lkb1 in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L; Giese, K Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2011-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons.

  16. Mig-6 plays a critical role in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bon Jeong Ku

    Full Text Available The disruption of cholesterol homeostasis leads to an increase in cholesterol levels which results in the development of cardiovascular disease. Mitogen Inducible Gene 6 (Mig-6 is an immediate early response gene that can be induced by various mitogens, stresses, and hormones. To identify the metabolic role of Mig-6 in the liver, we conditionally ablated Mig-6 in the liver using the Albumin-Cre mouse model (Alb(cre/+Mig-6(f/f; Mig-6(d/d. Mig-6(d/d mice exhibit hepatomegaly and fatty liver. Serum levels of total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and hepatic lipid were significantly increased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. The daily excretion of fecal bile acids was significantly decreased in the Mig-6(d/d mice. DNA microarray analysis of mRNA isolated from the livers of these mice showed alterations in genes that regulate lipid metabolism, bile acid, and cholesterol synthesis, while the expression of genes that regulate biliary excretion of bile acid and triglyceride synthesis showed no difference in the Mig-6(d/d mice compared to Mig-6(f/f controls. These results indicate that Mig-6 plays an important role in cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Mice with liver specific conditional ablation of Mig-6 develop hepatomegaly and increased intrahepatic lipid and provide a novel model system to investigate the genetic and molecular events involved in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and bile acid synthesis. Defining the molecular mechanisms by which Mig-6 regulates cholesterol homeostasis will provide new insights into the development of more effective ways for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  17. MicroRNAs at the epicenter of intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcheva, Antoaneta

    2017-03-01

    Maintaining intestinal homeostasis is a key prerequisite for a healthy gut. Recent evidence points out that microRNAs (miRNAs) act at the epicenter of the signaling networks regulating this process. The fine balance in the interaction between gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial cells, and the host immune system is achieved by constant transmission of signals and their precise regulation. Gut microbes extensively communicate with the host immune system and modulate host gene expression. On the other hand, sensing of gut microbiota by the immune cells provides appropriate tolerant responses that facilitate the symbiotic relationships. While the role of many regulatory proteins, receptors and their signaling pathways in the regulation of the intestinal homeostasis is well documented, the involvement of non-coding RNA molecules in this process has just emerged. This review discusses the most recent knowledge about the contribution of miRNAs in the regulation of the intestinal homeostasis. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Breast Milk Hormones and Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Savino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that a complex relationship exists between the central nervous system and peripheral organs involved in energy homeostasis. It consists in the balance between food intake and energy expenditure and includes the regulation of nutrient levels in storage organs, as well as in blood, in particular blood glucose. Therefore, food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose homeostasis are strictly connected to each other. Several hormones, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and ghrelin, are involved in this complex regulation. These hormones play a role in the regulation of glucose metabolism and are involved in the development of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Recently, their presence in breast milk has been detected, suggesting that they may be involved in the regulation of growth in early infancy and could influence the programming of energy balance later in life. This paper focuses on hormones present in breast milk and their role in glucose homeostasis.

  19. Phospholipid Homeostasis Regulates Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Meltzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in lipid homeostasis have been observed in many neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dendrite morphogenesis defects. However, the molecular mechanisms of how lipid homeostasis affects dendrite morphogenesis are unclear. We find that easily shocked (eas, which encodes a kinase with a critical role in phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE synthesis, and two other enzymes in this synthesis pathway are required cell autonomously in sensory neurons for dendrite growth and stability. Furthermore, we show that the level of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP activity is important for dendrite development. SREBP activity increases in eas mutants, and decreasing the level of SREBP and its transcriptional targets in eas mutants largely suppresses the dendrite growth defects. Furthermore, reducing Ca2+ influx in neurons of eas mutants ameliorates the dendrite morphogenesis defects. Our study uncovers a role for EAS kinase and reveals the in vivo function of phospholipid homeostasis in dendrite morphogenesis.

  20. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower-visitors.