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Sample records for enzymes horseradish peroxidase

  1. An Enzyme Switch Employing Direct Electrochemical Communication between Horseradish Peroxidase and a Poly(aniline) Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, P N; Birkin, P R; Wang, J H; Palmisano, F; De Benedetto, G

    1998-09-01

    An enzyme switch, or microelectrochemical enzyme transistor, responsive to hydrogen peroxide was made by connecting two carbon band electrodes (∼10 μm wide, 4.5 mm long separated by a 20-μm gap) with an anodically grown film of poly(aniline). Horseradish peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) was either adsorbed onto the poly(aniline) film or immobilized in an insulating poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) polymer grown electrochemically on top of the poly(aniline) film to complete the device. In the completed device, the conductivity of the poly(aniline) film changes from conducting (between - 0.05 and + 0.3 V vs SCE at pH 5) to insulating (>+0.3 V vs SCE at pH 5) on addition of hydrogen peroxide. The change in conductivity is brought about by oxidation of the poly(aniline) film by direct electrochemical communication between the enzyme and the conducting polymer. This was confirmed by measuring the potential of the poly(aniline) film during switching of the conductivity in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The devices can be reused by rereducing the poly(aniline) electrochemically to a potential below +0.3 V vs SCE. A blind test showed that the device can be used to determine unknown concentrations of H(2)O(2) in solution and that, when used with hydrogen peroxide concentrations below 0.5 mmol dm(-)(3), the same device maybe reused several times. The possible development of devices of this type for use in applications requiring the measurement of low levels of hydrogen peroxide or horseradish peroxidase is discussed.

  2. Wound-induced expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaoka, A; Kawamoto, T; Ohta, H; Sekine, M; Takano, M; Shinmyo, A

    1994-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in the responses of plants to physiological stress and to pathogens. Wound-induced peroxidase of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) was studied. Total peroxidase activity was increased by wounding in cell wall fractions extracted from roots, stems and leaves of horseradish. On the other hand, wounding decreased the peroxidase activity in the soluble fraction from roots. The enzyme activities of the basic isozymes were induced by wounding in horseradish leaves based on data obtained by fractionation of crude enzyme in isoelectric focusing gel electrophoresis followed by activity staining. We have previously isolated genomic clones for four peroxidase genes, namely, prxC1a, prxC1b, prxC2 and prxC3. Northern blot analysis using gene-specific probes showed that mRNA of prxC2, which encodes a basic isozyme, accumulated by wounding, while the mRNAs for other peroxidase genes were not induced. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants were transformed with four chimeric gene constructs, each consisting of a promoter from one of the peroxidase genes and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) structural gene. High level GUS activity induced in response to wounding was observed in tobacco plants containing the prxC2-GUS construct.

  3. Competitive photometric enzyme immunoassay for fullerene C60 and its derivatives using a fullerene conjugated to horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, Olga D.; Smirnova, Natalya I.; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.; Sveshnikov, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a highly sensitive single-step microplate enzyme immunoassay of the ELISA type for fullerene C 60 and its derivatives. Monoclonal anti-fullerene antibodies and a conjugate between fullerene and horseradish peroxidase were used as specific reagents. A direct competitive ELISA was carried out that was based on antibodies immobilized in the well of a microtiter plate, a peroxidase-labeled antigen, and detection via the dye formed from 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine and hydrogen peroxide. Both pristine fullerene C 60 and its water-soluble forms can be determined. The detection limits are 1.5 ng∙mL −1 for fullerene C 60 , and between 0.1 and 1.3 ng∙mL −1 for its derivatives. This ELISA format allows for almost two-fold reduction of the time needed for the assay in comparison to indirect scheme with labeled antibodies. (author)

  4. Oxidation of NAD dimers by horseradish peroxidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Avigliano, L; Carelli, V; Casini, A; Finazzi-Agrò, A; Liberatore, F

    1985-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase catalyses the oxidation of NAD dimers, (NAD)2, to NAD+ in accordance with a reaction that is pH-dependent and requires 1 mol of O2 per 2 mol of (NAD)2. Horseradish peroxidase also catalyses the peroxidation of (NAD)2 to NAD+. In contrast, bacterial NADH peroxidase does not catalyse the peroxidation or the oxidation of (NAD)2. A free-radical mechanism is proposed for both horseradish-peroxidase-catalysed oxidation and peroxidation of (NAD)2.

  5. Enzymatic removal of phenol and p-chlorophenol in enzyme reactor: Horseradish peroxidase immobilized on magnetic beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramoglu, Guelay; Arica, M. Yakup

    2008-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the magnetic poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate) (poly(GMA-MMA)), via covalent bonding and used for the treatment of phenolic wastewater in continuous systems. For this purposes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was covalently immobilized onto magnetic poly(GMA-MMA) beds using glutaraldehyde (GA) as a coupling agent. The maximum HRP immobilization capacity of the magnetic poly(GMA-MMA)-GA beads was 3.35 mg g -1 . The immobilized HRP retained 79% of the activity of the free HRP used for immobilization. The immobilized HRP was used for the removal of phenol and p-chlorophenol via polymerization of dissolved phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The effect of pH and temperature on the phenol oxidation rate was investigated. The results were compared with the free HRP, which showed that the optimum pH value for the immobilized HRP is similar to that for the free HRP. The optimum pH value for free and immobilized HRP was observed at pH 7.0. The optimum temperature for phenols oxidation with immobilized HRP was between 25 and 35 deg. C and the immobilized HRP has more resistance to temperature inactivation than that of the free form. Finally, the immobilized HRP was operated in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed reactor, and phenols were successfully removed in the enzyme reactor

  6. Combined cross-linked enzyme aggregates of horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase for catalyzing cascade chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Le Truc; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Cascade reactions involved unstable intermediates are often encountered in biological systems. In this study, we developed combined cross-linked enzyme aggregates (combi-CLEA) to catalyze a cascade reaction which involves unstable hydrogen peroxide as an intermediate. The combi-CLEA contains two enzymes̶ glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) which are cross-linked together as solid aggregates. The first enzyme GOx catalyzes the oxidation of glucose and produces hydrogen peroxide, which is used by the second enzyme HRP to oxidize 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS). The apparent reaction rate of the cascade reaction reaches 10.5±0.5μM/min when the enzyme ratio is 150:1 (GOx:HRP). Interestingly, even in the presence of catalase, an enzyme that quickly decomposes hydrogen peroxide, the reaction rate only decreases by 18.7% to 8.3±0.3μM/min. This result suggests that the intermediate hydrogen peroxide is not decomposed by catalase due to a short diffusion distance between GOx and HRP in the combi-CLEA. Scanning electron microscopy images suggest that combi-CLEA particles are hollow spheres and have an average diameter around 250nm. Because of their size, combi-CLEA particles can be entrapped inside a nylon membrane for detecting glucose by using the cascade reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glycosylation and thermodynamic versus kinetic stability of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tams, J.W.; Welinder, Karen G.

    1998-01-01

    Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability......Glycoprotein stability, glycoprotein unfolding, horseradish peroxidase, thermodynamic stability, kinetik stability...

  8. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié , Sté phane C.; Kahawong, Patarawan; Duan, Xiaonan; Bowser, Daniel; Edward, Joseph B.; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs

  9. Development of horseradish peroxidase-based cross-linked enzyme aggregates and their environmental exploitation for bioremediation purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), in-house isolated crude cocktail enzyme, from Armoracia rusticana was cross-linked using a new type of cross-linking agent, i.e., ethylene glycol-bis [succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide, (EG-NHS)], which is mild in nature as compared to the glutaraldehyde (GA). The HRP-immobilized cross-linked enzyme aggregates (HRP-CLEAs) were developed using a wider range of EG-NHS and notably no adverse effect was observed. In a comparative evaluation, in the case of EG-NHS, a high-level stability in the residual activity was recorded, whereas a sharp decrease was observed in the case of glutaraldehyde. Following initial cross-linker evaluation, the HRP-CLEAs were tested to investigate their bio-catalytic efficacy for bioremediation purposes using a newly developed packed bed reactor system (PBRS). A maximal of 94.26% degradation of textile-based methyl orange dye was recorded within the shortest time frame, following 91.73% degradation of basic red 9, 84.35% degradation of indigo, 81.47% degradation of Rhodamin B, and 73.6% degradation of Rhodamine 6G, respectively, under the same working environment. Notably, the HRP-CLEAs retained almost 60% of its original activity after methyl orange dye degradation in seven consecutive cycles using PBRS. Furthermore, after HRP-CLEAs-mediated treatment in the PBRS, a significant toxicity reduction in the dye samples was recorded as compared to their pristine counterparts. In conclusion, the results suggest that the newly developed HRP-CLEAs have a great potential for industrial exploitation, to tackle numerous industrial dye-based emergent pollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a thiol-ene based screening platform for enzyme immobilization demonstrated using horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Pinelo, Manuel; Woodley, John

    2017-01-01

    Efficient immobilization of enzymes on support surfaces requires an exact match between the surface chemistry and the specific enzyme. A successful match would normally be identified through time consuming screening of conventional resins in multiple experiments testing individual immobilization...... strategies. In this study we present a versatile strategy that largely expands the number of possible surface functionalities for enzyme immobilization in a single, generic platform. The combination of many individual surface chemistries and thus immobilization methods in one modular system permits faster...... functionalization by thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) resulted in the formation of a functional monolayer in each well, whereas, polymer surface grafts were introduced through surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP). Enzyme immobilization on the modified surfaces was evaluated by using a rhodamine...

  11. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näätsaari, Laura; Krainer, Florian W; Schubert, Michael; Glieder, Anton; Thallinger, Gerhard G

    2014-03-24

    Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes.

  12. Paper Microzone Plates as Analytical Tools for Studying Enzyme Stability: A Case Study on the Stabilization of Horseradish Peroxidase Using Trehalose and SU-8 Epoxy Novolac Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaja, Kirsten A; Chaplan, Cory A; Zhang, Jingyi; Martinez, Nathaniel W; Martinez, Andres W

    2017-05-16

    Paper microzone plates in combination with a noncontact liquid handling robot were demonstrated as tools for studying the stability of enzymes stored on paper. The effect of trehalose and SU-8 epoxy novolac resin (SU-8) on the stability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied in both a short-term experiment, where the activity of various concentrations of HRP dried on paper were measured after 1 h, and a long-term experiment, where the activity of a single concentration of HRP dried and stored on paper was monitored for 61 days. SU-8 was found to stabilize HRP up to 35 times more than trehalose in the short-term experiment for comparable concentrations of the two reagents, and a 1% SU-8 solution was found to stabilize HRP approximately 2 times more than a 34% trehalose solution in both short- and long-term experiments. The results suggest that SU-8 is a promising candidate for use as an enzyme-stabilizing reagent for paper-based diagnostic devices and that the short-term experiment could be used to quickly evaluate the capacity of various reagents for stabilizing enzymes to identify and characterize new enzyme-stabilizing reagents.

  13. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kermad, A., E-mail: amina_energetique@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Sam, S., E-mail: Sabrina.sam@polytechnique.edu [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria); Ghellai, N., E-mail: na_ghellai@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Khaldi, K., E-mail: Khadidjaphy@yahoo.fr [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables (URMER), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abou Baker Belkaid, B.P. 119, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Gabouze, N., E-mail: ngabouze@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE), 02 Bd. Frantz-Fanon, B.P. 140, Alger-7 merveilles, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode.

  14. Horseradish peroxidase-modified porous silicon for phenol monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermad, A.; Sam, S.; Ghellai, N.; Khaldi, K.; Gabouze, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface. • Multistep strategy was used allowing the maintaining of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized enzyme. • Direct electron transfer has occurred between the immobilized enzyme and the surface. • Electrochemical measurements showed a response of HRP-modified PSi toward phenol in the presence of H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: In this study, horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) was covalently immobilized on porous silicon (PSi) surface using multistep strategy. First, acid terminations were generated on hydrogenated PSi surface by thermal hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid. Then, the carboxyl-terminated monolayer was transformed to active ester (succinimidyl ester) using N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the presence of the coupling agent N-ethyl-N′-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Subsequently, the enzyme was anchored on the surface via an amidation reaction. The structure of the PSi layers was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and contact angle measurements confirmed the efficiency of the modification at each step of the functionalization. Cyclic voltammetry was recorded using the HRP-modified PSi as working electrode. The results show that the enzymatic activity of the immobilized HRP is preserved and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, the enzyme oxidizes phenolic molecules which were subsequently reduced at the modified-PSi electrode

  15. Coupled enzyme reactions performed in heterogeneous reaction media: experiments and modeling for glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase in a PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumiller, William M; Davis, Bradley W; Hashemian, Negar; Maranas, Costas; Armaou, Antonios; Keating, Christine D

    2014-03-06

    The intracellular environment in which biological reactions occur is crowded with macromolecules and subdivided into microenvironments that differ in both physical properties and chemical composition. The work described here combines experimental and computational model systems to help understand the consequences of this heterogeneous reaction media on the outcome of coupled enzyme reactions. Our experimental model system for solution heterogeneity is a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/sodium citrate aqueous mixture that provides coexisting PEG-rich and citrate-rich phases. Reaction kinetics for the coupled enzyme reaction between glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were measured in the PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Enzyme kinetics differed between the two phases, particularly for the HRP. Both enzymes, as well as the substrates glucose and H2O2, partitioned to the citrate-rich phase; however, the Amplex Red substrate necessary to complete the sequential reaction partitioned strongly to the PEG-rich phase. Reactions in ATPS were quantitatively described by a mathematical model that incorporated measured partitioning and kinetic parameters. The model was then extended to new reaction conditions, i.e., higher enzyme concentration. Both experimental and computational results suggest mass transfer across the interface is vital to maintain the observed rate of product formation, which may be a means of metabolic regulation in vivo. Although outcomes for a specific system will depend on the particulars of the enzyme reactions and the microenvironments, this work demonstrates how coupled enzymatic reactions in complex, heterogeneous media can be understood in terms of a mathematical model.

  16. Oxidative degradation of alkylphenols by horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuyama, Hisae; Endo, Yasushi; Fujimoto, Kenshiro; Hatana, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Alkylphenols such as bisphenol A (2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane; BPA), p-nonylphenol (p-NP), and p-octylphenol (p-OP) that are known as endocrine disrupters were oxidized by horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase (HRP) with H2O2. The optimal pHs for BPA, p-NP, and p-OP were 8.0, 7.0, and 5.0, respectively. The optimal temperature for BPA was 20 degrees C. Although BPA was rapidly degraded by HRP, its degradation depended on the concentration of HRP. Most of the oxidation products of BPA were polymers, although some 4-isopropenylphenol was produced. When male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to BPA, vitellogenin in the blood increased. However, no increased vitellogenin was observed in medaka exposed to HRP-oxidized BPA. The enzymatic oxidation of BPA using HRP was able to eliminate its estrogen-like activity.

  17. Horseradish peroxidase-nanoclay hybrid particles of high functional and colloidal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Marko; Rouster, Paul; Somosi, Zoltan; Szilagyi, Istvan

    2018-08-15

    Highly stable dispersions of enzyme-clay nanohybrids of excellent horseradish peroxidase activity were developed. Layered double hydroxide nanoclay was synthesized and functionalized with heparin polyelectrolyte to immobilize the horseradish peroxidase enzyme. The formation of a saturated heparin layer on the platelets led to charge inversion of the positively charged bare nanoclay and to highly stable aqueous dispersions. Great affinity of the enzyme to the surface modified platelets resulted in strong horseradish peroxidase adsorption through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding network and prevented enzyme leakage from the obtained material. The enzyme kept its functional integrity upon immobilization and showed excellent activity in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of an aromatic compound in the test reactions. In addition, remarkable long term functional stability of the enzyme-nanoclay hybrid was observed making the developed colloidal system a promising antioxidant candidate in biomedical treatments and industrial processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidations of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic aliphatic amines by horseradish peroxidase: the indole ring binds to the enzyme and mediates electron-transfer amine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Shan; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2008-01-23

    Although oxidations of aromatic amines by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are well-known, typical aliphatic amines are not substrates of HRP. In this study, the reactions of N-benzyl and N-methyl cyclic amines with HRP were found to be slow, but reactions of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines were 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. Analyses of pH-rate profiles revealed a dominant contribution to reaction by the amine-free base forms, the only species found to bind to the enzyme. A metabolic study on a family of congeneric N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines indicated competition between amine and indole oxidation pathways. Amine oxidation dominated for the seven- and eight-membered azacycles, where ring size supports the change in hybridization from sp3 to sp2 that occurs upon one-electron amine nitrogen oxidation, whereas only indole oxidation was observed for the six-membered ring congener. Optical difference spectroscopic binding data and computational docking simulations suggest that all the arylalkylamine substrates bind to the enzyme through their aromatic termini with similar binding modes and binding affinities. Kinetic saturation was observed for a particularly soluble substrate, consistent with an obligatory role of an enzyme-substrate complexation preceding electron transfer. The significant rate enhancements seen for the indoleethylamine substrates suggest the ability of the bound indole ring to mediate what amounts to medium long-range electron-transfer oxidation of the tertiary amine center by the HRP oxidants. This is the first systematic investigation to document aliphatic amine oxidation by HRP at rates consistent with normal metabolic turnover, and the demonstration that this is facilitated by an auxiliary electron-rich aromatic ring.

  19. Purification of peroxidase from Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Christopher B; Macinnis, Morgan C; Macdonald, M Jason; Williams, Joanna Bassey; Spencer, Colin A; Burke, Alicia A; Irwin, David J G; D'Cunha, Godwin B

    2010-08-11

    Peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from horseradish ( Armoracia rusticana ) roots was purified using a simple, rapid, three-step procedure: ultrasonication, ammonium sulfate salt precipitation, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl Sepharose CL-4B. The preparation gave an overall yield of 71%, 291-fold purification, and a high specific activity of 772 U mg(-1) protein. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified enzyme was homogeneous and had a molecular weight of approximately 40 kDa. The isolated enzyme had an isoelectric point of 8.8 and a Reinheitszahl value of 3.39 and was stable when stored in the presence of glycerol at -20 degrees C, with >95% retention of original enzyme activity for at least 6 months. Maximal activity of purified horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was obtained under different optimized conditions: substrate (guaiacol and H(2)O(2)) concentrations (0.5 and 0.3 mM, respectively), type of buffer (50 mM phosphate buffer), pH (7.0), time (1.0 min), and temperature of incubation (30 degrees C). In addition, the effect of HRP and H(2)O(2) in a neutral-buffered aqueous solution for the oxidation of phenol and 2-chlorophenol substrates was also studied. Different conditions including concentrations of phenol/2-chlorophenol, H(2)O(2), and enzyme, time, pH, and temperature were standardized for the maximal activity of HRP with these substrates; under these optimal conditions 89.6 and 91.4% oxidations of phenol and 2-chlorophenol were obtained, respectively. The data generated from this work could have direct implications in studies on the commercial production of this biotechnologically important enzyme and its stability in different media.

  20. An updated view on horseradish peroxidases: recombinant production and biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian W; Glieder, Anton

    2015-02-01

    Horseradish peroxidase has been the subject of scientific research for centuries. It has been used exhaustively as reporter enzyme in diagnostics and histochemistry and still plays a major role in these applications. Numerous studies have been conducted on the role of horseradish peroxidase in the plant and its catalytic mechanism. However, little progress has been made in its recombinant production. Until now, commercial preparations of horseradish peroxidase are still isolated from plant roots. These preparations are commonly mixtures of various isoenzymes of which only a small fraction has been described so far. The composition of isoenzymes in these mixed isolates is subjected to uncontrollable environmental conditions. Nowadays, horseradish peroxidase regains interest due to its broad applicability in the fields of medicine, life sciences, and biotechnology in cancer therapy, biosensor systems, bioremediation, and biocatalysis. These medically and commercially relevant applications, the recent discovery of new natural isoenzymes with different biochemical properties, as well as the challenges in recombinant production render this enzyme particularly interesting for future biotechnological solutions. Therefore, we reviewed previous studies as well as current developments with biotechnological emphasis on new applications and the major remaining biotechnological challenge-the efficient recombinant production of horseradish peroxidase enzymes.

  1. Incorporation of carbohydrate residues into peroxidase isoenzymes in horseradish roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, J Y; Shannon, L M

    1973-11-01

    Sliced root tissue of the horseradish plant (Armoracia rusticana), when incubated with mannose-U-(14)C, incorporated radioactivity into peroxidase isoenzymes. Over 90% of the radioactivity in the highly purified peroxidase isoenzymes was present in the neutral sugar residues of the molecule, i.e. fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose. When the root slices were incubated simultaneously with leucine-4,5-(3)H and mannose-U-(14)C, cycloheximide strongly inhibited leucine incorporation into the peptide portion of peroxidase isoenzymes but had little effect on the incorporation of (14)C into the neutral sugars. These results indicated that synthesis of the peptide portion of peroxidase was completed before the monosaccharide residues were attached to the molecule. This temporal relationship between the synthesis of protein and the attachment of carbohydrate residues in the plant glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase, appears to be similar to that reported for glycoprotein biosynthesis in many mammalian systems.

  2. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase-Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal K. Mitra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNP using electrochemical techniques, which provide some insight in the application of biosensors as tools for diagnostics because HRP is widely used in clinical diagnostics kits. AuNP capped with (i glutathione and (ii lipoic acid was covalently linked to HRP. The immobilized HRP/AuNP conjugate showed characteristic redox peaks at a gold electrode. It displayed good electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, with good sensitivity and without any electron mediator. The covalent linking of HRP and AuNP did not affect the activity of the enzyme significantly. The response of the electrode towards the different concentrations of H2O2 showed the characteristics of Michaelis Menten enzyme kinetics with an optimum pH between 7.0 to 8.0. The preparation of the sensor involves single layer of enzyme, which can be carried out efficiently and is also highly reproducible when compared to other systems involving the layer-by-layer assembly, adsorption or encapsulation of the enzyme. The immobilized AuNP-HRP can be used for immunosensor applications

  3. The cDNA sequence of a neutral horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek-Roxå, E; Eriksson, H; Mattiasson, B

    1991-02-16

    A cDNA clone encoding a horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase has been isolated and characterized. The cDNA contains 1378 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and the deduced protein contains 327 amino acids which includes a 28 amino acid leader sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence is nine amino acids shorter than the major isoenzyme belonging to the horseradish peroxidase C group (HRP-C) and the sequence shows 53.7% identity with this isoenzyme. The described clone encodes nine cysteines of which eight correspond well with the cysteines found in HRP-C. Five potential N-glycosylation sites with the general sequence Asn-X-Thr/Ser are present in the deduced sequence. Compared to the earlier described HRP-C this is three glycosylation sites less. The shorter sequence and fewer N-glycosylation sites give the native isoenzyme a molecular weight of several thousands less than the horseradish peroxidase C isoenzymes. Comparison with the net charge value of HRP-C indicates that the described cDNA clone encodes a peroxidase which has either the same or a slightly less basic pI value, depending on whether the encoded protein is N-terminally blocked or not. This excludes the possibility that HRP-n could belong to either the HRP-A, -D or -E groups. The low sequence identity (53.7%) with HRP-C indicates that the described clone does not belong to the HRP-C isoenzyme group and comparison of the total amino acid composition with the HRP-B group does not place the described clone within this isoenzyme group. Our conclusion is that the described cDNA clone encodes a neutral horseradish peroxidase which belongs to a new, not earlier described, horseradish peroxidase group.

  4. Stability and Catalytic Kinetics of Horseradish Peroxidase Confined in Nanoporous SBA-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hediki; Chi, Qijin; Ulstrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    We have synthesized nanoporous silica, SBA-15 in the 1 m size range with the pore diameter of 7.6 nm. The redox enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was entrapped in the pores to form nanostructured hybrid materials. The catalytic activity of free and immobilized enzyme was first compared at room...... likely due to different hydrogen bonding of water and increased hydration strength of the protein inside the nanopores....

  5. Preferential hydroxylation over epoxidation catalysis by a horseradish peroxidase mutant: a cytochrome P450 mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P

    2007-10-25

    Density functional theory calculations are presented on the catalytic properties of a horseradish peroxidase mutant whereby the axial nitrogen atom is replaced by phosphorus. This mutant has never been studied experimentally and only one theoretical report on this system is known (de Visser, S. P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 20759-20761). Thus, a one-atom substitution in horseradish peroxidase changes the properties of the catalytic center of the enzyme to more cytochrome P450-type qualities. In particular, the phosphorus-substituted horseradish peroxidase mutant reacts with substrates via a unique reactivity pattern, whereby alkanes are regioselectively hydroxylated even in the presence of a double bond. Reaction barriers of propene epoxidation and hydroxylation are almost identical to ones observed for a cytochrome P450 catalyst and significantly higher than those obtained for a horseradish peroxidase catalyst. It is shown that the regioselectivity difference is entropy and thermally driven and that the electron-transfer processes that occur during the reaction mechanism follow cytochrome P450-type patterns in the hydroxylation reaction.

  6. New fluorimetric assay of horseradish peroxidase using sesamol as substrate and its application to EIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Arakawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish peroxidase (HRP is generally used as a label enzyme in enzyme immunoassay (EIA. The procedure used for HRP detection in EIA is critical for sensitivity and precision. This paper describes a novel fluorimetric assay for horseradish peroxidase (HRP using sesamol as substrate. The principle of the assay is as follow: sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxy phenol is reacted enzymatically in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to produce dimeric sesamol. The dimer is fluorescent and can be detected sensitively at ex. 347 nm, em. 427 nm.The measurable range of HRP was 1.0×10−18 to 1.0×10−15 mol/assay, with a detection limit of 1.0×10−18 mol/assay. The coefficient of variation (CV, n=8 was examined at each point on the standard curve, with a mean CV percentage of 3.8%. This assay system was applied to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH EIA using HRP as the label enzyme. Keywords: Sesamol, Fluorescence, Enzyme immunoassay (EIA, Horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH

  7. Horseradish peroxidase embedded in polyacrylamide nanoparticles enables optical detection of reactive oxygen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, A.K.; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Olsen, L.F.

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized new nanometer-sized polyacrylamide particles containing horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent dyes. Proteins and dyes are encapsulated by radical polymerization in inverse microemulsion. The activity of the encapsulated enzyme has been examined and it mainta......We have synthesized and characterized new nanometer-sized polyacrylamide particles containing horseradish peroxidase and fluorescent dyes. Proteins and dyes are encapsulated by radical polymerization in inverse microemulsion. The activity of the encapsulated enzyme has been examined...... for quantification of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species in microenvironments, and we propose that the particles may find use as nanosensors for use in, e.g., living cells. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  8. Self-Assembled Complexes of Horseradish Peroxidase with Magnetic Nanoparticles Showing Enhanced Peroxidase Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Corgié, Stéphane C.

    2012-02-15

    Bio-nanocatalysts (BNCs) consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) self-assembled with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) enhance enzymatic activity due to the faster turnover and lower inhibition of the enzyme. The size and magnetization of the MNPs affect the formation of the BNCs, and ultimately control the activity of the bound enzymes. Smaller MNPs form small clusters with a low affinity for the HRP. While the turnover for the bound fraction is drastically increased, there is no difference in the H 2O 2 inhibitory concentration. Larger MNPs with a higher magnetization aggregate in larger clusters and have a higher affinity for the enzyme and a lower substrate inhibition. All of the BNCs are more active than the free enzyme or the MNPs (BNCs > HRP ≤laquo; MNPs). Since the BNCs show surprising resilience in various reaction conditions, they may pave the way towards new hybrid biocatalysts with increased activities and unique catalytic properties for magnetosensitive enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Structure of the horseradish peroxidase isozyme C genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, K; Takemura, H; Shibayama, S; Kobayashi, K; Choi, J K; Shinmyo, A; Takano, M; Yamada, Y; Okada, H

    1988-05-02

    We have isolated, cloned and characterized three cDNAs and two genomic DNAs corresponding to the mRNAs and genes for the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase isoenzyme C (HPR C). The amino acid sequence of HRP C1, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of one of the cDNA clone, pSK1, contained the same primary sequence as that of the purified enzyme established by Welinder [FEBS Lett. 72, 19-23 (1976)] with additional sequences at the N and C terminal. All three inserts in the cDNA clones, pSK1, pSK2 and pSK3, coded the same size of peptide (308 amino acid residues) if these are processed in the same way, and the amino acid sequence were homologous to each other by 91-94%. Functional amino acids, including His40, His170, Tyr185 and Arg183 and S-S-bond-forming Cys, were conserved in the three isozymes, but a few N-glycosylation sites were not the same. Two HRP C isoenzyme genomic genes, prxC1 and prxC2, were tandem on the chromosomal DNA and each gene consisted of four exons and three introns. The positions in the exons interrupted by introns were the same in two genes. We observed a putative promoter sequence 5' upstream and a poly(A) signal 3' downstream in both genes. The gene product of prxC1 might be processed with a signal sequence of 30 amino acid residues at the N terminus and a peptide consisting of 15 amino acid residues at the C terminus.

  10. Study of Horseradish Peroxidase Fixed on Mesoporous Materials as a Chemical Reaction Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengdan; Dai, Rongji

    2017-12-01

    Nanostructured mesoporous materials is a new type of porous materials, which has been widely used. It has excellent capability in enzymes immobilization, but modification on the chemical bonds of the enzyme reduce the enzymatic activity and rarely used in chemical reactions. The horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the mesoporous materials with appropriate aperture and its activity and stability was evaluated when catalyzing the nitration reaction of amines and oxidation reaction of thiourea. The optimum mesoporous material to fix the horseradish peroxidase can be obtained by mixing polyoxyethylene - polyoxypropylene-pol, yoxyethylene(P123), 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene(TMB), and tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) at a ratio of 10:1:1, whose surface area and pore volume and pore diameter calculated by BET and BJH model were 402.903m2/g, 1.084cm2/g, 1.084cm2/g respectively. The horseradish peroxidase, immobilized on the mesoporous materials, was applied for catalyzing the nitration reaction of anilines and oxidation reaction of thiourea, produced a high product yield and can be recycled. Thus, it is a strong candidate as a catalysts for oxidation reactions, to be produced at industral scale, due to its high efficiency and low cost.

  11. A novel and efficient oxidative functionalization of lignin by layer-by-layer immobilised Horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perazzini, Raffaella; Saladino, Raffaele; Guazzaroni, Melissa; Crestini, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was chemically immobilised onto alumina particles and coated by polyelectrolytes layers, using the layer-by-layer technique. The reactivity of the immobilised enzyme was studied in the oxidative functionalisation of softwood milled wood and residual kraft lignins and found higher than the free enzyme. In order to investigate the chemical modifications in the lignin structure, quantitative (31)P NMR was used. The immobilised HRP showed a higher reactivity with respect to the native enzyme yielding extensive depolymerisation of lignin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chinese hamster ovary cell lysosomes retain pinocytized horseradish peroxidase and in situ-radioiodinated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storrie, B.; Sachdeva, M.; Viers, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    We used Chinese hamster ovary cells, a cell line of fibroblastic origin, to investigate whether lysosomes are an exocytic compartment. To label lysosomal contents, Chinese hamster ovary cells were incubated with the solute marker horseradish peroxidase. After an 18-h uptake period, horseradish peroxidase was found in lysosomes by cell fractionation in Percoll gradients and by electron microscope cytochemistry. Over a 24-h period, lysosomal horseradish peroxidase was quantitatively retained by Chinese hamster ovary cells and inactivated with a t 1/2 of 6 to 8 h. Lysosomes were radioiodinated in situ by soluble lactoperoxidase internalized over an 18-h uptake period. About 70% of the radioiodine incorporation was pelleted at 100,000 X g under conditions in which greater than 80% of the lysosomal marker enzyme beta-hexosaminidase was released into the supernatant. By one-dimensional electrophoresis, about 18 protein species were present in the lysosomal membrane fraction, with radioiodine incorporation being most pronounced into species of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons. After a 30-min or 2-h chase at 37 degrees C, radioiodine that was incorporated into lysosomal membranes and contents was retained in lysosomes. These observations indicate that lysosomes labeled by fluid-phase pinocytosis are a terminal component of endocytic pathways in fibroblasts

  13. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Proximity does not contribute to activity enhancement in the glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Tsitkov, Stanislav; Hess, Henry

    2016-12-01

    A proximity effect has been invoked to explain the enhanced activity of enzyme cascades on DNA scaffolds. Using the cascade reaction carried out by glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase as a model system, here we study the kinetics of the cascade reaction when the enzymes are free in solution, when they are conjugated to each other and when a competing enzyme is present. No proximity effect is found, which is in agreement with models predicting that the rapidly diffusing hydrogen peroxide intermediate is well mixed. We suggest that the reason for the activity enhancement of enzymes localized by DNA scaffolds is that the pH near the surface of the negatively charged DNA nanostructures is lower than that in the bulk solution, creating a more optimal pH environment for the anchored enzymes. Our findings challenge the notion of a proximity effect and provide new insights into the role of DNA scaffolds.

  15. Electrospun Chitosan-Gelatin Biopolymer Composite Nanofibers for Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilization in a Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwan Teepoo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor based on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymers nanofibers is found to be effective for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase to detect hydrogen peroxide. The biopolymer nanofibers were fabricated by an electrospining technique. Upon optimization of synthesis parameters, biopolymers nanofibers, an average of 80 nm in diameter, were obtained and were then modified on the working electrode surface. The effects of the concentration of enzyme, pH, and concentration of the buffer and the working potential on the current response of the nanofibers-modified electrode toward hydrogen peroxide were optimized to obtain the maximal current response. The results found that horseradish peroxidase immobilization on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymer nanofibers had advantages of fast response, excellent reproducibility, high stability, and showed a linear response to hydrogen peroxide in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1.7 mM with a detection limit of 0.05 mM and exhibited high sensitivity of 44 µA∙mM−1∙cm−2. The developed system was evaluated for analysis of disinfectant samples and showed good agreement between the results obtained by the titration method without significant differences at the 0.05 significance level. The proposed strategy based on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymer nanofibers for the immobilization of enzymes can be extended for the development of other enzyme-based biosensors.

  16. New fluorimetric assay of horseradish peroxidase using sesamol as substrate and its application to EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Nakabayashi, Shigeo; Ohno, Ken-Ichi; Maeda, Masako

    2012-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is generally used as a label enzyme in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The procedure used for HRP detection in EIA is critical for sensitivity and precision. This paper describes a novel fluorimetric assay for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using sesamol as substrate. The principle of the assay is as follow: sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxy phenol) is reacted enzymatically in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to produce dimeric sesamol. The dimer is fluorescent and can be detected sensitively at ex. 347 nm, em. 427 nm. The measurable range of HRP was 1.0×10 -18 to 1.0×10 -15  mol/assay, with a detection limit of 1.0×10 -18  mol/assay. The coefficient of variation (CV, n =8) was examined at each point on the standard curve, with a mean CV percentage of 3.8%. This assay system was applied to thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) EIA using HRP as the label enzyme.

  17. Horseradish Peroxidase-Encapsulated Hollow Silica Nanospheres for Intracellular Sensing of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Si-Han; Chen, Chien-Tsu; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chang, Feng-Peng; Chien, Fan-Ching; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have crucial roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Overproduction of ROS can induce oxidative damage to various biomolecules and cellular structures. Therefore, developing an approach capable of monitoring and quantifying ROS in living cells is significant for physiology and clinical diagnoses. Some cell-permeable fluorogenic probes developed are useful for the detection of ROS while in conjunction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Their intracellular scenario is however hindered by the membrane-impermeable property of enzymes. Herein, a new approach for intracellular sensing of ROS by using horseradish peroxidase-encapsulated hollow silica nanospheres (designated HRP@HSNs), with satisfactory catalytic activity, cell membrane permeability, and biocompatibility, was prepared via a microemulsion method. These HRP@HSNs, combined with selective probes or targeting ligands, could be foreseen as ROS-detecting tools in specific organelles or cell types. As such, dihydrorhodamine 123-coupled HRP@HSNs were used for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of physiological H2O2 levels in activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. We envision that this HSNs encapsulating active enzymes can be conjugated with selective probes and targeting ligands to detect ROS in specific organelles or cell types of interest.

  18. Decolorization of Anthraquinonic Dyes from Textile Effluent Using Horseradish Peroxidase: Optimization and Kinetic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Ž. Šekuljica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C. The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes.

  19. Decolorization of Anthraquinonic Dyes from Textile Effluent Using Horseradish Peroxidase: Optimization and Kinetic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šekuljica, Nataša Ž.; Prlainović, Nevena Ž.; Stefanović, Andrea B.; Žuža, Milena G.; Čičkarić, Dragana Z.; Mijin, Dušan Ž.; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica D.

    2015-01-01

    Two anthraquinonic dyes, C.I. Acid Blue 225 and C.I. Acid Violet 109, were used as models to explore the feasibility of using the horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) in the practical decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes in wastewater. The influence of process parameters such as enzyme concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, temperature, dye concentration, and pH was examined. The pH and temperature activity profiles were similar for decolorization of both dyes. Under the optimal conditions, 94.7% of C.I. Acid Violet 109 from aqueous solution was decolorized (treatment time 15 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.4 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 4, and temperature 24°C) and 89.36% of C.I. Acid Blue 225 (32 min, enzyme concentration 0.15 IU/mL, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.04 mM, dye concentration 30 mg/L, pH 5, and temperature 24°C). The mechanism of both reactions has been proven to follow the two substrate ping-pong mechanism with substrate inhibition, revealing the formation of a nonproductive or dead-end complex between dye and HRP or between H2O2 and the oxidized form of the enzyme. Both chemical oxygen demand and total organic carbon values showed that there was a reduction in toxicity after the enzymatic treatment. This study verifies the viability of use of horseradish peroxidase for the wastewaters treatment of similar anthraquinonic dyes. PMID:25685837

  20. Construction of a horseradish peroxidase resistant toward hydrogen peroxide by saturation mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dastgheib, Seyed Mohammad Mehdi; Khajeh, Khosro

    2016-11-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with a variety of potential biotechnological applications is still isolated from the horseradish root as a mixture of different isoenzymes with different biochemical properties. There is an increasing demand for preparations of high amounts of pure enzyme but its recombinant production is limited because of the lack of glycosylation in Escherichia coli and different glycosylation patterns in yeasts which affects its stability parameters. The goal of this study was to increase the stability of non-glycosylated enzyme, which is produced in E. coli, toward hydrogen peroxide via mutagenesis. Asparagine 268, one of the N-glycosylation sites of the enzyme, has been mutated via saturation mutagenesis using the megaprimer method. Modification and miniaturization of previously described protocols enabled screening of a library propagated in E. coli XJb (DE3). The library of mutants was screened for stability toward hydrogen peroxide with azinobis (ethylbenzthiazoline sulfonate) as a reducing substrate. Asn268Gly mutant, the top variant from the screening, exhibited 18-fold increased stability toward hydrogen peroxide and twice improved thermal stability compared with the recombinant HRP. Moreover, the substitution led to 2.5-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with phenol/4-aminoantipyrine. Constructed mutant represents a stable biocatalyst, which may find use in medical diagnostics, biosensing, and bioprocesses. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Transient Expression and Purification of Horseradish Peroxidase C in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddy, Suzanne M; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Meyers, Ann E; Weber, Brandon; Rybicki, Edward P

    2018-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a commercially important reagent enzyme used in molecular biology and in the diagnostic product industry. It is typically purified from the roots of the horseradish ( Armoracia rusticana ); however, this crop is only available seasonally, yields are variable and often low, and the product is a mixture of isoenzymes. Engineering high-level expression in transiently transformed tobacco may offer a solution to these problems. In this study, a synthetic Nicotiana benthamiana codon-adapted full-length HRP isoenzyme gene as well as C-terminally truncated and both N- and C-terminally truncated versions of the HRP C gene were synthesized, and their expression in N. benthamiana was evaluated using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transient expression system. The influence on HRP C expression levels of co-infiltration with a silencing suppressor (NSs) construct was also evaluated. Highest HRP C levels were consistently obtained using either the full length or C-terminally truncated HRP C constructs. HRP C purification by ion exchange chromatography gave an overall yield of 54% with a Reinheitszahl value of >3 and a specific activity of 458 U/mg. The high level of HRP C production in N. benthamiana in just five days offers an alternative, viable, and scalable system for production of this commercially significant enzyme.

  2. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase based on halloysite nanotubes/chitosan nanocomposite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiumei; Zhang Yao; Shen Hebai [Department of Chemistry, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China); Jia Nengqin, E-mail: nqjia@shnu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2010-12-30

    The novel halloysite nanotubes/chitosan (HNTs/Chi) composite films were firstly explored to utilize for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and their bioelectrochemical properties were studied, in which the biopolymer chitosan was used as a binder to increase film adherence on glassy carbon (GC) electrode. UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that HRP in the composite film could retain its native secondary structure. A pair of well-defined redox peaks of HRP was obtained at the HRP/HNTs/Chi composite film-modified electrode, exhibiting its fast direct electron transfer (DET). Furthermore, the immobilized HRP displayed its good electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The results demonstrate that the HNTs/Chi composite film may improve the enzyme loading with the retention of bioactivity and greatly promote the direct electron transfer, which can be attributed to its unique tubular structure, high specific surface area, and good biocompatibility.

  3. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  4. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  5. Chemical Composition and Rheological Properties of Set Yoghurt Prepared from Skimmed Milk Treated with Horseradish Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to determine the impact of an enzymatic treatment on the fermentation and rheological properties of set yoghurt prepared from skimmed milk. Skimmed bovine milk was treated with horseradish peroxidase added at the level of 645 U per g of proteins in the presence (addition level of 7.8 mmol per L of milk or absence of ferulic acid as a cross-linking agent, and used to prepare set yoghurt with commercial direct vat set starter culture. The evaluation showed that the treatment of skimmed milk with horseradish peroxidase enhanced its apparent viscosity, and storage and loss moduli. The prepared yoghurt contained protein, fat and total solids at 3.49–3.59, 0.46–0.52 and 15.23–15.43 %, respectively, had titratable acidity of 0.83–0.88 %, and no significant difference in the composition was found among the yoghurt samples (p>0.05. Compared to the control yoghurt, the yoghurt prepared from the milk treated with horseradish peroxidase had a higher apparent viscosity, storage and loss moduli and flow behavior indices, especially when ferulic acid was added. Yoghurt samples from the skimmed milk treated either with horseradish peroxidase only or with the additional ferulic acid treatment had better structural reversibility, because their hysteresis loop area during rheological analysis was larger (p<0.05.

  6. A novel membrane-based process to isolate peroxidase from horseradish roots: optimization of operating parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Yang, Bo; Chen, Changzhen

    2013-02-01

    The optimization of operating parameters for the isolation of peroxidase from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots with ultrafiltration (UF) technology was systemically studied. The effects of UF operating conditions on the transmission of proteins were quantified using the parameter scanning UF. These conditions included solution pH, ionic strength, stirring speed and permeate flux. Under optimized conditions, the purity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) obtained was greater than 84 % after a two-stage UF process and the recovery of HRP from the feedstock was close to 90 %. The resulting peroxidase product was then analysed by isoelectric focusing, SDS-PAGE and circular dichroism, to confirm its isoelectric point, molecular weight and molecular secondary structure. The effects of calcium ion on HRP specific activities were also experimentally determined.

  7. Competitive horseradish peroxidase-linked aptamer assay for sensitive detection of Aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linlin; Zhao, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is one of highly toxic mycotoxins and a known human carcinogen. The frequent contamination of AFB1 in food products and large health risk of AFB1 have raised global concerns. Sensitive detection of AFB1 is of vital importance and highly demanded. Herein, we reported a competitive horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-linked aptamer assay for AFB1, combining the advantages of aptamer for affinity binding and enzyme label for signal amplification. In this assay, free AFB1 in solution competed with a covalent conjugate of bovine serum albumin-AFB1 (BSA-AFB1) coated on the wells of microplate in binding to the HRP-labeled aptamer probe. HRP attached on BSA-AFB1 in the wells catalyzed the conversion of substrates into products, allowing the final detection of AFB1 through measurement of the generated products. When TMB (3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride) was used as substrate, absorbance analysis of the product of enzyme reaction enabled the detection of AFB1 at 0.2nM. We further lowered the detection limit of AFB1 to 0.01nM through chemiluminescence analysis by using chemiluminescence substrate of HRP. This assay enabled the detection of AFB1 in complex sample matrix, such as diluted white wine and maize flour. This assay provides a simple, sensitive and rapid method for AFB1 determination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Horseradish peroxidase-screen printed biosensors for determination of Ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lomillo, M Asunción; Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Román, Lorena Del Torno-de; Arcos-Martínez, M Julia

    2011-02-28

    This work summarizes the manufacturing procedure of Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) based biosensors for the determination of the mycotoxin Ochratoxin A (OTA). The biosensors have been fabricated using the single technology of screen-printing. That is to say, an HRP containing ink has been directly screen-printed onto carbon electrodes, which offers a higher rapidity and simplicity in the manufacturing process of biosensors for OTA determination. The formal redox potential of the Fe(III/II) moiety of HRP has been used to demonstrate the effective loading of enzyme into the ink. The chronoamperometric oxidation current registered has been successfully related to the concentration of OTA in solution from different samples, including beer ones. Under the optimum conditions of the experimental variables, precision in terms of reproducibility and repeatability has been calculated in the concentration range from 23.85 to 203.28 nM. A relative standard deviation for the slopes of 10% (n = 4) was obtained for reproducibility. In the case of repeatability, the biosensor retained a 30% of the initial sensitivity after the third calibration. The average capability of detection for 0.05% probabilities of false positive and negative was 26.77 ± 3.61 nM (α = 0.05 and β=0.05, n = 3). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of monomeric and polymeric horseradish peroxidase as labels in competitive ELISA for small molecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongyang; Ying, Yibin; Wu, Jian; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a simple and sensitive competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine aflatoxin B1 (as a model small analyte) and using streptavidin-polymeric horseradish peroxidase complex (SApolyHRP) as a label for signal amplification. The performance of the assay was evaluated by comparing it with the classical indirect competitive ELISA using HRP labeled anti-mouse IgG as the tracer antibody. The results indicate that the SApolyHRP-based competitive ELISA exhibits a typically 2.4-fold steeper slope of the linear working range of the calibration curve compared to the monomeric HRP based classical ELISA, i.e., the sensitivity was increased. The SApolyHRP conjugate causes a typically 19-fold stronger signal generation in comparison to the traditional HRP labeled anti-mouse IgG at the same concentration (25 ng mL −1 ). Moreover, the SApolyHRP-based assay has a much wider linear range and a 3.8-fold better signal-to-noise ratio. Considering its simplicity, sensitivity and ease of operation, this competitive ELISA is considered to be a promising tool for small molecule immuno detection. (author)

  10. Improved activity of immobilized horseradish peroxidase on gold nanoparticles in the presence of bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yuyang; Li, Jun; Huang, Zhenzhen; He, Ke; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    The using of macromolecular additives is known to be a simple and effective way to improve the activity of immobilized enzymes on solid support, yet the mechanism has not been well understood. Taking horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an example, only 30 % of its catalytic activity was kept after being immobilized on the surface of 25-nm Au nanoparticles, mainly attributed to the conformational change of the heme-containing active site. The catalytic activity of HRP was significantly improved to 80 % when a certain amount of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added at the initial stage of the immobilization. Systematic spectral investigation indicated that the addition of BSA inhibited the tertiary structure change around the active site, which was a prerequisite for improved activity of the immobilized HRP. Steady-state kinetic analyses revealed that the introduction of BSA could effectively improve the turnover rate of substrate to product in spite of slight reduced affinity to substrates, which also contributed to the improved catalytic activity

  11. Study on a hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase/GNPs-thionine/chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Xiaobin; Pang Guangchang; Liang Xinyi; Wang Meng; Liu Jing; Zhu Weiming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Glutaraldehyde was used as the bridge linking agent to covalently bonded thionine in chitosan, which is more stable and could effectively prevalent leakage of the electronic mediator. ► The effect of GNPs adsorbed HRP was first accurately characterized by bio-layer interferometry using the ForteBio Octer system. ► The application of self-assembly technology increases the biosensor stability. - Abstract: A novel hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase/GNPs-thionine/chitosan has been developed. Gold nanoparticles fixed with horseradish peroxidase were adsorbed on glassy carbon electrode by the chitosan which cross-linked with the electron mediator of horseradish peroxidase as the bridge linking agent. The assembly procedures were monitored by UV–visible spectral scanning, bio-layer interferometry, cyclic voltammetric and alternating current impedance. The chronoamperometry was used to measure hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide biosensor linear range of detection is 1 × 10 −7 –1 × 10 −4 mol/L, detection limit up to 5.0 × 10 −8 mol/L. Moreover the stability, reproducibility and selectivity of the biosensor were also studied and the results confirmed that the biosensor exhibit fast response to hydrogen peroxide and possess high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  12. Chaperone-like activity of β-casein and its effect on residual in vitro activity of horseradish peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria; Olsen, Karsten; Sørensen, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    , as similar experiment with bovine serum albumin resulted in residual activity of horseradish peroxidase that was significantly lower than without any addition. The effect of β-casein on HRP disappears when pH is below the isoelectric point of β-casein. It was also proven by light scattering studies that β...... proteins. Incubating HRP (0.1 mg mL-1) for 10 min at 72 °C resulted in residual activity of 59 ± 5%, while addition of 1 mg mL-1 β-casein resulted in increase in residual activity up to 85 ± 1%. Increased residual activity is not merely attributed to an effect of higher total protein concentration......-casein interacts with horseradish peroxidase when the temperature was increased from 25 to 70 °C whereas interactions seem to cease when temperature was lowered back to 25 °C. This study highlights how specific proteins can influence enzyme activity, which is of potential importance for various industries...

  13. A H2O2 Biosensor Based on Immobilization of HorseradishPeroxidase in a Gelatine Network Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Zhu

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple and promising H2O2 biosensor has been developed by successfulentrapment of horseradish peroxidase (HRP in a gelatine matrix which was cross-linkedwith formaldehyde. The large microscopic surface area and porous morphology of thegelatine matrix lead to high enzyme loading and the enzyme entrapped in this matrix canretain its bioactivity. This biosensor exhibited a fast amperometric response to hydrogenperoxide (H2O2. The linear range for H2O2 determination was from 2.5×10-5 to2.5×10-3 M, with a detection limit of 2.0×10-6 M based on S / N = 3. This biosensorpossessed very good reproducibility.

  14. Structure-activity relationships and molecular docking of thirteen synthesized flavonoids as horseradish peroxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoudi, Reguia; Djeridane, Amar; Benarous, Khedidja; Gaydou, Emile M; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    For the first time, the structure-activity relationships of thirteen synthesized flavonoids have been investigated by evaluating their ability to modulate horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalytic activity. Indeed, a modified spectrophotometrically method was carried out and optimized using 4-methylcatechol (4-MC) as peroxidase co-substrate. The results show that these flavonoids exhibit a great capacity to inhibit peroxidase with Ki values ranged from 0.14±0.01 to 65±0.04mM. Molecular docking has been achieved using Auto Dock Vina program to discuss the nature of interactions and the mechanism of inhibition. According to the docking results, all the flavonoids have shown great binding affinity to peroxidase. These molecular modeling studies suggested that pyran-4-one cycle acts as an inhibition key for peroxidase. Therefore, potent peroxidase inhibitors are flavonoids with these structural requirements: the presence of the hydroxyl (OH) group in 7, 5 and 4' positions and the absence of the methoxy (O-CH 3 ) group. Apigenin contributed better in HRP inhibitory activity. The present study has shown that the studied flavonoids could be promising HRP inhibitors, which can help in developing new molecules to control thyroid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Conformation and activity alteration of horseradish peroxidase induced by the interaction with gene carrier polyethyleneimines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aimin; Wei, Bangzhi; Mo, Junyong; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Lin

    2018-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) has long been considered as "golden standard" for polymeric gene delivery carriers. However the molecular basis of the cytotoxicity of PEI is poorly understood. Little is known about the effects of PEI on the structure and functions of biomacromolecules. In this work, fluorescence, UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy were conducted to investigate the influence of PEI of average molecular weight 25, 10 and 1.8 kDa (denoted as PEI25k, PEI10k and PEI1.8k) on the conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its catalytic efficiency. Zeta-potential measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry were used to reveal the mechanism of the interaction between PEIs and HRP. PEIs were found to bind onto the surface of HRP predominantly via hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bond or van der Waals interaction. The complex formation between HRP and PEI induced a more compact conformation of the enzyme and an increased hydrophobicity of the microenvironment surrounding heme pocket. The conformational change of HRP had little impact on the affinity towards H2O2 and phenol. However, the increase in the non-planarity of porphyrin ring in the heme group led to an increase in the exposure degree of the active center and thus an enhancement of catalytic efficiency of HRP in the presence of high molecular weight PEIs (PEI25k and PEI10k). The polymer size played an important role in PEI-HRP interaction. PEI of low molecular weight (PEI1.8k) was less efficient to alter the conformation and catalytic activity of HRP in aqueous solutions.

  16. Effects of molecular confinement and crowding on horseradish peroxidase kinetics using a nanofluidic gradient mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichert, William R A; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-07

    The effects of molecular confinement and crowding on enzyme kinetics were studied at length scales and under conditions similar to those found in biological cells. These experiments were carried out using a nanofluidic network of channels constituting a nanofluidic gradient mixer, providing the basis for measuring multiple experimental conditions simultaneously. The 100 nm × 40 μm nanochannels were wet etched directly into borosilicate glass, then annealed and characterized with fluorescein emission prior to kinetic measurements. The nanofluidic gradient mixer was then used to measure the kinetics of the conversion of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of non-fluorescent Amplex Red (AR) to the fluorescent product resorufin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The design of the gradient mixer allows reaction kinetics to be studied under multiple (five) unique solution compositions in a single experiment. To characterize the efficiency of the device the effects of confinement on HRP-catalyzed AR conversion kinetics were studied by varying the starting ratio of AR : H2O2. Equimolar concentrations of Amplex Red and H2O2 yielded the highest reaction rates followed by 2 : 1, 1 : 2, 5 : 1, and finally 1 : 5 [AR] : [H2O2]. Under all conditions, initial reaction velocities were decreased by excess H2O2. Crowding effects on kinetics were studied by increasing solution viscosity in the nanochannels in the range 1.0-1.6 cP with sucrose. Increasing the solution viscosities in these confined geometries decreases the initial reaction velocity at the highest concentration from 3.79 μM min(-1) at 1.00 cP to 0.192 μM min(-1) at 1.59 cP. Variations in reaction velocity are interpreted in the context of models for HRP catalysis and for molecular crowding.

  17. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Amplified biosensing using the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme as an electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelossof, Gilad; Tel-Vered, Ran; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2010-06-01

    The hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme is assembled on Au electrodes. It reveals bioelectrocatalytic properties and electrocatalyzes the reduction of H(2)O(2). The bioelectrocatalytic functions of the hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme are used to develop electrochemical sensors that follow the activity of glucose oxidase and biosensors for the detection of DNA or low-molecular-weight substrates (adenosine monophosphate, AMP). Hairpin nucleic structures that include the G-quadruplex sequence in a caged configuration and the nucleic acid sequence complementary to the analyte DNA, or the aptamer sequence for AMP, are immobilized on Au-electrode surfaces. In the presence of the DNA analyte, or AMP, the hairpin structures are opened, and the hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme structures are generated on the electrode surfaces. The bioelectrocatalytic cathodic currents generated by the functionalized electrodes, upon the electrochemical reduction of H(2)O(2), provide a quantitative measure for the detection of the target analytes. The DNA target was analyzed with a detection limit of 1 x 10(-12) M, while the detection limit for analyzing AMP was 1 x 10(-6) M. Methods to regenerate the sensing surfaces are presented.

  19. Preparation of goat and rabbit anti-camel immunoglobulin G whole molecule labeled with horseradish peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Hussein Abdel-Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: As the labeled anti-camel immunoglobulins (Igs with enzymes for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA are unavailable in the Egyptian market, the present investigation was directed for developing local labeled anti-camel IgG with horseradish peroxidase (HRP to save hard curacy. Materials and Methods: For purification of camel IgG whole molecule, camel sera was preliminary precipitated with 50% saturated ammonium sulfate and dialyzed against 15 mM phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.2 then concentrated. This preparation was further purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. The purity of the eluted camel IgG was tested by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresi. Anti-camel IgG was prepared by immunization of goats and rabbits separately, with purified camel IgG. The anti-camel IgG was purified by protein A sepharose affinity column chromatography. Whole molecule anti-camel IgG was conjugated with HRP using glutraldehyde based assay. Sensitivity and specificity of prepared conjugated secondary antibodies were detected using positive and negative camel serum samples reacted with different antigens in ELISA, respectively. The potency of prepared conjugated antibodies was evaluated compared with protein A HRP. The stability of the conjugate at −20°C during 1 year was assessed by ELISA. Results: The electrophoretic profile of camel IgG showed four bands of molecular weight 63, 52, 40 and 33 kDa. The recorded sensitivity and specificity of the product are 100%. Its potency is also 100% compared to 58-75% of commercial protein A HRP. The conjugates are stable for 1 year at −20°C as proved by ELISA. Conclusion: Collectively, this study introduces goat and rabbit anti-camel IgG whole molecules with simple, inexpensive method, with 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity and stability up to 1 year at −20°C. The important facet of the current study is saving hard curacy. Future investigations are necessary for

  20. Engineering a horseradish peroxidase C stable to radical attacks by mutating multiple radical coupling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Peroxidases have great potential as industrial biocatalysts. In particular, the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by peroxidases has been extensively examined because of the advantage of this method over other conventional chemical methods. However, the industrial application of peroxidases is often limited because of their rapid inactivation by phenoxyl radicals during oxidative polymerization. In this work, we report a novel protein engineering approach to improve the radical stability of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRPC). Phenylalanine residues that are vulnerable to modification by the phenoxyl radicals were identified using mass spectrometry analysis. UV-Vis and CD spectra showed that radical coupling did not change the secondary structure or the active site of HRPC. Four phenylalanine (Phe) residues (F68, F142, F143, and F179) were each mutated to alanine residues to generate single mutants to examine the role of these sites in radical coupling. Despite marginal improvement of radical stability, each single mutant still exhibited rapid radical inactivation. To further reduce inactivation by radical coupling, the four substitution mutations were combined in F68A/F142A/F143A/F179A. This mutant demonstrated dramatic enhancement of radical stability by retaining 41% of its initial activity compared to the wild-type, which was completely inactivated. Structure and sequence alignment revealed that radical-vulnerable Phe residues of HPRC are conserved in homologous peroxidases, which showed the same rapid inactivation tendency as HRPC. Based on our site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we have shown that engineering radical-vulnerable residues to eliminate multiple radical coupling can be a good strategy to improve the stability of peroxidases against radical attack. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. An N-terminal peptide extension results in efficient expression, but not secretion, of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Mihaly; Burbridge, Emma; Brock, Ian W; Heggie, Laura; Dix, Philip J; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2004-03-01

    Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N-terminal or the C-terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV-35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO-SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N- and C-terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild-type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N-terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C-terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N-terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been generated with greatly elevated cytosolic peroxidase activity, and smaller increases in apoplastic

  2. Combining Protein and Strain Engineering for the Production of Glyco-Engineered Horseradish Peroxidase C1A in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Capone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish peroxidase (HRP, conjugated to antibodies and lectins, is widely used in medical diagnostics. Since recombinant production of the enzyme is difficult, HRP isolated from plant is used for these applications. Production in the yeast Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris, the most promising recombinant production platform to date, causes hyperglycosylation of HRP, which in turn complicates conjugation to antibodies and lectins. In this study we combined protein and strain engineering to obtain an active and stable HRP variant with reduced surface glycosylation. We combined four mutations, each being beneficial for either catalytic activity or thermal stability, and expressed this enzyme variant as well as the unmutated wildtype enzyme in both a P. pastoris benchmark strain and a strain where the native α-1,6-mannosyltransferase (OCH1 was knocked out. Considering productivity in the bioreactor as well as enzyme activity and thermal stability, the mutated HRP variant produced in the P. pastoris benchmark strain turned out to be interesting for medical diagnostics. This variant shows considerable catalytic activity and thermal stability and is less glycosylated, which might allow more controlled and efficient conjugation to antibodies and lectins.

  3. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oligomerization of ferulic acid on a template of a tyrosine-containing tripeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudgenoeg, G.; Dirksen, E.; Ingemann, S.; Hilhorst, R.; Gruppen, H.; Boeriu, C.G.; Piersma, S.R.; Berkel, W.J.H. van; Laane, C.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is an abundantly present phenolic constituent of plant cell walls. Kinetically controlled incubation of FA and the tripeptide Gly-Tyr-Gly (GYG) with horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 yielded a range of new cross-linked products. Two predominant series of hetero-oligomers of FA linked

  4. Well-Defined Macromolecules Using Horseradish Peroxidase as a RAFT Initiase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Alex P; Bailey-Van Kuren, Dylan; Lucius, Melissa E; Makaroff, Katherine; Williams, Cameron; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A; Konkolewicz, Dominik

    2016-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and control over macromolecular architectures from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) are combined to give a new method of making polymers. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to catalytically generate radicals using hydrogen peroxide and acetylacetone as a mediator. RAFT is used to control the polymer structure. HRP catalyzed RAFT polymerization gives acrylate and acrylamide polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. The polymerization is rapid, typically exceeding 90% monomer conversion in 30 min. Complex macromolecular architectures including a block copolymer and a protein-polymer conjugate are synthesized using HRP to catalytically initiate RAFT polymerization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Electrochemical properties of seamless three-dimensional carbon nanotubes-grown graphene modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Kikuo; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized through sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the surface of a seamless three-dimensional hybrid of carbon nanotubes grown at the graphene surface (HRP-SDS/CNTs/G) and its electrochemical properties were investigated. Compared with graphene alone electrode modified with HRP via SDS (HRP-SDS/G electrode), the surface coverage of electroactive HRP at the CNTs/G electrode surface was approximately 2-fold greater because of CNTs grown at the graphene surface. Based on the increase in the surface coverage of electroactive HRP, the sensitivity to H2O2 at the HRP-SDS/CNTs/G electrode was higher than that at the HRP-SDS/G electrode. The kinetics of the direct electron transfer from the CNTs/G electrode to compound I and II of modified HRP was also analyzed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modifying sulfomethylated alkali lignin by horseradish peroxidase to improve the dispersibility and conductivity of polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Huang, Wenjing; Qiu, Xueqing; Lou, Hongming; Qian, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Pine and wheat straw alkali lignin (PAL and WAL) were sulfomethylated to improve water solubility, polymerized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to improve the molecular weight (Mw) and applied to dope and disperse polyaniline (PANI). The structural effect of lignin from different origins on the reactivities of sulfomethylation and HRP polymerization was investigated. The results show that WAL with less methoxyl groups and lower Mw have higher reactivity in sulfomethylation (SWAL). More phenolic hydroxyl groups and lower Mw benefit the HRP polymerization of sulfomethylated PAL (SPAL). Due to the natural three-dimensional aromatic structure and introduced sulfonic groups, SPAL and SWAL could effectively dope and disperse PANI in water by π-π stacking and electrostatic interaction. HRP modified SPAL (HRP-SPAL) with much higher sulfonation degree and larger Mw significantly increased the conductivity and dispersibility of lignin/PANI composites.

  7. Two New Preyssler-Type Polyoxometalate-Based Coordination Polymers and Their Application in Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Cao, Mei-Da; Feng, Shu-Li; Su, Fang; Sang, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Lan-Cui; You, Wan-Sheng; Yang, Mei; Zhu, Zai-Ming

    2017-10-17

    Enzyme immobilization is of increasing importance for biocatalysis, for which good supports are critical. Herein, two new Preyssler-type polyoxometalate (POM)-based coordination polymers, namely, {[Cu(H 2 biim) 2 ][{Cu(H 2 biim) 2 (μ-H 2 O)} 2 Cu(H 2 biim)(H 2 O) 2 ]H[({Cu(H 2 biim)(H 2 O) 2 } 0.5 ) 2 ((μ-C 3 HN 2 Cl 2 ){Cu(H 2 biim)} 2 ){Z(H 2 O)P 5 W 30 O 110 }]⋅x H 2 O} n (1: Z=Na, x=9; 2: Z=Ag, x=10; H 2 biim=2,2'-biimidazole) were designed and synthesized. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit the same skeletons, which contain multiple Cu II complex fragments and penta-supported {ZP 5 W 30 } (Z=Na, Ag) clusters. They were first employed to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Results show that compounds 1 and 2 are good supports for HRP immobilization, and exhibit higher enzyme loading, lower loading times, and excellent reusability. The immobilized HRP (HRP/1 or HRP/2) was further applied to detect H 2 O 2 , and good sensitivity, wide linear range, low detection limit, and fast response were achieved. This work shows that POM-based hybrid materials are a new kind of promising support for enzyme immobilization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. How modification of accessible lysines to phenylalanine modulates the structural and functional properties of horseradish peroxidase: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Navapour

    Full Text Available Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP is one of the most studied peroxidases and a great number of chemical modifications and genetic manipulations have been carried out on its surface accessible residues to improve its stability and catalytic efficiency necessary for biotechnological applications. Most of the stabilized derivatives of HRP reported to date have involved chemical or genetic modifications of three surface-exposed lysines (K174, K232 and K241. In this computational study, we altered these lysines to phenylalanine residues to model those chemical modifications or genetic manipulations in which these positively charged lysines are converted to aromatic hydrophobic residues. Simulation results implied that upon these substitutions, the protein structure becomes less flexible. Stability gains are likely to be achieved due to the increased number of stable hydrogen bonds, improved heme-protein interactions and more integrated proximal Ca2+ binding pocket. We also found a new persistent hydrogen bond between the protein moiety (F174 and the heme prosthetic group as well as two stitching hydrogen bonds between the connecting loops GH and F'F″ in mutated HRP. However, detailed analysis of functionally related structural properties and dynamical features suggests reduced reactivity of the enzyme toward its substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that substitutions narrow the bottle neck entry of peroxide substrate access channel and reduce the surface accessibility of the distal histidine (H42 and heme prosthetic group to the peroxide and aromatic substrates, respectively. Results also demonstrated that the area and volume of the aromatic-substrate binding pocket are significantly decreased upon modifications. Moreover, the hydrophobic patch functioning as a binding site or trap for reducing aromatic substrates is shrunk in mutated enzyme. Together, the results of this simulation study could provide possible structural clues to explain

  9. Direct electron transfer biosensor for hydrogen peroxide carrying nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle – Characterization and application to bienzyme systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Okawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A reagentless electrochemical biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was fabricated. The sensor carries a monolayer of nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle, and responds to hydrogen peroxide through the highly efficient direct electron transfer at a mild electrode potential without any soluble mediator. Formation of the nanocomplex was studied with visible spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The sensor performance was analyzed based on a hydrodynamic electrochemical technique and enzyme kinetics. The sensor was applied to fabrication of sensors for glucose and uric acid through further modification of the nanocomplex-carrying electrode with the corresponding hydrogen peroxide-generating oxidases, glucose oxidase and urate oxidase, respectively.

  10. Inhibition mechanism of lanthanum ion on the activity of horseradish peroxidase in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Wang, Lihong; Lu, Aihua; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Huang, Xiaohua

    2010-02-01

    In order to understand the inhibition mechanism of lanthanum ion (La 3+) on the activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the effects of La 3+ on the activity, electron transfer and conformation of HRP in vitro were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF/MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that La 3+ can combine with the amide groups of the polypeptide chain in HRP molecule, forming the complex of La 3+ and HRP (La-HRP). The formation of the La-HRP complex causes the destruction of the native structure of HRP molecule, leading to the decrease in the non-planarity of the porphyrin ring in the heme group of HRP molecule, and then in the exposure extent of active center, Fe(III) of the porphyrin ring of HRP molecule. Thus, the direct electrochemical and catalytic activities of HRP are decreased. It is a possible inhibition mechanism of La 3+ on the activity of peroxidase.

  11. Quercetin oxidation by horseradish peroxidase: The effect of UV-B irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Saša R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish peroxidase (HRP, a highly-investigated member of the peroxidase family has been known, among many other biological activities, to catalyze the oxidation of flavonoids and phenolic substrates overall, including quercetin. On the other hand, quercetin is very well known for its antioxidant activities, which in the case of UV external radiation is exibited partly in a preventive manner since it is an excellent UV-absorber. Therefore the aim of this investigation is to study quercetin oxidation by HRP in phosphate buffer under the conditions of UV-stress, i.e. continuous, prolonged UV-B irradiation. The results show that while UV-B irradiation affects the activity of HRP, and the overal rate of quercetin oxidation by HRP, it probably has very little effect on it for longer UV-B-irradiation periods (>30 min. [Acknowledgements. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Serbia under Project No.TR-34012 and OI-172044

  12. Step-Up Synthesis of Periodic Mesoporous Organosilicas with a Tyrosine Framework and Performance in Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wenqi; Gu, Changqing; Zhang, Wenpei; Zhou, Man; Wang, Zhiwei; Guo, Cheng; Sun, Linbing

    2017-12-14

    New amino-acid-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) were constructed by hydrolysis and condensation reactions under acid conditions in the presence of a template. The tyrosine bissilylated organic precursor (TBOS) was first prepared through a multistep reaction by using tyrosine (a natural amino acid) as the starting material. PMOs with the tyrosine framework (Tyr-PMOs) were constructed by simultaneously using TBOS and tetraethoxysilane as complex silicon sources in the condensation process. All the Tyr-PMOs materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption-desorption, TEM, SEM, and solid-state 29 Si NMR spectroscopy to confirm the structure. The horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme was first immobilized on these new Tyr-PMOs materials. Optimal conditions for enzyme adsorption included a temperature of 40 °C, a time of 8 h, and a pH value of 7. Furthermore, the novel Tyr-PMOs materials could store HRP for approximately 40 days and maintained the enzymatic activity, and the Tyr-PMOs-10 % HRP with the best immobilization effect could be reused at least eight times. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Expression and Activation of Horseradish Peroxidase-Protein A/G Fusion Protein in Silkworm Larvae for Diagnostic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xxxx, Patmawati; Minamihata, Kosuke; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2018-06-01

    Recombinant protein production can create artificial proteins with desired functions by introducing genetic modifications to the target proteins. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been used extensively as a reporter enzyme in biotechnological applications; however, recombinant production of HRP has not been very successful, hampering the utilization of HRP with genetic modifications. A fusion protein comprising an antibody binding protein and HRP will be an ideal bio-probe for high-quality HRP-based diagnostic systems. A HRP-protein A/G fusion protein (HRP-pAG) is designed and its production in silkworm (Bombyx mori) is evaluated for the first time. HRP-pAG is expressed in a soluble apo form, and is activated successfully by incubating with hemin. The activated HRP-pAG is used directly for ELISA experiments and retains its activity over 20 days at 4 °C. Moreover, HRP-pAG is modified with biotin by the microbial transglutaminase (MTG) reaction. The biotinylated HRP-pAG is conjugated with streptavidin to form a HRP-pAG multimer and the multimeric HRP-pAG produced higher signals in the ELISA system than monomeric HRP-pAG. The successful production of recombinant HRP in silkworm will contribute to creating novel HRP-based bioconjugates as well as further functionalization of HRP by applying enzymatic post-translational modifications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Amperometric inhibition biosensors based on horseradish peroxidase and gold sononanoparticles immobilized onto different electrodes for cyanide measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Aisha; Cubillana-Aguilera, Laura; Naranjo-Rodríguez, Ignacio; de Cisneros, José Luis Hidalgo-Hidalgo; Palacios-Santander, José María; Amine, Aziz

    2015-02-01

    New biosensors based on inhibition for the detection of cyanide and the comparison of the analytical performances of nine enzyme biosensor designs by using three different electrodes: Sonogel-Carbon, glassy carbon and gold electrodes were discussed. Three different horseradish peroxidase immobilization procedures with and without gold sononanoparticles were studied. The amperometric measurements were performed at an applied potential of -0.15V vs. Ag/AgCl in 50mM sodium acetate buffer solution pH=5.0. The apparent kinetic parameters (Kmapp, Vmaxapp) of immobilized HRP were calculated in the absence of inhibitor (cyanide) by using caffeic acid, hydroquinone, and catechol as substrates. The presence of gold sononanoparticles enhanced the electron transfer reaction and improved the analytical performance of the biosensors. The HRP kinetic interactions reveal non-competitive binding of cyanide with an apparent inhibition constant (Ki) of 2.7μM and I50 of 1.3μM. The determination of cyanide can be achieved in a dynamic range of 0.1-58.6μM with a detection limit of 0.03μM which is lower than those reported by previous studies. Hence this biosensing methodology can be used as a new promising approach for detecting cyanide. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Horseradish peroxidase and toluidine blue covalently immobilized leak-free sol-gel composite biosensor for hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenmozhi, K; Narayanan, S Sriman

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the water-soluble mediator toluidine blue were covalently immobilized to 3-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane precursor through glutaraldehyde crosslinker. A rigid ceramic composite electrode was fabricated from this modified silane along with graphite powder, which resulted in an amperometric biosensor for H 2 O 2 . The electrochemical behaviour of the modified biosensor was monitored using cyclic voltammetry in the potential range of 0.2V to -0.4V vs SCE. The biosensor exhibited a stable voltammogram with cathodic peak at -0.234V and anodic peak at -0.172V, with a formal potential of -0.203V. Various factors influencing the performance of the biosensor such as buffer solution, pH, temperature and potential were examined for optimizing the working conditions. The modified biosensor exhibited a good catalytic behaviour for the reduction of H 2 O 2 at a lower potential of -0.25V without any barrier from possible interferents. The analytical working range was found to be 0.429μM to 0.455mM of H 2 O 2 with a detection limit of 0.171μM. The fabricated biosensor is robust for long-term usage in addition to the high sensitivity, rapid response and having an advantage of surface renewability by simple mechanical polishing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved biodegradation of synthetic azo dye by horseradish peroxidase cross-linked on nano-composite support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huaiyan; Jin, Xinyu; Long, Nengbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-02-01

    A ZnO nanowires/macroporous SiO 2 composite was used as support to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by in-situ cross-linking method. Using diethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (DDE) as a long-chained cross-linker, it was adsorbed on the surface of ZnO nanowires before reaction with HRPs, the resulted composite was quite different from the traditional cross-linking enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) on both structure and catalytic performance. The immobilized HRP showed high activity in the decolorization of azo dyes. The effect of various conditions such as the loading amount of HRP, solution pH, temperature, contact time and concentration of dye were optimized on the decolorization. The decolorization percentage of Acid Blue 113 and Acid black 10 BX reached as high as 95.4% and 90.3%, respectively. The immobilized HRP gave the highest decolorization rate under dye concentration as 50mg/L and reaction time of 35min. The immobilized HRP exhibited much better resistance to temperature and pH inactivation than free HRP. The storage stability and reusability were greatly improved through the immobilization, from the decolorization of Acid blue 113 it was found that 80.4% of initial efficiency retained after incubation at 4°C for 60 days, and that 79.4% of decolorization efficiency retained after 12 cycles reuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultra-high-throughput screening of an in vitro-synthesized horseradish peroxidase displayed on microbeads using cell sorter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    Full Text Available The C1a isoenzyme of horseradish peroxidase (HRP is an industrially important heme-containing enzyme that utilizes hydrogen peroxide to oxidize a wide variety of inorganic and organic compounds for practical applications, including synthesis of fine chemicals, medical diagnostics, and bioremediation. To develop a ultra-high-throughput screening system for HRP, we successfully produced active HRP in an Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis system, by adding disulfide bond isomerase DsbC and optimizing the concentrations of hemin and calcium ions and the temperature. The biosynthesized HRP was fused with a single-chain Cro (scCro DNA-binding tag at its N-terminal and C-terminal sites. The addition of the scCro-tag at both ends increased the solubility of the protein. Next, HRP and its fusion proteins were successfully synthesized in a water droplet emulsion by using hexadecane as the oil phase and SunSoft No. 818SK as the surfactant. HRP fusion proteins were displayed on microbeads attached with double-stranded DNA (containing the scCro binding sequence via scCro-DNA interactions. The activities of the immobilized HRP fusion proteins were detected with a tyramide-based fluorogenic assay using flow cytometry. Moreover, a model microbead library containing wild type hrp (WT and inactive mutant (MUT genes was screened using fluorescence-activated cell-sorting, thus efficiently enriching the WT gene from the 1:100 (WT:MUT library. The technique described here could serve as a novel platform for the ultra-high-throughput discovery of more useful HRP mutants and other heme-containing peroxidases.

  18. Luminol, horseradish peroxidase, and glucose oxidase ternary functionalized graphene oxide for ultrasensitive glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Ma, Wenjing; Liu, Jiachang; Wu, Xiang; Wang, Yan; He, Jianbo

    2018-01-01

    Luminol, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and glucose oxidase (GOx) ternary functionalized graphene oxide (HRP/GOx-luminol-GO) with excellent chemiluminescence (CL) activity and specific enzymatic property was prepared via a simple and general strategy for the first time. In this approach, luminol functionalized GO (luminol-GO) was prepared by gently stirring GO with luminol. Then HRP and GOx were further co-immobilized onto the surface of luminol-GO by storing HRP and GOx with luminol-GO at 4 °C overnight, to form HRP/GOx-luminol-GO bionanocomposites. The synthesized HRP/GOx-luminol-GO could react with H 2 O 2 generated from GOx catalyzed glucose oxidization reaction, to produce strong CL emission in the presence of co-immobilized HRP. Thus, we developed an ultrasensitive, homogeneous, reagentless, selective, and simple CL sensing system for glucose detection. The resulting biosensors exhibited ultra-wide linear range from 5.0 nM to 5.0 mM, and an ultra-low detection limit of 1.2 nM, which was more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than previously reported methods. Furthermore, the sensing system was successfully applied for the detection of glucose in human blood samples.

  19. Mechanisms for Covalent Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase on Ion-Beam-Treated Polyethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Kondyurin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of polyethylene was modified by plasma immersion ion implantation. Structure changes including carbonization and oxidation were observed. High surface energy of the modified polyethylene was attributed to the presence of free radicals on the surface. The surface energy decay with storage time after treatment was explained by a decay of the free radical concentration while the concentration of oxygen-containing groups increased with storage time. Horseradish peroxidase was covalently attached onto the modified surface by the reaction with free radicals. Appropriate blocking agents can block this reaction. All aminoacid residues can take part in the covalent attachment process, providing a universal mechanism of attachment for all proteins. The native conformation of attached protein is retained due to hydrophilic interactions in the interface region. The enzymatic activity of covalently attached protein remained high. The long-term activity of the modified layer to attach protein is explained by stabilisation of unpaired electrons in sp2 carbon structures. A high concentration of free radicals can give multiple covalent bonds to the protein molecule and destroy the native conformation and with it the catalytic activity. The universal mechanism of protein attachment to free radicals could be extended to various methods of radiation damage of polymers.

  20. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu; Xian Yuezhong; Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: → A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H 2 O 2 with a linear range of 5.0 x 10 -6 to 9.3 x 10 -4 mol L -1 .

  1. Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on electrografted 4-ethynylphenyl film via click chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Qin; Peng Ru; Liang Cong; Ye Siqiu [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xian Yuezhong, E-mail: yzxian@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Zhang Wenjing; Jin Litong [Department of Chemistry, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Hydrogen peroxide biosensor was developed based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and click chemistry. Highlights: > A simple, versatile two-step approach, which is based on electrochemically assisted aryldiazonium salt chemistry and Cu(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed for covalent redox proteins immobilization and biosensing for the first time. In this work, azido group modified HRP was covalently grafted on 4-ethylnylphenyl diazonium compound via CuAAC reaction and a novel electrochemical hydrogen peroxide biosensor was successfully fabricated. - Abstract: In this paper, a simple two-step approach for redox protein immobilization was introduced. Firstly, alkynyl-terminated film was formed on electrode surface by electrochemical reduction of 4-ethylnylphenyl (4-EP) diazonium compound. Then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) modified with azido group was covalently immobilized onto the electrografted film via click reaction. Reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the modification process. The results indicate that HRP retains its native structure and shows fast direct electron transfer. Moreover, the immobilized HRP shows excellent electrocatalytic reduction activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a linear range of 5.0 x 10{sup -6} to 9.3 x 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}.

  2. Direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase on Nafion-cysteine modified gold electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Rad, Ahmad Molaei; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    Direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase, immobilized on a functional membrane-modified gold electrode, was studied. The electrode showed a quasi-reversible electrochemical redox behavior with a formal potential of 60mV (versus Ag/AgCl) in 20mM potassium phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.0 and temperature 25 o C. The cathodic transfer coefficient was 0.42 and electron transfer rate constant was evaluated to be 1.6s -1 . Furthermore, the modified electrode was used as a biosensor and exhibited a satisfactory stability and sensitivity to H 2 O 2 . The linear range of this biosensor for H 2 O 2 determination was from 5.0x10 -6 to 1.5x10 -4 M while its detection limit, based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 1.3x10 -6 M. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K m app ) for immobilized HRP was calculated to be 1.6x10 -4 M

  3. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase immobilized in graphene oxide–Nafion nanocomposite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lili; Cheng Huhu; Zhang Huimin; Qu Liangti

    2012-01-01

    Direct electron transfer of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized in graphene oxide (GO)–Nafion nanocomposite film and its application as a new biosensor was investigated with electrochemical methods. Immobilized HRP shows a pair of well-defined redox waves and retains its bioelectrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 . As a new sensor with excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 , calibrations with good linear relationships were obtained from 1.0 μmol L −1 to 1.0 mmol L −1 for H 2 O 2 and from 0.5 μmol L −1 to 18.6 μmol L −1 for O 2 with the detection limits of 4.0 × 10 −7 mol L −1 for H 2 O 2 and 1.0 × 10 −7 mol L −1 for O 2 at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Additionally, the responses showed Michaelis–Menten behavior with K m app values of 0.684 mmol L −1 for H 2 O 2 and 0.0160 mmol L −1 for O 2 . Moreover, the cathodic peak current of an HRP/GO/Nafion/GCE biosensor decreases by less than 5% after 4 weeks. These results reveal that GO can be conveniently incorporated into a polymer nanocomposite for fabrication of new GO-based biosensors.

  4. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase on NiO Nanoflower Modified Electrode and Its Electrocatalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper nickel oxide (NiO nanoflower was synthesized and used for the realization of direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP. By using carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE as the substrate electrode, NiO-HRP composite was casted on the surface of CILE with chitosan (CTS as the film forming material and the modified electrode was denoted as CTS/NiO-HRP/CILE. UV-Vis absorption and FT-IR spectra confirmed that HRP retained its native structure after mixed with NiO nanoflower. Direct electron transfer of HRP on the modified electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry with a pair of quasi-reversible redox waves appeared, indicating that the presence of NiO nanoflower on the electrode surface could accelerate the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of HRP and the substrate electrode. Electrochemical behaviors of HRP on the modified electrode were carefully investigated. The HRP modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid with wider linear range and lower detection limit. Therefore the presence of NiO nanoflower could provide a friendly biocompatible interface for immobilizing biomolecules and keeping their native structure. The fabricated electrochemical biosensor displayed the advantages such as high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

  5. Effect of ozone and histamine on airway permeability to horseradish peroxidase in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.D.; Gordon, T.; Warnick, M.; Amdur, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    Airway permeability was studied in groups of male guinea pigs at 2, 8, and 24 h after a 1-h exposure to 1 ppm ozone or at 2 h after a 1-h exposure to filtered air (control). Intratracheal administration of 2 mg horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was followed by blood sampling at 5-min intervals up to 30 min. The rate of appearance of HRP in plasma was significantly higher at 2 and 8 h after ozone exposure than that found in animals examined 2 h after air exposure or 24 h after ozone exposure. A dose of 0.12 mg/kg of subcutaneous histamine given after the 15 min blood sample significantly increased the already elevated permeability seen at 2 h post ozone, but had no effect on animals exposed to filtered air 2 h earlier or to ozone 24 h earlier. No difference was seen in the amount of subcutaneous radiolabeled histamine in the lungs of animals exposed 2 h earlier either to air or to ozone. These data indicate that a short-term exposure to ozone produced a reversible increase in respiratory epithelial permeability to HRP in guinea pigs. The potentiation of this increased permeability by histamine may be another manifestation of ozone-induced hyperreactivity

  6. Rachiplusia nu larva as a biofactory to achieve high level expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lucía Virginia; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Wolman, Federico Javier; Cascone, Osvaldo; Miranda, María Victoria

    2011-05-01

    A process based on orally-infected Rachiplusia nu larvae as biological factories for expression and one-step purification of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRP-C) is described. The process allows obtaining high levels of pure HRP-C by membrane chromatography purification. The introduction of the partial polyhedrin homology sequence element in the target gene increased HRP-C expression level by 2.8-fold whereas it increased 1.8-fold when the larvae were reared at 27 °C instead of at 24 °C, summing up a 4.6-fold overall increase in the expression level. Additionally, HRP-C purification by membrane chromatography at a high flow rate greatly increase D the productivity without affecting the resolution. The V(max) and K(m) values of the recombinant HRP-C were similar to those of the HRP from Armoracia rusticana roots. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  7. Thermal stability and degradation kinetics of polyphenols and polyphenylenediamines enzymatically synthesized by horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hansol; Ryu, Keungarp; Kwon, Oyul

    2015-01-01

    Various substituted phenols and phenylenediamines were enzymatically polymerized by horseradish peroxidase in 80% (v/v) organic solvents-aqueous buffer (100 mM sodium acetate, pH 5) mixtures with H 2 O 2 as the oxidant. The thermal stability of the polymers was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and represented by the char yield (wt% of the initial polymer mass) after being heated at 800 .deg. C. Poly(p-phenylphenol) had the highest thermal stability among the synthesized polymers with a char yield of 47 wt%. The polymers containing amino groups such as poly(p-aminophenol) and polyphenylenediamines were also shown to possess high thermal stabilities. The activation energies for the thermal degradation of the polymers determined by derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) using Horowitz-Metzger's pseudo-first-order kinetics were in the range between 23-65 kJ/mol and comparable to those of the chemically synthesized polymers. Dynamic structural changes of the enzymatically synthesized polymers upon heating were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC curves of poly(p-phenylphenol) showed a broad exothermic peaks between 150-250 .deg. C, indicating that the polymer undergoes complex structural transitions in the temperature range. On the other hand, the DSC curves of the poly(p-aminophenol) and the poly(p-phenylenediamine) which contain amino groups showed strong sharp endothermic peaks near 150 .deg. C, implying that these polymers possess homogeneous oriented structures which undergo a concerted structural disintegration upon heating.

  8. Horseradish peroxidase immobilized on copper surfaces and applications in selective electrocatalysis of p-dihydroxybenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuntao, E-mail: tsyj1992@126.com [Department of Chemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan 030031 (China); Institute of Energy and Environmental Electrochemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan 030031 (China); Luo, Xiaoxiao [Department of Natural Science, Michigan State University, MI 48823,USA (United States); Jia, Zehui [Department of Chemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan 030031 (China); Institute of Energy and Environmental Electrochemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan 030031 (China); Shi, Qinghua; Zhu, Ritao [Department of Chemistry, Taiyuan Normal University, Taiyuan 030031 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Abstract: Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized on copper surfaces with the linker of L-Cysteine (L-Cys) self-assembled films to form Cu/L-Cys/HRP electrodes. The activity of HRP can be preserved by the Cu/L-Cys self-assembled films. The Cu/L-Cys/HRP electrodes can be used for the selective electrocatalytic oxidase of p-dihydroxybenzen in absent of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The optimum pH for electrocatalyzing p-dihydroxybenzen was 5.5 or 7.0, which corresponds to the isoelectric points of L-Cys and HRP, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided the evidence that L-Cys linked with Cu surface by the Cu− S bond. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses indicated that aromatic plane of p-dihydroxybenzen was connected parallel to porphyrin ring of heme in HRP. Quantum chemical calculation of density functional theory (DFT) revealed that symmetry of molecular structure and minimum space steric hindrance for p-dihydroxybenzen were benefit to combination with HRP. Moreover, the lowest energy of LUMO and most negative charges of oxygen atom on hydroxyl group of p-dihydroxybenzen were advantage to lose the hydrogen atom of hydroxyl group to be oxided.

  9. Cooxidation of styrene by horseradish peroxidase and phenols. A biochemical model for protein-mediated cooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.; Grab, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene is oxidized to styrene oxide and benzaldehyde when incubated with horseradish peroxidase, H 2 O 2 , and 4-methylphenol. Styrene oxide is not formed in the absence of any of these reaction components or of molecular oxygen. The coupling products 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethane, 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-1-phenylethan-1-ol, and 2-(4-methylphenoxy)-2-phenylethan-1-ol are not formed, but the ortho-linked dimer of 4-methylphenol is a major product. The epoxide oxygen is labeled in the presence of 18 O 2 but not H 2 18 O 2 . Styrene oxide formation is not inhibited by mannitol or superoxide dismutase. The stereochemistry of trans-[1- 2 H]styrene is partially scrambled in the epoxide product. EPR signals attributable to the 2,4-dihydroxyl-5-methylphenoxy radical, a product of the oxidation of 4-methylcatechol, are observed if Zn 2+ is added to stabilize the radical. This radical is only detected in the presence of styrene. The results imply that styrene is epoxidized by the hydroperoxy radical generated by addition of molecular oxygen to the 4-methylphenoxy radical. The epoxidation mimics the chemistry proposed to occur in the protein-mediated cooxidation of styrene by hemoglobin and myoglobin

  10. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  11. An N‐terminal Peptide Extension Results in Efficient Expression, but not Secretion, of a Synthetic Horseradish Peroxidase Gene in Transgenic Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIS, MIHALY; BURBRIDGE, EMMA; BROCK, IAN W.; HEGGIE, LAURA; DIX, PHILIP J.; KAVANAGH, TONY A.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N‐terminal and C‐terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. • Methods Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N‐terminal or the C‐terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV‐35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO‐SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium‐mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N‐ and C‐terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. • Key Results Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten‐fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild‐type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N‐terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C‐terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. • Conclusions There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N‐terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been

  12. Thermal stability and degradation kinetics of polyphenols and polyphenylenediamines enzymatically synthesized by horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hansol; Ryu, Keungarp [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oyul [Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Various substituted phenols and phenylenediamines were enzymatically polymerized by horseradish peroxidase in 80% (v/v) organic solvents-aqueous buffer (100 mM sodium acetate, pH 5) mixtures with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the oxidant. The thermal stability of the polymers was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and represented by the char yield (wt% of the initial polymer mass) after being heated at 800 .deg. C. Poly(p-phenylphenol) had the highest thermal stability among the synthesized polymers with a char yield of 47 wt%. The polymers containing amino groups such as poly(p-aminophenol) and polyphenylenediamines were also shown to possess high thermal stabilities. The activation energies for the thermal degradation of the polymers determined by derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) using Horowitz-Metzger's pseudo-first-order kinetics were in the range between 23-65 kJ/mol and comparable to those of the chemically synthesized polymers. Dynamic structural changes of the enzymatically synthesized polymers upon heating were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC curves of poly(p-phenylphenol) showed a broad exothermic peaks between 150-250 .deg. C, indicating that the polymer undergoes complex structural transitions in the temperature range. On the other hand, the DSC curves of the poly(p-aminophenol) and the poly(p-phenylenediamine) which contain amino groups showed strong sharp endothermic peaks near 150 .deg. C, implying that these polymers possess homogeneous oriented structures which undergo a concerted structural disintegration upon heating.

  13. Mode of bindings of zinc oxide nanoparticles to myoglobin and horseradish peroxidase: A spectroscopic investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Gopa; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Ganguly, Tapan

    2011-07-01

    The interactions between two heme proteins myoglobin (HMb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are investigated by using UV-vis absorption, steady state fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological condition of pH˜7.4. The presence of mainly static mode in fluorescence quenching mechanism of HMb and HRP by ZnO nanoparticle indicates the possibility of formation of ground state complex. The processes of bindings of ZnO nanoparticles with the two proteins are spontaneous molecular interaction procedures. In both cases hydrogen bonding plays a major role. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that a helicity of the proteins is reduced by increasing ZnO nanoparticle concentration although the α-helical structures of HMb and HRP retain their identity. On binding to the ZnO nanoparticles the secondary structure of HRP molecules (or HMb molecules) remains unchanged while there is a substantial change in the environment of the tyrosin active site in case of HRP molecules and tryptophan active site in case of HMb molecules. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied for the investigation the structure of HRP adsorbed in the environment of nanoparticles on the silicon and on the bare silicon. HRP molecules adsorb and aggregate on the mica with ZnO nanoparticle. The aggregation indicates an attractive interaction among the adsorbed molecules. The molecules are randomly distributed on the bare silicon wafer. The adsorption of HRP in the environment of ZnO nanoparticle changes drastically the domains due to a strong interaction between HRP and ZnO nanoparticles. Similar situation is observed in case of HMb molecules. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of biomedical applications of ZnO nanoparticles as well as in elucidating their mechanisms of action as drugs in both human and plant systems.

  14. Novel characteristics of horseradish peroxidase immobilized onto the polyvinyl alcohol-alginate beads and its methyl orange degradation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Rasheed, Tahir; Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we report the immobilization of in-house isolated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) from Armoracia rusticana with novel characteristics. The HRP was immobilized onto the self-fabricated polyvinyl alcohol-alginate (PVA-alginate) beads using sodium nitrate as a cross-linker. The PVA-alginate beads (2.0mm size) developed using 10% PVA and 1.5% sodium alginate showed maximal immobilization yield. The surface morphologies of the PVA-alginate (control) and immobilized-HRP were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The immobilized-HRP retained 64.14% of its initial activity after 10 consecutive substrate-oxidation cycles as compared to the free counterpart. Simultaneously, the thermal stability of the immobilized-HRP was significantly enhanced as compared to the free HRP. The enzyme leakage (E L ) assay was performed by storing the immobilized-HRP in phosphate buffer solution for 30days. Evidently, the leakage of immobilized-HRP was recorded to be 6.98% and 14.82% after 15 and 30days of incubation, respectively. Finally, the immobilized-HRP was used for methyl orange (MO) dye degradation in a batch mode. A noticeable decline in spectral shift accompanied by no appearance of a new peak demonstrated the complete degradation of MO. The degraded fragments of MO were scrutinized by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). A plausible degradation pathway for MO was proposed based on the identified intermediates. In conclusion, the study portrays the PVA-alginate-immobilized-HRP as a cost-effective and industrially desirable green catalyst, for biotechnological at large and industrial in particular, especially for the treatment of textile dyes or dye-containing industrial waste effluents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanobody Based Immunoassay for Human Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Detection Using Polymeric Horseradish Peroxidase (PolyHRP) for Signal Enhancement: The Rediscovery of PolyHRP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongyang; Cui, Yongliang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Bever, Candace S; Liu, Xiangjiang; Wu, Jian; Hammock, Bruce D; Ying, Yibin

    2017-06-06

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, cancer, pain, and multiple cardiovascular related diseases. A variable domain of the heavy chain antibody (termed single domain antibody (sdAb), nanobody, or VHH) possesses the advantages of small size, high stability, ease of genetic manipulation, and ability for continuous manufacture, making such nanobody a superior choice as an immunoreagent. In this work, we developed an ultrasensitive nanobody based immunoassay for human sEH detection using polymeric horseradish peroxidase (PolyHRP) for signal enhancement. Llama nanobodies against human sEH were used as the detection antibody in sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with polyclonal anti-sEH as the capture antibody. A conventional sandwich ELISA using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled anti-hemeagglutinin (HA) tag as the tracer showed a marginal sensitivity (0.0015 optical density (OD)·mL/ng) and limit of detection (LOD) of 3.02 ng/mL. However, the introduction of the PolyHRP as the tracer demonstrated a 141-fold increase in the sensitivity (0.21 OD·mL/ng) and 57-fold decrease in LOD (0.05 ng/mL). Systematic comparison of three different tracers in four ELISA formats demonstrated the overwhelming advantage of PolyHRP as a label for nanobody based immunoassay. This enhanced sEH immunoassay was further evaluated in terms of selectivity against other epoxide hydrolases and detection of the target protein in human tissue homogenate samples. Comparison with an enzyme activity based assay and a Western blot for sEH detection reveals good correlation with the immunoassay. This work demonstrates increased competiveness of nanobodies for practical sEH protein detection utilizing PolyHRP. It is worthwhile to rediscover the promising potential of PolyHRP in nanobody and other affinity based methods after its low-profile existence for decades.

  16. Efecto de la polietilenimina en la actividad catalítica de la peroxidasa de rábano (horseradish peroxidase inmovilizada en electrodos de oro modificados con monocapas autoensambladas de tioles (SAMs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. Matheus

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the Polyethyleneimine in the Activity Catalytic of the horseradish peroxidase Immobilized on Gold Electrodes Modified with a Self-assembled Monolayer of Thiols (SAMs. Studies were conducted bycyclic voltammetry (CV to investigate the effect of the polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI in the electrochemical reversibility of the mediator thionine and thus the catalytic activity of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase of recombinant HRP-NHis (horseradish peroxidase to the has been added to a chain of six histidine in the extreme N-terminal protein. This self produced monolayers of thiols (SAMS on gold electrodes, with chemical modifications obtained through successive stages in the solid phase of the electrode. The gold electrodes were modified with monolayer SAM-TOA-[ANTA/DADOO] -Co2+ [SAM: self-assembled monolayers of thiols, TOA: dithioctic acid, ANTA: nitrilotriacetic acid, DADOO: 1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxa octane]. The results showed that the presence of the polymer improves the electrochemical reversibility of the mediator to endure catalyticcurrents as high as those that are obtained with molar ratios ANTA:DADOO 10:1 in the absence of PEI, and improve the response voltammetric obtained.

  17. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase onto kaolin by glutaraldehyde method and its application in decolorization of anthraquinone dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šekuljica Nataša Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of environmental pollution day by day becomes more worrisome, primarily due to the large amounts of wastewater contaminated with various harmful organic compounds, discharged into the environment untreated or partially clean. Feasibility of use of horseradish peroxidase (Amoracia rusticana in the synthetic dyes decolorization was approved by many researchers. Among a number of supports used for the immobilization, it was found that natural clay, kaolin has excellent features which are a precondition for obtaining biocatalysts with the excellent performances. For this reason, a horseradish peroxidase was immobilized onto kaolin using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. Obtained biocatalyst was applied in the decolorization of anthraquinone dye C. I. Acid Violet 109. Under determined optimal conditions (pH 4.0, hydrogen peroxide concentration 0.6 mM, dye concentration 30 mg L-1, temperature 24ºC around 76 % of dye decolorization was achieved. Reusability study showed that resulting biocatalyst was possible to apply four times in the desired reaction with relatively high decolorization percentage. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III-46010 i br. 172013

  18. Radiobiology effects of radiation-induced horseradish peroxidase/indole-3-acetic suicide gene expression in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jie; Zhou Yunfeng; Wang Weifeng; Sun Wenjie; Liao Zhengkai; Zhou Fuxiang; Xie Conghua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To detect specific cell killing effect of radiation combined with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/indole-3-acetic (IAA) suicide gene therapy controlled by a novel radio-inducible and cancer-specific chimeric gene promoter in lung cancer. Methods: We constructed a plasmid expressing HRP enzyme under the control of chimeric human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter carrying 6 CArG elements, a plasmid expressing HRP enzyme under the control of hTERT promoter carrying single CArG element, and two control plasmids, which named pE6-hTERT-HRP, phTERT-HRP, pControl-HRP, and pControlluc, respectively. After radiation, the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction effect of each type of plasmid in lung cancer cells (A549, SPC-A1) and normal lung cells (hEL) was detected by cell counting and Annexin V-FITC staining. The change of radiosensitivity of lung cancer cells with plasmid system was also detected by clonogenic assays. Results: After a single dose radiation of 6 Gy,the average proliferation inhibition rates of pE6-hTERT-HRP, phTERT-HRP, pControl-HRP, and pControlluc systems were 72.92% ,40.60% , 51.00% and 25.19% (F= 67.31, P< 0.01) in A549 cells, 64.63%, 30.02%, 48.23% and 23.16% (F=64.94, P< 0.01) in SPC-A1 cells, and 20.81%, 18.05%, 44.20% and 18.32% (F=52.19, P<0.01) in normal hEL cells, respectively. The average early apoptosis rates of these four plasmid systems were 36.63%, 22.30%, 24.33% and 12.53% (F =50.99, P <0.01) in A549 cells, 33.73%, 17.37%, 22.43% and 11.20% (F = 20. 76, P < 0.01) in SPC-A1 cells, and 13.53 %, 12.5%, 21.93% and 12.16% (F = 15.08, P < 0.01) in normal hEL cells,respectively. The sensitizing enhancement ratios of the four plasmid systems were 3.45, 2.29, 3.05 and 1.21 in A549 cells, while 2.68, 2.15, 3.05 and 1.21 in SPC-A1 cells, respectively. Conclusions: The new suicide gene system controlled by chimeric promoter may provide a novel therapeutic modality for lung cancer. (authors)

  19. Ectopic expression of a horseradish peroxidase enhances growth rate and increases oxidative stress resistance in hybrid aspen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaoka, Akiyoshi; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Endo, Saori; Kondo, Shinkichi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu

    2003-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that overexpression of the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase prxC1a gene stimulated the growth rate of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S::prxC1a construct was introduced into hybrid aspen (Populus sieboldii x Populus grandidentata). The growth rate of these transformed hybrid aspen plants was substantially increased under greenhouse conditions. The average stem length of transformed plants was 25% greater than that of control plants. There was no other obvious phenotypic difference between the transformed and control plants. Fast-growing transformed hybrid aspen showed high levels of expression of prxC1a and had elevated peroxidase activities toward guaiacol and ascorbate. However, there was no increase of the endogenous class I ascorbate peroxidase activities in the transformed plants by separate assay and activity staining of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, calli derived from the transformed hybrid aspen grew faster than those from control plants and were resistant to the oxidative stress imposed by hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, enhanced peroxidase activity affects plant growth rate and oxidative stress resistance.

  20. Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase on NH2-Modified Magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2 Particles and Its Application in Removal of 2,4-Dichlorophenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method with the assistance of ultrasound irradiation, and then coated with silica generated by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxysilane. The silica-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles were further modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, resulting in anchoring of primary amine groups on the surface of the particles. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was then immobilized on the magnetic core-shell particles by using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent. Immobilization conditions were optimized to obtain the highest relative activity of the immobilized enzyme. It was found the durability of the immobilized enzyme to heating and pH variation were improved in comparison with free HRP. The apparent Michaelis constants of the immobilized HRP and free HRP with substrate were compared, showing that the enzyme activity of the immobilized HRP was close to that of free HRP. The HRP immobilized particles, as an enzyme catalyst, were used to activate H2O2 for degrading 2,4-dichlorophenol. The rapid degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol indicated that the immobilized enzyme has potential applications for removing organic pollutants.

  1. ENCAPSULATION OF HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE-GLUCOSE OXIDASE (HRP-GOx IN SILICA AQUAGEL SYNTHESIZED FROM RICE HULL ASH FOR ENZYMATIC REACTION OF GLUCOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the sol-gel technique has attracted increasing interest as a unique approach to immobilize biomolecules for bioanalytical applications as well as biochemical and biophysical studies. In this research, encapsulation of Horseradish peroxidase-Glucose oxidase (HRP-GOx enzymes in silica aquagel from rice hull ash by sol-gel process has been carried out. In addition, the effect of several parameters (weight ratio of HRP to GOx, pH, temperature, sodium ion concentration on enzyme activity was studied, as well. Rice hull ash, which was produced by ashing at 700 °C, was extracted it's silika by NaOH solution 1 M at 100 °C for two hours to produce sodium silikate (Na2SiO3 solution. The Na2SiO3 solution with pH of 13 was added with a strong cation exchanger resin, to produce sol solution with the pH of 4. Encapsulation was emphasized by mixing sol solution and phosphate buffer pH 7 containing HRP-GOx solution at volume ratio of buffer to sol solution 1:5. The mixture was transferred into 96-microwell plate and was aged for 24 hours. Enzymatic reaction was carried out by adding chromogenic solution of phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP and b-D-glucose solution (as substrate into the microwell. Enzymatic activity was examined by measuring absorbance of product solution at 490 nm with ELISA reader. Result of enzymatic activity for encapsulated enzymes (SGE was compared to that for free enzymes (EB. Results showed that at the investigated condition, HRP-GOx enzymes gave high activity at weight ratio of HRP to GOx 10:1 and pH 7 for both SGE and EB. Encapsulation caused the enzymes activity decrease to 53.0±0.2 %. However, SGE was observed to be more stable on pH and temperature changes than EB. Study on the effect of sodium concentration showed that the increase of sodium concentration from 0.10 to 0.37 M decreased the enzymatic activity to 56±0.2%. Reusability test showed that the synthesized SGE was reusable with activity decrease of 60

  2. Enzyme Technology of Peroxidases: Immobilization, Chemical and Genetic Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoria, Adriana; Tinoco, Raunel; Torres, Eduardo

    An overview of enzyme technology applied to peroxidases is made. Immobilization on organic, inorganic, and hybrid supports; chemical modification of amino acids and heme group; and genetic modification by site-directed and random mutagenesis are included. Different strategies that were carried out to improve peroxidase performance in terms of stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity are analyzed. Immobilization of peroxidases on inorganic and organic materials enhances the tolerance of peroxidases toward the conditions normally found in many industrial processes, such as the presence of an organic solvent and high temperature. In addition, it is shown that immobilization helps to increase the Total Turnover Number at levels high enough to justify the use of a peroxidase-based biocatalyst in a synthesis process. Chemical modification of peroxidases produces modified enzymes with higher thermostability and wider substrate variability. Finally, through mutagenesis approaches, it is possible to produce modified peroxidases capable of oxidizing nonnatural substrates with high catalytic activity and affinity.

  3. Reversible formation of high-valent-iron-oxo-porphyrin intermediate in heme-based catalysis: revisiting the kinetic model for horseradish peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandel, van M.J.H.; Primus, J.L.; Teunis, C.; Boersma, M.G.; Osman, A.M.; Veeger, C.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many heme-containing biocatalysts exert their catalytic action through the initial formation of so-called high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin intermediates. For horseradish peroxidase the initial intermediate formed has been identified as a high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin π-radical cation, called compound

  4. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  5. Hydrogen atom abstraction of 3,5-disubstituted analogues of paracetamol by horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome P450

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, J.G.M.; Groot, M.J. de; Baede, E.J.; Koppele, J.M. te; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1998-01-01

    1. The formation of free radicals during enzyme catalysed oxidation of eight 3,5-disubstituted analogues of paracetamol (PAR) has been studied. A simple peroxidase system as well as cytochrome P450-containing systems were used. Radicals were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) on incubation of

  6. Enzymatic biosensor of horseradish peroxidase immobilized on Au-Pt nanotube/Au-graphene for the simultaneous determination of antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Long; Yin, Wenmin; Tang, Kun; Li, Dian; Shao, Kang; Zuo, Yunpeng; Ma, Jing; Liu, Jiawei; Han, Heyou, E-mail: hyhan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2016-08-24

    A new electrochemical method has been proposed for the simultaneous determination of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and propyl gallate (PG) in food matrices based on enzymatic biosensors. Spiny Au-Pt nanotubes (SAP NTs) was first synthesized and demonstrated to exhibit intrinsic peroxidase and catalase-like activity. The structure of SAP NTs provides large surface area and favorable medium for electron transfer, on which HRP were immobilized and acted as enzymatic biosensor for the simultaneous detection of BHA and PG. The results revealed that BHA and PG both have well-defined oxidation waves with peak potentials of 624 and 655 mV, respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the method behaved satisfactory analytical performance towards BHA and PG with a wide linear range of 0.3–50 mg L{sup −1} and 0.1–100 mg L{sup −1}, as well as a detection limit of 0.046 mg L{sup −1} and 0.024 mg L{sup −1} (3σ/slope), respectively. Besides, the proposed method exhibits good sensitivity, stability and reproducibility, providing an alternative to fabricate electrode and construct sensitive biosensors. - Highlights: • SAP NTs was synthesized and demonstrated to exhibit intrinsic peroxidase and catalase-like activity. • The structure of SAP NTs provides larger surface area and more favorable medium for electron transfer. • Horseradish peroxidase immobilized on Au-Pt nanotube/Au-graphene acted as enzymatic biosensor. • The simultaneous detection of BHA and PG in food matrices was achieved based on enzymatic biosensors.

  7. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed cross-linking of feruloylated arabinoxylans with β-casein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Oudgenoeg, G.; Spekking, W.T.J.; Berendsen, L.B.J.M.; Vancon, L.; Boumans, H.; Gruppen, H.; Berkel, W.J.H. van; Laane, C.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Heterologous conjugates of wheat arabinoxylan and β-casein were prepared via enzymatic cross-linking, using sequential addition of the arabinoxylan to a mixture of β-casein, peroxidase, and hydrogen peroxide. The maximal formation of adducts between the β-casein and the feruloylated arabinoxylan was

  8. A one-electron oxidation of carcinogenic nonaminoazo dye Sudan I by horseradish peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semanská, M.; Dračínský, Martin; Martínek, V.; Hudeček, J.; Hodek, P.; Frei, E.; Stiborová, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2008), s. 712-716 ISSN 0172-780X Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0505; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/0329 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carcinogen * Sudan I * peroxidase * NMR spectroscopy * mechanism of oxidation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2008 http://node.nel.edu

  9. Amperometric hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on core-shell organosilica-chitosan nanospheres and multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shihong; Yuan Ruo; Chai Yaqin; Yin Bin; Li Wenjun; Min Ligen

    2009-01-01

    The application of the composites of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and core-shell organosilica-chitosan crosslinked nanospheres as an immobilization matrix for the construction of an amperometric hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) biosensor was described. MWNTs and positively charged organosilica-chitosan nanospheres were dispersed in acetic acid solution (0.6 wt%) to achieve organosilica-chitosan/MWNTs composites, which were cast onto a glass carbon electrode (GCE) surface directly. And then, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), as a model enzyme, was immobilized onto it through electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged organosilica-chitosan nanospheres and HRP. The direct electron transfer of HRP was achieved at HRP/organosilica-chitosan/MWNTs/GCE, which exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H 2 O 2 . The catalysis currents increased linearly to H 2 O 2 concentration in a wide range of 7.0 x 10 -7 to 2.8 x 10 -3 M, with a sensitivity of 49.8 μA mM -1 cm -2 and with a detection limit of 2.5 x 10 -7 M at 3σ. A Michaelies-Menten constant K M app value was estimated to be 0.32 mM, indicating a high-catalytic activity of HRP. Moreover, the proposed biosensor displayed a rapid response to H 2 O 2 and possessed good stability and reproducibility. When used to detect H 2 O 2 concentration in disinfector samples and sterilized milks, respectively, it showed satisfactory results

  10. A novel biosensor based on the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized in the three-dimensional flower-like Bi_2WO_6 microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui; Guo, Kai; Duan, Congyue; Chen, Xianjin; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional flower-like Bi_2WO_6 microspheres (3D-Bi_2WO_6 MSs) have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method. The morphology and structure of 3D-Bi_2WO_6 MSs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The 3D-Bi_2WO_6 MSs subsequently were used to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and fabricate a mediator-free biosensor for the detection of H_2O_2. Spectroscopic and electrochemical results reveal that 3D-Bi_2WO_6 MSs constitute an excellent immobilization matrix with biocompatibility for enzymes. Meanwhile, due to unique morphology of the flower-like microspheres, the direct electron transfer of HRP is facilitated and the prepared biosensors display good performances for the detection of H_2O_2 with a wide linear range, including two linear sections: 0.5–100 μM (R"2 = 0.9983) and 100–250 μM (R"2 = 0.9981), as well as an extremely low method detection limit of 0.18 μM. - Highlights: • 3D-Bi_2WO_6 microspheres are used to fabricate a mediator-free biosensor firstly. • The biosensor displays a wide linear range of 0.5–250 μM for H_2O_2. • The biosensor exhibits a low detection limit of 0.18 μM for H_2O_2.

  11. A silica-dextran nanocomposite as a novel matrix for immobilization of horseradish peroxidase, and its application to sensing hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satvekar, Rajshri K.; Rohiwal, S. S.; Raut, A. V.; Karande, V. A.; Tiwale, B. M.; Pawar, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel matrix of sol gel organic–inorganic nanocomposite that was fabricated from silica sol gel and dextran. It was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to give a biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The sensor film was characterized by Fourier transform infrared and UV–vis spectroscopy with respect to structural features and the conformation of the enzyme. The topographies of the surface of the electrode were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The biosensor was used to determine H 2 O 2 quantitatively in the presence of Methylene blue as a mediator with high electron transfer efficiency. A pair of stable and well defined quasi-reversible redox peaks of the HRP [Fe (III)]/HRP [Fe (II)] redox couple was observed at pH 7.0. The biosensor responds to H 2 O 2 in the 0.5 mM to 16.5 mM concentration range, and the limit of detection is 0.5 mM. (author)

  12. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on ZnO nanowires/macroporous SiO2 composites for the complete decolorization of anthraquinone dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huaiyan; Jin, Xinyu; Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2018-03-01

    A zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires/macroporous silicon dioxide composite was used as support to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) simply by in situ cross-linking method. As cross-linker was adsorbed on the surface of ZnO nanowires, the cross-linked HRP was quite different from the traditional cross-linking enzyme aggregates on both structure and catalytic performance. Among three epoxy compounds, diethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (DDE) was the best cross-linker, with which the loading amount of HRP with pI of 5.3 reached as high as 118.1 mg/g and specific activity was up to 14.9 U/mg-support. The mass loss of HRP cross-linked with DDE was negligible during 50-H leaching at 4 °C, and the thermal stability of the immobilized HRP was also quite good. The catalytic performance of immobilized HRP to decolorize anthraquinone dye was explored by using Reactive Blue 19 (RB 19) and Acid Violet 109 (AV 109) as model substrates. The results indicated that the immobilized HRP exhibited high decolorization efficiency and good reusability. The decolorization efficiency reached 94.3% and 95.9% for AV 109 and RB 19 within the first 30 Min, respectively. A complete decolorization of these two dyes has been realized within 2-3 H by using this new biocatalysis system. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Mediatorless amperometric bienzyme glucose biosensor based on horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase cross-linked to multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhou, Shiyi; Zhang, Xinfeng; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2014-01-01

    We report on a bienzyme-channeling sensor for sensing glucose without the aid of mediator. It was fabricated by cross-linking horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx) on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The bienzyme was cross-linked with the MWNTs by glutaraldehyde and bovine serum albumin. The MWNTs were employed to accelerate the electron transfer between immobilized HRP and electrode. Glucose was sensed by amperometric reduction of enzymatically generated H 2 O 2 at an applied voltage of −50 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). Factors influencing the preparation and performance of the bienzyme electrode were investigated in detail. The biosensor exhibited a fast and linear response to glucose in the concentration range from 0.4 to 15 mM, with a detection limit of 0.4 mM. The sensor exhibited good selectivity and durability, with a long-term relative standard deviation of <5 %. Analysis of glucose-spiked human serum samples yielded recoveries between 96 and 101 %. (author)

  14. Horseradish peroxidase functionalized gold nanorods as a label for sensitive electrochemical detection of alpha-fetoprotein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinjin; Han, Xiaowei; Wang, Junchun; Zhao, Junqing; Guo, Zilin; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2015-12-15

    In this study, a novel tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) functionalized gold nanorods (Au NRs) nanocomposites (HRP-Au NRs), was designed to label the signal antibodies for sensitive electrochemical measurement of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The preparation of HRP-Au NRs nanocomposites and the labeling of secondary antibody (Ab2) were performed by one-pot assembly of HRP and Ab2 on the surface of Au NRs. The immunosensor was fabricated by assembling carbon nanotubes (CNTs), Au NRs, and capture antibodies (Ab1) on the glassy carbon electrode. In the presence of AFP antigen, the labels were captured on the surface of the Au NRs/CNTs via specific recognition of antigen-antibody, resulting in the signal intensity being clearly increased. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was employed to record the response signal of the immunosensor in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB). Under optimal conditions, the signal intensity was linearly related to the concentration of AFP in the range of 0.1-100 ng ml(-1), and the limit of detection was 30 pg ml(-1) (at signal/noise [S/N] = 3). Furthermore, the immunoassay method was evaluated using human serum samples, and the recovery obtained was within 99.0 and 102.7%, indicating that the immunosensor has potential clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioelectrocatalytic and biosensing properties of horseradish peroxidase covalently immobilized on (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane-modified titanate nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovic, David; Gajovic, Andreja; Ivekovic, Damir

    2011-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes (TiNT) surface modified with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane were employed as a support for covalent immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by using 1,4-benzoquinone as a coupling agent. Composite film-electrodes consisting of HRP-modified TiNT embedded into the porous carbon powder/Nafion matrix were fabricated and their applicability in direct bioelectrocatalytic reduction of H 2 O 2 and H 2 O 2 biosensing were investigated. An efficient direct electron transfer between the immobilized HRP molecules and the electrode was observed in the presence of H 2 O 2 at potentials lower than 600 mV (vs. Hg/Hg 2 Cl 2 /3.5 M KCl). For the HRP-TiNT-modified electrodes polarized at 0 mV, a linear dependence of the bioelectrocatalytic current on the concentration of H 2 O 2 was observed up to the concentration of H 2 O 2 equal to 10 μM, with the sensitivity of (1.10 ± 0.01) AM -1 cm -2 and the detection limit of 35 nM.

  16. Permeability of skin and oral mucosa to water and horseradish peroxidase as related to the thickness of the permeability barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squier, C.A.; Hall, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The permeability of porcine skin and keratinized and nonkeratinized oral mucosa to tritium-labeled water and horseradish peroxidase (HRPO) was determined using perfusion chambers. Small blocks from each tissue were also incubated with HRPO and the extent of penetration visualized microscopically; this enabled measurements to be made of the thickness of the permeability barrier to this water-soluble tracer. Results obtained after inverting the oral mucosa in the chambers or adding metabolic inhibitors indicated that both compounds diffuse across the tissue. The permeability constants derived directly in the study showed that skin was less permeable than oral mucosa and that the floor of the mouth was significantly more permeable than all other regions. When these constants were normalized in terms of a standard permeability barrier thickness and the different tissues compared, the values obtained for skin were again less than those of the oral regions but, of these, the buccal mucosa was significantly higher. The difference in permeability between epidermis and keratinized oral epithelium may be due to differences in the volume density of membrane-coating granules known to exist between the tissues; differences between the oral mucosal regions may reflect differences in the nature of the intercellular barrier material

  17. Immobilization of horseradish peroxidase on self-assembled (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane film: Characterization, direct electrochemistry, redox thermodynamics and biosensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Fanghua; Hu Zhichao; Xu Jingjing; Tian Yuan; Wang Liwei; Xian Yuezhong; Jin Litong

    2008-01-01

    Highly organized (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (3-MPT) films have been prepared via self-assembled coupled with sol-gel linking technology. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is successfully immobilized onto the densely packed three-dimensional (3D) 3-MPT network and the direct electrochemistry of HRP is achieved without any electron mediators or promoters. Redox thermodynamics of HRP on the 3-MPT films, which is obtained from the temperature dependence of the reduction potential, suggests that the positive shift of redox potentials of HRP at the interface of 3-MPT originates from the solvent reorganization effects and conformational change of the polypeptide chain of HRP. Based on the direct electrochemistry and electrocatalytic ability of HRP, a sensitive third-generation amperometric H 2 O 2 biosensor is developed with two linear dependence ranges of 5.0 x 10 -7 to 1.0 x 10 -4 and 1.0 x 10 -4 to 2.0 x 10 -2 mol L -1

  18. Amperometric carbohydrate antigen 19-9 immunosensor based on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic Au film coupling direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qi [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Chen, Xiaojun, E-mail: chenxj_njut@126.com [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Tang, Yin [Zhangjiagang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhangjiagang 215600 (China); Ge, Lingna; Guo, Buhua [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Yao, Cheng, E-mail: yaochengnjut@163.com [College of Sciences, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic electrode was newly used in electrochemical immunosensor. • The large surface area of macroporous magnetic electrode could improve the immobilized amount of antibody. • Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 was used to immobilize enzyme labeled Ab₂ and enzyme. • Macroporous magnetic electrode and Au nanoparticles composite facilitated the direct electron transfer of enzyme. • The immunoassay avoided adding electron transfer mediator, simplifying the procedure. Abstract: A sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) antigen based on the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab₁) on three dimensional ordered macroporous magnetic (3DOMM) electrode, and the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) that was used as both the label of secondary antibody (Ab₂) and the blocking reagent. The 3DOMM electrode was fabricated by introducing core–shell Au–SiO₂@Fe₃O₄ nanospheres onto the surface of three dimensional ordered macroporous (3DOM) Au electrode via the application of an external magnet. Au nanoparticles functionalized SBA-15 (Au@SBA-15) was conjugated to the HRP labeled secondary antibody (HRP-Ab₂) through the Au–SH or Au–NH₃⁺ interaction, and HRP was also used as the block reagent. The formation of antigen–antibody complex made the combination of Au@SBA-15 and 3DOMM exhibit remarkable synergistic effects for accelerating direct electron transfer (DET) between HRP and the electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the DET current signal increased proportionally to CA 19-9 concentration in the range of 0.05 to 15.65 U mL⁻¹ with a detection limit of 0.01 U mL⁻¹. Moreover, the immunosensor showed high selectivity, good stability, satisfactory reproducibility and regeneration. Importantly, the developed method was used to assay clinical serum specimens, achieving a good relation with those obtained from

  19. Multi-input and -output logic circuits based on bioelectrocatalysis with horseradish peroxidase and glucose oxidase immobilized in multi-responsive copolymer films on electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue; Lian, Wenjing; Zhang, Jiannan; Liu, Hongyun

    2016-06-15

    Herein, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N'-dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) copolymer films were polymerized on electrode surface with a simple one-step method, and the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was embedded in the films simultaneously, which were designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP. The films exhibited a reversible structure change with the external stimuli, such as pH, CO2, temperature and SO4(2-), causing the cyclic voltammetric (CV) response of electroactive K3Fe(CN)6 at the film electrodes to display the corresponding multi-stimuli sensitive ON-OFF behavior. Based on the switchable CV property of the system and the electrochemical reduction of H2O2 catalyzed by HRP in the films and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-) in solution, a 5-input/3-output logic gate was established. To further increase the complexity of the logic system, another enzyme glucose oxidase (GOD) was added into the films, designated as P(NiPAAm-co-DMEM)-HRP-GOD. In the presence of oxygen, the oxidation of glucose in the solution was catalyzed by GOD in the films, and the produced H2O2 in situ was recognized and electrocatalytically reduced by HRP and mediated by Fe(CN)6(3-). Based on the bienzyme films, a cascaded or concatenated 4-input/3-output logic gate system was proposed. The present work combined the multi-responsive interface with bioelectrocatalysis to construct cascaded logic circuits, which might open a new avenue to develop biocomputing elements with more sophisticated functions and design novel glucose biosensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitroxides protect horseradish peroxidase from H2O2-induced inactivation and modulate its catalase-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuni, Amram; Maimon, Eric; Goldstein, Sara

    2017-08-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes H 2 O 2 dismutation while undergoing heme inactivation. The mechanism underlying this process has not been fully elucidated. The effects of nitroxides, which protect metmyoglobin and methemoglobin against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation, have been investigated. HRP reaction with H 2 O 2 was studied by following H 2 O 2 depletion, O 2 evolution and heme spectral changes. Nitroxide concentration was followed by EPR spectroscopy, and its reactions with the oxidized heme species were studied using stopped-flow. Nitroxide protects HRP against H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. The rate of H 2 O 2 dismutation in the presence of nitroxide obeys zero-order kinetics and increases as [nitroxide] increases. Nitroxide acts catalytically since its oxidized form is readily reduced to the nitroxide mainly by H 2 O 2 . The nitroxide efficacy follows the order 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (TPO)>4-OH-TPO>3-carbamoyl proxyl>4-oxo-TPO, which correlates with the order of the rate constants of nitroxide reactions with compounds I, II, and III. Nitroxide catalytically protects HRP against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 while modulating its catalase-like activity. The protective role of nitroxide at μM concentrations is attributed to its efficient oxidation by P940, which is the precursor of the inactivated form P670. Modeling the dismutation kinetics in the presence of nitroxide adequately fits the experimental data. In the absence of nitroxide the simulation fits the observed kinetics only if it does not include the formation of a Michaelis-Menten complex. Nitroxides catalytically protect heme proteins against inactivation induced by H 2 O 2 revealing an additional role played by nitroxide antioxidants in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quantitative determination of trace hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfide using the Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nannan; Miller, Christopher J; Wang, Peng; Waite, T David

    2017-04-22

    The Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase (AR/HRP) assay for H 2 O 2 is one of the most sensitive and simple approaches for H 2 O 2 quantification, which is effected by measuring the highly-fluorescent resorufin formed from oxidation of AR by the oxidizing intermediates generated by reaction of HRP and H 2 O 2 . The direct reactions of S(-II) with both H 2 O 2 and resorufin are too slow to be of relevance on analytical timescales, however, the reaction between S(-II) and the HRP/H 2 O 2 oxidizing intermediates is rapid enough to compete with the desired reaction of these oxidizing intermediates with AR, suppressing formation of the resorufin analyte. As this mode of interference can be considered simply a competition between the AR reagent and S(-II) for the intermediate oxidizing species, a simple equation is derived in this work enabling one to correct for this interference and obtain a good estimate of the true H 2 O 2 concentration after measuring the apparent H 2 O 2 concentration and the S(-II) concentration. This mode of interference is general to any compound that can act as a HRP substrate even if not directly reactive with H 2 O 2 . As such, the approach described is widely applicable to many potential reducing interferents and opens up the use of the AR/HRP assay to a much wider range of conditions, as well as demonstrating the utility of explicitly considering the mechanism of the analytical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced amperometric response of a glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase based bienzyme glucose biosensor modified with a film of polymerized toluidine blue containing reduced graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fang; Gong, Wencheng; Wang, Lili; Chen, Zilin

    2015-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was used to construct a bienzyme biosensor containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx). A poly(toluidine blue) (pTB) film containing RGO acted as both enzyme immobilization matrix and electron transfer mediator. The bienzyme biosensor was characterized by electrochemical techniques and displays a highly sensitive amperometric response to glucose and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) at a potential as low as −0.1 V (vs. SCE). It is shown that use of RGO causes a strong enhancement on the amperometric responses. H 2 O 2 formed by the action of GOx in the presence of oxygen can be further reduced by HRP in the pTB film contacting the RGO modified electrode. In the absence of oxygen, glucose oxidation proceeds by another mechanism in which electron transfer occurs from GOx to the electrode and with pTB acting as the mediator. Amperometric responses to glucose and H2O2 follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The experimental conditions were optimized, and under these conditions glucose can be determined in the 80 μM to 3.0 mM range with a detection limit of 50 μM. H 2 O 2 , in turn, can be quantified in up to 30.0 μM concentration with a detection limit of 0.2 μM. The bienzyme biosensor is reproducible, repeatable and stable. Finally, it has been successfully applied to the determination of glucose in plasma samples. (author)

  3. Single turnover studies of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation by horseradish peroxidase reveal a mechanism involving two consecutive one electron steps: toward a functional halophenol bioremediation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumithran, Suganya; Sono, Masanori; Raner, Gregory M; Dawson, John H

    2012-12-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzes the oxidative para-dechlorination of the environmental pollutant/carcinogen 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). A possible mechanism for this reaction is a direct oxygen atom transfer from HRP compound I (HRP I) to trichlorophenol to generate 2,6-dichloro 1,4-benzoquinone, a two-electron transfer process. An alternative mechanism involves two consecutive one-electron transfer steps in which HRP I is reduced to compound II (HRP II) and then to the ferric enzyme as first proposed by Wiese et al. [F.W. Wiese, H.C. Chang, R.V. Lloyd, J.P. Freeman, V.M. Samokyszyn, Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 34 (1998) 217-222]. To probe the mechanism of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation, the reactions between 2,4,6-TCP and HRP compounds I or II have been investigated under single turnover conditions (i.e., without excess H(2)O(2)) using rapid scan stopped-flow spectroscopy. Addition of 2,4,6-TCP to HRP I leads rapidly to HRP II and then more slowly to the ferric resting state, consistent with a mechanism involving two consecutive one-electron oxidations of the substrate via a phenoxy radical intermediate. HRP II can also directly dechlorinate 2,4,6-TCP as judged by rapid scan stopped-flow and mass spectrometry. This observation is particularly significant since HRP II can only carry out one-electron oxidations. A more detailed understanding of the mechanism of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation will facilitate the use of HRP as a halophenol bioremediation catalyst. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protecting peroxidase activity of multilayer enzyme-polyion films using outer catalase layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F; Hu, Naifei

    2007-12-27

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and they biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2.

  5. Vesicular transport route of horseradish C1a peroxidase is regulated by N- and C-terminal propeptides in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T; Nakayama, H; Yoshida, K; Shinmyo, A

    2003-10-01

    Peroxidases (PRX, EC 1.11.1.7) are widely distributed across microorganisms, plants, and animals; and, in plants, they have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions. In particular, horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) root represents the main source of commercial PRX production. The prxC1a gene, which encodes horseradish PRX (HRP) C, is expressed mainly in the roots and stems of the horseradish plant. HRP C1a protein is shown to be synthesized as a preprotein with both a N-terminal (NTPP) and a C-terminal propeptide (CTPP). These propeptides, which might be responsible for intracellular localization or secretion, are removed before or concomitant with production of the mature protein. We investigated the functional role of HRP C1a NTPP and CTPP in the determination of the vesicular transport route, using an analytical system of transgenically cultured tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum, BY2). Here, we report that NTPP and CTPP are necessary and sufficient for accurate localization of mature HRP C1a protein to vacuoles of the vesicular transport system. We also demonstrate that HRP C1a derived from a preprotein lacking CTPP is shunted into the secretory pathway.

  6. Silica Sol-Gel Entrapment of the Enzyme Chloro peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.; Chan, S.; Ebaid, B.; Sommerhalter, M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme chloro peroxidase (CPO) was immobilized in silica sol-gel beads prepared from tetramethoxysilane. The average pore diameter of the silica host structure (∼3 nm) was smaller than the globular CPO diameter (∼6 nm) and the enzyme remained entrapped after sol-gel maturation. The catalytic performance of the entrapped enzyme was assessed via the pyrogallol peroxidation reaction. Sol-gel beads loaded with 4 μg CPO per mL sol solution reached 9-12% relative activity compared to free CPO in solution. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed a decrease in K_cat but no changes in K_M or K_I . Product release or enzyme damage might thus limit catalytic performance. Yet circular dichroism and visible absorption spectra of transparent CPO sol-gel sheets did not indicate enzyme damage. Activity decline due to methanol exposure was shown to be reversible in solution. To improve catalytic performance the sol-gel protocol was modified. The incorporation of 5, 20, or 40% methyltrimethoxysilane resulted in more brittle sol-gel beads but the catalytic performance increased to 14% relative to free CPO in solution. The use of more acidic casting buffers (ph 4.5 or 5.5 instead of 6.5) resulted in a more porous silica host reaching up to 18% relative activity

  7. Activity of the C-terminal-dependent vacuolar sorting signal of horseradish peroxidase C1a is enhanced by its secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takeshi; Tabayashi, Ayako; Iwano, Megumi; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko; Nakayama, Hideki

    2011-02-01

    Plant class III peroxidase (PRX) catalyzes the oxidation and oxidative polymerization of a variety of phenolic compounds while reducing hydrogen peroxide. PRX proteins are classified into apoplast type and vacuole type based on the absence or the presence of C-terminal propeptides, which probably function as vacuolar sorting signals (VSSs). In this study, in order to improve our understanding of vacuole-type PRX, we analyzed regulatory mechanisms of vacuolar sorting of a model vacuole-type PRX, the C1a isozyme of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) (HRP C1a). Using cultured transgenic tobacco cells and protoplasts derived from horseradish leaves, we characterized HRP C1a's VSS, which is a 15 amino acid C-terminal propeptide (C15). We found that the C-terminal hexapeptide of C15 (C6), which is well conserved among vacuole-type PRX proteins, forms the core of the C-terminal-dependent VSS. We also found that the function of C6 is enhanced by the remaining N-terminal part of C15 which probably folds into an amphiphilic α-helix.

  8. Enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and identification of a dimeric product by LC-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Sasa; Vojinovic, Katarina; Milenkovic, Sanja; Smelcerovic, Andrija; Lamshoeft, Marc; Petronijevic, Zivomir

    2013-12-15

    Flavonoid oxidation is important issue in food processing and quality. The kinetic mechanism of enzymatic oxidation of rutin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was studied. Rutin oxidation reaction was followed by recording of spectral changes over the time at 360 nm. The studied oxidation is mostly enzymatic and less part non-enzymatic. The reaction with HRP has a higher rate compared with the reaction without of HRP, whereby is part of non-enzymatic reaction about 10% of the total reaction. Kinetic parameters were determined from graphics of linear Michaelis-Menten equation, and it was found that investigated reactions of rutin oxidation by HRP take place in a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. High resolution HPLC-MS analysis of the mixture of oxidized products of rutin revealed the presence of rutin dimer. Because of widely distribution of rutin as well as presence of peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide in fresh foods identification of this enzymatic modification product can be beneficial for foods quality and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepel, F.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Dupont, J.L.; Sotelo, C.

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields. (author)

  10. Alterations in blood-brain barrier function following acute hypertension: comparison of the blood-to-brain transfer of horseradish peroxidase with that of alpha-aminisobutyric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, M.D.B.

    1985-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively restricts the blood-to-brain passage of many solutes owing to unique properties of cerebrovascular endothelial cell membranes. To date, experimental study of the BBB has been accomplished primarily through the use of two different methodological approaches. Morphological studies have mostly employed large molecular weight (MW) tracers to detect morphological alterations underlying increased permeability. Physiological studies, employing smaller, more physiologic tracers have successfully described, quantitatively, certain functional aspects of blood-to-brain transfer. The current work attempts to merge these two approaches and to consider barrier function/dysfunction from both a morphological and a functional perspective. Specifically, the study compares in rats, following acute hypertension, the cerebrovascular passage of 14 C-alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The blood-to-brain passage of AIB and HRP were compared following acute hypertension, with regard to both the distributions of the tracer extravasation patterns and the magnitude of tracer extravasation. The results of this study suggest that traditional morphological barrier studies alone do not reveal all aspects of altered barrier status and that multiple mechanisms underlying increased BBB permeability may operate simultaneously during BBB dysfunction

  11. Horseradish peroxidase and antibody labeled gold nanoparticle probe for amplified immunoassay of ciguatoxin in fish samples based on capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Chaoying; Luan, Wenxiu

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a new amplified immunoassay with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody (Ab) labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) probe hyphenated to capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrochemical (EC) detection for ultrasensitive determination of ciguatoxin CTX1B. AuNPs were conjugated with HRP and Ab, and then incubated with limited amount of CTX1B to produce immunocomplex. The immunoreactive sample was injected into capillary for CE separation and EC detection. Enhanced sensitivity was obtained by adopting the AuNPs as carriers of HRP and Ab at high HRP/Ab molar ratio. The calibration curve of CTX1B was in the range of 0.06-90 ng/mL. The detection limit was 0.045 ng/mL, which is 38-fold lower than that of HPLC-MS method for CTX1B analysis. The proposed method was successfully applied for the quantification of CTX1B in contamined fish samples by simultaneously labeling Ab and HRP on AuNPs. The amplified IA with HRP and Ab labeled AuNPs probe hyphenated to CE and EC detection provides a sensitive analytical approach for the determination of trace ciguatoxin in complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrochemical horseradish peroxidase biosensor based on dextran-ionic liquid-V2O5 nanobelt composite material modified carbon ionic liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhihong; Sun Xiaoying; Wang Yan; Zeng Yan; Sun Wei; Huang Xintang

    2010-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was realized in a dextran (De), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM]EtOSO 3 ) and V 2 O 5 nanobelt composite material modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE). Spectroscopic results indicated that HRP retained its native structure in the composite. A pair of well-defined redox peaks of HRP appeared in pH 3.0 phosphate buffer solution with the formal potential of -0.213 V (vs. SCE), which was the characteristic of HRP heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. The result was attributed to the specific characteristics of De-IL-V 2 O 5 nanocomposite and CILE, which promoted the direct electron transfer rate of HRP with electrode. The electrochemical parameters of HRP on the composite modified electrode were calculated and the electrocatalysis of HRP to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was examined. Under the optimal conditions the reduction peak current increased with TCA concentration in the range from 0.4 to 16.0 mmol L -1 . The proposed electrode is valuable for the third-generation electrochemical biosensor.

  13. Light microscopic detection of sugar residues in glycoconjugates of salivary glands and the pancreas with lectin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates. I. Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, B A; Spicer, S S

    1983-12-01

    Mouse salivary glands and pancreases were stained with a battery of ten horseradish peroxidase-conjugated lectins. Lectin staining revealed striking differences in the structure of oligosaccharides of stored intracellular secretory glycoproteins and glycoconjugates associated with the surface of epithelial cells lining excretory ducts. The percentage of acinar cells containing terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine residues varied greatly in submandibular glands of 30 male mice, but all submandibular acinar cells contained oligosaccharides with terminal sialic acid and penultimate beta-galactose residues. The last named dimer was abundant in secretory glycoprotein of all mucous acinar cells in murine sublingual glands and an additional 20-50% of these cells in all glands contained terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues. In contrast, terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine was abundant in sublingual serous demilune secretions. Serous acinar cells in the exorbital lacrimal gland, posterior lingual gland, parotid gland and pancreas exhibited a staining pattern unique to each organ. In contrast, the apical cytoplasm and surface of striated duct epithelial cells in the submandibular, sublingual, parotid and exorbital lacrimal gland stained similarly. A comparison of staining with conjugated lectins reported biochemically to have very similar carbohydrate binding specificity has revealed some remarkable differences in their reactivity, suggesting different binding specificity for the same terminal sugars having different glycosidic linkages or with different penultimate sugar residues.

  14. Dendritic and axonic fields of Purkinje cells in developing and X-irradiated rat cerebellum. A comparative study using intracellular staining with horseradish peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crepel, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Dupont, J L [Paris-5 Univ., 75 (France); Sotelo, C [Hopital Foch, 92 - Suresnes (France). Centre Medico-Chirurgical

    1980-01-01

    Intracellular staining of cerebellar Purkinje cells with horseradish peroxidase was achieved in normal developing rats (8-13 days old), in normal adult rats and in adult rats in which the cerebellum had been degranulated by X-ray treatment. The mono- and multiple innervation of Purkinje cells by climbing fibres was electrophysiologically determined and correlated with their dendritic pattern and axonal field. In immature rats, considerable variations in dendritic arborization were observed between cells at the same age, according to their position in the vermis. In adult X-irradiated animals, a large variety of dendritic shapes was found, confirming previous anatomical data, but no obvious correlation was found between the morphology of the dendrites of Purkinje cells and their synaptic investment by climbing fibres. As regards the axonal field, the adult branching pattern of recurrent axon collaterals was almost established by postnatal day 8, except for some cells which exhibited richer recurrent collaterals. On the other hand, in X-irradiated animals, profuse plexuses were the rule and they originated either from one collateral stem, or from several collaterals, also independently of the number of afferent climbing fibres. The existence of these enlarged recurrent collateral plexuses can be explained by the persistence of an immature stage, and certainly also by the collateral sprouting following the largely impaired innervation of the terminal field during development. These results emphasize the role of the cellular interactions that occur during Purkinje cell growth in the formation of both its axonal and dendritic fields.

  15. Novel Dry-Type Glucose Sensor Based on a Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Capacitor Structure with Horseradish Peroxidase + Glucose Oxidase Catalyzing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Jenn; Wu, You-Lin; Hsu, Po-Yen

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, we present a novel dry-type glucose sensor based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSC) structure using SiO2 as a gate dielectric in conjunction with a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) + glucose oxidase (GOD) catalyzing layer. The tested glucose solution was dropped directly onto the window opened on the SiO2 layer, with a coating of HRP + GOD catalyzing layer on top of the gate dielectric. From the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of the sensor, we found that the glucose solution can induce an inversion layer on the silicon surface causing a gate leakage current flowing along the SiO2 surface. The gate current changes Δ I before and after the drop of glucose solution exhibits a near-linear relationship with increasing glucose concentration. The Δ I sensitivity is about 1.76 nA cm-2 M-1, and the current is quite stable 20 min after the drop of the glucose solution is tested.

  16. Study of electron transport in the functionalized nanotubes and their impact on the electron transfer in the active site of horseradish peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizabadi, Mina; Ajloo, Davood; Soleymanpour, Ahmad; Faridnouri, Hassan

    2018-05-01

    Electrochemical characterization of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNT) including carboxyl (CNT-COOH), amine (CNT-NH2) and hydroxyl (CNT-OH) functional groups were studied using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The current-voltage (I-V) curves were obtained from each system and the effect of f-CNT on redox interaction of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized on the electrode surface was investigated. The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) combined with density functional theory (DFT) were used to study the transport properties of f-CNT. Additionally, the effect of the number of functional groups on transport properties of CNT, I-V characteristics, electronic transmission coefficients and spatial distribution of f-CNTs have been calculated and analyzed. The results showed that the carboxyl derivative has larger transmission coefficients and current value than other f-CNTs. Then, the effect of functional groups on the electron transport in heme group of HRP is discussed. Finally, the effect of a covalent bond between active site amino acids and amine functional group of CNT was investigated and discussed.

  17. Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP Immobilized Poly(aniline-co-m-aminophenol Film Electrodes–fabrication and Evaluation as Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ho Choi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme modified electrodes were fabricated with poly(aniline-co-m-aminophenol. Electrochemical polymerization of aniline and m-aminophenol wasperformed to get the film of copolymer on the surface of gold electrode. Modifiedelectrodes were fabricated by two methods, physical entrapment and covalent cross-linking.In one of the method, gold nanoparticles were loaded into the copolymer film andhorseradish peroxidase (HRP was immobilized into the Au nanoparticle loaded copolymerfilm through physical entrapment. In the other method, the amino and -OH groups in thecopolymer are utilized to form covalent functionalization with HRP via glutaric dialdehydeas cross-linker/mediator. The conducting copolymer/enzyme modified electrodes preparedby physical entrapment/covalent functionalization of enzyme were tested forelectrocatalytic activities towards sensing of H2O2. Amperometric results indicate thatenzyme modified electrode via physical entrapment possesses better electrocatalyticperformance over covalent functionalized enzyme electrode.

  18. Ultrasensitive colorimetric immunoassay for hCG detection based on dual catalysis of Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticle functionalized by horseradish peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zou, Yake; Yan, Jinwu; Liu, Jing; Chen, Huixiong; Li, Shan; Zhang, Lei

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, an ultrasensitive colorimetric biosensor for human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) detection was designed from bottom-up method based on the dual catalysis of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and Au@Pt nanoparticles (NPs) relative to H2O2-TEM system. HRP and monoclonal mouse anti-hCG antibody (β-submit, mAb1) were co-immobilized onto the Au@Pt NP surface to improve catalytic efficiency and specificity, which formed a dual functionalized Au@Pt-HRP probe with the mean size of 42.8 nm (D50). The colorimetric immunoassay was developed for the hCG detection, and the Au@Pt-HRP probe featured a higher sensitivity in the concentration range of 0.4-12.8 IU L- 1 with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 IU L- 1 compared with the LODs of 0.8 IU L- 1 for BA-ELISA and of 2.0 IU L- 1 for Au@Pt, which indicated that the Au@Pt-HRP probe possessed higher catalytic efficiency with 2.8-fold increase over Au@Pt and 33.8-fold increase over HRP. Also, the Au@Pt-HRP probe exhibited good precision and reproducibility, high specificity and acceptable accuracy with CV being less than 15%. The dual functionalized Au@Pt-HRP probe as a type of signal amplified method was firstly applied in the colorimetric immunoassay for the hCG detection.

  19. Production of a conjugate between the rK346 antigen from Leishmania infantum and the horseradish peroxidase C for the detection of rK346 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengifo-González, Juan; Medina-Mora, Yollyseth; Silva-Barrios, Sasha; Márquez-Contreras, María Elizabeth; Tibisay Ruiz, María; Cáceres, Ana J; Concepción, Juan Luis; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    It was designed and characterized a reporter system to be captured by an- tibodies bound to ELISA plates. The system was designed with the rK346 from Leishmania infantum, a highly antigenic and specific protein. The rK346 was coupled to the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPc) from Armoracia rusticana using glutaraldehyde or sulfo-SMCC. Gluta- raldehyde conjugation was performed in two steps. Separation of conjugates was carried out using a Sepharose S-200 in size exclusion chromatography (SEC); fractions were analyzed via HRPc activity and through ELISA plates sensitized with polyclonal anti-rK346 IgG puri- fied from rabbit serum. A heterogeneous population of conjugates rK346-HRPc was obtained with molecular weights ranging between 109.7 ± 16.5 to 67.6 ± 10.1 kDa; with rK346-HRPe stoichiometries of 1:2; 2:1; 3:1; and 2:2. Conjugation using sulfo-SMCC was carried out first by introducing -SH groups onto the HRPc using the SATA reagent and the antigen was modi- fied with sulfo-SMCC during 45 min. Separation and analysis of conjugates was performed similarly as with glutaraldehyde, resulting in a heterogeneous population of conjugates rK346- HRPc with molecular weights between 150.5 ± 22.6 to 80.0 ± 12.0 kDa; with rK346-HRPC stoichiometries of 2:1; 1:2; 2:2; and 1:3, with an increased conjugation efficiency in compari- son with glutaraldehyde. This enables sulfo-SMCC to be used as a potential reagent for cou- pling the antigen to the HRPc, to design an economic, specific and easy method to apply as a reporter system, available to assess individuals at risk and/or at early and late stages of visceral leishmaniasis.

  20. Effect of the structure of imidazolium cations in [BF4](-)-type ionic liquids on direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase in Nafion films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Xirong; Qu, Yinbo

    2011-10-01

    The direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in Nafion films at glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was investigated in three [BF(4)](-)-type room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) to understand the structural effect of imidazolium cations. The three ILs are 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Emim][BF(4)]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF(4)]) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Hmim][BF(4)]). A small amount of water in the three ILs is indispensable for maintaining the electrochemical activity of HRP in Nafion films, and the optimum water contents decrease with the increase of alkyl chain length on imidazole ring. Analysis shows that the optimum water contents are primarily determined by the hydrophilicity of ILs used. In contrast to aqueous medium, ILs media facilitate the direct electron transfer of HRP, and the electrochemical parameters obtained in different ILs are obviously related to the nature of ILs. The direct electron transfer between HRP and GCE is a surface-confined quasi-reversible single electron transfer process. The apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant decreases gradually with the increase of alkyl chain length on imidazole ring, but the changing extent is relatively small. The electrocatalytic reduction current of H(2)O(2) at the present electrode decreases obviously with the increase of alkyl chain length, and the mass transfer of H(2)O(2) via diffusion in ILs should be responsible for the change. In addition, the modified electrode has good stability and reproducibility; the ability to tolerate high levels of F(-) has been greatly enhanced due to the use of Nafion film. When an appropriate mediator is included in the sensing layer, a sensitive nonaqueous biosensor could be fabricated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel biosensor based on the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase immobilized in the three-dimensional flower-like Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui, E-mail: liuhui@sust.edu.cn; Guo, Kai; Duan, Congyue; Chen, Xianjin; Zhu, Zhenfeng

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional flower-like Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} microspheres (3D-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} MSs) have been synthesized through a simple hydrothermal method. The morphology and structure of 3D-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} MSs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The 3D-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} MSs subsequently were used to immobilize horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and fabricate a mediator-free biosensor for the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Spectroscopic and electrochemical results reveal that 3D-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} MSs constitute an excellent immobilization matrix with biocompatibility for enzymes. Meanwhile, due to unique morphology of the flower-like microspheres, the direct electron transfer of HRP is facilitated and the prepared biosensors display good performances for the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with a wide linear range, including two linear sections: 0.5–100 μM (R{sup 2} = 0.9983) and 100–250 μM (R{sup 2} = 0.9981), as well as an extremely low method detection limit of 0.18 μM. - Highlights: • 3D-Bi{sub 2}WO{sub 6} microspheres are used to fabricate a mediator-free biosensor firstly. • The biosensor displays a wide linear range of 0.5–250 μM for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • The biosensor exhibits a low detection limit of 0.18 μM for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  2. Covalent immobilization of lipase, glycerol kinase, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase & horseradish peroxidase onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC strip & its application in serum triglyceride determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Chauhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives:Reusable biostrip consisting enzymes immobilized onto alkylamine glass beads affixed on plasticized PVC strip for determination of triglyceride (TG suffers from high cost of beads and their detachments during washings for reuse, leading to loss of activity. The purpose of this study was to develop a cheaper and stable biostrip for investigation of TG levels in serum. Methods: A reusable enzyme-strip was prepared for TG determination by co-immobilizing lipase, glycerol kinase (GK, glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GPO and peroxidase (HRP directly onto plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC strip through glutaraldehyde coupling. The method was evaluated by studying its recovery, precision and reusability. Results: The enzyme-strip showed optimum activity at pH 7.0, 35 o C and a linear relationship between its activity and triolein concentration in the range 0.1 to 15 mM. The strip was used for determination of serum TG. The detection limit of the method was 0.1 mM. Analytical recovery of added triolein was 96 per cent. Within and between batch coefficients of variation (CV were 2.2 and 3.7 per cent, respectively. A good correlation (r=0.99 was found between TG values by standard enzymic colrimetric method employing free enzymes and the present method. The strip lost 50 per cent of its initial activity after its 200 uses during the span of 100 days, when stored at 4 o C. Interpretation & conclusions: The nitrating acidic treatment of plasticized PVC strip led to glutaraldehyde coupling of four enzymes used for enzymic colourimetric determination of serum TG. The strip provided 200 reuses of enzymes with only 50 per cent loss of its initial activity. The method could be used for preparation of other enzyme strips also.

  3. Horseradish peroxidase-loaded nanospheres attached to hollow gold nanoparticles as signal enhancers in an ultrasensitive immunoassay for alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ya; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhuo, Ying; Su, Huilan; Zhang, Yuxia

    2014-01-01

    We report on a novel electrochemical signal amplification strategy for use in immunoassays. The highly responsive immunoelectrode was constructed in the following way: (1) The surface of a gold electrode was covered with a layer single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in chitosane functionalized with L-cysteine; (2) Gold nanoparticles containing protein A and anti-alpha-fetoprotein (anti-AFP) were then covalently attached to the surface via the thiol groups of the chitosane. The electrode is then exposed to the analyte (AFP) which then is bound by the antibody. In the next step, a gold-conjugated secondary antibody is added that was prepared in the following way: (1) Horseradish peroxidase was crosslinked and the resulting spheres were coated with hollow gold nanoparticles (hollow Au-NPs) to give nanospheres of ∼100 nm in diameter. (2) These were the coated with thionine and, in a last step, with secondary antibody. The use of these materials has several attractive features: The HRP-NPs functionalized with hollow Au-NPs possess a large surface area that can load the large amount of secondary antibody. Thionine (Thi) is highly redox active and improves the intensity of the signal. Carbon nanotubes were used because they possess an excellent electron transfer rate and large surface area. Following incubation of the modified electrode (a) with a sample containing AFP, (b) then with the secondary antibody, and (c) with washing buffer, the electrode is placed in a solution containing H 2 O 2 . The HRP in the smart secondary antibody causes the catalytic decomposition of H 2 O 2 and the results in an electrical current that is linearly related to the concentration of AFP in the 0.025 to 5.0 ng mL −1 concentration range. The detection limit for AFP is as low as 8.3 pg mL −1 . We believe that this novel kind of immunoassay represents a promising tool for use in sensitive clinical assays. (author)

  4. Design and development of a highly stable hydrogen peroxide biosensor on screen printed carbon electrode based on horseradish peroxidase bound with gold nanoparticles in the matrix of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkuaram, Tanin; Ponchio, Chatchai; Kangkasomboon, Thippayawadee; Katikawong, Panadda; Veerasai, Waret

    2007-04-15

    The design and development of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) on a polyvinyl chloride substrate as a disposable sensor is described. Six configurations were designed on silk screen frames. The SPCEs were printed with four inks: silver ink as the conducting track, carbon ink as the working and counter electrodes, silver/silver chloride ink as the reference electrode and insulating ink as the insulator layer. Selection of the best configuration was done by comparing slopes from the calibration plots generated by the cyclic voltammograms at 10, 20 and 30 mM K(3)Fe(CN)(6) for each configuration. The electrodes with similar configurations gave similar slopes. The 5th configuration was the best electrode that gave the highest slope. Modifying the best SPCE configuration for use as a biosensor, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was selected as a biomaterial bound with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the matrix of chitosan (HRP/AuNP/CHIT). Biosensors of HRP/SPCE, HRP/CHIT/SPCE and HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE were used in the amperometric detection of H(2)O(2) in a solution of 0.1M citrate buffer, pH 6.5, by applying a potential of -0.4V at the working electrode. All the biosensors showed an immediate response to H(2)O(2). The effect of HRP/AuNP incorporated with CHIT (HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE) yielded the highest performance. The amperometric response of HRP/AuNP/CHIT/SPCE retained over 95% of the initial current of the 1st day up to 30 days of storage at 4 degrees C. The biosensor showed a linear range of 0.01-11.3mM H(2)O(2), with a detection limit of 0.65 microM H(2)O(2) (S/N=3). The low detection limit, long storage life and wide linear range of this biosensor make it advantageous in many applications, including bioreactors and biosensors.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...

  6. Role of thyroid gland on the peroxidase and iodinating enzymes of submaxillary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, T.; Das, R.; Datta, A.G.

    1977-01-01

    The peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and iodinase (EC 1.11.1.8) activities of rat submaxillary gland were found to be increased after thyroidectomy. The enzyme activities were maximal on the seventh day after operation and then decreased slightly. However, the enzyme activities were still more than 100% even 28 days following operation. Administration of thyroxine (10 μg/100 g body weight) prevented the increase. Puromycin, cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, the inhibitors of protein synthesis, as well as Thiouracil partially abolished the increase of activities. These results suggest that thyroxine acts as a regulator of the iodinase and peroxidase enzyme(s) of submaxillary gland. Iodine 131 was the isotope used in the experiments. (orig./AJ) [de

  7. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öztekin, Aykut, E-mail: aoztekin@agri.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Agri Ibrahim Cecen University Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 04100-Agri (Turkey); Almaz, Züleyha, E-mail: zturkoglu-2344@hotmail.com [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey); Mus Alparslan University Faculty of Sciences, Department of Moleculer Biology, 49250-Mus (Turkey); Özdemir, Hasan, E-mail: hozdemir@atauni.edu.tr [Ataturk University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 25240-Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC{sub 50} values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  8. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztekin, Aykut; Almaz, Züleyha; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC50 values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  9. Determining inhibition effects of some aromatic compounds on peroxidase enzyme purified from white and red cabbage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öztekin, Aykut; Almaz, Züleyha; Özdemir, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (E.C.1.11.1.7) catalyze the one electron oxidation of wide range of substrates. They are used in synthesis reaction, removal of peroxide from industrial wastes, clinical biochemistry and immunoassays. In this study, the white cabbage (Brassica Oleracea var. capitata f. alba) and red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra) peroxidase enzymes were purified for investigation of inhibitory effect of some aromatic compounds on these enzymes. IC_5_0 values and Ki constants were calculated for the molecules of 6-Amino nicotinic hydrazide, 6-Amino-5-bromo nicotinic hydrazide, 2-Amino-5-hydroxy benzohydrazide, 4-Amino-3-hydroxy benzohydrazide on purified enzymes and inhibition type of these molecules were determined. (This research was supported by Ataturk University. Project Number: BAP-2015/98).

  10. Dibromine radical anion reactions with heme enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Gebicki, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of Br 2 radical anion with heme enzymes, catalase horseradish peroxidase, have been studied by pulse radiolysis. It has been found that Br 2 - does not react with the heme centre of investigated enzymes. Dibromine radical anion reacts with tryptophan residues of catalase without any influence on the activity of catalase. It is suggested that in pulse radiolysis studies, where horseradish peroxidase is at about tenfold excess toward Br 2 - , the enzyme is modified rather by Br 2 , than by Br 2 - . (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  11. A Biocatalytic One-Pot Approach for the Preparation of Lignin Oligomers Using an Oxidase/Peroxidase Cascade Enzyme System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, Mohamed H. M.; Deuss, Peter J.; Loncar, Nikola; Trajkovic, Milos; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic lignin was prepared biocatalytically in a one-pot, two-step reaction using an oxidase/peroxidase cascade enzyme system. Using eugenol in combination with eugenol oxidase and a peroxidase, lignin-like material was produced. The cascade reaction takes advantage of the ability of the oxidase

  12. Effect of low concentrations of ozone on the enzymes catalase, peroxidase, papain and urease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, G W

    1958-01-01

    The enzymes catalase, peroxidase, papain and urease were treated in vitro with low concentrations of ozone gas. Wide variations were found in the sensitivity of the enzymes to the inhibitory action of the gas. Papain showed the greatest sensitivity; the rest required a much greater amount of ozone for inactivation. Comparisons of ozone and hydrogen peroxide as inhibitors of papain and urease showed ozone to be 30 times as effective as hydrogen peroxide on papain and 3 times as effective on urease. 14 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    ABSTRACT Activity of endogenous enzymes may cause browning of fruits and vegetables. These enzymes can be inactivated, for example by heat treatment, but the response of enzymes to heat treatment depends on many factors. Foods are very complex systems and the stability of enzymes......-casein on the enzymatic activity of three targets was tested by monitoring enzyme activity after heat treatment and by measuring the intensity of scattered light during and after heat treatment. β-Casein was shown to interact at elevated temperatures with three selected targets:horseradish peroxidase, tyrosinase from......, residual activity of horseradish peroxidase was lower in samples containing BSA than in samples without any addition. Horseradish peroxidase heated with BSA did not regain activity within one hour after treatment. BSA is often added to enzyme solutions to prevent enzyme adhesion to vial surfaces...

  14. [Flavonoid oxidation kinetics in aqueous and aqueous organic media in the presence of peroxidase, tyrosynase, and hemoglobin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsukova, M E; Tokareva, A I; Buslova, T S; Malinina, L I; Veselova, I A; Shekhovtsova, T N

    2017-01-01

    The kinetics of oxidation reactions of flavonoids, quercetin, dihydroquercetin, and epicatechin has been studied in the presence of biocatalysts of different natures: horseradish peroxidase, mushroom tyrosinase, and hemoglobin from bull blood. Comparison of the kinetic parameters of the oxidation reaction showed that peroxidase appeared to be the most effective biocatalyst in these processes. The specificity of the enzyme for quercetin increased with increasing the polarity of the solvent in a series of ethanol–acetonitrile–dimethyl sulfoxide.

  15. Magnetic resonance spectral characterization of the heme active site of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Jabro, M.N.; Goff, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the peroxidase isolated from the inkcap Basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus shows that the 42,000-dalton enzyme contains a protoheme IX prosthetic group. Reactivity assays and the electronic absorption spectra of native Coprinus peroxidase and several of its ligand complexes indicate that this enzyme has characteristics similar to those reported for horseradish peroxidase. In this paper, the authors characterize the H 2 O 2 -oxidized forms of Coprinus peroxidase compounds I, II, and III by electronic absorption and magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of this Coprinus peroxidase indicate the presence of high-spin Fe(III) in the native protein and a number of differences between the heme site of Coprinus peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Carbon-13 (of the ferrous CO adduct) and nitrogen-15 (of the cyanide complex) NMR studies together with proton NMR studies of the native and cyanide-complexed Caprinus peroxidase are consistent with coordination of a proximal histidine ligand. The EPR spectrum of the ferrous NO complex is also reported. Protein reconstitution with deuterated hemin has facilitated the assignment of the heme methyl resonances in the proton NMR spectrum

  16. Ligninolytic enzymes of the fungus Irpex lacteus (Polyporus tulipiferae): isolation and characterization of lignin peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rothschild, N.; Novotný, Čeněk; Šašek, Václav; Dosoretz, C. G.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 31, - (2002), s. 627-633 ISSN 0141-0229 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin * peroxidase * heme peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.773, year: 2002

  17. Structure of soybean seed coat peroxidase: a plant peroxidase with unusual stability and haem-apoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, A; Mirza, O; Indiani, C

    2001-01-01

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a peroxidase with extraordinary stability and catalytic properties. It belongs to the family of class III plant peroxidases that can oxidize a wide variety of organic and inorganic substrates using hydrogen peroxide. Because the plant enzyme is a heterogeneous...... glycoprotein, SBP was produced recombinant in Escherichia coli for the present crystallographic study. The three-dimensional structure of SBP shows a bound tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane molecule (TRIS). This TRIS molecule has hydrogen bonds to active site residues corresponding to the residues that interact...... with the small phenolic substrate ferulic acid in the horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC):ferulic acid complex. TRIS is positioned in what has been described as a secondary substrate-binding site in HRPC, and the structure of the SBP:TRIS complex indicates that this secondary substrate-binding site could...

  18. A Biosensor Based on Immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase in Chitosan Matrix Cross-linked with Glyoxal for Amperometric Determination of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Xiang Wang

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available An amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was developed viaan easy and effective enzyme immobilization method with the “sandwich” configuration:ferrocene-chitosan: HRP: chitosan-glyoxal using a glassy carbon electrode as the basicelectrode. In order to prevent the loss of immobilized HRP under optimized conditions,the biosensor surface was cross-linked with glyoxal. Ferrocene was selected andimmobilized on the glassy carbon electrode surface as a mediator. The fabricationprocedure was systematically optimized to improve the biosensor performance. Thebiosensor had a fast response of less than 10 s to H2O2, with a linear range of 3.5×10-5 to1.1×10-3 M, and a detection limit of 8.0×10-6 M based on S/N = 3.

  19. The clinical application of fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay to detect human thyroid peroxidase autoantibody quantitatively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Jinyan; Fang Peihua; Li Ning; Zhang Yanli

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish a fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay (FEIA) with recombinant human thyroid peroxidase (hTPO) as the antigen. Methods: Sera of 326 healthy people, 119 cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 116 cases of Graves disease (untreated), 28 cases of nodular goiter, 10 ca-ses of subacute thyroiditis and 6 cases of simple goiter were measured by the FEIA with recombinant hTPO as the antigen. Rrank sum test and χ 2 -test were used in inter-groups. Results: (1) Concentration above 4000 U/L was considered to be positive. (2) The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) and the inter-as-say CV were 4.59% ∼ 6.52% and 17.37% ∼ 17.45%. (3) The values measured by the FEIA were positively correlated with the values measured by hTPO antibody (hTPOAb) commercial kit (r=0.80, P 2 = 53.45, 39.30, 15.41 and 21.74, all P < 0.01). Conclusions: The method can be applied in the serum measurement of thyroid disease. HT presented the highest positive rate, therefore, the FEIA was an effective method in diagnosing HT. (authors)

  20. Quantification of Horseradish Peroxidase Delivery into the Arterial Wall In Vivo as a Model of Local Drug Treatment: Comparison Between a Porous and a Gel-Coated Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Armin; Kromen, Wolfgang; Juengling, Eberhard; Grosskortenhaus, Stephanie; Kammermeier, Helmut; Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify horseradish peroxidase (HRP) delivery into the arterial wall, as a model of local drug delivery, and to compare two different percutaneous delivery balloons. Methods: Perforated and hydrophilic hydrogel-coated balloon catheters were used to deliver HRP in aqueous solution into the wall of porcine iliac arteries in vivo. HRP solutions of 1 mg/ml were used together with both perforated and hydrophilic hydrogel-coated balloon catheters and 40 mg/ml HRP solutions were used with the hydrogel-coated balloon only. The amount of HRP deposited in the arterial wall was then determined photospectrometrically. Results: Using the 1 mg/ml HRP solution, the hydrogel-coated balloon absorbed 0.047 mg HRP into the coating. Treatment with this balloon resulted in a mean vessel wall concentration of 7.4 μg HRP/g tissue ± 93% (standard deviation) (n 7). Treatment with the hydrogel-coated balloon that had absorbed 1.88 mg HRP into the coating (using the 40 mg/ml HRP solution) led to a mean vessel wall concentration of 69.5 μg HRP/g tissue ± 74% (n = 7). Treatment with the perforated balloon using 1 mg/ml aqueous HRP solution led to a mean vessel wall concentration of 174 μg/g ± 81% (n = 7). Differences between the hydrogel-coated and perforated balloons (1 mg/g solutions of HRP) and between hydrogel-coated balloons (0.047 mg vs 1.88 mg absorbed into the balloon coating) were significant (p < 0.05; two-sided Wilcoxon test). Conclusions: The use of a perforated balloon catheter allowed the delivery of a higher total amount of HRP compared with the hydrogel-coated balloon, but at the cost of a higher systemic HRP application. To deliver 174 μg HRP per gram of vessel wall with the perforated balloon, 6.5 ± 1.5 mg HRP were lost into the arterial blood (delivery efficiency range = 0.2%-0.3%). With 0.047 mg HRP loaded into the coating of the hydrogel balloon, 7.4 μg HRP could be applied to 1 g of vessel wall (delivery efficiency 1.7%), and with 1.88 mg HRP loaded

  1. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hernández Anzaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H2O2 oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto, (meso, (deuteroporphyrinato (picdien]Fe(III complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III quantum mixed spin (qms ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1–3 + guaiacol + H2O2 → oxidation guaiacol products. The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III and H2O2, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0–4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III family with the ligand picdien [N,N’-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  2. Catalase and ascorbate peroxidase-representative H2O2-detoxifying heme enzymes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjum, Naser A; Sharma, Pallavi; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Khan, Ekhlaque A; Kachhap, Kiran; Mohamed, Amal A; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Devi, Gurumayum Devmanjuri; Vasudhevan, Palanisamy; Sofo, Adriano; Khan, Nafees A; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Lukatkin, Alexander S; Singh, Harminder Pal; Pereira, Eduarda; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-10-01

    Plants have to counteract unavoidable stress-caused anomalies such as oxidative stress to sustain their lives and serve heterotrophic organisms including humans. Among major enzymatic antioxidants, catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11) are representative heme enzymes meant for metabolizing stress-provoked reactive oxygen species (ROS; such as H2O2) and controlling their potential impacts on cellular metabolism and functions. CAT mainly occurs in peroxisomes and catalyzes the dismutation reaction without requiring any reductant; whereas, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and utilizes ascorbate (AsA) as specific electron donor for the reduction of H2O2 into H2O in organelles including chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Literature is extensive on the glutathione-associated H2O2-metabolizing systems in plants. However, discussion is meager or scattered in the literature available on the biochemical and genomic characterization as well as techniques for the assays of CAT and APX and their modulation in plants under abiotic stresses. This paper aims (a) to introduce oxidative stress-causative factors and highlights their relationship with abiotic stresses in plants; (b) to overview structure, occurrence, and significance of CAT and APX in plants; (c) to summarize the principles of current technologies used to assay CAT and APX in plants; (d) to appraise available literature on the modulation of CAT and APX in plants under major abiotic stresses; and finally, (e) to consider a brief cross-talk on the CAT and APX, and this also highlights the aspects unexplored so far.

  3. Tetra(p-tolyl)borate-functionalized solvent polymeric membrane: a facile and sensitive sensing platform for peroxidase and peroxidase mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewei; Qin, Wei

    2013-07-22

    The determination of peroxidase activities is the basis for enzyme-labeled bioaffinity assays, peroxidase-mimicking DNAzymes- and nanoparticles-based assays, and characterization of the catalytic functions of peroxidase mimetics. Here, a facile, sensitive, and cost-effective solvent polymeric membrane-based peroxidase detection platform is described that utilizes reaction intermediates with different pKa values from those of substrates and final products. Several key but long-debated intermediates in the peroxidative oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) have been identified and their charge states have been estimated. By using a solvent polymeric membrane functionalized by an appropriate substituted tetraphenylborate as a receptor, those cationic intermediates could be transferred into the membrane from the aqueous phase to induce a large cationic potential response. Thus, the potentiometric indication of the o-PD oxidation catalyzed by peroxidase or its mimetics can be fulfilled. Horseradish peroxidase has been detected with a detection limit at least two orders of magnitude lower than those obtained by spectrophotometric techniques and traditional membrane-based methods. As an example of peroxidase mimetics, G-quadruplex DNAzymes were probed by the intermediate-sensitive membrane and a label-free thrombin detection protocol was developed based on the catalytic activity of the thrombin-binding G-quadruplex aptamer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Screening of Coprinus species for the production of extracellular peroxidase and evaluation of its applicability to the treatment of aqueous phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikehata, K.; Buchanan, I.D.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine strains of Coprinus species comprising 16 strains from 12 identified species and 13 unidentified strains as well as one Arthromyces ramosus strain were screened for the production of extracellular peroxidase. Among the fungi examined, three strains of C. cinereus, UAMH 4103, UAMH 7907 and IFO 30116, as well as one Coprinus sp., UAMH 10067, which was isolated from urea treated soil, were shown to produce large amounts of extracellular peroxidase. The performance of crude peroxidase, obtained from liquid culture of C. cinereus, (CIP) on phenol removal from synthetic wastewater was evaluated and compared with that of purified horseradish peroxidase and A. ramosus peroxidase. Although crude CIP performed better than both purified enzymes, its superiority vanished in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol), a known protective agent of peroxidase. This suggests that the residual soluble substances present in crude CIP have protective effects similar to those of poly(ethylene glycol). (author)

  5. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of ciguatoxin in fish tissue using chicken immunoglobulin Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empey Campora, Cara; Hokama, Yoshitsugi; Yabusaki, Kenichi; Isobe, Minoru

    2008-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect ciguatoxin (CTX) in fish tissue. The assay utilizes two antibodies, chicken immunoglobulin Y specific to the ABCD domain of CTX and a mouse monoclonal immunoglobulin G-horseradish peroxidase conjugate specific to the JKLM domain of CTX. The sensitivity, working range, cross reactivity, accuracy, precision, and reproducibility were examined.

  6. Using minced horseradish roots and peroxides for the deodorization of swine manure: a pilot scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govere, Ephraim M; Tonegawa, Masami; Bruns, Mary Ann; Wheeler, Eileen F; Kephart, Kenneth B; Voigt, Jean W; Dec, Jerzy

    2007-04-01

    Enzymes that have proven to be capable of removing toxic compounds from water and soil may also be useful in the deodorization of animal manures. Considering that pork production in the US is a $40-billion industry with over half a million workers, odor control to protect air quality in the neighboring communities must be considered an essential part of managing livestock facilities. This pilot scale (20-120 L) study tested the use of minced horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) roots (1:10 roots to swine slurry ratio), with calcium peroxide (CaO(2) at 34 mM) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2) at 68 mM), to deodorize swine slurry taken from a 40,000-gallon storage pit at the Pennsylvania State University's Swine Center. Horseradish is known to contain large amounts of peroxidase, an enzyme that, in the presence of peroxides, can polymerize phenolic odorants and thus reduce the malodor. Twelve compounds commonly associated with malodor (seven volatile fatty acids or VFAs, three phenolic compounds and two indolic compounds) were used as odor indicators. Their concentration in swine slurry before and after treatment was determined by gas chromatography (GC) to assess the deodorization effect. The pilot scale testing demonstrated a complete removal of phenolic odorants (with a detection limit of 0.5 mg L(-1)) from the swine slurry, which was consistent with our previous laboratory experiments using 30-mL swine slurry samples. Horseradish could be recycled (reused) five times while retaining significant reduction in the concentration of phenolic odorants. In view of these findings, inexpensive plant materials, such as horseradish, represent a promising tool for eliminating phenolic odorants from swine slurry.

  7. Wiring of heme enzymes by methylene-blue labeled dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Shahdost-fard, Faezeh; Ferapontova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme- and moli......Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme......- and molibdopterin-containing sulfite oxidase (SOx), wired to gold by the methylene blue (MB)-labeled polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. The enzymes’ electrochemical transformation and bioelectrocatalytic function could be followed at both unlabeled and MB-labeled dendrimer-modified electrodes with the formal redox......, optimization of bioelectrocatalysis of complex intermembrane and, possibly, membrane enzymes....

  8. The Peroxidase-Glucose Oxidase Enzyme System in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolridge, Elisa; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Offers a series of experiments which introduce students to the general principles of enzymology. The experiment demonstrates several basic enzyme properties and the chromatographic exercises provide an analysis of each enzymatic activity. Questions are also presented for extending discussion on the activities. (ML)

  9. Facile synthesis of enzyme-embedded magnetic metal-organic frameworks as a reusable mimic multi-enzyme system: mimetic peroxidase properties and colorimetric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chen; Wang, Yang; Ding, Qinghua; Jiang, Long; Li, Ming; Zhu, Weiwei; Pan, Duo; Zhu, Hao; Liu, Mingzhu

    2015-11-28

    This work reports a facile and easily-achieved approach for enzyme immobilization by embedding glucose oxidase (GOx) in magnetic zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (mZIF-8) via a de novo approach. As a demonstration of the power of such materials, the resulting GOx embedded mZIF-8 (mZIF-8@GOx) was utilized as a colorimetric sensor for rapid detection of glucose. This method was constructed on the basis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which possessed very fascinating peroxidase-like properties, and the cascade reaction for the visual detection of glucose was combined into one step through the mZIF-8@GOx based mimic multi-enzyme system. After characterization by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nitrogen sorption, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, the as-prepared mZIF-8@GOx was confirmed with the robust core-shell structure, the monodisperse nanoparticle had an average diameter of about 200 nm and displayed superparamagnetism with a saturation magnetization value of 40.5 emu g(-1), it also exhibited a large surface area of 396.10 m(2) g(-1). As a peroxidase mimic, mZIF-8 was verified to be highly stable and of low cost, and showed a strong affinity towards H2O2. Meanwhile, the mZIF-8 embedded GOx also exhibited improved activity, stability and greatly enhanced selectivity in glucose detection. Moreover, the mZIF-8@GOx had excellent recyclability with high activity (88.7% residual activity after 12 times reuse).

  10. Double Antibody EIA of Cortisol Using Peroxidase As Label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, F.M.; Hamad, A.W.R.; Hashim, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique for plasma cortisol was established by using cortisol-3 (carboxymethyl) oxime covalently linked to the horseradish peroxidase as the label. An antibody raised in the rabbits against cortisol-3-(carboxy-methyl) oxime-bovline serum albumin was used as the first anti-body. Sheep anti-rabbit gamma-globulin serum with 8 percent poly-ethyleneglycol were used to separate antibody-bound and free cortisol. The enzyme activity of the bound fraction was measured with ortho-phenylene diamine as substrate. The procedure performed at room temperature was evaluated by sensitivity (50 pg/ tube). The correlation coefficient between our enzyme immunoassay technique and radioimmunoassay technique for determination of plasma cortisol was 97 percent

  11. Acquisition of Heat Stable Enzymes from Thermophilic Microorganisms: Peroxidases, Ureases, and Glucose Oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    heptahydrate, 1.50 g/L boric acid, 0.05 g/L copper sulfate pentahydrate . 0.20 g/L molybdic acid dihydrate sodium salt and 0.05 g/L cobalt chloride...vanadium, cobalt, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper , manganese, sodium, chloride and various forms of nitrogen. In addition to pH and temperature...growth may not coincide with the optimal conditions for production of the desired enzyme. For isolate #135, the sulfate , magnesium, potassium and

  12. Biotechnological advances towards an enhanced peroxidase production in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian W; Gerstmann, Michaela A; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-09-10

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is a high-demand enzyme for applications in diagnostics, bioremediation, biocatalysis and medicine. Current HRP preparations are isolated from horseradish roots as mixtures of biochemically diverse isoenzymes. Thus, there is a strong need for a recombinant production process enabling a steady supply with enzyme preparations of consistent high quality. However, most current recombinant production systems are limited at titers in the low mg/L range. In this study, we used the well-known yeast Pichia pastoris as host for recombinant HRP production. To enhance recombinant enzyme titers we systematically evaluated engineering approaches on the secretion process, coproduction of helper proteins, and compared expression from the strong methanol-inducible PAOX1 promoter, the strong constitutive PGAP promoter, and a novel bidirectional promoter PHTX1. Ultimately, coproduction of HRP and active Hac1 under PHTX1 control yielded a recombinant HRP titer of 132mg/L after 56h of cultivation in a methanol-independent and easy-to-do bioreactor cultivation process. With regard to the many versatile applications for HRP, the establishment of a microbial host system suitable for efficient recombinant HRP production was highly overdue. The novel HRP production platform in P. pastoris presented in this study sets a new benchmark for this medically relevant enzyme. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical significance of quantitative analysis of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) with chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Cuiying; Wang Qing; Huang Gang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The only method of laboratory diagnosis for autoimmune thyroid diseases used to be serum TGA and TMA detections. Morerecently, quantitative analysis of TPOAb has been introduced. To assess the relative sensitivity of these tests , positive rates detected with the respective tests were compared. Methods: Serum TGA, TMA (with RIA) and TPOAb (with chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay) were simultaneously detected in 998 cases of thyroid diseases (hyperthyroidism 307, Hashimoto's disease 193, simple goiter 498). For complementary sake, fine needle aspiration cytology was obtained in a number of cases including all the patients with Hashimoto's disease. Results: Positive detection rate of TPOAb in three groups of patients (hyperthyroidism, Hashimoto's, simple goiter) was 81.76%, 96.89 % and 42.97% respectively. With TMA, the positive rate was only 54.72%, 65.80%, 22.09% respectively. About one third more cases would be detected with the newer method. Conclusion: For the laboratory detection of auto immune thyroid diseases, quantitative analysis of TPOAb is much wore sensitive than the conventional TMA detection. (authors)

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  15. Enzyme stabilization for pesticide degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivers, D.B.; Frazer, F.R. III; Mason, D.W.; Tice, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Enzymes offer inherent advantages and limitations as active components of formulations used to decontaminate soil and equipment contaminated with toxic materials such as pesticides. Because of the catalytic nature of enzymes, each molecule of enzyme has the potential to destroy countless molecules of a contaminating toxic compound. This degradation takes place under mild environmental conditions of pH, temperature, pressure, and solvent. The basic limitation of enzymes is their degree of stability during storage and application conditions. Stabilizing methods such as the use of additives, covalent crosslinking, covalent attachment, gel entrapment, and microencapsulation have been directed developing an enzyme preparation that is stable under extremes of pH, temperature, and exposure to organic solvents. Initial studies were conducted using the model enzymes subtilisin and horseradish peroxidase.

  16. Peroxidases in nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria eCarmona-Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting and reusability.

  17. Mutual synergy between catalase and peroxidase activities of the bifunctional enzyme KatG is facilitated by electron hole-hopping within the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Davis, Ian; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Krewall, Jessica R; Liu, Aimin; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2017-11-10

    KatG is a bifunctional, heme-dependent enzyme in the front-line defense of numerous bacterial and fungal pathogens against H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damage from host immune responses. Contrary to the expectation that catalase and peroxidase activities should be mutually antagonistic, peroxidatic electron donors (PxEDs) enhance KatG catalase activity. Here, we establish the mechanism of synergistic cooperation between these activities. We show that at low pH values KatG can fully convert H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O only if a PxED is present in the reaction mixture. Stopped-flow spectroscopy results indicated rapid initial rates of H 2 O 2 disproportionation slowing concomitantly with the accumulation of ferryl-like heme states. These states very slowly returned to resting ( i.e. ferric) enzyme, indicating that they represented catalase-inactive intermediates. We also show that an active-site tryptophan, Trp-321, participates in off-pathway electron transfer. A W321F variant in which the proximal tryptophan was replaced with a non-oxidizable phenylalanine exhibited higher catalase activity and less accumulation of off-pathway heme intermediates. Finally, rapid freeze-quench EPR experiments indicated that both WT and W321F KatG produce the same methionine-tyrosine-tryptophan (MYW) cofactor radical intermediate at the earliest reaction time points and that Trp-321 is the preferred site of off-catalase protein oxidation in the native enzyme. Of note, PxEDs did not affect the formation of the MYW cofactor radical but could reduce non-productive protein-based radical species that accumulate during reaction with H 2 O 2 Our results suggest that catalase-inactive intermediates accumulate because of off-mechanism oxidation, primarily of Trp-321, and PxEDs stimulate KatG catalase activity by preventing the accumulation of inactive intermediates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Enzymatic decolourisation of Methyl Orange and Bismarck Brown using crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambatkar, Mugdha; Mukundan, Usha

    2015-12-01

    The decolourisation of Methyl Orange (MO) and Bismarck Brown (BB) by crude peroxidase from Armoracia rusticana (Horseradish) was studied by varying different reaction parameters. The pH of the reaction mixture, initial dye concentration, amount of enzyme and hydrogen peroxide concentration were optimised for ambient temperatures (30 ± 2 °C). The optimum pH for decolourisation was 4.0 (72.95 %) and 3.0 (79.24 %) for MO and BB, respectively. Also it was found that the Chemical Oxygen Demand of the enzyme-treated sample was significantly lower than that of the untreated controls for both dyes. The addition of a complex iron salt like Ferric EDTA was found to enhance the decolourisation of both dyes at pH 6.0, showing an increase of 8.69 % and 14.17 % in the decolourisation of MO and of BB, respectively. The present study explores the potential of crude peroxidase from horseradish to decolourise representative monoazo and diazo dyes, MO and BB, respectively. An attempt has been made to utilise a crude enzyme with appreciable activity obtained after minimal processing for the decolourisation of the aforesaid dyes. The findings of this study would find application in the enzymatic treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  19. Co-immobilization of multiple enzymes by metal coordinated nucleotide hydrogel nanofibers: improved stability and an enzyme cascade for glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Jiang, Shuhui; Yuan, Qipeng; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zijie; Liu, Juewen

    2016-03-21

    Preserving enzyme activity and promoting synergistic activity via co-localization of multiple enzymes are key topics in bionanotechnology, materials science, and analytical chemistry. This study reports a facile method for co-immobilizing multiple enzymes in metal coordinated hydrogel nanofibers. Specifically, four types of protein enzymes, including glucose oxidase, Candida rugosa lipase, α-amylase, and horseradish peroxidase, were respectively encapsulated in a gel nanofiber made of Zn(2+) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with a simple mixing step. Most enzymes achieved quantitative loading and retained full activity. At the same time, the entrapped enzymes were more stable against temperature variation (by 7.5 °C), protease attack, extreme pH (by 2-fold), and organic solvents. After storing for 15 days, the entrapped enzyme still retained 70% activity while the free enzyme nearly completely lost its activity. Compared to nanoparticles formed with AMP and lanthanide ions, the nanofiber gels allowed much higher enzyme activity. Finally, a highly sensitive and selective biosensor for glucose was prepared using the gel nanofiber to co-immobilize glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase for an enzyme cascade system. A detection limit of 0.3 μM glucose with excellent selectivity was achieved. This work indicates that metal coordinated materials using nucleotides are highly useful for interfacing with biomolecules.

  20. Detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by a four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay.

    OpenAIRE

    Turunen, H J

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii is described. Microtiter plates were sensitized with rabbit anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) used as the primary antibodies; guinea pig anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) were used as the secondary trapping antibodies. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-guinea pig immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The specificity of th...

  1. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan

    2014-02-20

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2O2, producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hierarchical hybrid peroxidase catalysts for remediation of phenol wastewater

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaonan; Corgié , Sté phane C.; Aneshansley, Daniel J.; Wang, Peng; Walker, Larry P.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new family of hierarchical hybrid catalysts comprised of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-magnetic nanoparticles for advanced oxidation processes and demonstrate their utility in the removal of phenol from water. The immobilized HRP catalyzes the oxidation of phenols in the presence of H2O2, producing free radicals. The phenoxy radicals react with each other in a non-enzymatic process to form polymers, which can be removed by precipitation with salts or condensation. The hybrid peroxidase catalysts exhibit three times higher activity than free HRP and are able to remove three times more phenol from water compared to free HRP under similar conditions. In addition, the hybrid catalysts reduce substrate inhibition and limit inactivation from reaction products, which are common problems with free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. Reusability is improved when the HRP-magnetic nanoparticle hybrids are supported on micron-scale magnetic particles, and can be retained with a specially designed magnetically driven reactor. The performance of the hybrid catalysts makes them attractive for several industrial and environmental applications and their development might pave the way for practical applications by eliminating most of the limitations that have prevented the use of free or conventionally immobilized enzymes. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels in tobacco chewers and smokers: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chundru Venkata Naga Sirisha

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study gave us an insight about the relationship between antioxidant enzyme activity, oxidative stress and tobacco. The altered antioxidant enzyme levels observed in this study will act as a predictor for pre potentially malignant lesions. Therefore an early intervention of tobacco habit and its related oxidative stress would prevent the development of tobacco induced lesions.

  4. Enzyme immunoassay for rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids and its application to differentiation of street and laboratory strains of rabies virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J S; Sumner, J W; Roumillat, L F

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive enzyme immunoassay is described for detecting rabies antibody in hybridoma culture fluids. Glass fiber filter disks were used to immobilize gamma-irradiated mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with street or laboratory strains of rabies virus. Bound rabies-specific antibody was detected by reaction with horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G. The assay was performed in a 96-well filtration device developed by Cleveland et al. (J. Clin. Microbiol. ...

  5. Phenol Removal from Industrial Wastewater by HRP Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran Alemzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, horseradish peroxidase for phenol removal was utilized. First, the process was studied at the laboratory scale using a synthetic phenol solution (1-10 mM. Results showed that horseradish peroxidase (HRP could effectively remove phenolic compounds from wastewater and that the catalytic capability of the enzyme was maintained for a wide range of pH, temperature, and aromatic concentration levels. The performance conditions were optimized for at lease 95% and 100% removal of phenolic compounds for both actual and synthetic wastewaters under high and low phenol concentrations (1 and 10 mM. The phenolic wastewater used was an olive mill effluent with a phenol concentration of 1221 mg/L (13 mM and a pH value of 3.5. At the end of the reaction, the phenolic compounds changed to insoluble polymers and precipitated. Each enzyme/wastewater system was optimized for the following chemical dosages: hydrogen peroxide, enzyme, polyethylene glycol (PEG, and buffer. Furthermore, the reaction time to achieve at least 95% phenol removal was determined. According to the results, COD and BOD reduced to 58% and 78%, respectively. Experimental results showed an increase in H2O2 concentration beyond the optimum dose resulting from enzyme inactivation, thus reducing the phenol removal efficiency. On the other hand, increasing the enzyme, PEG, and/or reaction time beyond the optimum values resulted in only a marginal increase in removal efficiency.

  6. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  8. Purification and characterization of myrosinase from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Kushad, Mosbah M

    2005-06-01

    Myrosinase (beta-thioglucoside glucohydrolase; EC 3.2.3.147) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Q-sepharose, and concanavalin A sepharose affinity chromatography. The purified protein migrated as a single band with a mass of about 65 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using LC-MS/MS, this band was identified as myrosinase. Western blot analysis, using the anti-myrosinase monoclonal antibody 3D7, showed a single band of about 65 kDa for horseradish crude extract and for the purified myrosinase. The native molecular mass of the purified myrosinase was estimated, using gel filtration, to be about 130 kDa. Based on these data, it appeared that myrosinase from horseradish root consists of two subunits of similar molecular mass of about 65 kDa. The enzyme exhibited high activity at broad pH (pH 5.0-8.0) and temperature (37 and 45 degrees C). The purified enzyme remained stable at 4 degrees C for more than 1 year. Using sinigrin as a substrate, the Km and Vmax values for the purified enzyme were estimated to be 0.128 mM and 0.624 micromol min(-1), respectively. The enzyme was strongly activated by 0.5 mM ascorbic acid and was able to breakdown intact glucosinolates in a crude extract of broccoli.

  9. A novel bi-enzyme electrochemical biosensor for selective and sensitive determination of methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Umasankar, Yogeswaran; Ramasamy, Ramaraja P

    2016-07-15

    An amperometric sensor based on a bi-enzyme modified electrode was fabricated to detect methyl salicylate, a volatile organic compound released by pathogen-infected plants via systemic response. The detection is based on cascadic conversion reactions that result in an amperometric electrochemical signal. The bi-enzyme electrode is made of alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase enzymes immobilized on to a carbon nanotube matrix through a molecular tethering method. Methyl salicylate undergoes hydrolysis to form methanol, which is consumed by alcohol oxidase to form formaldehyde while simultaneously reducing oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide will be further reduced to water by horseradish peroxidase, which results in an amperometric signal via direct electron transfer. The bi-enzyme biosensor was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry using hydrolyzed methyl salicylate as the analyte. The sensitivity of the bi-enzyme biosensor as determined by cyclic voltammetry and constant potential amperometry were 112.37 and 282.82μAcm(-2)mM(-1) respectively, and the corresponding limits of detection were 22.95 and 0.98μM respectively. Constant potential amperometry was also used to evaluate durability, repeatability and interference from other compounds. Wintergreen oil was used for real sample study to establish the application of the bi-enzyme sensor for selective determination of plant pathogen infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of novel nano-carriers for multi-enzyme co-localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Feng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design novel nano-structured carriers and strategies to co-localize multiple enzymes to mimic the functionalities of MECs. In order to achieve this goal, distinct approaches for enzyme co-localization were developed and evaluated. Specifically, we investigated different polymeric nano-carriers, both flexible and rigid, as platforms for co-localization, as well as distinct enzyme attachment techniques using model enzyme systems using glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase to control the spatial arrangement of the multiple enzymes on the nanocarriers. This platform technology can be potentially used to co-localize various enzyme systems and its broad applicability will be tested using the sclareol biosynthesis process to control the formation of products through the formation of MECs with multiple enzymes NgCPS and sSsSS to regulate the pathway of reactive intermediate to enhance the final product conversion rate.

  11. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K_C_A_T and K_C_A_T/K_M values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H_2O_2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H_2O_2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H_2O_2 concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL"−"1 SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL"−"1 was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K_C_A_T) and catalytic efficiency (K_C_A_T/K_M) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment.

  12. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhang, Ya [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People’s Republic of China, Nanjing 210042 (China); Ji, Yuefei [College of Resources and Environmental Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Gao, Shixiang, E-mail: ecsxg@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • Enzymatic treatment of triclosan in water by soybean and horseradish peroxidases. • pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage affected the removal efficiency of TCS. • The removal of TCS by SBP was more efficient than that of HRP. • K{sub CAT} and K{sub CAT}/K{sub M} values for SBP toward TCS were much higher than those for HRP. • Polymers formed via radical coupling mechanism were nontoxic to the growth of alga. - Abstract: This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, while the optimal pH and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration were 7.0 and 8 μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1 U mL{sup −1} SBP in 30 min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3 U mL{sup −1} was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (K{sub CAT}) and catalytic efficiency (K{sub CAT}/K{sub M}) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via C−C and C−O coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water

  13. Purification and characterization of novel cationic peroxidases from Asparagus acutifolius L. with biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Vincenzo; Cantarella, Maria; Chambery, Angela; Mezzacapo, Maria C; Parente, Augusto; Landi, Nicola; Severino, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo

    2014-08-01

    Four novel basic peroxidases, named AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, were purified from Asparagus acutifolius L. seeds by cation-exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. The four proteins showed a similar electrophoretic mobility of 46 kDa while, by MALDI-TOF MS, different Mr values of 42758.3, 41586.9, 42796.3, and 41595.5 were determined for AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4, respectively. N-terminal sequences of AaPs 1-4 up to residue 20 showed a high percentage of identity with the peroxidase from Glycine max. In addition, AaP-1, AaP-2, AaP-3, and AaP-4 were found to be glycoproteins, containing 21.75, 22.27, 25.62, and 18.31 % of carbohydrates, respectively. Peptide mapping and MALDI-TOF MS analysis of AaPs 1-4 showed that the structural differences between AaP-1 and AaP-2 and AaP-3 and AaPs-4 were mainly due to their glycan content. We also demonstrate that AaPs were able to remove phenolic compounds from olive oil mill wastewaters with a higher catalytic efficiency with respect to horseradish peroxidase, thus representing candidate enzymes for potential biotechnological applications in the environmental field.

  14. Temperature-Controlled Encapsulation and Release of an Active Enzyme in the Cavity of a Self-Assembled DNA Nanocage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Sissel; Iacovelli, Federico; Falconi, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We demonstrate temperature-controlled encapsulation and release of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase using a preassembled and covalently closed three-dimensional DNA cage structure as a controllable encapsulation device. The utilized cage structure was covalently closed and composed of 12...... to fold into hairpin structures. As demonstrated by gel-electrophoretic and fluorophore-quenching experiments this design imposed a temperature-controlled conformational transition capability to the structure, which allowed entrance or release of an enzyme cargo at 37 C while ensuring retainment...

  15. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  16. Immobilization of leachable toxic soil pollutants by using oxidative enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, M.J.R.; Bartha, R.

    1988-01-01

    Screening of leachable toxic chemicals in a horseradish peroxidase-H 2 O 2 immobilization system established that immobilization was promising for most phenolic pollutants but not for benzoic acid, 2,6-dinitrocresol, or dibutyl phthalate. The treatment did not mobilize inherently nonmobile pollutants such as anilines and benzo[a]pyrene. In a separate study, an extracellular laccase in the culture filtrate of Geotrichum candidum was selected from five fungal enzymes evaluated as a cost-effective substitute for horseradish peroxidase. This enzyme was used in demonstrating the immobilization and subsequent fate of 14 C-labeled 4-methylphenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol in soil columns. When applied to Lakewood sand, 98.1% of 4-methylpheno was leached through with distilled water. Two days after immobilization treatment with the G. candidum culture filtrate, only 9.1% of the added 4-methylphenol was leached with the same volume of water. Of the more refractory test pollutant 2,4-dichlorophenol, 91.6% had leached at time zero and 48.5% had leached 1 day after the immobilization treatment. However, 2 weeks after immobilization, only 12.0% of the 2,4-dichlorophenol was leached compared with 61.7% from the control column that received no immobilization treatment. No remobilization of the bound pollutants was detected during 3- and 4-week incubation periods

  17. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  18. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  19. Unravelling important odorants in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva-Maria; Buettner, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a plant well known for its roots' spicy aroma. The present study investigates the main aroma constituents of horseradish roots in general by analysing the aroma profiles of six different horseradish varieties, with one variety grown in two different soils. Odorants were characterised by means of gas chromatography-olfactometry and identified via their mass spectra, retention indices on two columns with different polarity, and their characteristic odour. A series of new aroma compounds from different substance groups were identified that have hitherto not been described in horseradish. Moreover, several of these constituents were successfully shown to exhibit high odour potency, alongside a high potential to influence the overall aroma of horseradish roots, like (3S,3aS,7aR)-wine lactone and 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of condition for conjugation of enrofloxacin to enzymes in chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Songcheng; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Hongquan; Qu, Lingbo; Wu, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    In this study, in order to find out a proper method for conjugation of enrofloxacin to label enzymes, two methods were compared and carbodiimide condensation was proved to be better. The results showed that the binding ratio of enrofloxacin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was 8:1 and that of enrofloxacin and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was 5:1. This indicated that conjugate synthesized by carbodiimide condensation was fit for chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA). Furthermore, data revealed that dialysis time was an important parameter for conjugation and 6 days was best. Buffer to dilute conjugate had little effect on CLEIA. The storage condition for conjugates was also studied and it was shown that the conjugate was stable at 4 °C with no additive up to 30 days. These data were valuable for establishing CLEIA to quantify enrofloxacin.

  1. Long-term chemiluminescence signal is produced in the course of luminol oxidation catalyzed by enhancer-independent peroxidase purified from Jatropha curcas leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Peipei; Cai, Feng; Luo, Yongting; Chen, Yangxi; Zou, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Isoenzyme c of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) is widely used in enzyme immunoassay combined with chemiluminescence (CL) detection. For this application, HRP-C activity measurement is usually based on luminol oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, this catalysis reaction was enhancer dependent. In this study, we demonstrated that Jatropha curcas peroxidase (JcGP1) showed high efficiency in catalyzing luminol oxidation in the presence of H2O2. Compared with HRP-C, the JcGP1-induced reaction was enhancer independent, which made the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) simpler. In addition, the JcGP1 catalyzed reaction showed a long-term stable CL signal. We optimized the conditions for JcGP1 catalysis and determined the favorable conditions as follows: 50 mM Tris buffer (pH 8.2) containing 10 mM H2 O2, 14 mM luminol and 0.75 M NaCl. The optimum catalysis temperature was 30°C. The detection limit of JcGP1 under optimum condition was 0.2 pM. Long-term stable CL signal combined with enhancer-independent property indicated that JcGP1 might be a valuable candidate peroxidase for clinical diagnosis and enzyme immunoassay with CL detection. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Online Detection of Peroxidase Using 3D Printing, Active Magnetic Mixing, and Spectra Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for online detection of peroxidase (POD using 3D printing, active magnetic mixing, fluidic control, and optical detection was developed and demonstrated in this study. The proposed POD detection system consisted of a 3D printing and active magnetic mixing based fluidic chip for online catalytic reaction, an optical detector with a fluidic flow cell for quantitative determination of the final catalysate, and a single-chip microcontroller based controller for automatic control of two rotating magnetic fields and four precise peristaltic pumps. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP was used as research model and a linear relationship between the absorbance at the characteristic wavelength of 450 nm and the concentration of HRP of 1/4–1/128 μg mL−1 was obtained as A  =  0.257ln⁡(C + 1.425 (R2  = 0.976. For the HRP spiked pork tests, the recoveries of HRP ranged from 93.5% to 110.4%, indicating that this proposed system was capable of detecting HRP in real samples. It has the potential to be extended for online detection of the activity of other enzymes and integration with ELISA method for biological and chemical analysis.

  3. "Chitin-specific" peroxidases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, I V; Cherepanova, E A; Khairullin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of various plant peroxidases and the ability of their individual isoforms to bind chitin was studied. Some increase in peroxidase activity was observed in crude extracts in the presence of chitin. Activated peroxidases of some species fell in the fraction not sorbed on chitin and those of other species can bind chitin. Only anionic isoperoxidases from oat (Avena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), garden radish (Raphanus sativus var. radicula), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Link et Otto) were sorbed on chitin. Both anionic and cationic isoforms from pea (Pisum sativum), galega(Galega orientalis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were sorbed on chitin. Peroxidase activation under the influence of chitin was correlated to the processes that occur during hypersensitive reaction and lignification of sites, in which pathogenic fungus penetrates into a plant. The role of chitin-specific isoperoxidases in inhibition of fungal growth and connection of this phenomenon with structural characteristics of isoperoxidases are also discussed.

  4. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloyl groups can promote gelation of sugar beet pectin (SBP). It is uncertain how the enzyme kinetics of this cross-linking reaction are affected in emulsion systems and whether the gelation affects emulsion stability. In this study, SBP (2.5% w...... larger average particle sizes than the emulsions in which the SBP was homogenized into the emulsion system during emulsion preparation (referred as Mix B). Mix B type emulsions were stable. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP helped stabilize the emulsions in Mix A. The kinetics of the enzyme...... catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (EC 1.11.1.7) and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) catalysis, respectively. HRP catalyzed gelation rates, determined from the slopes of the increase of elastic modulus (G0) with time, were higher...

  5. Effect of Vitamin C on Glutathione Peroxidase Activities in Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione peroxidase is one of the most important antioxidant enzymes in humans. We studied the relationship between serum glutathione peroxidase activity and vitamin C ingestion during normal pregnancy in women attending antenatal clinic in the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin. Glutathione peroxidase ...

  6. Degradation kinetics of peroxidase enzyme, phenolic content, and physical and sensorial characteristics in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) during blanching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Elsa M; Pinheiro, Joaquina; Alegria, Carla; Abreu, Marta; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2009-06-24

    The effects of water blanching treatment on peroxidase inactivation, total phenolic content, color parameters [-a*/b* and hue (h degrees*)], texture (maximum shear force), and sensory attributes (color and texture, evaluated by a trained panel) of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. ssp. Italica) were studied at five temperatures (70, 75, 80, 85, and 90 degrees C). Experimental results showed that all studied broccoli quality parameters suffered significative changes due to blanching treatments. The vegetal total phenolic content showed a marked decline. Degradation on objective color and texture measurements and alterations in sensorial attributes were detected. Correlations between sensory and instrumental measurements have been found. Under the conditions 70 degrees C and 6.5 min or 90 degrees C and 0.4 min, 90% of the initial peroxidase activity was reduced. At these conditions, no significant alterations were detected by panelists, and a small amount of phenolic content was lost (ca. 16 and 10%, respectively). The peroxidase inactivation and phenolic content degradation were found to follow first-order reaction models. The zero-order reaction model showed a good fit to the broccoli color (-a*/b* and h degrees*), texture, and sensory parameters changes. The temperature effect was well-described by the Arrhenius law.

  7. Selective distribution of enzymes in a microfluidic reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines; Krühne, Ulrich

    Off stoichiometric thiol-ene mixtures are well suited for preparation of microfluidic devices with highly functional surfaces. Here a two stage process employing first thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) to prepare two opposite parts of a microfluidic system with a 30x30 mm reactor and subsequently a thiol......-epoxy bonding was used to prepare a fully sealed microfluidic system. The reactor was surface functionalized in-situ with allyl glycidyl ether in different patterns (half-reactor, full-reactor, checkerboard structures) on the surface to provide a controlled distribution of epoxides. The method additionally...... enables the selective immobilization on either top-side or bottom-side or both sides of the reactor. Thereafter horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the surface and activity tests illustrated how this distribution of the enzyme on the surface could be used to optimize the activity of the enzyme...

  8. Thermal Stabilization of Enzymes Immobilized within Carbon Paste Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Liu, J; Cepra, G

    1997-08-01

    In this note we report on the remarkable thermal stabilization of enzymes immobilized in carbon paste electrodes. Amperometric biosensors are shown for the first time to withstand a prolonged high-temperature (>50 °C) stress. Nearly full activity of glucose oxidase is retained over periods of up to 4 months of thermal stress at 60-80 °C. Dramatic improvements in the thermostability are observed for polyphenol oxidase, lactate oxidase, alcohol oxidase, horseradish peroxidase, and amino acid oxidase. Such resistance to heat-induced denaturation is attributed to the conformational rigidity of these biocatalysts within the highly hydrophobic (mineral oil or silicone grease) pasting liquid. While no chemical stabilizer is needed for attaining such protective action, it appears that low humidity (i.e., low water content) is essential for minimizing the protein mobility. Besides their implications for electrochemical biosensors, such observations should lead to a new generation of thermoresistant enzyme reactors based on nonpolar semisolid supports.

  9. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, R. S. S.; Yadav, K. S.; Yadav, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K m values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydroge...

  10. Immobilization of HRP Enzyme on Layered Double Hydroxides for Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zouhair M. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new biosensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The biosensor was based on the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzyme on layered double hydroxides- (LDH- modified gold surface. The hydrotalcite LDH (Mg2Al was prepared by coprecipitation in constant pH and in ambient temperature. The immobilization of the peroxidase on layered hybrid materials was realized via electrostatic adsorption autoassembly process. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS buffer with cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. A limit detection of 9 μM of H2O2 was obtained with a good reproducibility. We investigate the sensitivity of our developed biosensor for H2O2 detection in raw milk.

  11. Enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive biolayer interferometry biosensor for palytoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shunxiang; Zheng, Xin; Hu, Bo; Sun, Mingjuan; Wu, Jihong; Jiao, Binghua; Wang, Lianghua

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we coupled biolayer interferometry (BLI) with competitive binding assay through an enzyme-linked aptamer and developed a real-time, ultra-sensitive, rapid quantitative method for detection of the marine biotoxin palytoxin. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled aptamers were used as biorecognition receptors to competitively bind with palytoxin, which was immobilized on the biosensor surface. The palytoxin: horseradish peroxidase-aptamer complex was then submerged in a 3,3'-diaminobenzidine solution, which resulted in formation of a precipitated polymeric product directly on the biosensor surface and a large change in the optical thickness of the biosensor layer. This change could obviously shift the interference pattern and generate a response profile on the BLI biosensor. The biosensor showed a broad linear range for palytoxin (200-700pg/mL) with a low detection limit (0.04pg/mL). Moreover, the biosensor was applied to the detection of palytoxin in spiked extracts and showed a high degree of selectivity for palytoxin, good reproducibility, and stability. This enzyme-linked, aptamer-based, competitive BLI biosensor offers a promising method for rapid and sensitive detection of palytoxin and other analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  13. Oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Kulkarni, K A; Kulkarni, A P

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of eugenol by purified human term placental peroxidase (HTPP) was examined. Spectral analyses indicated that, similar to horseradish peroxidase, HTPP is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of eugenol. The accumulated stable product in the reaction medium due to eugenol oxidation by HTPP was tentatively identified as quinone methide of eugenol (EQM). The EQM formation exhibited a pH optimum of 8.0 and was dependent on incubation time, amount of HTPP and the concentration of both eugenol and hydrogen peroxide. The specific activity of approx 2.8 micromoles of EQM/min/mg protein was observed with different preparations of HTPP. The EQM formation was significantly suppressed by glutathione and ascorbic acid. The classical peroxidase inhibitors viz. potassium cyanide and sodium azide blocked the reaction in a concentration manner. Collectively, the results suggest that eugenol may undergo peroxidative metabolism in human placenta. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. [Antimutagenic activity of plant extracts from Armoracia rusticana, Ficus carica and Zea mays and peroxidase in eukaryotic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabeĭli, R A; Kasimova, T E; Alekperov, U K

    2004-01-01

    Antimutagene activity and high efficiency of antimutagene action of plant extracts from horseradish roots (Armoracia rusticana), fig brunches (Ficus carica) and mays seedlings (Zea mays) and their ability to decrease the frequency of spontaneous and induced by gamma-rays chromosome aberrations in meristematic cells of Vicia faba and marrow cells of mice have been shown. Comparative assessment of genoprotective properties of peroxidase and the studied extracts has revealed higher efficiency of antimutagene action of peroxidase.

  15. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  16. Use of additives to enhance the removal of phenols from water treated with horseradish and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Masami; Dec, Jerzy; Bollag, Jean-Marc

    2003-01-01

    Use of additives, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), selected surfactants, chitosan gel, or activated carbon, has been shown to enhance enzymatic treatment of water polluted with organic compounds. In this study, additives were used to facilitate the removal of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) from water using minced horseradish (Armoracia rusticana P. Gaertn. et al.) as a carrier of peroxidase activity. The specific objectives of the study were to (i) enhance the pollutant removal activity of minced horseradish by the addition of PEG and other additives (e.g., Tween 20, Triton X-100, and rhamnolipid); (ii) eliminate colored reaction products by the addition of chitosan; and (iii) eliminate color by amending treated water with activated carbon. The disappearance of 2,4-DCP in horseradish-treated water samples amended with PEG or various surfactants (75-90%) was greatly increased over that observed in nonamended samples (29%). The effect of PEG depended on its average molecular weight. As indicated by visible spectrophotometry, enclosing horseradish pieces between two sealed chitosan films completely eliminated colored reaction products; however, the decolorization was accompanied by a reduction in 2,4-DCP removal (from 95 to 60%). On the other hand, commercially available activated carbon completely removed colored reaction products from the treated water without reducing the removal efficiency. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the use of additives may considerably improve the quality of wastewater treated by plant materials.

  17. A Facile synthesis of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers with superior peroxidase-like catalytic activity for sensitive colorimetric detection of L-cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sihui; Chi, Maoqiang; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Mu; Wang, Ce; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2018-05-01

    Superaramagnetic Fe3O4 nanomaterials are good candidates as enzyme mimics due to their excellent catalytic activity, high stability and facile synthesis. However, the morphology of Fe3O4 nanomaterials has much influence on their enzyme-like catalytic activity. In this work, we have developed a simple polymer-assisted thermochemical reduction approach to prepare Fe3O4 nanofibers for peroxidase-like catalytic applications. The as-prepared Fe3O4 nanofibers show a higher catalytic activity than commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The steady-state kinetic assay result shows that the Michaelis-Menten constant value of the as-obtained Fe3O4 nanofibers is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), indicating their superior affinity to the 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2 substrate. Based on the outstanding catalytic activity, a sensing platform for the detection of L-cysteine has been performed and the limit of detection is as low as 0.028 μM. In addition, an excellent selectivity toward L-cysteine over other types of amino acids, glucose and metal ions has been achieved as well. This work offers an original means for the fabrication of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers and demonstrates their delightful potential applications in the fields of biosensing, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics.

  18. Tumor cell proliferation and cyclooxygenase inhibitory constituents in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) and Wasabi (Wasabia japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Marvin J; Zhang, Yanjun; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2005-03-09

    Cyclooxygenase and human tumor cell growth inhibitory extracts of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) and wasabi (Wasabia japonica) rhizomes upon purification yielded active compounds 1-3 from horseradish and 4 and 5 from wasabi rhizomes. Spectroscopic analyses confirmed the identities of these active compounds as plastoquinone-9 (1), 6-O-acyl-beta-d-glucosyl-beta-sitosterol (2), 1,2-dilinolenoyl-3-galactosylglycerol (3), linolenoyloleoyl-3-beta-galactosylglycerol (4), and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-beta-galactosylglycerol (5). 3-Acyl-sitosterols, sinigrin, gluconasturtiin, and phosphatidylcholines isolated from horseradish and alpha-tocopherol and ubiquinone-10 from wasabi rhizomes isolated were inactive in our assays. At a concentration of 60 microg/mL, compounds 1 and 2 selectively inhibited COX-1 enzyme by 28 and 32%, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, and 5 gave 75, 42, and 47% inhibition of COX-1 enzyme, respectively, at a concentration of 250 microg/mL. In a dose response study, compound 3 inhibited the proliferation of colon cancer cells (HCT-116) by 21.9, 42.9, 51.2, and 68.4% and lung cancer cells (NCI-H460) by 30, 39, 44, and 71% at concentrations of 7.5, 15, 30, and 60 microg/mL, respectively. At a concentration of 60 microg/mL, compound 4 inhibited the growth of colon, lung, and stomach cancer cells by 28, 17, and 44%, respectively. This is the first report of the COX-1 enzyme and cancer cell growth inhibitory monogalactosyl diacylglycerides from wasabi and horseradish rhizomes.

  19. Expression, purification and characterization of a peroxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peroxidase is one of the key enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense system, which is mostly involved in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Here, a peroxidase gene, named ThPOD1 was isolated from a cDNA library, which was generated from root tissue of Tamarix hispida that was exposed to 0.4 M NaCl. The cDNA ...

  20. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  1. Occurrence and properties of Petunia peroxidase a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, T.

    1989-01-01

    Peroxidases are probably the most extensively studied enzymes in higher plants. Various isoenzymes occur as soluble proteins in the apoplast and in the vacuole, or are bound to membranes and cell walls. Their occurrence is often organ-specific and developmentally controlled, and there is

  2. Thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2005-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is a key enzyme in the formation of thyroid hormones and a major autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Titers of TPO antibodies also correlate with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration in euthyroid subjects, and they are frequently present in euthyroid subjects

  3. Ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate-induced nanofibrillarity of polyaniline-polyvinyl sulfonate electropolymer and application in an amperometric enzyme biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndangili, Peter M.; Waryo, Tesfaye T.; Muchindu, Munkombwe; Baker, Priscilla G.L.; Ngila, Catherine J.; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of nanofibrillar polyaniline-polyvinyl sulfonate (Pani-PVS) composite by electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of ferrocenium hexafluorophophate (FcPF 6 ) and its application in mediated-enzyme biosensor using the horseradish peroxidase/hydrogen peroxide (HRP/H 2 O 2 ) enzyme-substrate system is reported. The electropolymerization was carried out at glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) and screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCE) in a strongly acidic medium (HCl). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that 100 nm diameter nanofibrils were formed on the SPCE in contrast to the 800-1000 nm cauliflower-shaped clusters which were formed in the absence of FcPF 6 . A model biosensor (GCE//Pani-PVS/BSA/HRP/Glu), consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized by drop coating atop the GCE//Pani-PVS in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutaraldehyde (glu) in the enzyme layer casting solution, exhibited voltammetric responses characteristic of a mediated-enzyme system. The biosensor response to H 2 O 2 was very fast (5 s) and it exhibited a detection limit of 30 μM (3σ) and a linearity of up to 2 mM (R 2 = 0.998). The relatively high apparent Michaelis-Menten constant value (K M app =1.7mM) of the sensor indicated that the immobilized enzyme was in a biocompatible microenvironment. The freshly prepared biosensor was successfully applied in the determination of the H 2 O 2 content of a commercial tooth whitening gel with a very good recovery rate (97%).

  4. Ferrocenium hexafluorophosphate-induced nanofibrillarity of polyaniline-polyvinyl sulfonate electropolymer and application in an amperometric enzyme biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndangili, Peter M. [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, P. Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Waryo, Tesfaye T., E-mail: twaryo@uwc.ac.z [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, P. Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muchindu, Munkombwe; Baker, Priscilla G.L. [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, P. Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Ngila, Catherine J. [School of Chemistry, University of KwaZulu-Natal, P. Bag X541001 Westville, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Iwuoha, Emmanuel I. [SensorLab, Department of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, P. Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2010-05-30

    The formation of nanofibrillar polyaniline-polyvinyl sulfonate (Pani-PVS) composite by electropolymerization of aniline in the presence of ferrocenium hexafluorophophate (FcPF{sub 6}) and its application in mediated-enzyme biosensor using the horseradish peroxidase/hydrogen peroxide (HRP/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) enzyme-substrate system is reported. The electropolymerization was carried out at glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) and screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCE) in a strongly acidic medium (HCl). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that 100 nm diameter nanofibrils were formed on the SPCE in contrast to the 800-1000 nm cauliflower-shaped clusters which were formed in the absence of FcPF{sub 6}. A model biosensor (GCE//Pani-PVS/BSA/HRP/Glu), consisting of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilized by drop coating atop the GCE//Pani-PVS in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glutaraldehyde (glu) in the enzyme layer casting solution, exhibited voltammetric responses characteristic of a mediated-enzyme system. The biosensor response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was very fast (5 s) and it exhibited a detection limit of 30 muM (3sigma) and a linearity of up to 2 mM (R{sup 2} = 0.998). The relatively high apparent Michaelis-Menten constant value (K{sub M}{sup app}=1.7mM) of the sensor indicated that the immobilized enzyme was in a biocompatible microenvironment. The freshly prepared biosensor was successfully applied in the determination of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content of a commercial tooth whitening gel with a very good recovery rate (97%).

  5. pH-sensitive pHluorins as a molecular sensor for in situ monitoring of enzyme-catalyzed prodrug activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Cao, Xiaodan; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2017-07-01

    This work examines the feasibility of using a pH-sensitive fluorescent protein as a molecular reporter for enzyme-catalyzed prodrug activation reaction. Specifically, a ratiometric pHluorins was examined for detection of the activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for the activation of indole-3-acetic acid. The pHluorins and HRP were conjugated chemically, forming a biocatalyst with a self-reporting function. Results showed that the characteristic fluorescence intensity ratio of the conjugate shifted from 1.47 to 1.40 corresponding to the progress of the prodrug activation reaction. The effectiveness of applying the conjugate for inhibition of the growth of Bcap-37 cells was also demonstrated simultaneously with reaction monitoring. The results reveal a very promising approach to realizing in situ monitoring of enzyme activities based on pH shifting for enzyme-based prodrug therapy applications. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  7. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... enzymes in plant and its resistance to heat has been reported by a ... sintered glass funnel and washed with cold acetone under low vacuum ... Peroxidase activity was determined by measuring the colour deve- lopment at ...

  8. Production of manganese peroxidase by white rot fungi from potato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... production rate of the MnP using the potato-processing wastewater-based medium were higher (ca. 2.5- ... Ligninolytic enzymes, such as manganese peroxidase ... not currently reached industrial levels except for the laccase.

  9. Analysis of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymatic activity by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection combined with an assay of oxidation with a peroxidase and its application to MAO inhibitors from foods and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Tomás; Flores, Andrea; Fernández, Lidia

    2018-01-15

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes catalyze the oxidative deamination of biogenic amines and neurotransmitters and produce ammonia, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide which is involved in oxidative processes. Inhibitors of MAO-A and -B isozymes are useful as antidepressants and neuroprotectants. The assays of MAO usually measure amine oxidation products or hydrogen peroxide by spectrophotometric techniques. Those assays are often compromised by interfering compounds resulting in poor results. This research describes a new method that combines in the same assay the oxidative deamination of kynuramine to 4-hydroxyquinoline analyzed by HPLC-DAD with the oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) (or Amplex Rex) by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in presence of hydrogen peroxide. The new method was applied to study the inhibition of human MAO-A and -B by bioactive compounds including β-carboline alkaloids and flavonoids occurring in foods and plants. As determined by HPLC-DAD, β-carbolines, methylene blue, kaempferol and clorgyline inhibited MAO-A and methylene blue, 5-nitroindazole, norharman and deprenyl inhibited MAO-B, and all of them inhibited the oxidation of TMB in the same extent. The flavonoids catechin and cyanidin were not inhibitors of MAO by HPLC-DAD but highly inhibited the oxidation of TMB (or Amplex Red) by peroxidase whereas quercetin and resveratrol were moderate inhibitors of MAO-A by HPLC-DAD, but inhibited the peroxidase assay in a higher level. For some phenolic compounds, using the peroxidase-coupled assay to measure MAO activity led to mistaken results. The new method permits to discern between true inhibitors of MAO from those that are antioxidants and which interfere with peroxidase assays but do not inhibit MAO. For true inhibitors of MAO, inhibition as determined by HPLC-DAD correlated well with inhibition of the oxidation of TMB and this approach can be used to assess the in vitro antioxidant activity (less hydrogen peroxide production) resulting

  10. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd) Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R S S; Yadav, K S; Yadav, H S

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd) fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The K(m) values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with K(i) value of 3.35 mM.

  11. Luffa aegyptiaca (Gourd Fruit Juice as a Source of Peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. S. Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases have turned out to be potential biocatalyst for a variety of organic reactions. The research work reported in this communication was done with the objective of finding a convenient rich source of peroxidase which could be used as a biocatalyst for organic synthetic reactions. The studies made have shown that Luffa aegyptiaca (gourd fruit juice contains peroxidase activity of the order of 180 enzyme unit/mL. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide were 2.0 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 6.5 and 60°C, respectively. Like other peroxidases, it followed double displacement type mechanism. Sodium azide inhibited the enzyme competitively with Ki value of 3.35 mM.

  12. Optimization of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and Lac production from Ganoderma lucidum under solid state fermentation of pineapple leaf

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Hariharan; Padma Nambisan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate ligninase-producing white-rot fungi for use in the extraction of fibre from pineapple leaf agriwaste. Fifteen fungal strains were isolated from dead tree trunks and leaf litter. Ligninolytic enzymes (lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), and laccase (Lac)), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple leaves as the substrate. Of the isolated strains, the one showing maximum production of ligninolytic enzymes was identified...

  13. Quantitative enzyme activity determination with zeptomole sensitivity by microfluidic gradient-gel zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alex J; Herr, Amy E

    2010-05-01

    We describe a sensitive zymography technique that utilizes an automated microfluidic platform to report enzyme molecular weight, amount, and activity (including k(cat) and K(m)) from dilute protein mixtures. Calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIP) is examined in detail as a model enzyme system, and the method is also demonstrated for horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The 40 min assay has a detection limit of 5 zmol ( approximately 3 000 molecules) of CIP. Two-step pore-limit electrophoresis with enzyme assay (PLENZ) is conducted in a single, straight microchannel housing a polyacrylamide (PA) pore-size gradient gel. In the first step, pore limit electrophoresis (PLE) sizes and pseudoimmobilizes resolved proteins. In the second step, electrophoresis transports both charged and neutral substrates into the PLE channel to the entrapped proteins. Arrival of substrate at the resolved enzyme band generates fluorescent product that reveals enzyme molecular weight against a fluorescent protein ladder. Additionally, the PLENZ zymography assay reports the kinetic properties of CIP in a fully quantitative manner. In contrast to covalent enzyme immobilization, physical pseudoimmobilization of CIP in the PA gel does not significantly reduce its maximum substrate turnover rate. However, an 11-fold increase in the Michaelis constant (over the free solution value) is observed, consistent with diffusional limitations on substrate access to the enzyme active site. PLENZ offers a robust platform for rapid and multiplexed functional analysis of heterogeneous protein samples in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics, and biocatalyst engineering.

  14. Enzyme-enhanced fluorescence detection of DNA on etched optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shu-yan; Li, Quan-yi; Ren, Rui; Zhang, Shu-sheng

    2009-05-15

    A novel DNA biosensor based on enzyme-enhanced fluorescence detection on etched optical fibers was developed. The hybridization complex of DNA probe and biotinylated target was formed on the etched optical fiber, and was then bound with streptavidin labeled horseradish peroxidase (streptavidin-HRP). The target DNA was quantified through the fluorescent detection of bi-p,p'-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (DBDA) generated from the substrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (p-HPA) under the catalysis of HRP, with a detection limit of 1 pM and a linear range from 1.69 pM to 169 pM. It is facile to regenerate this sensor through surface treatment with concentrated urea solution. It was discovered that the sensor can retain 70% of its original activity after three detection-regeneration cycles.

  15. Quantitative measurement of ultraviolet-induced damage in cellular DNA by an enzyme immunodot assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakizaka, A.; Nishizawa, Y.; Aiba, N.; Okuhara, E.; Takahashi, S.

    1989-01-01

    A simple enzyme immunoassay procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of 254-nm uv-induced DNA damage in cells. With the use of specific antibodies to uv-irradiated DNA and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody to rabbit IgG, the extent of damaged DNA in uv-irradiated rat spleen mononuclear cells was quantitatively measurable. Through the use of this method, the amount of damaged DNA present in 2 X 10(5) cells irradiated at a dose of 75 J/m2 was estimated to be 7 ng equivalents of the standard uv-irradiated DNA. In addition, when the cells, irradiated at 750 J/m2, were incubated for 1 h, the antigenic activity of DNA decreased by 40%, suggesting that a repair of the damaged sites in DNA had proceeded to some extent in the cells

  16. Optimalization of the peroxidase production by tissue cultures of horseradish in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Podlipná, Radka; Maršík, Petr; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2005), s. 487-492 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/04/0135 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : agrobacterium rhizogenes * Armoracia rusticana * cadmium Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.792, year: 2005

  17. Effects of heavy metals and nitroaromatic compounds on horseradish glutathione S-transferase and peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nepovím, Aleš; Podlipná, Radka; Soudek, Petr; Schröder, P.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 57, - (2004), s. 1007-1015 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P065; GA MŠk OC 837.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : GST * POX * heavy metals Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2004

  18. Nanomolar hydrogen peroxide detection using horseradish peroxidase covalently linked to undoped nanocrystalline diamond surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, Q.; Kromka, Alexander; Houdková, Jana; Babchenko, Oleg; Rezek, Bohuslav; Li, M.; Boukherroub, R.; Szunerits, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2012), s. 587-592 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX00100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : intrinsic diamond * large area growth * optical biosensor * covalent * XPS Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.187, year: 2012

  19. Photophysics and photochemistry of horseradish peroxidase A2 upon ultraviolet illumination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Petersen, Steffen B.; Klitgaard, Søren

    2007-01-01

    content loss. Prolonged UV illumination and Heme irradiation at 403nm has pronounced effect on the fluorescence quantum yield, correlated with changes in the prosthetic group pocket, leading to pronounced decrease in the heme's Soret absorbance band. Analyzes of the picosecond resolved fluorescence...

  20. Oxidative cross-linking of casein by horseradish peroxidase and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... The cross-linking of casein was demonstrated by capillary zone electrophoresis analysis. .... linking reaction was started by addition of 1.0 ml 3% (w/v) H2O2 and .... by Design Expert Software (Version 7.0), keeping one variable at its ... The emulsion was immediately transferred into a 250 ml capa-.

  1. Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed oxidation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.; Eastmond, D.A.; Ruzo, L.O.; Smith, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    MPO-catalyzed conversion of phenolic metabolites of benzene may be involved in benzene-induced myelotoxicity. The authors have studied the metabolism and protein binding of phenol - the major metabolite of benzene - during peroxidatic oxidation. The major metabolite observed during MPO- and HRP- catalyzed oxidation was characterized as 4,4 biphenol using HPLC and combined GC-MS. When glutathione (GSH) was added to the incubation mixtures, two additional compounds were observed during HPLC analysis which were characterized as GSH-conjugates of 4,4-diphenoquinone by fast atom bombardment MS and by NMR. ESR spectroscopy showed that both MPO-and HRP-catalyzed oxidation of phenol proceeded via the generation of free radical intermediates. Using 14 C-phenol, both MPO- and HRP-catalyzed oxidations resulted in the production of species which bound covalently to boiled liver microsomal protein. The increase in binding correlated well with removal of substrate. Thus, peroxidatic oxidation of phenolic metabolites of benzene in the bone marrow may be involved in benzene-induced myelotoxicity

  2. Experimental and computational evaluation of area selectively immobilized horseradish peroxidase in a microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Pereira Rosinha Grundtvig, Ines; Thrane, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    experimentally and by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Ultimately, such a correlation would lead to faster development through computational pre-screening and optimized experimental design.In this proof-of-concept study, microreactors were prepared in a 2-step curing process of an off......-stoichiometric thiol-ene-epoxy (OSTE+) mixture employing both a thiol-ene (TEC) and a thiol-epoxy curing reaction. Subsequent surface functionalization of the remaining thiol groups on the reactor surface through stenciled photoinitiated TEC enabled the preparation of specific surface patterns in the reactor. Patterns...... as obtained from experimental determination. This good agreement between the obtained experimental and computational results confirmed the high potential of CFD models for predicting and optimizing the biocatalytic performance of such a reactor....

  3. Attachment of annexin V and horseradish peroxidase to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, Luís Filipe Ferreira.

    2007-01-01

    Atendendo à necessidade do desenvolvimento de um sistema terapêutico com selectividade a células cancerígenas, neste estudo é apresentado um possível sistema de tratamento tumoral específico e localizado. A exposição de PS na face externa da membrana celular é quase exclusiva das células canceríginas e das células endoteliais da vasculatura tumoral. Com este conhecimento e atendendo ao facto de que a proteína anexina V, apresenta excelentes propriedades de ligação Ca2+ -fosfolípidos teremos e...

  4. A young root-specific gene (ArMY2) from horseradish encoding a MYR II myrosinase with kinetic preference for the root-specific glucosinolate gluconasturtiin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebers, Andreas; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    The pungent taste of horseradish is caused by isothiocyanates which are released from glucosinolates by myrosinases. These enzymes are encoded by genes belonging to one of two subfamilies, termed MYR I and MYR II, respectively. A MYR II-type myrosinase gene was identified for the first time in horseradish. The gene termed ArMY2 was only expressed in young roots. A full-length cDNA encoding a myrosinase termed ArMy2 was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant His-tagged enzyme was characterized biochemically. Substrate affinity was 5 times higher towards gluconasturtiin than towards sinigrin. Gluconasturtiin was found to be the most abundant glucosinolate in young horseradish roots while sinigrin dominated in storage roots and leaves. This indicates that a specialized glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system might be active in young roots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Caseoperoxidase, mixed β-casein-SDS-hemin-imidazole complex: a nano artificial enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Movahedi, Zainab; Gharibi, Hussein; Hadi-Alijanvand, Hamid; Akbarzadeh, Mohammad; Esmaili, Mansoore; Atri, Maliheh S; Sefidbakht, Yahya; Bohlooli, Mousa; Nazari, Khodadad; Javadian, Soheila; Hong, Jun; Saboury, Ali A; Sheibani, Nader; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    A novel peroxidase-like artificial enzyme, named "caseoperoxidase", was biomimetically designed using a nano artificial amino acid apo-protein hydrophobic pocket. This four-component nano artificial enzyme containing heme-imidazole-β-casein-SDS exhibited high activity growth and k(cat) performance toward the native horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by the steady state kinetics using UV-vis spectrophotometry. The hydrophobicity and secondary structure of the caseoperoxidase were studied by ANS fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Camel β-casein (Cβ-casein) was selected as an appropriate apo-protein for the heme active site because of its innate flexibility and exalted hydrophobicity. This selection was confirmed by homology modeling method. Heme docking into the newly obtained Cβ-casein structure indicated one heme was mainly incorporated with Cβ-casein. The presence of a main electrostatic site for the active site in the Cβ-casein was also confirmed by experimental methods through Wyman binding potential and isothermal titration calorimetry. The existence of Cβ-casein protein in this biocatalyst lowered the suicide inactivation and provided a suitable protective role for the heme active-site. Additional experiments confirmed the retention of caseoperoxidase structure and function as an artificial enzyme.

  6. Oxidative Stress in Horseradish (Armoracia lapathifolia Gilib. Tissues Grown in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Peharec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study it was reported that transformed tissue of horseradish (Armoracia lapathifolia Gilib., obtained by infection of leaf explants with A. tumefaciens, developed two tumour lines with different morphology. One line grew as a completely unorganized tissue (TN – tumour tissue, while the other line grew as a partially organized teratogenous tumour with malformed hyperhydric shoots (TM – teratoma tissue, but did not regenerate the whole plant of normal morphology. The factor responsible for this problem could be the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, in this study a possible involvement of activated oxygen metabolism in dedifferentiation and hyperhydricity in TM and TN tissues is investigated. Elevated values of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents found in TM and TN, in comparison with plantlet leaf, confirm the presence of oxidative stress. However, lower H2O2 content was measured in TM and TN. Lipoxygenase (LOX activity was more pronounced in TM and especially in TN compared to leaf, which suggests that the LOX-dependent peroxidation of fatty acids might be one of the causes of oxidative damage. Moreover, significantly higher peroxidase (PRX and ascorbate peroxidase (APX activity as well as the increased number of their isoforms was found in transformed TM and TN in comparison with leaf. On the other hand, significantly lower superoxide dismutase (SOD activity was found in TM and TN, which correlates with lower H2O2 content. High catalase (CAT activity measured in leaf and partially organized TM is consistent with the role of CAT in growth and differentiation. In conclusion, in horseradish transformed tissues that underwent dedifferentiation and hyperhydricity, prominent oxidative damage was found. This result suggests that oxidative stress could be associated with the inability of partially organized teratogenous TM to regenerate plantlets with normal morphology.

  7. Production and Purification of Peroxidase from Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Jebor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in the laboratories of Biology Department, College of Science, which deals with isolation and purification of peroxidase and optimization of process parameters to achieve maximum yield of peroxidase by Aspergillus niger. Solid-state fermentation of Aspergillus niger was carried out for enhanced production of peroxidase using hydrogen peroxide as the substrate of enzyme maximum activity of the enzyme was achieved under optimum growth conditions. The optimum conditions were the isolated of Aspergillus niger from soil and growth in synthetic medium, it gave high titer of peroxidase activity, the fructose as carbon source, peptone as nitrogen source, after 12 days of incubation, incubation temperature 25 °C and pH = 6.5. Peroxidase purified in four purification steps; precipitation with 70% saturation of ammonium sulfate, step of dialysis, the third by ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Cellulose and fourth by gel filtration throughout Sephadex G-100. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 150U/mg with 7.75 folds. The peroxidase was shown to have molecular weight of 40kDa in SDS-PAGA and about 40kDa in gel filtration.The optimum pH and temperature for peroxidase activity 7 and 35 C0 respectively.

  8. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source.

  9. Evaluating strategies to improve glucosinolate concentration and root yield of field-grown horseradish in a Mediterranean environment: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Rivelli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish is grown for its enlarged taproot that is widely used as a dish condiment and as a source of horseradish peroxidase. Nowadays, the species is gaining great interest due to the richness in bioactive compounds that besides providing a high nutritional value are tested for innovative applications in different fields. Nevertheless, the effect of crop management on root yield and glucosinolates (GLS biosynthesis is poorly documented. Aim of this study was to evaluate the root yield and GLS concentration of two field-grown horseradish accessions (Cor and Mon grown with nitrogen (N alone and both N and sulphur (S (-N-S, +N-S and +N+S treatments and harvested at different times [late autumn (LA, 2011 and 2012, early spring (ES, 2012]. Yield increased throughout the harvests up to 48% on average of the fertilised treatments and 25% in the unfertilised control. Conversely, root GLS concentration significantly declined in the unfertilised control throughout the harvests [from 7.6 in LA_2011 to 1.43 μmol/g dry matter (DM in LA_2012] while it highly increased in plants grown with N alone and with both N and S by 46 and 98%, respectively, from LA_2011 to ES_2012 (up to 11.9 and 21.1 μmol/g DM, respectively; then it drastically decreased by 80% on average, in the next harvest. Among individual GLS, the concentration of sinigrin and nasturtin similarly varied as effect of the analysed factors, showing the highest values in Cor accession. The data show that although the level of GLS is highly dependent on genotype, fertilisation and harvesting date may play a primary role in determining the yield and GLS concentration in horseradish root.

  10. Guaiacol peroxidase zymography for the undergraduate laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically detect peroxidase activity and furthermore, to analyze the total protein profile. After the assay, students may estimate the apparent molecular mass of the enzyme and discuss its structure. After the 4-h experiment, students gain knowledge concerning biological sample preparation, gel preparation, electrophoresis, and the importance of specific staining procedures for the detection of enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. A highly efficient nano-cluster artificial peroxidase and its direct electrochemistry on a nano complex modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jun; Wang, Wei; Huang, Kun; Yang, Wei-Yun; Zhao, Ying-Xue; Xiao, Bao-Lin; Gao, Yun-Fei; Moosavi-Movahedi, Zainab; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    A nano-cluster with highly efficient peroxide activity was constructed based on nafion (NF) and cytochrome c (Cyt c). UV-Vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were utilized for characterization of the nano-structured enzyme or artificial peroxidase (AP). The nano-cluster was composed of a Chain-Ball structure, with an average ball size of about 40 nm. The Michaelis-Menten (K(m)) and catalytic rate (k(cat)) constants of the AP were determined to be 2.5 ± 0.4 µM and 0.069 ± 0.001 s(-1), respectively, in 50 mM PBS at pH 7.0. The catalytic efficiency of the AP was evaluated to be 0.028 ± 0.005 µM(-1) s(-1), which was 39 ± 5% as efficient as the native horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The AP was also immobilized on a functional multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNCTs)-gold colloid nanoparticles (AuNPs) nano-complex modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The cyclic voltammetry of AP on the nano complex modified GC electrode showed a pair of well-defined redox peaks with a formal potential (E°') of -45 ± 2 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) was evaluated to be 0.65 s(-1). The surface concentration of electroactive AP on GC electrode (Γ) was 7 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)(app)) was 0.23 nM.

  12. Distribution and Translocation of 141Ce (III) in Horseradish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoshan; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Fang, Min; Huang, Xiaohua

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Rare earth elements (REEs) are used in agriculture and a large amount of them contaminate the environment and enter foods. The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish was investigated in order to help understand the biochemical behaviour and toxic mechanism of REEs in plants. Method The distribution and translocation of 141Ce (III) in horseradish were investigated using autoradiography, liquid scintillation counting (LSC) and electron microscopic autoradiography (EMARG) techniques. The contents of 141Ce (III) and nutrient elements were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Results The results from autoradiography and LSC indicated that 141Ce (III) could be absorbed by horseradish and transferred from the leaf to the leaf-stalk and then to the root. The content of 141Ce (III) in different parts of horseradish was as follows: root > leaf-stalk > leaf. The uptake rates of 141Ce (III) in horseradish changed with the different organs and time. The content of 141Ce (III) in developing leaves was greater than that in mature leaves. The results from EMARG indicated that 141Ce (III) could penetrate through the cell membrane and enter the mesophyll cells, being present in both extra- and intra-cellular deposits. The contents of macronutrients in horseradish were decreased by 141Ce (III) treatment. Conclusions 141Ce (III) can be absorbed and transferred between organs of horseradish with time, and the distribution was found to be different at different growth stages. 141Ce (III) can enter the mesophyll cells via apoplast and symplast channels or via plasmodesmata. 141Ce (III) can disturb the metabolism of macronutrients in horseradish. PMID:17921527

  13. Optimized Production of Lignin Peroxidase, Manganese Peroxidase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    submerged culture fermentations were investigated for maximum enzymes ... 0.18, 4.44 and 593 U/ml, respectively compared to 0.0011, 0.0054 and 2.3 U/ml .... (2004) studied some Tanzanian white rot ... were done in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and ... rotary shaker at 125 rpm. ..... bioreactor cultures (Hess et al., 2002). From.

  14. Strategies for an enzyme immobilization on electrodes: Structural and electrochemical characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, V.; Muthurasu, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we propose various strategies for an enzyme immobilization on electrodes (both metal and semiconductor electrodes). In general, the proposed methodology involves two critical steps viz., (1) chemical modification of substrates using functional monolayers [Langmuir - Blodgett (LB) films and/or self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)] and (2) anchoring of a target enzyme using specific chemical and physical interactions by attacking the terminal functionality of the modified films. Basically there are three ways to immobilize an enzyme on chemically modified electrodes. First method consists of an electrostatic interaction between the enzyme and terminal functional groups present within the chemically modified films. Second and third methods involve the introduction of nanomaterials followed by an enzyme immobilization using both the physical and chemical adsorption processes. As a proof of principle, in this work we demonstrate the sensing and catalytic activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) anchored onto SAM modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Structural characterization of such modified electrodes is performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. The binding events and the enzymatic reactions are monitored using electrochemical techniques mainly cyclic voltammetry (CV).

  15. Rational Design of Thermally Stable Novel Biocatalytic Nanomaterials: Enzyme Stability in Restricted Spatial Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudhivarthi, Vamsi K.

    Enzyme stability is of intense interest in bio-materials science as biocatalysts, and as sensing platforms. This is essentially because the unique properties of DNA, RNA, PAA can be coupled with the interesting and novel properties of proteins to produce systems with unprecedented control over their properties. In this article, the very first examples of enzyme/NA/inorganic hybrid nanomaterials and enzyme-Polyacrylic acid conjugates will be presented. The basic principles of design, synthesis and control of properties of these hybrid materials will be presented first, and this will be followed by a discussion of selected examples from our recent research findings. Data show that key properties of biological catalysts are improved by the inorganic framework especially when the catalyst is co-embedded with DNA. Several examples of such studies with various enzymes and proteins, including horseradish peroxidase (HRP), glucose oxidase (GO), cytochrome c (Cyt c), met-hemoglobin (Hb) and met-myoglobin (Mb) will be discussed. Additionally, key insights obtained by the standard methods of materials science including XRD, SEM and TEM as well as biochemical, calorimetric and spectroscopic methods will be discussed. Furthermore, improved structure and enhanced activities of the biocatalysts in specific cases will be demonstrated along with the potential stabilization mechanisms. Our hypothesis is that nucleic acids provide an excellent control over the enzyme-solid interactions as well as rational assembly of nanomaterials. These novel nanobiohybrid materials may aid in engineering more effective synthetic materials for gene-delivery, RNA-delivery and drug delivery applications.

  16. Bio-functionalization of electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface by heme enzyme using a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as synergetic immobilization matrix: Conformational characterization and electrocatalytic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElKaoutit, Mohammed; Naranjo-Rodriguez, Ignacio; Dominguez, Manuel; Hidalgo-Hidalgo-de-Cisneros, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    Use of a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as new immobilization matrix was described. The percentage of Nafion was optimized to prevent denaturation of horseradish peroxidase enzyme after its crosslinkage with glutaraldehyde on electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface. Topographic study by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) shows that the enzyme seems to have been introduced inside the ionic cluster of Nafion. The characterization of the resulting bio-interfaces by UV-vis and FT-IR shows that the intra-crosslinkage phenomena caused by the use of glutaraldehyde can be eliminated by the optimization of the concentration of Nafion additive. The secondary structure contents of native and immobilized enzyme were analyzed by a Gaussian curve fitting of the respective FT-IR spectra in the amide I region. Immobilized enzyme presented notable increasing percentages of globular and short helical structure compared with native enzyme. This indicates that immobilized enzyme was folded which is in accordance with AFM studies and supports the enzyme entrance inside ionic clutter of Nafion. Thanks to synergic effects of the polypyrrole conducting polymer and the perfluorosulfonic acid polymer Nafion, HRP enzyme was immobilized in its 'native' state, the resulting biosensor was able to sense peroxide without any chemical mediator and can be categorized as third generation.

  17. Bio-functionalization of electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface by heme enzyme using a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as synergetic immobilization matrix: Conformational characterization and electrocatalytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElKaoutit, Mohammed, E-mail: elkaoutit@uca.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Naranjo-Rodriguez, Ignacio [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Dominguez, Manuel [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Hidalgo-Hidalgo-de-Cisneros, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Use of a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as new immobilization matrix was described. The percentage of Nafion was optimized to prevent denaturation of horseradish peroxidase enzyme after its crosslinkage with glutaraldehyde on electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface. Topographic study by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) shows that the enzyme seems to have been introduced inside the ionic cluster of Nafion. The characterization of the resulting bio-interfaces by UV-vis and FT-IR shows that the intra-crosslinkage phenomena caused by the use of glutaraldehyde can be eliminated by the optimization of the concentration of Nafion additive. The secondary structure contents of native and immobilized enzyme were analyzed by a Gaussian curve fitting of the respective FT-IR spectra in the amide I region. Immobilized enzyme presented notable increasing percentages of globular and short helical structure compared with native enzyme. This indicates that immobilized enzyme was folded which is in accordance with AFM studies and supports the enzyme entrance inside ionic clutter of Nafion. Thanks to synergic effects of the polypyrrole conducting polymer and the perfluorosulfonic acid polymer Nafion, HRP enzyme was immobilized in its 'native' state, the resulting biosensor was able to sense peroxide without any chemical mediator and can be categorized as third generation.

  18. Biogenic porous silica and silicon sourced from Mexican Giant Horsetail (Equisetum myriochaetum) and their application as supports for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Rabada, Anna; Sahare, Padma; Hickman, Graham J; Vasquez, Marco; Canham, Leigh T; Perry, Carole C; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2018-06-01

    Porous silica-based materials are attractive for biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and biodegradable character. In addition, inorganic supports such as porous silicon are being developed due to integrated circuit chip compatibility and tunable properties leading to a wide range of multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, biosilica extracted from a rarely studied plant material (Equisetum Myriochaetum), its conversion to silicon and the potential for both materials to be used as supports for enzyme immobilization are investigated. E. myriochaetum was subject to conventional acid digestion to extract biogenic silica with a% yield remarkably higher (up to 3 times) than for other Equisetum sp. (i.e. E. Arvense). The surface area of the isolated silica was ∼400 m 2 /g, suitable for biotechnological applications. Biogenic silicon was obtained by magnesiothermic reduction. The materials were characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD, FT-IR, ICP-OES, TGA and BET analysis and did not contain significant levels of class 1 heavy elements (such as Pb, Cd, Hg and As). Two commercial peroxidases, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) were immobilized onto the biogenic materials using three different functionalization routes: (A) carbodiimide, (B) amine + glutaraldehyde and (C) amine + carbodiimide. Although both biogenic silica and porous silicon could be used as supports differences in behaviour were observed for the two enzymes. For HRP, loading onto biogenic silica via the glutaraldehyde immobilization technique (route B) was most effective. The loading of CiP showed a much higher peroxidase activity onto porous silicon than silica functionalized by the carbodiimide method (route A). From the properties of the extracted materials obtained from Equisetum Myriochaetum and the immobilization results observed, these materials appear to be promising for industrial and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier

  19. Obtenção de nova fonte de peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. com alta atividade Obtention of a new source of peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaf, Desf. with high activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermelinda Penha Freire Maciel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho extrair peroxidase de folha de Copaifera langsdorffii (COP, medir sua atividade, compará-la com a peroxidase de raiz forte (Horseradish peroxidase - HRP e determinar o pH ótimo, a melhor solução extratora e o efeito de aditivos sobre a atividade da COP. Os resultados mostraram que a COP atingiu 81,6% da atividade de HRP e a faixa de pH ótimo foi de 5,5 a 6,0. A melhor solução extratora da enzima foi o tampão fosfato de sódio 50 mM, pH 6,0 e o melhor aditivo foi o PVPP. Concluindo, a COP apresenta atividade mais alta que outras peroxidases de diferentes fontes citadas na literatura.The purpose of this work was to extract peroxidase from Copaifera langsdorffii leaves (COP, measure its activity, compare it to that of Horseradish peroxidase and determine the optimum pH, the best extraction solution and the effect of additives on the COP activity. The results showed that COP has 81.6% of the activity of HRP and an optimum pH range between 5.5-6.0. The best extraction solution was a sodium phosphate buffer 50 mM, pH 6.0 and the best additive was PVPP. In conclusion, COP presents higher activity than peroxidases from different sources reported in the literature.

  20. Polyketone polymer: a new support for direct enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, E; Belli, F; Tempera, G; Mura, A; Floris, G; Toniolo, L; Vavasori, A; Fabris, S; Momo, F; Stevanato, R

    2007-01-20

    Polyketone polymer -[-CO-CH(2)-CH(2)-](n)-, obtained by copolymerization of ethene and carbon monoxide, is utilized for immobilization of three different enzymes, one peroxidase from horseradish (HRP) and two amine oxidases, from bovine serum (BSAO) and lentil seedlings (LSAO). The easy immobilization procedure is carried out in diluted buffer, at pH 7.0 and 3 degrees C, gently mixing the proteins with the polymer. No bifunctional reagents and spacer arms are required for the immobilization, which occurs exclusively via a large number of hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl groups of the polymer and the -NH groups of the polypeptidic chain. Experiments demonstrate a high linking capacity of polymer for BSAO and an extraordinary strong linkage for LSAO. Moreover, activity measurements demonstrate that immobilized LSAO totally retains the catalytic characteristics of the free enzyme, where only a limited increase of K(M) value is observed. Finally, the HRP-activated polymer is successfully used as active packed bed of an enzymatic reactor for continuous flow conversion and flow injection analysis of hydrogen peroxide containing solutions.

  1. Enzyme immunoassay for DDT analysis in Lebanese soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashour, I.; Dagher, S.; Shammas, G.; Sukkariyah, B.; Kawar, N.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique in estimating pesticide residue in soils is a faster, less expensive and easier method to use than the gas chromatography (GC) analysis technique..In the test, DDT pesticide residues in the simple compete with enzyme (horseradish peroxidase)-labeled DDT for a limited number of antibody binding sites on the inside surfaces of the test wells; the envirologix plate kit was tested for the measurement of total DDT in virgin and fortified (0-1000 ng g exp-1) soil samples of different properties from Lebanon. Extraction of DDT from soil was done by shaking the samples for 16 hours on a mechanical shaker with 90% methanol without any clean-up steps. Then the samples were allowed to stand for 30 minutes and an aliquot was taken from the clear supernatant. The DDT in the extract was measured in triplicate by GC and ELISA. The results indicated that the two techniques were highly correlated (r2 =0.9671-0.9973). Differences in soils physical and chemical properties did not accuracy of the detection limits of ELISA when compared to GC-ECD results. Immunoassay technique is a suitable method for rapid and accurate measurement of DDT residue in mineral Lebanese soils

  2. Purification, characterization and stability of barley grain peroxidase BP1, a new type of plant peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christine B; Henriksen, Anette; Abelskov, A. Katrine

    1997-01-01

    peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRP C). However, when measuring the specific activity of BP 1 at pH 4.0 in the presence of 1 mM CaCl2, the enzyme was as competent as HRP C at neutral pH towards a variety of substrates (mM mg(-1) min(-1)): coniferyl alcohol (930+/-48), caffeic acid (795+/-53), ABTS (2,2(1)-azino...

  3. Studies of peroxidase isozyme profile in mungbean mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auti, S.G.; Apparao, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    Peroxidase is an important oxygen-scavenging enzyme. The activity of peroxidase is often correlated with growth, development and hormonal activity. Traditional methods of cultivar identification usually involve observation and recording of morphological characters or description such as yield, height, weight, earliness etc. which vary with environmental conditions and often misleading. So molecular markers like protein and isozymes profiles, RFLP, RAPDs markers etc. are widely employed in varietal identification of cultivars. It plays important role in respiration and is an indicator of oxidative status of plants. Electrophoretic techniques have been used to group species and identify cultivars. Such identification has various advantages including the unique pattern of protein or isozymes bands for each pure cultivar under any set of environmental conditions. Peroxidase isozyme serves as very good marker for any mutational studies. In the present investigation, peroxidase isozyme profiles of various mutants of mungbean was studied employing the technique of electrophoresis

  4. Screen-printable sol-gel enzyme-containing carbon inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Pamidi, P V; Park, D S

    1996-08-01

    Enzymes usually cannot withstand the high-temperature curing associated with the thick-film fabrication process and require a separate immobilization step in connection with the production of single-use biosensors. We report on the development of sol-gel-derived enzyme-containing carbon inks that display compatibility with the screen-printing process. Such coupling of sol-gel and thick-film technologies offers a one-step fabrication of disposable enzyme electrodes, as it obviates the need for thermal curing. The enzyme-containing sol-gel carbon ink, prepared by dispersing the biocatalyst, along with the graphite powder and a binder, within the sol-gel precursors, is cured very rapidly (10 min) at low temperature (4 °C). The influence of the ink preparation conditions is explored, and the sensor performance is evaluated in connection with the incorporation of glucose oxidase or horseradish peroxidase. The resulting strips are stable for at least 3 months. Such sol-gel-derived carbon inks should serve as hosts for other heat-sensitive biomaterials in connection with the microfabrication of various thick-film biosensors.

  5. Enzyme-Polymers Conjugated to Quantum-Dots for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mansur

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the concept of developing a novel system based on polymer-enzyme macromolecules was tested by coupling carboxylic acid functionalized poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA-COOH to glucose oxidase (GOx followed by the bioconjugation with CdS quantum-dots (QD. The resulting organic-inorganic nanohybrids were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The spectroscopy results have clearly shown that the polymer-enzyme macromolecules (PVA-COOH/GOx were synthesized by the proposed zero-length linker route. Moreover, they have performed as successful capping agents for the nucleation and constrained growth of CdS quantum-dots via aqueous colloidal chemistry. The TEM images associated with the optical absorption results have indicated the formation of CdS nanocrystals with estimated diameters of about 3.0 nm. The “blue-shift” in the visible absorption spectra and the PL values have provided strong evidence that the fluorescent CdS nanoparticles were produced in the quantum-size confinement regime. Finally, the hybrid system was biochemically assayed by injecting the glucose substrate and detecting the formation of peroxide with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP. Thus, the polymer-enzyme-QD hybrid has behaved as a nanostructured sensor for glucose detecting.

  6. Utilizing a CdTe quantum dots-enzyme hybrid system for the determination of both phenolic compounds and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jipei; Guo, Weiwei; Wang, Erkang

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, we attempt to construct a simple and sensitive detection method for both phenolic compounds and hydrogen peroxide, with the successful combination of the unique property of quantum dots and the specificity of enzymatic reactions. In the presence of H2O2 and horseradish peroxidase, phenolic compounds can quench quantum dots' photoluminescence efficiently, and the extent of quenching is severalfold to more than 100-fold increase. Quinone intermediates produced from the enzymatic catalyzed oxidation of phenolic compounds were believed to play the main role in the photoluminescence quenching. Using a quantum dots-enzyme system, the detection limits for phenolic compounds and hydrogen peroxide were detected to be approximately 10(-7) mol L(-1). The coupling of efficient quenching of quantum dot photoluminescence by quinone and the effective enzymatic reactions make this a simple and sensitive method for phenolic compound detection and great potential in the development of H2O2 biosensors for various analytes.

  7. Induction of Laccase, Lignin Peroxidase and Manganese Peroxidase Activities in White-Rot Fungi Using Copper Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Vrsanska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic enzymes, such as laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, are biotechnologically-important enzymes. The ability of five white-rot fungal strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Fomes fomentarius, Trametes gibbosa, Trametes suaveolens and Trametes versicolor to produce these enzymes has been studied. Three different copper(II complexes have been prepared ((Him[Cu(im4(H2O2](btc·3H2O, where im = imidazole, H3btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, [Cu3(pmdien3(btc](ClO43·6H2O and [Cu3(mdpta3(btc](ClO43·4H2O, where pmdien = N,N,N′,N′′,N′′-pentamethyl-diethylenetriamine and mdpta = N,N-bis-(3-aminopropylmethyl- amine, and their potential application for laccase and peroxidases induction have been tested. The enzyme-inducing activities of the complexes were compared with that of copper sulfate, and it has been found that all of the complexes are suitable for the induction of laccase and peroxidase activities in white-rot fungi; however, the newly-synthesized complex M1 showed the greatest potential for the induction. With respect to the different copper inducers, this parameter seems to be important for enzyme activity, which depends also on the fungal strains.

  8. Purification and characterization of an intracellular catalase-peroxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Roubroeks, Hanno P.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1996-01-01

    The first dimeric catalase-peroxidase of eucaryotic origin, an intracellular hydroperoxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum which exhibited both catalase and peroxidase activities, has been isolated. The enzyme has an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa and is composed of two identical

  9. Cross reactivities of rabbit anti-chicken horse radish peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cross reactivities of rabbit anti chicken horse radish peroxidase (conjugate) was tested with sera of Chicken, Ducks, Geese, Guinea fowl, Hawks, Pigeons and Turkeys in indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Sera from mammalian species (Bat, Equine and swine) were used as negative ...

  10. Expression, purification and characterization of a peroxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... from a cDNA library, which was generated from root tissue of Tamarix hispida that was exposed to ... enzymes, peroxidase (POD) plays an important role in .... ThPOD1 protein under various conditions, 3 month old T. hispida.

  11. Thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase increases resistance to salt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cellular indicators of stress. In plants, they function as secondary messengers in response to environmental stress. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is an important enzyme directly involved in the scavenging of ROS. In this study, we aimed at identifying the function of the Brassica napus ...

  12. Potential Applications of Peroxidases in the Fine Chemical Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Luigi; Monzani, Enrico; Nicolis, Stefania

    A description of selected types of reactions catalyzed by heme peroxidases is given. In particular, the discussion is focused mainly on those of potential interest for fine chemical synthesis. The division into subsections has been done fromthe point of view of the enzyme action, i.e., giving emphasis to themechanismof the enzymatic reaction, and from that of the substrate, i.e., analyzing the type of transformation promoted by the enzyme. These two approaches have several points in common.

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Z-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M J; Strobl, J S

    1988-10-01

    Dot blot and transblot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (e.l.i.s.a.) are described which provide sensitive non-radioactive methods for screening Z-DNA-specific antisera and for detecting Z-DNA in polydeoxyribonucleotides and supercoiled plasmids. In the alkaline phosphatase dot blot e.l.i.s.a., Z-DNA, Br-poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), or B-DNA, poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), Br-poly(dI-dC).poly(dI-dC), or salmon sperm DNA were spotted onto nitrocellulose discs and baked. The e.l.i.s.a. was conducted in 48-well culture dishes at 37 degrees C using a rabbit polyclonal antiserum developed against Br-poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated second antibody, and p-nitrophenol as the substrate. Under conditions where antibody concentrations were not limiting, alkaline phosphatase activity was linear for 2 h. Dot blot e.l.i.s.a. conditions are described which allow quantification of Z-DNA [Br-poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC)] within the range 5-250 ng. Dot blot and transblot horseradish peroxidase e.l.i.s.a. are described that detect Z-DNA within supercoiled plasmid DNAs immobilized on diazophenylthioether (DPT) paper. In the transblot e.l.i.s.a., plasmid pUC8 derivatives containing 16, 24, or 32 residues of Z-DNA were electrophoresed in agarose gels and electrophoretically transferred to DPT paper. Z-DNA-antibody complexes were detected by the horseradish peroxidase-catalysed conversion of 4-chloro-1-naphthol to a coloured product that was covalently bound to the DPT paper. Z-DNA antibody reactivity was specific for supercoiled Z-DNA containing plasmids after removal of the antibodies cross-reactive with B-DNA by absorption onto native DNA-cellulose. The transblot e.l.i.s.a. was sensitive enough to detect 16 base pairs of alternating G-C residues in 100 ng of pUC8 DNA.

  14. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar; Grunwald, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  15. Functionalization of PDMS modified and plasma activated two-component polyurethane coatings by surface attachment of enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreider, Alexej; Richter, Katharina; Sell, Stephan; Fenske, Mandus; Tornow, Christian; Stenzel, Volkmar [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Grunwald, Ingo, E-mail: ingo.grunwald@ifam.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials - IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    This article describes a new strategy for coupling the enzyme horseradish peroxidase to a two-component polyurethane (2C-PUR) coating. A stable polymer conjugate was achieved by combining the enzyme and the 2C-PUR coating which was modified with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), located at the surface. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet system was used to convert alkyl groups from the PDMS into polar silanol functionalities. This conversion was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the stability of the activated 2C-PUR surface containing silanol groups was determined by measuring the contact angle as a function of time. Compared to the non-modified 2C-PUR systems the one with PDMS displayed a higher stability over a time period over 28 h. In a silanization process the coating was treated with (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane and the enzyme was subsequently immobilized to the coating via the cross linker glutaraldehyde to receive new biomimetic catalytic/enzymatic functions. The chemical immobilization (chemisorption) of the enzyme to the surface showed statistically significant higher biological activity as compared to references samples without using a cross linker (physisorption). The presented technique offers the opportunity to design new and smart multifunctional surface coatings which employ biomimetic capabilities.

  16. The Effect of Citrus Aurantium, Foeniculum Vulgare and Rosmarinus Officinalis Essential Oils on Peroxidase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Mohajerani (PhD); Afsaneh Aghae i ( MSc )

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Peroxidases catalyze protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. The activity of these enzymes in nerve cells is involved in causing disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. This study investigated the effect of Citrus aurantium, Foeniculum vulgare and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils on activity of peroxidase enzyme. Methods: All three medicinal plants were dried at room temperature. Their essential oil was extracted by steam distillation ...

  17. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zucca Paolo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase. Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts.

  18. Nucleotide sequences of two genomic DNAs encoding peroxidase of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intapruk, C; Higashimura, N; Yamamoto, K; Okada, N; Shinmyo, A; Takano, M

    1991-02-15

    The peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7)-encoding gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was screened from a genomic library using a cDNA encoding a neutral isozyme of horseradish, Armoracia rusticana, peroxidase (HRP) as a probe, and two positive clones were isolated. From the comparison with the sequences of the HRP-encoding genes, we concluded that two clones contained peroxidase-encoding genes, and they were named prxCa and prxEa. Both genes consisted of four exons and three introns; the introns had consensus nucleotides, GT and AG, at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. The lengths of each putative exon of the prxEa gene were the same as those of the HRP-basic-isozyme-encoding gene, prxC3, and coded for 349 amino acids (aa) with a sequence homology of 89% to that encoded by prxC3. The prxCa gene was very close to the HRP-neutral-isozyme-encoding gene, prxC1b, and coded for 354 aa with 91% homology to that encoded by prxC1b. The aa sequence homology was 64% between the two peroxidases encoded by prxCa and prxEa.

  19. Peroxidase-mediated polymerization of 1-naphthol: impact of solution pH and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Alok; Xu, Fangxiang; Koch, David E; Hunter, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidase-mediated oxidation has been proposed as a treatment method for naphthol-contaminated water. However, the impact of solution chemistry on naphthol polymerization and removal has not been documented. This research investigated the impact of pH and ionic strength on peroxidase-mediated removal of 1-naphthol in completely mixed batch reactors. The impact of hydrogen peroxide to 1-naphthol ratio and activity of horseradish peroxidase was also studied. Size exclusion chromatography was used to estimate the molecular weight distribution of oligomeric products, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to estimate product structure. Naphthol transformation decreased with ionic strength, and substrate removal was lowest at neutral pHs. Solution pH influenced the size and the composition of the oligomeric products. An equimolar ratio of H(2)O(2):naphthol was sufficient for optimal naphthol removal. Polymerization products included naphthoquinones and oligomers derived from two, three, and four naphthol molecules. Our results illustrate the importance of water chemistry when considering a peroxidase-based approach for treatment of naphthol-contaminated waters.

  20. Purification and characterization of an intracellular peroxidase from Streptomyces cyaneus.

    OpenAIRE

    Mliki, A; Zimmermann, W

    1992-01-01

    An intracellular peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from Streptomyces cyaneus was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 185,000 and was composed of two subunits of equal size. It had an isoelectric point of 6.1. The enzyme had a peroxidase activity toward o-dianisidine with a Km of 17.8 microM and a pH optimum of 5.0. It also showed catalase activity with a Km of 2.07 mM H2O2 and a pH optimum of 8.0. The purified enzyme did not catalyze C alpha-C beta bond cleavage of 1,3-dihydr...

  1. Effect of Hydrolysis Products of Different Proteins of Wheat on Antioxidant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hasanov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the effect of products of enzymatic hydrolysis of various proteins of wheat with a neutral proteinase (neutrase “Novozymes”, Denmark on the activity of peroxidase from horseradish. It is shown that the hydrolysis products of albumin activate peroxidase activity, the constant of activation being 2.3 micromoles. At the same time with increasing the depth of hydrolysis of albumin the activating effect of peptides disappears. Peptides derived from the salt-soluble, alcohol-soluble alkali-soluble proteins had no effect on the activity of peroxidase.

  2. Sequence and RT-PCR expression analysis of two peroxidases from Arabidopsis thaliana belonging to a novel evolutionary branch of plant peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaersgård, I V; Jespersen, H M; Rasmussen, S K; Welinder, K G

    1997-03-01

    cDNA clones encoding two new Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases, ATP 1a and ATP 2a, have been identified by searching the Arabidopsis database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST). They represent a novel branch of hitherto uncharacterized plant peroxidases which is only 35% identical in amino acid sequence to the well characterized group of basic plant peroxidases represented by the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) isoperoxidases HRP C, HRP E5 and the similar Arabidopsis isoperoxidases ATP Ca, ATP Cb, and ATP Ea. However ATP 1a is 87% identical in amino acid sequence to a peroxidase encoded by an mRNA isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). As cotton and Arabidopsis belong to rather diverse families (Malvaceae and Crucifereae, respectively), in contrast with Arabidopsis and horseradish (both Crucifereae), the high degree of sequence identity indicates that this novel type of peroxidase, albeit of unknown function, is likely to be widespread in plant species. The atp 1 and atp 2 types of cDNA sequences were the most redundant among the 28 different isoperoxidases identified among about 200 peroxidase encoding ESTs. Interestingly, 8 out of totally 38 EST sequences coding for ATP 1 showed three identical nucleotide substitutions. This variant form is designated ATP 1b. Similarly, six out of totally 16 EST sequences coding for ATP 2 showed a number of deletions and nucleotide changes. This variant form is designated ATP 2b. The selected EST clones are full-length and contain coding regions of 993 nucleotides for atp 1a, and 984 nucleotides for atp 2a. These regions show 61% DNA sequence identity. The predicted mature proteins ATP 1a, and ATP 2a are 57% identical in sequence and contain the structurally and functionally important residues, characteristic of the plant peroxidase superfamily. However, they do show two differences of importance to peroxidase catalysis: (1) the asparagine residue linked with the active site distal histidine via hydrogen bonding is absent

  3. A High Sensitivity Micro Format Chemiluminescence Enzyme Inhibition Assay for Determination of Hg(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchanmala Deshpande

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive and specific enzyme inhibition assay based on alcohol oxidase (AlOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP for determination of mercury Hg(II in water samples has been presented. This article describes the optimization and miniaturization of an enzymatic assay using a chemiluminescence reaction. The analytical performance and detection limit for determination of Hg(II was optimized in 96 well plates and further extended to 384 well plates with a 10-fold reduction in assay volume. Inhibition of the enzyme activity by dissolved Hg(II was found to be linear in the range 5–500 pg.mL−1 with 3% CVin inter-batch assay. Due to miniaturization of assay in 384 well plates, Hg(II was measurable as low as 1 pg.mL−1 within15 min. About 10-fold more specificity of the developed assay for Hg(II analysis was confirmed by challenging with interfering divalent metal ions such as cadmium Cd(II and lead Pb(II. Using the proposed assay we could successfully demonstrate that in a composite mixture of Hg(II, Cd(II and Pb(II, inhibition by each metal ion is significantly enhanced in the presence of the others. Applicability of the proposed assay for the determination of the Hg(II in spiked drinking and sea water resulted in recoveries ranging from 100–110.52%.

  4. Radioimmunoassays for catalase and glutathion peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baret, A.; Courtiere, A.; Lorry, D.; Puget, K.; Michelson, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    Specific and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human, bovine and rat catalase (CAT) and glutathion Peroxidase (GPX) are described. The obtained values are expressed as enzymatic units per μg of immunoreactive protein. They appear to closely correspond to specific activities of the purified enzymes determined by colorimetric protein-assay. Indeed, the values of the specific activities of purified human CAT is 57.9 k/mg and that of purified rat GPX is 180 units/mg. This result validates the present RIAs and the association of the two techniques allows the determination of a further parameter. In conclusion, RIAs for CAT and GPX can be applied with great specificity and sensitivity to a wide variety of human, rat and bovine medias

  5. An Amperometric Biosensor for the Determination of Bacterial Sepsis Biomarker, Secretory Phospholipase Group 2-IIA Using a Tri-Enzyme System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Nurhanan Nik Mansor

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A tri-enzyme system consisting of choline kinase/choline oxidase/horseradish peroxidase was used in the rapid and specific determination of the biomarker for bacterial sepsis infection, secretory phospholipase Group 2-IIA (sPLA2-IIA. These enzymes were individually immobilized onto the acrylic microspheres via succinimide groups for the preparation of an electrochemical biosensor. The reaction of sPLA2-IIA with its substrate initiated a cascading enzymatic reaction in the tri-enzyme system that led to the final production of hydrogen peroxide, which presence was indicated by the redox characteristics of potassium ferricyanide, K3Fe(CN6. An amperometric biosensor based on enzyme conjugated acrylic microspheres and gold nanoparticles composite coated onto a carbon-paste screen printed electrode (SPE was fabricated and the current measurement was performed at a low potential of 0.20 V. This enzymatic biosensor gave a linear range 0.01–100 ng/mL (R2 = 0.98304 with a detection limit recorded at 5 × 10−3 ng/mL towards sPLA2-IIA. Moreover, the biosensor showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation (RSD of 3.04% (n = 5. The biosensor response was reliable up to 25 days of storage at 4 °C. Analysis of human serum samples for sPLA2-IIA indicated that the biosensor has potential for rapid bacterial sepsis diagnosis in hospital emergency department.

  6. Preparation of catalytically active, covalent α-polylysine-enzyme conjugates via UV/vis-quantifiable bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzky, Andrea; Manaka, Yuichi; Kojima, Taisuke; Walde, Peter

    2011-01-10

    Covalent UV/vis-quantifiable bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation was investigated for the preparation of conjugates between α-poly-d-lysine (PDL) and either α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP). PDL and the enzymes were first modified via free amino groups with the linking reagents succinimidyl 6-hydrazinonicotinate acetone hydrazone (S-HyNic, at pH 7.6) and succinimidyl 4-formylbenzoate (S-4FB, at pH 7.2), respectively. The modified PDL and enzymes were then conjugated at pH 4.7, whereby polymer chains carrying several enzymes were obtained. Kinetics of the bis-aryl hydrazone bond formation was investigated spectrophotometrically at 354 nm. Retention of the enzymatic activity after conjugate formation was confirmed by using the substrates N-succinimidyl-l-Ala-l-Ala-l-Pro-l-Phe-p-nitroanilide (for α-CT) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS, for HRP). Thus, not only a mild and efficient preparation and convenient quantification of a conjugate between the polycationic α-polylysine and enzymes could be shown, but also the complete preservation of the enzymatic activity.

  7. Halide peroxidase in tissues that interact with bacteria in the host squid Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1999-03-15

    An enzyme with similarities to myeloperoxidase, the antimicrobial halide peroxidase in mammalian neutrophils, occurs abundantly in the light organ tissue of Euprymna scolopes, a squid that maintains a beneficial association with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Using three independent assays typically applied to the analysis of halide peroxidase enzymes, we directly compared the activity of the squid enzyme with that of human myeloperoxidase. One of these methods, the diethanolamine assay, confirmed that the squid peroxidase requires halide ions for its activity. The identification of a halide peroxidase in a cooperative bacterial association suggested that this type of enzyme can function not only to control pathogens, but also to modulate the interactions of host animals with their beneficial partners. To determine whether the squid peroxidase functions under both circumstances, we examined its distribution in a variety of host tissues, including those that typically interact with bacteria and those that do not. Tissues interacting with bacteria included those that have specific cooperative associations with bacteria (i.e., the light organ and accessory nidamental gland) and those that have transient nonspecific interactions with bacteria (i.e., the gills, which clear the cephalopod circulatory system of invading microorganisms). These bacteria-associated tissues were compared with the eye, digestive gland, white body, and ink-producing tissues, which do not typically interact directly with bacteria. Peroxidase enzyme assays, immunocytochemical localization, and DNA-RNA hybridizations showed that the halide-dependent peroxidase is consistently expressed in high concentration in tissues that interact bacteria. Elevated levels of the peroxidase were also found in the ink-producing tissues, which are known to have enzymatic pathways associated with antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the host uses a common biochemical response to

  8. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  9. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in different sugarcane cultivars, in Presidente Prudente region; Polifenoloxidases e peroxidase em diferentes variedades de cana-de-acucar na regiao de Presidente Prudente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Tadeu A.; Gomes, Danilo B.; Marques, Patricia A.A.; Alves, Vagner C. [Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Curso de Agronomia], Emails: tmarques@unoeste.br, pmarques@unoeste.br, vagner@unoeste.br

    2009-07-01

    The objective in present work was compare three sugarcane cultivars (RB 72-454, RB 86-7515, IAC 86-2480), evaluating the content of polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase. These determinations had aimed at to detect possible differences between varieties thus and being to differentiate them with regard to the products most interesting to be elaborated, ethanol production or sugar production. The varieties had presented differences of behavior for studied enzymes. The activity of polyphenoloxidase was superior the activity of peroxidase. The enzyme peroxidase was presented in bigger indices in the dry and cold periods. The enzyme polyphenoloxidase was presented well changeable, but with strong trend of bigger values in the rainy periods. It can be said that distinct periods for the best use of the varieties in the sugar production or alcohol exist. (author)

  10. Arabidopsis peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization of coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols: kinetics of an endwise process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demont-Caulet, Nathalie; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Méchin, Valérie

    2010-10-01

    In order to determine the mechanism of the earlier copolymerization steps of two main lignin precursors, sinapyl (S) alcohol and coniferyl (G) alcohol, microscale in vitro oxidations were carried out with a PRX34 Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase in the presence of H(2)O(2). This plant peroxidase was found to have an in vitro polymerization activity similar to the commonly used horseradish peroxidase. The selected polymerization conditions lead to a bulk polymerization mechanism when G alcohol was the only phenolic substrate available. In the same conditions, the presence of S alcohol at a 50/50 S/G molar ratio turned this bulk mechanism into an endwise one. A kinetics monitoring (size-exclusion chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) of the different species formed during the first 24h oxidation of the S/G mixture allowed sequencing the bondings responsible for oligomerization. Whereas G homodimers and GS heterodimers exhibit low reactivity, the SS pinoresinol structure act as a nucleating site of the polymerization through an endwise process. This study is particularly relevant to understand the impact of S units on lignin structure in plants and to identify the key step at which this structure is programmed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenol remediation by peroxidase from an invasive mesquite: Turning an environmental wound into wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Savita; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Radhey Shyam; Mishra, Vandana

    2017-07-15

    The present study examines mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), an invasive species, to yield peroxidase that may reduce hazards of phenolics to living organisms. As low as 0.3U of low-purity mesquite peroxidase (MPx) efficiently remove phenol and chlorophenols (90-92%) compared with Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (40-60%). MPx shows a very high removal efficiency (40-50%) at a wide range of pH (2-9) and temperature (20-80°C), as opposed to HRP (15-20%). At a high-level of the substrate (2.4mM) and without the addition of PEG, MPx maintains a significant phenolic removal (60-≥92%) and residual activity (∼25%). It proves the superiority of MPx over HRP, which showed insignificant removal (10-12%) under similar conditions, and no residual activity even with PEG addition. The root elongation and plant growth bioassays confirm phenolic detoxification by MPx. Readily availability of mesquite across the countries and easy preparation of MPx from leaves make this tree as a sustainable source for a low-technological solution for phenol remediation. This study is the first step towards converting a biological wound of invasive species into wisdom and strength for protecting the environment from phenol pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel Colorimetric Immunoassay Utilizing the Peroxidase Mimicking Activity of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gyu Park

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple colorimetric immunoassay system, based on the peroxidase mimicking activity of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, has been developed to detect clinically important antigenic molecules. MNPs with ca. 10 nm in diameter were synthesized and conjugated with specific antibodies against target molecules, such as rotaviruses and breast cancer cells. Conjugation of the MNPs with antibodies (MNP-Abs enabled specific recognition of the corresponding target antigenic molecules through the generation of color signals arising from the colorimetric reaction between the selected peroxidase substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB and H2O2. Based on the MNP-promoted colorimetric reaction, the target molecules were detected and quantified by measuring absorbance intensities corresponding to the oxidized form of TMB. Owing to the higher stabilities and economic feasibilities of MNPs as compared to horseradish peroxidase (HRP, the new colorimetric system employing MNP-Abs has the potential of serving as a potent immunoassay that should substitute for conventional HRP-based immunoassays. The strategy employed to develop the new methodology has the potential of being extended to the construction of simple diagnostic systems for a variety of biomolecules related to human cancers and infectious diseases, particularly in the realm of point-of-care applications.

  13. Evaluation of Seasonal Variations in the Glucosinolate Content in Leaves and Roots of Four European Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciska Ewa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In comparison with other cruciferous vegetables, horseradish has rarely been the object of scientific research, and the knowledge about the composition, content and distribution of glucosinolates (GLS in different organs of horseradish plants is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the GLS content in leaves and roots of four horseradish landraces during the growing season.

  14. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidase During Phenol Derivatives Oxidation. Possible Molecular Cloaking of the Active Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Kulys

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been applied to the study of the molecular structure of phenol derivatives and oligomers produced during peroxidasecatalyzed oxidation. The interaction of substrates and oligomers with Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase was analyzed by docking methods. The most possible interaction site of oligomers is an active center of the peroxidase. The complexation energy increases with increasing oligomer length. However, the complexed oligomers do not form a precise (for the reaction hydrogen bonding network in the active center of the enzyme. It seems likely that strong but non productive docking of the oligomers determines peroxidase inhibition during the reaction.

  15. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, w...

  16. Calorimetric studies of the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresheck, G.C.; Erman, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Two endotherms are observed by differential scanning calorimetry during the thermal denaturation of cytochrome c peroxidase at pH 7.0. The transition midpoint temperatures (t/sub m/) were 43.9 +- 1.4 and 63.3 +- 1.6 0 C, independent of concentration. The two endotherms were observed at all pH values between 4 and 8, with the transition temperatures varying with pH. Precipitation was observed between pH 4 and 6, and only qualitative data are presented for this region. The thermal unfolding of cytochrome c peroxidase was sensitive to the presence and ligation state of the heme. Only a single endotherm was observed for the unfolding of the apoprotein, and this transition was similar to the high-temperature transition in the holoenzyme. Addition of KCN to the holoenzyme increases the midpoint of the high-temperature transition whereas the low-temperature transition was increased upon addition of KF. Binding of the natural substrate ferricytochrome c to the enzyme increases the low-temperature transition by 4.8 +- 1.3 0 C but has no effect on the high-temperature transition at pH 7. The presence of cytochrome c peroxidase decreases the stability of cytochrome c, and both proteins appear to unfold simultaneously. The results are discussed in terms of the two domains evident in the X-ray crystallographic structure of cytochrome c peroxidase

  17. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eSaathoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L., and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans.

  18. Frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients of vitiligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhokhar, A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the frequency of anti thyroid peroxidase antibody in patients suffering from vitiligo with healthy control group. Type of Study: Case control study. Settings: Dermatology Department, Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 20th March 2010 to 20th July 2011. Material and Methods: Fifty clinically diagnosed patients of vitiligo, age = 18 yrs and both genders with no history of thyroid disease, past or current use of drugs for thyroid disorder or thyroid surgery were included as cases (Group A). Fifty healthy individuals with no evidence of vitiligo or thyroid disorder on history and physical examination and with no family history of vitiligo, matched for age and gender with cases, were included as control (Group B). Serum anti thyroid peroxidase (anti TPO) antibodies were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both cases and control. Results: Eight (16%) patients in Group A were anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive and forty two (84%) patients were negative while one (2%) patient was anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody positive in Group B and forty nine (98%) patients were negative (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Anti TPO antibody is significantly more common in patients of vitiligo as compared to general population. (author)

  19. Automated determination of asulam by enhanced chemiluminescence using luminol/peroxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Francisco García; Díaz, Aurora Navas; Bracho, Visitación; Aguilar, Alfonso; Algarra, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    A flow injection system with chemiluminescence detection for the determination of asulam, enhancer of the system luminol-H(2)O(2)-horseradish peroxidase, is proposed. The method shows a moderate selectivity against other pesticides usually present in formulations of herbicides and in water. The procedure was applied to the determination of asulam in tap water samples and a recovery study was carried out in order to validate the method. The obtained results show acceptable recovery values (between 88.3 and 93.9%). The detection limit for asulam was 0.12 ng/mL. The precision of the method expressed as relative standard deviation was 1.55% (n = 8), at the 19 ng/mL level.

  20. Enhanced visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3 adsorbing redox enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kamada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report fabrication of hybrid photocatalyst composed of an n-type semiconductor (α-Fe2O3 and a redox enzyme (horseradish peroxidase; HRP, and its performance for oxidation of luminol in an aqueous solution. The hybrid photocatalyst is simply formed via physical adsorption of HRP to an α-Fe2O3 sintered body. Under visible light irradiation, the bare α-Fe2O3 with a narrow bandgap photocatalytically oxidizes luminol along with blue emission that can be used as an indicator of the photocatalytic performance. The blue emission is largely strengthened after the adsorption of HRP, demonstrating that the presence of enzyme improves apparent photocatalytic activity of α-Fe2O3. The favorable effect is derived from synergistic oxidation of luminol by the biocatalysts (HRP as well as by the photocatalyst (α-Fe2O3. In this paper, influence of excitation wavelength, adsorption amount of HRP, and reaction temperature on the overall photocatalytic activity are elucidated, and then a reaction mechanism of the proposed novel hybrid photocatalyst is discussed in detail.

  1. Assessment of Behavior of Rice Root Peroxidase in the Presence of Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadzade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs can change proteins function and structure. The increased production and high surface reactivity of silver nanoparticles, has interested researchers to study the interactions of these particles with biomolecules. Objectives The present study aimed to show the effects of AgNPs on rice plant root peroxidase enzyme and the interaction quality between silver nanoparticles and the enzyme. Materials and Methods Extracted peroxidase enzyme of rice plant root was treated by AgNPs at concentrations of 0, 20, 40, 80, 100mg/L for 2, 7 and 24 hours. The experiment was done with 15 treatments for measuring the peroxidase enzyme activity using the spectrophotometry method at a wavelength of 470. Results Low concentrations of AgNPs and short incubation times can have the maximum positive impact on the peroxidase activity, and in the present study the highest activity was seen at a concentration of 40 mg/L and two hours of incubation time. Conclusions This study suggests that changes of enzyme activity can occur as a result of the effect of silver nanoparticles on enzyme conformation, increase of reactive environment pH, and amount of substrate and enzyme stability.

  2. A novel amperometric alcohol biosensor developed in a 3rd generation bioelectrode platform using peroxidase coupled ferrocene activated alcohol oxidase as biorecognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Kakoti, Ankana; Santhosh, Mallesh; Goswami, Pranab

    2014-05-15

    Alcohol oxidase (AOx) with a two-fold increase in efficiency (Kcat/Km) was achieved by physical entrapment of the activator ferrocene in the protein matrix through a simple microwave based partial unfolding technique and was used to develop a 3rd generation biosensor for improved detection of alcohol in liquid samples. The ferrocene molecules were stably entrapped in the AOx protein matrix in a molar ratio of ~3:1 through electrostatic interaction with the Trp residues involved in the functional activity of the enzyme as demonstrated by advanced analytical techniques. The sensor was fabricated by immobilizing ferrocene entrapped alcohol oxidase (FcAOx) and sol-gel chitosan film coated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon electrode through layer-by-layer technique. The bioelectrode reactions involved the formation of H2O2 by FcAOx biocatalysis of substrate alcohol followed by HRP-catalyzed reduction of the liberated H2O2 through MWCNT supported direct electron transfer mechanism. The amperometric biosensor exhibited a linear response to alcohol in the range of 5.0 × 10(-6) to 30 × 10(-4)mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and a sensitivity of 150 µA mM(-1) cm(-2). The biosensor response was steady for 28 successive measurements completed in a period of 5h and retained ~90% of the original response even after four weeks when stored at 4 °C. The biosensor was successfully applied for the determination of alcohol in commercial samples and its performance was validated by comparing with the data obtained by GC analyses of the samples. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  4. Characterization and enzyme-conjugation of a specific anti-L1 nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaeian, Sara; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Zarkesh Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2012-01-01

    Persistent infection of the human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been shown to result in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia. Early detection and screening programs are essential strategies against cervical cancer. A nanobody is the smallest antigen-binding fragment known and is derived from a camelid heavy-chain antibody. This tiny protein shows high solubility and stability. It can be produced cost-effectively with high yield production. In this study, we enriched a nanobody library against the L1 protein of HPV. Several colons were selected from this enriched library using monoclonal phage-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) and analyzed for identification of nanobody genes. The expression of nanobody fragments was performed in Rosetta gami2. The C74 nanobody that showed strong binding to the L1 protein of HPV16 was selected, purified, and characterized by Western blotting and ELISA. The selected nanobody was tested for sensitivity, specificity, and affinity. A nanobody conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was selected and used for detection of L1 protein of HPV16. This study demonstrates that the C74-HRP, due to its specificity and good binding affinity for a specific viral antigen, is a potential diagnostic tool that can be used as a promising reagent for the new generation of HPV diagnosis approaches.

  5. A magnetic particles-based chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay for rapid detection of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao-Li; Ren, Hong-Lin; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Yan, Dong-Ming; Hui, Qi; Liu, Dong; Lin, Chao; Liu, Nan-Nan; Liu, Yan-Yan; Lu, Shi-Ying

    2014-08-15

    Egg allergy is an important public health and safety concern, so quantification and administration of food or vaccines containing ovalbumin (OVA) are urgently needed. This study aimed to establish a rapid and sensitive magnetic particles-chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (MPs-CLEIA) for the determination of OVA. The proposed method was developed on the basis of a double antibodies sandwich immunoreaction and luminol-H2O2 chemiluminescence system. The MPs served as both the solid phase and separator, the anti-OVA MPs-coated polyclonal antibodies (pAbs) were used as capturing antibody, and the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) was taken as detecting antibody. The parameters of the method were evaluated and optimized. The established MPs-CLEIA method had a linear range from 0.31 to 100ng/ml with a detection limit of 0.24ng/ml. The assays showed low reactivities and less than 5% of intraassay and interassay coefficients of variation (CVs), and the average recoveries were between 92 and 97%. Furthermore, the developed method was applied in real samples analysis successfully, and the correlation coefficient with the commercially available OVA kit was 0.9976. Moreover, it was more rapid and sensitive compared with the other methods for testing OVA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Colorimetric Aptasensor Based on Enzyme for the Detection of Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Wang, Yinqiu; Duan, Nuo; Ma, Haile; Wang, Zhouping

    2015-09-09

    A simple colorimetric aptasensor system has been developed to detect Vibrio parahemolyticus. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are synthesized and conjugated with specific aptamers against target and used as capture probes. In addition, this method employs gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as carriers of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and aptamers, which served as signal probes. In the presence of target, a "sandwich-type" complex of AuNPs-HRP-aptamer-target-aptamer-MNPs is formed through specific recognition of aptamers and corresponding target. As a result, HRP molecules confined at the surface of the "sandwich" complexes catalyze the enzyme substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2 and generate an optical signal. Under optimal conditions, the signals are linearly dependent on V. parahemolyticus concentrations from 10 to 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL in a logarithmic plot, with a limit of detection of 10 cfu/mL. Owing to AuNPs, a large amount of HRP could be loaded, resulting in an amplified signal, and the sensitivity would be improved. This strategy has the potential of being extended to the construction of simple monitor systems for a variety of biomolecules related to food safety.

  7. Design considerations of a hollow microneedle-optofluidic biosensing platform incorporating enzyme-linked assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, Sahan A.; Padeste, Celestino; Häfeli, Urs O.; Stoeber, Boris; Cadarso, Victor J.

    2018-02-01

    A hollow metallic microneedle is integrated with microfluidics and photonic components to form a microneedle-optofluidic biosensor suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in biological fluids, like interstitial fluid, that can be collected in a painless and minimally-invasive manner. The microneedle inner lumen surface is bio-functionalized to trap and bind target analytes on-site in a sample volume as small as 0.6 nl, and houses an enzyme-linked assay on its 0.06 mm2 wall. The optofluidic components are designed to rapidly quantify target analytes present in the sample and collected in the microneedle using a simple and sensitive absorbance scheme. This contribution describes how the biosensor components were optimized to detect in vitro streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase (Sav-HRP) as a model analyte over a large detection range (0-7.21 µM) and a very low limit of detection (60.2 nM). This biosensor utilizes the lowest analyte volume reported for TDM with microneedle technology, and presents significant avenues to improve current TDM methods for patients, by potentially eliminating blood draws for several drug candidates.

  8. An aptasensor for staphylococcus aureus based on nicking enzyme amplification reaction and rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingguo; Guo, Jia; Maina, Sarah Wanjiku; Yang, Yumeng; Hu, Yimin; Li, Xuanxuan; Qiu, Jiarong; Xin, Zhihong

    2018-05-15

    An ultra-sensitive aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of staphylococcus aureus was established by adopting the nicking enzyme amplification reaction (NEAR) and the rolling circle amplification (RCA) technologies. Aptamer-probe (AP), containing an aptamer and a probe sequence, was developed to act as the recognition unit of the biosensor, which was specifically bound to S. aureus. The probe was released from AP and initiated into the subsequent DNA amplification reactions where S. aureus was present, converting the detection of S. aureus to the investigation of probe oligonucleotide. The RCA amplification products contained a G-quadruplex motif and formed a three dimensional structure in presence of hemin. The G4/hemin complex showed horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimic activity and catalyzed the chemiluminescence reaction of luminol mediated by H 2 O 2 . The results showed that the established biosensor could detect S. aureus specifically with a good linear correlation at 5-10 4  CFU/mL. The signal values based on NEAR-RCA two-step cycle were boosted acutely, much higher than that relied on one-cycle magnification. The limit of detection (LoD) was determined to be as low as 5 CFU/mL. The established aptasensor exhibited a good discrimination of living against dead S. aureus, and can be applied to detect S. aureus in the food industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phytochelatin homologs induced in hairy roots of horseradish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, H; Sato, K; Yamada, T; Maitani, T

    2000-01-01

    When exposed to excess heavy metals, plants induce phytochelatins and related peptides (all designated as PCAs). Thus, when hairy roots of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) were exposed for 3 days to cadmium (1 mM) along with reduced glutathione (2 mM), PCA induction occurred. Moreover, a new family of thiol peptides was detected as well as the previously known PCAs, as revealed by postcolumn-derivatization HPLC. Two were isolated and their structures were identified as (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gln (n = 3 and 4) by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometer spectra, this being confirmed by chemical synthesis of the peptides. These new analogs constitute the sixth PCA family identified to date.

  10. Light Requirement for Shoot Regeneration in Horseradish Hairy Roots 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Tsutomu; Kamada, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Hairy roots of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) were induced by inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring Ri plasmid and cultured on phytohormone-free Murashige and Skoog medium after eliminating the bacteria. Hairy roots grew vigorously and sometimes formed yellowish calli under dark conditions. On the other hand, growth of hairy roots stopped after several weeks of culture with light, then shoots were regenerated. Frequency of shoot formation from hairy roots increased as the culture period in light lengthened and the light intensity increased. The shoot regeneration was induced by treatment with white or red light, but not with far-red light. Shoot regeneration by red light was inhibited by following treatment with far-red light. Red and far-red light reversibly affected shoot regeneration. Excised roots of nontransformed plants grew quite slowly on phytohormone-free Murashige and Skoog medium and occasionally formed shoots under white light conditions. PMID:16669041

  11. Light requirement for shoot regeneration in horseradish hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, T; Kamada, H; Harada, H

    1992-08-01

    Hairy roots of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) were induced by inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring Ri plasmid and cultured on phytohormone-free Murashige and Skoog medium after eliminating the bacteria. Hairy roots grew vigorously and sometimes formed yellowish calli under dark conditions. On the other hand, growth of hairy roots stopped after several weeks of culture with light, then shoots were regenerated. Frequency of shoot formation from hairy roots increased as the culture period in light lengthened and the light intensity increased. The shoot regeneration was induced by treatment with white or red light, but not with far-red light. Shoot regeneration by red light was inhibited by following treatment with far-red light. Red and far-red light reversibly affected shoot regeneration. Excised roots of nontransformed plants grew quite slowly on phytohormone-free Murashige and Skoog medium and occasionally formed shoots under white light conditions.

  12. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  13. Fe(III)-TAML activator: a potent peroxidase mimic for chemiluminescent determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovenko, Marina M; Demiyanova, Alexandra S; Kopylov, Kirill E; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2014-07-01

    Efforts to replace native peroxidase with its low molecular weight alternatives have stimulated a search for peroxidase mimetics. Herein we describe the oxidation of luminol with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by commercially available Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a, which was shown to be a more active catalyst than hemin. At Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a use in chemiluminescent assay for H2O2 determination the detection limit value (3σ) of 5×10(-8)M was similar to the detection limit obtained with horseradish peroxidase (1×10(-7)M) and significantly lower than that obtained in the presence of hemin (6×10(-7)M). The linear ranges (R(2)=0.98) of the assay were 6×10(-8)-1×10(-6)M and 6×10(-7)-1×10(-6)M H2O2 for Fe(III)-TAML 1a and hemin, respectively. The CV values for Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based assay measured within the working range varied from 1.0% to 3.7% (n=4), whereas in the case of hemin -5.0% to 9.7% (n=4). Moreover, the sensitivity of Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based method was 56 and 5 times higher than that of hemin- and HRP-based methods, respectively. The obtained results open good perspectives to apply Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a in CL analytical methods instead of hemin, a traditionally used peroxidase mimetic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChithrashreeGS

    2012-08-23

    Aug 23, 2012 ... peroxidase are two important antioxidant scavenging enzymes involved in ... Catalase was assayed using the method of Beers and Sizer. (1951) with .... yeast dextrose calcium carbonate agar (YDC) medium. Catalase and ...

  15. Glucose oxidase-modified carbon-felt-reactor coupled with peroxidase-modified carbon-felt-detector for amperometric flow determination of glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yue; Hasebe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were covalently immobilized on a porous carbon-felt (CF) by using cyanuric chloride (CC) as a linking reagent. The resulting GOx-modified-CF (GOx-ccCF) was used as column-type enzyme reactor and placed on upstream of the HRP-ccCF-based H 2 O 2 flow-detector to fabricate amperometric flow-biosensor for glucose. Sensor setting conditions and the operational conditions were optimized, and the analytical performance characteristics of the resulting flow-biosensor were evaluated. The chemical modification of the GOx via CC was found to be effective to obtain larger catalytic activity as compared with the physical adsorption. Under the optimized conditions (i.e., volume ratio of the GOx-ccCF-reactor to the HRP-ccCF-detector is 1.0; applied potential is − 0.12 V vs. Ag/AgCl; carrier pH is 6.5; and carrier flow rate is 4.3 ml/min), highly selective and quite reproducible peak current responses toward glucose were obtained: the RSD for 30 consecutive injections of 3 mM glucose was 1.04%, and no serious interferences were observed for fructose, ethanol, uric acid, urea and tartaric acid for the amperometric measurements of glucose. The magnitude of the cathodic peak currents for glucose was linear up to 5 mM (sensitivity, 6.38 ± 0.32 μA/μM) with the limit detection of 9.4 μM (S/N = 3, noise level, 20 nA). The present GOx-ccCF-reactor and HRP-ccCF-detector-coupled flow-glucose biosensor was utilized for the determination of glucose in beverages and liquors, and the analytical results by the sensor were in fairly good agreement with those by the conventional spectrophotometry. - Highlights: ► Glucose oxidase (GOx) and peroxidase (HRP) were modified on carbon-felt. ► GOx-CF reactor and HRP-CF detector-coupled flow glucose biosensor was developed. ► This flow biosensor enabled the determination of glucose in beverages and liquors.

  16. Glucose oxidase-modified carbon-felt-reactor coupled with peroxidase-modified carbon-felt-detector for amperometric flow determination of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yue [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology LiaoNing, 185 Qianshan Middle Road, High-tech Zone, Anshan, LiaoNing, 114501 (China); Hasebe, Yasushi, E-mail: hasebe@sit.ac.jp [Department of Life Science and Green Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690, Fusaiji, Fukaya, Saitama 369-0293 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Glucose oxidase (GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were covalently immobilized on a porous carbon-felt (CF) by using cyanuric chloride (CC) as a linking reagent. The resulting GOx-modified-CF (GOx-ccCF) was used as column-type enzyme reactor and placed on upstream of the HRP-ccCF-based H{sub 2}O{sub 2} flow-detector to fabricate amperometric flow-biosensor for glucose. Sensor setting conditions and the operational conditions were optimized, and the analytical performance characteristics of the resulting flow-biosensor were evaluated. The chemical modification of the GOx via CC was found to be effective to obtain larger catalytic activity as compared with the physical adsorption. Under the optimized conditions (i.e., volume ratio of the GOx-ccCF-reactor to the HRP-ccCF-detector is 1.0; applied potential is - 0.12 V vs. Ag/AgCl; carrier pH is 6.5; and carrier flow rate is 4.3 ml/min), highly selective and quite reproducible peak current responses toward glucose were obtained: the RSD for 30 consecutive injections of 3 mM glucose was 1.04%, and no serious interferences were observed for fructose, ethanol, uric acid, urea and tartaric acid for the amperometric measurements of glucose. The magnitude of the cathodic peak currents for glucose was linear up to 5 mM (sensitivity, 6.38 {+-} 0.32 {mu}A/{mu}M) with the limit detection of 9.4 {mu}M (S/N = 3, noise level, 20 nA). The present GOx-ccCF-reactor and HRP-ccCF-detector-coupled flow-glucose biosensor was utilized for the determination of glucose in beverages and liquors, and the analytical results by the sensor were in fairly good agreement with those by the conventional spectrophotometry. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glucose oxidase (GOx) and peroxidase (HRP) were modified on carbon-felt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GOx-CF reactor and HRP-CF detector-coupled flow glucose biosensor was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This flow biosensor enabled the determination of glucose in beverages and

  17. Phenolic compounds and related enzymes as determinants of sorghum for food use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicko, M.H.; Gruppen, H.; Traore, A.S.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Phenolic compounds and related enzymes such as phenol biosynthesizing enzymes (phenylalanine ammonia lyase) and phenol catabolizing enzymes (polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase) are determinants for sorghum utilization as human food because they influence product properties during and after sorghum

  18. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Marcela; Roman, Rosa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  19. Interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang-Mei; Chu, Yun-Xia; Lv, Xiao-Fen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Lanthanum (La) is an important rare earth element in the ecological environment of plant. The proteins on the plasma membrane control the transport of molecules into and out of cell. It is very important to investigate the effect of La(III) on the proteins on the plasma membrane in the plant cell. In the present work, the interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish was investigated using optimization of the fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is found that the fluorescence of the complex system of protoplasts and 1-aniline Kenai-8-sulfonic acid in horseradish treated with the low concentration of La(III) is increased compared with that of the control horseradish. The opposite effect is observed in horseradish treated with the high concentration of La(III). These results indicated that the low concentration of La(III) can interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, causing the improvement in the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. The high concentration of La(III) can also interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, leading to the destruction of the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that the proteins on the plasma membrane are the targets of La(III) action on plant cell.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Peroxidase and Polyphenol Oxidase: Substrate Specificity and Active Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalida Shank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO are enzymes that are well known to be involved in the enzymatic browning reaction of fruits and vegetables with different catalytic mechanisms. Both enzymes have some common substrates, but each also has its specific substrates. In our computational study, the amino acid sequence of grape peroxidase (ABX was used for the construction of models employing homology modeling method based on the X-ray structure of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from pea (PDB ID:1APX, whereas the model of grape polyphenol oxidase was obtained directly from the available X-ray structure (PDB ID:2P3X. Molecular docking of common substrates of these two enzymes was subsequently studied. It was found that epicatechin and catechin exhibited high affinity with both enzymes, even though POD and PPO have different binding pockets regarding the size and the key amino acids involved in binding. Predicted binding modes of substrates with both enzymes were also compared. The calculated docking interaction energy of trihydroxybenzoic acid related compounds shows high affinity, suggesting specificity and potential use as common inhibitor to grape ascorbate peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase.

  1. Lignin peroxidase isoenzyme: a novel approach to biodegrade the toxic synthetic polymer waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Nazia; Jamal, Asif; Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq

    2018-01-05

    Fungal metabolites are playing an immense role in developing various sustainable waste treatment processes. The present study aimed at production and characterization of fungal lignin peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.14) with a potential to degrade Polyvinyl Chloride. Optimization studies revealed that the maximum enzyme production occurred at a temperature 25°C, pH 5 in the 4th week of the incubation period with fungal strain. Enzyme assay was performed to find out the dominating enzyme in the culture broth. The molecular weight of the enzyme was found to be 46 kDa. Partially purified lignin peroxidase from Phanerocheate chrysosporium was used for the degradation of PVC films. A significant reduction in the weight of PVC film was observed (31%) in shake flask experiment. FTIR spectra of the enzyme-treated plastic film revealed structural changes in the chemical composition, indicating a specific peak at 2943 cm -1 that corresponded to alkenyl C-H stretch. Moreover, deterioration on the surface of PVC films was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy tracked through activity assay for the lignin peroxidase. Extracellular lignin peroxidases from P. chrysosporium play a significant role in the degradation of complex polymeric compounds like PVC.

  2. Assessing two different peroxidases´ potential for application in recalcitrant organic compound bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Caicedo

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the promising future presented by the following enzymes: Chloroperoxidase (CPO from Caldariomyces fumago and royal palm peroxidase (Roystonea regia, PPR. These peroxidases were obtained from different sources (microbial and vegetable and used as biocatalysts for applicating them in bioremediation of recalcitrant organic compounds. Each one of the enzymes' peroxidase catalytic activity was evaluated in organic phase systems, using different model compounds such as: PAHs (pyrene and anthracene, organic-nitrogenated compounds (diphenylamine, monoaromatic phenolic molecules (guayacol and dyes (methyl orange and ABTS. The reaction systems were composed of mono-phase water mixtures and organic miscible solvent (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran, dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl formamide, on which both peroxidases' catalytic activity was evaluated. The two enzymes' catalytic activity was observed on the evaluated substrates in most of these assays. However, PPR did not show biocatalytic oxidation for methyl orange dye and some PAHs. This enzyme did show the best tolerance to the evaluated solvents. Its catalytic activity was appreciably enhanced when low hydrophobic solvents were used. The kcat was calculated from this experimental data (as kinetic parameter leading to each enzyme's biocatalytic performance on substrates being compared.

  3. Decolorization of direct dyes using peroxidase from raphanus sativus (F04 SL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, H.N.; Kalsoom, U.; Habib, A.

    2012-01-01

    An acidic peroxidase was isolated and partially purified from Raphanus sativus. The purified enzyme was characterized in terms of kinetics and thermodynamic aspects. Finally the enzyme was assessed to see its potential for decolorization of direct dyes. The specific activity of Raphanus sativus peroxidase increased from 44.77 to 65.20 U/mg of protein using 80 % ammonium sulphate precipitation. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme was 4 and 55 deg. C respectively. The activation energy of Raphanus sativus peroxidase was 25.44 kJ/mol and average value of Km was 0.25 mM. The activation energy of thermal denaturation of Raphanus sativus peroxidase was 17.79 kJ/mol. It was observed that with an increase in temperature, there was decrease in a half life and enthalpy, which showed that the enzyme was unstable at higher temperature. A maximum decolorization of 97 and 77 % was observed for Solar Blue A and Solar Flavine 5G at pH 4 and temperature 50 deg. C respectively. It was observed that % decolorization of both the dyes increased with an increase in enzyme units and incubation time. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ dose of 0.8 mM for Solar Blue A and 0.7 mM for Solar Flavine 5G was sufficient for the maximum dye degradation. (author)

  4. Treatment of colored effluents with lignin-degrading enzymes: An emerging role of marine-derived fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; DeSouza-Ticlo, D.; Verma, A.K.

    laccase, manganese-peroxidase and lignin peroxidases are useful in the treatment of colored industrial effluents and other xenobiotics. Free mycelia, mycelial pellets, immobilized fungi or their lignin-degrading enzymes fromterrestrial fungi have been...

  5. Fungal peroxidases : molecular aspects and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Peroxidases are oxidoreductases that utilize hydrogen peroxide to catalyze oxidative reactions. A large number of peroxidases have been identified in fungal species and are being characterized at the molecular level. In this manuscript we review the current knowledge on the molecular aspects of this

  6. Comparison of Different Solvents and Extraction Methods for Isolation of Phenolic Compounds from Horseradish Roots (Armoracia rusticana)

    OpenAIRE

    Lolita Tomsone; Zanda Kruma; Ruta Galoburda

    2012-01-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial herb belonging to the Brassicaceae family and contains biologically active substances. The aim of the current research was to determine best method for extraction of phenolic compounds from horseradish roots showing high antiradical activity. Three genotypes (No. 105; No. 106 and variety ‘Turku’) of horseradish roots were extracted with eight different solvents: n-hexane, ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, 2-propanol, acetone, ethanol (95%), ethanol...

  7. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of 14 CO 2 release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini

  8. Nanoparticle-based sandwich electrochemical immunoassay for carbohydrate antigen 125 with signal enhancement using enzyme-coated nanometer-sized enzyme-doped silica beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Su, Biling; Tang, Juan; Ren, Jingjing; Chen, Guonan

    2010-02-15

    A novel nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) as a model was designed to couple with a microfluidic strategy using anti-CA125-functionalized magnetic beads as immunosensing probes. To construct the immunoassay, thionine-horseradish peroxidase conjugation (TH-HRP) was initially doped into nanosilica particles using the reverse micelle method, and then HRP-labeled anti-CA125 antibodies (HRP-anti-CA125) were bound onto the surface of the synthesized nanoparticles, which were used as recognition elements. Different from conventional nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassays, the recognition elements of the immunoassay simultaneously contained electron mediator and enzyme labels and simplified the electrochemical measurement process. The sandwich-type immunoassay format was used for the online formation of the immunocomplex in an incubation cell and captured in the detection cell with an external magnet. The electrochemical signals derived from the carried HRP toward the reduction of H(2)O(2) using the doped thionine as electron mediator. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunoassay exhibited a wide working range from 0.1 to 450 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL CA125. The precision, reproducibility, and stability of the immunoassay were acceptable. The assay was evaluated for clinical serum samples, receiving in excellent accordance with results obtained from the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Concluding, the nanoparticle-based assay format provides a promising approach in clinical application and thus represents a versatile detection method.

  9. Screening of postharvest agricultural wastes as alternative sources of peroxidases: characterization and kinetics of a novel peroxidase from lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) stubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Cuadrado, Nazaret; Pérez-Galende, Patricia; Manzano, Teresa; De Maria, Cándido Garcia; Shnyrov, Valery L; Roig, Manuel G

    2012-05-16

    Aqueous crude extracts of a series of plant wastes (agricultural, wild plants, residues from sports activities (grass), ornamental residues (gardens)) from 17 different plant species representative of the typical biodiversity of the Iberian peninsula were investigated as new sources of peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7). Of these, lentil (Lens culinaris L.) stubble crude extract was seen to provide one of the highest specific peroxidase activities, catalyzing the oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to tetraguaiacol, and was used for further studies. For the optimum extraction conditions found, the peroxidase activity in this crude extract (110 U mL(-1)) did not vary for at least 15 months when stored at 4 °C (k(inact) = 0.146 year(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 4.75 year), whereas, for comparative purposes, the peroxidase activity (60 U mL(-1)) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana L.) root crude extract, obtained and stored under the same conditions, showed much faster inactivation kinetics (k(inact) = 2.2 × 10(-3) day(-1), t(1/2 inact) = 315 days). Using guaiacol as an H donor and a universal buffer (see above), all crude extract samples exhibited the highest peroxidase activity in the pH range between 4 and 7. Once semipurified by passing the crude extract through hydrophobic chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, the novel peroxidase (LSP) was characterized as having a purity number (RZ) of 2.5 and three SDS-PAGE electrophoretic bands corresponding to molecular masses of 52, 35, and 18 kDa. The steady-state kinetic study carried out on the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of guaiacol by the catalytic action of this partially purified peroxidase pointed to apparent Michaelian kinetic behavior (K(m)(appH(2)O(2)) = 1.87 mM; V(max)(appH(2)O(2)) = 6.4 mM min(-1); K(m)(app guaicol) = 32 mM; V(max)(app guaicol) = 9.1 mM min(-1)), compatible with the two-substrate ping-pong mechanism generally accepted for peroxidases. Finally, after the effectiveness of the crude

  10. Rapid, Sensitive, Enzyme-Immunodotting Assay for Detecting Cow Milk Adulteration in Sheep Milk: A Modern Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Luis A.; Razquín, Pedro; Lampreave, Fermín; Alava, María A.; Calvo, Miguel

    1998-12-01

    Specificity, sensitivity, and experimental simplicity make the immunoenzymatic assay suitable for a variety of laboratories dedicated to diverse activities such as research, quality control in food analysis, or clinical biochemistry. In these assays, the antibody that specifically recognizes the antigen is covalently attached to an enzyme. Once the antigen-antibody immunocomplex is formed, the enzymatic reaction gives a colored product that allows the detection of the initial antigen. The aim of this work was the design of a new laboratory project appropriate for use in courses of biochemistry, immunochemistry, or analytical chemistry. The assay described here detects the presence of cow milk in milk of other species. The main application is the detection of cow milk in sheep milk and cheese. Specific proteins, immunoglobulins (IgG) of the fraudulent bovine milk, are specifically recognized and retained by antibodies immobilized on a membrane. The binding of a second antibody covalently attached to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) allows the development of a visible signal. Thus, students can rapidly detect milk adulterations using a specific, sensitive, and safe experimental approach. The experiment allows students to apply their theoretical knowledge, resulting in a stimulating experience of solving a real problem during a 4-hour laboratory period.

  11. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of staphylococcal enterotoxin B in food using enzyme-nanosilica-doped carbon nanotubes for signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Tang, Juan; Su, Biling; Chen, Guonan

    2010-10-27

    A new sandwich-type electrochemical immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in food was developed using horseradish peroxidase-nanosilica-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HRPSiCNTs) for signal amplification. Rabbit polyclonal anti-SEB antibodies immobilized on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and covalently bound to the HRPSiCNTs were used as capture antibodies and detection antibodies, respectively. In the presence of SEB analyte, the sandwich-type immunocomplex could be formed between the immobilized anti-SEB on the SPCE and anti-SEB-labeled HRPSiCNTs, and the carried HRP could catalyze the electrochemical reduction of H2O2 with the help of thionine. The high content of HRP in the HRPSiCNTs could greatly amplify the electrochemical signal. Under optimal conditions, the reduction current increased with the increase of SEB in the sample, and exhibited a dynamic range of 0.05-15 ng/mL with a low detection limit (LOD) of 10 pg/mL SEB (at 3σ). Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were below 10%. In addition, the assay was evaluated with SEB spiked samples including watermelon juice, soymilk, apple juice, and pork food, receiving excellent correlation with results from commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

  12. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a gold-nanoparticle based immuno chromatographic test for amatoxins using recombinant antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kuo; Zhao, Ruiping; Wang, Lixia; Feng, Tingting; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Xiuyuan

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe two kinds of rapid assays for the determination of amatoxins in mushrooms. The first is an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using horseradish peroxidase. The second is a rapid immuno chromatographic assay that uses colloidal gold as a red label (CG-ICA). Both are based on the use of a well-characterized recombinant single chain variable fragment antibody (named scFv-A4). The half-maximum inhibition concentrations (IC50) of α-amanitin, β-amanitin and γ-amanitin are 78, 85 and 90 ng⋅mL"-"1, and the limits of detection (LODs; for IC15) are 1.9, 2.1 and 2.8 ng⋅mL"-"1. The method was applied to the determination of amanitins in mushrooms, and the LODs for α-amanitin, β-amanitin and γ-amanitin in mushroom samples were found to be 4.9, 6.4 and 8.3 ng⋅mL"-"1. The visual minimum detection limits of the optimized CGIA are 4 and 6 ng⋅mL"-"1 for mushroom samples. The test can be performed within 10 min. The results of the analysis of spiked samples showed that the CG-IA can rapidly and semi-quantitatively quantify amatoxins in mushroom samples on site and at low costs. (author)

  13. Detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by a four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, H J

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive four-layer modification of an enzyme immunoassay for the detection of soluble antigens of Toxoplasma gondii is described. Microtiter plates were sensitized with rabbit anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) used as the primary antibodies; guinea pig anti-toxoplasma immunoglobulins (6 micrograms/ml) were used as the secondary trapping antibodies. Horseradish peroxidase-conjugated anti-guinea pig immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The specificity of the antigen assay was confirmed by using guinea pig immunoglobulins from preimmunization sera. The sensitivity of the antigen assay was found to be at least 10 ng of antigen protein per ml. The suitability of the method for detecting antigens of T. gondii in different specimens was studied by experimental toxoplasma infection in mice. Antigenic components of T. gondii could be detected in different tissue specimens from infected animals from the first day after infection onwards. Toxoplasma antigen in serum and urine samples from infected mice reached detectable levels on day 2 after infection followed by a linear increase in antigen concentration in succeeding samples. This method might offer a valuable aid for a rapid etiological diagnosis also in human cases of acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:6345574

  14. Development and evaluation of a Sarcocystis neurona-specific IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Meadows, C; Bolten, K; Saville, W J A

    2006-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurologic disease of horses caused primarily by the protozoal parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Currently available antemortem diagnostic testing has low specificity. The hypothesis of this study was that serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of horses experimentally challenged with S neurona would have an increased S neurona-specific IgM (Sn-IgM) concentration after infection, as determined by an IgM capture enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA). The ELISA was based on the S neurona low molecular weight protein SNUCD-1 antigen and the monoclonal antibody 2G5 labeled with horseradish peroxidase. The test was evaluated using serum and CSF from 12 horses experimentally infected with 1.5 million S neurona sporocysts and 16 horses experimentally infected with varying doses (100 to 100,000) of S neurona sporocysts, for which results of histopathologic examination of the central nervous system were available. For horses challenged with 1.5 million sporocysts, there was a significant increase in serum Sn-IgM concentrations compared with values before infection at weeks 2-6 after inoculation (P neurona, there were significant increases in serum Sn-IgM concentration at various points in time after inoculation, depending on the challenge dose (P < .01). In addition, there was a significant increase between the CSF Sn-IgM concentrations before and after inoculation (P < .0001). These results support further evaluation of the assay as a diagnostic test during the acute phase of EPM.

  15. Peroxidase activity as a marker for estrogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.; Liel, Y.; Glick, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the possibility that peroxidase activity might be a marker for estrogen activity in established estrogen-dependent tissues: dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumours and human breast cancer. In DMBA-induced tumours undergoing regression after ovariectomy or tamoxifen treatment, tumour size decreased by 50%, estradiol receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PgR) decreased by 25 and 20%, respectively, but peroxidase activity paradoxically increased six- to sevenfold. In DMBA tumours stimulated by estradiol treatment or by the cessation of tamoxifen administration in intact rats, tumour size increased threefold. ER and PgR increased two- and threefold, respectively, while peroxidase activity decreased 50%. These data indicate an inverse relation between tumour growth, ER and PgR on the one hand, and peroxidase activity on the other. In the human breast cancers there was a singificant negative relation between the presence of ER and peroxidase activity. By using a calibrated Sephadex G-100 column it was shown that uterine peroxidase differs in molecular weight from the peroxidase of rat mammary tumours and that of human breast cancer. (author)

  16. Activity of Mn-Oxidizing Peroxidases of Ganoderma lucidum Depending on Cultivation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Ćilerdžić

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trunks and stumps of various deciduous species act as natural habitats for Ganoderma lucidum. The chemical composition of their cell wall affects the development of fungal ligninolytic enzyme system as well as its ability to degrade lignin from the plant cell wall. Additionally, numerous compounds structurally similar to lignin can be degraded by the G. lucidum enzyme system which could take important roles in various biotechnological processes. The laccases, which are the dominant enzymes synthesized by G. lucidum, have been studied more extensively than the Mn-oxidizing peroxidases. Therefore, this study aimed to create the dynamics profile of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases activities in four G. lucidum strains, classifying and determining their properties depending on the cultivation type and plant residue as a carbon source in the medium, as well as to establish whether intraspecific variety exists. The findings suggest that submerged cultivation appeared to be a more appropriate cultivation type for enzyme activities compared with solid-state cultivation, and oak sawdust was a better carbon source than wheat straw. Under the optimum conditions, on day 14, G. lucidum BEOFB 431 was characterized by the highest levels of both Mn-dependent and Mn-independent peroxidase activities (4795.5 and 5170.5 U/L, respectively. Strain, cultivation type, and carbon source were factors that affected the profiles of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases isoenzymes.

  17. Glutathione peroxidase activity in the selenium-treated alga Scenedesmus quadricauda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Zachleder, Vilém; Rucki, M.; Čížková, Mária

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, 1-2 (2011), s. 87-94 ISSN 0166-445X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Cell cycle * Enzyme activity * Glutathione peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2011

  18. Tissue Printing to Visualize Polyphenol Oxidase and Peroxidase in Vegetables, Fruits, and Mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melberg, Amanda R.; Flurkey, William H.; Inlow, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    A simple tissue-printing procedure to determine the tissue location of the endogenous enzymes polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and mushrooms is described. In tissue printing, cell contents from the surface of a cut section of the tissue are transferred to an adsorptive surface, commonly a nitrocellulose…

  19. Characterization of glutathione peroxidase diversity in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis

    OpenAIRE

    Pey , Alexis; Zamoum , Thamilla; Christen , Richard; Merle , Pierre-Laurent; Furla , Paola

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Cnidarians living in symbiosis with photosynthetic dinoflagellates (commonly named zooxanthellae) are exposed to high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon illumination. To quench ROS production, both the cnidarian host and zooxanthellae express a full suite of antioxidant enzymes. Studying antioxidative balance is therefore crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. We characterized glutathione peroxidases (GPx) in the s...

  20. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich

  1. Petunia peroxidase a: isolation, purification and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, T; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1991-07-01

    The fast-moving anionic peroxidase isoenzyme variant PRXa was purified from leaves of petunia (Petunia hybrida). Over 1300-fold purification was achieved by subjecting extracellular extracts to two sequential acetone precipitations and resuspending the pellets at pH 5.0 and pH 8.0, respectively, followed by gel filtration and chromatofocusing. The purified enzyme had an absorbance ratio (A405 nm/A280 nm) of 3.6, a molecular mass of about 37 kDa and a pI of 3.8. Three molecular forms with slightly different molecular masses were separated by concanavalin-A--Sepharose affinity chromatography, indicating that these three forms differ in their carbohydrate moieties. The absorption spectrum of PRXa had maxima at 496 and 636 nm and a Soret band at 405 nm. Spectra of compounds I and IV were obtained by titrating a batch of PRXa stored for several months at -20 degrees C with H2O2. The addition of 1 mol H2O2/mol freshly purified PRXa caused the formation of compound II, indicating that freshly isolated PRXa contains a bound hydrogen donor which is lost upon storage. Compound III was obtained from both preparations in the presence of excess H2O2. The pH optimum of PRXa for the reaction with H2O2 and guaiacol was 5.0 and its specific activity 61 mkat/g protein. Among various aromatic compounds, coniferyl alcohol was polymerized by PRXa to presumed lignin-like material. The extracellular localization and high affinity of PRXa for the cinnamic acid derivatives suggest that this isoenzyme functions in the polymerization or cross-linking of lignin in the plant cell wall.

  2. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Reyes, José O; Robles-Olvera, Victor; Carvajal-Zarrabal, Octavio; Castro Matinez, Claudia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N; Aguilar-Uscanga, María Guadalupe

    2014-07-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill, cv. Hass) fruit ranks tenth in terms of the most important products for Mexico. Avocado products are quite unstable due to the presence of oxidative enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase. The present study is to characterize the activity of purified avocado peroxidase from avocado in order to ascertain the biochemical and kinetic properties and their inhibition conditions. Purification was performed by Sephacryl S 200 HR gel filtration chromatography and its estimated molecular weight was 40 kDa. The zymogram showed an isoelectric point of 4.7. Six substrates were tested in order to ascertain the affinity of the enzyme for these substrates. The purified peroxidase was found to have low Km (0.296 mM) and high catalytic efficiency (2688 mM(-1) s(-1)) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), optimum activity being reached at 51°C, pH 3.8. The addition of dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, ascorbic acid, sodium azide, L-cysteine and Tween-20 had high inhibitory effects, while metals ions such as Cu(+), Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) had weak inhibitory activity on purified avocado peroxidase. The purified avocado peroxidase exhibits high inhibition (Ki = 0.37 µM) with 1.97 µM n-propyl gallate using ABTS as substrate at 51°C, pH 3.8 for 10 min. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. A peroxidase related to the mammalian antimicrobial protein myeloperoxidase in the Euprymna-Vibrio mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, V M; Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1996-11-26

    Many animal-bacteria cooperative associations occur in highly modified host organs that create a unique environment for housing and maintaining the symbionts. It has been assumed that these specialized organs develop through a program of symbiosis-specific or -enhanced gene expression in one or both partners, but a clear example of this process has been lacking. In this study, we provide evidence for the enhanced production of an enzyme in the symbiotic organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes, which harbors a culture of the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data show that this enzyme has a striking biochemical similarity to mammalian myeloperoxidase (MPO; EC 1.11.17), an antimicrobial dianisidine peroxidase that occurs in neutrophils. MPO and the squid peroxidase catalyze the same reaction, have similar apparent subunit molecular masses, and a polyclonal antibody to native human MPO specifically localized a peroxidase-like protein to the bacteria-containing regions of the symbiotic organ. We also provide evidence that a previously described squid cDNA encodes the protein (LO4) that is responsible for the observed dianisidine peroxidase activity. An antibody made against a fragment of LO4 immunoprecipiated dianisidine peroxidase activity from extracts of the symbiotic organ, and reacted against these extracts and human MPO in Western blot analysis. These data suggest that related biochemical mechanisms for the control of bacterial number and growth operate in associations that are as functionally diverse as pathogenesis and mutualism, and as phylogenetically distant as molluscs and mammals.

  4. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase: Its relationship to plasma selenium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, G.; Cellerino, R.; Guidi, G.C.; Moschini, G.; Stievano, B.M.; Tregnaghi, C.

    1977-01-01

    Erythrocytic glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and plasma selenium concentrations were measured in 14 patients: 7 with iron deficiency and 7 with raised serum iron levels. The decreased enzymatic activity in iron deficiency was confirmed. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients with lower serum iron; furthermore there is a significant correlation between serum iron and plasma selenium concentrations. Another correlation even more significant was found between plasma selenium and enzyme activity in all the cases we studied. These data suggests that the importance of iron for GSH-Px activity may be merely due to its relationship with selenium and that plasma selenium concentration may be of critical importance for enzyme activity. (author)

  5. Antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates (ITCs) extracted from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) root against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ho-Won; Choi, Kyu-Duck; Shin, Il-Shik

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of isothiocyanates (ITCs) extracted from horseradish root was investigated against oral microorganisms: 6 strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans; one strain of yeast, Candida albicans, and 3 strains of anaerobic bacteria, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella nigrescens, and Clostridium perfringens. The ITCs extracted from horseradish root showed antimicrobial activity against all oral microorganisms by the paper disk method. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the ITCs extracted from horseradish root ranged from 1.25 to 5.00 mg/ml against 6 strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria and one strain of yeast, and 4.17 to 16.67 mg/ml against 3 strains of anaerobic bacteria. The ITCs extracted from horseradish root showed the strongest antimicrobial activity, with a MBC of 1.25 mg/ml, against C. albicans among facultative microorganisms, and 4.17 mg/ml against F. nucleatum among anaerobic bacteria. These results suggest that the ITCs extracted from horseradish root may be a candidate for use as an antimicrobial agent against oral microorganisms.

  6. An enzyme-assisted electrochemiluminescent biosensor developed on order mesoporous carbons substrate for ultrasensitive glyphosate sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qingrong; Xu, Guifang; Gong, Lingshan; Dai, Hong; Zhang, Shupei; Li, Yilin; Lin, Yanyu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a strategy of developing a late-model and sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for glyphosate detection based on enzyme-assisted in situ generation of ZnS quantum dots (QDs) on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMC) substrate was proposed. OMC, as a typically ordered mesoporous carbon material, not only provides a protective microenvironment for enzyme to retain its structure and activity but also has a synergistic effect with chitosan for the absorption of Zn 2+ ions by virtue of its high surface area and high pore volume and thus employed as the matrix of proposed biosensor. Then horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was introduced to expedite the generation of ZnS QDs via accelerating the reduction of Na 2 S 2 O 3 with H 2 O 2 to yield H 2 S that reacted with Zn 2+ ions. Glyphosate, as a kind of organic pesticide with amine, carboxyl and phosphonate group which would coordinate strongly to metal ions, possessed the potential to inhibited the activity of HRP, because HRP contain iron (III) protoporphyrin IX (ferriprotoporphyrin IX) as the prosthetic group which would react with the amine, carboxyl and phosphonate group of glyphosate. Accordingly, the proposed ECL QDs biosensor was employed to determine the Gly and shown a wide linear range from 0.1 nM to 10 mM with excellent sensitivity, reproducibility and selectivity. Further, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) and the Michaelis–Menten constant were studied, and all the results indicated that the proposed strategy is practicable and provide a new opportunity to develop novel ECL sensing platforms in various applications.

  7. Anti-inflammatory activity of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) root extracts in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocco, Stefania; Calabrone, Luana; Adesso, Simona; Larocca, Marilena; Franceschelli, Silvia; Autore, Giuseppina; Martelli, Giuseppe; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-12-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop belonging to the Brassicaceae family. Horseradish root is used as a condiment due to its extremely pungent flavour, deriving from the high content of glucosinolates and their breakdown products such as isothiocyanates and other sulfur compounds. Horseradish also has a long history in ethnomedicine. In this study the anti-inflammatory potential of three accessions of Armoracia rusticana on lipopolysaccharide from E. coli treated J774A.1 murine macrophages was evaluated. Our results demonstrate that Armoracia rusticana reduced nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release and nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in macrophages, acting on nuclear transcription factor NF-κB p65 activation. Moreover Armoracia rusticana reduced reactive oxygen species release and increased heme-oxygenase-1 expression, thus contributing to the cytoprotective cellular effect during inflammation.

  8. Effects of light and growth regulators on adventitious bud formation in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, H; Tachikawa, Y; Saitou, T; Harada, H

    1995-07-01

    To clarify that the presence of Ri T-DNA genes are not prerequisite for the light-induced bud formation in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) hairy roots, leaf and root segments of nontransformed horseradish plants were used as explants. Bud formation from nontransformed tissues was observed in hormone-free medium under 16 h daylight conditions, but not under continuous darkness. To investigate the effects of growth regulators on bud formation, leaf and root explants were treated with auxin (1-naphthaleneacetic acid; NAA) and / or cytokinin (6-benzyl-aminopurine; BA). The most effective treatment in the dark to stimulate bud formation was BA at 1 mg·1(-1). These results show that adventitious bud formation in horseradish can be induced by light and growth regulators, and especially cytokinin, may be involved in bud formation, irrespective of whether the tissues were transformed with Ri T-DNA.

  9. One-pot synthesis of porphyrin functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites as peroxidase mimics for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glucose detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingyun, E-mail: qyliu@sdust.edu.cn; Zhang, Leyou; Li, Hui; Jia, Qingyan; Jiang, Yanling; Yang, Yanting; Zhu, Renren

    2015-10-01

    Meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were successfully prepared by one-pot method under hydrothermal conditions and were found to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. The H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites can catalytically oxidize peroxidase substrate 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce a blue color reaction, which can be easily observed by the naked eye. Furthermore, kinetic studies indicate that the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites have an even higher affinity to TMB than that of the natural enzyme, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). On the basis of the high activity, the reaction provides a simple, sensitive and selective method for colorimetric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over a range of 10–100 μM with a minimum detection limit of 1.73 μM. Moreover, H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/glucose oxidase (GOx)/TMB system provides a novel colorimetric sensor for glucose and shows good response toward glucose detection over a range of 5–25 μM with a minimum detection limit of 2.54 μM. The results indicated that it is a simple, cheap, convenient, highly selective, sensitive and easy handling colorimetric assay. Results of a fluorescent probe suggest that the catalase-mimic activity of the H{sub 2}TCPP-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites effectively catalyze the decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: 5,10,15,20-Tetrakis(4-carboxyl phenyl)-porphyrin (H{sub 2}TCPP)-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and showed a higher catalytic activity, compared to that of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles alone. - Highlights: • Porphyrin-functionalized γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot method. • The porphyrin-γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposites were found to possess

  10. [Isolation and purification of Mn-peroxidase from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Selivanov, N Iu; Nikitina, V E

    2012-01-01

    Homogenous Mn-peroxidase of a 26-fold purity grade was isolated from a culture of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 cultivated on a medium containing 0.1 mM pyrocatechol. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 43 kD as revealed by electrophoresis in SDS-PAAG. It was shown that the use of pyrocatechol and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulfonate) at concentrations of 0.1 and I mM as inductors increased the Mn-peroxidase activity by a factor of 3.

  11. Correlation of glucosinolate content to myrosinase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Kushad, Mosbah M

    2004-11-17

    Fully developed horseradish (Armoracia rusticana Gaertn., Mey., & Scherb.) roots from 27 accessions and leaves from a subset of 9 accessions were evaluated for glucosinolates and myrosinase enzyme activity. Eight different glucosinolates were detected (based on HPLC retention times as desulfoglucosinolates) in both root and leaf tissues. The sum of these glucosinolates, referred to as total, ranged from 2 to 296 micromol g(-1) of dry weight (DW) in both tissues. Four glucosinolates (sinigrin, glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin) were detected in major quantities. In fully developed roots, sinigrin concentration represented approximately 83%, gluconasturtiin approximately 11%, and glucobrassicin approximately 1% of the total glucosinolates. Approximately the same proportions of individual glucosinolates appeared in fully developed leaves, except that glucobrassicin was substituted by neoglucobrassicin and gluconasturtiin concentration was significantly lower (<1%). At least four other glucosinolates were detected in very small quantities (<1%) in both roots and leaves. Myrosinase (beta-thioglucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.3.1) is the enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of the parent glucosinolates into biologically active products. Very little is known about myrosinase activity and the correlation of its activity to total and individual glucosinolates in plant tissues. Significant differences in myrosinase activity were detected between the roots and leaves, ranging from 1.2 to 57.1 units g(-1) of DW. Data showed no correlation between myrosinase activity and total and/or individual glucosinolates in the roots. However, in the leaves, significant correlations were found between myrosinase activity and total glucosinolates (0.78 at P = 0.01) and between myrosinase activity and sinigrin (0.80 at P = 0.01). Glucosinolates content and myrosinase activity were also correlated in young and fully developed roots and leaves and during tissue crushing

  12. A dual amplified electrochemical immunosensor for ofloxacin: Polypyrrole film-Au nanocluster as the matrix and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized gold nanorod as the label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Shuai; Liu, Yingju; Lin, Mouhong; Kang, Jianli; Sun, Yuanming; Lei, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of the OFL electrochemical immunosensor using Au nanoclusters/PPy/GCE as the substrate and multi-HRP-GNR-Ab2 bioconjugates as the label. Highlights: ► Gold nanorod was used to load HRP and Ab 2 to form multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 . ► A sensitive immunosensor for ofloxacin was constructed using the homemade antibody. ► A dual signal amplified strategy was based on the PPy-Au and multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 . -- Abstract: In this work, an electrochemical immunosensor, basing on a dual signal amplified strategy by employing a biocompatible polypyrrole film-Au nanocluster matrix as a sensor platform and multi-enzyme-antibody functionalized gold nanorod as an electrochemical detection label, is established for sensitive detection of ofloxacin (OFL). Firstly, polypyrrole film and Au nanoclusters were progressively fabricated onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode via electropolymerization and electrochemical deposition, respectively. Such PPy-Au nanocomposite modified electrode was used to immobilize OFL-OVA, blocked with the blocking reagent, and then associated with the corresponding antibody. Secondly, gold nanorod (GNR) was synthesized to load horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and horseradish peroxidase-secondary antibody (HRP-Ab 2 ), and the resulting nanostructure (multi-HRP-GNR-Ab 2 ) was applied as the detection label. The fabrication process of the ordered multilayer structure and immunosensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical measurements, respectively. Finally, based on a competitive immunoassay, i.e., the association ability with the corresponding antibody between the captured antigen and free OFL in the solution, the fabricated immunosensor exhibited a sensitive response to OFL in the range from 0.08 to 410 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL. The current immunosensor exhibited good sensitivity, selectivity and long-term stability. This amplification strategy shows excellent

  13. Identification and characterization of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in Setaria cervi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anchal; Rathaur, Sushma

    2005-01-01

    Setaria cervi a bovine filarial parasite secretes selenium glutathione peroxidase during in vitro cultivation. A significant amount of enzyme activity was detected in the somatic extract of different developmental stages of the parasite. Among different stages, microfilariae showed a higher level of selenium glutathione peroxidase activity followed by males then females. However, when the activity was compared in excretory secretory products of these stages males showed higher activity than microfilariae and female worms. The enzyme was purified from female somatic extract using a combination of glutathione agarose and gel filtration chromatography, which migrated as a single band of molecular mass ∼20 kDa. Selenium content of purified enzyme was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and found to be 3.5 ng selenium/μg of protein. Further, inhibition of enzyme activity by potassium cyanide suggested the presence of selenium at the active site of enzyme. This is the first report of identification of selenium glutathione peroxidase from any filarial parasite

  14. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  15. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  16. Improving the oxidative stability of a high redox potential fungal peroxidase by rational design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sáez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103 near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme.

  17. Biphenyl-metabolizing bacteria in the rhizosphere of horseradish and bulk soil contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-10-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [(13)C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase alpha subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [(13)C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [(13)C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl.

  18. Musa paradisiaca stem juice as a source of peroxidase and ligninperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernwal, S K; Yadav, R S; Yadav, K D

    2000-10-01

    Musa paradisiaca stem juice has been shown to contain peroxidase activity of the order of 0.1 enzyme unit/ml. The Km values of this peroxidase for the substrates guaiacol and hydrogen peroxide are 2.4 and 0.28 mM respectively. The pH and temperature optima are 4.5 and 62.5 degrees C respectively. Like other peroxidases, it follows double displacement type mechanism. At low pH, Musa paradisiaca stem juice exhibits ligninperoxidase type activity. The pH optimum for ligninperoxidase type activity is 2.0 and the temperature optimum is 24 degrees C. The Km values for veratryl alcohol and n-propanol are 66 and 78 microM respectively.

  19. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  20. An electric detection of immunoglobulin G in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using an indium oxide nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Cui, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) are used to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles were layer-by-layer self-assembled with the oppositely charged polyelectrolyte as the electrochemical transducer and antibody immobilization site, respectively. The assay was conducted on a novel platform of indium oxide nanoparticle ISFETs, where the electric signals are generated in response to the concentration of target IgG using the labeled detecting antibody. The sandwiched ELISA structure catalyzed the conversion of the acidic substrate into neutral substance with the aid of horseradish peroxidase. The pH change in the substrate solution was detected by nanoparticle ISFETs. Normal rabbit IgG was used as a model antigen whose detection limit of 0.04 ng ml −1 was found. The facile electric detection in the conventional assay through the semiconducting nanoparticle ISFET has potential applications as a point-of-care detection or a sensing element in a lab-on-a-chip system

  1. Molecular detection of genotype II grass carp reovirus based on nucleic acid sequence-based amplification combined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (NASBA-ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Weiwei; Yao, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Li, Yingying; Bermann, Sven M; Ren, Yan; Shi, Cunbin; Song, Xinjian; Huang, Qiwen; Zheng, Shuchen; Wang, Qing

    2017-05-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is the causative agent of the grass carp hemorrhagic disease that has resulted in severe economic losses in the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) farming industry in China. Early diagnosis and vaccine administration are important priorities for GCRV control. In this study, a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (NASBA-ELISA) was developed for to detect genotype II GCRV (GCRV- II). Primers specifically targeting viral RNA genome segment 6 were utilized for amplification in an isothermal digoxigenin-labeling NASBA process, resulting in DIG-labeled RNA amplicons. The amplicons were hybridized to specific biotinylated DNA probes and the products were detected colorimetrically using horseradish peroxidase and a microplate reader. The new method is able to detect GCRV at 14 copies/μL within 5h and had a diagnostic sensitivity and a specificity of 100% when GCRV-II and non-target virus were tested. This NASBA-ELISA was evaluated using a panel of clinical samples (n=103) to demonstrate that it is a rapid, effective and sensitive method for GCRV detection in grass carp aquaculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking all eight thiol peroxidases were viable and withstood redox stresses. They transcriptionally responded to various redox treatments, but were unable to activate and repress gene expression in response to H2O2. Further studies involving redox transcription factors suggested that thiol peroxidases are major regulators of global gene expression in response to H2O2. The data suggest that thiol peroxidases sense and transfer oxidative signals to the signaling proteins and regulate transcription, whereas a direct interaction between H2O2 and other cellular proteins plays a secondary role. PMID:21282621

  3. Characteristics of estrogen-induced peroxidase in mouse uterine luminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellinck, P.H.; Newbold, R.R.; McLachlan, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Peroxidase activity in the uterine luminal fluid of mice treated with diethylstilbestrol was measured by the guaiacol assay and also by the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol. In the radiometric assay, the generation of 3H2O and 3H-labeled water-soluble products was dependent on H2O2 (25 to 100 microM), with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Tyrosine or 2,4-dichlorophenol strongly enhanced the reaction catalyzed either by the luminal fluid peroxidase or the enzyme in the CaCl2 extract of the uterus, but decreased the formation of 3H2O from [2-3H]estradiol by lactoperoxidase in the presence of H2O2 (80 microM). NADPH, ascorbate, and cytochrome c inhibited both luminal fluid and uterine tissue peroxidase activity to the same extent, while superoxide dismutase showed a marginal activating effect. Lactoferrin, a major protein component of uterine luminal fluid, was shown not to contribute to its peroxidative activity, and such an effect by prostaglandin synthase was also ruled out. However, it was not possible to exclude eosinophil peroxidase, brought to the uterus after estrogen stimulation, as being the source of peroxidase activity in uterine luminal fluid

  4. Peroxidase activity in Raphanus sativus and its relationship with soil heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alipour, H.; Zare Myvan, H.; Sharifi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Today heavy metals are important environmental pollutants which generated from human activities and are one of the most important environmental stresses that cause molecular damages to plants through reactive oxygen species formation such as H2O2. Heavy metals are absorbed and accumulated by plants thus are absorbed by human bodies through the food chain. Raphanus sativus is a herbaceous plant within the Brassicaceae family that has different varieties and is used as a food plant in different parts of Iran. Peroxidase is one of the most important enzyme in oxidoreductase super family that can metabolize H2O2. In this research we studied some growth parameters, peroxidase activity and their relationships with heavy metal content and other soil factors in three different populations of radish collected from Sari, Semnan and south of Tehran. After harvesting the plants shoots and roots Peroxidase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically at 470 nm. Our results showed total heavy metal content of shomal 3 station soil and radish plants was higher than other stations, so plants collected from this station had lowest root and shoot lengths, fresh weights, dry weights, protein content and leaf collrophyll content. The peroxidase activity in both leaves and roots of these plants was higher than plants of other stations Therefore our results showed that with increasing heavy metal concentrations in soils peroxidase activity increased.

  5. Sensory-Analytical Comparison of the Aroma of Different Horseradish Varieties (Armoracia rusticana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Kroener

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana is consumed and valued for the characteristic spicy aroma of its roots in many countries all over the world. In our present study we compare six different horseradish varieties that were grown under comparable conditions, with regard to their aroma profiles, using combined sensory-analytical methods. Horseradish extracts were analyzed through gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O and their aroma-active compounds ranked according to their smell potency using the concept of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA. Identification was carried out through comparison of retention indices, odor qualities and mass spectra with those of reference substances. Besides some differences in relative ratios, we observed some main odorants that were common to all varieties such as 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine and allyl isothiocyanate, but also characteristics for specific varieties such as higher contents for 3-isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine in variety Nyehemes. Moreover, three odorous compounds were detected that have not been described in horseradish roots before.

  6. Effect of caffeine on peroxidase activity and gamma-ray-induced oxic and anoxic damage in Hordeum vulgare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, R.; Kesavan, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of caffeine during and after gamma radiation of barley seeds was studied using seedling injury and peroxidase activity as parameters. The radiation-induced stimulation of peroxidase activity is evident in eight-day only seedlings but not in embryos (i.e. immediately after irradiation). Caffeine present during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygenated water diminishes seedling injury and also reduces the peroxidase activity to the level observed in eight-day old seedlings of unirradiated seeds. Caffeine, however, produces just the opposite effect (i.e. enhances the seedling injury and peroxidase activity of eight-day old seedlings) when applied during irradiation of seeds soaked in oxygen-free water. There is no evidence that caffeine effects enzyme activity under in vitro conditions. (author)

  7. Peroxidase of Brazilian Cerrado grass as an alternative for agro industrial waste treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Pinheiro Reis Souza Ramalho

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Decontamination of wastewater continues to be a challenge for society and the scientific community. Despite the availability of various materials for study, enzymes stand out due to their specificity for decomposition and biodegradability for disposal. New sources of enzymes may represent efficient and low-cost alternatives compared to routinely used techniques. In this survey, the peroxidase profile from Echinolaena inflexa fruits was studied for possible applications in the treatment of wastewater. The protein content was found to be 5.33 mg g-1. The optimum reaction conditions were: 50°C, pH 7.5 at 0.1 mol L-1 of phosphate buffer for 15 min. The enzyme was inactivated after 5 min at 94°C and was inhibited when incubated with ascorbic acid at 10 mmol L-1. In tests using phenols and agro industrial waste, the peroxidase was able to oxidase 87.5% of catechol, 67.8% of pyrogallol, 39.1% of resorcinol and still presented 29.1% of the degradation capacity of raw wastewater phenolic compounds. The results showed that the Echinolaena inflexa peroxidase, a new source of enzymes, is a potential alternative to wastewater treatment.

  8. The phylogeny of the mammalian heme peroxidases and the evolution of their diverse functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ó'Fágáin Ciarán

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian heme peroxidases (MHPs are a medically important group of enzymes. Included in this group are myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, and thyroid peroxidase. These enzymes are associated with such diverse diseases as asthma, Alzheimer's disease and inflammatory vascular disease. Despite much effort to elucidate a clearer understanding of the function of the 4 major groups of this multigene family, we still do not have a clear understanding of their relationships to each other. Results Sufficient signal exists for the resolution of the evolutionary relationships of this family of enzymes. We demonstrate, using a root mean squared deviation statistic, how the removal of the fastest evolving sites aids in the minimisation of the effect of long branch attraction and the generation of a highly supported phylogeny. Based on this phylogeny we have pinpointed the amino acid positions that have most likely contributed to the diverse functions of these enzymes. Many of these residues are in close proximity to sites implicated in protein misfolding, loss of function or disease. Conclusion Our analysis of all available genomic sequence data for the MHPs from all available completed mammalian genomes, involved sophisticated methods of phylogeny reconstruction and data treatment. Our study has (i fully resolved the phylogeny of the MHPs and the subsequent pattern of gene duplication, and (ii, we have detected amino acids under positive selection that have most likely contributed to the observed functional shifts in each type of MHP.

  9. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies on the leishmanial tryparedoxin peroxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozal Mutlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is one of the most common form of neglected parasitic disease that affects about 350 million people worldwide. Leishmanias have a trypanothione mediated hydroperoxide metabolism to eliminate endogenous or exogenous oxidative agents. Both of 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx and glutathione peroxidase type tryparedoxin peroxidase (Px are the terminal enzymes in the trypanothione dependent detoxification system. Therefore absence of trypanothione redox system in mammals and the sensitivity of trypanosomatids against oxidative stress, enzymes of this pathway are drug targets candidates. In this study, 3D structure of tryparedoxin peroxidase (2-Cys peroxiredoxin type from Leishmania donovani (LdTXNPx was described by homology modeling method based on the template of tryparedoxin peroxidase from Crithidia fasciculata and selected compounds were docked to the active site pocket. The quality of the 3D structure of the model was confirmed by various web based validation programs. When compared secondary and tertiary structure of the model, it showed a typical thioredoxin fold containing a central beta-sheet and three alpha-helices. Docking study showed that the selected compound 2 (CID 16073813 interacted with the active site amino acids and binding energy was -118.675 kcal/mol.

  10. Direct and mediated electrochemistry of peroxidase and its electrocatalysis on a variety of screen-printed carbon electrodes: amperometric hydrogen peroxide and phenols biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekin, Fereshteh; Gorton, Lo; Tapsobea, Issa

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the behaviour of direct and mediated electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs) and screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carboxyl-functionalised single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-SPCEs). The techniques of cyclic voltammetry and amperometry in the flow mode were used to characterise the properties of the HRP immobilised on screen-printed electrodes. From measurements of the mediated and mediatorless currents of hydrogen peroxide reduction at the HRP-modified electrodes, it was concluded that the fraction of enzyme molecules in direct electron transfer (DET) contact with the electrode varies substantially for the different electrodes. It was observed that the screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-SPCEs and SWCNT-SPCEs) demonstrated a substantially higher percentage (≈100 %) of HRP molecules in DET contact than the screen-printed carbon electrodes (≈60 %). The HRP-modified electrodes were used for determination of hydrogen peroxide in mediatorless mode. The SWCNT-SPCE gave the lowest detection limit (0.40 ± 0.09 μM) followed by MWCNT-SPCE (0.48 ± 0.07 μM) and SPCE (0.98 ± 0.2 μM). These modified electrodes were additionally developed for amperometric determination of phenolic compounds. It was found that the SWCNT-SPCE gave a detection limit for catechol of 110.2 ± 3.6 nM, dopamine of 640.2 ± 9.2 nM, octopamine of 3341 ± 15 nM, pyrogallol of 50.10 ± 2.9 nM and 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine of 980.7 ± 8.7 nM using 50 μM H2O2 in the flow carrier.

  11. Asparagus byproducts as a new source of peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Lopez, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-03

    Soluble peroxidase (POD) from asparagus byproducts was purified by ion exchange chromatographies, and its kinetic and catalytic properties were studied. The isoelectric point of the purified isoperoxidases was 9.1, and the optimum pH and temperature values were 4.0 and 25 °C, respectively. The cationic asparagus POD (CAP) midpoint inactivation temperature was 57 °C, which favors its use in industrial processes. The Km values of cationic asparagus POD for H₂O₂ and ABTS were 0.318 and 0.634 mM, respectively. The purified CAP is economically obtained from raw materials using a simple protocol and possesses features that make it advantageous for the potential use of this enzyme in a large number of processes with demonstrated requirements of thermostable POD. The results indicate that CAP can be used as a potential candidate for removing phenolic contaminants.

  12. An intimately bonded titanate nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle ternary composite as a scaffold for electrochemical enzyme biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: liuxiaoqiang@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Zhu, Jie; Huo, Xiaohe; Yan, Rui [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Wong, Danny K.Y., E-mail: Danny.Wong@mq.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    In this work, titanate nanotubes (TNTs), polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were assembled to form a ternary composite, which was then applied on an electrode as a scaffold of an electrochemical enzyme biosensor. The scaffold was constructed by oxidatively polymerising aniline to produce an emeraldine salt of PANI on TNTs, followed by gold nanoparticle deposition. A novel aspect of this scaffold lies in the use of the emeraldine salt of PANI as a molecular wire between TNTs and GNPs. Using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme, voltammetric results demonstrated that direct electron transfer of HRP was achieved at both TNT-PANI and TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrodes. More significantly, the catalytic reduction current of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HRP was ∼75% enhanced at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode, compared to that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of HRP was found to be ∼3 times larger at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode than that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. Based on chronoamperometric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, a linear range from 1 to 1200 μM, a sensitivity of 22.7 μA mM{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.13 μM were obtained at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode. The performance of the biosensor can be ascribed to the superior synergistic properties of the ternary composite. - Highlights: • A ternary TiO{sub 2} nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle composite was developed. • New synthetic route for ternary composite with a polyaniline molecular wire between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. • An electrochemical biosensor with ternary composite as a scaffold. • Ternary composite facilitated improved analytical performance of electrochemical biosensor.

  13. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases : Chapter 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christien Lokman; S. de Weert

    2010-01-01

    This monograph describes many applications of peroxidase-based biocatalysis in the biotechnology industry. The need for such a book emerges from the considerable amount of new data regarding the phylogeny, reaction mechanisms, thermodynamic characterization and structural features of fungal and

  14. Peroxidase-like activity of magnetoferritin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melníková, V.; Pospíšková, K.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 181, 3-4 (2014), s. 295-301 ISSN 0026-3672 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetoferritin * magnetic nanoparticles * peroxidase-like activity * hydrogen peroxide * oxidative stress Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.741, year: 2014

  15. Peroxidase-catalyzed stabilization of 2,4-dichlorophenol in alkali-extracted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Mónica; Bhandari, Alok

    2011-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase- (HRP) mediated stabilization of phenolic contaminants is a topic of interest due to its potential for remediation of contaminated soils. This study evaluated the sorption of 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and its HRP-mediated stabilization in two alkali-extracted soils. Alkali extraction reduced the soil organic matter (SOM) contents of the geomaterials and enriched the residual SOM with humin C. Sorption of DCP on these sorbents was complete within 1 d. However, most of the sorbed DCP was removed from the geomaterials by water and methanol, suggesting weak solute-sorbent interactions. The addition of HRP resulted in the generation of DCP polymerization products (DPP), which partitioned between the aqueous and solid phases. The DPP phase distribution was rapid and complete within 24 h. Between 70 and 90% of the added DCP was converted to DPP and up to 43% of the initial aqueous phase contaminant was transformed into a residue that was resistant to extraction with methanol. Bound residues of DPP increased with initial aqueous phase solute concentration and remained fairly constant after 7 d of contact. Contaminant stabilization was noted to be high in the humin-mineral geomaterial. Results illustrate that HRP may be effective in stabilizing phenolic contaminants in subsoils that are likely to contain SOM enriched in humin C.

  16. Peroxidase isozyme profiles in some sweet cherry rootstocks and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PERS

    2012-01-10

    , 2005). Santamour (1980) defined role of peroxidase in graft compatibility as; 1) lignification is essential for a strong and permanent graft union; 2) peroxidase isoenzymes mediate the polymeri- zation of cinnamic alcohols to ...

  17. Effect of γ-radiation on the activities of superoxide dimutase, catalase and peroxidase on the germinating wheat grain (Triticum aestivum,L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, M.; Chatterjee, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of γ-radiation on several enzymes like catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in different parts of germinating wheat seeds has been studied. It was found that superoxide dismutase activity under the influence of γ-radiation was highest in the embryo part and showed maximum activity, 24 hours after germination. The activity exhibited a gradual decline with time. catalase and peroxidase, the stimulatory efect being maximum in the case of catalase activity. The catalase and peroxidase activities were found to be maximally localised in the embryo part and the highest value was attained after 72 hrs. in the case of catalase and after 48 hrs in the case of peroxidase activity. The results indicate that γ-radiation stimulates free radical generation in the embryo along with subsequent increase in the activities of superoside dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. (author)

  18. Degradation of direct azo dye by Cucurbita pepo free and immobilized peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherit, Nabila; Abouseoud, Mahmoud; Adour, Lydia

    2013-06-01

    Enzymatic decolourization of the azo dye, Direct Yellow (DY106) by Cucurbita pepo (courgette) peroxidase (CP) is a complex process, which is greatly affected by pH, temperature, enzyme activity and the concentrations of H2O2 and dye. Courgette peroxidase was extracted and its performance was evaluated by using the free-CP (FCP) and immobilized-CP (ICP) forms in the decolourization of DY106. Immobilization of peroxidase in calcium alginate beads was performed according to a strategy aiming to minimize enzyme leakage and keep its activity at a maximum value by optimizing sodium alginate content, enzyme loading and calcium chloride concentration. The initial conditions at which the highest DY106 decolourization yield was obtained were found at pH 2, temperature 20 degrees C, H2O2 dose 1 mmol/L (FCP) and 100 mmol/L (ICP). The highest decolourization rates were obtained for dye concentrations 50 mg/L (FCP) and 80 mg/L (ICP). Under optimal conditions, the FCP was able to decolorize more than 87% of the dye within 2 min. While with ICP, the decolourization yield was 75% within 15 min. The decolourization and removal of DY106 was proved by UV-Vis analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy analysis was also performed on DY106 and enzymatic treatment precipitated byproduct.

  19. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  20. Purification and characterization of peroxidase from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Ekrem; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2008-01-01

    Peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; donor: hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase) are part of a large group of enzymes. In this study, peroxidase, a primer antioxidant enzyme, was purified with 19.3 fold and 0.2% efficiency from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L.) by ammonium sulphate precipitation, dialysis, CM-Sephadex ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-25 purification steps. The substrate specificity of peroxidase was investigated using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol), 1,2,3-trihyidroxybenzene (pyrogallol) and 4-methylcatechol. Also, optimum pH, optimum temperature, optimum ionic strength, stable pH, stable temperature, thermal inactivation conditions were determined for guaiacol/H(2)O(2), pyrogallol/H(2)O(2), ABTS/H(2)O(2), catechol/H(2)O(2) and 4-methyl catechol/H(2)O(2) substrate patterns. The molecular weight (M(w)) of this enzyme was found to be 44 kDa by gel filtration chromatography method. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was performed for isoenzyme determination and a single band was observed. K(m) and V(max) values were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk graph for each substrate patterns.

  1. Comparative study of peroxidase purification from apple and orange ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the isolation and purification of peroxidase from low cost material; moreover, no significant work has been done on the isolation and purification of peroxidase from such cost effective sources (apple and orange seeds). Peroxidases had attracted considerable interest in recent years because of their ...

  2. Evaluation of an Aqueous Extract from Horseradish Root (Armoracia rusticana Radix) against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cellular Inflammation Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Herz, Corinna; Tran, Hoai Thi Thu; M?rton, Melinda-Rita; Maul, Ronald; Baldermann, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Lamy, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop and its root is used in condiments. Traditionally, horseradish root is used to treat bacterial infections of the respiratory tract and urinary bladder. The antiphlogistic activity, determined in activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), was evaluated for an aqueous extract and its subfractions, separated by HPLC. Compound analysis was done by UHPLC-QToF/MS and GC-MS. The aqueous extract concentration-dependently in...

  3. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  4. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (pal) and peroxidase activity in brown rust infected tissues of pakistani wheat cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, A.; Tahir, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Besides other factors resistance and susceptibility is the outcome of biochemical processes such as activities of defense-related enzymes. So in this study, Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and Peroxidase activity of resistant (Inqilab-91) and susceptible (Kirin-95) wheat cultivars were determined through spectrophotometer to address the biochemical aspect related to the disease after 8 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours of leaf rust inoculation. The results have shown that these enzymes were present in both the resistant and susceptible cultivars but the activity was more pronounced in the resistant one. The effect of PAL and peroxidase activity was also investigated among inoculated and uninoculated plants within the same cultivar. The activity of both PAL and peroxidase were more significant in inoculated ones. The results have shown that the after 72 hours of inoculation Inqilab-91 had more PAL activity i.e., 5.47 IU/ml/min than in Kirin-95 i.e., 2.08 IU/ml/min at 270 nm. While peroxidase activity in Inqilab-91 was 6.41 IU/ml/min and in Kirin-95, 3.66 IU/ml/min after 72 hours of inoculation, observed under 470 nm wavelength. Increase in one's activity increases the other enzyme's activity. The activity was more prominent after 72 hours of infection as pathogen had successfully established itself in the host plant tissue. The activities of these enzymes act as plants active defense mechanism against the attack of pathogen. (author)

  5. Inactivation of peroxidase, pectinesterase and alkaline phosphatase in polymers as a model for irradiation of dried foodstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, J.P.

    1972-01-01

    This thesis consists of a summary only of 6 refereed scientific papers published in Lebensmittel -Wissenschaft und -Technologie 3, 37-40 (1970); 4, 24-26, 93-96, 158-162, 196-200 (1971); 5, 128-131 (1972).

    Aqueous solutions containing an enzyme (peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase,

  6. Ultraviolet-B- and ozone-induced biochemical changes in antioxidant enzymes of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, M.V.; Paliyath, G.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    Earlier studies with Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to ultraviolet B (UV-B) and ozone (O 3 ) have indicated the differential responses of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. In this study, we have investigated whether A. thaliana genotype Landsberg erecta and its flavonoid-deficient mutant transparent testa (tt5) is capable of metabolizing UV-B- and O 3 -induced activated oxygen species by invoking similar antioxidant enzymes. UV-B exposure preferentially enhanced guaiacol-peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase, and peroxidases specific to coniferyl alcohol and modified the substrate affinity of ascorbate peroxidase. O 3 exposure enhanced superoxide dismutase, peroxidases, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase to a similar degree and modified the substrate affinity of both glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase. Both UV-B and O 3 exposure enhanced similar Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase isoforms. New isoforms of peroxidases and ascorbate peroxidase were synthesized in tt5 plants irradiated with UV-B. UV-B radiation, in contrast to O 3 , enhanced the activation oxygen species by increasing membrane-localized NADPH-oxidase activity and decreasing catalase activities. These results collectively suggest that (a) UV-B exposure preferentially induces peroxidase-related enzymes, whereas O 3 exposure invokes the enzymes of superoxide dismutase/ascorbate-glutathione cycle, and (b) in contrast to O 3 , UV-B exposure generated activated oxygen species by increasing NADPH-oxidase activity. 10 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Living target of Ce(III) action on horseradish cells: proteins on/in cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangmei; Sun, Zhaoguo; Lv, Xiaofen; Deng, Yunyun; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-12-01

    Positive and negative effects of rare earth elements (REEs) in life have been reported in many papers, but the cellular mechanisms have not been answered, especially the action sites of REEs on plasma membrane are unknown. Proteins on/in the plasma membrane perform main functions of the plasma membrane. Cerium (Ce) is the richest REEs in crust. Thus, the interaction between Ce(III) and the proteins on/in the plasma membrane, the morphology of protoplast, and the contents of nutrient elements in protoplast of horseradish were investigated using the optimized combination of the fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that Ce(III) at the low concentrations (10, 30 μM) could interact with proteins on/in the plasma membrane of horseradish, leading to the improvement in the structure of membrane proteins and the plasma membrane, which accelerated the intra-/extra-cellular substance exchange and further promoted the development of cells. When horseradish was treated with Ce(III) at the high concentrations (60, 80 μM), Ce(III) also could interact with the proteins on/in the plasma membrane of horseradish, leading to the destruction in the structure of membrane proteins and the plasma membrane. These effects decelerated the intra-/extra-cellular substance exchange and further inhibited the development of cells. Thus, the interaction between Ce(III) and proteins on/in the plasma membrane in plants was an important reason of the positive and negative effects of Ce(III) on plants. The results would provide some references for understanding the cellular effect mechanisms of REEs on plants.

  8. Sulfate determines the glucosinolate concentration of horseradish in vitro plants (Armoracia rusticana Gaertn., Mey. & Scherb.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnsour, Mohammad; Kleinwächter, Maik; Böhme, Julia; Selmar, Dirk

    2013-03-15

    Horseradish plants (Armoracia rusticana) contain high concentrations of glucosinolates. Former studies have revealed that Armoracia plants cultivated in vitro have markedly lower glucosinolate concentrations than those grown in soils. Yet, these studies neglected that the sulfate concentration in the growth medium may have had a strong impact on glucosinolate metabolism. Accordingly, in this study horseradish in vitro plants were cultivated with differing sulfate concentrations and the glucosinolate concentrations were quantified by ion pair HPLC. Cultivation in 1.7 mmol L(-1) sulfate (as used in the prior studies) resulted in the accumulation of 16.2 µmol g(-1) DW glucosinolates, while the glucosinolate concentration increased to more than 23 µmol g(-1) DW when 23.5 mmol L(-1) sulfate was used in the medium. Correspondingly, the glucosinolate concentration decreased to 1.6 µmol g(-1) DW when sulfate concentration was lowered to 0.2 mmol L(-1). Since the glucosinolate accumulation in relation to the sulfate concentration follows a typical saturation curve, we deduce that the availability of sulfate determines the glucosinolate concentration in horseradish in vitro plants. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pontine and medullary projections to the nucleus retroambiguus : A wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase and autoradiographic tracing study in the cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, Peter O.; Holstege, Gert

    1996-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the caudal medulla oblongata plays a role in expiration, vocalization, vomiting, and possibly lordosis. The present study tried to determine which structures, in turn, control the NRA. One cell group is the periaqueductal gray (FAG), which is considered to be the

  11. Use of avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex for measurement of UV lesions in human DNA by microELISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leipold, B [Technischen Universitaet Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Dermatologische Klinik; Remy, W [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1984-02-10

    The avidin/biotin system was introduced into the standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to increase its sensitivity for detecting UV lesions in human DNA. Goat anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase used in the standard ELISA as second antibody was replaced by biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG plus the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) reagent. Sensitivity of detection of plate-fixed UV-DNA-antibody complexes was increased about 8-fold and photolesions in human DNA samples irradiated with as low a dose as 1 J/m/sup 2/ UVC or a suberythermal dose of UVB light could be detected.

  12. Biphenyl-Metabolizing Bacteria in the Rhizosphere of Horseradish and Bulk Soil Contaminated by Polychlorinated Biphenyls as Revealed by Stable Isotope Probing▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Mackova, Martina; Vlcek, Cestmir; Hroudova, Miluse; Demnerova, Katerina; Paces, Vaclav; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based stable isotope probing in combination with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism was used in order to identify members of the microbial community that metabolize biphenyl in the rhizosphere of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) cultivated in soil contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) compared to members of the microbial community in initial, uncultivated bulk soil. On the basis of early and recurrent detection of their 16S rRNA genes in clone libraries constructed from [13C]DNA, Hydrogenophaga spp. appeared to dominate biphenyl catabolism in the horseradish rhizosphere soil, whereas Paenibacillus spp. were the predominant biphenyl-utilizing bacteria in the initial bulk soil. Other bacteria found to derive carbon from biphenyl in this nutrient-amended microcosm-based study belonged mostly to the class Betaproteobacteria and were identified as Achromobacter spp., Variovorax spp., Methylovorus spp., or Methylophilus spp. Some bacteria that were unclassified at the genus level were also detected, and these bacteria may be members of undescribed genera. The deduced amino acid sequences of the biphenyl dioxygenase α subunits (BphA) from bacteria that incorporated [13C]into DNA in 3-day incubations of the soils with [13C]biphenyl are almost identical to that of Pseudomonas alcaligenes B-357. This suggests that the spectrum of the PCB congeners that can be degraded by these enzymes may be similar to that of strain B-357. These results demonstrate that altering the soil environment can result in the participation of different bacteria in the metabolism of biphenyl. PMID:19700551

  13. Expression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme in the tissue samples of patients with various clinicopathological stages of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Aruldoss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2 enzyme in the tissue samples of patients with various clinicopathological stages of oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Materials and Methods: The samples for the study were divided into 4 groups. Group A comprised 20 healthy individuals with no habits. Twenty healthy individuals with habitual tobacco usage and no oral lesions were included in Group B. Twenty cases of leukoplakia diagnosed clinically and histopathologically were included in Group C. Staging was done using the modified classification and staging system of oral leukoplakia. Twenty cases of OSCC diagnosed clinically and histopathologically were included in Group D. Immunohistochemical staining was done on these 80 samples (paraffin blocks for COX-2 expression by indirect method using polymer based Horseradish peroxidase system. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman′s rank correlation test. Results: Significant and proportional increase of COX-2 staining was noted with the increase in the severity of dysplasia. Eighty percent of OSCC expressed COX-2, increasing in its intensity of staining with the decrease in differentiation. Seventy five percent of leukoplakia showed positive COX-2 expression. Only 15% of positive controls were COX-2 positive. No normal mucosa showed positive expression of COX-2. Conclusion: High expression of COX-2 is seen in advanced stages of leukoplakia and OSCC. Hence, COX-2 enzyme increases cell proliferation, promotes angiogenesis and inhibits immune surveillance in carcinogenesis; it can be an early detection marker in oral leukoplakia and a prognostic marker of OSCC.

  14. Ligninolytic enzyme complex of Armillaria spp

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoychev, I.; Nerud, František

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2000), s. 248-250 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : lignin olytic enzyme * lignin peroxidase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  15. Role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes and extracellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present work, we studied the role of antioxidant scavenging enzymes of plant pathogenic bacteria: catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and a virulence factor; extracelluar polysaccharide production in determining the virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) isolates and its differential reaction to rice cultivars.

  16. Peroxidase Activity in Poplar Inoculated with Compatible and Incompetent Isolates of Paxillus involutus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDUL GAFUR

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase activity of the hybrid poplar Populus×canescens (Ait. Sm. (= P. tremula L. × P. alba L. inoculated with compatible and incompetent isolates of Paxillus involutus (Batsch Fr. was investigated. Screening of the ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates was initiated with exploration of mycelial growth characteristics and mycorrhizal ability in vitro with poplar. Both traits varied within the fungus although they did not seem to be genetically correlated. While isolates SCO1, NAU, and 031 grew faster than others, only isolates MAJ, SCO1, and 031 were able to form ectomycorrhiza with poplar. Isolates MAJ (compatible and NAU (incompetent were subsequently selected for further experiments. Activity of peroxidase, one of the defense-related enzymes, was examined in pure culture and short root components of compatible and incompetent interactions between poplar and P. involutus. Peroxidase activities increased significantly in poplar inoculated with incompetent isolate of the fungus compared to control, while induction of the same enzyme was not detected in compatible associations.

  17. Development and validation of a sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for blood plasma cortisol in female cattle, buffaloes, and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R; Mohan, K; Kumar, V; Sarkar, M; Nitu, K; Meyer, H H D; Prakash, B S

    2013-08-01

    A highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) that used the second antibody coating technique and the cortisol-horseradish peroxidase conjugate as a label for determination of free and total cortisol in blood plasma of dairy animals (cows, buffaloes, and goats) was developed. For biological validation of the EIA, blood samples were collected from the animals at 48 and 24 h before and 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, and 132 h after dexamethasone administration. The EIA was performed directly with 20 μL of fresh plasma (for free cortisol) and also with 20 μL of heat-treated plasma (for total cortisol) after 1:5 dilutions with PBS. Cortisol standards ranging from 0.39 to 200 pg/well/20 μL were used, and the sensitivity of the EIA procedure was found to be 0.39 pg/well/20 μL, which corresponded to 0.02 ng/mL. In comparison with RIA the EIA was at least 4 times more sensitive and required 5 times less cortisol antiserum. In female cattle, buffaloes, and goats, the total, free, and bound plasma cortisol before dexamethasone administration was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than the total, free, and bound cortisol after dexamethasone administration. It can be concluded from these studies that the direct, sensitive EIA validated for estimating the free and total cortisol concentrations was sufficiently reliable and quick for studying the dynamics of cortisol distribution in blood plasma of dairy animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10 4  s -1 subunit -1 at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  19. Peroxidase-Catalyzed Oxidative Coupling of Phenols in the Presence of Geosorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qingguo; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2003-03-26

    This study focuses on elucidation of the reaction behaviors of peroxidase-mediated phenol coupling in the presence of soil/sediment materials. Our goal is a mechanistic understanding of the influences of geosorbent materials on enzymatic coupling reactions in general and the development of methods for predicting such influences. Extensive experimental investigations of coupling reactions were performed under strategically selected conditions in systems containing model geosorbents having different properties and chemical characteristics. The geosorbents tested were found to influence peroxidase-mediated phenol coupling through one or both of two principal mechanisms; i.e., (1) mitigation of enzyme inactivation and/or (2) participation in cross-coupling reactions. Such influences were found to correlate with the chemical characteristics of the sorbent materials and to be simulated well by a modeling approach designed in this paper. The results of the study have important implications for potential engineering implementation and enhancement of enzymatic coupling reactions in soil/subsurface remediation practice.

  20. Purification and partial characterization of peroxidase from human term placenta of non-smokers: metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene-7, 8-dihydrodiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, N D; Naidu, K A

    2000-01-01

    Peroxidase (Donor: H(2)O(2)oxidoreductase EC 1.11.1.7) from human term placentae of non-smokers was purified to homogeneity by a combination of NH(4)Cl extraction, affinity chromatography, (NH(4))(2)SO(4)precipitation, ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The homogeneity of purified human placental peroxidase (HTPP) was confirmed by gel filtration, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and SDS-PAGE. Peroxidase was found to be a membrane bound enzyme. A high concentration of NH(4)Cl (1.2 m) was needed to extract and solublize the enzyme. Removal of the salt resulted in irreversible precipitation of the enzyme. The protein exhibited a molecular mass of 126 000 kDa according to gel filtration and approximately 60 000 kDa by SDS-PAGE, indicating that the peroxidase is a homodimer. The purified peroxidase showed an optimum pH range of 7 to 8.5 and the K(m)for H(2)O(2)and guaiacol were found to be 0.08 m m and 10.0 m m, respectively. The purified peroxidase oxidized several substrates, namely potassium iodide, tetramethyl benzidine, guaiacol, ortho dianisidne and tyrosine. The enzyme was resistant to thermal denaturation up to 70 degrees C and also to chaotropic agents, guanidinium chloride and urea. Spectral properties indicated the presence of Soret band at 433 which shifted to 451 nm on complexation with cyanide. The circular dichroism studies showed that HTPP has a predominantly helical secondary structure. The enzyme showed similarities to the myeloperoxidase with regard to spectral and catalytical properties but differed significantly in amino acid composition, the R(z)value and molecular mass. Purified HTPP differed from eosinophil peroxidase in all physico-chemical properties indicating that it is not of eosinophil origin, but may represent a distinct, constitutive peroxidase in human placenta. Further, purified peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of benzo(a)pyrene-7, 8-dihydrodiol in presence of tyrosine and hydrogen peroxide to BP

  1. Comparison of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, hydroxyproline and selenium levels in patients with vitiligo and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozturk I

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology and pathophysiologic mechanism of vitiligo are still unclear. The relationship between increased oxidative stress due to the accumulation of radicals and reactive oxygen species and the associated changes in blood and epidermal component of vitiliginous skin have been reported many times. We investigated the possible changes of plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, selenium, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in patients with vitiligo in order to evaluate the relationship between oxidative stress and etiopathogenesis of vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels were measured by spectrophotometric methods, and HPLC was used for measurement of selenium concentrations. Results: Our results showed increased malondialdehyde, hydroxyproline and glutathione peroxidase activity levels in plasma of vitiligo group ( P < 0.05. Conclusion: Support of antioxidant system via nonenzymatic antioxidant compounds and antioxidant enzymes may be useful to prevent of melanocyte degeneration which occur due to oxidative damage in vitiligo.

  2. Purification and characterization of Mn-peroxidase from Musa paradisiaca (banana) stem juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pratibha; Singh, V K; Yadav, Meera; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Yadava, Sudha; Yadav, K D S

    2012-02-01

    Mn-peroxidase (MnP), a biotechnologically important enzyme was purified for the first time from a plant source Musa paradisiaca (banana) stem, which is an agro-waste easily available after harvest of banana fruits. MnP was earlier purified only from the fungal sources. The enzyme was purified from stem juice by ultrafiltration and anion-exchange column chromatography on diethylamino ethylcellulose with 8-fold purification and purification yield of 65%. The enzyme gave a single protein band in SDS-PAGE corresponding to molecular mass 43 kDa. The Native-PAGE of the enzyme also gave a single protein band, confirming the purity of the enzyme. The UV/VIS spectrum of the purified enzyme differed from the other heme peroxidases, as the Soret band was shifted towards lower wavelength and the enzyme had an intense absorption band around 250 nm. The K(m) values using MnSO4 and H2O2 as the substrates of the purified enzyme were 21.0 and 9.5 microM, respectively. The calculated k(cat) value of the purified enzyme using Mn(II) as the substrate in 50 mM lactate buffer (pH 4.5) at 25 degrees C was 6.7s(-1), giving a k(cat)/K(m) value of 0.32 microM(-1)s(-1). The k(cat) value for the MnP-catalyzed reaction was found to be dependent of the Mn(III) chelator molecules malonate, lactate and oxalate, indicating that the enzyme oxidized chelated Mn(II) to Mn(III). The pH and temperature optima of the enzyme were 4.5 and 25 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme in combination with H2O2 liberated bromine and iodine in presence of KBr and KI respectively. All these enzymatic characteristics were similar to those of fungal MnP. The enzyme has the potential as a green brominating and iodinating agent in combination with KBr/KI and H2O2.

  3. Characterization of structure and activity of garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ichi, Sarra; Miodek, Anna; Sauriat-Dorizon, Hélène; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Henry, Céline; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib; Korri-Youssoufi, Hafsa

    2011-01-01

    Structural characterization and study of the activity of new POX(1B) protein from garlic which has a high peroxidase activity and can be used as a biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide and phenolic compounds were performed and compared with the findings for other heme peroxidases. The structure-function relationship was investigated by analysis of the spectroscopic properties and correlated to the structure determined by a new generation of high-performance hybrid mass spectrometers. The reactivity of the enzyme was analyzed by studies of the redox activity toward various ligands and the reactivity with various substrates. We demonstrated that, in the case of garlic peroxidase, the heme group is pentacoordinated, and has an histidine as a proximal ligand. POX(1B) exhibited a high affinity for hydrogen peroxide as well as various reducing cosubstrates. In addition, high enzyme specificity was demonstrated. The k(cat) and K(M) values were 411 and 400 mM(-1) s(-1) for 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and 2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), respectively. Furthermore, the reduction of nitro compounds in the presence of POX(1B) was demonstrated by iron(II) nitrosoalkane complex assay. In addition, POX(1B) showed a great potential for application for drug metabolism since its ability to react with 1-nitrohexane in the presence of sodium dithionite was demonstrated by the appearance of a characteristic Soret band at 411 nm. The high catalytic efficiency obtained in the case of the new garlic peroxidase (POX(1B)) is suitable for the monitoring of different analytes and biocatalysis.

  4. Different responses of tobacco antioxidant enzymes to light and chilling stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, T; Willekens, H; Van Montagu, M; Inze, D; Van Camp, W; Toneva, [No Value; Minkov, [No Value

    The effect of elevated light treatment (25 degreesC, PPFD 360 mumol m(-2) sec(-1)) or chilling temperatures combined with elevated light (5 degreesC, PPFD 360 mumol m-2 sec-1) on the activity of six antioxidant enzymes, guaiacol peroxidases, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, EC 1.11.1.9) protein

  5. Rapid and direct spectrophotometric method for kinetics studies and routine assay of peroxidase based on aniline diazo substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazizi, Fatemeh; Bahrami, Azita; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Bakavoli, Mehdi; Legge, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Peroxidases are ubiquitous enzymes that play an important role in living organisms. Current spectrophotometrically based peroxidase assay methods are based on the production of chromophoric substances at the end of the enzymatic reaction. The ambiguity regarding the formation and identity of the final chromophoric product and its possible reactions with other molecules have raised concerns about the accuracy of these methods. This can be of serious concern in inhibition studies. A novel spectrophotometric assay for peroxidase, based on direct measurement of a soluble aniline diazo substrate, is introduced. In addition to the routine assays, this method can be used in comprehensive kinetics studies. 4-[(4-Sulfophenyl)azo]aniline (λmax = 390 nm, ɛ = 32 880 M(-1) cm(-1) at pH 4.5 to 9) was introduced for routine assay of peroxidase. This compound is commercially available and is indexed as a food dye. Using this method, a detection limit of 0.05 nmol mL(-1) was achieved for peroxidase.

  6. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  7. An optical sensor for pesticide determination based on the autoindicating optical properties of peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marcos, Susana; Callizo, Esther; Mateos, Elena; Galbán, Javier

    2014-05-01

    During the enzymatic reaction of the heme-protein Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with hydrogen peroxide there are changes in the molecular absorption spectra of HRP and its different oxidation states which can be used for quantitative determination of the substrate. One of these intermediate oxidation states is the HRPII, with iron as an oxyferryl. This compound is assumed to be responsible for the organophosphate pesticide degradation in the Fenton reaction. In this work, the enzymatic HRP-H₂O₂ reaction has been studied, based on the effect of different pesticides on the mechanism reaction; these modifications have been used for the quantitative determination of pesticides. A mathematical model has been developed relating to the analytical signal with the pesticide concentration. Three organophosphate pesticides (diazinon, trichlorfon and tetrachlorvinphos) and one sulfamide (dichlofluanid) have been used to demonstrate the viability of the methodology and the accomplishment fulfillment of the model. Tetrachlorvinphos was chosen as the pesticide model to develop the optical sensor film for continuous pesticide determination, consisting of HRP immobilized in a polyacrylamide gel. The sensor can be used for at least 15 days and responds linearly to tetrachlorvinphos concentrations in the range from 4.0 × 10(-7) to 4.0 × 10(-6)mol L(-1). The main advantage of the methodology is its reversibility in contrast to the irreversible Fenton reaction. The HRP-H2O2 methodology has been used to measure the pesticides in a waste water sample spiked with tetrachlorvinphos. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reverse-Bumpy-Ball-Type-Nanoreactor-Loaded Nylon Membranes as Peroxidase-Mimic Membrane Reactors for a Colorimetric Assay for H₂O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Ying; Jiao, Xiangyu; Yang, Hankun; Wen, Yongqiang; Su, Lei; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-04-01

    Herein we report for the first time fabrication of reverse bumpy ball (RBB)-type-nanoreactor-based flexible peroxidase-mimic membrane reactors (MRs). The RBB-type nanoreactors with gold nanoparticles embedded in the inner walls of carbon shells were loaded on nylon membranes through a facile filtration approach. The as-prepared flexible catalytic membrane was studied as a peroxidase-mimic MR. It was found that the obtained peroxidase-mimic MR could exhibit several advantages over natural enzymes, such as facile and good recyclability, long-term stability and easy storage. Moreover, the RBB NS-modified nylon MRs as a peroxidase mimic provide a useful colorimetric assay for H₂O₂.

  9. Radiation induced deactivation, post deactivation of horse radish peroxidase, glucose oxidase and the protective effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Min; Zhong Qun; Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In order to check the fact if the radiation induced post deactivation are possessed by all the enzymes, the radiation effects of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOD) were investigated. It was found that in dilute aqueous solution the irradiated HRP has the post deactivation also. The effects of absorbed dose, initial HRP concentration in solution, atmosphere, temperature and additives (three kinds of complex agents: EDTA, CDTA and D) on the post deactivation of HRP were investigated. The regularity of post deactivation of HRP is similar with the catalase. Oxygen in enzyme samples is necessary for the post deactivation. 5 x 10 -3 mol/l of the three additives could control the phenomenon efficiently. Of course, the radiation deactivation of HRP was given as well. In the case of GOD the post deactivation was not found, although it's radiation deactivation is serious. It means that the radiation induced post deactivation is not a common phenomenon for all enzymes

  10. Evaluation of Staphylococcus aureus DNA aptamer by enzyme-linked aptamer assay and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraç, Ceren; Öktem, Hüseyin Avni

    2017-02-01

    To monitor the specificity of Staphylococcus aureus aptamer (SA-31) against its target cell, we used enzyme-linked aptamer assay. In the presence of target cell, horseradish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin bound to biotin-labeled SA-31 showed specific binding to S  aureus among 3 different bacteria with limit of detection of 10 3 colony-forming unit per milliliter. The apparent K a was 1.39 μM -1  ± 0.3 μM -1 . The binding of SA-31 to membrane proteins extracted from cell surface was characterized using isothermal titration calorimetry, and the effect of changes in binding temperature and salt concentrations of binding buffer was evaluated based on thermodynamic parameters (K a , ΔH, and ΔG). Since binding of aptamer to its targets solely depends on its 3-dimensional structure under experimental conditions used in selection process, the change in temperature and ion concentration changed the affinity of SA-31 to its target on surface of bacteria. At 4°C, SA-31 did not show an affinity to its target with poor heat change upon injection of membrane fraction to aptamer solution. However, the apparent association constants of SA-31 slightly varied from K a  = 1.56 μM -1  ± 0.69 μM -1 at 25°C to K a  = 1.03 μM -1  ± 0.9 μM -1 at 37°C. At spontaneously occurring exothermic binding reactions, affinities of S aureus aptamer to its target were also 9.44 μM -1  ± 0.38 μM -1 at 50mM, 1.60 μM -1  ± 0.11 μM -1 at 137mM, and 3.28 μM -1  ± 0.46 μM -1 at 200 mM of salt concentration. In this study, it was demonstrated that enzyme-linked aptamer assay and isothermal titration calorimetry were useful tools for studying the fundamental binding mechanism between a DNA aptamer and its target on the outer surface of S aureus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effect of phenol on germination capacity and polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadić Vojin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and antioxidant enzymes, peroxidase (POX and catalase (CAT during lettuce seed germination at different concentrations of phenol. Out of eleven varieties of lettuce, four were chosen according to their germination tolerance to phenol as follows: plants exhibiting high (Ljubljanska ledenka - LJL and Nansen - N and low toleranace (Little Gem - LG and Majska kraljica - MK. A decrease in germination efficiency after exposure to LD50 of phenol was determined for these four varieties. The effects of phenol treatment on POX, CAT and PPO activities were determined after 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 days of growth at LD50 concentrations. A trend of increased peroxidase activity was observed in seeds grown on LD50 of phenol compared to control seeds. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed at the beginning of treatment for MK, LG and N in seeds grown on phenol as well as in control seeds. A trend of increased PPO activity was observed in all control seeds. We also investigated the affinity of PPO for two different substrates that were used for the determination of enzyme activity. Our results show that LJL and N are the varieties most tolerant to growth on phenol. Here we report on the activities of their antioxidant enzymes and PPO during seed germination. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON173017

  12. Dependency of a therapy-resistant state of cancer cells on a lipid peroxidase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vasanthi S; Ryan, Matthew J; Dhruv, Harshil D; Gill, Shubhroz; Eichhoff, Ossia M; Seashore-Ludlow, Brinton; Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Eaton, John K; Shimada, Kenichi; Aguirre, Andrew J; Viswanathan, Srinivas R; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Tamayo, Pablo; Yang, Wan Seok; Rees, Matthew G; Chen, Sixun; Boskovic, Zarko V; Javaid, Sarah; Huang, Cherrie; Wu, Xiaoyun; Tseng, Yuen-Yi; Roider, Elisabeth M; Gao, Dong; Cleary, James M; Wolpin, Brian M; Mesirov, Jill P; Haber, Daniel A; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Boehm, Jesse S; Kotz, Joanne D; Hon, Cindy S; Chen, Yu; Hahn, William C; Levesque, Mitchell P; Doench, John G; Berens, Michael E; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Stockwell, Brent R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2017-07-27

    Plasticity of the cell state has been proposed to drive resistance to multiple classes of cancer therapies, thereby limiting their effectiveness. A high-mesenchymal cell state observed in human tumours and cancer cell lines has been associated with resistance to multiple treatment modalities across diverse cancer lineages, but the mechanistic underpinning for this state has remained incompletely understood. Here we molecularly characterize this therapy-resistant high-mesenchymal cell state in human cancer cell lines and organoids and show that it depends on a druggable lipid-peroxidase pathway that protects against ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by the build-up of toxic lipid peroxides. We show that this cell state is characterized by activity of enzymes that promote the synthesis of polyunsaturated lipids. These lipids are the substrates for lipid peroxidation by lipoxygenase enzymes. This lipid metabolism creates a dependency on pathways converging on the phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPX4), a selenocysteine-containing enzyme that dissipates lipid peroxides and thereby prevents the iron-mediated reactions of peroxides that induce ferroptotic cell death. Dependency on GPX4 was found to exist across diverse therapy-resistant states characterized by high expression of ZEB1, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition in epithelial-derived carcinomas, TGFβ-mediated therapy-resistance in melanoma, treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer, and sarcomas, which are fixed in a mesenchymal state owing to their cells of origin. We identify vulnerability to ferroptic cell death induced by inhibition of a lipid peroxidase pathway as a feature of therapy-resistant cancer cells across diverse mesenchymal cell-state contexts.

  13. A novel life cycle arising from leaf segments in plants regenerated from horseradish hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Y; Matsuhashi, M

    1995-03-01

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) hairy root clones were established from hairy roots which were transformed with the Ri plasmid in Agrobacterium rhizogenes 15834. The transformed plants, which were regenerated from hairy root clones, had thicker roots with extensive lateral branches and thicker stems, and grew faster compared with non-transformed horseradish plants. Small sections of leaves of the transformed plants generated adventitious roots in phytohormone-free G (modified Gamborg's) medium. Root proliferation was followed by adventitious shoot formation and plant regeneration. Approximately twenty plants were regenerated per square centimeter of leaf. The transformed plants were easily transferable from sterile conditions to soil. When leaf segments of the transformed plants were cultured in a liquid fertilizer under non-sterile conditions, adventitious roots were generated at the cut ends of the leaves. Adventitious shoots were generated at the boundary between the leaf and the adventitious roots and developed into complete plants. This novel life cycle arising from leaf segments is a unique property of the transformed plants derived from hairy root clones.

  14. Nematicidal activity of allylisothiocyanate from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) roots against Meloidogyne incognita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissani, Nadhem; Tedeschi, Paola; Maietti, Annalisa; Brandolini, Vincenzo; Garau, Vincenzo Luigi; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2013-05-22

    In recent years, there has been a great development in the search for new natural pesticides for crop protection aiming a partial or total replacement of currently used chemical nematicides. Glucosinolate breakdown products are volatile and are therefore good candidates for nematodes fumigants. In this article, the methanol-aqueous extract (1:1, w/v) of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) fresh roots (MAH) was in vitro tested for nematicidal activity against second stage (J2) Meloidogyne incognita. The EC50 of MAH after 3 days of J2 immersion in test solutions was 251 ± 46 mg/L. The chemical composition analysis of the extract carried out by the GC-MS technique showed that allylisothicyanate was the most abundant compound. This pure compound induced J2 paralysis with an EC50 of 52.6 ± 45.6 and 6.6 ± 3.4 mg/L after 1 h and 3 days of incubation. The use of LC-MS/MS showed for the first time that horseradish root is rich in polyphenols. The study of isothiocyanate degradation in soil showed that allylisothiocyanate was the most quickly degradable compound (half-life <10 min), whereas no significant differences in half-life time were noted between degradation in regular and autoclaved soil.

  15. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic browning arises by peroxidase in fruits. However, essential oils are recognized as natural antioxidant agents. So in this study, the effect of thyme, coriander and rosemary essential oils were evaluated on the reduction of peroxidase activity in apples (Malus domestica Mill. cv Golden delicious), (M. domestica Mill.

  16. Cloning and analysis of the ascorbate peroxidase gene promoter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) is known to catalyze the reduction of H2O2 to water and enhance plants' tolerance in stress environment. An ascorbate peroxidase protein (BnAPX) was previously isolated from Brassica napus in our laboratory and it was located in the chloroplast. In order to clarify the physiological function of ...

  17. Production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum using solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objectives of this study were to optimize the culture conditions for the production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum, economic utilization of waste corn cobs as inducers substrate by pollution free fermentation technology and to optimize the solid state fermentation (SSF) process for lignin peroxidase ...

  18. Heat stable peroxidases from Vigna species (V) | Mbassi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoots of three landraces of a Vigna species from two climatic areas of Cameroon were evaluated for their content of heat-resistant peroxidases. The peroxidase activity in the three landraces was detected with a greater catalytic efficiency for oxidation of O-dianisidine relative to ABTS (2, 2'-azino-bis-(3- ...

  19. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-05-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Lignin peroxidase mediated biotransformations useful in the biocatalytic production of vanillin

    OpenAIRE

    Have, ten, R.

    2000-01-01

    This research concentrates on lignin peroxidase (LiP) mediated biotrans-formations that are useful in producing vanillin.

    In order to obtain this extracellular enzyme, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was cultivated on nitrogen rich medium. This procedure resulted in a successful LiP production of 600 U/L. Peptone in the culture medium was shown to interfere with the standard LiP assay in which the formation of veratraldehyde (V...

  1. Colorimetric detection of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor based on the peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Hong, Guo-Lin; Lin, Feng-Lin; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-07

    Herein, we reported for the first time that gold nanoparticles-catalyzed 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 system can serve as an ultrasensitive colorimetric pH indicator. Gold nanoparticles acted as a catalyst and imitated the function of horseradish peroxidase. The absorbance at 450 nm of the yellow-color product in the catalytic reaction exhibited a linear fashion over the pH range of 6.40-6.60. On the basis of this property, we constructed a novel sensing platform for the determination of urea, urease, and urease inhibitor. The limit of detection for urea and urease was 5 μM and 1.8 U/L, respectively. The half-maximal inhibition value IC50 of acetohydroxamic acid was found to be 0.05 mM. Urea in human urine and urease in soil were detected with satisfied results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative proteomics reveals that peroxidases play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mudassar Nawaz; Sakata, Katsumi; Hiraga, Susumu; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-12-05

    Soybean is an important legume crop that exhibits markedly reduced growth and yields under flooding conditions. To unravel the mechanisms involved in recovery after flooding in soybean root, gel-free proteomic analysis was performed. Morphological analysis revealed that growth suppression was more severe with increased flooding duration. Out of a total of 1645 and 1707 identified proteins, 73 and 21 proteins were changed significantly during the recovery stage following 2 and 4 days flooding, respectively. Based on the proteomic, clustering, and in silico protein-protein interaction analyses, six key enzymes were analyzed at the mRNA level. Lipoxygenase 1, which was increased at the protein level during the recovery period, was steadily down-regulated at the mRNA level. The peroxidase superfamily protein continuously increased in abundance during the course of recovery and was up-regulated at the mRNA level. HAD acid phosphatase was decreased at the protein level and down-regulated at the transcript level, while isoflavone reductase and an unknown protein were increased at both the protein and mRNA levels. Consistent with these findings, the enzymatic activity of peroxidase was decreased under flooding stress but increased significantly during the recovery sage. These results suggest that peroxidases might play key roles in post-flooding recovery in soybean roots through the scavenging of toxic radicals.

  3. Effects of ageing on peroxidase activity and localization in radish (Raphanus sativus L. seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Scialabba

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase activity was assayed in crude extracts of integument, cotyledons and embryo axis of radish seeds, deteriorated under accelerated ageing conditions. Over five days of ageing, in which germination decreased from 100 to 52%, the enzyme activity in integument was higher than that in other seed parts, increasing in the first days of ageing and then decreasing sharply in extremely aged seeds. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed four peroxidase isoenzymes with MM of 98, 52.5, 32.8 and 29.5 kDa in the embryo axis of unaged seeds, and only the 32.8 and 29.5 kDa MM isoforms in the integument and cotyledons. In these parts of the seed, only the 29.5 kDa MM isoenzyme increased in activity in early days of ageing and decreased thereafter. In the embryo axis, the 29.5 kDa MM isoenzyme activity increased slowly in the first day of ageing, while the 98 and 52.5 kDa MM isoenzyme activities disappeared. A cytochemical localization of peroxidase activity in the various tissues showed that main differences between unaged and extremely aged seeds occurred in the embryo axis.

  4. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  5. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  6. Leishmania mexicana amazonensis: heterogeneity in 5-nucleotidase and peroxidase activities of mononuclear phagocytes during in vivo and in vitro infection

    OpenAIRE

    Côrte-Real, Suzana; Grimaldi Junior, Gabriel; Meirelles, Maria de Nazareth Leal de

    1988-01-01

    The degree of maturation of cells of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System (MPS), during in vivo and in vitro infection by Leishmania mexicana amazonenesis, was evaluated in this study. The macrophages' differentiation was assayed by cytochemical characterization at the ultrastrctural level, using two well-established markers: 5'-nucleotidase enzyme activity, for revealing the mature cells, and the peroxidase activity present in the cell granules to demonstrate immature mononuclear phagocytes. onl...

  7. Peroxidase production and ligninolytic potentials of fresh water bacteria Raoultella ornithinolytica and Ensifer adhaerens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji O. Falade

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in novel ligninolytic bacteria has remained topical due to, in part, the maneuverability of the bacterial genome. Conversely, the fungal genome lacks the dexterity for similar maneuverability thus, posing challenges in the fungal enzyme yield optimization process. Some impact of this situation includes the inability to commercialize the bio-catalytic process of lignin degradation by fungi. Consequently, this study assessed some fresh water bacteria isolates for ligninolytic and peroxidase properties through the utilization and degradation of model lignin compounds (guaiacol and veratryl alcohol and the decolourization of selected ligninolytic indicator dyes; Azure B (AZB, Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR and Congo Red (CR. Bacterial strains with appreciable ligninolytic and peroxidase production potentials were identified through 16S rDNA sequence analysis and the nucleotide sequences deposited in the GenBank. About 5 isolates were positive for the degradation of both guaiacol (GA and veratryl alcohol (VA thus, accounting for about 17% of the test isolates. Similarly, AZB, RBBR and CR were respectively decolorized by 3, 2 and 5 bacterial strains thus, accounting for 10%, 7% and 17% of the test isolates. Two of the test bacterial strains were able to decolourize AZB, RBBR and CR respectively and these bacterial strains were identified as Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2 with respective accession numbers as KX640917 and KX640918. Upon quantitation of the peroxidase activities; 5250 ± 0.00 U/L was recorded against Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and 5833 ± 0.00 U/L against Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2. The ligninolytic and dye decolourization properties of Raoultella ornithinolytica OKOH-1 and Ensifer adhaerens NWODO-2 marks for novelty particularly, as dyes with arene substituents were decolourized. Consequently, the potentials for the industrial applicability of these test bacterial strains abound as

  8. A sensitive colorimetric aptasensor based on trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuwen; Xu, Naihan; Tan, Chunyan; Fang, Wei; Tan, Ying; Jiang, Yuyang

    2018-08-14

    In this study, a novel colorimetric aptasensor was prepared by coupling trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme and magnetic nanoparticles for highly sensitive and selective detection of target proteins. A three G-quadruplex (G4) DNA-hemin complex was employed as the trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme, in which hemin assisted the G4-DNA to fold into a catalytic conformation and act as an enzyme. The design of the aptasensor includes magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), complementary DNA (cDNA) modified with biotin, and a label-free single strand DNA (ssDNA) including the aptamer and trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme. The trivalent DNAzyme, which has the highest catalytic activity among multivalent DNAzymes, catalyzed the H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation of ABTS. The colorless ABTS was oxidized to produce a blue-green product that can be clearly distinguished by the naked eye. The aptamer and trivalent peroxidase-mimic DNAzyme promote the specificity and sensitivity of this detection method, which can be generalized for other targets by simply replacing the corresponding aptamers. To demonstrate the feasible use of the aptasensor for target detection, a well-known tumor biomarker MUC1 was evaluated as the model target. The limits of detection were determined to be 5.08 and 5.60 nM in a linear range of 50-1000 nM in a buffer solution and 10% serum system, respectively. This colorimetric and label-free aptasensor with excellent sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability has potential application in disease diagnoses, prognosis tracking, and therapeutic evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of an Aqueous Extract from Horseradish Root (Armoracia rusticana Radix against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cellular Inflammation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Herz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana is a perennial crop and its root is used in condiments. Traditionally, horseradish root is used to treat bacterial infections of the respiratory tract and urinary bladder. The antiphlogistic activity, determined in activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, was evaluated for an aqueous extract and its subfractions, separated by HPLC. Compound analysis was done by UHPLC-QToF/MS and GC-MS. The aqueous extract concentration-dependently inhibited the anti-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS in terms of TNF-α release at ≥37 μg/mL. Further, the cyclooxygenase as well as lipoxygenase pathway was blocked by the extract as demonstrated by inhibition of COX-2 protein expression and PGE2 synthesis at ≥4 μg/mL and leukotriene LTB4 release. Mechanistic studies revealed that inhibition of ERK1/2 and c-Jun activation preceded COX-2 suppression upon plant extract treatment in the presence of LPS. Chemical analysis identified target compounds with a medium polarity as relevant for the observed bioactivity. Importantly, allyl isothiocyanate, which is quite well known for its anti-inflammatory capacity and as the principal pungent constituent in horseradish roots, was not relevant for the observations. The results suggest that horseradish root exerts an antiphlogistic activity in human immune cells by regulation of the COX and LOX pathway via MAPK signalling.

  10. Evaluation of an Aqueous Extract from Horseradish Root (Armoracia rusticana Radix) against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Cellular Inflammation Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Corinna; Tran, Hoai Thi Thu; Márton, Melinda-Rita; Maul, Ronald; Baldermann, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Lamy, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Horseradish ( Armoracia rusticana ) is a perennial crop and its root is used in condiments. Traditionally, horseradish root is used to treat bacterial infections of the respiratory tract and urinary bladder. The antiphlogistic activity, determined in activated primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), was evaluated for an aqueous extract and its subfractions, separated by HPLC. Compound analysis was done by UHPLC-QToF/MS and GC-MS. The aqueous extract concentration-dependently inhibited the anti-inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in terms of TNF- α release at ≥37  μ g/mL. Further, the cyclooxygenase as well as lipoxygenase pathway was blocked by the extract as demonstrated by inhibition of COX-2 protein expression and PGE 2 synthesis at ≥4  μ g/mL and leukotriene LTB4 release. Mechanistic studies revealed that inhibition of ERK1/2 and c-Jun activation preceded COX-2 suppression upon plant extract treatment in the presence of LPS. Chemical analysis identified target compounds with a medium polarity as relevant for the observed bioactivity. Importantly, allyl isothiocyanate, which is quite well known for its anti-inflammatory capacity and as the principal pungent constituent in horseradish roots, was not relevant for the observations. The results suggest that horseradish root exerts an antiphlogistic activity in human immune cells by regulation of the COX and LOX pathway via MAPK signalling.

  11. Synergistic Use of Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs) and “Capillary Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)” for High Sensitivity and Fast Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Cho, Hyo Young; Jeong, Bongjin; Byun, Sangwon; Huh, JaeDoo; Kim, Young Jun

    2017-01-01

    Using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on “capillary enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)”, we produced highly sensitive and rapid assays, which are the major attributes for point-of-care applications. First, in order to understand the size effect of AuNPs, AuNPs of varying diameters (5 nm, 10 nm, 15 nm, 20 nm, 30 nm, and 50 nm) conjugated with Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-C reactive protein (antiCRP) (AuNP•antiCRP-HRP) were used for well-plate ELISA. AuNP of 10 nm produced the largest optical density, enabling detection of 0.1 ng/mL of CRP with only 30 s of incubation, in contrast to 10 ng/mL for the ELISA run in the absence of AuNP. Then, AuNP of 10 nm conjugated with antiCRP-HRP (AuNP•antiCRP-HRP) was used for “capillary ELISA” to detect as low as 0.1 ng/mL of CRP. Also, kinetic study on both 96-well plates and in a capillary tube using antiCRP-HRP or AuNP•antiCRP-HRP showed a synergistic effect between AuNP and the capillary system, in which the fastest assay was observed from the “AuNP capillary ELISA”, with its maximum absorbance reaching 2.5 min, while the slowest was the typical well-plate ELISA with its maximum absorbance reaching in 13.5 min. PMID:29278402

  12. Pseudo-immunolabelling with the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) due to the presence of endogenous biotin in retinal Müller cells of goldfish and salamander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharjee, J.; Nunes Cardozo, B.; Kamphuis, W.; Kamermans, M.; Vrensen, G. F.

    1997-01-01

    Immunodetection techniques are dependent on enzyme-protein conjugates for the visualisation of antigen-antibody complexes. One of the most widely used is the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method. The present study demonstrates that direct treatment of goldfish and salamander retinal

  13. Characterization of two catalase-peroxidase-encoding genes in Fusarium verticillioides reveals differential responses to in vitro versus in planta oxidative challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are a superfamily of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-degrading enzymes believed to be horizontally acquired by ancient Ascomycota from bacteria. Subsequent gene duplication resulted in two KatG paralogs in ascomycetes: the widely distributed intracellular KatG1 group, and ...

  14. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A) + RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L- 35 S-methionine. The 35 S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues

  15. Insecticidal activity and fungitoxicity of plant extracts and components of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) and garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Paola; Leis, Marilena; Pezzi, Marco; Civolani, Stefano; Maietti, Annalisa; Brandolini, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    To avoid environmental pollution and health problems caused by the use of traditional synthetic pesticides, there is a trend to search for naturally occurring toxicants from plants. Among the compounds discussed for anti-fungal and insecticidal activity, the natural extracts from garlic and horseradish have attracted considerable attention. The objective of this study is to determine the insecticidal and anti-fungal activity of Armoracia rusticana and Allium sativum L. extracts against larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and some pathogenic fungi. For the insecticidal test, horseradish and garlic extracts were prepared from fresh plants (cultivated in Emilia Romagna region) in a solution of ethanol 80 % and the two different solutions were used at different concentrations (for the determination of the lethal dose) against the fourth instar mosquito's larvae. The fungicidal test was carried out by the agar plates technique using garlic and horseradish extracts in a 10 % ethanol solution against the following organisms: Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Trichoderma longibrachiatum, Botrytis cinerea Pers., Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. and Fusarium culmorum (Wm. G. Sm.) Sacc. The first results demonstrated that the horseradish ethanol extracts present only a fungistatic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc., Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. and F. culmorum (Wm.G. Sm) Sacc. while garlic extracts at the same concentration provided a good fungicidal activity above all against Botrytis cinerea Pers. and S. rolfsii. A. rusticana and A. sativum preparations showed also an interesting and significant insecticidal activity against larvae of A. albopictus, even if horseradish presented a higher efficacy (LC₅₀ value of 2.34 g/L), approximately two times higher than garlic one (LC₅₀ value of 4.48 g/L).

  16. Isolation, characterization and transcriptome analysis of a novel Antarctic Aspergillus sydowii strain MS-19 as a potential lignocellulosic enzyme source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Bailin; Wang, Nengfei; Liu, Shenghao; Liu, Feng; Yin, Xiaofei; Shen, Jihong

    2017-05-30

    With the growing demand for fossil fuels and the severe energy crisis, lignocellulose is widely regarded as a promising cost-effective renewable resource for ethanol production, and the use of lignocellulose residues as raw material is remarkable. Polar organisms have important value in scientific research and development for their novelty, uniqueness and diversity. In this study, a fungus Aspergillus sydowii MS-19, with the potential for lignocellulose degradation was screened out and isolated from an Antarctic region. The growth profile of Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 was measured, revealing that Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 could utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Its ability to synthesize low-temperature lignin peroxidase (Lip) and manganese peroxidase (Mnp) enzymes was verified, and the properties of these enzymes were also investigated. High-throughput sequencing was employed to identify and characterize the transcriptome of Aspergillus sydowii MS-19. Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZyme)-annotated genes in Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 were compared with those in the brown-rot fungus representative species, Postia placenta and Penicillium decumbens. There were 701CAZymes annotated in Aspergillus sydowii MS-19, including 17 cellulases and 19 feruloyl esterases related to lignocellulose-degradation. Remarkably, one sequence annotated as laccase was obtained, which can degrade lignin. Three peroxidase sequences sharing a similar structure with typical lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase were also found and annotated as haem-binding peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase-peroxidase. In this study, the fungus Aspergillus sydowii MS-19 was isolated and shown to synthesize low-temperature lignin-degrading enzymes: lignin peroxidase (Lip) and manganese peroxidase (Mnp). These findings provide useful information to improve our understanding of low-temperature lignocellulosic enzyme production by polar microorganisms and to facilitate research and

  17. Preparation and characterization of room temperature ionic liquid/single-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposites and their application to the direct electrochemistry of heme-containing proteins/enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Pan; Liu, Shuna; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the formation and possible electrochemical application of a novel nanocomposite based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim]BF 4 , a hydrophilic RTIL) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim]PF 6 , a hydrophobic RTIL). The nanocomposites ([bmim]BF 4 -SWNTs, and [bmim]PF 6 -SWNTs) were formed by simply grinding the SWNTs with the respective RTIL. The results of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the nanocomposites were formed by adsorption of an imidazolium ion on the surface of SWNTs via the 'cation-π' interaction. SEM images showed that [bmim]BF 4 -SWNTs (or [bmim]PF 6 -SWNTs) nanocomposites could uniformly cover the surface of a glassy carbon (GC) electrode resulting in a RTILs-SWNTs/GC modified electrode with a high stability. The RTILs-SWNTs composite could be readily used as a matrix to immobilize heme-containing proteins/enzymes (myoglobin, cytochrome c, and horseradish peroxidase) without undergoing denaturation, as was verified by UV-vis and circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopic results. The voltammetric results showed that heme-containing proteins/enzymes entrapped in RTILs-SWNTs composites displayed a pair of well-defined, stable redox peaks, which were ascribed to their direct electron-transfer reactions. The results of controlled experiments showed that the positive charged imidazolium ion played a significant effect on the electrochemical parameters, such as the redox peak separation and the value of the formal potentials, etc., of the electron-transfer reaction of non-neutral species dissolved in solution or immobilized on the electrode surface. Further results demonstrated that the heme-containing proteins/enzymes entrapped in RTILs-SWNTs composites could still retain their bioelectrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen

  18. Detection of enzyme activity in decontaminated spices of industrial use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Müller, R.; Theobald, R.

    1995-01-01

    A range of decontaminated spices of industrial use have been examinated for their enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, amylase, lipase activity). The genuine enzymes remain fully active in irradiated spices, whereas the microbial load is clearly reduced. In contrast steam treated spices no longer demonstrate enzyme activities. Steam treatment offers e.g. black pepper without lipase activity, which can no longer cause fat deterioration. Low microbial load in combination with clearly detectable enzyme activity in spices is an indication for irradiation, whereas, reduced microbial contamination combined with enzyme inactivation indicate steam treatment of raw material [de

  19. Data on blueberry peroxidase kinetic characterization and stability towards thermal and high pressure processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netsanet Shiferaw Terefe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to a research article entitled ‘Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase’ (Terefe et al., 2017 [1]. In this article, we report original data on the activity of partially purified blueberry peroxidase at different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and phenlylenediamine as substrates and the effects of thermal and high pressure processing on the activity of the enzyme. Data on the stability of the enzyme during thermal (at temperatures ranging from 40 to 80 °C and combined thermal-high pressure processing (100–690 MPa, 30–90 °C are included in this report. The data are presented in this format in order to facilitate comparison with data from other researchers and allow statistical analyses and modeling by others in the field.

  20. Effects of topical vitamin E on corneal superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities and polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, Ayse; Bilgihan, Kamil; Yis, Ozgür; Sezer, Cem; Akyol, Gülen; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2003-04-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) induces free radical formation and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell infiltration in the cornea. Vitamin E is a free radical scavenger and protects the cells from reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effects of topical vitamin E on corneal PMN cell infiltration and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities after PRK. We studied four groups, each consisting of seven eyes. Group 1 were control eyes. In group 2 the corneal epithelium was removed by a blunt spatula (epithelial scrape). In group 3, corneal photoablation (59 micro m, 5 dioptres) was performed after epithelial removal (traditional PRK). In group 4 we tested the effects of topical Vitamin E after traditional PRK. Corneal tissues were removed and studied with enzymatic analysis (measurement of corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities) and histologically. Stromal PMN leucocyte counts were significantly higher after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). Corneal superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased significantly after mechanical epithelial removal and traditional PRK (p < 0.05). In group 4, treated with vitamin E, corneal superoxide dismutase activity did not differ significantly from that in the medically non-treated groups, nor did corneal PMN cell infiltration after traditional PRK. The reduction of corneal glutathione peroxidase activity after PRK was reduced significantly after topical vitamin E treatment. Topical vitamin E treatment may be useful for reducing the harmful effects of reactive oxygen radical after epithelial scraping and PRK in that it increases corneal glutathione peroxidase activity.

  1. Apple and quince peroxidase activity in response to essential oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... activities of edible coatings enriched with natural plant extracts such as rosemary ..... its oxidation by ascorbate peroxidase activity (Talano et al., 2008). ... delicious and quince improved the antioxidant protection of the fruits ...

  2. Evaluation of Crude Oil Biodegradation Efficiency and Peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Increase in biomass enhanced degradation efficiency above 80 % after 10 days for all concentration of crude oil studied. Peroxidase ... compounds by various bacteria and fungi (Gianfreda et al, 1999) ... into a clean plastic container. Microbial.

  3. Cloning and characterization of an ascorbate peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to explore expression patterns of. MaAPX1 in ... and the activity of a number of enzymatic systems, including ... peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase and catalase.

  4. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  5. Platelet crossmatch tests using radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A or peroxidase anti-peroxidase in alloimmunised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yam, P.; Petz, L.D.; Scott, E.P.; Santos, S.

    1984-01-01

    Refractoriness to random-donor platelets as a result of alloimmunization remains a major problem in long-term platelet transfusion therapy despite the use of HLA-matched platelets. A study has been made of two methods for detection of platelet associated IgG as platelet crossmatch tests for the selection of platelet donors. These methods use radiolabelled staphylococcal protein A( 125 I-SPA) and peroxidase anti-peroxidase (PAP), respectively. One hundred and ten crossmatch tests using 125 I-SPA were performed retrospectively in 18 alloimmunized patients. The results indicated that the predictive value of a positive or a negative test was 87%; the sensitivity was 73% and the specificity was 95%. Results with the PAP test were similar. The HLA types were known for 48 donor-recipient pairs. With few exceptions, there was a correlation between the results of the platelet crossmatch tests and the effectiveness of platelet transfusion regardless of the degree of HLA match. These results indicate that platelet crossmatch tests may be valuable even when closely HLA matched donors are not available. A large-scale prospective study is warranted, particularly in highly immunized patients. (author)

  6. Peroxidase Biocathodes for a Biofuel Cell Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Celso; Shipovskov, Stepan; Ferapontova, Elena

    at 1.5 V for 6 days; the maximum power density of the cell was 98 W cm-2 at 0.6 V and pH 6. When coupled to the H2O2-producing glucose oxidizing enzymes (glucose oxidase or pyranose oxidase), the HRP-biocathode could function in the presence of glucose with no essential loss in I - V characteristics...

  7. Enzyme-mediated hyaluronic acid-tyramine hydrogels for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Keming; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Lee, Fan; Bae, Ki Hyun; Gao, Shujun; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2015-09-01

    The propagation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds facilitates the cell expansion process and supplies pluripotent cells of high quality for broad-spectrum applications in regenerative medicine. Herein, we report an enzyme-mediated hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tyr) hydrogel that encapsulated and propagated hESCs in 3D. HA-Tyr hydrogels were formed by crosslinking the tyramine moieties with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). By changing the HRP and H2O2 concentration, we prepared HA-Tyr hydrogels of different mechanical strength and studied the self-renewal properties of hESCs in these scaffolds. We observed that both the chemical composition and mechanical strength of substrates were important factors affecting cell proliferation and pluripotency. The HA-Tyr hydrogel with a compressive modulus of ∼350Pa supported the proliferation of hESCs at the pluripotent state in both mTeSR1 medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-conditioned medium. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that hESCs proliferated well and formed spheroid structures in 3D, without undergoing apoptosis. The hESCs cultured in HA-Tyr hydrogels showed high expression of CD44 and pluripotency markers. These cells exhibited the capability to form cell derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the genetic integrity of the hESCs was unaffected in the 3D cultivation system. The scope of this study is to provide a stable 3D cultivation system for the expansion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards clinical applications. We report an enzyme mediated hyaluronic acid-tyramine (HA-Tyr) hydrogel that encapsulated and propagated hESCs in 3D. Unlike other HA-based photo-crosslinked hydrogel systems reported, we investigated the effects of mechanical strength of hydrogels on the self-renewal properties of hESCs in 3D. Then, we characterized hESCs cultured in hydrogels with lower mechanical strength

  8. Peroxidase activity in root hairs of cress (lepidium sativum L.) Cytochemical localization and radioactive labelling of wall bound peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaar, K.

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructural localization of peroxidase activity in young, growing root hairs of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) after assay with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine is reported. Prominent peroxidase activity has been found in the dictyosomes and the associated vesicles, in ribosomes on ER-cisternae, as well as in the cell wall. On the basis of both ultrastructural and cytochemical evidence it is proposed that peroxidase in root hairs is synthesized on the ER- and within dictyosome cisternae packaged and transported in secretory vesicles and extruded into the cell wall particularily at the tip region of a root hair. The kinetic of Golgi apparatus mediated peroxidasesecretion was monitored by measuring the 55 Fe protoheme content of primary cell walls. Peroxidase secretion seems to be enhanced during stress incubation in destilled water. Secretory activity in root hairs is 20 times higher than in cells of the root body. (author)

  9. Enzyme Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Rosanna G.; Ferrari, Luna De; Mavridis, Lazaros; McDonagh, James L.; Mitchell, John B. O.; Nath, Neetika

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 50 years, sequencing, structural biology and bioinformatics have completely revolutionised biomolecular science, with millions of sequences and tens of thousands of three dimensional structures becoming available. The bioinformatics of enzymes is well served by, mostly free, online databases. BRENDA describes the chemistry, substrate specificity, kinetics, preparation and biological sources of enzymes, while KEGG is valuable for understanding enzymes and metabolic pathways. EzCatDB, SFLD and MACiE are key repositories for data on the chemical mechanisms by which enzymes operate. At the current rate of genome sequencing and manual annotation, human curation will never finish the functional annotation of the ever-expanding list of known enzymes. Hence there is an increasing need for automated annotation, though it is not yet widespread for enzyme data. In contrast, functional ontologies such as the Gene Ontology already profit from automation. Despite our growing understanding of enzyme structure and dynamics, we are only beginning to be able to design novel enzymes. One can now begin to trace the functional evolution of enzymes using phylogenetics. The ability of enzymes to perform secondary functions, albeit relatively inefficiently, gives clues as to how enzyme function evolves. Substrate promiscuity in enzymes is one example of imperfect specificity in protein-ligand interactions. Similarly, most drugs bind to more than one protein target. This may sometimes result in helpful polypharmacology as a drug modulates plural targets, but also often leads to adverse side-effects. Many cheminformatics approaches can be used to model the interactions between druglike molecules and proteins in silico. We can even use quantum chemical techniques like DFT and QM/MM to compute the structural and energetic course of enzyme catalysed chemical reaction mechanisms, including a full description of bond making and breaking. PMID:23116471

  10. Effects of pH and Temperature on Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase Production and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Kongsaeree, Puapong; Schilke, Karl; Lajoie, Curtis; Kelly, Christine

    The enzyme manganese peroxidase (MnP) is produced by numerous white-rot fungi to overcome biomass recalcitrance caused by lignin. MnP acts directly on lignin and increases access of the woody structure to synergistic wood-degrading enzymes such as cellulases and xylanases. Recombinant MnP (rMnP) can be produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris αMnP1-1 in fed-batch fermentations. The effects of pH and temperature on recombinant manganese peroxidase (rMnP) production by P. pastoris αMnP1-1 were investigated in shake flask and fed-batch fermentations. The optimum pH and temperature for a standardized fed-batch fermentation process for rMnP production in P. pastoris ctMnP1-1 were determined to be pH 6 and 30 °C, respectively. P. pastoris αMnP1-1 constitutively expresses the manganese peroxidase (mnp1) complementary DNA from Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and the rMnP has similar kinetic characteristics and pH activity and stability ranges as the wild-type MnP (wtMnP). Cultivation of P. chrysosporium mycelia in stationary flasks for production of heme peroxidases is commonly conducted at low pH (pH 4.2). However, shake flask and fed-batch fermentation experiments with P. pastoris αMnP1-1 demonstrated that rMnP production is highest at pH 6, with rMnP concentrations in the medium declining rapidly at pH less than 5.5, although cell growth rates were similar from pH 4-7. Investigations of the cause of low rMnP production at low pH were consistent with the hypothesis that intracellular proteases are released from dead and lysed yeast cells during the fermentation that are active against rMnP at pH less than 5.5.

  11. Catalase in peroxidase clothing: Interdependent cooperation of two cofactors in the catalytic versatility of KatG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuma, Olive J; Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2014-02-15

    Catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is found in eubacteria, archaea, and lower eukaryotae. The enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has received the greatest attention because of its role in activation of the antitubercular pro-drug isoniazid, and the high frequency with which drug resistance stems from mutations to the katG gene. Generally, the catalase activity of KatGs is striking. It rivals that of typical catalases, enzymes with which KatGs share no structural similarity. Instead, catalatic turnover is accomplished with an active site that bears a strong resemblance to a typical peroxidase (e.g., cytochrome c peroxidase). Yet, KatG is the only member of its superfamily with such capability. It does so using two mutually dependent cofactors: a heme and an entirely unique Met-Tyr-Trp (MYW) covalent adduct. Heme is required to generate the MYW cofactor. The MYW cofactor allows KatG to leverage heme intermediates toward a unique mechanism for H2O2 oxidation. This review evaluates the range of intermediates identified and their connection to the diverse catalytic processes KatG facilitates, including mechanisms of isoniazid activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Caracterização isozimática e atividade de peroxidase em folhas de plantas hiperídrica, intermediária e normal de Bidens pilosa L. mantidas in vitro Isoezymatic characterization and peroxidase activity in leaves of hyperhydric, intermediary and normal plants of Bidens pilosa L. grown in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Emílio Zanzirolani de Oliveira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram caracterizadas as plantas: hiperídrica, intermediária e normal de um clone de Bidens pilosa mantido em cultivo in vitro por meio de isozimas e da atividade de peroxidase. Empregando-se a eletroforese em géis de amido a 12%, testou-se seis isozimas, sendo detectado polimorfismo em peroxidase e fosfatase ácida, permitindo caracterizar cada tipo de planta. Não houve polimorfismo em fosfogluco isomerase, fosfoglucomutase, glutamato oxaloacetato transaminase e malato desidrogenase. A atividade da peroxidase foi maior nas plantas hiperídricas e intermediárias. Conclui-se que a variabilidade enzimática tem potencial como marcador de hiperidricidade em plantas mantidas in vitro.Activity of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7 and isozymes analysis of a Bidens pilosa clone maintained in vitro culture were characterized in hyperhydric, intermediary and normal plants. Electrophorese in starch gels (12% of six isozymes systems was tested, polymorphisms in peroxidase and acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2 were detected. There was absence of polymorphism in phosphoglucoisomerase (EC 5.3.1.9, phosphoglucomutase (EC 5.4.2.2, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (EC 2.6.1.1 and malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37. Comparing the activity of peroxidase enzyme, it was higher in hyperhydric and intermediary plants in relation to normal ones. Enzymatic variability is a potential tool as hyperhydricity marker in plants grown in vitro.

  13. Construction and Characterization of Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin (VHb) with Enhanced Peroxidase Activity for Efficient Degradation of Textile Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zidong; Li, Wei; Li, Haichao; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yuebin; Cao, Yufeng; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, Zhengqiang

    2015-09-01

    Pollution resulting from the discharge of textile dyes into water systems has become a major global concern. Because peroxidases are known for their ability to decolorize and detoxify textile dyes, the peroxidase activity of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) has recently been studied. It is found that VHb and variants of this enzyme show great promise for enzymatic decolorization of dyes and may play a role in achieving their successful removal from industrial wastewater. The level of VHb peroxidase activity correlates with two amino acid residues present within the conserved distal pocket, at positions 53 and 54. In this work, sitedirected mutagenesis of these residues was performed and resulted in improved VHb peroxidase activity. The double mutant, Q53H/P54C, shows the highest dye decolorization and removal efficiency, with 70% removal efficiency within 5 min. UV spectral studies of Q53H/P54C reveals a more compact structure and an altered porphyrin environment (λSoret = 413 nm) relative to that of wild-type VHb (λSoret = 406), and differential scanning calorimetry data indicate that the VHb variant protein structure is more stable. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopic studies indicate that this variant's increased protein structural stability is due to an increase in helical structure, as deduced from the melting temperature, which is higher than 90°C. Therefore, the VHb variant Q53H/P54C shows promise as an excellent peroxidase, with excellent dye decolorization activity and a more stable structure than wild-type VHb under high-temperature conditions.

  14. Peroxidase activity in roots of arracacha affected by pH and temperature = Atividade da peroxidase em raízes de batata-baroa afetada pelo pH e temperatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Nunes Menolli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, roots of arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhyza Bancroft were stored at 5ºC to induce chilling injury symptoms and stress-related peroxidase activity. Later, peroxidase kinetic activity was determined in different pH and temperature conditions. For this, soluble crude extract was sequentially saturated with ammonium sulfate, obtaining a semi-purified enzyme solution used for the analysis. Activity of peroxidase induced by the chilling at 5oC was determined from pH 2.5 to 9.0 and at temperature ranging from 10 to80oC. The peroxidase had higher activity when the reaction occurred between pH 5.5 and 6.0 and at temperature of 30oC. Complete inactivation of the activity was observed in pH 2.5 after 60 minutes of pre-incubation or at 60oC for 10 minutes or alternatively at 70oCafter 5 minutes of pre-incubation. The enzyme is more susceptible to inactivation in acid than alkaline pHs or alternatively using heat treatment.Neste trabalho, raízes de batata-baroa (Arracacia xanthorrhiza Bancroft foram armazenadas a 5oC para induzir injúria por frio e expressar atividade da peroxidase de estresse. Posteriormente, a cinética de atividade foi determinada em diferentes condições depHs e temperatura. Para isto, extrato solúvel da raiz foi sequencialmente saturado com sulfato de amônio, obtendo-se uma preparação semi-purificada para a análise enzimática. Atividade peroxidativa induzida pela temperatura de armazenamento de 5oC foideterminada em pHs de 2,5 a 9,0 e a temperaturas de 10 a 80oC. A atividade da peroxidase foi maior quando a reação foi realizada nos pHs de 5,5 e 6,0 e temperatura de 30oC. A inativação completa da enzima ocorreu em pH de 2,5 após 60 min. de pré-incubação ou a60oC por 10 min., e alternativamente a 70oC após 5 min. de pré-incubação. A enzima foi mais susceptível à inativação em pH ácido do que alcalino, podendo também ser inativada pelo tratamento de calor.

  15. Selenium-containing enzymes in mammals: Chemical perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of selenocysteine moiety in natural mammalian enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), iodothyronine deiodinase (ID) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is highlighted and the effect of other amino acid residues located in close proximity to selenocysteine is described. It is evident from various studies that ...

  16. Using ultrasound technology for the inactivation and thermal sensitization of peroxidase in green coconut water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Meliza Lindsay; Trevilin, Júlia Hellmeister; Funcia, Eduardo Dos Santos; Gut, Jorge Andrey Wilhelms; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2017-05-01

    Green coconut water has unique nutritional and sensorial qualities. Despite the different technologies already studied, its enzymatic stability is still challenging. This study evaluated the use of ultrasound technology (US) for inactivating/sensitizing coconut water peroxidase (POD). The effect of both US application alone and as a pre-treatment to thermal processing was evaluated. The enzyme activity during US processing was reduced 27% after 30min (286W/L, 20kHz), demonstrating its high resistance. The thermal inactivation was described by the Weibull model under non-isothermal conditions. The enzyme became sensitized to heat after US pre-treatment. Further, the use of US resulted in more uniform heat resistance. The results suggest that US is a good technology for sensitizing enzymes before thermal processing (even for an enzyme with high thermal resistance). Therefore, the use of this technology could decrease the undesirable effects of long times and/or the high temperatures of the conventional thermal processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glucosinolate profile and distribution among plant tissues and phenological stages of field-grown horseradish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agneta, Rosa; Lelario, Filomena; De Maria, Susanna; Möllers, Christian; Bufo, Sabino Aurelio; Rivelli, Anna Rita

    2014-10-01

    Profile and distribution of glucosinolates (GLS) were detected in plant tissues of horseradish at different developmental stages: beginning of vegetative re-growth, flowering and silique formation. The GLS profile varied widely in the different tissues: we identified 17 GLS in roots and sprouts, one of which was not previously characterized in horseradish, i.e. the 2(S)-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl-GLS (glucobarbarin) and/or 2(R)-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl-GLS (epiglucobarbarin), 11 already found in the roots, including the putative 2-methylsulfonyl-oxo-ethyl-GLS, and 5 previously recognized only in the sprouts. Fifteen of those GLS were also identified in young and cauline leaves, 12 in the mature leaves and 13 in the inflorescences. No difference in GLS profile was observed in plant among the phenological stages. Differences in concentrations of GLS, quantified as desulfated, were found in plant. At the beginning of vegetative re-growth, sprouts while showing the same profile of the roots were much richer in GLS having the highest total GLS concentrations (117.5 and 7.7μmolg(-1) dry weight in sprouts and roots, respectively). During flowering and silique forming stages, the roots still maintained lower amount of total GLS (7.4μmolg(-1) of dry weight, on average) with respect to the epigeous tissues, in which mature and young leaves showed the highest total concentrations (70.5 and 73.8μmolg(-1) of dry weight on average, respectively). Regardless of the phenological stages, the aliphatic GLS were always predominant in all tissues (95%) followed by indolic (2.6%) and benzenic (2.4%) GLS. Sinigrin contributed more than 90% of the total GLS concentration. Aliphatic GLS concentrations were much higher in the epigeous tissues, particularly in the mature and young leaves, while benzenic and indolic GLS concentrations were higher in the roots. Through the phenological stages, GLS concentration increased in young and mature leaves and decreased in cauline leaves and inflorescences

  18. Correlation of quinone reductase activity and allyl isothiocyanate formation among different genotypes and grades of horseradish roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Kang-Mo; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Juvik, John A; Kushad, Mosbah M

    2015-03-25

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is a perennial crop and its ground root tissue is used in condiments because of the pungency of the glucosinolate (GS)-hydrolysis products allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) derived from sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, respectively. Horseradish roots are sold in three grades: U.S. Fancy, U.S. No. 1, and U.S. No. 2 according to the USDA standards. These grading standards are primarily based on root diameter and length. There is little information on whether root grades vary in their phytochemical content or potential health promoting properties. This study measured GS, GS-hydrolysis products, potential anticancer activity (as quinone reductase inducing activity), total phenolic content, and antioxidant activities from different grades of horseradish accessions. U.S. Fancy showed significantly higher sinigrin and AITC concentrations than U.S. No. 1 ,whereas U.S. No. 1 showed significantly higher concentrations of 1-cyano 2,3-epithiopropane, the epithionitrile hydrolysis product of sinigrin, and significantly higher total phenolic concentrations than U.S. Fancy.

  19. Acute and persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections depend on the thiol peroxidase TpX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmin Hu

    Full Text Available The macrophage is the natural niche of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to combat oxidative and nitrosative stresses and persist in macrophages successfully, M. tuberculosis is endowed with a very efficient antioxidant complex. Amongst these antioxidant enzymes, TpX is the only one in M. tuberculosis with sequence homology to thiol peroxidase. Previous reports have demonstrated that the M. tuberculosis TpX protein functions as a peroxidase in vitro. It is the dominant antioxidant which protects M. tuberculosis against oxidative and nitrosative stresses. The level of the protein increases in oxidative stress. To determine the roles of tpx gene in M. tuberculosis survival and virulence in vivo, we constructed an M. tuberculosis strain lacking the gene. The characteristics of the mutant were examined in an in vitro stationary phase model, in response to stresses; in murine bone marrow derived macrophages and in an acute and an immune resistant model of murine tuberculosis. The tpx mutant became sensitive to H(2O(2 and NO compared to the wild type strain. Enzymatic analysis using bacterial extracts from the WT and the tpx mutant demonstrated that the mutant contains reduced peroxidase activity. As a result of this, the mutant failed to grow and survive in macrophages. The growth deficiency in macrophages became more pronounced after interferon-gamma activation. In contrast, its growth was significantly restored in the macrophages of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or NOS2 knockout mice. Moreover, the tpx mutant was impaired in its ability to initiate an acute infection and to maintain a persistent infection. Its virulence was attenuated. Our results demonstrated that tpx is required for M. tuberculosis to deal with oxidative and nitrosative stresses, to survive in macrophages and to establish acute and persistent infections in animal tuberculosis models.

  20. Peroxidase-like activity of nanocrystalline cobalt selenide and its application for uric acid detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang QQ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quan-Quan Zhuang,1 Zhi-Hang Lin,1 Yan-Cheng Jiang,1 Hao-Hua Deng,2 Shao-Bin He,1,3 Li-Ting Su,4 Xiao-Qiong Shi,2 Wei Chen2 1Department of Pharmacy, Affiliated Quanzhou First Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Quanzhou, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 3Department of Pharmacy, Quanzhou Infectious Disease Hospital, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Quanzhou Medical College, Quanzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dendrite-like cobalt selenide nanostructures were synthesized from cobalt and selenium powder precursors by a solvothermal method in anhydrous ethylenediamine. The as-prepared nanocrystalline cobalt selenide was found to possess peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the reaction of peroxidase substrates in the presence of H2O2. A spectrophotometric method for uric acid (UA determination was developed based on the nanocrystalline cobalt selenide-catalyzed coupling reaction between N-ethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl-3-methylaniline sodium salt and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP in the presence of H2O2. Under optimum conditions, the absorbance was proportional to the concentration of UA over the range of 2.0–40 µM with a detection limit of 0.5 µM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determination of UA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Keywords: enzyme mimics, cobalt selenide, peroxidase-like activity, uric acid, human serum

  1. Mutation of katG in a clinical isolate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: effects on catalase-peroxidase for isoniazid activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkan; Ihsanawati; Natalia, D; Syah, Y M; Retnoningrum, D S; Kusuma, H S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in katG gene are often associated with isoniazid (INH) resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. This research was perfomed to identify the katG mutation in clinical isolate (L8) that is resistant to INH at 1 μg/ml. In addition to characterize the catalase-peroxidase of KatG L8 and perform the ab initio structural study of the protein to get a more complete understanding in drug activation and the resistan­ce mechanism. The katG gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, then followed by characterization of catalase-peroxidase of KatG. The structure modelling was performed to know a basis of alterations in enzyme activity. A substitution of A713G that correspond to Asn238Ser replacement was found in the L8 katG. The Asn238Ser modification leads to a decline in the activity of catalase-peroxidase and INH oxidation of the L8 KatG protein. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) of mutant KatGAsn238Ser respectively decreases to 41 and 52% for catalase and peroxidase. The mutant KatGAsn238Ser also shows a decrease of 62% in INH oxidation if compared to a wild type KatG (KatGwt). The mutant Asn238Ser might cause instability in the substrate binding­ site of KatG, because of removal of a salt bridge connecting the amine group of Asn238 to the carbo­xyl group of Glu233, which presents in KatGwt. The lost of the salt bridge in the substrate binding site in mutant KatGAsn238Ser created changes unfavorable for enzyme activities, which in turn emerge as INH resistan­ce in the L8 isolate of M. tuberculosis.

  2. Effective Peroxidase-Like Activity of Co-Aminoclay [CoAC] and Its Application for Glucose Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Pill Song

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe a novel peroxidase-like activity of Co-aminoclay [CoAC] present at pH ~5.0 and its application to fluorescent biosensor for the determination of H2O2 and glucose. It is synthesized with aminoclays (ACs entrapping cationic metals such as Fe, Cu, Al, Co., Ce, Ni, Mn, and Zn to find enzyme mimicking ACs by sol–gel ambient conditions. Through the screening of catalytic activities by the typical colorimetric reaction employing 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic aciddiammonium salt (ABTS as a substrate with or without H2O2, Fe, Cu, and CoACs are found to exhibit peroxidase-like activity, as well as oxidase-like activity was observed from Ce and MnACs. Among them, CoAC shows exceptionally high peroxidase-like activity, presumably due to its ability to induce electron transfer between substrates and H2O2. CoAC is then used to catalyze the oxidation of Amplex® UltraRed (AUR into a fluorescent end product, which enables a sensitive fluorescent detection of H2O2. Moreover, a highly sensitive and selective glucose biosensing strategy is developed, based on enzyme cascade reaction between glucose oxidase (GOx and CoAC. Using this strategy, a highly linear fluorescence enhancement is verified when the concentration of glucose is increased in a wide range from 10 μM to 1 mM with a lower detection limit of 5 μM. The practical diagnostic capability of the assay system is also verified by its use to detect glucose in human blood serum. Based on these results, it is anticipated that CoAC can serve as potent peroxidase mimetics for the detection of clinically important target molecules.

  3. Effect of oxidative enzymes on bulk rheological properties of wheat flour doughs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunnewind, B.; Vliet, T. van; Orsel, R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of enzymes such as peroxidases or glucose oxidase instead of chemical oxidants is a very interesting option for improving breadmaking performance of doughs. In this study the effect of such enzymes on bulk rheological properties of dough was quantified and their influence on the polymer

  4. Effect of Oxidative Enzymes on Bulk Rheological Properties of Wheat Flour Doughs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunnewind, B.; Vliet, van T.; Orsel, R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of enzymes such as peroxidases or glucose oxidase instead of chemical oxidants is a very interesting option for improving breadmaking performance of doughs. In this study the effect of such enzymes on bulk rheological properties of dough was quantified and their influence on the polymer

  5. Tumor suppressor function of the plasma glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 in colitis-associated carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Caitlyn W.; Ning, Wei; Chen, Xi; Smith, J. Joshua; Washington, Mary K; Hill, Kristina E.; Coburn, Lori A.; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.; Burk, Raymond F.; Williams, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione peroxidases, a family of selenocysteine-containing redox enzymes, play pivotal roles in balancing the signaling, immunomodulatory and deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The glutathione peroxidase GPX3 is the only extracellular member of this family, suggesting it may defend cells against ROS in the extracellular environment. Notably, GPX3 hypermethylation and underexpression occurs commonly in prostate, gastric, cervical, thyroid and colon cancers. We took a reverse genetics approach to investigate whether GPX3 would augment inflammatory colonic tumorigenesis, a process characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation, comparing Gpx3−/− mice established two-stage model of inflammatory colon carcinogenesis. Gpx3-deficient mice exhibited an increased tumor number, though not size, along with a higher degree of dysplasia. Additionally, they exhibited increased inflammation with redistribution towards pro-tumorigenic M2 macrophage subsets, increased proliferation, hyperactive WNT signaling, and increased DNA damage. To determine the impact of acute gene loss in an established colon cancer line, we silenced GPX3 in human Caco2 cells, resulting in increased ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in response to oxidative stress, combined with decreased contact-independent growth. Taken together, our results suggested an immunomodulatory role for GPX3 that limits the development of colitis-associated carcinoma. PMID:23221387

  6. Ultra-small particles of iron oxide as peroxidase for immunohistochemical detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yihang; Song Mengjie; Zhang Xiaoqing; Zhang Yu; Wang Chunyu; Gu Ning; Xin Zhuang; Li Suyi

    2011-01-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) modified ultra-small particles of iron oxide (USPIO) were synthesized through a two-step process. The first step: oleic acid (OA) capped Fe 3 O 4 (OA-USPIO) were synthesized by a novel oxidation coprecipitation method in H 2 O/DMSO mixing system, where DMSO acts as an oxidant simultaneously. The second step: OA was replaced by DMSA to obtain water-soluble nanoparticles. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, FTIR, TGA, VSM, DLS, EDS and UV-vis. Hydrodynamic sizes and Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of the nanoparticles were investigated. The hydrodynamic sizes of the nanoparticles (around 24.4 nm) were well suited to developing stable nanoprobes for bio-detection. The kinetic studies were performed to quantitatively evaluate the catalytic ability of the peroxidase-like nanoparticles. The calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the DMSA-USPIO possesses high catalytic activity. Based on the high activity, immunohistochemical experiments were established: using low-cost nanoparticles as the enzyme instead of expensive HRP, Nimotuzumab was conjugated onto the surface of the nanoparticles to construct a kind of ultra-small nanoprobe which was employed to detect epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over-expressed on the membrane of esophageal cancer cell. The proper sizes of the probes and the result of membranous immunohistochemical staining suggest that the probes can be served as a useful diagnostic reagent for bio-detection.

  7. Cu-Hemin Metal-Organic-Frameworks/Chitosan-Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites with Peroxidase-Like Bioactivity for Electrochemical Sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Yang, Han; He, Juan; Zhang, Yayun; Yu, Jie; Song, Yonghai

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple, sensitive and effective method to detect hydrogen peroxide based on a hybrid Cu-hemin metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs)/chitosan-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) nanocomposite was achieved via Cu-hemin MOFs constructing with CS-rGO in room temperature. The Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanomaterials exhibited a unique peroxidase-like activity and good electrical conductivity as well as some novel properties. And the as-prepared electrode resulted in a perfect electrochemical performance towards reduction of hydrogen peroxide which was superior to natural enzymes and some inorganic mimic enzymes. - Highlights: • A hybrid Cu-hemin MOF/CS-rGO with a unique peroxidase-like activity was prepared. • The CS-rGO improved electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites greatly. • The 3D porous structure enhanced the catalytic activity of hemin for H 2 O 2 . • A novel sensitive electrochemical biosensing for H 2 O 2 detection was achieved. - Abstract: Herein, a Cu-hemin metal-organic-frameworks (MOFs)/chitosan (CS)-reduced graphene oxide (CS-rGO) nanocomposite with unique peroxidase-like bioactivity and good electrical conductivity was prepared for electrochemical H 2 O 2 sensing for the first time. The prepared Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanocomposites were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, UV–vis spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques. The results showed that after the Cu-hemin MOFs were formed on the CS-rGO surface, the crystalline structure of the Cu-hemin MOFs was kept while the size of Cu-hemin MOFs was decreased and the electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites was enhanced greatly as compared with that of Cu-hemin MOFs. The unique peroxidase-like bioactivity and good electrical conductivity as well as some novel properties of Cu-hemin MOFs/CS-rGO nanocomposites resulted in

  8. Peroxidase activity in Spondias dulcis = Atividade da peroxidase em Spondias dulcis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Cardozo-Filho

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the best conditions to obtain crude extracts showingPeroxidase activity from Spondia dulcis (caja-mango were evaluated. Fresh fruits (25 g were blended in different sodium phosphate buffer (0.05 to 0.2 M with a pH varying from 3.0 to 9.0. The muddy material was centrifuged for 20 minutes. In order to improve POD activity, the crude extract was submitted to precipitation with ammonium sulfate at 90% saturation. This precipitated was re-suspended in sodium phosphate buffer 0.2 M pH 6.5 and then, optimum pH for activity assay (pH varying from 5.0 to 9.0 and thermal stability (exposure to different temperatures varying from 30 to 75ºC for periods between 0 to 15 minutes were determined. The best conditions for activity assay were in phosphate buffer 0.2 M at pH7.0. The results obtained for thermal inactivation study suggest that the heating at 75ºCfor 15 minutes inactivated 95% of initial POD activity.Foram avaliadas, neste trabalho, algumas condições para a obtenção de extratos brutos com atividade peroxidase de Spondias dulcis (cajá-manga. Frutas frescas (25 g foram trituradas com tampão fosfato de sódio (0,05 a 0,2 M em pHs diferentes (3,0 a 9,0. O material obtido foi centrifugado por 20 min. O extrato bruto foi submetido à precipitação com sulfato de amônio até 90% de saturação. Este precipitado foi ressuspenso em tampão fosfato de sódio 0,2 M pH 6,5 e, assim, o pH ótimo para o ensaio de atividade (pH que varia de 5,0 a 9,0 e a estabilidade térmica (exposição a temperaturas de 30, 60, 65, 70 e 75ºC por um período de 0 a 15 min. deste foram determinados. As melhores condições encontradas para o ensaio de atividade foram em tampão fosfato 0,2 M pH 7,0. Os resultados para a inativação térmica sugerem que o aquecimento a 75ºC por 15 mininativa 95% da atividade de POD inicial.

  9. Magnetic Fe3S4 nanoparticles with peroxidase-like activity, and their use in a photometric enzymatic glucose assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Caiping; Yan, Yinghan; Zhang, Cuiling; Xian, Yuezhong; Xiang, Dongshan

    2016-01-01

    Greigite magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 S 4 -MNPs) were prepared and reveal a peroxidase-like activity. Kinetic studies revealed a pseudo-enzymatic activity that is much higher than that of other magnetic nanomaterial-based enzyme mimetics. This finding was exploited to design a photometric enzymatic glucose assay based on the formation of H 2 O 2 during enzymatic oxidation of glucose by glucose oxidase, and the formation of a blue product from an enzyme substrate that is catalytically oxidized by H 2 O 2 in the presence of Fe 3 S 4 -MNPs. Glucose can be detected in the 2 to 100 μM concentration range, and the low detection limit is 0.16 μM. The method was applied to quantify glucose in human serum. In our perception, this enzyme mimetic has a large potential in that it may be used in other oxidase based assays, but also in ELISAs. (author)

  10. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  11. Covalent Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Hybrid Membranes for the Construction of Optical Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov Yotova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to covalently immobilize horse radish peroxidase (HRP onto new hybrid membranes synthesized by the sol-gel method based on silica precursors, dendrimers and cellulose derivatives. This new system will be used for designing biosensor. For investigation of the properties of membranes, HRP was used as a modeling enzyme. Kinetic parameters, pH and temperature optimum were determined, and the structure of the membranes surface was examined. Results showed higher relative and residual activity of HRP immobilized onto membranes with cellulose acetate butyrate with high molecular weight CAB/H. This novel biosensor could offer a simple, cheap and rapid tool with enhanced sensing performance as well as having potentials to find application in medicine, pharmacy, food and process control and environmental monitoring.

  12. Enzymatic extract containing lignin peroxidase immobilized on carbon nanotubes: Potential biocatalyst in dye decolourization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sabrina Feliciano; da Luz, José Maria Rodrigues; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi; Ladeira, Luiz Orlando; Correa Junior, Ary

    2018-05-01

    The majority of the textile dyes are harmful to the environment and potentially carcinogenic. Among strategies for their exclusion, the treatment of dye contaminated wastewater with fungal extract, containing lignin peroxidase (LiP), may be useful. Two fungi isolates, Pleurotus ostreatus (PLO9) and Ganoderma lucidum (GRM117), produced the enzymatic extract by fermentation in the lignocellulosic residue, Jatropha curcas seed cake. The extracts from PLO9 and GRM117 were immobilized on carbon nanotubes and showed an increase of 18 and 27-fold of LiP specific activity compared to the free enzyme. Also, LiP from both fungi extracts showed higher Vmax and lower Km values. Only the immobilized extracts could be efficiently reused in the dye decolourization, contrary, the carbon nanotubes became saturated and they should be discarded over time. This device may offer a final biocatalyst with higher catalytic efficiency and capability to be reused in the dye decolourization process.

  13. Catalase, Peroxidase and Polyphenoloxidase from Pitaya Amarilla (Acanthocereus pitajaya Fruits: Ripening and Senescense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Estrella Baquero Duarte

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the relation between some symptoms of deterioration and the activity of enzymes entailed with both the browning and the antioxiding system in fruits of yellow pitaya (Acanthocereus pitajaya, harvested in its physiological maturity and stored for 15 days at 24°C and 85% of relative humidity. In the whole fruits, the respiratory intensity and the external colors were evaluated; further, the activity of catalase (CAT, peroxidase (POD and polyphenoloxidase (PPO was studied in the peel of the fruit. The fruit exhibited a climacteric behavior six days after the date of the harvest. The browning of the peel had a direct relation with the activity of POD and PPO. The maximum observed activity of CAT in the climacterium, responds to the proper balance with the high production of H2O2 expected at that moment.

  14. A role of proton transfer in peroxidase-catalyzed process elucidated by substrates docking calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziemys Arturas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous kinetic investigations of fungal-peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of N-aryl hydroxamic acids (AHAs and N-aryl-N-hydroxy urethanes (AHUs revealed that the rate of reaction was independent of the formal redox potential of substrates. Moreover, the oxidation rate was 3–5 orders of magnitude less than for oxidation of physiological phenol substrates, though the redox potential was similar. Results To explain the unexpectedly low reactivity of AHAs and AHUs we made ab initio calculations of the molecular structure of the substrates following in silico docking in the active center of the enzyme. Conclusions AHAs and AHUs were docked at the distal side of heme in the sites formed by hydrophobic amino acid residues that retarded a proton transfer and finally the oxidation rate. The analogous phenol substrates were docked at different sites permitting fast proton transfer in the relay of distal His and water that helped fast substrate oxidation.

  15. Fungal Community and Ligninolytic Enzyme Activities in Quercus deserticola Trel. Litter from Forest Fragments with Increasing Levels of Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús A. Rosales-Castillo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Litter fungal communities and their ligninolytic enzyme activities (laccase, Mn-peroxidase, and lignin-peroxidase play a vital role in forest biogeochemical cycles by breaking down plant cell wall polymers, including recalcitrant lignin. However, litter fungal communities and ligninolytic enzyme activities have rarely been studied in Neotropical, non-coniferous forests. Here, we found no significant differences in litter ligninolytic enzyme activities from well preserved, moderately disturbed, and heavily disturbed Quercus deserticola Trel. forests in central Mexico. However, we did find seasonal effects on enzyme activities: during the dry season, we observed lower laccase, and increased Mn-peroxidase and lignin-peroxidase activities, and in the rainy season, Mn-peroxidase and lignin-peroxidase activities were lower, while laccase activity peaked. Fungal diversity (Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices based on ITS-rDNA analyses decreased with increased disturbance, and principal component analysis showed that litter fungal communities are structured differently between forest types. White-rot Polyporales and Auriculariales only occurred in the well preserved forest, and a high number of Ascomycota were shared between forests. While the degree of forest disturbance significantly affected the litter fungal community structure, the ligninolytic enzyme activities remained unaffected, suggesting functional redundancy and a possible role of generalist Ascomycota taxa in litter delignification. Forest conservation and restoration strategies must account for leaf litter and its associated fungal community.

  16. Enzyme catalytic resonance scattering spectral detection of trace hydrogen peroxide using guaiacol as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwen Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidized guaiacol to form tetramer particles that exhibited a strong resonance scattering (RS peak at 530 nm in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP in citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution of pH 4.4. The RS peak increased when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased. The increased RS intensity (ΔI530 nm was linear to the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the range of 0.55-27.6 μM, with a linear regression equation of ΔI530 nm = 17.1C + 1.6, a relative coefficient of 0.9996 and a detection limit of 0.03 μM H2O2. This proposed method was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide in rain water, with sensitivity, selectivity, rapidity, and recovery of 98.0-104 %.

  17. EVALUATION OF ENDOGLUCANASE, EXOGLUCANASE, LACCASE, AND LIGNIN PEROXIDASE ACTIVITIES ON TEN WHITE-ROT FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Montoya B

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a way of tracking the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes in ten species of white rot fungi: Lentinula edodes, Schizophyllum commune, Trametes trogii, Coriolus versicolor, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma lucidum, Grifola frondosa, Pleurotus ostreatus and Auricularia delicata. These species were first screened on solid culture media containing carboxymethyl cellulose, crystalline cellulose, ABTS (2,2´-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate and azure B, which showed the production of endoglucanase, exoglucanase, laccase and lignin peroxidase (LiP enzymes. Cellulolytic activities were detected after five days of incubation with congo red indicator, forming a clear-white halo in areas where cellulose was degraded. For ligninases, the tracking consisted of the monitoring in the formation of green halos due to ABTS oxidation for laccase, and decolorization halos on azure B for LiP during 14 days of incubation. From this qualitative screening, four strains were selected (G. lucidum, L. edodes, C. versicolor and T. trogii as the best producers of cellulolytic and ligninolytic enzymes. These four species were inoculated on a substrate of sawdust oak, yielding 51,8% of lignin degraded by L. edodes and 22% of cellulose degraded by C. versicolor.

  18. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  19. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  20. Polyamines, peroxidase and proteins involved in the senescence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senescence is the natural aging process at the cellular level or range of phenomena associated with this process. The objective of this review was to show the involvement of substances that may be related to senescence in plants, such as polyamines, peroxidase and proteins. These substances were related with the ...

  1. Glutathione peroxidases of the potato cyst nematode Globodera Rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, J.T.; Reavy, B.; Smant, G.; Prior, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterisation of full-length DNAs complementary to RNA (cDNAs) encoding two glutathione peroxidases (GpXs) from a plant parasitic nematode, the potato cyst nematode (PCN) Globodera rostochiensis. One protein has a functional signal peptide that targets the protein for

  2. Decolourization of Direct Blue 2 by peroxidases obtained from an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, an increase in toxicity, determined by Vibrio fisheri, was observed after the enzymatic oxidation of the dye. Results suggest that the oxidation of DB2 with peroxidases can be recommended as a pretreatment step before a conventional treatment process. Keywords: decolourization, Direct Blue 2, industrial waste, ...

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new peroxidase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    length cDNA of O.violaceus peroxidase gene (OvRCI, GenBank. Acc. No. AY428037) was 1220 bp and contained an 1128 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 375 amino acids. Homology analysis and molecular modeling revealed that ...

  4. Isolation of an ascorbate peroxidase in Brassica napus and analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-05

    Apr 5, 2010 ... domain; APX, ascorbate peroxidase; Bn-APX, Brassica napus ascorbate ... Brassica napus, which is widely grown as the oilseed crop of rape or canola, .... grew on the SD-Leu-Trp-His-Ade medium and were verified by PCR.

  5. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of heat treatment (55°C/20 min) on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities and total phenolic compounds was investigated in Algerian dates (Deglet Nour variety) at Tamar (fully ripe) stage and in dates stored for 5 months at ambient temperature and in cold storage (10°C). Results obtained ...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7675 - Leukocyte peroxidase test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leukocyte peroxidase test. 864.7675 Section 864.7675 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7675 Leukocyte...

  7. Effect of industrial wastewater ontotal protein and the peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of industrial wastewaters on protein and the peroxidase activity in Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., Capsicum annuum L., Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Vicia faba L. Industrial wastewaters were taken from Dardanel Fisheries Company, Tekel alcoholic drinks companies' ...

  8. Efficient production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase by Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokman, B.C.; Joosten, V.; Hovenkamp, J.; Gouka, R.J.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2003-01-01

    The heterologous production of Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) was analysed in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori under control of the inducible endoxylanase promoter. Secretion of active ARP was achieved up to 800 mg l-1 in shake flask cultures. Western blot analysis showed that an

  9. Histochemical characterization of glycoproteins present in jejunal and colonic goblet cells of pigs on different diets. A biopsy study using chemical methods and peroxidase-labelled lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, J; Fioramonti, J; Bénazet, F; Buéno, L

    1987-01-01

    We examined the glycoprotein composition of intestinal goblet cells in jejunal and colonic biopsies obtained from pigs on different diets. Paraffin sections were stained both chemically and with the following horseradish-peroxidase conjugated lectins: Canavalia ensiformis (Con-A), Limulus polyphemus (LPA), Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA1), Glycine max (SBA) and Triticum vulgaris (WGA). Using chemical staining procedures, only small quantitative differences were noted between the two organs. With respect to lectin staining, the mucus of the jejunum was characterized by the absence of Con-A binding sites, and colonic mucus consistently exhibited an absence of SBA affinity. After dietary modifications, O-acetyl sialic acid reactivity was lowered in the jejunum but was enhanced in the colon. In the jejunum, the glycoproteins became neuraminidase susceptible, whereas the colon became characterized by the absence of neutral mucins. The affinity for the tested lectins after the different diets was variable, but the most striking effects were observed after the fibreless diet (milk alone). Our data suggest the existence of marked regional variations in goblet-cell mucus and indicate significant differences between the glycoprotein components of the jejunal and colonic mucosa. Furthermore, the biosynthesis of mucins in both regions was altered by even only short-term feeding modifications.

  10. Electrochemical gene sensor for Mycoplasma pneumoniae DNA using dual signal amplification via a Pt-Pd nanowire and horse radish peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Linlin; Xiang, Guiming; Jiang, Dongneng; Du, Chunlan; Liu, Chang; Huang, Weiwei; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    A dually amplified DNA biosensor was constructed for the determination of the DNA of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneu). A gold electrode was modified with 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA; a π-stacking perylene semiconductor dye with outstanding electronic and optical properties), a layer of gold nanoparticles (nano-Au), and capture DNA. Pt-Pd nanowires served as carriers for the co immobilization of complementary probe (CP2) and the mediator thionine (Thi). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) acted as a blocking reagent and signal enhancer. Following base pairing, the modified Pt-Pd nanowires were captured on the surface of the gold electrode. After addition of H 2 O 2 , the Pt-Pd nanowires and HRP both catalyzed the reduction of H 2 O 2 and promoted the electron transfer via the mediator Thi, resulting in an amplified electrochemical signal. The electrical signal, best measured at a working voltage of −200 mV (vs a SCE), is logarithmically related to the concentration of the M. pneu DNA in the 0.1 pM to 20 nM concentration range, and the detection limit (at an S/N ratio of 3) is 0.03 pM. The assay is robust, sensitive and specific. Conceivably, it is a cost-effective alternative to the established PCR method for the detection of M. pneu in clinical samples. (author)

  11. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mammalian spermatozoa are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are very susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS and membrane lipid peroxide ion. Normally a balance is maintained between the amount of ROS produced and that scavenged. Cellular damage arises when this equilibrium is disturbed. A shift in the levels of ROS towards pro-oxidants in semen and vaginal secretions can induce an oxidative stress on spermatozoa. The aim was to study lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD and to correlate the same, with the ′water test′, in male infertility. SETTINGS: Experimental study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ejaculates from a total of 83 infertile and fertile healthy individuals were obtained. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme levels were studied and correlated with water test. RESULTS: The results indicate that (i the antioxidant enzyme catalase showed no significant changes in the various pathological samples, (ii antioxidant enzymes SOD and glutathione peroxidase correlate positively with asthenozoospermic samples and (iii the degree of lipid peroxidation also correlates positively with the poorly swollen sperm tails. The increase in SOD and glutathione peroxidase values, in the pathological cases represents an attempt made to overcome the reactive oxygen species. CONCLUSION: Water test could be used as a preliminary marker test for sperm tail damage by reactive oxygen species, since it correlates very well with lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

  12. Hairy root transgene expression analysis of a secretory peroxidase (PvPOX1) from common bean infected by Fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Xingbo; Wang, Yingjie; Zhuang, Yan; Chen, Jian; Wu, Jing; Ge, Weide; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W

    2017-07-01

    Plant peroxidases (POXs) are one of the most important redox enzymes in the defense responses. However, the large number of different plant POX genes makes it necessary to carefully confirm the function of each paralogous POX gene in specific tissues and disease interactions. Fusarium wilt is a devastating disease of common bean caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli. In this study, we evaluated a peroxidase gene, PvPOX1, from a resistant common bean genotype, CAAS260205 and provided direct evidence for PvPOX1's role in resistance by transforming the resistant allele into a susceptible common bean genotype, BRB130, via hairy root transformation using Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Analysis of PvPOX1 gene over-expressing hairy roots showed it increased resistance to Fusarium wilt both in the roots and the rest of transgenic plants. Meanwhile, the PvPOX1 expressive level, the peroxidase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) accumulation were also enhanced in the interaction. The result showed that the PvPOX1 gene played an essential role in Fusarium wilt resistance through the occurrence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced hypersensitive response. Therefore, PvPOX1 expression was proven to be a valuable gene for further analysis which can strengthen host defense response against Fusarium wilt through a ROS activated resistance mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Horseradish extract promotes urinary bladder carcinogenesis when administered to F344 rats in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Man; Hasumura, Mai; Imai, Toshio; Takami, Shigeaki; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2017-07-01

    Horseradish extract (HRE), consisting mainly of a mixture of allyl isothiocyanate and other isothiocyanates, has been used as a food additive. To evaluate the potential hazards of HRE, a 104-week chronic study, a 2-week analysis of cell proliferation in the urinary bladder and a medium-term promotion bioassay of HRE were conducted with administration at concentrations of up to 0.04% HRE in the drinking water to male F344 rats. In the 104-week chronic study with 32 male rats per group, no treatment-related increases in the incidences of neoplastic lesions in any organ, including urinary bladder, were observed, except for simple hyperplasia in the urinary bladder in rats treated with HRE at concentrations of more than 0.01% (5.0 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ). In the promotion study, HRE treatment after N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine initiation caused a clear increase in papillary or nodular hyperplasia, papilloma, and urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder in the groups given HRE for 13 weeks at doses higher than 0.005%, 0.01%, and 0.04% (2.7, 5.4 and 20.5 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ), respectively. In the 2-week cell proliferation analysis, treatment with HRE at concentrations greater than 0.005% (3.9 mg kg -1 body weight day -1 ) caused transient increases in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling indices in the urothelium. Although clear tumor induction was not observed, administration of relatively low-dose HRE increased cell proliferation in the urothelium and exerted obvious promoting effects on rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mode of action of HRE in the rat urinary bladder to facilitate data extrapolation from the present study and provide insights into risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

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    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  15. Degradação de deoxinivalenol (DON) e a atividade da enzima peroxidase durante fermentação submersa

    OpenAIRE

    Garda-Buffon, Jaqueline; Kupski, Larine; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to evaluate deoxynivalenol degradation by Aspergillus oryzae and Rhizopus oryzae in a submerged fermentation system and to correlate it to the activity of oxydo-reductase enzymes. The submerged medium consisted of sterile distilled water contaminated with 50 μg of DON and 4 × 10(6) spore.mL-1 inoculum of Aspergillus oryzae and Rhizopus oryzae species, respectively in each experiment. Sampling was performed every 24 hours for monitoring the peroxidase specific activity, and ever...

  16. Lignocellulolytic enzyme production of Pleurotus ostreatus growth in agroindustrial wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Rodrigues da Luz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus has nutritional and medicinal characteristics that depend on the growth substrate. In nature, this fungus grows on dead wood, but it can be artificially cultivated on agricultural wastes (coffee husks, eucalyptus sawdust, corncobs and sugar cane bagasse. The degradation of agricultural wastes involves some enzyme complexes made up of oxidative (laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase and hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases, xylanases and tanases. Understanding how these enzymes work will help to improve the productivity of mushroom cultures and decrease the potential pollution that can be caused by inadequate discharge of the agroindustrial residues. The objective of this work was to assess the activity of the lignocellulolytic enzymes produced by two P. ostreatus strains (PLO 2 and PLO 6. These strains were used to inoculate samples of coffee husks, eucalyptus sawdust or eucalyptus bark add with or without 20 % rice bran. Every five days after substrate inoculation, the enzyme activity and soluble protein concentration were evaluated. The maximum activity of oxidative enzymes was observed at day 10 after inoculation, and the activity of the hydrolytic enzymes increased during the entire period of the experiment. The results show that substrate composition and colonization time influenced the activity of the lignocellulolytic enzymes.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  18. Calcium carbonate mediates higher lignin peroxidase activity in the culture supernatant of Streptomyces Viridosporus T7A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. B. MACEDO

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignin peroxidase (LiP production has been extensively studied due to the potential use of this enzyme in environmental pollution control. Important aspects of the production of the enzyme by S. viridosporus T7A which have been studied include the improvement of yield and enzyme stabilization. In experiments performed in agitated flasks containing culture media composed of yeast extract as the source of nitrogen, mineral salts and different carbon sources, the use of glucose resulted in the highest values for LiP activity (350 U/L, specific LiP activity (450 U/g and productivity (7 U/L/h. As the profile obtained with glucose-containing medium suggested enzyme instability, the effect of calcium carbonate was evaluated. The addition of CaCO3 in two different concentrations, 0.5% and 5.0%, resulted in higher values of maximum LiP activity, 600 and 900 U/L, respectively. The presence of this salt also anticipated enzyme activity peaks and allowed the detection of higher enzyme activities in the extracellular medium for longer periods of time. These results indicate a positive effect of calcium carbonate on LiP production, which is extremely relevant for industrial processes.

  19. Preparation and characterization of a carbon-based magnetic nanostructure via co-precipitation method: Peroxidase-like activity assay with 3,3ʹ,5,5ʹ-tetramethylbenzidine

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    Navvabeh Salarizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(S: Natural and artificial enzymes have shown important roles in biotechnological processes. Recently, design and synthesis of artificial enzymes especially peroxidase mimics has been interested by many researchers. Due to disadvantages of natural peroxidases, there is a desirable reason of current research interest in artificial peroxidase mimics. Methods: In this study, magnetic multiwall carbon nanotubes with a structure of Fe3O4/MWCNTs as enzyme mimetic were fabricated using in situ co-precipitation method. The structure, composition, and morphology of Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The magnetic properties were investigated by the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. Peroxidase-like catalytic activity of nanocomposite was investigated using colorimetric and electrochemical tests with 3,3ʹ,5,5ʹ-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB substrate. Results: The obtained data proved the synthesis of Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite. The average crystallite size of nanostructures was estimated about 12 nm by Debye–Scherer equation. It was found that Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocomposite exhibit peroxidase-like activity. Colorimetric and electrochemical data demonstrated that prepared nanocomplex has higher catalytic activity toward H2O2 than pure MWCNT nanocatalyst. From electrochemical tests concluded that the Fe3O4/MWCNTs electrode exhibited the better redox response to H2O2, which is ~ 2 times larger than that of the MWCNTs. Conclusions: The synthesis of Fe3O4nanoparticles on MWCNTs was successfully performed by in situ co-precipitation process. Fe3O4/MWCNTs nanocatalyst exhibited a good peroxidase-like activity. These biomimetic catalysts have some advantages such as simplicity, stability and cost effectiveness that can be used in the design of enzyme-based devices for various applied fields.

  20. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.