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Sample records for enriched uo2 fuel

  1. Criticality experiments with low enriched UO2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.; Murphy, E.S.; Clayton, E.D.; Keay, R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The results obtained in a criticality experiments program performed for British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL) under contract with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) are presented in this report along with a complete description of the experiments. The experiments involved low enriched UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel rods in water containing dissolved gadolinium, and are in direct support of BNFL plans to use soluble compounds of the neutron poison gadolinium as a primary criticality safeguard in the reprocessing of low enriched nuclear fuels. The experiments were designed primarily to provide data for validating a calculation method being developed for BNFL design and safety assessments, and to obtain data for the use of gadolinium as a neutron poison in nuclear chemical plant operations - particularly fuel dissolution. The experiments program covers a wide range of neutron moderation (near optimum to very under-moderated) and a wide range of gadolinium concentration (zero to about 2.5 g Gd/l). The measurements provide critical and subcritical k/sub eff/ data (1 greater than or equal to k/sub eff/ greater than or equal to 0.87) on fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 rods at two enrichments (2.35 wt % and 4.31 wt % 235 U) and on mixed fuel-water assemblies of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 rods containing 4.31 wt % 235 U and 2 wt % PuO 2 in natural UO 2 respectively. Critical size of the lattices was determined with water containing no gadolinium and with water containing dissolved gadolinium nitrate. Pulsed neutron source measurements were performed to determine subcritical k/sub eff/ values as additional amounts of gadolinium were successively dissolved in the water of each critical assembly. Fission rate measurements in 235 U using solid state track recorders were made in each of the three unpoisoned critical assemblies, and in the near-optimum moderated and the close-packed poisoned assemblies of this fuel

  2. New UO2 fuel studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehaudt, P.; Lemaignan, C.; Caillot, L.; Mocellin, A.; Eminet, G.

    1998-01-01

    With improved UO 2 fuels, compared with the current PWR, one would enable to: retain the fission products, rise higher burn-ups and deliver the designed power in reactor for longer times, limit the pellet cladding interaction effects by easier deformation at high temperatures. Specific studies are made in each field to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for these improvements. Four programs on new UO 2 fuels are underway in the laboratory: advanced microstructure fuels (doped fuels), fuels containing Er 2 O 3 a burnable absorber, fuels with improved caesium retention, composite fuels. The advanced microstructure UO 2 fuels have special features such as: high grain sizes to lengthen the fission gas diffusion paths, intragranular precipitates as fission gas atoms pinning sites, intergranular silica based viscoplastic phases to improve the creep properties. The grain size growth can be obtained with a long time annealing or with corundum type oxide additives partly soluble in the UO 2 lattice. The amount of doping element compared with its solubility limit and the sintering conditions allows to obtain oxide or metallic precipitates. The fuels containing Er 2 O 3 as a burnable absorber are under irradiation in the TANOX device at the present time. Specific sintering conditions are required to improve the erbium solubility in UO 2 and to reach standard or large grain sizes. The improved caesium retention fuels are doped with SiO 2 +A1 2 O 3 or SiO 2 +ZrO 2 additives which may form stable compounds with the Cs element in accidental conditions. The composite fuels are made of UO 2 particles of about 100 μm in size dispersed in a molybdenum metallic (CERMET) or MgA1 2 O 4 ceramic (CERCER) matrix. The CERMET has a considerably higher thermal conductivity and remains ''cold'' during irradiation. The concept of double barrier (matrix+fuel) against fission products is verified for the CERMET fuel. A thermal analysis of all the irradiated rods shows that the thermal

  3. Analysis of gamma ray dose for dried up pond storing low enriched UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauchi, Yasushi; Suzuki, Motomu

    2017-09-01

    Gamma ray dose is calculated for loss of coolant accident in spent fuel pond (SFP) storing irradiated fuels used in light water reactors. Influence of modelling of fuel assemblies, source distributions, and loading fraction of fuel assemblies in the fuel rack on the dose are investigated.

  4. Analysis of gamma ray dose for dried up pond storing low enriched UO2 fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauchi Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray dose is calculated for loss of coolant accident in spent fuel pond (SFP storing irradiated fuels used in light water reactors. Influence of modelling of fuel assemblies, source distributions, and loading fraction of fuel assemblies in the fuel rack on the dose are investigated.

  5. Fabrication of metallic channel-containing UO2 fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Song, Kun Woo; Kim, Keon Sik; Jung, Youn Ho

    2004-01-01

    The uranium dioxide is widely used as a fuel material in the nuclear industry, owing to many advantages. But it has a disadvantage of having the lowest thermal conductivity of all kinds of nuclear fuels; metal, carbide, nitride. It is well known that the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel is enhanced by making, so called, the CERMET (ceramic-metal) composite which consists of both continuous body of highly thermal-conducting metal and UO 2 islands. The CERMET fuel fabrication technique needs metal phase of at least 30%, mostly more than 50%, of the volume of the pellet in order to keep the metal phase interconnected. This high volume fraction of metal requires such a high enrichment of U that the parasitic effect of metal should be compensated. Therefore, it is attractive to develop an innovative composite fuel that can form continuous metal phase with a small amount of metal. In this investigation, a feasibility study was made on how to make such an innovative fuel. Candidate metals (W, Mo, Cr) were selected, and fabrication process was conceptually designed from thermodynamic calculations. We have experimentally found that a metal phase envelops perfectly UO 2 grains, forming continuous channel throughout the pellet, and improving the thermal conductivity of pellet

  6. Thermal expansion of UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Kang, Kweon; Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Seung Yang, Myung

    2002-01-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO 2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO 2 , and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO 2 . For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO 2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471x10 -6 and 10.751x10 -6 K -1 , respectively

  7. Fabrication of nano-structured UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kang, Ki Won; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Heon; Kim, Keon Sik; Song, Kun Woo

    2007-01-01

    Nano-structured materials have received much attention for their possibility for various functional materials. Ceramics with a nano-structured grain have some special properties such as super plasticity and a low sintering temperature. To reduce the fuel cycle costs and the total mass of spent LWR fuels, it is necessary to extend the fuel discharged burn-up. In order to increase the fuel burn-up, it is important to understand the fuel property of a highly irradiated fuel pellet. Especially, research has focused on the formation of a porous and small grained microstructure in the rim area of the fuel, called High Burn-up Structure (HBS). The average grain size of HBS is about 300nm. This paper deals with the feasibility study on the fabrication of nano-structured UO 2 pellets. The nano sized UO 2 particles are prepared by a combined process of a oxidation-reducing and a mechanical milling of UO 2 powder. Nano-structured UO 2 pellets (∼300nm) with a density of ∼93%TD can be obtained by sintering nano-sized UO 2 compacts. The SEM study reveals that the microstructure of the fabricated nano-structure UO 2 pellet is similar to that of HBS. Therefore, this bulk nano-structured UO 2 pellet can be used as a reference pellet for a measurement of the physical properties of HBS

  8. Analysis of enriched UO2 light water moderated lattices using CAROL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, H.K.; Thaker, K.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of uniform lattice experiments for enriched UO 2 rods in light water moderator using CAROL code is presented. The experiments selected have four different enrichments and moderator to fuel volume ratio varying between 1 to 4. The deviation of ksub(eff) has been observed to lie between +- 0.01 over the important range of moderator to fuel volume ratio. In addition to reactivity prediction, the calculated and measured relative reaction rates have also been compared. (author)

  9. Spent fuel UO2 matrix corrosion behaviour studies through alpha-doped UO2 pellets leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzeau, B.; Jegou, C.; Broudic, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behaviour of the UO 2 matrix in aqueous media subjected to α-β-γ radiations. The β-γ emitters account for the most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persist over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over geological disposal scale. In the present investigation the UO 2 matrix corrosion under alpha radiation is studied as a function of different parameters such as: the alpha activity, the carbonates and hydrogen concentrations,.. In order to study the effect of alpha radiolysis of water on the UO 2 matrix, 238/239 Pu doped UO 2 pellets (0.22 %wt. Pu total) were fabricated with different 238 Pu/ 239 Pu ratio to reproduce the alpha activity of a 47 GWd.t HMi -1 UOX spent fuel at different milestones in time (15, 50, 1500, 10000 and 40000 years). Undoped UO 2 pellets were also available as reference sample. Leaching experiments were conducted in deionized or carbonated water (NaHCO 3 1 mM), under Argon (O 2 2 30% gas mixture. Previous experiments conducted in deionized water under argon atmosphere, have shown a good correlation between alpha activity and uranium release for the 15-, 1500- and 40000-years alpha doped UO 2 batches. Besides, uranium release in the leachate is controlled either by the kinetics, or by the thermodynamics. Provided the solubility limit of uranium is not achieved, uranium concentration increases and is only limited by the kinetics, unless precipitation occurs and the uranium concentration remains constant over time. These controls are highly dependant on the solution chemistry (HCO 3 - , pH, Eh,..), the atmosphere (Ar, Ar/H 2 ,..), and the radiolysis strength. The experimental matrix

  10. Thermal properties of UO2 - Gd2O3 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G. S.; Yang, J. H.; Kang, K. W.; Kim, Y. M.; Song, G. W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal properties (thermal conductivity, oxygen potential and thermal expansion) of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuels were measured by the laser-flash, TGA and dilatometry method. The thermal conductivity decreased with Gd content, but the oxygen potential and thermal expansion increased with Gd content. Substitution of Gd +3 ion in UO 2 structure increases the scattering site for thermal phonon propagation and thereby decreases the thermal conductivity. The oxygen potential of Gd-doped UO 2 increase mainly because the Gd +3 ions, which are inert to oxidation, make it difficult for oxygen interstitials to access just near them

  11. Comparison of neutronic behavior of UO2, (Th-233UO2 and (Th-235UO2 fuels in a typical heavy water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mirvakili

    2015-04-01

    The obtained computational data showed both thorium-based fuels caused less negative temperature reactivity coefficients for the modeled research reactor in comparison with UO2 fuel loading. By contrast, 233U-containing thorium-based fuel and 235U-containing thorium-based fuel loadings in the thermal core did not drastically reduce the effective delayed neutron fractions and delayed neutron fractions compared to UO2 fuel. A provided higher conversion factor and lower transuranic production in the research core fed by the thorium-based fuels make the fuel favorable in achieving higher cycle length and less dangerous and costly nuclear disposals.

  12. UO2 fuel pellet characterization: density and porosity measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopuz, B.; Bayram, Y.; Colak, L. and others

    1997-01-01

    The most commonly used fuel in nuclear power plants is UO 2 . UO 2 is a ceramic material and is produced by powder metallurgy techniques. The densities of the material produced can never reach the theoretical densities because of the production technology. The porosity allows the gas fission products, generated under power plant working conditions, to escape and therefor is required. Direct measurement of density which is an application of the Archimedes principle, is based on replacement of liquids. Replacement fluid is m-xylene. Density measurement are made by weighing the dry pellets in air, then weighing the m-xylene impregnated pellets in air and m-xylene impregnated pellets in air and m-xylene. UO 2 pellets densities, total porosities and open porosities can be calculated from the collection data

  13. Development of ceramics based fuel, Phase I, Kinetics of UO2 sintering by vibration compacting of UO2 powder (Introductory report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, M.M.

    1962-10-01

    After completing the Phase I of the task related to development of ceramics nuclear fuel the following reports are presented: Kinetics of UO 2 sintering; Vibrational compacting and sintering of UO 2 ; Characterisation of of UO 2 powder by DDK and TGA methods; Separation of UO 2 powder

  14. Cracking and relocation of UO2 fuel during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Dagbjartsson, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cracking and relocation of light water reactor (LWR) fuel pellets affect the axial gas flow path within nuclear reactor fuel rods and the thermal performance of the fuel. As part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Fuel Behavior Program, the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., is conducting fuel rod behavior studies in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway. The Instrumental Fuel Assembly-430 (IFA-430) operated in that facility is a multipurpose assembly designed to provide information on fuel cracking and relocation, the long-term thermal response of LWR fuel rods subjected to various internal pressures and gas compositions, and the release of fission gases. This report presents the results of an analysis of fuel cracking and relocation phenomena as deduced from fuel rod axial gas flow and fuel temperature data from the first 6.5 GWd/tUO 2 burnup of the IFA-430

  15. A Design Study on Experimental Power Reactor Core Fueled with UO2 CFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Ferhat; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2003-01-01

    A neutronic study on core design of a 300 MWt EPR was performed. In this study the use of 4.8% enriched UO 2 coated fuel particle was analyzed. The design was then compared to 5% enriched UO 2 pin fueled EPR based on existing PWRs. Both reactors are operated with single batch refueling system with a cycle length of 3 years. The core physics parameters analyzed were : effective multiplication factor in a cycle, flux distributions and cycle burnup. The results of calculation showed that the core effective multiplication factor for reactor with fuel compact can be maintained at 1.2841 at beginning of cycle (BOC) and 1.0060 at end of cycle (EOC). As for the UO 2 pin fueled reactor, the effective multiplication factor was 1.1927 at BOC and 1.0514 at EOC. The size of active core for the CFP fueled reactor were 320 cm in height and 320 cm in diameter. As for pin fueled reactor, the height was 200 cm and diameter was 180 cm. The results of calculations showed that neutron flux distribution was quite flat for both types of reactor designs, although the volume of CFP fueled reactor was 5 times as big as the pin fueled reactor

  16. Interim results from UO2 fuel oxidation tests in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j.

    1987-08-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO 2 , fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO 2 pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250 0 C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10 5 R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10 5 R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Production and release of the fission gas in (Th U)O2 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio S.

    1982-06-01

    The volume, composition and release of the fission gas products were caculated for (Th, U)O 2 fuel rods. The theorectical calculations were compared with experimental results available on the literature. In ThO 2 + 5% UO 2 fuel rods it will be produced approximated 5% more fission gas as compared to UO 2 fuel rods. The fission gas composition or Xe to Kr ratio has showed a decreasing fuel brunup dependence, in opposition to that of UO 2 . Under the same fuel rod operational conditions, the (Th, U)O 2 fission gas release will be smaller as compared to UO 2 . This behaviour of (Th, U)O 2 fuel comes from smallest gas atom difusivity and higher activation energies of the processes that increase the fission gas release. (Author) [pt

  18. Development of UO2/PuO2 dispersed in uranium matrix CERMET fuel system for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Hegde, P.V.; Prasad, G.J.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P.

    2012-01-01

    CERMET fuel with either PuO 2 or enriched UO 2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix has a strong potential of becoming a fuel for the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMR’s). In fact it may act as a bridge between the advantages and disadvantages associated with the two extremes of fuel systems (i.e. ceramic fuel and metallic fuel) for fast reactors. At Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), R and D efforts are on to develop this CERMET fuel by powder metallurgy route. This paper describes the development of flow sheet for preparation of UO 2 dispersed in uranium metal matrix pellets for three different compositions i.e. U–20 wt%UO 2 , U–25 wt%UO 2 and U–30 wt%UO 2 . It was found that the sintered pellets were having excellent integrity and their linear mass was higher than that of carbide fuel pellets used in Fast Breeder Test Reactor programme (FBTR) in India. The pellets were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique for phase analysis and lattice parameter determination. The optical microstructures were developed and reported for all the three different U–UO 2 compositions.

  19. Completion of UO2 pellets production and fuel rods load for the RA-8 critical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marajofsky, Adolfo; Perez, Lidia E.; Thern, Gerardo G.; Altamirano, Jorge S.; Benitez, Ana M.; Cardenas, Hugo R.; Becerra, Fabian A.; Perez, Aldo E.; Fuente, Mariano de la

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Fuels Division produced fuel pellets of 235 U with 1.8% and 3.6% enrichment and Zry-4 cladding loads for the RA-8 reactor at Pilcaniyeu Technological Unit. For economical and availability reasons, the powder acquired was initially UO 2 with 3.4% enrichment in 235 U, therefore the 235 U powder with 1.8% enrichment was produced by mechanical mixture. The production of fuel pellets for both enrichments was carried out by cold pressing and sintering processes in reducing atmosphere. The load of Zry-4 claddings was performed manually. The production stages can be divided into setup, qualification and production. This production allows not only to fulfill satisfactorily the new fuel rods supply for the RA-8 reactor but also to count with a new equipment and skilled personnel as well as to meet quality and assurance control methods for future pilot-scale production and even new fuel elements production. (author)

  20. The Effect of Ion Irradiation on the Dissolution of UO2 and UO2-based Simulant Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popel, Aleksej; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, A Scott; Qafoku, Odeta; Grygiel, Calara; Monnet, I.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Farnan, Ian E.

    2018-02-25

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of fission fragment damage on the dissolution of UO2 fuel matrix in water. Plain and doped (43 GWd/tU simulated burn-up) UO2 samples were produced and irradiated by 92 MeV 129Xe23+ ions to a fluence of 4.8 × 1015 ions/cm2 to simulate the fission damage that occurs within nuclear fuels. Dissolution experiments were conducted in single-pass flow-through mode under anoxic conditions (< 0.1 O2 ppm in Ar) to study the effect of the induced irradiation damage on the dissolution of the UO2 matrix. The ion irradiation caused smoothening of the surface features and formation of hollow blisters. Local overheating during the ion irradiation was suggested to cause these features. The dissolution studies showed that the irradiated samples generally showed a higher initial release of uranium than unirradiated ones and then the uranium concentrations converged towards a value of the same order (~10-9 mol/l) with time. No noticeable difference in dissolution behaviour was observed between the plain and doped samples in this work. Secondary phase formations were observed on the surface of UO2 samples after the dissolution experiment.

  1. Thermal expansion of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Une, Katsumi

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, more consideration has been given to the application of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 burnable poison fuel to LWRs in order to improve the core physics and to extend the burnup. It has been known that UO 2 forms a single phase cubic fluorite type solid solution with Gd 2 O 3 up to 20 - 30 wt.% above 1300 K. The addition of Gd 2 O 3 to UO 2 lattices changes the properties of the fuel pellets. The limited data on the thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel exist, but those are inconsistent. UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were fabricated, and the linear thermal expansion of UO 2 and UO 2 -(5, 8 and 10 wt.%)Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets was measured with a differential dilatometer over the temperature range of 298 - 1973 K. A sapphire rod of 6 mm diameter and 15.5 mm length was used as the reference material. After the preheating cycle, the measurement was performed in argon atmosphere. The results for UO 2 pellets showed excellent agreement with the data in literatures. The linear thermal expansion of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets showed the increase with increasing the Gd 2 O 3 content. Consideration must be given to this excessive expansion in the fuel design of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 pellets. The equations for the linear thermal expansion and density of UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel pellets were derived by the method of least squares. (Kako, I.)

  2. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO2 in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.R.; Lucoff, D.M.; Reil, K.O.; Croucher, D.W.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO 2 under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  3. BURNY-SQUID, 2-D Burnup of UO2 and Mix UO2 PuO2 Fuel in X-Y or R-Z Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, I.; Zara, G.; Guidotti, R.

    1974-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: - Multigroup neutron diffusion and burnup equations for two- to five- energy groups over a rectangular region of the x-y or r-z plane. - For a given geometry and initial enrichment, it calculates the two- to five- group flux distributions, the nuclides burnt in a time step t, and then the flux distribution again. This process is repeated until the maximum burn-up is reached. - Criticality search by uniform variation of a control isotope. - Solution of problems with fuel having different geometrical parameters, by means of super-compositions. - Recycle and restart options are available. - UO 2 and PUO 2 -UO 2 fuel can be handled. 2 - Method of solution: The zero-dimension burn-up program RIBOT-5 is coupled with the two-dimension program SQUID and alternately executed. The differential equations are solved by the difference method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: 200 maximum number of compositions 10,000 maximum number of mesh points 5 maximum Number of groups. 4 maximum number of super-compositions. Diagonal symmetry allowed

  4. Effect of water α radiolysis on the spent nuclear fuel UO2 matrix alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In the option of long term storage or direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel, it is essential to study the long-term behaviour of the spent fuel matrix (UO 2 ) in water, in presence of ionizing radiations. This work gives some knowledge elements about the impact of aerated water alpha radiolysis on UO 2 alteration. An original experiment method was used in this study. UO 2 /water interfaces were irradiated by an external He 2+ ions beam. The sequential batch dissolution tests on UO 2 samples were performed in aerated deionized water, before, during and after a-irradiation under high fluxes. A corrosion product, identified as hydrated uranium peroxide, was formed on the UO 2 surface. The uranium release was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher under irradiation than out of irradiation. The concentrations of the radiolysis products H 2 O 2 and H 3 O + were affected by the uranium oxide surface. They could not only explain the whole uranium release reached during irradiation in water. Leaching experiments on UO X spent fuel samples (with or without the Zircaloy clad) were also performed, in hot cells. The uranium release was relatively small, and H 2 O 2 was not detected in solution. The rates of uranium release in aerated water during one hour were calculated. They were about mg -1 .m -2 .d -1 for spent fuel and for UO 2 , and about g -1 .m -2 .d -1 for UO 2 irradiated by He 2+ ions. The comparison of the results between the two kinds of experiment shows a difference of the behaviour in water between UO 2 irradiated by He 2+ ions and spent fuel. Some hypothesis are given to explain this difference. (author)

  5. Sintering of Kernel UO2 for High Temperature Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono; Dwi-Heru-Sucahyo; Hidayati; Evi-Hertiviana; Bambang-Sugeng

    2000-01-01

    Sintering investigation of UO 2 gel has been done. The gel was preparedthrough two ways. The first, gel was produced using PVA as additive agent.The second gel was produced using HMTA and Urea as additive agent. From thepreparation of gel, the PVA method better than the urea - HMTA method,because was not necessary the cold temperature for sol preparation and alsowas not necessary the hot temperature for gelation process. After nextprocessing, the sintered gel of gel through PVA, also better than HMTAprocess. (author)

  6. Simulation of microstructure of rim region in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J. Y.; Koo, Y. H.; Lee, B. H.; Cheon, J. S.; Son, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    The rim region in the periphery of high burnup UO 2 pellet has a large number of pores and very small recrystallized grains. If the microstructure of the rim region is modeled more refinedly, it is possible to simulate the behavior of pores in rim region more accurately. In this paper, the microstructure of rim region was simulated through proper assumptions, and it was compared with the observed microstructure of the rim region. The validity of assumptions used in the simulation was verified qualitatively through this comparison

  7. Modelling the high burnup UO2 structure in LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.; Walker, C.T.; Laar, J. van de; Lindstroem, F.

    1995-01-01

    The concept of a burnup threshold for the formation of the high burnup UO 2 structure (HBS) is supported by experimental data, which also reveal that a transition zone exists between the normal UO 2 structure and the fully developed HBS. From the analysis of radial xenon profiles measured by EPMA a threshold burnup is obtained in the range 60-75 GW d/t U. The lower value is considered to be the threshold for the onset of the HBS and the higher value the threshold for the fully developed HBS. Xenon depletion in the transition zone and the fully developed HBS can be described by a simple model. At local burnups above 120 GW d/t U the xenon generated is in equilibrium with the xenon lost to the fission gas pores and the concentration does not fall below 0.25 wt%. The TRANSURANUS burnup model TUBRNP predicts reasonably well the penetration of the HBS and the associated xenon depletion up to a cross section average burnup of approximately 70 GW d/t U. (orig.)

  8. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of an External-Fuel [UO2] Full-Length Thermionic Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred; Raab, B; Giorgio, F.

    1971-09-01

    The development of a double-ended full-core-length external-fuel converter, a prototypical fuel module for a 200- to 300-ekw thermionic reactor, is described. The converter design is based on a revolver-shaped tungsten emitter body, with six peripheral fuel chambers loaded with enriched UO2 pellets. The columbium collector is water-cooled through a sub-atmospheric adjustable-pressure helium gap. The converter employs graded metal-ceramic seals, and its double-ended construction is made possible by bellows to compensate for differential axial expansion. Fission gases are vented from the fuel chambers and collected in an accumulator designed for continuous monitoring of the pressure buildup. Component fabrication, assembly sequence, and joining methods are described; also the test procedures, and the converter load control. All tests are performed in vacuum. During inpile testing, the fuel is triply contained, with thermal insulation between the secondary and tertiary containers. Before insertion inpile, the fully fueled converter is qualification-tested by rf-induction heating using a specially developed high vacuum rf-feedthrough.

  9. Fission product release from UO2 during irradiation. Diffusion data and their application to reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, J.R.; Johnson, F.A.; Turnbull, J.A.; Friskney, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Release of fission product species from UO 2 , and to a limited extent from (U, Pu)0 2 was studied using small scale in-reactor experiments in which these interacting variables may be separated, as far as is possible, and their influences assessed. Experiments were at fuel ratings appropriate to water reactor fuel elements and both single crystal and poly-crystalline specimens were used. They employed highly enriched uranium such that the relative number of fissions occurring in plutonium formed by neutron capture was small. The surface to volume ratio (S/V) of the specimens was well defined thus reducing the uncertainties in the derivation of diffusion coefficients. These experiments demonstrate many of the important characteristics of fission product behaviour in UO 2 during irradiation. The samples used for these experiments were small being always less than 1g with a fissile content usually between 2 and 5mg. Polycrystalline materials were taken from batches of production fuel prepared by conventional pressing and sintering techniques. The enriched single crystals were grown from a melt of sodium and potassium chloride doped with UO 2 powder 20% 235 U content. The irradiations were performed in the DIDO reactor at Harwell. The neutron flux at the specimen was 4x10 16 neutrons m -2 s -1 providing a heat rating within the samples of 34.5 MW/teU

  10. Fabrication of Tungsten-UO 2 Hexagonal-Celled Fuel-Element Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, R.R.; Cover, P.W.; Gripshover, P.J.; Wilson, W.J.

    1964-12-04

    The gas-pressure-bonding process is being evaluated as a means of fabricating tungsten-UO 2 hexagonal-celled fuel geometries. A two-part study was initiated to optimize the fuel materials and to develp the required fixturing and loading techniques. Production of fueled tungsten-coated UO 2 particles in in progress so that geometries embodying coated particles or coated particles plus fine tungsten powder can be evaluated. Tests to data have shown the rquirement for a pretreatment in which a gaseous oxide phase is removed. Initial loading and fixturing procedures were proven satisfactory by the fabrication of a 19-cylindrical-hole hexagonal-type composite.

  11. The Width of High Burnup Structure in LWR UO2 Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Oh, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2007-01-01

    The measured data available in the open literature on the width of high burnup structure (HBS) in LWR UO 2 fuel were analyzed in terms of pellet average burnup, enrichment, and grain size. Dependence of the HBS width on pellet average burnup was shown to be divided into three regions; while the HBS width is governed by accumulation of fission damage (i.e., burnup) for burnup below 60 GWd/tU, it seems to be restricted to some limiting value of around 1.5 mm for burnup above 75 GWd/tU due to high temperature which might have caused extensive annealing of irradiation damage. As for intermediate burnup between 60 and 75 GWd/tU, although temperature would not have been so high as to induce extensive annealing, the microstructural damage could have been partly annealed, resulting in the reduction of the HBS width. It was found that both enrichment and grain size also affects the HBS width. However, as long as the pellet average burnup is lower than about 75 GWd/tU, the effect does not appear to be significant for the enrichment and grain size that are typically used in current LWR fuel. (authors)

  12. Statistical model for grain boundary and grain volume oxidation kinetics in UO2 spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Shaw, H.F.; Einziger, R.E.

    1989-09-01

    This paper addresses statistical characteristics for the simplest case of grain boundary/grain volume oxidation kinetics of UO 2 to U 3 O 7 for a fragment of a spent fuel pellet. It also presents a limited discussion of future extensions to this simple case to represent the more complex cases of oxidation kinetics in spent fuels. 17 refs., 1 fig

  13. Specification of PWR UO2 pellet design parameters with the fuel performance code FRAPCON-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.; Marra Neto, A.

    1988-08-01

    UO 2 pellet design parameters are analysed to verify their influence in the fuel basic properties and in its performance under irradiation in pressurized water reactors. Three groups of parameters are discussed: 1) content of fissionable and impurity materials; 2) stoichiometry; 3) density pore morpholoy, and microstructure. A methodology is applied with the fuel performance program FRAPCON-1 to specify these parameters. (author [pt

  14. Improving the Thermal Conductivity of UO2 Fuel with the Addition of Graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byoung Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Improvement of fuel performances by increasing the fuel thermal conductivity using the BeO or W were reported elsewhere. In this paper, some major fuel performances of improved thermal conductivity oxide (ICO) nuclear fuel with the addition of 10 v/o graphene have been compared to those of standard UO 2 fuel. The fuel thermal conductivity affects many performance parameters and thus is an important parameter to determine the fuel performance. Furthermore, it also affects the performance of the fuel during reactor accidents. The improved thermal conductivity of the fuel would reduce the fuel temperature at the same power condition and would improve the fission gas release, rod internal pressure and fuel stored energy. Graphene is well known for its excellent electrical conductivity, strength and thermal conductivity. The addition of graphene to the UO 2 fuel could increase the thermal conductivity of the ICO fuel. Although the graphene material is extensively studied recently, the characteristics of the graphene material, especially the thermal properties, are not well-known yet. In this study, we used the Light Water Reactor fuel performance analysis code FRAPCON-3.2 to analyze the performance of standard UO 2 and ICO fuel

  15. Influence of porosity formation on irradiated UO2 fuel thermal conductivity at high burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaii, B.; Kazeminejad, H.; Khakshournia, S.

    2016-10-01

    Based on the existing low temperature high burnup gaseous swelling model for UO2 fuel, the matrix swelling terms are calculated and the formation of total volume porosity up to burnup of 120 MWd/KgU is computed. The irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model based on the Maxwell-Eucken correlation for porosity factor is selected as a case study and the calculation of porosity evolution with burnup is carried out. It is shown that taking into account the formation of porosity with burnup compared to the case with constant porosity equal to as-fabricated value leads to a decrease in the UO2 fuel thermal conductivity up to 15% at high burnup values of 120 MWd/kgU. Results of the calculations are also compared with the available experimental data and good agreement was found. The conducted parametric study clearly demonstrated the impact of the key parameters on the results of the present investigation.

  16. Achieving higher productivity of UO2 fuel at NUOFP through improved in-plant quality surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, R.; Pramanik, D.; Sairam, S.; Rajkumar, J.V.; Rao, R.V.R.L.V.; Sinha, T.K.; Santra, N.; Rao, G.V.S.H.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    At Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), in the production of UO 2 fuel for PHWRs, a standard set of process parameters are monitored regularly for every lot of powder and pellet. Quality of intermediate products in the production process like UNP, ADU(dry), U 3 O 8 , UO 2+x , UO 2 granules, green pellets, sintered pellets are also regularly analysed/monitored apart from the final finished pellet and ensured to be within specified range. This range is decided by final product specifications and sometimes also based on the feed requirement in the next process in the downstream of the flow sheet. Vast experience gained over the years, behavior of various equipment under given set of conditions, feed back from the customer plants etc; have been primary criteria hither to, for defining the process conditions and chemical/physical properties of intermediate products

  17. Experimental evaluation of thermal ratcheting behavior in UO2 fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling of UO2 at high temperatures has been experimentally evaluated to determine the rates of distortion of UO2/clad fuel elements. Two capsules were rested in the 1500 C range, one with a 50 C thermal cycle, the other with a 100 C thermal cycle. It was observed that eight hours at the lower cycle temperature produced sufficient UO2 redistribution to cause clad distortion. The amount of distortion produced by the 100 C cycle was less than double that produced by the 50 C, indicating smaller thermal cycles would result in clad distortion. An incubation period was observed to occur before the onset of distortion with cycling similar to fuel swelling observed in-pile at these temperatures.

  18. Analysis of UO2-BeO fuel performance using FRAPCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revankar, Shripad T.; Chandramouli, Deepthi

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced thermal properties of nuclear fuel UO2 have been achieved by addition of compounds like BeO and SiC. This study focuses on studying the performance of UO2-10%vol BeO using FRAPCON code and examines steady state fuel behavior at high burnup. New correlations were developed to calculate thermo-physical and thermo-mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, specific enthalpy, emissivity, vapor pressure and creep for UO2-BeO. FRAPCON code resulting from modifications done to property subroutines was used to study fission gas release behavior. With combined effect of enhanced thermal conductivity and lower thermal expansion, fission gas release predicted by FRAPCON for UO2-BeO was found to be less than that for UO2, but results from data interpolation did not exactly match for few cases. For lower burnups and lower pressure systems, FRAPCON predictions arising out of modified properties match decently well with those obtained from data interpolations and for higher levels of burnup. Enhancement of the temperature term by a factor 1.27, in the calculation of diffusion constant resulted in a good agreement between the two values. (author)

  19. Methods of modification and investigations of properties of fuel UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurina, I.; Popov, V.; Rogov, S.; Dvoryashin, A.; Serebrennikova, O.

    2009-01-01

    In the SSC RF-IPPE the researches are carried out directed towards the uranium dioxide fuel pellets modification with the purpose of improvement of their performance parameters (increase of thermal conductivity, growth of grain for decrease gas release, decrease of interaction with coolant). The following technological methods of manufacturing of modified pellets UO 2 were used: 1) The water method including precipitation of Ammonium Polyuranate (APU) with manufacturing of simultaneously coarse and super dispersed particles, and also coprecipitation APU with additives (Cr, Ti, etc.), with the after calcination of powders, reduction to UO 2 pressing and sintering of pellets; 2) A method including addition of chemical reagent containing ammonia to the powder UO 2 manufactured under the dry or water technology; mechanical mixture; pressing and sintering of pellets. Application of the specified up methods makes manufacturing the UO 2 fuel pellets having the properties differing from pellets manufactured by industrial technology. Conclusions: 1) Properties of powders and the pellets manufactured by different technologies considerably differ; 2) Precipitate manufactured by water industrial technology, consists of phase NH 3 ·3UO 3 ·5H 2 O whereas the precipitate manufactured by nanotechnology contains in addition phase NH 3 ·2UO 3 ·3H 2 O; 3) Powders of U 3 O 8 manufactured by water nanotechnology have particles size 300-500 nm and ultra dispersive particles size ∼70-75 nm; 4) Powder UO 2 obtained by water nanotechnology differs by greater activity because all phase changes under oxidation result at lower temperatures; 5) Basic differences of properties of modified UO 2 pellets was established: decreasing of defects inside and on grains boundaries, minor porosity (pore size 0,05-0,5 μm), presence of pore of spherical form, presence of additional chemical bond U-U (presence of metal clusters), polyvalence of U; 6) Methods including addition of Cr and Ti under

  20. Out-of-pile UO2/Zircaloy-4 experiments under severe fuel damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, P.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical interactions between UO 2 fuel and Zircaloy-4 cladding up to the melting point of zircaloy (Zry) are described. Out-of-pile UO 2 /zircaloy reaction experiments have been performed to investigate the chemical interaction behavior under possible severe fuel damage conditions (very high temperatures and external overpressure). The tests have been conducted in inert gas (1 to 80 bar) with 10-cm-long zircaloy cladding specimens filled with UO 2 pellets. The annealing temperature varied between 1000 and 1700 deg. C and the annealing period between 1 and 150 min. The extent of the chemical reaction depends decisively on whether or not good contact between UO 2 and zircaloy has been established. If solid contact exists, zircaloy reduces the UO 2 to form oxygen-stabilized α-Zr(O) and uranium metal. The uranium reacts with zircaloy to form a (U,Zr) alloy rich in uranium. The (U,Zr) alloy, which is liquid above approx. 1150 deg. C, lies between two α-Zr(O) layers. The UO 2 /zircaloy reaction obeys a parabolic rate law. The degree of chemical interaction is determined by the extent of oxygen diffusion into the cladding, and hence by the time and temperature. The affinity of zirconium for oxygen, which results in an oxygen gradient across the cladding, is the driving force for the reaction. The growth of the reaction layers can be represented in an Arrhenius diagram. The UO 2 /Zry-4 reaction occurs as rapidly as the steam/Zry-4 reaction above about 1100 deg. C. The extent of the interaction is independent of external pressure above about 10 bar at 1400 deg. C and 5 bar at 1700 deg. C. The maximum measured oxygen content of the cladding is approx. 6wt.%. Up to approx. 9 volume % of the UO 2 can be chemically dissolved by the zircaloy. In an actual fuel rod, complete release of the fission products in this region of the fuel must therefore be assumed. (author)

  1. Grain growth in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Scoberg, J.A.; Walden, W.

    1979-06-01

    Grain growth studies have been carried out on UO 2 to provide data for the fuel modelling program and to evaluate fuel fabricated in commissioning the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Laboratory at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Fuel examined includes natural UO 2 commercially fabricated from ADU powder for CANDU reactors; natural UO 2 commercially fabricated from AU powder; natural UO 2 from ADU and AU powder, fabricated in the MOFFL; and commercially fabricated UO 2 enriched 1.7, 4.5, and 9.6 wt. percent U-235 in U. Samples were step-annealed in vacuo at 1870-2070 K for up to 32.5 h. All data fit a (grain size)sup(2.5) versus annealing time relationship. Apparent activation energy for grain growth, Q, depends on fuel type and varies from 150+-10 kJ/mol for early AU powder to 360+-10 kJ/mol for pellets from ADU fabricated in the MOFFL. Grain sizes calculated using the laboratory equation in a fuel performance code tend to be greater than those measured in irradiated natural fuel, suggesting irradiation-induced inhibition of grain growth. However, any inhibition is equivalent to that expected for a systematic 5 percent underpredicition in reactor power. (author)

  2. UO2 fuel pellets fabrication via Spark Plasma Sintering using non-standard molybdenum die

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papynov, E. K.; Shichalin, O. O.; Mironenko, A. Yu; Tananaev, I. G.; Avramenko, V. A.; Sergienko, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    The article investigates spark plasma sintering (SPS) of commercial uranium dioxide (UO2) powder of ceramic origin into highly dense fuel pellets using non-standard die instead of usual graphite die. An alternative and formerly unknown method has been suggested to fabricate UO2 fuel pellets by SPS for excluding of typical problems related to undesirable carbon diffusion. Influence of SPS parameters on chemical composition and quality of UO2 pellets has been studied. Also main advantages and drawbacks have been revealed for SPS consolidation of UO2 in non-standard molybdenum die. The method is very promising due to high quality of the final product (density 97.5-98.4% from theoretical, absence of carbon traces, mean grain size below 3 μm) and mild sintering conditions (temperature 1100 ºC, pressure 141.5 MPa, sintering time 25 min). The results are interesting for development and probable application of SPS in large-scale production of nuclear ceramic fuel.

  3. TiO2 doped UO2 fuels sintered by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tiankai; Scott, Spencer M.; Xin, Guoqing; Lian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    UO2 fuels doped with oxide additives Cr2O3 and TiO2 display larger grain size, improving fission product retention capability and thus accident tolerance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) was applied to consolidate TiO2-doped UO2 fuel pellets with 0.5 wt % dopant concentration, above its solubility, in order to induce eutectic phase formation and promote sintering kinetics. The grain size can reach 80 μm by sintering at 1700 °C for 20 min, and liquid U-Ti-O eutectic phase occurs at the triple junction of grain boundaries and significantly improves grain growth during sintering. The oxide additive also impedes the reduction of the initial hyperstoichiometric fuel powders to more stoichiometric fuel pellets upon SPS process. Thermal-mechanical properties of the sintered doped fuel pellets including thermal conductivity and hardness are measured and compared with undoped fuel pellets. The enlarged grain size (80 μm) and densification within short sintering duration highlight the immense possibility of SPS in fabricating large grained UO2 fuel pellets to improve fuel performance.

  4. The credit analysis of recycling beryllium and uranium in BeO-UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungki; Ko, Wonil; Zhou, W.; Revankar, Shripad T.; Chung, Yanghon; Bang, Sungsig

    2012-01-01

    This study quantifies the credits of beryllium and uranium which are used as the raw materials for BeO-UO 2 nuclear fuel by analyzing the influence of their credits on the nuclear fuel cycle cost was analyzed, where the credit was defined as the value of raw materials recovered from spent fuel and the raw materials that were re-cycled. The credits of beryllium and uranium at 60 MWD/kg burn-up were -0.22 Mills/kWh and -0.14 Mills/kWh, respectively. These findings were based on the assumption that the optimal mixing proportion of beryllium in the BeO-UO 2 nuclear fuel is 4.8 wt%. In sum, the present study verified that the credits of beryllium and uranium in relation to BeO-UO 2 nuclear fuel are significant cost drivers in the cost of the nuclear fuel cycle and in estimating the nuclear fuel cycle of the reprocessing option for spent nuclear fuels. (author)

  5. TRU transmutation using ThO2-UO2 and fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuels in LWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Sergi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design new LWR fuel assemblies which are able to efficiently destroy TRU (transuranics) nuclide without degradation of safety aspects by using ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuel pins containing TRU fuel particles. Thorium was mixed to UO 2 in order to reduce the generation of plutonium nuclides and to save the uranium resources in the UO 2 pins. Additionally, the use of thorium contributes to the extension of the fuel cycle length. All calculations were performed by using DeCART (Deterministic Core Analysis based on Ray Tracing) code. The results show that the new concept of fuel assembly has the TRU destruction rates of ∼40% and ∼25% per 1200 EFPD (Effective Full Power Day) over the TRU FCM pins and the overall fuel assembly, respectively, without degradation of FTC and MTC

  6. A microstructure-dependent model for fission product gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Hastings, I.J.

    1979-06-01

    A model for the release of fission gas from irradiated UO2 fuel is presented. It incorporates fission gas diffusion bubble and grain boundary movement,intergranular bubble formation and interlinkage. In addition, the model allows estimates of the extent of structural change and fuel swelling. In the latter, contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles are considered. When included in the ELESIM fuel performance code, the model yields predictions which are in good agreement with data from UO2 fuel elements irradiated over a range of water-cooled reactor conditions: linear power outputs between 40 and 120 kW/m, burnups between 10 and 300 MW.h/kg U and power histories including constant, high-to-low and low-to-high power periods. The predictions of the model are shown to be most sensitive to fuel power (temperature), the selection of diffusion coefficient for fission gas in UO2 and burnup. The predictions are less sensitive to variables such as fuel restraint, initial grain size and the rate of grain growth. (author)

  7. Dopant solubility and lattice contraction in gadolinia and gadolinia-chromia doped UO2 fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, T.; Hertog, J.; Vos, B.; de Tollenaere, L.; Delafoy, C.; Verwerft, M.

    2012-05-01

    Gadolinia doped UO2 fuel is widely used as burnable neutron absorber in Light Water Reactors to reduce power peaking and excess reactivity during the first reactor cycle of fresh fuel assemblies. The thermal conductivity of gadolinia doped fuel is substantially lower than that of standard UO2. To maintain safety margins later in life, some design or operating restrictions can be defined, for example to compensate higher fission gas release levels. Development of large grain U/Gd fuel by suitable doping, e.g. Cr2O3, could offer a solution to such restrictions, but solid state information about the double doped (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 system is very scarce. In the present paper, we present X-ray diffraction and microstructure results of standard U/Gd fuel and chromia doped U/Gd fuel manufactured by powder metallurgy. The dissolution of chromium in (U1-xGdx)O2 as a function of Gd content, the role of free UO2 and the lattice contraction at different Gd and Cr doping levels of (U1-x-yGdxCry)O2 is studied both for the single doped and double doped system. On the basis of lattice contraction and precise measurements of the composition of the solid solution phases, the evolution of theoretical density with dopant concentration is derived.

  8. Neutron flux depression in the UO2-PuO2 (15 to 30%) fuel rods from IVO-FR2-Vg7-Irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Fernandez Marron, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal-neutron flux depression within a fuel rod has a great influence on the radial temperature profile of the rod, especially for high enrichment fuel. For this reason, a study was made about the UO 2 -PuO 2 (15 to 30% PuO 2 ) fuel pins for the KfK-JEN joint irradiation program IVO, in the FR2 reactor. Different methods (diffusion, Bonalumi, successive generations) were compared and a new approach (parabolic approximation) was developed. (author)

  9. Neutron Flux Depression in the UO2-PuO2 (15 to 30%) Fuel Rods from IVO-FR2-Vg7-Irradiation Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Fernandez Marron, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal-neutron flux depression within a fuel rod has a great influence in the radial temperature profile of the rod, especially for high enrichment fuel. For this reason, a study was made about the UO 2 -PUO 2 (15 to 30% PUO 2 ) fuel pins for the KfK-JEN joint irradiation program IVO, in the FR2 reactor. Different methods (diffusion, Bonalumi, successive generations) were compared and a new approach (parabolic approximation) was developed. (Author) 22 refs

  10. Influence of radiolysis on UO2 fuel matrix dissolution under disposal conditions. Literature Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the recent published literature on the influence of water radiolysis on UO 2 fuel matrix dissolution under the disposal conditions. The α radiation is considered to be dominating over the other types of radiations at times longer than 1000 years. The presence of the anaerobic corrosion products of iron, especially of hydrogen, has been observed to play an important role under radiolysis conditions. It is not possible to exclude gamma/beta radiolysis effects in the experiments with spent fuel, since there is not available a fuel over 100 years old. More direct measurements of α radiolysis effects have been conducted with α doped UO 2 materials. On the basis of the results of these experiments, a specific activity threshold to observe α radiolysis effects has been presented. The threshold is 1.8 x 10 7 to 3.3 x 10 7 Bq/g in anoxic 10 -3 M carbonate solution. It is dependent on the environmental conditions, such as the reducing buffer capacity of the conditions. The results of dissolution rate measurements at VTT with 233 U-doped UO 2 samples in 0.01 to 0.1 M NaCl solutions under anoxic conditions did not show any effect of α radiolysis with doping levels of 5 and 10% 233 U (3.2 x 10 7 and 6.3 x 10 7 Bq/g). Both Fe 2+ and hydrogen can act as reducing species and could react with oxidizing radiolytic species. Fe 2+ concentrations of the order of 10 -5 M can decrease the rate of H 2 O 2 production. Low dissolution rates, 2 x 10 -8 to 2 x 10 -7 /yr, have been measured in the presence of metallic Fe with 5 and 10% 233 U-doped UO 2 in 0.01 to 1 M NaCl solutions. The tests with isotope dilution method showed precipitation phenomena of U to occur during dissolution process. The concentrations of dissolved U were extremely low (≤ 8.4 x 10 -11 M). No effects of -radiolysis could be seen. It is difficult to distinguish the effects of metallic Fe, Fe 2+ or hydrogen in these tests. Hydrogen could also act as a reducing agent

  11. Modelling the radiolytic corrosion of α-doped UO2 and spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nazhen; Qin, Zack; Noël, James J.; Shoesmith, David W.

    2017-10-01

    A model previously developed to predict the corrosion rate of spent fuel (UO2) inside a failed waste container has been adapted to simulate the rates measured on a wide range of α-doped UO2 and spent fuel specimens. This simulation confirms the validity of the model and demonstrates that the steady-state corrosion rate is controlled by the radiolytic production of H2O2 (which has been shown to be the primary oxidant driving fuel corrosion), irrespective of the reactivity of the UO2 matrix. The model was then used to determine the consequences of corrosion inside a failed container resealed by steel corrosion products. The possible accumulation of O2, produced by H2O2 decomposition, was found to accelerate the corrosion rate in a closed system. However, the simultaneous accumulation of radiolytic H2, which is activated as a reductant on the noble metal (ε) particles in the spent fuel, rapidly overcame this acceleration leading to the eventual suppression of the corrosion rate to insignificant values. Calculations also showed that, while the radiation dose rate, the H2O2 decomposition ratio, and the surface coverage of ε particles all influenced the short term corrosion rate, the influence of the radiolytically produced H2 was the overwhelming influence in reducing the rate to negligible level (i.e., <10-20 mol m-2 s-1).

  12. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Modeling of Pore Coarsening in the Rim Region of High Burn-up UO2 Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxing Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the coarsening process of the large fission gas pores in the high burn-up structure (HBS of irradiated UO2 fuel is very necessary for analyzing the safety and reliability of fuel rods in a reactor. A numerical model for the description of pore coarsening in the HBS based on the Ostwald ripening mechanism, which has successfully explained the coarsening process of precipitates in solids is developed. In this model, the fission gas atoms are treated as the special precipitates in the irradiated UO2 fuel matrix. The calculated results indicate that the significant pore coarsening and mean pore density decrease in the HBS occur upon surpassing a local burn-up of 100 GWd/tM. The capability of this model is successfully validated against irradiation experiments of UO2 fuel, in which the average pore radius, pore density, and porosity are directly measured as functions of local burn-up. Comparisons with experimental data show that, when the local burn-up exceeds 100 GWd/tM, the calculated results agree well with the measured data.

  14. The influence of porosity on the thermal conductivity of irradiated UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, K.; Kwast, H.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1994-12-01

    The influence of porosity on the thermal conductivity of irradiated UO 2 fuel has been determined with the Finite Element Method (FEM). Light-microscopy photographs were made of the fuel. The pore shape and the pore distribution are entered in the FEM program from these photographs. The two dimensional (2D) thermal conductivity in the plane of the photograph is obtained from the FEM calculations. The 2D thermal conductivity, that has no physical meaning itself, is the lower limit of the three dimensional (3D) thermal conductivity. For three well defined pore shapes the relation is determined between the 2D thermal conductivity and the 3D thermal conductivity. From these computations a simple relation is obtained that transfers the 2D thermal conductivity into the 3D thermal conductivity, independent of the pore shape. The influence of porosity on the 3D thermal conductivity of irradiated UO 2 fuel and UO 2 fuel doped with Nb 2 O 5 was computed with the FEM. (orig.)

  15. Modelling of fission gas swelling in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho

    1999-06-01

    Discharge burnup of the fuel in LWR has been increased to improve the fuel economy, and currently the high burnup fuel of over 70 MWd/kg U-rod avg. is being developed by the fuel vendors worldwide. At high burnup, thermal / mechanical properties of the fuel is known to change and new phenomenon could arise. This report describes the model development on fission gas swelling in high burnup UO 2 fuel. For the low burnup fuel, swelling only by the solid fission products has been considered in the fuel performance analysis. However, at high burnup fuel, swelling by fission gas bubbles can not be neglected anymore. Therefore, fission gas swelling model which can predict bubble swelling of the high burnup UO 2 fuel during the steady-state and the transient conditions in LWR was developed. Based on the bubble growth model, the empirical fission gas swelling model was developed as function of burnup, time and temperature. The model showed that fuel bubble swelling would be proportional to the burnup by the power of 1.157 and to the time by the power of 0.157. Comparison of the model prediction with the measured fission gas swelling data under the various burnup and temperature conditions showed that the model would predict the measured data reasonably well. (author). 20 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs

  16. An Overview of Current and Past W-UO[2] CERMET Fuel Fabrication Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas E. Burkes; Daniel M. Wachs; James E. Werner; Steven D. Howe

    2007-01-01

    Studies dating back to the late 1940s performed by a number of different organizations and laboratories have established the major advantages of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems, particularly for manned missions. A number of NTP projects have been initiated since this time; none have had any sustained fuel development work that appreciably contributed to fuel fabrication or performance data from this era. As interest in these missions returns and previous space nuclear power researchers begin to retire, fuel fabrication technologies must be revisited, so that established technologies can be transferred to young researchers seamlessly and updated, more advanced processes can be employed to develop successful NTP fuels. CERMET fuels, specifically W-UO2, are of particular interest to the next generation NTP plans since these fuels have shown significant advantages over other fuel types, such as relatively high burnup, no significant failures under severe transient conditions, capability of accommodating a large fission product inventory during irradiation and compatibility with flowing hot hydrogen. Examples of previous fabrication routes involved with CERMET fuels include hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) and press and sinter, whereas newer technologies, such as spark plasma sintering, combustion synthesis and microsphere fabrication might be well suited to produce high quality, effective fuel elements. These advanced technologies may address common issues with CERMET fuels, such as grain growth, ductile to brittle transition temperature and UO2 stoichiometry, more effectively than the commonly accepted 'traditional' fabrication routes. Bonding of fuel elements, especially if the fabrication process demands production of smaller element segments, must be investigated. Advanced brazing techniques and compounds are now available that could produce a higher quality bond segment with increased ease in joining. This paper will briefly address the history of CERMET

  17. Physical and chemical characterization of the (Th, U)O2 mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.M. dos; Avelar, M.M.; Palmieri, H.E.L.; Lameiras, F.S.; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The NUCLEBRAS R and D Center (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN) has been performing, together with german institutions (Kernforschungsanlage Julich GmbH - KFA, Krafwerk Union A.G. - KWU and NUKEM GmbH), a program for utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. In this paper are presented the physical and chemical characterizations necessary to quality the (Th, U)O 2 fuel and the respective methods. (Author) [pt

  18. Physical characteristics of Gd2O3-UO2 fuel in LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Iwao; Furuta, Toshiro; Toba, Masao; Tsuda, Katsuhiro.

    1981-12-01

    A series of critical experiments in light water lattice were carried out on five kinds of Gadolinia-Uranium dioxide (Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 ) test fuel rods containing 0.0, 0.05, 0.25, 1.50, 3.00 weight % of Gd 2 O 3 in Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 . Reactivity effect, power distribution, neutron flux distribution, and temperature coefficient were measured for three types of lattices which were in shapes of annular, rectangular parallele-piped, and JPDR mockup core. The theoretical values corresponding to the measured ones were obtained by means of the design method for the FTA which is the test fuel assembly with Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 rods for JPDR, and the accuracy was checked. In general, the calculated values were in good agreement with the measured ones. Besides, the following characteristics of Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 rods are recognized both in measurement and calculation, i.e. (1) the effect due to gadolinia on reactivity, power distribution, and thermal neutron flux distribution are steeply saturating; the gadolinia content of only 1.50 weight % is enough to reach the almost saturated condition, (2) the relative power becomes 20% to that of normal fuel under the saturated condition, (3) the relation between the negative reactivity and the power depression effect due to gadolinia is almost linear, and (4) the interference on power depression between the adjacent gadolinia loaded rods is almost negligible, and that on reactivity effect is 15% at most. (author)

  19. Effects of hyperstoichiometry and fission products on the electrochemical reactivity of UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betteridge, J.S.; Scott, N.A.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Bahen, L.E.; Hocking, W.H.; Lucuta, P.G.

    1997-03-01

    The effects of hyperstoichiometry and fission products on the electrochemical reactivity Of UO 2 nuclear fuel have been systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry and the O 2 reduction reaction. Significant constraints are placed on the active-site model for O 2 reduction by the modest impact of bulk hyperstoichiometry. Formation of the U 4 O 9 derivative phase was associated with a marked increase in transient surface oxidation/reduction processes, which probably involve localized attack and might be fostered by tensile stresses induced during oxidation. Electrocatalytic reduction Of O 2 on simulated nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) has been determined to increase progressively with nominal burnup and pronounced enhancement of H 2 O reduction has been observed as well. Substitution of uranium by lower-valence (simulated) fission products, which was formerly considered the probable cause for this behaviour, has now been shown to merely provide good electrical conductivity. Instead, the enhanced reduction kinetics for O 2 and H 2 O on SIMFUEL can be fully accounted for by noble metals, which segregate to the UO 2 grain boundaries as micron-sized particles, despite their low effective surface area. Apparent convergence of the electrochemical properties Of UO 2 and SIMFUEL through natural corrosion likely reflects evolution toward a common active surface. (author)

  20. A model for evolution of oxygen potential and stoichiometry deviation in irradiated UO 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozrin, V. D.

    2011-12-01

    A model for radial redistribution of oxygen in irradiated UO 2 fuel under conditions of temperature and fission rate gradients has been developed. The oxygen transport in irradiated fuel is considered as a two-scale problem. On the local scale defined by the grain size, irradiated fuel is considered as a multi-phase system including solid solution of fission products in UO 2 matrix, solid precipitates (metal phase, grey phase of complex ternary compounds, the phase of condensed CsI) formed at the gas/solid interface and the gas phase in the intergranular bubbles. Intraganular transport of fission products is described by a set of diffusion equations which are supplemented by the condition of partial thermochemical equilibrium in the subsystem "precipitates & gas phase". The boundary conditions are formulated basing on thermochemical equilibrium on the interface of subsystems "solid solution" and "precipitates & gas phase". Calculation of the partial thermochemical equilibrium yields local values of the oxygen chemical potential and the deviation from fuel stoichiometry. On the global scale defined by the fuel pellet size, spatial variations of the oxygen potential caused by the temperature gradients or the presence of sources/sinks at the pellet boundary determine thermal diffusion fluxes resulting in redistribution of oxygen. The whole set of equations describing local equilibration and the transport in the local and global scales is solved in a self-consistent manner. The model results for radial distribution of oxygen potential of UO 2 calculated for typical reactor operating conditions and the fuel burnup up ˜100 MW d/kg HM are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  1. Transient fission product release within operating UO2 fuel elements during power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Hastings, I.J.

    1983-05-01

    We have measured short-lived fission product release during shutdown and startup transients for intact UO 2 fuel elements normally operating at linear powers of 45-62 kW/m. The magnitudes of the transient releases are dependent on the steady state operating power and severity of the transient. It is inferred that the inventory of short-lived species at the fuel-to-sheath gap, and thus the accident source term, could be augmented by a series of normal operation transients

  2. Performance of LMFBR fuel pins with (Pu,Th)O/sub 2-x/ and UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.

    1983-09-01

    The irradiation performance of (Pu,Th)O/sub 2-x/ and UO 2 fueled pins for breeder reactor application were compared to the extensive performance data base for the (U,Pu)O/sub 2-x/ fuel system. Th-Pu and 238 U- 233 U based fuel systems were candidate fuel fertile/fissile isotopic combinations for development of alternatives to the current LMFBR fuel cycle. Initial screening tests were conducted in the EBR-II to obtain comparative performance data because of the limited experience with these fuel systems. In some cases, 235 U was used as a substitute for 233 U because of the difficulties in fabrication of available 233 U due to its high gamma ray emission rate

  3. Subcriticality determination of low-enriched UO2 lattices in water by exponential experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Takenori

    1991-01-01

    To determine the static k (effective neutron multiplication factor) ranging from the critical to an extremely subcritical states, the exponential experiments were performed using various sizes of light-water moderated and reflected low-enriched UO 2 lattice cores. For comparison, the pulsed neutron source experiments were also carried out. In the manner of the Gozani's bracketing method applied to the pulsed source experiment, a formula to obtain k from the measured spatial-decay constant was derived on the basis of diffusion theory. Parameters in the formulas needed to obtain k from the respective experiments were evaluated by 4-group neutron diffusion calculations. The results of the exponential experiments agreed well with those of the pulsed source experiments, the 4-group diffusion calculations and the 137-group Monte Carlo calculations. Therefore, the present data-processing method developed for the exponential experiment was demonstrated to be valid. Besides, through the examination on the parameters used in the data processing, it was found that the dependence of parameter value upon k is weak in the exponential experiment compared with that in the pulsed source experiment. This indicates the superiority of the exponential experiment over the pulsed source experiment for the subcriticality determination of a wide range. (author)

  4. Irradiation of defected SAP clad UO2 fuel in the X-7 organic loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.; Cracknell, A.G.; MacDonald, R.D.

    1961-10-01

    This report describes an experiment designed to test the behaviour under irradiation of a UO 2 fuel specimen clad in a defected SAP sheath and cooled by recirculating organic liquid. The specimen containing the defect was irradiated in the X-7 loop in the NRX reactor from the 25th of November until the 13th of December 1960. Up to the 13th of December the behaviour was analogous to that seen with defected UO 2 specimens clad in zircaloy which were irradiated in water loops. Reactor power transients resulted in peaking of gamma ray activities in the loop, but on steady operation these activities tended to fall to a steady state level, Over this period the pressure drop across the fuel increased by a factor of two, the increases occurring after reactor shut downs and start ups. On 13th December the pressure drop increased rapidly, after a reactor shut down and start up, to over five times its original value and the activities in the loop rose to a high level. The specimen was removed and examination showed that the sheath was very badly split and that the volume between the fuel and the sheath was filled with a hard black organic substance. This report gives full details of the irradiation and of the post -irradiation examination. Correlation of the observed phenomenon is attempted and a preliminary assessment of the problems which would be associated with defect fuel in an organic reactor is given. (author)

  5. Behaviour in air at 175-400 degrees C of irradiated UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; McCracken, D.

    1984-09-01

    The authors extended their study of irradiated, defected UO 2 fuel elements to 200 and 400 degrees C. At 200 degrees C there was no diametral change, but at 400 degrees C we observed swelling and severe sheath splitting. Neither short-lived fission products, nor Cs-134, Cs-137 or Ru-106 above background, were detected. Maximum Kr-85 release was 4 Bq ( -6 Ci). Discharge time was 2.5 years. UO 2 fragment studies were extended to 400 degrees C. The oxidation process for unirradiated and irradiated fuel up to 300 degrees C was characterized by activation energies of 140 +- 10 and 120 +- 10 kJ/mol, respectively; enhancement of oxidation rate was confirmed in the irradiated samples. There is an apparent reduction of activation energy above about 300 degrees C. Fuel elements with artificial and natural defects showed similar oxidation and dimensional response at 250 degrees C. Behaviour of fuel fragments from the defect area of a naturally-defected element is consistent with that for fragments from intact elements when prior oxidation during the defect period is considered

  6. Development of a computer code for the analysis of MOX and UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    A computer code called COSMOS has been developed for the thermal analysis of MOX and UO 2 fuel rod during steady-state and transient conditions. The main purpose of COSMOS is to calculate the temperature distribution in the fuel and cladding and the fission gas release. Based on a computer code developed for the analysis of UO 2 fuel, following features have been taken into account to analyze the MOX fuel : 1) changes in thermo-mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient, 2) change in radial power depression as a function of Pu fissile content, and 3) change in the mechanism of fission gas release resulting form the heterogeneity of microstructure of MOX fuel. In addition, recent experimental findings such as rim effect and thermal conductivity degradation with burnup are taken into account to analyze high burnup fuel. A mechanistic fission gas release model developed based on physical processes is applied to steady-state operation and an empirical model developed based on the amount of fission gas stored at grain boundary is used for transient operation. Another important feature of COSMOS is that it can analyze the fuel segment refabricated from the base irradiated fuel rods. This feature makes it possible to utilize database obtained from international projects such as HALDEN and RISO, many of which were collected from refabricated fuel segments. The capacity of COSMOS has been tested with a number of experimental results from some international fuel irradiation programs. This paper provides a general description of the models contained in COSMOS and some results of comparison between calculation and measurement. (author). 15 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs

  7. Release of tellurium and cesium from UO2 in LWR fuel rods during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the release of tellurium (Te-132) and cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from UO 2 -fuel is analyzed. The basis for the analysis is the experimental results from the S176 series of experiments performed at Studsvik. It seems that the model developed earlier for release of iodine applies also to tellurium and cesium. This model assumes sweeping up of the species in question by moving grain boundaries and subsequent release through grain boundary porosity. An interesting extra feature is deposition of tellurium at temperatures in the range 1500-2000 K believed to be due to condensation. (author)

  8. Studies on the Sintering Behaviour of UO2-Gd2O3 Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, Michelangelo; Gracher Riella, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    The incorporation of gadolinium directly into nuclear power reactor fuel is important from the point of reactivity compensation and adjustment of power distribution enabling thus longer fuel cycles and optimized fuel utilization. The incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 powder directly into the UO 2 powder by dry mechanical blending is the most attractive process because of its simplicity. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. This is due to blockages during the sintering process. There is little information in published literature about the possible mechanism for this blockage and this is restricted to the hypothesis based on formation of a low diffusivity Gd rich (U,Gd)O 2 phase. Experimental evidences indicated the existence of phases in the (U,Gd)O 2 system with structure different from the fluorite type structure of UO 2 . The apparition of these new phases coincides with the lowering of the density after sintering and with the lowering of the interdiffusion coefficient. However, it has been shown experimentally that the sintering blockage phenomena cannot be explained on the basis of the formation of low diffusivity Gd rich (U,Gd)O 2 phases. The work was continued to investigate other possible blocking mechanism. (authors)

  9. Pressure analysis in the fabrication process of TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The pressure signals during the real TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle fabrication process. ► A new relationship about the pressure drop change and the coated fuel particles properties. ► The proposed relationship is validated by experimental results during successive coating. ► A convenient method for monitoring the fluidized state during coating process. - Abstract: The pressure signals in the coating furnace are obtained experimentally from the TRISO UO 2 -coated fuel particle fabrication process. The pressure signals during the coating process are analyzed and a simplified relationship about the pressure drop change due to the coated layer is proposed based on the spouted bed hydrodynamics. The change of pressure drop is found to be consistent with the change of the combination factor about particle density, bed density, particle diameter and static bed height, during the successive coating process of the buffer PyC, IPyC, SiC and OPyC layer. The newly proposed relationship is validated by the experimental values. Based on this relationship, a convenient method is proposed for real-time monitoring the fluidized state of the particles in a high-temperature coating process in the spouted bed. It can be found that the pressure signals analysis is an effective method to monitor the fluidized state on-line in the coating process at high temperature up to 1600 °C.

  10. Gaseous swelling of B4C and UO2 fuel: similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, I.; Khoruzhii, O.; Kourtchatov, S.; Likhanskii, V.; Matweev, L.

    2001-01-01

    A major factor limiting the resource of control rods (CRs) for WWER-1000 reactors is their radiation damage. Radiation induced embrittlement of the CRs cladding, core swelling and gaseous internal pressure in CRs result in mechanical core-cladding interaction. This work is devoted to the physical analysis of processes that control the structural changes in neutron absorber elements with B 4 C under irradiation in water reactors. Particularly, the analysis of mechanisms of the helium porosity formation in B 4 C is undertaken. In view of the deficiency of experimental data on the subject, a fruitful approach to the problem is a comparative analysis of the swelling mechanisms in B 4 C absorber and UO 2 fuel. Using this similarity a phenomenological model of fission gas behavior in boron carbide is proposed. The model predictions for radial profile of 10 B burnup under influence of thermal and epithermal neutrons are compared with experimental results. The main results show that despite the external similarity of the process of fission gas accumulation in UO 2 and in B 4 C, phenomenology of gaseous swelling is much different for the fuel and the CR core. The reason for that difference is the distinction of physical conditions in irradiated fuel and CR core

  11. Determination of the cationic self-diffusion coefficient in ThO2-5%UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabioni, A.C.S.

    1984-01-01

    The cation self-diffusion coefficient for the ThO 2 -5%UO 2 by means of the densification model developed by Assmann and Stehle was determined. The experimental data of the fuel densification, used in the calculations, were obtained from thermal resinter tests. Our result is comparable to previously published values for U and Th diffusion in polycrystalline ThO 2 and (Th, U)O 2 . (Author) [pt

  12. Burn-up credit applications for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies in AREVA/COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Riffard, C.; Batifol, M.; Pelletier, S.

    2003-01-01

    For the last seven years, AREVA/COGEMA has been implementing the second phase of its burn-up credit program (the incorporation of fission products). Since the early nineties, major actinides have been taken into account in criticality analyses first for reprocessing applications, then for transport and storage of fuel assemblies Next year (2004) COGEMA will take into account the six main fission products (Rh103, Cs133, Nd143, Sm149, Sm152 and Gd155) that make up 50% of the anti-reactivity of all fission products. The experimental program will soon be finished. The new burn-up credit methodology is in progress. After a brief overview of BUC R and D program and COGEMA's application of the BUC, this paper will focus on the new burn-up measurement for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies. It details the measurement instrumentation and the measurement experiments on MOX fuels performed at La Hague in January 2003. (author)

  13. Behaviour of short-lived iodines in operating UO2 fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.; Hastings, I.J.; Hunt, C.E.L.

    1984-11-01

    Sweep gas experiments have been done to determine the behaviour of short-lived fission products within operating UO 2 fuel elements at linear powers of 45, 54, and 60 KW/m, and to burnups of 70, 80, and 50 MWh/kgU respectively. Although radioiodine transport was not observed directly during normal operation, equilibrium gap inventories for I-131 were deduced from the shutdown decay behaviour of the fission gases. These inventories were a strong function of fuel power and ranged from 10 GBq (0.27 Ci) to 100 GBq (2.7 Ci) over the range tested. We conclude that the iodine inventory was adsorbed onto the fuel and/or sheath surfaces with a volatile fraction of less than 10 -2 and a charcoal-filter-penetrating fraction of less than 2x10 -4

  14. Mechanistic modelling of gaseous fission product behaviour in UO2 fuel by Rtop code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanukova, V.D.; Khoruzhii, O.V.; Kourtchatov, S.Y.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Matveew, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The current status of a mechanistic modelling by the RTOP code of the fission product behaviour in polycrystalline UO 2 fuel is described. An outline of the code and implemented physical models is presented. The general approach to code validation is discussed. It is exemplified by the results of validation of the models of fuel oxidation and grain growth. The different models of intragranular and intergranular gas bubble behaviour have been tested and the sensitivity of the code in the framework of these models has been analysed. An analysis of available models of the resolution of grain face bubbles is also presented. The possibilities of the RTOP code are presented through the example of modelling behaviour of WWER fuel over the course of a comparative WWER-PWR experiment performed at Halden and by comparison with Yanagisawa experiments. (author)

  15. Advanced fuel cycle for the LWR on a basis of UF6 pyrohydrolysis up to UO2 and vibropack technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.B.; Mayorshin, A.A.; Sokolovsky, Y.S.; Skiba, O.V.; Porodnov, P.T.; Rybin, D.G.; Chernyshov, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    The traditional circuit of a fuel cycle for thermal neutrons reactors provides conversion of enriched uranium hexafluoride in a press-powder uranium dioxide, using it for manufacturing pellet fuel and subsequently pins. It is known that, each of these stages contains rather plenty of technological and control operations. In SSC RF RIAR the large cycle of studies for improving and simplifying fuel cycle of power reactors is executed. One of studies is devoted to the development of one-stage way of granulated uranium dioxide obtaining by hexafluoride pyrohydrolysis in UO 2 particles boiling layer in a combination with vibropack technology for pins manufacture of fast and thermal neutrons reactors. Reduction of time that conversion of uranium hexafluoride into uranium dioxide takes in a combination with potential advantages of vibropacking: 1) minimum quantity of technological and control operations; 2) possibility of introducing various component (getter, burning out absorber) at a stage of preparation of fuel portion; 3) possibility of using fuel on the basis of mechanical mixes and, if it is necessary, distribution of components profiled along length of the fuel column. (J.P.N.)

  16. Framatome-ANP France UO2 fuel fabrication - criticality safety analysis in the light of the 1999' Tokay Mura accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, M.; Zheng, S.; Mouton, J.; Porte, R.

    2004-01-01

    In France the 1999' Tokai Mura criticality accident in Japan had a big impact on the nuclear fuel manufacturing facility community. Moreover this accident led to a large public discussion about all the nuclear facilities. The French Safety Authorities made strong requirements to the industrials to revisit completely their safety analysis files mainly those concerning nuclear fuels treatments. The Framatome-ANP production of its French low enriched (5 w/o) UO 2 fuel fabrication plant (FBFC/Romans) exceeds 1000 metric tons a year. Special attention was given to the emergency evacuation plan that should be followed in case of a criticality accident. If a criticality accident happens, site internal and external radioprotection requirements need to have an emergency evacuation plan showing the different routes where the absorbed doses will be as low as possible for people. The French Safety Authorities require also an update of the old based neutron source term accounting for state of the art methodology. UO 2 blenders units contain a large amount of dry powder strictly controlled by moderation; a hypothetical water leakage inside one of these apparatus is simulated by increasing the water content of the powder. The resulted reactivity insertion is performed by several static calculations. The French IRSN/CEA CRISTAL codes are used to perform these static calculations. The kinetic criticality code POWDER simulates the power excursion versus time and determines the consequent total energy source term. MNCP4B performs the source term propagation (including neutrons and gamma) used to determine the isodose curves needed to define the emergency evacuation plant. This paper deals with the approach Framatome-ANP has taken to assess Safety Authorities demands using the more up to date calculation tools and methodology. (authors)

  17. Framatome-ANP France UO2 fuel fabrication. Criticality safety analysis in the light of the JCO accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, M.; Zheng, S.; Mouton, J.; Porte, R.

    2003-01-01

    In France the 1999' Tokai Mura criticality accident in Japan had a big impact on the nuclear fuel manufacturing facility community. Moreover this accident led to a large public discussion about all the nuclear facilities. The French Safety Authorities made strong requirements to the industrials to revisit completely their safety analysis files mainly those concerning nuclear fuels treatments. The FRAMATOME-ANP production of its French low enriched (5 w/o) UO2 fuel fabrication plant (FBFC/Romans) exceeds 1000 metric tons a year. Special attention was given to the emergency evacuation plan that should be followed in case of a criticality accident. If a criticality accident happens, site internal and external radioprotection requirements need to have an emergency evacuation plan showing the different routes where the absorbed doses will be as low as possible for people. The French Safety Authorities require also an update of the old based neutron source term accounting for state of the art methodology. UO2 blenders units contain a large amount of dry powder strictly controlled by moderation; a hypothetical water leakage inside one of these apparatus is simulated by increasing the water content of the powder. The resulted reactivity insertion is performed by several static calculations. The French IRSN/CEA CRISTAL codes are used to perform these static calculations. The kinetic criticality code POWDER simulates the power excursion versus time and determines the consequent total energy source term. MNCP4B performs the source term propagation (including neutrons and gamma) used to determine the isodose curves needed to define the emergency evacuation plant. This paper deals with the approach FRAMATOME-ANP has taken to assess Safety Authorities demands using the more up to date calculation tools and methodology. (author)

  18. Overall models and experimental database for UO2 and MOX fuel increasing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Blanpain, P.

    2001-01-01

    COPERNIC is an advanced fuel rod performance code developed by Framatome. It is based on the TRANSURANUS code that contains a clear and flexible architecture, and offers many modeling possibilities. The main objectives of COPERNIC are to accurately predict steady-state and transient fuel operations at high burnups and to incorporate advanced materials such as the Framatome M5-alloy cladding. An extensive development program was undertaken to benchmark the code to very high burnups and to new M5-alloy cladding data. New models were developed for the M5-alloy cladding and the COPERNIC thermal models were upgraded and improved to extend the predictions to burnups over 100 GWd/tM. Since key phenomena, like fission gas release, are strongly temperature dependent, many other models were upgraded also. The COPERNIC qualification range extends to 67, 55, 53 GWd/tM respectively for UO 2 , UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 , and MOX fuels with Zircaloy-4 claddings. The range extends to 63 GWd/tM with UO 2 fuel and the advanced M5-alloy cladding. The paper focuses on thermal and fission gas release models, and on MOX fuel modeling. The COPERNIC thermal model consists of several submodels: gap conductance, gap closure, fuel thermal conductivity, radial power profile, and fuel rim. The fuel thermal conductivity and the gap closure models, in particular, have been significantly improved. The model was benchmarked with 3400 fuel centerline temperature data from many French and international programs. There are no measured to predicted statistical biases with respect to linear heat generation rate or burnup. The overall quality of the model is state-of-the-art as the model uncertainty is below 10 %. The fission gas release takes into account athermal and thermally activated mechanisms. The model was adapted to MOX and Gadolinia fuels. For the heterogeneous MOX MIMAS fuels, an effective burnup is used for the incubation threshold. For gadolinia fuels, a scaled temperature effect is used. The

  19. Coupled thermochemical, isotopic evolution and heat transfer simulations in highly irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, M. H. A.; Banfield, J.; Clarno, K. T.; Simunovic, S.; Besmann, T. M.; Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.

    2013-10-01

    Predictive capabilities for simulating irradiated nuclear fuel behavior are enhanced in the current work by coupling thermochemistry, isotopic evolution and heat transfer. Thermodynamic models that are incorporated into this framework not only predict the departure from stoichiometry of UO2, but also consider dissolved fission and activation products in the fluorite oxide phase, noble metal inclusions, secondary oxides including uranates, zirconates, molybdates and the gas phase. Thermochemical computations utilize the spatial and temporal evolution of the fission and activation product inventory in the pellet, which is typically neglected in nuclear fuel performance simulations. Isotopic computations encompass the depletion, decay and transmutation of more than 2000 isotopes that are calculated at every point in space and time. These computations take into consideration neutron flux depression and the increased production of fissile plutonium near the fuel pellet periphery (i.e., the so-called “rim effect”). Thermochemical and isotopic predictions are in very good agreement with reported experimental measurements of highly irradiated UO2 fuel with an average burnup of 102 GW d t(U)-1. Simulation results demonstrate that predictions are considerably enhanced when coupling thermochemical and isotopic computations in comparison to empirical correlations. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  20. Rim characteristics and their effects on the thermal conductivity in high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung-Ho; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of high burnup UO 2 fuel such as threshold burnup for the formation of high burnup microstructure (rim), rim average burnup and rim width were estimated and then the thermal conductivity degradation due to the porous rim region was investigated. The threshold burnup for rim formation was estimated as a function of temperature and fission rate using Rest's model. The calculated threshold burnup, which shows a particular dependence on temperature, ranges from 40 to 50 MWd/kgU at typical fuel periphery temperatures of 400 to 600degC. In addition, the rim average burnup and the rim width were obtained by statistical analysis of the data available in open literature. To consider the additional degradation of thermal conductivity in the rim region, a formula for rim porosity was presented with the assumption that rim pores are overpressurized and that all the produced fission gases are retained in the rim pores. To estimate the thermal conductivity in the porous rim using the general correction method applicable to two-phase structure, it was assumed that the rim region consists of pores and fully dense materials composed of UO 2 matrix and solid fission products. Then by combining the general model for two-phase with the rim porosity developed in the present paper and HALDEN's thermal conductivity model, a thermal conductivity model for the porous rim region was developed. The predicted thermal conductivity shows an additional reduction of ∼20% due to the porous rim structure which would cause to increase the fuel temperature of high burnup fuel during steady-state operation and transient irradiation. (author)

  1. Influence of environment on the alteration of the UO2 matrix of spent fuel in storage condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaulard, C.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, research on the long term behavior of spent fuel is undertaken and in particular the study of mechanisms of UO 2 oxidation and dissolution in water-saturated host rock. Under the law program on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste of June 28, 2006, France was chose as the reference solution the retreatment of spent fuel and disposal in deep geological repository of vitrified final waste. Nevertheless, studies on a direct disposal of spent fuel will continue for safety. The disposal concept provides for conditioning spent fuel in a steel container whose seal is guaranteed for a period specified in the order of 10,000 years. It is also reasonable to assume that the groundwater comes into contact with the fuel after the deterioration of container and lead to the UO 2 matrix degradation and the release of radionuclides. The oxidation/dissolution of UO 2 has been studied by means electrochemical methods coupled to XPS and ICP-MS measurements.A thermodynamic and bibliographic study of U(VI)/UO 2 (s) system allowed to show the effect of the physical and chemical conditions of the solution on the system, and to show the different mechanisms proposed to describe the oxidation and the dissolution of the uranium dioxide in different media (non-complexing, carbonate and clay). The study of the oxidation/dissolution of UO 2 in acidic and non-complexing media (0.1 mol/L NaCF 3 SO 3 , pH = 3), where UO 2 2+ /UO 2 (s) predominates and the formation of precipitates is limited or even avoided, showed a mechanism with two electrochemical steps and a model characteristic of UO 2 oxidation in acidic non-complexing media. Then, the study in neutral non-complexing media (0.05 mol/L NaCl, pH = 7.5) showed a mechanism with two electrochemical steps and one chemical step (EEC) in which both electrochemical steps are similar to those proposed in acidic media. Finally, a first approach of the UO 2

  2. Quality assurance and control in the manufacture of metalclad UO2 reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has carried out a programme since its earliest days that includes the collection and dissemination of information on nuclear fuels. Since the 1960 symposium on Fuel Element Fabrication with Special Emphasis on Cladding Materials there has been an average of one meeting a year reviewing some aspect of fuel fabrication technology. A recent meeting dealing with the fabrication of UO 2 fuels was the Study Group on the Facilities and Technology needed for Nuclear Fuel Manufacture, held in Grenoble in 1972 (Rep. IAEA-158). After that meeting it became apparent that the quality of fuel production was an important aspect that had received inadequate coverage so far, and the Panel on Quality Assurance and Control in Nuclear Fuel Manufacture was convened by the Agency in Vienna in November 1974. In the working papers and discussions at the Panel meeting the viewpoints of different countries and of various interested parties, such as manufacturers, reactor operators and government authorities, were presented

  3. UO2-can thermal transfer. Application to the case of the first EL 4 batch of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringot, C.; Faussat, A.

    1964-01-01

    The UO 2 -can thermal transfer is one of the most important factors affecting the operational working of fuel elements. A systematic study of the elements influencing the heat transfer coefficient has been undertaken: in particular the effects of the contact pressure and of the gas filling pressure have been studied. Tests have been carried out using planar and cylindrical geometrical shapes. Using the values obtained and the integral conductivity curve for UO 2 , a calculation has been made of the evolution of the EL-4 fuel element during its life-time, if it is assumed that the fusion gas occupies a free volume of 2,5 per cent at the end of the fuel element and of zero or 2 per cent in the UO 2 . (authors) [fr

  4. Development and research of the modified nanostructured fuel UO2 with improved performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurina, I.; Popov, V.; Rumyantsev, V.; Rogov, S.

    2011-01-01

    Activities of SSC RF IPPE aimed at improvement of fast reactor fuels include the research in the following areas: (1) enhancement of thermal conductivity and crack resistance, (2) structure improvement for reduction of fission-product-gas release, and (3) softening the fuel-cladding interaction. The developed technologies allow us to fabricate UO 2 fuel pellets, which demonstrated improved properties as compared to the standard pellets. The improved properties of the pellets have been attained with the help of a nanotechnology (precipitation with no additives and co-precipitation with additives) and a technology based on addition of ammonium-containing reactants to the standard powders. In the developed, so called modified, fuel, the U-U chemical bonding, attributed to metal nanoclusters, and the dominating fraction of nanosized pores have been found. A lower swelling of the modified fuel under irradiation is expected because of a compensation effect of the surface tension on the fission-product-gas pressure. The enhanced thermal conductivity and thermal stability allow the modified fuel to attain a deeper burn-up and to provide more safety during reactor power maneuvering. (authors)

  5. Development of UO2-30 WT per cent PuO2 fuel for FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H.S.; Ramachandran, R.; Purushotham, D.S.C.; Roy, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The specifications on Fast Breeder Reactor (FBTR) fuel pellets have two apparently contradictory requirements viz. (1) formation of homogeneous solid between UO 2 and PuO 2 which can only be achieved by high temperature sintering and (2) density of sintered pellets in the range of 92 ± 1 per cent T.D. which is normally achieved by low temperature sintering. Deactivation of starting powders under CO 2 or addition of volatile pore formers to the powders are the two methods which have been developed for lowering the denity of the pellets without reducing the sintering temperature. Two alternative fabrication routes utilizing these processes for manufacturing of FBTR pellets are described in this report. (author)

  6. TEM characterization of UO2-Gd2O3 nuclear fuels synthesized by coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldati, A.; Gana Watkins, I.; Menghini, J.; Prado, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a micro and nano structural characterization of 4% weight doped Gd 2 O 3 -UO 2 pellet using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Agglomerate morphology and crystallite sizes were determined using light/dark field and high resolution (HR-TEM) images. Convergent beam Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron Diffraction (ED) were used to evaluate sample composition and homogeneity, even at the nanometer scale. We obtained an average crystallite size of 90±20 nm. Moreover, from TEM-EDS analyses we determined the presence of Gadolinium in all the analyzed crystallites but with 25% variation among their concentrations. These results show the capability of TEM analysis to characterize a nuclear fuel pellet with burnable poisons nano structure and homogeneity.(author)

  7. Pore pressure and swelling in the rim region of LWR high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2001-01-01

    Based on measured rim characteristics of LWR high burnup UO 2 fuel, the pressure of rim pores and the additional pellet swelling due to rim formation have been modeled. Using the assumption that the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim pores is the same as that which is depleted from the rim matrix, excessive pore pressure is derived as a function of temperature, pellet average burnup and pore radius. The rim pores with small radii are calculated to be highly overpressurized at high burnup. Comparison with experimental data shows that, while the pellet swelling obtained with best-estimate rim width is underpredicted, the one calculated with conservative rim width agrees well with the measured data for rim burnups between 50 and 65 GWd/tU. On the other hand, the measured swelling at 85 GWd/tU is about in-between the two calculations

  8. Effect of technological parameters and microstructure on mechanical strength of UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of various peculiarities of tablet microstructure namely, sammury porosity (tablet density), grain size and pore distribution over sizes on technological parameters, is studied. It is shown that density decrease leads to a fast reduction of UO 2 tablet strength. The maximum effect on strength is produced by pore distribution over sizes, characterized by a median size, and not by the grain size, though a combined effect of those two factors is also observed. The important role of the technology of tablet production manifests itself in the fact that all operations bringing about the increase of pore or grain sizes leads to a reduction of strength. Such factors as powder origin, granule sizes, U 3 O 8 content and the amount of additions do not cause any considerable changes in the strength of tablets. Bend tests under conditions of biaxial loading should be considered as an ideal method of determining fuel tablets strength [ru

  9. Radial distribution of UO2 and Gd2O3 in fuel cells of a BWR Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Perusquia del C, R.; Francois, J.L.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2008-01-01

    The fuel system that is used at the moment in a power plant based on power reactors BWR, includes as much like the one of its substantial parts to the distribution of the fissile materials like a distribution of burnt poisons within each one of the cells which they constitute the fuel assemblies, used for the energy generation. Reason why at the beginning of a new operation cycle in a reactor of this type, the reactivity of the nucleus should be compensated by the exhaustion of the assemblies that it moves away of the nucleus for their final disposition. This compensation is given by means of the introduction of the recharge fuel, starting from the UO 2 enriched in U 2 35, and of the Gadolinium (Gd 2 O 3 ). The distribution of these materials not only defines the requirements of energy generation, but in certain measures also the form in that the margins will behave to the limit them thermal during the operation of the reactor. These margins must be taken into account for the safe and efficient extraction of the energy of the fuel. In this work typical fuel cells appear that are obtained by means of the use of a emulation model of an ants colony. This model allows generating from a possible inventory of values of enrichment of U 2 35, as well as of concentration of Gadolinium a typical fuel cell, which consists of an arrangement of lOxlO rods, of which 92 contain U 2 35, some of these rods contain a concentration of Gd 2 O 3 and 8 of the total contain only water. The search of each cell finishes when the value of the Local Peak Power Factor (LPPF) in the cell reaches a minimal value, or when a pre established value of iterations is reached. The cell parameters are obtained from the results of the execution of the code HELIOS, which incorporates like a part integral of the search algorithm. (Author)

  10. Effect of PCMI restraint on bubble size distribution in the rim structure of UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Je-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Cheon, Jin-Sik; Lee, Byung-Ho; Sohn, Dong-Seong

    2005-01-01

    Generally, the bubble size in the rim structure of UO 2 is not dependent on the fuel burnup and the bubble pressure is higher than that in the equilibrium condition. However it was also observed that if the fuel pellet is not restrained, the size of the bubbles in the rim structure could be larger than that in the restraint condition. Although the wide variety of rim bubble sizes and porosities possibly result from an external restrain effect, the quantitative method to analyze the effect of PCMI restraint on bubble distribution in the rim is not available at the moment. In this paper, a method is developed which can be used to analyze the effect of PCMI restraint on the bubble distribution in the rim structure of UO 2 fuel based on the data in the literatures. The total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles per unit rim volume could be derived by a summation of the number of Xe atoms of each rim bubble in a unit rim volume. The number of Xe atoms of each rim bubble could be calculated by the Van der Waals equation of state and the pressure expressed by p=σ+C/r, where C is an unknown constant to be determined as a function of the temperature and the burnup. On the other hand, the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles per unit rim volume can also be calculated by Xe depression data. If the fuel pellet is not restrained, the uniform hydrostatic stress, σ is zero. Hence if the data of the fuel disk without a restraint is used, a constant C can be obtained at 823K and a local burnup of 90 GWd/t. Although the local burnup of PCMI restraint case is slightly different from that without PCMI restraint, the value derived above is used for the analysis of PCMI restraint case. The calculated bubble distribution with PCMI restraint was similar to the measured one. Because the effect of PCMI restraint on bubble size increased with the bubble size, the development of a large bubble was suppressed. Hence, the PCMI restraint caused a typical bubble size in the rim and

  11. Fission gas release behavior in high burnup UO2 fuels with developed rim-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Une, Katsumi; Kashibe, Shinji; Hayashi, Kimio

    2002-01-01

    The effect of rim structure formation and external restraint pressure on fission gas release at transient conditions has been examined by using an out-of-pile high pressure heating technique for high burnup UO 2 fuels (60, 74 and 90 GWd/t), which had been irradiated in test reactors. The latter two fuels bore a developed rim structure. The maximum heating temperature was 1500 degC, and the external pressures were independently controlled in the range of 10-150 MPa. The present high burnup fuel data were compared with those of previously studied BWR fuels of 37 and 54 GWd/t with almost no rim structure. The fission gas release and bubble swelling due to the growth of grain boundary bubbles and coarsened rim bubbles were effectively suppressed by the strong restraint pressure of 150 MPa for all the fuels; however the fission gas release remarkably increased for the two high burnup fuels with the developed rim structure, even at the strong restraint conditions. From the stepwise de-pressurization tests at an isothermal condition of 1500degC, the critical external pressure, below which a large burst release due to the rapid growth and interlinkage of the bubbles abruptly begins, was increased from a 40-60 MPa level for the middle burnup fuels to a high level of 120-140 MPa for the rim-structured high burnup fuels. The high potential for transient fission gas release and bubble swelling in the rim-structured fuels was attributed to highly over-pressurized fission gases in the rim bubbles. (author)

  12. Results of the irradiation of mixed UO2 - PuO2 oxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikailoff, H.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bloch, J.; Ezran, L.; Hayet, L.

    1966-01-01

    In order to study the behaviour of fuel elements used for the first charge of the reactor Rapsodie, a first batch of eleven needles was irradiated in the reactor EL3 and then examined. These needles (having a shape very similar lo that of the actual needles to be used) were made up of a stack of sintered mixed-oxide pellets: UO 2 containing about 10 per cent of PuO 2 . The density was 85 to 97 per cent of the theoretical, value. The diametral gap between the oxide and the stainless steel can was between 0,06 and 0,27 mm. The specific powers varied from 1230 to 2700 W/cm 3 and the can temperature was between 450 and 630 C. The maximum burn-up attained was 22000 MW days/tonne. Examination of the needles (metrology, radiography and γ-spectrography) revealed certain macroscopic changes, and the evolution of the fuel was shown by micrographic studies. These observations were used, together with flux measurements results, to calculate the temperature distribution inside the fuel. The volume of the fission gas produced was measured in some of the samples; the results are interpreted taking into account the temperature distribution in the oxide and the burn-up attained. Finally a study was made both of the behaviour of a fuel element whose central part was molten during irradiation, and of the effect of sodium which had penetrated into some of the samples following can rupture. (author) [fr

  13. Effect of additives in sintering UO2-7wt%Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Gadolinium has been used as burnable poison for reactivity control in modern PWRs. The incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 powder directly into the UO 2 powder enables longer fuel cycles and optimized fuel utilization. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The process for manufacturing UO 2 - Gd 2 O 3 generates scraps that should be reused. The main scraps are green and sintered pellets, which must be calcined to U 3 O 8 to return to the fabrication process. Also, the incorporation of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 requires the use of an additive to improve the sintering process, in order to achieve the physical properties specified for the mixed fuel, mainly density and microstructure. This paper describes the effect of the addition of fabrication scraps on the properties of the UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 fuel. Aluminum hydroxide Al(OH) 3 was also incorporated to the fuel as a sintering aid. The results shown that the use of 2000 ppm of Al(OH) 3 as additive allow to fabricate good pellets with up to 10 wt% of recycled scraps. (author)

  14. The growth of intra-granular bubbles in post-irradiation annealed UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of low temperature irradiated UO 2 reveal large numbers of very small intra-granular bubbles, typically of around 1 nm diameter. During high temperature reactor transients these bubbles act as sinks for fission gas atoms and vacancies and can give rise to large volumetric swellings, sometimes of the order of 10%. Under irradiation conditions, the nucleation and growth of these bubbles is determined by a balance between irradiation-induced nucleation, diffusional growth and an irradiation induced re-solution mechanism. This conceptual picture is, however, incomplete because in the absence of irradiation the model predicts that the bubble population present from the pre-irradiation would act as the dominant sink for fission gas atoms resulting in large intra-granular swellings and little or no fission gas release. In practice, large fission gas releases are observed from post-irradiation annealed fuel. A recent series of experiments addressed the issue of fission gas release and swelling in post-irradiation annealed UO 2 originating from Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel which had been ramp tested in the Halden Test reactor. Specimens of fuel were subjected to transient heating at ramp rates of 0.5 deg. C/s and 20 deg. C/s to target temperatures between 1600 deg. C and 1900 deg. C. The release of fission gas was monitored during the tests. Subsequently, the fuel was subjected to post-irradiation examination involving detailed Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. Bubble-size distributions were obtained from seventeen specimens, which entailed the measurement of nearly 26,000 intra-granular bubbles. The analysis reveals that the bubble densities remain approximately invariant during the anneals and the bubble-size distributions exhibit long exponential tails in which the largest bubbles are present in concentrations of 10 4 or 10 5 lower than the concentrations of the average sized bubbles. Detailed modelling of the bubble

  15. Analysis of neutron parameters in light water moderated lattices of ThO2 and UO2 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onusic Junior, J.; Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A large number of light water moderated lattices of UO 2 and ThO 2 fuel rods were analyzed with the code HAMMER. The purpose of the study was to compare experimental results with computer calculated values. The model employed is described and some modification were introduced in the resonance parameters of Th-232 to increase the agreement with the experimental value [pt

  16. Contribution to the identification and the evaluation of a doped UO2 fuel with controlled oxygen potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennisi, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Temperature and oxygen partial pressure (PO 2 ) of nuclear oxide fuels are the main parameters governing both their thermochemical evolution in reactor and the speciation of volatile fission products such as Cs, I or Te. An innovative way to limit the risk of cladding rupture by corrosion under irradiation consists in buffering the oxygen partial pressure of the fuel under operation in a PO 2 domain where the fission gas are harmless towards Zr clad, by using solid redox buffers as additives. Niobium, with its NbO 2 /NbO and Nb 2 O 5 /NbO 2 redox couples has been found to be a promising candidate to this end. A manufacturing process of a buffered UO 2 fuel, doped with niobium has been optimized, in order to fulfill usual specifications (density, microstructure). The experimental study of the UO 2 -NbO x system has shown the existence of a liquid phase between UO 2 and NbO x at 810 C, which was not reported in the literature. The characterization of Nb containing phases present in UO 2 both in solid solution and as precipitates has lead us to propose a solubility thermodynamic model of niobium in UO 2 at 1700 C. An extensive study of the niobium precipitates shows the co-existence in the fuel of NbO 2 and NbO as major phases, together with small amounts of metallic Nb. The coexistence of niobium under two oxidation states inside the fuel is a key element of demonstration of a possible in-situ buffering effect, which is likely to impact some properties of the material that are dependent upon PO 2 , such as densification. These results confirm the promising potential of oxygen buffered fuels as regard to their performance in reactor. (author) [fr

  17. Simulation of pore interlinkage in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Oh, Je Yong; Lee, Byung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Joo, Hyung Kook; Sohn, Dong Seong

    2003-01-01

    Threshold porosity above which fission gas release channels would be formed in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 fuel was estimated by the Monte Carlo method and Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm. With the assumption that both rim pore and rim grain can be represented by cube, pore distribution in the rim was simulated 3-dimensionally by the Monte Carlo method according to porosity and pore size distribution. Then, using the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm, the fraction of open rim pores interlinked to the outer surface of a fuel pellet was derived as a function of rim porosity. The simulation showed that porosity of 24-25% is the threshold above which the number of rim pores forming release channels increases very rapidly. On the other hand, channels would not be formed if the porosity is less than about 23.5%. This is consistent with the observation that, for porosity less than 23.5%, almost no fission gas is released in the rim. However, once the rim porosity reaches beyond 25%, extensive open paths would be developed and considerable fission gas release would start in the rim

  18. SPS Fabrication of Nuclear CERMET Fuel Materials using W Powder Coated UO2 Feedstocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To overcome the NTP propellant feedstock challenges, MSFC developed a new powder coating technique that uses a polymer binder to coat UO2 particles with W prior to...

  19. Estimation of pore pressure in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the pore pressure in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 fuel as a function of rim burnup using the measured rim width, average porosity and pore density in the rim region. First, a linear relationship is developed based on measured rim burnup and rim width. Second, fraction of fission gas retained in the grain boundary of rim region is estimated. Third, total pores in the rim is calculated from the measured pore density in the rim region. Finally using the assumption that all the pores in the rim have the same size of 1.2μm, pore pressure is calculated from the equation of state for ideal gas. An estimated pore pressure of about 60 to 80 MPa for the rim burnup of 90 GWd/tU appears to be in reasonable agreement with other value given in a literature that pore pressure at 800 K become 90-210 MPa for pellet average burnup of 80 GWd/tU

  20. Comparative Studies on UO2 Fueled HTTR Several Nuclear Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayati, Anni N.; Prastyo, Puguh A.; Waris, Abdul; Irwanto, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) is one of Generation IV nuclear reactors that has been developed by JAERI (former name of JAEA, JAPAN). HTTR uses graphite moderator, helium gas coolant with UO2 fuel and outlet coolant temperature of 900°C or higher than that. Several studies regarding HTTR have been performed by employing JENDL 3.2 nuclear data libraries. In this paper, comparative evaluation of HTTR with several nuclear data libraries (JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4.0, and JEF 3.1) have been conducted.. The 3-D calculation was performed by using CITATION module of SRAC 2006 code. The result shows some differences between those nuclear data libraries result. K-eff or core effective multiplication factor results are about 1.17, 1,18 and 1,19 (JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4.0, and JEF 3.1) at Begin of Life, also at the End of Life (after two years operation) are 1.16, 1.17 and 1.17 for each nuclear data libraries. There are some different result of K-eff but for neutron spectra results, those nuclear data libraries show the same result.

  1. Analysis of burnup and isotopic compositions of BWR 9 x 9 UO2 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Ando, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    2012-01-01

    In order to extend isotopic composition data focusing on fission product nuclides, measurements are progressing using facilities of JAEA for five samples taken from high burnup BWR 9 x 9 UO 2 fuel assemblies. Neutronics analysis with an infinite assembly model was applied to the preliminary measurement data using a continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup calculation code MVP-BURN with nuclear libraries based on JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0. The burnups of the samples were determined to be 28.0, 39.3, 56.6, 68.1, and 64.0 GWd/t by the Nd-148 method. They were compared with those calculated using node-average irradiation histories of power and in-channel void fractions which were taken from the plant data. The comparison results showed that the deviations of the calculated burnups from the measurements were -4 to 3%. It was confirmed that adopting the nuclear data library based on JENDL-4.0 reduced the deviations of the calculated isotopic compositions from the measurements for 238 Pu, 144 Nd, 145 Nd, 146 Nd, 148 Nd, 134 Cs, 154 Eu, 152 Sm, 154 Gd, and 157 Gd. On the other hand, the effect of the revision in the nuclear. data library on the neutronics analysis was not significant for major U and Pu isotopes. (authors)

  2. Experimental simulation of irradiation effects on thermomechanical behaviour of UO2 fuel: Impact of solid and gaseous fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balland, J.

    2007-12-01

    Predictive simulation of thermomechanical behaviour of nuclear fuel has to take into account irradiation effects. Fission Products (FP) can modify the thermomechanical behaviour of UO 2 . During this thesis, differentiation was made between fission products which create a solid solution with UO 2 and gaseous products, generating pressurized bubbles. SIMFUELS containing gadolinium oxide and pressurized argon bubbles were manufactured, respectively by conventional process and by Gas Pressure Sintering. Brittle and ductile behaviour of UO 2 was investigated, under experimental conditions representative of Pellet-Cladding Interaction (PCI), respectively with 3 points bending tests and compressive creep tests. Investigation of brittle behaviour of UO 2 showed that fracture is mainly controlled by natural defects, like porosities, acting like starting points for cracks propagation. Addition of simulates fission products increase the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature of UO 2 , up to 400-500 C regarding FP in solid solution, and up to 200 C for gaseous products. Fission products although reduce fracture stresses, by a factor between 1.5 and 4, respectively for gas bubbles and solid solutions. Decrease of fracture stress is linked to an increase of microstructural defects due the solid solution and to pressurized bubbles located at grain boundaries. Pellets were tested under compressive solicitation at high temperatures. Experimental results of creep tests are well represented by Norton laws. Creep controlling mechanisms are evidenced by microstructural analysis performed on pellets at different strains. On the basis of calculations made for fuels having the same microstructures than the SIMFUELs, a creep factor is determined. It revealed a strong hardening effect of the solid solution, due to the fact that the added elements anchor the dislocations, whereas pressurized bubbles showed a coupling between hardening and softening effects. (author)

  3. The Influences of Uranium Concentration and Polyvinyl Alcohol on the Quality UO2 Microsphere for Fuel of High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damunir; Sukarsono; Bangun-Wasito; Endang Nawangsih

    2000-01-01

    The influences of uranium concentration and PVA on the quality of UO 2 microspheres for fuel of high temperature reactor have been investigated. The UO 2 particles were prepared by gel precipitation using internal gelation process. Uranyl nitrate solution containing uranium of 100 g/l was neutralized using NH 4 OH 1 M. The solution was changed into sol by adding 60 g PVA/l solution while stirred and heated up to 80 o C for 20 minutes. In order to find gels in spherical shape, the sol solution was dropped into 5 M NH 4 OH medium. The formed gels were small spheres, was washed, screened and heated up to 120 o C. After that, the gels were calcined at 800 o C for 4 hours, resulting in U 3 O 8 spheres. The U 3 O 8 particles were reduced using H 2 gas in a N 2 media at 800 o C for 4 hours, yielded in UO 2 spheres. Using a similar procedure, the influence of uranium concentration of 150-250 g/l and PVA 40-80 g/l were studied. The qualities of UO 2 particles were obtained by their physical properties, i.e. density, specific surface area, total volume of pores and pore radius using surface area meter and N 2 gas used as absorbent, and the particle size was observed using optical microscope. The result showed that the changing of uranium and PVA concentrations on the internal gelation affected the density, specific surface area, total volume of pores and pore radius of UO 2 particles. (author)

  4. Measurement of the in-pile core temperature of an EL-4 pencil element, first charge (can of type-347 stainless steel, 0.4 mm thick, UO2 fuel, 11 mm diameter). Determination of the apparent thermal conductivity integral of in-pile UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavaud, B.; Ringot, C.; Vignesoult, N.

    1966-11-01

    The core temperature of a pencil fuel element depends on the thermal conductivity of the UO 2 , and on the UO 2 -can contact. This temperature may be known accurately only if in-pile tests using the actual geometry are carried out. The test described concerns the measurement of the core- temperature of an EL-4 fuel element, first charge, having a stainless steel can. This temperature is measured at the center of the in-pile pencil element using a high-temperature thermocouple (W-Re with Ta sheath). The element is subjected to operating conditions similar to those of EL-4, both for the specific power and the can temperature and for the pressure acting on the can. The specific power is obtained in the EL-3 reactor using a slightly higher enrichment for the UO 2 than that planned for EL-4. The required can temperature and pressure are obtained using a Zircaloy-2 irradiation container filled with NaK, adapted for use in the EL-3 reactor. The core temperatures of the UO 2 , and that of the can surface are measured. The power is calculated from the heat exchanges in the container calibrated in the laboratory. The temperature drop at the UO 2 -can interface is deduced from laboratory measurements carried out under comparable heat flux conditions, and in a gas atmosphere corresponding to the beginning of the life-time of the fuel element. It is possible to draw an integral conductivity curve. It is also possible to check the temperature distribution in the oxide, as deduced from the thermal conductivity integral, by micro-graphic examination of the oxide structure. (authors) [fr

  5. Dependence of rim pore radius on rim porosity and temperature behavior in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    The rim porosity at the high burnup UO 2 fuel is obtained at the various rim pore radius ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 μm. The rim pore radius of 1.0 μm gives the best estimation for the rim porosity. With increasing the rim pore radius, thermal conductivity degrades with pellet average burnup because the rim pore acts as the thermal barrier. And by using the NEA database, the culculated fuel centerline temperature considering the rim effect is compared with the experimentally measured NEA database. The calculated temperature predicts reasonably well the temperature behavior of irradiated fuel

  6. Niobia-doped UO2 fuel manufacturing experience at British nuclear fuels Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.; Wood, G.A.; Perkins, C.P.

    1998-01-01

    BNFL Fuel Division has made niobia doped fuel for over twenty years in its Springfields Research and Development facilities. This paper reviews this experience together with feedback from successful in-reactor and laboratory tests. Recent experience in qualifying and manufacturing niobia doped fuel pellets for a European PWR will be described. (author)

  7. Design of springs in non-instrumented capsule for the HANARO irradiation test of advanced UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Kang, H. S.

    2001-01-01

    Non-instrumented capsule was designed to irradiate the large grain UO 2 pellet developed for the high burn-up LWR fuel in the HANARO reactor. The non-instrumented capsule will be irradiated for about 30 months in HANARO Outside-core (OR) region. In the non-instrumented capsule, there are four different springs such as top guide spring, bottom spring, plenum spring and fuel rod hol-down spring. To ensure the mechanical integrity of non-instrumented capsule during the long term operation, those springs were designed after the spring characteristic tests

  8. Physics study on recycling of ThO2/UO2 fuel in CANDU reactors through dry reprocess technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Chang Je; Jeong, Chang Joon

    2003-06-01

    The dry process fuel technology has high proliferation-resistance which is one of important goals of Generation-IV (Gen-IV) reactor development. It is expected that the dry process fuel technology can be applied not only to existing nuclear systems but also to future nuclear systems. In this report, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel cycle option of a CANDU reactor has been studied, including the physics analysis of recycling spent fuel. Reactivity swing and variation of isotopic content with irradiation are reported for various cases of initial uranium loadings. It was found that natural uranium saving increases significantly by recycling thorium/uranium fuel and it is feasible to recycle thorium with the dry process technology in a CANDU reactor. It is, however, required to further investigate the dry process that can be applied to the thorium-abundant dioxide fuel

  9. Physical and chemical characterization of the (Th, U)O2 mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.M. dos; Avelar, M.M.; Palmieri, H.E.L.; Lameiras, F.S.; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclebras R and D Center (Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN) has been performing, together with german institutions (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH - KFA, Kraftwerk Union A.G. KWU NUKEM Gmbh), a program for utilization of thorium in pressurized water reactors. In this paper are presented the physical and chemical chacterizations necessary to qualify the (Tn, U)O 2 and the respective methods. (Author) [pt

  10. Role of Microstructure and Surface Defects on the Dissolution Kinetics of CeO2, a UO2 Fuel Analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkhill, Claire L; Bailey, Daniel J; Tocino, Florent Y; Stennett, Martin C; Miller, James A; Provis, John L; Travis, Karl P; Hyatt, Neil C

    2016-04-27

    The release of radionuclides from spent fuel in a geological disposal facility is controlled by the surface mediated dissolution of UO2 in groundwater. In this study we investigate the influence of reactive surface sites on the dissolution of a synthesized CeO2 analogue for UO2 fuel. Dissolution was performed on the following: CeO2 annealed at high temperature, which eliminated intrinsic surface defects (point defects and dislocations); CeO2-x annealed in inert and reducing atmospheres to induce oxygen vacancy defects and on crushed CeO2 particles of different size fractions. BET surface area measurements were used as an indicator of reactive surface site concentration. Cerium stoichiometry, determined using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and supported by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, was used to determine oxygen vacancy concentration. Upon dissolution in nitric acid medium at 90 °C, a quantifiable relationship was established between the concentration of high energy surface sites and CeO2 dissolution rate; the greater the proportion of intrinsic defects and oxygen vacancies, the higher the dissolution rate. Dissolution of oxygen vacancy-containing CeO2-x gave rise to rates that were an order of magnitude greater than for CeO2 with fewer oxygen vacancies. While enhanced solubility of Ce(3+) influenced the dissolution, it was shown that replacement of vacancy sites by oxygen significantly affected the dissolution mechanism due to changes in the lattice volume and strain upon dissolution and concurrent grain boundary decohesion. These results highlight the significant influence of defect sites and grain boundaries on the dissolution kinetics of UO2 fuel analogues and reduce uncertainty in the long term performance of spent fuel in geological disposal.

  11. Post-irradiation behaviour of defected UO2 fuel elements in air at 220-250 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Hastings, I.J.

    1983-08-01

    We have heated in air irradiated CANDU UO 2 fuel elements with and without deliberately-induced defects. The temperature range was 220-250 degrees C for times up to 685 h. Pre-test burnup was about 190 MW.h/kg U (8000 MW.d/TeU) at a maximum linear power of 45 kW/m. Elements with single and multiple defects maintained reasonable dimensional stability up to 685 h at 220 and 230 degrees C, consistent with fuel oxidation primarily to U 3 O 7 . In this temperature range, there was no significant difference in response of defected elements with different power histories and cooling times. Irradiated fuel showed rates of weight increases up to 50 times greater than those for unirradiated fuel. Elements with single and multiple defects showed significant diametral increases and severe sheath splitting after about 200 h at 250 degrees C, consistent with fuel oxidation primarily to U 3 O 8

  12. Manufacturing at industrial level of UO2 pellets for the fuel elements of the Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyment, I.G.; Noguera Rojas, Francisco

    1982-01-01

    The interest to produce fuel elements within a policy of self sufficiency arose with the installation of Atucha I. The first steps towards this goal consisted in processing the uranium oxide, transforming it into fuel pellets of high density. The developments towards the fabrication of said pellets, performed by CNEA since 1968, first at a laboratory level and afterwards on an industrial scale, allowed CNEA to obtain its own technological capability to produce 400 kg of UO 2 per day. The fuel pellets manufacturing method developed by CNEA is a powder-metallurgical process, which, besides conventional equipment, involves the use of special equipment that required the performance of systematic testing programmes, as well as special training at operational level. The developed processes respond to a modern and advanced technology. A general scheme of the process, starting with a directly sinterable UO 2 powder, is described, including compacting of the powder into pellets, sintering, control of the temperature in the sintering and reduction zones and of the time of permanence in both zones, and cylindric rectifying of the pellets. During the whole process, specialized personnel controls the operations, after which the material is released by the Quality Control Department. The national contribution to the manufacturing technology of the pellets for fuel elements of power and research reactors was of 100%. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. Hydromechanics calculation for micro sphere UO2 fuel produced by sol-gelation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xin; Liang Tongxiang; Guo Wenli; Zhao Xingyu; Hao Shaochang

    2009-01-01

    Relation between the jet steam velocity in nozzle and height of glue solution level and relation between the jet steam velocity in nozzle and the pressure of glue solution level in pressure kettle are established with Bernoulli equation. The result calculated from this relations shows that the flow of gelation solution is of laminar, the effect of the height of solution level on the the jet steam velocity in nozzle is little and the maximum error for diameter of micro global UO 2 , resulting from the height of solution level, is far more less than the control error. (authors)

  14. Densification Behavior of BN-added UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Keonsik; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Hun; Oh, Jang Soo; Yang, Jae Ho

    2013-01-01

    Local wall thinning in pipelines affects the structural integrity of industries like nuclear power plants (NPPs). In the present study a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technology to detect the wall thing of carbon steel pipe covered with insulation is developed. Boron is commercially used as a neutron absorber fuel. A neutron absorber fuel is burned out or depleted during reactor operation. Westinghouse have been produced the Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA) which is enriched UO 2 fuel pellets with a thin coating of zirconium diboride (ZrB 2 ) on the outer surface. Standard sintered fuel pellets are sputter coated with ZrB 2 . It is known that IFBA fuel can incur 20% to 30% additional fabrication costs. Boron-dispersed UO 2 fuel pellet made by the conventional pressing and sintering process of a powder mixture of UO 2 and B compound might be more cost-effective than IFBAs. M. G. Andrew et al. tried to sinter boron-dispersed UO 2 green pellet. However, they reported that boron-dispersed UO 2 fuel pellet is very difficult to be fabricated with a sufficient level of boron retention and high sintered density (greater than 90 % of theoretical density) because of the volatilization of boron oxide. We have investigated the densification behavior of mixtures of UO 2 and various boron compounds, such as B 4 C, BN, TiB 2 , ZrB 2 , SiB 6 , and HfB 2 . Boron compounds seemed to act as a sintering additive for UO 2 at a certain low temperature range. In this study, the densification behavior of BN-added UO 2 pellet has been investigated by sintering green pellets of a mixture of UO 2 powder and BN powder in H 2 atmosphere. A high density BN-added UO 2 pellet can be fabricated after sintering at 1200 .deg. C for more than 1 h in a H 2 atmosphere. The sintered density of BN-added UO 2 pellet can be increased up to about 95 %TD

  15. A small long-cycle PWR core design concept using fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) and UO2–ThO2 fuels for burning of TRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gonghoon; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new small pressurized water reactor (PWR) core design concept using fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) particle fuels and UO 2 –ThO 2 fuels was studied for effective burning of transuranics from a view point of core neutronics. The core of this concept rate is 100 MWe. The core designs use the current PWR-proven technologies except for a mixed use of the FCM and UO 2 –ThO 2 fuel pins of low-enriched uranium. The significant burning of TRU is achieved with tri-isotropic particle fuels of FCM fuel pins, and the ThO 2 –UO 2 fuel pins are employed to achieve long-cycle length of ∼4 EFPYs (effective full-power year). Also, the effects of several candidate materials for reflector are analyzed in terms of core neutronics because the small core size leads to high sensitivity of reflector material on the cycle length. The final cores having 10 w/o SS303 and 90 w/o graphite reflector are shown to have high TRU burning rates of 33%–35% in FCM pins and significant net burning rates of 24%–25% in the total core with negative reactivity coefficients, low power peaking factors, and sufficient shutdown margins of control rods. (author)

  16. The utilization of thorium in light water reactors - a comparison between a PWR fuel element using UO2 with a seed blanket fuel element using (Th-U)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Ana C.A.A.; Maiorino, Jose R.; Carluccio, Thiago; Russo, Pedro C.R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work a preliminary study on the utilization of thorium in light water reactor is made. The work compares the performance of a typical PWR fuel element, 17X17, Pitch = 1.43 cm, using UO 2 , 3 w/0 enriched(reference) with one seed blanket fuel element, consisting of the (Th 0.9 U 0.1 ) O 2 in the blanket, and UO 2 in the seed, with 20 w/0 of uranium enrichment and the same reference pitch. The parameters of the comparison were, 1) the production of Plutonium, minor actinides (MA) and long lived fission products(LLFP) after 300 days of burn up in order to assess the radio toxicity of these two fuel elements, 2) the conversion ratio, 3) k eff versus time. All the calculations were made using TRITON/NEWT modules of SCALE 5.1, with a library 238groupndf from ENDFB-VI. The results shows that the seed-blanket (Th-U)O 2 produces less plutonium, MA and LLPP than the reference fuel element, demonstrating that it has a lower radio toxicity and therefore more attractive for spent fuel storage. Also the neutronic performance shows advantages for the (Th-U)O 2 . (author)

  17. A new technique to measure fission-product diffusion coefficients in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Verrall, R.A.; Bushby, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new out-reactor technique for the measurement of fission-product diffusion rates in UO 2 . The technique accurately simulates in-reactor fission-fragment effects: a thermal diffusion that is due to localized mixing in the fission track, radiation-enhanced diffusion that is due to point-defect creation by fission fragments, and bubble resolution. The technique utilizes heavy-ion accelerators - low energy (40 keV to 1 MeV) for fission-product implantation, high energy (72 MeV) to create fission-fragment damage effects, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for measuring the depth profile of the implanted species. Preliminary results are presented from annealing tests (not in the 72 MeV ion flux) at 1465 deg. C and 1650 deg. C at low and high concentrations of fission products. (author)

  18. Steady-state and transient temperature measurements on BWR-type fuel up to 68 MWd/kgUO2 (IFA-533.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.T.

    1996-03-01

    The demonstration test IFA-533.2, for re-instrumentation of irradiated rods with fuel thermocouples, has been irradiated in HBWR from March 1992. The objectives of the irradiation include in-pile testing of the re-instrumentation technique and the generation of temperature data, in order to study the fuel thermal behaviour at high burn-up. With this technique, changes in UO 2 thermal conductivity, rim effects and temperature response to fission gas release can be investigated at high irradiation levels. On the other hand, data obtained from this rig enlarge the Halden data base on the thermal behaviour of UO 2 fuel at high burn-up. The rig contains two BWR-type fuel rods, pre-irradiated in IFA-409 to a bum-up of around 44 MWd/kgUO 2 , and re-instrumented with fresh fuel thermocouples. Reliable data could be obtained from one of the thermocouples (TF2), while the other was affected by a bad connection in the in-core plug. This report presents an evaluation of the results in steady-state and transient operation to a burn-up of 68 MWd/kgUO 2 . The data can be interpreted in terms of fuel conductivity degradation and fission gas release. The results are consistent with fuel temperature data obtained in other IFAs. (author)

  19. Basic tendencies of restructured UO2 nuclear fuels fabrication industry for water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhova, V.A.; Bokshitskij, V.I.; Blinova, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    Processes of reformation and consolidation of firms and frontier nuclear fuels fabrication industry associated with processes of globalization and deregulation of electric power market are analyzed. Current state of nuclear fuel market and basic factors influenced on the market are presented. The role of nuclear fuel in increasing competition of NPP and fundamental directions of innovation action on the creation of perspective kinds of fuel were considered [ru

  20. Early-in-life thermal performance of UO2--PuO2 fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Leggett, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Results from the combined analyses of two thermal performance tests, HEDL P-19 and HEDL P-20 are described. The tests were designed to provide data on the power required to cause incipient fuel melting early in life under conditions prototypic of FFTF driver fuel pins and similar FBR fuel systems

  1. Control rod effects on reaction rate distributions in tight pitched PuO2-UO2 fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Choong-Sup; Okumura, Keisuke; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1991-11-01

    Investigations were made for the heterogeneity effects caused by insertion or withdrawal of a B 4 C control rod on fine structure of reaction rates distributions in a tight pitched PuO 2 -UO 2 fuel assembly. Analysis was carried out by using the VIM and SRAC codes with the libraries based on JENDL-2 for the hexagonal fuel assembly basically corresponding to the PROTEUS-LWHCR experimental core. The reaction rates are affected more remarkably by the withdrawal of the control rod rather than its insertion. The changes of the reaction rates were decomposed into three terms of spectrum shifts, the changes of effective cross sections with fine groups, and their higher order components. From the analysis, it is concluded that most changes of reaction rates are caused by spectral shifts. The SRAC code with fine group constants can predict the distribution of reaction rates and their ratios with the accuracy of about 5 % except for the values related to Pu-242 capture rate, as compared with the VIM results. To increase the accuracy, it is necessary to generate the effective cross sections of the fuel near control rods with consideration of the heterogeneities in the fuel assembly. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the internal pressure in UO2 and UO2-Gd2O3 rods of fuel assemblies 10 x 10 with the FEMAXI-Vi code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez L, H.; Lucatero, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    Inside the acceptable criterions of fuel licensing are some that should be fulfilled in relation to the internal pressure of the fuel rods. These criterions are related with the loss of mechanical integrity due to the load excess in the pressure inside the jacket, as well as by the pressure that exercises the pellet on the jacket at the time of suffering the swelling by irradiation. This work shows the calculation of the increment of the internal pressure of the fuel rods caused by the swelling contribution of the pellets and by the accumulation of the fission gases inside the hole, pellet-jacket, in function of the burned for values of the lineal heat generation reason (LHGR) mean of fuel rods in arrangements 10 x 10. (author)

  3. Fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of MO2 and UO2 sphere-pac and UO2 pellet fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linde, A. van der; Lucas Luijckx, H.J.B.; Verheugen, J.H.N.

    1981-04-01

    Three fuel pin bundles, R-109/1, 2 and 3, were irradiated in a PWR loop in the HFR at Petten during respectively 131, 57 and 57 effective full power days at average powers of approximately 39 kW.m -1 and at peak powers of approximately 60 kW.m -1 . The results of the post-irradiation examinations of these fuel bundles are presented. (Auth.)

  4. Characterization of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, carbon and sulfur in nuclear fuel (UO2) and cladding nuclear rod materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, Maria Teresa I.; Lopes, Paula Corain; Moura, Sergio C.; Sampaio, Jessica A.G.; Bustillos, Oscar V.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur gases analysis in nuclear fuels such as UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , U 3 Si 2 and in the fuel cladding such as Zircaloy, is a well known as a quality control in nuclear industry. In UO 2 pellets, the Hydrogen molecule fragilizes the metal lattice causing the material cracking. In Zircaloy material the H2 molecules cause the boiling of the cladding. Other gases like Nitrogen, Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur affect in the lattice structure change. In this way these chemical compounds have to be measure within specify parameters, these measurement are part of the quality control of the nuclear industry. The analytical procedure has to be well established by a convention of the quality assurance. Therefore, the Oxygen, Carbon, Sulfur and Hydrogen are measured by infrared absorption (IR) and the nitrogen will be measured by thermal conductivity (TC). The gas/metal analyzer made by LECO Co. model TCHEN-600 is Hydrogen, Oxygen and Nitrogen analyzer in a variety of metals, refractory and other inorganic materials, using the principle of fusion by inert gas, infrared and thermo-coupled detector. The Carbon and Sulfur compounds are measure by LECO Co. model CS-400. A sample is first weighed and placed in a high purity graphite crucible and is casted on a stream of helium gas, enough to release the oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During the fusion, the oxygen present in the sample combines with the carbon crucible to form carbon monoxide. Then, the nitrogen present in the sample is analyzed and released as molecular nitrogen and the hydrogen is released as gas. The hydrogen gas is measured by infrared absorption, and the sample gases pass through a trap of copper oxide which converts CO to CO 2 and hydrogen into water. The gases enter the cell where infrared water content is then converted making the measurement of total hydrogen present in the sample. The Hydrogen detection limits for the nuclear fuel is 1 μg/g for the Nitrogen

  5. Factors affecting the differences in reactivity and dissolution rates between UO2 and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.; Tait, J.C.; Sunder, S.; Steward, S.; Russo, R.E.; Rudnicki, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    Strategies for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel are being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Yucca Mountain site and by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in plutonic rock formations in the Canadian Shield. Uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel and dissolution of the matrix is regarded as a necessary step for the release of radionuclides to repository groundwaters. In order to develop models to describe the dissolution of the U0 2 fuel matrix and subsequent release of radionuclides, it is necessary to understand both chemical and oxidative dissolution processes and how they can be affected by parameters such as groundwater composition, pH, temperature, surface area, radiolysis and redox potential. This report summarizes both published and on-going dissolution studies of U0 2 and both LWR and CANDU spent fuels being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in the U.S. and at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Canada. The studies include both dissolution tests and electrochemical experiments to measure uranium dissolution rates. The report focuses on identifying differences in reactivity towards aqueous dissolution between U0 2 and spent fuel samples as well as estimating bounding values for uranium dissolution rates. This review also outlines the basic tenets for the development of a dissolution model that is based on electrochemical principles. (author). 49 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  6. Modelling of high burnup structure in UO2 fuel with the RTOP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Zborovskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Kanyukova, V.; Sorokin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The present work deals with self-consistent physical approach aimed to derive the criterion of fuel restructuring avoiding correlations. The approach is based on study of large over pressurized bubbles formation on dislocations, at grain boundaries and in grain volume. At first, stage of formation of bubbles non-destroyable by fission fragments is examined using consistent modelling of point defects and fission gas behavior near dislocation and in grain volume. Then, evolution of formed large non-destroyable bubbles is considered using results of the previous step as initial values. Finally, condition of dislocation loops punching by sufficiently large over pressurized bubbles is regarded as the criterion of fuel restructuring onset. In the present work consideration of large over pressurized bubbles evolution is applied to modelling of the restructuring threshold depending on temperature, burnup and grain size. Effect of grain size predicted by the model is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Restructuring threshold criterion as an analytical function of local burnup and fuel temperature is derived and compared with HBRP project data. To predict rim-layer width formation depending on fuel burnup and irradiation conditions the model is implemented into the mechanistic fuel performance code RTOP. Calculated dependencies give upper estimate for the width of restructured region. Calculations show that one needs to consider temperature distribution within pellet which depends on irradiation history in order to model rim-structure formation

  7. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of ( Th, U)O2 fuel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-08

    Jan 8, 2013 ... 233U inventory as well as less production rate of Pu long-lived alpha emitter radioisotopes, but it is naturally abundant in most .... 1 MW power to consider the fuel burn-up and waste inventory. Reactivity variations due to .... assembly management is required after 90 days (figure 11). As seen in figure 12, ...

  8. Development and characteristics of the rim region in high burnup UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research to define the behavior of Zircaloy-clad light-water reactor fuel irradiated to high burnup levels was conducted as part of the High Burnup Effects Program. One observed microstructural change related to irradiation to high burnup levels (up to 83 MWd/kg M pellet-average) is the development of a well-defined, unique microstructural region at the fuel pellet edge (rim). This rim region is characterized by the loss of optically-definable grain structure, increased porosity, and the depletion of matrix fission gas. The rim region holds the potential for significant localized increases in the athermal release of fission gases at high burnup levels, but the contribution of the rim release to the fractional release of the total fission gas produced in the rod is small. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of selenium in UO2 spent nuclear fuel by micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy and its thermodynamic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, E; Puranen, A; Grolimund, D; Jädernas, D; Sheptyakov, D; Mesbah, A

    2015-10-01

    Direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in deep geological formations is the preferred option for the final storage of nuclear waste in many countries. In order to assess to which extent radionuclides could be released to the environment, it is of great importance to understand how they are chemically bound in the waste matrix. This is particularly important for long-lived radionuclides such as (79)Se, (129)I, (14)C or (36)Cl, which form poorly sorbing anionic species in water and therefore migrate without significant retardation through argillaceous repository materials and host rocks. We present here X-ray absorption spectroscopic data providing evidence that in the investigated SNF samples selenium is directly bound to U atoms as Se(-II) (selenide) ion, probably replacing oxygen in the cubic UO2 lattice. This result is corroborated by a simple thermodynamic analysis, showing that selenide is the stable form of Se under reactor operation conditions. Because selenide is almost insoluble in water, our data indirectly explain the unexpectedly low release of Se in short-term aqueous leaching experiments, compared to iodine or cesium. These results have a direct impact on safety analyses for potential nuclear waste repository sites, as they justify assuming a small fractional release of selenium in performance assessment calculations.

  10. The effect of re-solution models on fission gas disposition in irradiated UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazzan, A.R.; Orkent, D.; Villalobos, A.

    1985-01-01

    A computer code developed earlier by Villalobos et al. to predict fission gas behavior in uranium oxide fuel under steady-state irradiation conditions and where bubble gas resolution is represented with the single knock-on model (SKO) is modified to replace the SKO model with the complete bubble destruction model (CBD). The CBD model required that bubble nucleation be included in the analysis. The revised code is used to compute gas release and total swelling. Both are found to be insensitive to whether they are obtained with the CBD or the SKO option. This is mainly because at low atomic percent of burnup, total swelling is dominated by the grain-edge bubble gas contribution, and release is dependent on the formation of a complete grainface/grain-edge tunnel network - factors that are not much affected by either the SKO or CBD models. At higher atomic percent of burnup, intragranular swelling, which can be sensitive to the re-solution model, contributes more to swelling. But even then, computations at 1.0 at .% burnup suggest total swelling will continue to be dominated by grain-edge gas. These results suggest that in modeling swelling and release in irradiated uranium dioxide fuel, the simpler SKO resolution model is satisfactory

  11. Performance of Bruce natural UO2 fuel irradiated to extended burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Y.N.; Floyd, M.R.; Ryz, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    Bruce-type bundles XY, AAH and GF were successfully irradiated in the NRU reactor at Chalk River Laboratories to outer-element burnups of 570-900 MWh/kgU. These bundles were of the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS)-A 'first-charge' design that contained gas plenums in the outer elements. The maximum outer-element linear powers were 33-37 kW/m. Post-irradiation examination of these bundles confirmed that all the elements were intact. Bundles XY and AAH, irradiated to outer-element burnups of 570-700 MWh/kgU, experienced low fission-gas release (FGR) ( 500 MWh/kgU (equivalent to bundle-average 450 MWh/kgU) when maximum outer-element linear powers are > 50 kW/m. The analysis in this paper suggests that CANDU 37-element fuel can be successfully irradiated (low-FGR/defect-free) to burnups of at least 700 MWh/kgU, provided maximum power do not exceed 40 kW/m. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs

  12. Simulation of reactivity-initiated accident transients on UO2-M5® fuel rods with ALCYONE V1.4 fuel performance code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Guénot-Delahaie

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The ALCYONE multidimensional fuel performance code codeveloped by the CEA, EDF, and AREVA NP within the PLEIADES software environment models the behavior of fuel rods during irradiation in commercial pressurized water reactors (PWRs, power ramps in experimental reactors, or accidental conditions such as loss of coolant accidents or reactivity-initiated accidents (RIAs. As regards the latter case of transient in particular, ALCYONE is intended to predictively simulate the response of a fuel rod by taking account of mechanisms in a way that models the physics as closely as possible, encompassing all possible stages of the transient as well as various fuel/cladding material types and irradiation conditions of interest. On the way to complying with these objectives, ALCYONE development and validation shall include tests on PWR-UO2 fuel rods with advanced claddings such as M5® under “low pressure–low temperature” or “high pressure–high temperature” water coolant conditions.This article first presents ALCYONE V1.4 RIA-related features and modeling. It especially focuses on recent developments dedicated on the one hand to nonsteady water heat and mass transport and on the other hand to the modeling of grain boundary cracking-induced fission gas release and swelling. This article then compares some simulations of RIA transients performed on UO2-M5® fuel rods in flowing sodium or stagnant water coolant conditions to the relevant experimental results gained from tests performed in either the French CABRI or the Japanese NSRR nuclear transient reactor facilities. It shows in particular to what extent ALCYONE—starting from base irradiation conditions it itself computes—is currently able to handle both the first stage of the transient, namely the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction phase, and the second stage of the transient, should a boiling crisis occur.Areas of improvement are finally discussed with a view to simulating and

  13. Study by electronic structure calculations of the radiation damage in the UO2 nuclear fuel: behaviour of the point defects and fission gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathonne, Emerson

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is worldwide the most widely used fuel in nuclear plants in the world and in particular in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In-pile the fission of uranium nuclei creates fission products and point defects in the fuel. The understanding of the evolution of these radiation damages requires a multi-scale modelling approach of the nuclear fuel, from the scale of the pellet to the atomic scale. We used an electronic structure calculation method based on the density functional theory (DFT) to model radiation damage in UO 2 at the atomic scale. A Hubbard-type Coulomb interaction term is added to the standard DFT formalism to take into account the strong correlations of the 5f electrons in UO 2 . This method is used to study point defects with various charge states and the incorporation and diffusion of krypton in uranium dioxide. This study allowed us to obtain essential data for higher scale models but also to interpret experimental results. In parallel of this study, three ways to improve the state of the art of electronic structure calculations of UO 2 have been explored: the consideration of the spin-orbit coupling neglected in current point defect calculations, the application of functionals allowing one to take into account the non-local interactions such as van der Waals interactions important for rare gases and the use of the Dynamical Mean Field Theory combined to the DFT method in order to take into account the dynamical effects in the 5f electron correlations. (author) [fr

  14. UO2 Fuel pellet impurities, pellet surface roughness and n(18O)/n(16O) ratios, applied to nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajo, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, law enforcement has faced the problem of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic science is a new branch of science that enables the identification of seized nuclear material. The identification is not based on a fixed scheme, but further identification parameters are decided based on previous identification results. The analysis is carried out by using traditional analysis methods and applying modern measurement technology. The parameters are generally not unambiguous and not self-explanatory. In order to have a full picture about the origin of seized samples, several identification parameters should be used together and the measured data should be compared to corresponding data from known sources. A nuclear material database containing data from several fabrication plants is installed for the purpose. In this thesis the use of UO 2 fabrication plant specific parameters, fuel impurities, fuel pellet surface roughness and oxygen isotopic ratio in UO 2 were investigated for identification purposes in nuclear forensic science. The potential use of these parameters as 'fingerprints' is discussed for identification purposes of seized nuclear materials. Impurities of the fuel material vary slightly according to the fabrication method employed and a plant environment. Here the impurities of the seized UO 2 were used in order to have some clues about the origin of the fuel material by comparing a measured data to nuclear database information. More certainty in the identification was gained by surface roughness of the UO 2 fuel pellets, measured by mechanical surface profilometry. Categories in surface roughness between a different fuel element type and a producer were observed. For the time oxygen isotopic ratios were determined by Thermal Ionisation Mass Speckometry (TIMS). Thus a TIMS measurement method, using U 16 O + and U 18 0 + ions, was developed and optimised to achieve precise oxygen isotope ratio measurements for the

  15. UO2-7%Gd2O3 fuel process development by mechanical blending with reprocessing of waste products and usage of densification additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Lauro Roberto dos

    2009-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, reprocessing and storage of 'burned' fuels, either temporary or permanent, demand high investments and, in addition, can potentially generate environmental problems. A strategy to decrease these problems is to adopt measures to reduce the amount of waste generated. The usage of integrated burnable poison based on gadolinium is a measure that contributes to achieve this goal. The reason to use burnable poison is to control the neutron population in the reactor during the early life of the fresh reactor core or the beginning of each recharging fuel cycle, extending its cycle duration. Another advantage of using burnable poison is to be able to operate the reactor with higher burning rate, optimizing the usage of the fuel. The process of manufacturing UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable fuel poison generates waste that, as much as possible, needs to be recycled. Blending of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 powder requires the usage of a special additive to achieve the final fuel pellet specified density. The objective of this work is to develop the process of obtaining UO 2 - 7% Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable poison using densification additives, aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3), and reprocessing manufacturing waste products by mechanical blending. The content of 7%- Gd 2 O 3 is based on commercial PWR reactor fuels - Type Angra 2. The results show that the usage of Al(OH) 3 as an additive is a very effective choice that promotes the densification of fuel pellets with recycle up to 10%. Concentrations of 0,20 % of Al(OH) 3 were found to be the indicated amount on an 7 industrial scale, specially when the recycled products come from U 3 O 8 obtained by calcination of sintered pellets. This is particularly interesting because it is following the steps of sintering and rectifying of the pellets, which is generating the largest amounts of recycled material. (author)

  16. UO2-7%Gd2O3 fuel process development by mechanical blending with reprocessing of waste products and usage of densification additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Lauro Roberto dos

    2009-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel cycle, reprocessing and storage of 'burned' fuels, either temporary or permanent, demand high investments and, in addition, can potentially generate environmental problems. A strategy to decrease these problems is to adopt measures to reduce the amount of waste generated. The usage of integrated burnable poison based on gadolinium is a measure that contributes to achieve this goal. The reason to use burnable poison is to control the neutron population in the reactor during the early life of the fresh reactor core or the beginning of each recharging fuel cycle, extending its cycle duration. Another advantage of using burnable poison is to be able to operate the reactor with higher burning rate, optimizing the usage of the fuel. The process of manufacturing UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable fuel poison generates waste that, as much as possible, needs to be recycled. Blending of Gd 2 O 3 in UO 2 powder requires the usage of a special additive to achieve the final fuel pellet specified density. The objective of this work is to develop the process of obtaining UO 2 - 7% Gd 2 O 3 integrated burnable poison using densification additives, aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ), and reprocessing manufacturing waste products by mechanical blending. The content of 7%- Gd 2 O 3 is based on commercial PWR reactor fuels - Type Angra 2. The results show that the usage of Al(OH) 3 as an additive is a very effective choice that promotes the densification of fuel pellets with recycle up to 10%. Concentrations of 0,20 % of Al(OH) 3 were found to be the indicated amount on an industrial scale, specially when the recycled products come from U 3 O 8 obtained by calcination of sintered pellets. This is particularly interesting because it is following the steps of sintering and rectifying of the pellets, which is generating the largest amounts of recycled material. (author)

  17. Argentina-LLNL-LANL Comparative Sample Analysis on UO2 fuel pellet CRM-125A for Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kips, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The recent workshop on analytical plan development provided context and background for the next step in this engagement, i.e. a comparative sample analysis on CRM 125-A. This is a commercially available certified low-enriched uranium oxide fuel pellet material from New Brunswick National Laboratory (NBL) (see certificate in Annex 1).

  18. Effect of Al(OH)3 on the sintering of UO2-Gd2O3 fuel pellets with addition of U3O8 from recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Lauro Roberto; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Urano de Carvalho, Elita Fontenele; Riella, Humberto Gracher

    2017-09-01

    The incorporation of gadolinium as burnable poison directly into nuclear fuel is important for reactivity compensation, which enables longer fuel cycles. The function of the burnable poison fuel is to control the neutron population in the reactor core during its startup and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extend the use of the fuel. The implementation of UO2-Gd2O3 poisoned fuel in Brazil has been proposed according to the future requirements established for the Angra-2 nuclear power plant. The UO2 powder used is produced from the Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC). The incorporation of Gd2O3 powder directly into the AUC-derived UO2 powder by dry mechanical blending is the most attractive process, because of its simplicity. Nevertheless, processing by this method leads to difficulties while obtaining sintered pellets with the minimum required density. The cause of the low densities is the bad sintering behavior of the UO2-Gd2O3 mixed fuel, which shows a blockage in the sintering process that hinders the densification. This effect has been overcome by microdoping of the fuel with small quantities of aluminum. The process for manufacturing the fuel inevitably generates uranium-rich scraps from various sources. This residue is reincorporated into the production process in the form of U3O8 powder additions. The addition of U3O8 also hinders densification in sintering. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of both aluminum and U3O8 additives on the density of fuel pellets after sintering. As the effects of these additives are counterposed, this work studied the combined effect thereof, seeking to find an applicable composition for the production process. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of aluminum, in the form of Al(OH)3, as an additive to promote increase in the densification of the (U,Gd)O2 pellets during sintering, even with high additions of U3O8 recycled from the manufacturing process.

  19. Analysis of the heat and mass transfer processes of a UO2 bubble in sodium for the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    The anticipated behavior of uranium oxide vapor bubbles produced by the capacitor discharge vaporization (CDV) method in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) Facility is discussed on the basis of relatively simple physical models. Results of calculations for the rate of bubble rise and for heat and mass transfer rates are presented. Parametric studies indicate that future analysis efforts should emphasize the diffusion condensation process and the loss of heat from the bubble by radiation. Transfer of heat in the surrounding sodium is rapid enough that simplified models should be adequate. No important effects were noted in connection with bubble depth, initial quantity of UO 2 , or initial superheat

  20. TRIGA low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gietzen, A.

    1993-01-01

    Sixty TRIGA reactors have been sold and the earliest of these are now passing twenty years of operation. All of these reactors use the uranium-zirconium hydride fuel (UZrH) which provides certain unique advantages arising out of its large prompt negative temperature coefficient, very low fission product release, and high temperature capability. Eleven of these Sixty reactors are conversions from plate fuel to TRIGA fuel which were made as a result of these advantages. With only a few exceptions, TRIGA reactors have always used low-enriched-uranium (LEU) fuel with an enrichment of 19.9%. The exceptions have either been converted from the standard low-enriched fuel to the 70% enriched FLIP fuel in order to achieve extended lifetime, or are higher powered reactors which were designed for long life using 93%-enriched uranium during the time when the use and export of highly enriched uranium (HEU) was not restricted. The advent of international policies focusing attention on nonproliferation and safeguards made the HEU fuels obsolete. General Atomic immediately undertook a development effort (nearly two years ago) in order to be in a position to comply with these policies for all future export sales and also to provide a low-enriched alternative to fully enriched plate-type fuels. This important work was subsequently partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The laboratory and production tests have shown that higher uranium densities can be achieved to compensate for reducing the enrichment to 20%, and that the fuels maintain the characteristics of the very thoroughly proven standard TRIGA fuels. In May of 1978, General Atomic announced that these fuels were available for TRIGA reactors and for plate-type reactors with power levels up to 15 MW with GA's standard commercial warranty

  1. Solubility of unirradiated UO2 fuel in aqueous solutions. Comparison between experimental and calculated (EQ3/6) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    1995-11-01

    The solubility behaviour of unirradiated UO 2 pellets was studied under oxic (air-saturated) and anoxic (N 2 ) conditions in deionized water, in sodium bicarbonate solutions with varying bicarbonate content (60 - 600 ppm), in Allard groundwater simulating granitic fresh groundwater conditions, and in bentonite water simulating the effects of bentonite on granitic fresh groundwater (25 deg C). The release of uranium was measured during static batch dissolution experiments of long duration (2-6 years). A comparison was made with the theoretical solubility data calculated with the geochemical code EQ3/6 in order to evaluate solubility (steady state) limiting factors. (orig.) (26 refs., 32 figs., 13 tabs.)

  2. Computational simulation of the microstructure of irradiation damaged regions for the plate type fuel of UO2 microspheres dispersed in stainless steel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, S.C. dos; Lage, A.F.; Braga, D.; Ferraz, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    Plate type fuel elements have high efficiency of thermal transference what benefits the heat flux with high rates of power output. In reactor cores, fuel elements, in general, are subject to a high neutrons flux, high working temperatures, severe corrosion conditions, direct interference of fission products that result from nuclear reactions and radiation interaction-matter. For plate type fuels composed of ceramic particles dispersed in metallic matrix, one can observe the damage regions that arise due to the interaction fission products in the metallic matrix. Aiming at evaluating the extension of the damage regions in function of the particles and its diameters, in this paper, computational geometric simulations structure of plate type fuel cores, composed of UO 2 microspheres dispersed in stainless steel in several fractions of volume and diameters were carried out. The results of the simulations were exported to AutoCAD R where it was possible its visualization and analysis. (author)

  3. Characterization and property evaluation of (Th–3.75U)O2+x fuel pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghra, C.; Sathe, D.B.; Prakash, A.; Mishra, A.K.; Afzal, Mohd; Panakkal, J.P.; Kamath, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Characterization of (Th–3.75%U)O 2+x pellet fabricated by a new technique i.e., impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP). ► Comparison with pellets fabricated by powder to pellet (POP) and coated agglomerate pelletization processes. ► Solid solution was more complete in POP and IAP pellets. ► Uranium distribution was less uniform in the pellets fabricated by the CAP route. -- Abstract: Impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) process has been developed by Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF), Tarapur for the fabrication of (Th–3.75U)O 2+x mixed oxide fuel for Indian advanced heavy water reactors (AHWR). In this process, ThO 2 spheroids were impregnated with uranyl nitrate solution and the resultant mixture was compacted to form green pellets which were sintered in the oxidizing atmosphere to obtain high density (Th–3.75%U)O 2+x pellets. An attempt has been made in this paper to characterize the pellets fabricated by IAP route. The characterization of the sintered IAP pellets was made by X-ray diffraction, EPMA, alpha autoradiography, chemical analysis, O/M ratio, immersion density and optical microscopy. The characteristics of (Th–U)O 2 pellets fabricated by impregnated agglomerate pelletization (IAP) were also compared with those fabricated by coated agglomerate pelletization (CAP), and conventional powder pellet (POP) processes. In case of pellets fabricated by IAP route, XRD data showed the presence of single fluorite phase. The uranium concentration and grain size distribution were found to be uniform throughout the pellet. These phase characteristics were also found to be more uniform in pellets made by both IAP and POP processes as compared to pellets fabricated using the CAP process

  4. Reduction of fuel enrichment for research reactors built-up in accordance with Russian (Soviet) projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.B.; Enin, A.A.; Tkachyov, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the Russian program of reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) built-up in accordance with Russian (Soviet) projects, AO 'NCCP' performs works on FA fabrication with reduced enrichment fuel. The main trends and results of performed works on research reactors FEs and FAs based on UO 2 and U-9%Mo fuel with U 235 19.7% enrichment are described. (author)

  5. Characterization of UO2 by infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeda, Kelly C.M.; Machado, Geraldo C.; Lameiras, Fernando S.

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of nuclear fuel is of great importance to minimize the effects related to burnup and temperature and to achieve stability during in-core operation. The understanding the U-O system and its thermodynamic properties has fundamental importance in nuclear industry. Many physical properties of UO 2±x depend on the ratio O / U, such as the electrical conductivity and thermal properties, as well as the diffusivities of its constituents and solutes. The U-O system presents various oxides such as UO 2±x , U 4 O 9 , U 3 O 8 , and UO 3 . The control of the O/U relation is critical to the manufacturing process of UO 2 . In this work, the infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the presence of phases in UO 2 powder samples that cannot be identified by thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction. (author)

  6. Measurements of thermal disadvantage factors in light-water moderated PuO2-UO2 and UO2 lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Akio; Kobayashi, Iwao; Tsuruta, Harumichi; Hashimoto, Masao; Suzaki, Takenori

    1980-01-01

    The disadvantage factor for thermal neutrons in light-water moderated PuO 2 -UO 2 and UO 2 square lattices were obtained from measurements of thermal neutron density distributions in a unit lattice cell, measured with Dy-Al wire detectors. The lattices consisted of 3.4 w/o PuO 2 .UO 2 and 2.6 w/o UO 2 fuel rods, and the water-to-fuel volume ratio within the unit cell was parametrically changed. The PuO 2 .UO 2 and UO 2 fuel rods were designed to realize equal fissile atomic number density. The disadvantage factors thus measured were 1.36 +- 0.07, 1.37 +- 0.08, 1.40 +- 0.06 and 1.38 +- 0.06 in the PuO 2 .UO 2 fuel lattices, and 1.30 +- 0.06, 1.31 +- 0.08, 1.30 +- 0.08 and 1.33 +- 0.06 in the UO 2 , for water-to-fuel volume ratios, of 1.76, 2.00, 2.38 and 2.95, respectively. This difference in disadvantage factor between PuO 2 .UO 2 and UO 2 fuel lattices corresponds to about 8%. Calculated results obtained by multigroup transport code LASER agreed well with the measured ones. (author)

  7. Critical experiments on minimal-content gadolinia for above-5wt% enrichment fuels in Toshiba NCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Shouichi; Yoshioka, Kenichi; Mitsuhashi, Ishi; Kumanomido, Hironori; Sugahara, Satoshi; Hiraiwa, Kouji

    2009-01-01

    A concept of 'minimal-content gadolinia' with a content of less than several hundred ppm mixed in the 'above-5wt% enrichment UO 2 fuel' for super high burnup is proposed for ensuring the criticality safety in the UO 2 fuel fabrication facility for light water reactors (LWRs) without increase in investment cost. Required gadolinia contents calculated were from 53 to 305 ppm for enrichments of UO 2 powders for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel from 6 to 10 wt%. It is expected that the minimal-content gadolinia yields an acceptable reactivity suppression at the beginning of operating cycle and no reactivity penalty at the end of operating cycle due to no residual gadolinium. A series of critical experiments were carried out in the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA). Reactivity effects of the gadolinia were measured to clarify the nuclear characteristics, and the measured values and the calculated values agreed within 5%. (author)

  8. Fabrication and post-irradiation examination of a zircaloy-2 clad UO2-1.5 wt% PuO2 fuel pin irradiated in PWL, CIRUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Sahoo, K.C.; Chatterjee, S.; Majumdar, S.; Kamath, H.S.; Ramachandran, R.; Bahl, J.K.; Purushottam, D.S.C.; Ramakumar, M.S.; Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.; Roy, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    A zircaloy-2 clad UO 2 -1.5 wt% PuO 2 fuel pin was fabricated at the Radiometallurgy Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, for irradiation in the pressurised water loop in CIRUS. Requisite development work related to powder conditioning, blending, pressing and sintering parameters was carried out to meet the exacting fuel pellet specifications of CANDU fuel. The fuel pin ruptured while being irradiated in the pressurised water loop in CIRUS, after experiencing a low burn-up of 507 MWD/MTM and was subsequently examined at the Radiometallurgy Hot Cells Facility. The results showed that internal clad hydriding led to primary failure of the fuel pin. Subsequent ingress of the coolant water caused excessive swelling of the thermal insulating magnesia pellets located at the ends of the fuel column. The swelling of magnesia pellets caused severe rupturing of the fuel pin at the two ends. The delayed rupturing of the fuel pin at the upper end, caused the fuel column to be displaced downwards by 5.85mm. (author)

  9. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  10. Sintering of nonstoichiometric UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susnik, D.; Holc, J.

    1983-01-01

    Activated sintering of UO 2 pellets at 1100 deg C is described. In CO 2 atmosphere is UO 2 is nonstoichiometric and pellets from active UO 2 powders sinter at 900 deg C to high density. At 1100 deg C the final sintered density is practically achieved at heating on sintering temperature. After reduction and cooling in H 2 atmosphere which is followed sintering in CO 2 the structure is identical to the structured UO 2 pellets sintered at high temperature in H 2 . Density of activated sintered UO 2 pellets is stable, even after additional sintering at 1800 deg C. (author)

  11. An Analysis of the Thermal and Structure Behaviour of the UO2-PuO2-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment of the UO2-PuO2-Fuel in the Irradiation Experiment FR2 Capsule Test Series 5a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Helmut, E.

    1981-01-01

    In the Karlsruhe research reactor FR2 nine fuel pins were irradiated within three irradiation capsules in the course of the test series 5a. The pins contained UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel pellets. They reached bump values of about 6, 17 and 47 Mwd/Kg Me with linear rod powers of 400 to 600 W/cm and clad surface temperature between 500 and 700 degree centigree. A detailed analysis of the fuel structuration data (columnar-grain and equiaxed- -grain growth regions) have allowed to determine, with the help of physic-mathematical models, the radii of these regions and the heat transfer through the contact zone between fuel and clad depending on the bump. The results of the analysis showed that the fuel surface temperature rose with increasing burnup. (Author) 16 refs

  12. Effect of densification additive (Al (OH)3) and U3O8 recycle in sintering UO2-7wt% Gd2O3 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, L.R.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuels are the consumable parts of nuclear reactors, and this has several consequences. From an economic point of view, it is important to keep the fuel into reactor for long time. In this context the use of burnable poison, as advanced fuel based in gadolinium oxide dispersed in a uranium oxide matrix, is a technological solution adopted worldwide. The function of the burnable poison fuels is to control the neutrons population in the nuclear reactors cores during its start up and the beginning of the fuel burning cycle to extending their use. In consequence of the use of this advanced fuel, the nuclear reactors can operate with higher rate of power, optimizing the use of the nuclear fuels. The objective of the present work is to show the development of UO 2 -7wt% Gd 2 O 3 burnable absorber containing pellets by using mechanical blending of (Al(OH) 3 ) densification additive and U 3 O 8 of the recycling of nuclear fuel scrap. In the procedures, the gadolinium content of 7 wt% was established as a consequence of the P and D Cooperation Programmer firmed by the CTMSP and the INB, looking for the nationalization of this type of nuclear fuel used in the Nuclear Facility of Angra 2. The experimental results permit to observe the effectiveness action of the compound Al(OH) 3 as a additive to promote the increasing in the densification of the (U-Gd)O 2 pellets during its sintering, when amounts of recycle are recycled to the production processing up to 10 wt%, and when 0,20 wt% of Al(OH) 3 is used as additive. (author)

  13. The Manufacture of W-UO2 Fuel Elements for NTP Using the Hot Isostatic Pressing Consolidation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert; Mireles, Omar

    2012-01-01

    NTP is attractive for space exploration because: (1) Higher Isp than traditional chemical rockets (2)Shorter trip times (3) Reduced propellant mass (4) Increased payload. Lack of qualified fuel material is a key risk (cost, schedule, and performance). Development of stable fuel form is a critical path, long lead activity. Goals of this project are: Mature CERMET and Graphite based fuel materials and Develop and demonstrate critical technologies and capabilities.

  14. In pile programme of first valutation of UO2 + PuO2 fuel produced by a new process (GSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracchin, R.; Lanchi, M.; Marinucci, G.; Nobili, A.; Dupont, G.; Galtier, J.

    1982-01-01

    The main scope of the ENEA-AGN-CEA programme collaboration is a first valutation of fuel elements produced by GSP method. This valuation will be done by in reactor experiment which enable to compare the performance of GSP and 'standard' FBR fuels. The composition is done by means of theree experimental device: P3, Lugel and Digel. The P3 device gives a direct measurement during irradiation of fuel central temperature, power and integral conductivity. The Lugel device measures fuel stack axial variations and Digel device gives the diameter variations of the pin and PCMI

  15. FABRIKASI MIKROSFIR UO2 MENGGUNAKAN TEKNIK AERASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meniek Rachmawati

    2016-10-01

    bakar PHWR maju dan PWR maju. Fabrikasi menggunakan teknik aerasi dengan gelasi cara 2 mempunyai peluang yang paling besar untuk menghasilkan mikrosfir UO2 dengan laju produksi yang tinggi dan karakteristik tertentu jika dilakukan pengaturan ulang pada laju dispersi dan durasi droplet jatuh bebas. Kata kunci: UO2, bahan bakar, sol-gel, mikrosfir, aerasi. ABSTRACT UO2 MICROSPHERE FABRICATION USING AERATION TECHNIQUE. It has been developed a fabrication process of low density UO2 microspheres for direct feed in pelletization process of PHWR advanced reactor fuel. The fabrication has been implemented by a sol-gel method using aeration technique on the sol / broth with external methods and three variations of gelation. In the aeration technique, broth is directly prepared in gelation mode without one night settling time. The aeration technique is the opposite of the deaeration technique, which is used in fabricating microspheres HTGR fuel. The broth which has been prepared with a mole ratio of NO3 / U between 1.5 to 1.7 with pH solution of 1.6 and viscosity between 630-660 cP directly to be gelated in three ways of gelation. The process of both gelation method 1 and method 2 is implemented by passing through the broth to a dispersion nozzle with 1 mm of diameter which is vibrated by an electromagnetic vibrator at 150 Hz with medium for free fall droplet differently before entering into a solution of NH4OH, while the gelation method 3 implemented manually. The wet UO2 microspheres derived from the three ways of gelation above are treated by heating process at the same way that is dried at a temperature of 85 ºC and 220 ºC each respectively for 1 hour, followed by a calcination process of microspheres UO2 for 1 hour at a temperature of 500 ºC in gaseous medium of O2 and a reduction process at a temperature of 600 ºC in gaseous mixture of N2 and H2 medium for 1 hour. The UO2 microspheres gelation of method 3 are chosen to be sorted and characterized. The characterization

  16. Thermal breeder fuel enrichment zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capossela, Harry J.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Luce, Robert G.; McCoy, Daniel F.; Merriman, Floyd C.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of a thermal breeder reactor having regions of higher than average moderator concentration are disclosed. The fuel modules of the reactor core contain at least two different types of fuel elements, a high enrichment fuel element and a low enrichment fuel element. The two types of fuel elements are arranged in the fuel module with the low enrichment fuel elements located between the high moderator regions and the high enrichment fuel elements. Preferably, shim rods made of a fertile material are provided in selective regions for controlling the reactivity of the reactor by movement of the shim rods into and out of the reactor core. The moderation of neutrons adjacent the high enrichment fuel elements is preferably minimized as by reducing the spacing of the high enrichment fuel elements and/or using a moderator having a reduced moderating effect.

  17. HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program (189a OHO45). Fuel refabrication, Task 500. Rate-controlling factors in the carbothermic preparation of UO2--UC2--C microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Tiegs, S.M.; Lackey, W.J.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rate controlling factors in the conversion of UO 2 + C microspheres to UC 2 + C were investigated using a 13-cm-dia fluidized bed furnace. X-ray diffraction, ion microprobe, and microstructural examination revealed that the conversion of UO 2 to UC 2 began at the surface of the microsphere and progressed toward the central unreacted core. Kinetic models for solid state reactions in spheres were evaluated by using quantitative mass spectrometric data on the rae of evolution of carbon monoxide during conversion. This analysis revealed that the rate of conversion was controlled by reaction at the outer surface of the microsphere. Also, decreased partial pressures of carbon monoxide were found to accelerate the rate of reaction

  18. Development of a thermo-kinetic diffusion model for UO2 and (U,Pu)O2 oxide fuels using the DICTRA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Emily Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is the most widely used nuclear fuel for light water reactors, while some countries including France make use of the uranium-plutonium (U,Pu)O 2±x mixed oxide (MOX). The MOX is also considered for future use in the Gen IV reactors, of which the sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) is of current research interest. Both oxides exhibit a large range of non-stoichiometry due to various oxidative states of uranium and plutonium metal. Thermo-physical properties of the fuel strongly depend on deviations in composition and temperature. Extreme temperature gradients (800 K) between the center (2300 K)and periphery of the MOX fuel pellet expose a central void due to the migration and subsequent redistribution of the fuel-elements. To gain insight into the restructuring, which occurs during the fuel lifetime as well as possible accident scenarios the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior, is crucial. A comprehensive evaluation of these properties can be incorporated in computational models to describe fuel behavior over large temperature and compositions ranges, providing a predictive tool that is applicable to other parts of the fuel cycle, such as optimizing the sintering conditions for manufacturing. Atomic transport especially in UO 2 is widely treated in the experimental and computational materials communities. The current understanding of diffusion properties is limited by the stoichiometric deviations inherent to the fuel. The difficulty is apparent in experimental settings as controlling the oxygen content is problematic. Defects (interstitial and vacancy) associated with the stoichiometric deviations of the oxides facilitate the diffusion process and is of interest in regards to the restructuring of the fuel. Experimental data is widely available; however, coherence between the evaluated diffusion coefficients is not always evident. Existing computational models based on the migration of defects are often based on atomistic level simulations. A complete

  19. Behavior of UO2-Zy fuel elements of nuclear power plants up to 40000 MWj/t U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atabek, R.; Contenson, G. de; Houdaille, B.; Lestiboudois, G.; Vignesoult, N.

    1979-01-01

    The two principal types of fuel elements studied are unstable oxide elements in 15x15 geometry and stable oxide elements in 17x17. Semi-statistical processing of the fission gas amounts released was performed on different fuel elements at specific burn-up varying between 2000 and 40,000 MWd/t U and linear powers between 250 and 600 W/cm. This study enabled the following essential points to be stated at this burn-up level: the swelling of the oxide appears to be less than predicted by the linear law (S=0.75 %/10,000 MWd/t U); the migration of volatile fission products is relatively low and without effect on the behavior of the fuel element; strong zircaloy 4 claddings exhibit little creep and their hydriding is insignificant. On a more general level, the analyses of the fission gases performed in the fuel elements after irradiation show an increase of the fraction released with specific burn-up at a given linear power or central temperature [fr

  20. Temperature distribution on fuel rods: a study on the effect of eccentricity in the position of UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar Junior, Joao Carlos Aguiar

    2010-01-01

    This work proposes the development of a method of solving equations of heat transfer applied in fuel rods using the finite element method, in order to evaluate the performance and safety of the nuclear system. Was prepared in a Fortran program to evaluate the equations governing the problem, the boundary conditions and apply the properties of materials on a steady state. This program uses the mesh generation input and graphical output generated by the program GID. The method was validated against the analytical solution found in the book Todreas and Kazimi with error less than 0.2% and with respect to the improved analytical solution of Nijsing for axisymmetry rod and eccentricity rod with error less than a 3.6%. Applications have been developed with the use of correlations for properties with the temperature dependence of resolution axisymmetry rod and the resolution of a rod with eccentricity. The method developed, should it be implemented, would allow the assessment of fuel rods in the given situations and other scenarios, as well as adding a tool of substantial value in the analysis of rods. (author)

  1. Radiation effects in glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of CANDU UO2 fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    AECL has investigated three waste forms for the immobilization of high-level liquid wastes that would arise if used CANDU fuels were reprocessed at some time in the future to remove fissile materials for the fabrication of new power reactor fuel. These waste forms are borosilicate glasses, aluminosilicate glasses and titanosilicate glass-ceramics. This report discusses the potential effects of alpha, beta and gamma radiation on the releases of radionuclides from these waste forms as a result of aqueous corrosion by groundwaters that would be present in an underground waste disposal vault. The report discusses solid-state damage caused by radiation-induced atomic displacements in the waste forms as well as irradiation of groundwater solutions (radiolysis), and their potential effects on waste-form corrosion and radionuclide release. The current literature on radiation effects on borosilicate glasses and in ceramics is briefly reviewed, as are potential radiation effects on specialized waste forms for the immobilization of 129 I, 85 Kr and 14 C. (author). 104 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  2. Interactions in Zircaloy/UO2 fuel rod bundles with Inconel spacers at temperatures above 1200deg C (posttest results of severe fuel damage experiments CORA-2 and CORA-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Schanz, G.; Sepold, L.

    1990-09-01

    In the CORA experiments test bundles of usually 16 electrically heated fuel rod simulators and nine unheated rods are subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. Thus, an accident sequence is simulated, which may develop from a small-break loss-of-coolant accident of an LWR. An aim of CORA-2, as a first test of its kind, was also to gain experience in the test conduct and posttest handling of UO 2 specimens. CORA-3 was performed as a high-temperature test. The transient phases of CORA-2 and CORA-3 were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircaloy(Zry)-steam reaction started at about 1000deg C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of 2000deg C and 2400deg C for tests CORA-2 and CORA-3, respectively. The test bundles resulted in severe oxidation and partial melting of the cladding, fuel dissolution by Zry/UO 2 interaction, complete Inconel spacer destruction, and relocation of melts and fragments to lower elevations in the bundle, where extended blockages have formed. In both tests the fuel rod destruction set in together with the formation of initial melts from the Inconel/Zry interaction. The lower Zry spacer acted as a catcher for relocated material. In test CORA-2 the UO 2 pellets partially disintegrated into fine particles. This powdering occurred during cooldown. There was no physical disintegration of fuel in test CORA-3. (orig./MM) [de

  3. Radiolysis and corrosion of Pu-doped UO2 pellets in chloride brine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    processes of aged spent fuel. 238Pu doped UO2 pellets were frequently used in the past9–11 for experiments in dilute or aerated solutions. This work describes corrosion experiments with 238Pu doped UO2 pellets in deaerated 5 M NaCl solution and compares them with experiments using undoped UO2 pellets in ...

  4. Modelling of UO2 oxidation in steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, A.C.; Iglesias, F.C.; Liu, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model has been developed for calculating oxidation of UO 2 at high temperatures in steam oxidising conditions. Several methods to calculate the partial pressure of oxygen in the fuel and in the environment surrounding the fuel are available. The various methodologies have been compared and the best models have been compiled into a computer model which will be implemented into fuel thermal/mechanical behaviour codes such as FACTAR 2.0 (LOECI) and ELESIM/ELOCA. Calculations from the computer model have been compared to experimental results. The calculated oxidation reaction kinetics are in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  5. A contribution to the analysis of the thermal behaviour of Fast Breeder fuel rods with UO2-PuO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Elbel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors which consists of Uranium and Plutonium dioxide is mainly characterized by the amount and distribution of void volume and Plutonium and the amount of oxygen. Irradiation experiments carried out with this fuel have shown that initial structure of the fuel pellet is subjected to large changes during operation. These are consequences of the radial and axial temperature gradients within the fuel rods. (Author) 54 refs

  6. Replacement of highly enriched uranium by medium or low-enriched uranium in fuels for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    To exclude the possibility of an explosive use of the uranium obtained from an elementary chemical process, one needs to use a fuel less enriched than 20 weight percent in U 235 . This goal can be reached by two ways: 1. The low density fuels, i.e. U or U 3 O 8 /Al fuels. One has to increase their U content from 1.3 g U/cm 3 presently qualified under normal operation conditions. Several manufacturers such as CERCA in France developed these fuels with a near-term objective of about 2 g U/cm 3 and a long-term objective of 3 g U/cm 3 . 2. The high density fuels. They are the UO 2 Caramel plate type fuels now under consideration, and U 3 Si and UMo as a long-term potential

  7. PERBANDINGAN DENSITAS PELET UO2 HASIL PELETISASI MENGGUNAKAN SERBUK DAN MIKROSPIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Mutiara

    2016-06-01

    spesifikasi mikrospir UO2yang efektif dalam memberikan pelet sinter UO2 dengan densitas sesuai persyaratan. Kata kunci: peletisasi, UO2, mikrospir, serbuk, densitas. ABSTRACT A COMPARISON OF PELLETS DENSITIES IN PELLETIZATION PROCESS USING UO2 POWDER AND UO2MICROSPHERE. A pelletization process UO2 fuel has been developed using UO2 microsphere as a substitute of UO2 powder. Microspheres are spherical, free flowing and porous with certain hardness (soft particle. The benefit of using microsphere in pelletization process is dust free in compaction and more effective in packing so the granulation process and solid lubricants are not required. It is hypothesized that the use of UO2 microsphere in the pelletization process will provide higher sintered pellet density than UO2 powder at the same pelletization process parameters. UO2 microsphere size used in this pelletization was 900 μm with crushing strength of 2.0 N / particles while the UO2 powder size between 150 and 850 μm. The pelletization processes of UO2 microsphere and UO2 powder were performed by varying the compacting pressure between 200Mpa up to 500MPa and sintered at temperatures of 1100 °C for 6 hours in an atmosphere of hydrogen and nitrogen gas mixture. Characterizations performed on the green and sintered pellets of UO2 microsphere and UO2 powder were dimension measurements, weighing and densities measurements. The densities of green and sintered pellets of UO2 microsphere were higher than the green and sintered pellets densities of UO2 powder with corresponded compaction pressure variations. The results indicate that the density of the green pellets both compaction results UO2 powder and UO2 mikrospir increased with increasing compacting pressure. Mikrospir UO2 pellets density crude ranged from 82.1 to 84.2% TD. At the same sintering conditions, both Compaction UO2 powder and UO2 mikrospir Compaction shows the density increases with the greater pressure compacting process. The sintered pellets densties of UO2

  8. Ceramic UO2 powder production at Cameco Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, A.K.; Kuchurean, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation covers the various aspects of ceramic grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder production at Cameco Corporation and its use as fuel and blanket fuel for heavy-water and light-water reactors, respectively. In addition, it discusses the significant production variables that affect production and product quality. It also provides an insight into how various support groups such as Quality Assurance, Analytical Services, and Technology Development fit into the quality cycle and contribute to a successful operation. The ability of Cameco to identify, measure and control the physical and chemical properties of ceramic grade UO 2 has resulted in the production of uniform quality powder. This has meant that 100% of Cameco's ceramic grade UO 2 powder produced since mid-1989 has been accepted by the fuel manufacturers. (author)

  9. Magnetoelastic interactions in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faber, J. Jr.; Lander, G.H.; Cooper, B.R.

    1975-12-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements of the elastic magnetic scattering cross section from antiferromagnetic UO 2 show additional nuclear intensity below T/sub N/ = 30.8 0 K. An examination was made of the possibility of analyzing the additional scattering in terms of homogeneous distortions, which involve shifts of the oxygen atoms from their fluorite lattice sites. The behavior arising from the presence of these homogeneous distortion modes formed the basis for Allen's theory of a cooperative Jahn--Teller effect in UO 2 . However, an analysis in terms of these homogeneous distortions cannot explain the neutron data. But, by extending Allen's concepts to include inhomogeneous deformations, corresponding to a zone boundary q = (π/a) (1,0,0) phonon, excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment. The oxygen displacement is 0.014(1) A from the fluorite lattice positions and, in addition, the inhomogeneous deformation (T/sub 2g/(Q 1 )--T/sub 1g/) does not require a reduction in the overall symmetry of the unit cell. The essential features of Allen's theory for UO 2 can still be maintained

  10. Study of UO2 radioinduced densification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, J.P.; Bruet, M.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements of radioinduced densification were performed on UO 2 DCN (intergranular fine porosity) and UO 2 DCI (interaggregate coarse porosity) in the Anemone device. The densification kinetics was followed by measuring the shrinkage of the oxide column on neutron radiographic plates. UO 2 DCI was found stable in regard to densification. At power near 450Wcm -1 , densification is hitten by restructuring phenomena [fr

  11. Physical characterization and reactivity of the uranyl peroxide [UO2(η(2)-O2)(H2O)2]·2H2O: implications for storage of spent nuclear fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Colm; Walshe, Aurora; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E; Baker, Robert J

    2012-08-06

    The unusual uranyl peroxide studtite, [UO(2)(η(2)-O(2))(H(2)O)(2)]·2H(2)O, is a phase alteration product of spent nuclear fuel and has been characterized by solid-state cyclic voltammetry. The voltammogram exhibits two reduction waves that have been assigned to the U(VI/V) redox couple at -0.74 V and to the U(V/IV) redox couple at -1.10 V. This potential shows some dependence upon the identity of the cation of the supporting electrolyte, where cations with larger ionic radii exhibit more cathodic reduction potentials. Raman spectroelectrochemistry indicated that exhaustive reduction at either potential result in a product that does not contain peroxide linkers and is likely to be UO(2). On the basis of the reduction potentials, the unusual behavior of neptunium in the presence of studtite can be rationalized. Furthermore, the oxidation of other species relevant to the long-term storage of nuclear fuel, namely, iodine and iodide, has been explored. The phase altered product should therefore be considered as electrochemically noninnocent. Radiotracer studies with (241)Am show that it does not interact with studtite so mobility will not be retarded in repositories. Finally, a large difference in band gap energies between studtite and its dehydrated congener metastudtite has been determined from the electronic absorption spectra.

  12. Higher plutonium isotopes studies - Results and interpretation of UO2-PuO2 fuel lattices with K close to 1, in the MINERVE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrouzet, Michel; Martin-Deidier, Loic.

    1978-11-01

    The integral measurement of the higher plutonium isotopes reaction rates, and specially of the 240 Pu and 241 Pu reaction rates in spectra that do not differ very much from the spectrum of a fast neutron power reactor, was performed in six lattices with K close to unity. These lattice were investigated in the fast-thermal critical facility ERMINE installed in the reactor MINERVE. Four standard fuels were used: three consisted of depleted uranium and plutonium with different isotopic compositions, and one consisted of enriched uranium oxyde. The fission rates were measured with the help of miniature fission chambers. The capture rates are derived from the comparison of the reactivity balances of the cells in different lattices. These balances were obtained by oscillation measurement of central cell worth [fr

  13. Neutronic performance of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor designed for fuel enrichment for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapici, H.; Baltacioglu, E.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the breeding performance of a fission hybrid reactor was analyzed to provide fissile fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR) as an alternative to the current methods of gas diffusion and gas centrifuge. LWR fuel rods containing UO 2 or ThO 2 fertile material were located in the fuel zone of the blanket and helium gas or Flibe (Li 2 BeF 4 ) fluid was used as coolant. As a result of the analysis, according to fusion driver (D,T and D,D) and the type of coolant the enrichment of 3%-4% were achieved for operation periods of 12 and 36 months in case of fuel rods containing UO 2 , respectively and for operation periods of 18 and 48 months in case of fuel rods containing ThO 2 , respectively. Depending on the type of fusion driver, coolant and fertile fuel, varying enrichments of between 3% and 8.9% were achieved during operation period of four years

  14. Realistic bandwidth estimation in the theoretically predicted radionuclide inventory of PWR-UO2 spent fuel derived from reactor design and operating data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    declared for compacted metallic waste residual from the reprocessing of spent fuel assemblies. In Germany, the radionuclide declaration list for the disposal of used fuel assemblies is not yet specified. An estimation of the average radionuclide composition of the burnt-up fuel including the realistic inventory bandwidths for each of relevant radionuclides would be highly desirable beforehand. This information is needed for the development of proof tools for the product quality control or safeguards, but also for the evaluation of various safety scenarios regarding the radionuclide mobility or contamination. This work is focused on the development of a method for the determination of realistic radionuclide bandwidths in cases when no information of reactor design and operating data is available. Reactor parameters are classes as Primary Reactor Parameters of burn-up (BU) and cooling time (CT) that are considered to be known, and so-called Secondary Reactor Parameters (SRPs) that include nine parameters that are analysed: initial enrichment (IE), fuel density (FD), fuel temperature (FT), specific power (SP), downtime (DT), irradiation time (IT), moderator density (MD), moderator temperature (MT) and boric acid concentration (BA) used in the water for reactor control. The modelling of radionuclide inventories is carried out with the burn-up code SCALE 6.1 using the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. The input data include geometry of the fuel assembly and a set of the associated SRP values. The magnitude of the bandwidth significantly varies for different radionuclides and depends strongly on the primary parameters of burn-up and cooling time. The theoretical bandwidths are validated with experimental data. For this purpose the destructive radiochemical assay (RCA) data are taken from the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), which is maintained by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. There is, however, presently insufficient experimental data to validate the

  15. Studies on sintering kinetics of ThO2-UO2 pellets using master sintering curve approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Joydipta; Ray, Aditi; Kumar, Arun; Banerjee, Srikumar

    2013-11-01

    Three different compositions of thoria-urania pellets, namely, ThO2-4%UO2, ThO2-10%UO2 and ThO2-20%UO2 (all compositions are in wt% containing natural uranium) were fabricated by Coated Agglomerate Pelletization (CAP) process. The compositions studied in the current paper are the proposed fuels for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy water Reactor (AHWR) and its variant based on low enriched uranium. Sintering kinetics of ThO2-x%UO2 (x = 4, 10, 20) green pellets, thus fabricated, were evaluated using constant heating rate experiments in a vertical dilatometer. Activation energies of sintering (Q) were estimated using Arrhenius plot as proposed by Wang and Raj. Master Sintering Curves (MSC) for the above three compositions were constructed using shrinkage data. A FORTRAN program, employing optimization based numerical algorithm for fitting relative density vs. work of sintering data with sigmoid function, was used for this purpose. The apparent activation energies, evaluated using MSC principle, appear to be consistent with the values obtained by Arrhenius plot.

  16. Sintering diagrams of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, A.; Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    Ashby's method (see Acta Met., vol. 22, p. 275, 1974) of constructing sintering diagrams has been modified to obtain contribution diagrams directly from the computer. The interplay of sintering variables and mechanisms are studied and the factors that affect the participation of mechanisms in UO 2 are determined. By studying the physical properties, it emerges that the order of inaccuracies is small in most cases and do not affect the diagrams. On the other hand, even a 10% error in activation energies, which is quite plausible, would make a significant difference to the diagram. The main criticism of Ashby's approach is that the numerous properties and equations used, communicate their inaccuracies to the diagrams and make them unreliable. The present study has considerably reduced the number of factors that need to be refined to make the sintering diagrams more meaningful. (Auth.)

  17. PULSTAR fuel, low enrichment, long lifetime, economical, proven

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Robert E.; Leonard, Bobby E.

    1993-01-01

    In 1962, the Western New York Research Center, Inc., located at the State University of New York at Buffalo, decided they had a need for a reactor with pulsing and high power steady state capabilities. Both General Atomic and the American Machine and Foundry Corporation (AMF) were contacted to ascertain if it were feasible to construct a dual purpose reactor of this type. The General Atomic proposal indicated the feasibility but would not warrant a steady state power of 2 MW with ultimate capability of 5 MW. AMF did provide a conceptual design for such a dual reactor, call the PULSTAR, and sufficient design information to confirm that the operating specifications could be met. The PULSTAR fuel consisted of 6 enrichment UO 2 sintered pellets in zircaloy tubes (pins) mounted in a x 5 array inside a fuel assembly. The fuel design was patterned after fuel that was under development for light water power reactors and that had been extensively tested under high power pulse conditions in the SPERT Test Reactor. The fuel assemblies are rectangular in a horizontal cross section, 315 inches by 2.74 inches, allowing for flat control blades to be inserted in the core grid arrangement. The active height of the core is approximately 24 inches. In the initial Buffalo AMF contract, a collaborative development agreement was signed in conjunction with agreement to construct the facility. After completion of the Buffalo PULSTAR Reactor, the PULSTAR fuel underwent an extensive test program which resulted in some minor changes in the basic design. In 1965, North Carolina State University contracted with AMF for the construction of a dual MW steady state (with ultimate capability of 5 MW and pulsing PULSTAR Research Reactor. Their fuel is identical to the Buffalo fuel except for having an enrichment of 4% U-235. This paper presented basic information about the characteristics and performance of the PULSTAR Research Reactor fuel. The following summarizes this information. The fuel is of

  18. Use of UO 2 films for electrochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserque, F.; Gouder, T.; Wegen, D. H.; Bottomley, P. D. W.

    2001-10-01

    UO 2 films have been prepared by dc reactive sputtering of a uranium metal target in an Ar/O 2 atmosphere. We have used the films deposited on gold substrates as working electrodes for electrochemical investigations as simulating the surfaces of fuel pellets. Film composition was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and UPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The oxide stoichiometry as a function of deposition conditions was determined and the appropriate conditions for UO 2.0 formation established. AC impedance and cyclic voltammetry measurements were performed. A double RC electrical equivalent circuit was used to fit the data from impedance measurements, similar to those used in unirradiated UO 2 or spent fuel pellets. However due to the porosity or adhesion defects on the thin films that permitted a direct contact between the solution and the gold substrate, we were obliged to add a contribution simulating the water-gold system. Cyclic voltammetry measurements show the influence of pH on the dissolution mechanism. Alkaline solutions permit the formation of an oxidised layer (UO 2.33) which is not present in the acidic solutions. In both pH=2 and pH=6 solutions, a U VI species layer is formed.

  19. Oxidation of UO2 at 150 to 3500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.R.; White, G.D.; Knox, C.A.

    1985-02-01

    Tests were performed on nonirradiated UO 2 pellets from 150 to 350 0 C in atmospheric air and controlled environments and on spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel fragments at 200 and 230 0 C in atmospheric air to determine the variables that affect oxidation behavior under dry storage conditions. The weight of spent fragments increased 50 to 100 times faster than the weight of nonirradiated UO 2 pellets at 230 0 C. Non-irradiated pellet fragments gained weight 5 to 7 times faster than nonirradiated pellets. The fragments simulated fuel fragmented by thermal gradients during reactor power changes. Low-density powder (U 3 O 8 ) formed at 0.05 and 0.3% weight gain for nonirradiated pellets and fragments, respectively, but had not formed at 3% weight gain for spent fuel fragments with a burnup of 29,000 MWd/MTU. Canadian investigators had found that powder formed at intermediate levels of weight gain in CANDU spent fuel fragments with an approximate burnup of 8000 MWd/MTU. The combined effects of the high rate of weight gain in spent fuel and the burnup dependence of weight gain at powder formation resulted in a minimum in a plot of the time for the onset of powder formation versus burnup. The minimum in powder induction time occurs at or below burnup levels typical of CANDU spent fuel and spent fuel at the ends of some LWR rods. The results are described in terms of thermal and neutron irradiation-induced changes in UO 2 pellet structure and chemical composition. Other tests were performed at up to 275 0 C with spent fuel fragments and nonirradiated UO 2 pellets in moist nitrogen to determine the suitability of nitrogen as a cover gas. No measurable weight gain or visible physical changes occurred during the first 2 months of testing. 22 figures, 7 tables

  20. Evaluation of B&W UO2/ThO2 VIII experimental core: criticality and thermal disadvantage factor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlo Parisi; Emanuele Negrenti

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the OECD/NEA International Reactor Physics Experiment (IRPHE) Project, an evaluation of core VIII of the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Spectral Shift Control Reactor (SSCR) critical experiment program was performed. The SSCR concept, moderated and cooled by a variable mixture of heavy and light water, envisaged changing of the thermal neutron spectrum during the operation to encourage breeding and to sustain the core criticality. Core VIII contained 2188 fuel rods with 93% enriched UO2-ThO2 fuel in a moderator mixture of heavy and light water. The criticality experiment and measurements of the thermal disadvantage factor were evaluated.

  1. Complete reduction of high-density UO2 to metallic U in molten Li2O-LiCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Jeong

    2017-10-01

    The large size and high density of spent fuel pellets make it difficult to use the pellets directly in electrolytic reduction (also called as oxide reduction, OR) for pyroprocessing owing to the slow diffusion of molten Li2O-LiCl salt electrolyte into the pellets. In this study, we investigated complete OR of high-density UO2 to metallic U without any remaining UO2. Only partial reductions near the surface of high-density UO2 pellets were observed under operation conditions employing fast electrolysis rate that allowed previously complete reduction of low-density UO2 pellets. Complete reduction of high-density UO2 pellets was observed at fast electrolysis rate when the pellet size was reduced. The complete reduction of high-density UO2 pellets without size reduction was achieved at slow electrolysis rate, which allowed sufficient chemical reduction of UO2 with the lithium metal generated by the cathode reaction.

  2. Study on Reactor Physics Characteristic of the PWR Core Using UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran Surbakti

    2009-01-01

    Study on reactor physics characteristic of the PWR core using UO 2 fuel it is necessary to be done to know the characteristic of geometry, condition and configuration of pin cell in the fuel assembly Because the geometry, configuration and condition of the pin cell in fuel core determine the loading strategy of in-core fuel management Calculation of k e ff is a part of the neutronic core parameter calculation to know the reactor physics characteristic. Generally, core calculation is done using computer code starts from modelling one unit fuel lattice cell, fuel assembly, reflector, irradiation facility and until core reactor. In this research, the modelling of pin cell and fuel assembly of the PWR 17 ×17 is done homogeneously. Calculation of the k-eff is done with variation of the fuel volume fraction, fuel pin diameter, fuel enrichment. The calculation is using by NITAWL and CENTRM, and then the results will be compared to KENOVI code. The result showed that the value of k e ff for pin cell and fuel assembly PWR 17 ×17 is not different significantly with homogenous and heterogenous models. The results for fuel volume fraction of 0.5; rod pitch 1.26 cm and fuel pin diameter of 9.6 mm is critical with burn up of 35,0 GWd/t. The modeling and calculation method accurately is needed to calculation the core physic parameter, but sometimes, it is needed along time to calculate one model. (author)

  3. Heat transfer coefficient between UO2 and Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, A.M.; Stoute, R.L.

    1962-06-01

    This paper provides some experimental values of the heat-transfer coefficient between UO 2 and Zircaloy-2 surfaces in contact under conditions of interfacial pressure, temperature, surface roughness and interface atmosphere, that are relevant to UO 2 /Zircaloy-2 fuel elements operating in pressurized-water power reactors. Coefficients were obtained from eight UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs in atmospheres of helium, argon, krypton or xenon, at atmosphere pressure and in vacuum. Interfacial pressures were varied from 50 to 550 kgf/cm 2 while surface roughness heights were in the range 0.2 x 10 -4 to 3.5 x 10 -4 cm. The effect on the coefficients of cycling the interfacial pressure, of interface gas pressure and of temperature were examined. The experimental values of the coefficients were used to test the predictions of expressions for the heat-transfer between two solids in contact. For the particular UO 2 / Zircaloy-2 pairs examined, numerical values were assigned to several parameters that related the surface roughnesses to either the radius of solid/solid contact spots or to the mean thickness of the interface voids and that accounted for the imperfect accommodation of the void gas on the test surfaces. (author)

  4. Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark-Phase II-E. Impact of Isotopic Inventory Changes due to Control Rod Insertions on Reactivity and the End Effect in PWR UO2 Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuber, Jens Christian; Tippl, Wolfgang; Hemptinne, Gwendoline de; Maes, Philippe; Ranta-aho, Anssu; Peneliau, Yannick; Jutier, Ludyvine; Tardy, Marcel; Reiche, Ingo; Kroeger, Helge; Nakata, Tetsuo; Armishaw, Malcom; Miller, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase II-E Burn-up Credit Criticality Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety. The objective of Phase II of the Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety programme is to study the impact of axial burn-up profiles of PWR UO 2 spent fuel assemblies on the reactivity of PWR UO 2 spent fuel assembly configurations. The objective of the Phase II-E benchmark was to study the impact of changes on the spent nuclear fuel isotopic composition due to control rod insertion during depletion on the reactivity and the end effect of spent fuel assemblies with realistic axial burn-up profiles for different control rod insertion depths ranging from 0 cm (no insertion) to full insertion (i.e. to the case that the fuel assemblies were exposed to control rod insertion over their full active length). For this purpose two axial burn-up profiles have been extracted from an AREVA-NP-GmbH-owned 17x17-(24+1) PWR UO 2 spent fuel assembly burn-up profile database. One profile has an average burn-up of 30 MWd/kg U, the other profile is related to an average burn-up of 50 MWd/kg U. Two profiles with different average burn-up values were selected because the shape of the burn-up profile is affected by the average burn-up and the end effect depends on the average burn-up of the fuel. The Phase II-E benchmark exercise complements the Phase II-C and Phase II-D benchmark exercises. In Phase II-D different irradiation histories were analysed using different control rod insertion histories during depletion as well as irradiation histories without control rod insertion. But in all the histories analysed a uniform distribution of the burn-up and hence a uniform distribution of the isotopic composition were assumed; and in all the histories including any usage of control rods full insertion of the control rods was assumed. In Phase II-C the impact of the asymmetry of axial burn-up profiles on the reactivity and the end effect of

  5. Advanced doped UO2 pellets in LWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arborelius, Jakob; Backman, Karin; Hallstadius, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry strives to reduce the fuel cycle cost, enhance flexibility and improve the reliability of operation. This can be done by both increasing the fuel weight and optimizing rod internal properties that affect operational margins. Further, there is focus on reducing the consequences of fuel failures. To meet these demands Westinghouse has developed ADOPT (Advanced Doped Pellet Technology) UO 2 fuel containing additions of chromium and aluminium oxides. This paper presents results from the extensive investigation program which covered examinations of doped and reference standard pellets both in the manufactured and irradiated states. The additives facilitate pellet densification during sintering and enlarge the pellet grain size. The final manufactured doped pellets reach about 0.5% higher density within a shorter sintering time and a five fold larger grain size compared with standard UO 2 fuel pellets. The physical properties of the pellets, including heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, melting temperature, thermal diffusivity, have been investigated and differences between the doped and standard UO 2 pellets are small. The in-reactor performance of the ADOPT pellets has been investigated in pool-side and hotcell Post Irradiation Examinations (PIEs), as well as in the Studsvik R2 test reactor. The investigations have identified three areas of improved operational behaviour: Reduced fission gas release, improved PCI performance thanks to increased pellet plasticity and higher resistance against post-failure degradation. Fuel segments have been exposed to ramp tests and enhanced power steady-state operation in the Studsvik R2 reactor after base-irradiation to above 30MWd/kgU in a commercial BWR. ADOPT reveals up to 50% lower fission gas release than standard UO 2 pellets. The fuel degradation behaviour has been studied in two oxidizing tests, a thermal-microbalance test and an erosion test under irradiation. The tests show that ADOPT pellets

  6. Determination of U3O8 in UO2 by infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Aparecida Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract The oxygen-uranium (O-U system has various oxides, such as UO2, U4O9, U3O8, and UO3. Uranium dioxide is the most important one because it is used as nuclear fuel in nuclear power plants. UO2 can have a wide stoichiometric variation due to excess or deficiency of oxygen in its crystal lattice, which can cause significant modifications of its proprieties. O/U relation determination by gravimetry cannot differentiate a stoichiometric deviation from contents of other uranium oxides in UO2. The presence of other oxides in the manufacturing of UO2 powder or sintered pellets is a critical factor. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR was used to identify U3O8 in samples of UO2 powder. UO2 can be identified by bands at 340 cm-1 and 470 cm-1, and U3O8 and UO3 by bands at 735 cm-1, 910 cm-1, respectively. The methodology for sample preparation for FTIR spectra acquisition is presented, as well as the calibration for quantitative measurement of U3O8 in UO2. The content of U3O8 in partially calcined samples of UO2 powder was measured by FTIR with good agreement with X-rays diffractometry (XRD.

  7. Measurement of the friction coefficient between UO2 and cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Toshimichi; Narita, Daisuke; Kaneko, Hiromitsu; Honda, Yutaka

    1978-01-01

    Most of fuel rods used for light water reactors or fast reactors consist of the cladding tubes filled with UO 2 -PuO 2 pellets. The measurement was made on the coefficient of static friction and the coefficient of dynamic friction in helium under high contact load on UO 2 /Zry-2 and UO 2 /SUS 316 combined samples at the temperature ranging from room temperature to 400 deg. C and from room temperature to 600 deg. C, respectively. The coefficient of static friction for Zry-2 tube and UO 2 pellets was 0.32 +- 0.08 at room temperature and 0.47 +- 0.07 at 400 deg. C, and increased with temperature rise in this temperature range. The coefficient of static friction between 316 stainless steel tube and UO 2 pellets was 0.29 +- 0.04 at room temperature and 1.2 +- 0.2 at 600 deg. C, and increased with temperature rise in this temperature range. The coefficient of dynamic friction for both UO 2 /Zry-2 and UO 2 /SUS 316 combinations seems to be equal to or about 10% excess of the coefficient of static friction. The coefficient of static friction for UO 2 /SUS 316 combination decreased with the increasing number of repetition, when repeating slip several times on the same contact surfaces. (Kobatake, H.)

  8. An improved UO2 thermal conductivity model in the ELESTRES computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassie, G.G.; Tochaie, M.; Xu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the improved UO 2 thermal conductivity model for use in the ELESTRES (ELEment Simulation and sTRESses) computer code. The ELESTRES computer code models the thermal, mechanical and microstructural behaviour of a CANDU® fuel element under normal operating conditions. The main purpose of the code is to calculate fuel temperatures, fission gas release, internal gas pressure, fuel pellet deformation, and fuel sheath strains for fuel element design and assessment. It is also used to provide initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high temperature transients. The thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel is one of the key parameters that affect ELESTRES calculations. The existing ELESTRES thermal conductivity model has been assessed and improved based on a large amount of thermal conductivity data from measurements of irradiated and un-irradiated UO 2 fuel with different densities. The UO 2 thermal conductivity data cover 90% to 99% theoretical density of UO 2 , temperature up to 3027 K, and burnup up to 1224 MW·h/kg U. The improved thermal conductivity model, which is recommended for a full implementation in the ELESTRES computer code, has reduced the ELESTRES code prediction biases of temperature, fission gas release, and fuel sheath strains when compared with the available experimental data. This improved thermal conductivity model has also been checked with a test version of ELESTRES over the full ranges of fuel temperature, fuel burnup, and fuel density expected in CANDU fuel. (author)

  9. Technological aspects of UO2 sintering at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thern, Gerardo G.; Dominguez, Carlos A.; Benitez, Ana M.; Marajofsky, Adolfo

    1999-01-01

    Within the Fuel Cycle Program of CNEA, the knowledge that plant personnel has on sintering at low temperature was evaluated, because this process could decrease costs for UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 pellets production, simplify the furnace maintenance and facilitate the automation of the production process, specially convenient for uranium recovery. By applying this technology, some companies have achieved production at pilot-scale and irradiated a significant number of pellets. (author)

  10. UO2 pellet and manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Kiichi; Nishinaka, Keiji; Adachi, Kazunori; Fujiwara, Shuji.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns an uranium dioxide pellet having a large crystal grain size. The grain size of the pellet is enlarged to increase the distance of an FP gas generated in the crystal grain to reach the grain boundary and, as a result, decrease the releasing speed of the FP gas. A UO 2 powder having a specific surface area of from 5 to 50m 2 /g is used as a starting powder in a step of forming a molding product, and chlorine or a chlorine compound is added in such an amount that the chlorine content in the UO 2 pellet is from 3 to 25ppm, in one of a production step, a molding step or a sintering step for UO 2 powder. With such procedures, a UO 2 pellet having a large crystal grain size can be prepared with good reproducibility. (T.M.)

  11. Geometrical dimensioning of PWR UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.T.

    1988-08-01

    The finite element structural program SAP-IV is used to calculate UO 2 pellet strains developed under thermal gradients in pressurized water reactors. The applied procedure allows to analyse the influence of various aspects of pelet geometry on cladding strains and can be utilized for the dimensioning of UO 2 pellets. Pellets purchased with flat ends, with dishes pressed into both ends, shouders, and a 45-deg edge chamfer are analysed. The analyse results are compared with experiemtnal data. (author) [pt

  12. Burnup performance of rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel in small pebble bed reactor with accumulative fuel loading scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simanullang, Irwan Liapto; Obara, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Burnup performance using ROX fuel in PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme was analyzed. • Initial excess reactivity was suppressed by reducing 235 U enrichment in the startup condition. • Negative temperature coefficient was achieved in all condition of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel. • Core lifetime of PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel was shorter than with UO 2 fuel. • In PBR with accumulative fuel loading scheme using ROX fuel, achieved discharged burnup can be as high as that for UO 2 fuel. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has proposed rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel as a new, once-through type fuel concept. Here, burnup performance using ROX fuel was simulated in a pebble bed reactor with an accumulative fuel loading scheme. The MVP-BURN code was used to simulate the burnup calculation. Fuel of 5 g-HM/pebble with 20% 235 U enrichment was selected as the optimum composition. Discharged burnup could reach up to 218 GWd/t, with a core lifetime of about 8.4 years. However, high excess reactivity occurred in the initial condition. Initial fuel enrichment was therefore reduced from 20% to 4.65% to counter the initial excess reactivity. The operation period was reduced by the decrease of initial fuel enrichment, but the maximum discharged burnup was 198 GWd/t. Burnup performance of ROX fuel in this reactor concept was compared with that of UO 2 fuel obtained previously. Discharged burnup for ROX fuel in the PBR with an accumulative fuel loading scheme was as high as UO 2 fuel. Maximum power density could be lowered by introducing ROX fuel compared to UO 2 fuel. However, PBR core lifetime was shorter with ROX fuel than with UO 2 fuel. A negative temperature coefficient was achieved for both UO 2 and ROX fuels throughout the operation period.

  13. Realistic bandwidth estimation in the theoretically predicted radionuclide inventory of PWR-UO2 spent fuel derived from reactor design and operating data

    OpenAIRE

    Fast, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear energy for power generation produces heat-generating high- and intermediate level radioactive waste (HLW and ILW) for which a safe solution for the handling and disposal has to be found. Currently, many European countries consider the final disposal of HLW and ILW in deep geological formations as the most preferable option. In Germany the main stream of HLW and ILW include spent fuel assemblies from nuclear power plants (NPPs), the vitrified waste and compacted metallic waste of the f...

  14. Low-enriched fuel particle performance review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.; Nabielek, H.; Yang, L.

    1978-08-01

    The available data on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel particles were reviewed under the United States-Federal Republic of Germany Agreement. The most influential factors controlling the irradiation performance of LEU fuel particles were found to be plutonium transport, fission product transport, fuel particle mechanical performance, and fuel particle chemical performance

  15. Study of secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO2 pellets manufactured by AUC route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnaval, João Paulo R.; Beltran, Dalton J.M.C.; Oliveira, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    The fuel assemblies manufactured by INB for Angra-1 power plant has axial blanket fuel rods which must be inspected due the columns formed by different enrichment pellets. The equipment used for inspection is built with a group of BGO scintillators detectors which measurement principle is based on the absorption of gamma rays emitted from Uranium decay. The commercial grade UF 6 used by INB is stored into cylinders type 30B. The uranium inside these cylinders is in secular equilibrium before the processing. It has been found that the AUC route causes the loss of that equilibrium because the UF 6 is volatilized from the cylinder and the uranium daughters remain in the container. As AUC is converted to powder and pellets, the secular equilibrium is restored through time. The purpose of this work is to present a study of the secular equilibrium reinstatement on UO 2 pellets manufactured by AUC route before being inspected on Rod Scanner. (author)

  16. Influence of the interpellet space to the Instant Release Fraction determination of a commercial UO2 Boiling Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torrents, A.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Casas, I.; De Pablo, J.

    2018-02-01

    The contact of the coolant with the fuel pin during irradiation produces a gradient of temperature in the fuel pellet that segregates the radionuclides (RN) depending on its volatility and reactivity. This segregation determines the Instant Release Fraction (IRF), an important source of radiological risk in the performance assessment (PA) of a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR). RN segregation was studied radially in previous papers. In the present work, it was studied axially, taking into special consideration the cutting position of the solid sample to be studied. Iodine and caesium were the RN with the highest release, while the contribution of rubidium, strontium, molybdenum and technetium to the IRF depended on their chemical state. The interpellet presence (known also as dishing) effect was clearly observed for caesium, increasing its release by one order of magnitude. According to these results, one of the major contributions to the IRF comes from the RN trapped in the dishing and has to be considered in the sampling and data interpretation that will be performed for the PA of the DGR.

  17. A Characterization Research of UO2 Powder for UO2 Pellet Fabrication of Candu Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M.

    1998-01-01

    A characterization research of of UO 2 powder for UO 2 pellet fabrication of Candu type is reported in this paper. The research has been conducted by characterizing sinterability, compactibility, and compressibility of UO 2 (Cameco) without a pre-compacting and UO 2 powder the result of a pre-compacting. The pre-compacting UO 2 powder has been done to have particle size to less than 150 mu (150-800) mu, and more than 800 mu with distribution varied. Sinterability of each group of particle sizes is analyzed using Thermogravimetric-Differential Thermal Analysis (TG-DTA). Then the final compacting to the powder is done using compaction pressure varied from 1 MP to 4 MP to the all groups of the particle sizes to find the optimum pressure by measuring the density and mechanical strength of the UO 2 green pellet. Both measurements are performed using Micrometer and Universal Testing Machine respectively. The result of this investigation shows that the group of UO 2 powder with no pre-compacting with particle size of less than 150 mu with 60% distribution and (150-800) mu size with 40% distribution are the UO 2 pellets which are eligible in terms of their density and mechanical strength

  18. Fabrication of ThO2, UO2, and PuO2-UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Jentzen, W.R.; McCord, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fabrication of ThO pellets for EBR-II irradiation testing and fabrication of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets for United Kingdom Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) irradiation testing is discussed. Effect of process parameters on density and microstructure of pellets fabricated by the cold press and sinter technique is reviewed

  19. PELAPISAN PERMUKAAN PELET UO2 DENGAN ZIRKONIUM DIBORIDA MENGGUNAKAN METODA SPUTTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkono Sungkono

    2016-06-01

    . Development of the nuclear fuel technology was aimed to improve nuclear power plant efficiency. One of the proposed solutions was utilization nuclear fuel with the high burn up. This leads to an increase in gas fission and nuclear reactor core reactivity. The excess reactivity of the reactor core controlled by integrated fuel burnable absorber. In connection it has made a layered thin UO2 pellets with burnable absorber. The objectives of this research was to obtain the characters of zirconium diboride layer on UO2 pellets surface i.e microstructure, crystal structure and chemical composition. The results of this experiment showed that the microstructure of UO2 + 0.4% Cr2O3 pellet has equiaxial and accicular grains with a diameter of 2.44 mm,, whereas the UO2 + 0.3% Nb2O5 pellets has a grain structure in the form of equiiaxial and flattened rod with a diameter of 2.47 mm. The layer of zirconium diboride on the surface of UO2 + 0.4% Cr2O3 and UO2 + 0.3% Nb2O5 pellets are similar namely thin and compact with a thickness of 2.71 mm and 2.82 mm. The identification of X-ray diffraction pattern on UO2 + 0.4% Cr2O3 and UO2 + 0.3% Nb2O5 pellets to exhibit there are of UO2 phase with cubical crystal structure and phase ZrB2 phase with hexagonal crystal structure. Meanwhile, zirconium concentration on the surface layer of UO2 + 0.4% Cr2O3 and UO2 + 0.3% Nb2O5 pellets each of 1.82 mg and 1.90 mg, The presence of zirconium element show that ZrB2 layer formed on the surface of UO2 pellets. Keywords: UO2 pellet, ZrB2 layer, sputtering, microstructure, thickness, crystal structure, chemical composition.

  20. Economical benefits for the use of slightly enriched fuel elements at the Atucha-I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidelnik, J.I.; Sosa, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fuel represents a very important factor in the operative cost of the Atucha I nuclear power plant. This cost is drastically reduced with the use of fuel elements of slightly enriched uranium. The annual saving is analyzed with actual values for fuel elements with an enrichment of 0.85% by weight of U-235. With the reactor core in equilibrium state the annual saving achieved is approximately 7.5-10 u$s. According to the present irradiation plan, the benefit for the transition period is studied. An analysis of the sensitivity to differential increments in factors determining the cost of fuel elements or to changes in manufacturing losses is also performed, calculating its effect on the waste, the storage of irradiated elements and the amount of UO 2 required. (Author)

  1. UO2 microspheres obtainment through the internal gelation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterba, M.E.; Gomez Constenla, A.

    1987-01-01

    UO 2 microspheres obtainment process through the internal gelation method which allows the spheres' obtainment of uniform size is detailed herein, varying the same among 0.3 and 1.7 mm of diameter. The sintered density reaches 10.78 g/cm 3 , permitting the fuels fabrication dispersed and vibro-compacted fuels. The trichloroethylene use implementation as gelation agent is described, thus reducing the number of stages in the microspheres fabrication. At the same time, the uranium sun composition has been modified so as to be compatible with the use solvent. (Author)

  2. Effets de la température et de l'irradiation sur la mobilité du xénon dans UO$_2$ : étude profilométrique et microstructurale

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    In France, electricity is mainly produced (78%) through the operation of 58 PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors). During reactor operation, many fission products (FP) are generated in the fuel which is, in most cases, UO2 enriched to about 4% in 235U. Among FPs, gaseous fission products as Xenon and Krypton, are abundantly produced (around 15% stable fission products). Because of their chemical nature, those two gases have a very low solubility in the fuel and therefore tend to form bubbles (to ...

  3. Automation system for production of UO2 granules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, N.; Setty, C.R.P.; Banerjee, P.K.; Husnain, G.; Rao, K.C.M.; Satyanarayana, A.

    1990-01-01

    Precompaction of UO 2 powder into slugs and granulation of the slugs were used to be carried out in two different work centres involving manual loading/handling of powder and compacts which resulted in a very high level of air-borne activity. This has been simplified by integrating both the operations into one work centre on both the precompaction presses. In the present system, UO 2 powder is transferred to feed hopper through the use of high vac. feeder. The powder in metered quantities is fed into the shoe by deploying screw feeder driven by a compact hydraulic motor. The die cavity is filled with just the right quantity of powder to prevent spillage. The compacts are pushed on to the granulator through a set of guides mounted on the die platform. The granulated powder is made to pass through Vibro screen for separating the fines before collecting in a replaceable S.S. Container. This container is mounted on the final compacting press by using job crane installed on the press. The replaceable container handling facility drastically cuts down the manual handling of UO 2 granules and also eliminates spillage, air borne activity. The development and fabrication of hydraulically operated screw feeder, feed shoe, replaceable container and the job crane structure etc., were completely carried out at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. Paper deals in detail the design of the system developed, present operational experiences and further improvements planned. (author). 6 figs

  4. Electron probe micro-analysis of irradiated Triso-coated UO2 particles, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kosaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1983-11-01

    The Triso-coated low-enriched UO 2 particles were subjected to the post-irradiation electron probe micro-analysis. Observations and analyses on the amoeba effect, inclusions and solutes in the UO 2 matrix were made. In the cooler side of the particle which suffered extensive kernel migration, two significant features were observed: (1) the wake of minute particles, presumably UO 2 , left by the moving kernel in the carbon phase and (2) carbon precipitation in the pores and along the grain boundaries of the UO 2 kernel. Both features could be hardly explained by the gas-phase mechanism of carbon transport and rather suggest the solid state mechanism. Two-types of 4d-transition metal inclusions were observed: the one which was predominantly Mo with a fraction of Tc and another which was enriched with Ru and containing significant amount of Si. The Mo and Si were also found in the UO 2 matrix; the observation led to the discussion of the oxygen potential in the irradiated Triso-coated UO 2 particle. (author)

  5. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of UO2 and PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate basic properties of UO 2 and PuO 2 as fundamental aspects of MA-bearing MOX fuel development. In this work, mechanical properties of UO 2 and PuO 2 were investigated by an ultrasound pulse-echo method. Longitudinal and transversal wave velocities were measured in UO 2 and PuO 2 pellets, and Young's modulus and shear modulus were evaluated, which were 219 MPa and 89 MPa for PuO 2 , and 249 MPa and 95 MPa for UO 2 , respectively. Poisson's ratio was 0.32 in both materials. The relationship between mechanical and thermal properties was described by using thermal expansion data which had been reported previously, and the heat capacity and thermal conductivity were analysed. (authors)

  6. Effect of alpha irradiation on UO2 surface reactivity in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegou, C.; Muzeau, B.; Broudic, V.; Poulesquen, A.; Roudil, D.; Jorion, F.; Corbel, C.

    2005-01-01

    The option of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geological formation raises the need to investigate the long-term behavior of the UO 2 matrix in aqueous media subjected to α-β-γ radiation. The β-γ emitters account for most of the activity of spent fuel at the moment it is removed from the reactor, but diminish within a millennial time frame by over three orders of magnitude to less than the long-term activity. The latter persists over much longer time periods and must therefore be taken into account over a geological disposal time scale. Leaching experiments with solution renewal were carried out on UO 2 pellets doped with alpha emitters ( 238 Pu and 239 Pu) to quantify the impact of alpha irradiation on UO 2 matrix alteration. Three batches of doped UO 2 pellets with different alpha flux levels (3.30 x 10 4 , 3.30 x 10 5 , and 3.2 x 10 6 α cm -2 s -1 ) were studied. The results obtained in aerated and deaerated media immediately after sample annealing or interim storage in air provide a better understanding of the UO 2 matrix alteration mechanisms under alpha irradiation. Interim storage in air of UO 2 pellets doped with alpha emitters results in variations of the UO 2 surface reactivity, which depends on the alpha particle flux at the interface and on the interim storage duration. The variation in the surface reactivity and the greater uranium release following interim storage cannot be attributed to the effect of alpha radiolysis in aerated media since the uranium release tends toward the same value after several leaching cycles for the doped UO 2 pellet batches and spent fuel. Oxygen diffusion enhanced by alpha irradiation of the extreme surface layer and/or radiolysis of the air could account for the oxidation of the surface UO 2 to UO 2+x . However, leaching experiments performed in deaerated media after annealing the samples and preleaching the surface suggest that alpha radiolysis does indeed affect the dissolution, which varies with the

  7. Caramel fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.

    1979-11-01

    This fuel for research reactors is made of UO 2 pellets in a zircaloy cladding to replace 93% enriched uranium. It is a cold fuel, non contaminating and non proliferating, enrichment is only 7 to 8%. Irradiation tests were performed until burn-up of 50000 MWD/t [fr

  8. Behaviour of the UO2/clayey water. A spectroscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbert, S.

    2000-05-01

    This work deals with the disposal of spent nuclear fuels in deep geological layers. After three years of irradiation, these fuels are constituted of 95 % UO 2 . It is then indispensable to know the leaching behaviour of this solid because ground waters are the main agents of dispersion to biosphere of the radioelements contained in these fuels. This work includes alteration tests carried out with a device allowing to synthesize a clayey water equilibrated with a partial pressure in CO 2 in oxidizing or reducing conditions. After the tests, the solid and the solution have been characterized in order to establish a balance of the alteration. The UO 2 matrix has been characterized by XPS. The uranium in solution has been titrated by ICP-MS. In oxidizing conditions, after some weeks, the dissolution velocity of UO 2 has stabilized around 3*10 11 mol/m 2 .s. This velocity is of 4*10 12 mol/m 2 .s in a reducing medium. The uranium concentrations in the oxidized water are of about 2*10 4 mol/l after two years of leaching. After 33 days of alteration in a reducing medium, the uranium amount is of 3*10 6 mol/l. The XPS technique has revealed a superficial and progressive oxidation of the uranium(IV) and the formation of U-OH bonds in the oxidizing medium. A U(VI)/U(IV) ratio has been determined by this technique. It has stabilized around 2 in some weeks. In reducing conditions, this ratio is stable and is of about 0.5. Modeling tools have allowed to propose a class of solids potentially able to control the uranium solubility. In oxidizing conditions, the uranyl hydrates (schoepite) evolve towards uranyl silicates which are thermodynamically more stable. In reducing conditions, a control of the uranium concentration in solution by U 4 O 9 is probable. (O.M.)

  9. Contribution to the study of UO2 pellet fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogaca Filho, N.; Gentile, E.F.; Mourao, M.B.; Souza Santos, T.D. de; Haydt, H.M.

    1977-01-01

    The establishment of a set of parametric comparisons related to UO 2 powders of two different origins as the ammonium diuranate and the ammonium uranyl carbonate is presented. It is emphasized the importance due to the pressing capability of the powders and the requirement for homogeneous microstructure for both, the pore distribution and the grain size. In order to establish the parameters of comparison, all the required normal tests for the in-process control of fabrication of fuel elements for nuclear power reactors were performed, particularly to the re-sintering test, in view of the evaluation of dimensional stability of the pellets [pt

  10. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, Lise

    2014-01-01

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO 2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO 2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author) [fr

  11. Parametric Evaluation of SiC/SiC Composite Cladding with UO2 Fuel for LWR Applications: Fuel Rod Interactions and Impact of Nonuniform Power Profile in Fuel Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Sweet, R.; Brown, N. R.; Wirth, B. D.; Katoh, Y.; Terrani, K.

    2018-02-01

    SiC/SiC composites are candidates for accident tolerant fuel cladding in light water reactors. In the extreme nuclear reactor environment, SiC-based fuel cladding will be exposed to neutron damage, significant heat flux, and a corrosive environment. To ensure reliable and safe operation of accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts such as SiC-based materials, it is important to assess thermo-mechanical performance under in-reactor conditions including irradiation and realistic temperature distributions. The effect of non-uniform dimensional changes caused by neutron irradiation with spatially varying temperatures, along with the closing of the fuel-cladding gap, on the stress development in the cladding over the course of irradiation were evaluated. The effect of non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod on the mechanical performance of the cladding is also evaluated. These analyses have been performed using the BISON fuel performance modeling code and the commercial finite element analysis code Abaqus. A constitutive model is constructed and solved numerically to predict the stress distribution in the cladding under normal operating conditions. The dependence of dimensions and thermophysical properties on irradiation dose and temperature has been incorporated into the models. Initial scoping results from parametric analyses provide time varying stress distributions in the cladding as well as the interaction of fuel rod with the cladding under different conditions of initial fuel rod-cladding gap and linear heat rate. It is found that a non-uniform circumferential power profile in the fuel rod may cause significant lateral bowing in the cladding, and motivates further analysis and evaluation.

  12. Enrichment measurement in TRIGA type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.; Mazon R, R.

    2001-05-01

    The Department of Energy of the United States of North America, through the program 'Idaho Operations Nuclear Spent Fuel Program' of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), in Idaho Falls; Idaho USA, hires to Global Technologies Inc. (GTI) to develop a prototype device of detection enrichment uranium (DEU Detection of Enrichment of Uranium) to determine quantitatively the enrichment in remainder U-235 in a TRIGA fuel element at the end of it useful life. The characteristics of the prototype developed by GTI are the following ones: It allows to carry out no-destructive measurements of TRIGA type fuel. Easily transportable due to that reduced of it size. The determination of the enrichment (in grams of U-235) it is obtained with a precision of 5%. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), in its facilities of the Nuclear Center of Mexico, it has TRIGA type fuel of high and low enrichment (standard and FLIP) fresh and with burnt, it also has the infrastructure (hot cells, armor-plating of transport, etc) and qualified personnel to carry out the necessary maneuvers to prove the operation of the DEU prototype. For this its would be used standard type fuel elements and FLIP, so much fresh as with certain burnt one. In the case of the fresh fuels the measurement doesn't represent any risk, the fuels before and after the measurement its don't contain a quantity of fission products that its represent a radiological risk in its manipulation; but in the case of the fuels with burnt the handling of the same ones represents an important radiological risk reason why for its manipulation it was used the transport armor-plating and the hot cells. (Author)

  13. Microscopic appearance analysis of raw material used for the production of sintered UO2 by scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu feiming

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the microscopic appearance of UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , ADU and AUC powders used for the production of sintered UO 2 slug of nuclear fuel component of PWR. The characteristic analysis of the microscopic appearance observed by scanning electron microscope shows that the quality and finished product rate of sintered UO 2 depend on the appearance characteristic of the active Uo 2 powder, such as grade size and its distribution, spherulitized extent, surface condition and heap model etc.. The addition of U 3 O 8 to the UO 2 powder improves significantly the quality and the finished product rate. The mechanism of this effect is discussed on the basis of the microscopic appearance characteristic for two kinds of powder

  14. Experience with a fuel rod enrichment scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, R.N.; Pettus, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    This enrichment scanner views all fuel rods produced at B and W's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Plant. The scanner design is derived from the PAPAS System reported by R. A. Forster, H. D. Menlove, and their associates at Los Alamos. The spatial resolution of the system and smoothing of the data are discussed in detail. The cost-effectiveness of multi-detector versus single detector scanners of this general design is also discussed

  15. Modeling of UO2 aqueous dissolution over a wide range of conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, S.A.; Weed, H.C.

    1993-11-01

    Previously it was not possible to predict reliably the rate at which spent fuel would react with groundwater because of conflicting data in the literature. The dissolution of the UO 2 spent fuel matrix is a necessary step for aqueous release of radioactive fission products. Statistical experimental design was used to plan a set of UO 2 dissolution experiments to examine systematically the effects of temperature (25--75C), dissolved oxygen (0.002--0.2 atm overpressure), pH (8--10) and carbonate (2-200x10 -4 molar) concentrations on UO 2 dissolution. The average uranium dissolution rate was 4.3 mg/m 2 /day. The regression fit of the data indicate an Arrhenius type activation energy of 8750 cal/mol and a half-power dependence on dissolved oxygen in the simulated groundwater

  16. UO2 fuel behaviour at rod burn-ups up to 105 MWd/kgHM. A review of 10 years of high burn-up examinations commissioned by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goll, W.; Hoffmann, P.B.; Hellwig, C.; Sauser, W.; Spino, J.; Walker, C.T.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation experience gained on fuel rods with burn-ups greater than 60 MWd/kgHM irradiated in the Nuclear Power Plant Goesgen, Switzerland, is described. Emphasis is placed on the fuel behaviour, which has been analysed by hot cell examinations at the Institute for Transuranium Elements and the Paul-Scherrer-Institute. Above 60 MWd/kgHM, the so-called high burn-up structure (HBS) forms and the fission gas release increases with burn-up and rod power. Examinations performed in the outer region of the fuel revealed that most if not all of the fission gas created was retained in the HBS, even at 25% porosity. Furthermore, the HBS has a relatively low swelling rate, greatly increased plasticity, and its thermal conductivity is higher than expected from the porosity. The post-irradiation examinations showed that the HBS has no detrimental effects on the performance of stationary irradiated PWR fuel irradiated to the high burn-ups that can be achieved with 5 wt% U-235 enrichment. On the contrary, the HBS results in fuel performance that is generally better than it would have been if the HBS had not formed. (orig.)

  17. SEM hot stage sintering of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.

    1976-06-01

    The sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide powder compacts, in the hot stage of a scanning electron microscope, was continuously monitored using 16 mm time lapse movies. From alumina microspheres placed on the surface of the compacts, shrinkage measurements were obtained. Converting shrinkage measurements into densification profiles indicates that a maximum densification rate is reached at a critical density, independent of the constant heating rates. At temperatures above 1350 0 C, the movement of the reference microspheres made shrinkage measurements impossible. It is believed the evolution of UO 3 gas from hyperstoichiometric UO 2 is the cause of this limitation

  18. Radiological implications of plutonium recycle and the use of thorium fuels in thermal power reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, H.F.; Nair, S.

    1979-01-01

    The Central Electricity Generating Board reactor inventory code RICE has been used to calculate the buildup of activity and radioactive emissions for a range of alternative fuel cycles based on a conceptual high-temperature gas-cooled reactor design. The fuels included in this study were a conventional 235 U-enriched oxide fuel, a mixed PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel employing pressurized water reactor plutonium, and both low- and high-enrichment mixed 235 UO 2 /ThO 2 fuels. The results have been used to quantify the radiological protection implications of these fuel cycles in terms of fuel handling and reprocessing waste management

  19. Development of AUC-based process at BARC for production of free-flowing and sinterable UO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keni, V.S.; Ghosh, S.K.; Ganguly, C.; Majumdar, S.

    1994-01-01

    Ammonium uranium carbonate (AUC) process has been developed and industrially used in Germany for preparation of free-flowing and sinterable UO 2 powder for fabrication of UO 2 fuel pellets for light water reactors (LWR). Efforts are underway at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for developing AUC-based process which would yield free-flowing UO 2 powder suitable for direct pelletisation and sintering to very high density (> 96% T.D.) UO 2 fuel pellets for pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs) in India. The first phase of this work has been completed jointly by Chemical Engineering Division (ChED) and Radiometallurgy Division (RMD) in batches of 1.5 kg. It was possible to fabricate UO 2 pellets of density 93-95% T.D. on a reproducible basis. At ChED, process parameters have been optimised for fabrication of AUC with suitable physical properties in batches of 1.5 kg (U), starting with nuclear pure uranyl nitrate solution. At RMD calcination parameters of AUC was optimised in batches of 500 g for obtaining free-flowing UO 2 powder, suitable for direct pelletisation and sintering. The pelletisation and sintering have been carried out at Radiometallurgy Division in batches of 1-1.5 kg. The maximum achievable density of UO 2 pellets has been in the range of 95.5-96% T.D. (author). 11 refs

  20. UO2 dissolution rates: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report reviews literature data on UO 2 dissolution kinetics and provides a framework for guiding future experimental studies as well as theoretical modeling studies. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution involves formation of an oxidized surface layer which is then dissolved by formation of aqueous complexes. Higher oxygen pressures or other oxidants are required at higher temperatures to have dissolution rates independent of oxygen pressure. At high oxygen pressures (1-5 atm, 25-70 C), the dissolution rate has a one-half order dependence on oxygen pressure, whereas at oxygen pressures below 0.2 atm, Grandstaff (1976), but nobody else, observed a first-order dependence on dissolution rate. Most people found a first-order dependence on carbonate concentration; Posey-Dowty (1987) found independence of carbonate at pH 7 to 8.2. Dissolution rates increase with temperature except in experiments involving granitic groundwater. Dissolution rates were generally greater under acid or basic conditions than near neutral pH

  1. Thermal expansion of ThO2-2 wt% UO2 by HT-XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, A.K.; Mathews, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    The linear thermal expansion of polycrystalline ThO 2 -2 wt% UO 2 has been investigated from room temperature to 1473 K in flowing helium atmosphere using high temperature X-ray diffractometry. ThO 2 -2 wt% UO 2 shows a marginally higher linear thermal expansion as compared to pure ThO 2 . The average linear and volume thermal expansion coefficients of ThO 2 -2 wt% UO 2 are found to be α-bar a =9.74x10 -6 K -1 and α-bar v =29.52x10 -6 K -1 (298-1473 K). This study will be useful in designing the nuclear reactor fuel assembly based on ThO 2

  2. Neutronics substantiation of possibility for conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to operation with low-enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arinkin, F.M.; Gizatulin, Sh.H.; Zhantikin, T.M.; Koltochnik, S.N.; Takibaev, A.Zh.; Talanov, S.V.; Chakrov, P.V.; Chekushina, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The studies are aimed to calculation and experimental justification of possibility for conversion of the WWR-R reactor core to low-enriched nuclear fuel (the 19.75-% enrichment in isotope U-235), resulting in reducing the risk of non-sanctioned proliferation of nuclear materials which can be used as weapons materials. The analysis of available published data, related to problem of reduction of enrichment in the fuel used in research thermal reactors, has been carried out. Basing on the analysis results, reference fuel compositions have been chosen, in particular, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) in aluminum master form and the UA1 4 alloy. Preliminary calculations have shown that, with the WWR-K reactor core preserved existing critical characteristics (the fuel composition: UA1 4 ), the uranium concentration in the fuel element is to be increased by a factor of 2.0-2.2, being impossible technologically. The calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo computational codes. The program of optimal conversion of the WWR-K reactor core to low-enriched fuel has been developed, including: development of calculation models of the reactor core, composed of various designs of fuel elements and fuel assemblies (FA), on a base of corresponding computational codes (diffusion, statistical, etc.); implementation of experiments in the zero-power reactor (critical assembly) with the WWR-C-type FA, in view of correction of the computational constants used in calculations; implementation of reactor core neutronics calculations, in view of selection of the U-235 optimal content in the low-enriched fuel elements and choice of FA reload strategy at the regime of reactor core after burning; determination of the fuel element specification; determination of the critical and operational loads for the reactor core composed of rod/tubular fuel elements; calculation of the efficiency of the protection control system effectors, optimization of its composition, number and locations in the

  3. Current status of the tasks performed by the Nuclear Fuel Department for the CAREM project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Federico; Perez, Lidia E.; Perez, Aaldo; Marchi, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    CAREM Project required to the Nuclear Fuels Department to perform the necessary tasks to define the powder characteristics and natural UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 , UO 2 -1.8 and 3.1 % enrichment fuel pellets manufacturing and control parameters. To start with these tasks it was necessary to hire and train staff, begin the licensing process of the facilities, update infrastructure works and equipment of existing facilities. A brief description of the tasks performed is shown. (author)

  4. Neutronics characteristics of micro-heterogeneous ThO2-UO2 PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, X.; Driscoll, M.J.; Kazimi, S.

    2001-01-01

    A new fuel concept, axially-micro-heterogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel, where ThO 2 fuel pellets and UO 2 fuel pellets are stacked in separate layers in the fuel rods, is being studied at MIT as an option to reduce plutonium production in LWR fuel. Very interesting neutronic behavior is observed: (1) A reactivity increase of 3% to 4% at EOL for a given 235 U inventory which results in a 20-30% increase in average core discharge burnup; (2) For certain configurations, a ''burnable poison'' effect is observed. Analysis shows that these effects are achieved due to a combination of changes in self-shielding, local fissile worth, and conversion ratio, among which self-shielding is the dominant effect at the end of a reactivity-limited burnup. Other variations of micro-heterogeneous UO 2 -ThO 2 fuel including duplex pellets, checkerboard pin distribution, and checkerboard-axial combinations have also been investigated, and their neutronic performance compared. It is concluded that the axial fuel micro-heterogeneity provides the largest gain in reactivity-limited burnup. (author)

  5. Measurements of the viscosity of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO2 and of sodium metaborate-UO2 liquid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.

    1983-01-01

    Adding UO 2 produces an increase of viscosity of borax and sodium metaborate. For temperatures below 920 0 C the measurements with the borax-UO 2 solution show a phase separation. Contrary to borax the sodium metaborate solutions indicate a well defined melting point. At temperatures slightly below the melting point a solid phase is formed. The tested sodium-borates-UO 2 mixtures are in liquid form. (DG)

  6. Study of Reduced-Enrichment Uranium Fuel Possibility for Research Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruppel V.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Having analyzed the results obtained in the work, it is possible to conclude that the flux density of fast and thermal neutrons in the shell of fuel elements in EFA in REU-zone decreased on average by 5% for UO2 fuel and by 7% for U9%Mo fuel. Change of neutrons flux density during the cycle does not exceed 4% for both fuel types. On average the fuel burnup in reactor core during the cycle for UO2 and U9%Mo increased by 2.8%. It is 1% less that in HEU-zone, which is conditioned by higher initial loading of 235U in fuel assembly with REU fuel.

  7. Sorption of Np by UO2 under repository conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakovskaya, T. V.; Zakharova, E. V.; Haire, M. J.

    2010-03-01

    This work is a part of the joint Russian - American Program on Beneficial Use of Depleted Uranium. The production of nuclear fuels results in the accumulation of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF6), which is converted to uranium oxides. Depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2) can be used as a component of radiation shielding and as an absorbent for migrating radionuclides that may emerge from casks containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that are stored for hundreds of thousands of years in high-level wastes (HLW) and SNF repositories (e.g. Yucca Mountain Project). In this case DU oxides serve as an additional engineered chemical barrier. It is known that the primary radioisotope contributor to the calculated long-term radiation dose to the public at the Yucca Mountain SNF repository site boundary is neptunium-237 (237Np). This paper describes the sorption of 237Np in various media (deionized water and J-13 solution) by DUO2. Samples of DUO2 used in this work originated from the treatment of UF6 in a reducing media to form UO2(DUO2-1 at 600°C, DUO2-2 at 700°C, and DUO2-3 at 800°C). All species of DUO2 sorb Np(V) and Np(IV) from aqueous media. Equilibrium was achieved in 24 hours for Np(V) and in 2 hours for Np(IV). Np(V) sorption is accompanied with partial reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and vice versa. The sorption of Np(V) onto DUO2 surfaces is irreversible. The investigations on DUO2 transformations were performed under dynamic and static conditions. Under static conditions the solubility of the DUO2 samples in J-13 solution is considerably higher than in DW. When the pre-treatment temperature is decreased, the solubility of DUO2 samples raises regardless of the media. The experiments on interaction between DUO2 and aqueous media (DW and J-13 solution) under dynamic conditions demonstrated that during 30-40 days the penetration/filtration rate of DW and J-13 solution through a thin DUO2 layer decreased dramatically, and then

  8. Behavior of UO2 and FISSIUM in sodium vapor atmosphere at temperatures up to 28000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuerstein, H.; Oschinski, J.

    1986-11-01

    In case of a HCDA a rubble bed of fuel debris may form under a sodium pool and reach high temperatures. An experimental technique was developed to study the behavior of fuel and fission products in out-of-pile tests in a sodium vapor atmosphere. Evaporation rates of UO 2 were measured up to 2800 0 C. The evaporation was found to be a complex process, depending on temperature and the 'active' surface. Evaporation restructures the surface of the samples, however no new 'active' surface is formed. UO 2 forms sometimes well shaped crystals and curious erosion products. The efficiency of the used condenser/filter lines was higher than 99.99%. In case of a HCDA all the evaporated substances will condense in the soidum pool. Thermal reduction of the UO 2 reduces the oxygen potential of the system. The final composition at 2500 0 C was found to be UO 1.95 . The only influence of the sodium vapor was found for the diffusion of UO 2 into the thoria of the crucible. Compared with experiments in an atmosphere of pure argon, the diffusion rate was reduced. (orig.) [de

  9. Dissolution of unirradiated UO2-pellets in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, B.

    1984-02-01

    Cinetics of dissolution of UO 2 -pellets in nitric acid and the gaseous reaction products, N 2 O, NO, NO 2 are determined for different temperatures and acid concentrations. NO 2 :NO ratio increases with temperature and nitrate concentration. The amount of N 2 O formed increases with temperature and acid concentration. At 90 0 C and dissolution in 12 m nitric acid 1l weight-% of UO 2 are dissolved forming N 2 O. The oxidation of UO 2 takes place on the crystal surface or at the interface UO 2 /HNO 3 . U(IV)-ions cannot be detected in the solution. The nitrous acid resulting from reduction of HNO 3 or the species which is in equilibrium with nitrous acid e.g. the nitrosyl-ion is responsible for UO 2 -oxidation. (orig./PW) [de

  10. Thermal reactions of uranium metal, UO 2, U 3O 8, UF 4, and UO 2F 2 with NF 3 to produce UF 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Bruce; Scheele, Randall; Kozelisky, Anne; Edwards, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that NF 3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO 2, UF 4, UO 3, U 3O 8, and UO 2F 2·2H 2O to produce the volatile UF 6 at temperatures between 100 and 550 °C. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium fluorination/oxidation state, physiochemical effects, and instances of discrete chemical speciation. Large differences in the onset temperatures for each system investigated implicate changes in mode of the NF 3 gas-solid surface interaction. These studies also demonstrate that NF 3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in actinide volatility reprocessing.

  11. Safety and licensing of MOX versus UO2 for BWRs and PWRs: Aspects applicable for civilian and weapons grade Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, L.; Malone, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the safety and licensing differences between MOX and UO 2 BWR and PWR cores. MOX produced from the normal recycle route and from weapons grade material are considered. Reload quantities of recycle MOX assemblies have been licensed and continue to operate safely in European LWRs. In general, the European MOX assemblies in a reload are 2 . These studies indicated that no important technical or safety related issues have evolved from these studies. The general specifications used by fuel vendors for recycled MOX fuel and core designs are as follows: MOX assemblies should be designed to minimize or eliminate local power peaking mismatches with co-resident and adjacently loaded UO 2 assemblies. Power peaking at the interfaces arises from different neutronic behavior between UO 2 and MOX assemblies. A MOX core (MOX and UO 2 or all-MOX assemblies) should provide cycle energy equivalent to that of an all-UO 2 core. This applies, in particular, to recycle MOX applications. An important consideration when burning weapons grade material is rapid disposition which may not necessarily allow for cycle energy equivalence. The reactivity coefficients, kinetics data, power peaking, and the worth of shutdown systems with MOX fuel and cores must be such to meet the design criteria and fulfill requirements for safe reactor operation. Both recycle and weapons grade plutonium are considered, and positive and negative impacts are given. The paper contrasts MOX versus UO 2 with respect to safety evaluations. The consequences of some transients/accidents are compared for both types of MOX and UO 2 fuel. (author)

  12. Progress in the dry route conversion process of UF-6 to UO-2: new equipment and theoretical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrais, C.; Ablitzer, C.

    1999-01-01

    The dry route conversion process of UF 6 to UO 2 is used on a large scale to produce powder for UO 2 fuel pellets. However, this powder is not very suitable for other kinds of fuels, such as for instance, Mixed Oxide (Mox) fuel. Thus, CEA and COGEMA have developed a programme to study and model the process in order to identify the parameters which lead to a better quality powder. For this purpose, specific equipment was built at the CEA/Cadarache. The first results of experiments and modelling have shown parameters which clearly modify the powder quality. (authors)

  13. Methodology for Producing a Uniform Distribution of UO2 in a Tungsten Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; O'Conner, Andrew; Hickman, Rickman; Broadway, Jeramie; Belancik, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Current work at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is focused on the development CERMET fuel materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). The CERMETs consist of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel particles embedded in a tungsten (W) metal matrix. Initial testing of W-UO2 samples fabricated from fine angular powders performed reasonably well, but suffered from significant fuel loss during repeated thermal cycling due to agglomeration of the UO2 (1). The blended powder mixtures resulted in a non-uniform dispersion of the UO2 particles in the tungsten matrix, which allows rapid vaporization of the interconnected UO2 from the sample edges into the bulk material. Also, the angular powders create areas of stress concentrations due to thermal expansion mismatch, which eventually cracks the tungsten matrix. Evenly coating spherical UO2 particles with chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten prior to consolidation was previously demonstrated to provide improved performance. However, the CVD processing technology is expensive and not currently available. In order to reduce cost and enhance performance, a powder coating process has been developed at MSFC to produce a uniform distribution of the spherical UO2 particles in a tungsten matrix. The method involves utilization of a polyethylene binder during mixing which leads to fine tungsten powders clinging to the larger UO2 spherical particles. This process was developed using HfO2 as a surrogate for UO2. Enough powder was mixed to make 8 discs (2cm diameter x 8mm thickness) using spark plasma sintering. A uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa was used at four different temperatures (2 samples at each temperature). The first two samples were heated to 1400C and 1500C respectively for 5 minutes. Densities for these samples were less than 85% of theoretical, so the time at temperature was increased to 20 minutes for the remaining samples. The highest densities were achieved for the two samples sintered at 1700C (approx. 92% of

  14. Pressure induced by Na entrapped in molten UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerici, G.; Schins, H.

    1978-01-01

    In a first approach the constraint supplied by the solidifying UO 2 -shell is evaluated. The mass of the injected sodium is assumed to have a spherical form. Its dimensions are negligible in respect to the extension of the UO 2 . Using the Von Karman Pohlhausen method for solving the Fourier equation, the temperature distributions in UO 2 and sodium are determined. The physical properties are taken to be independent of temperature. Once these temperature profiles are obtained, the pressure induced into the heated sodium by the hypothesised mechanical constraint of the rigid shell and the tangential stress produced in this shell, can be calculated. In a second approach then, a liquid-liquid contact between UO 2 and Na is considered. The interface temperature, however, is calculated by means of an adjusted initial temperature of UO 2 . Following an idea of Cho and Wright, to the actual temperature of UO 2 is added a value obtained by dividing its latent heat of fusion by its heat capacity. The thermal expansion of the sodium drop is initially delayed by the inertial constraint of the surrounding heavy UO 2 . The expansion of the liquid drop of sodium continues up to the moment where the average temperature of the entrapped sodium becomes equal to the homogeneous nucleation temperature. At this instant vaporisation starts and the process goes on described by the formation of a two-phase mixture for the sodium. In this way the interaction of an entrapped sodium drop is calculated as a superheat limited explosion

  15. Ceramic UO2 powder production at Cameco Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulligan, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the various aspects of ceramic grade UO 2 powder production at Cameco Corporation's Port Hope conversion facility. It discusses the significant safety systems, production processes and plant monitoring and control systems. It also provides an insight into how various support groups such as Quality Assurance, Analytical Services, and Technology Development contribute to the consistent production of high quality UO 2 powder. The ability of Cameco to identify, measure and control the physical and chemical properties of ceramic grade UO 2 has resulted in the production of uniform quality powder that has consistently met customer requirements. (author)

  16. Utilization of dilatometer for characterization of UO2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Broczkowski, M.E.; Kryst, K.; Ioffe, M.S.; Murchie, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    Particle size and specific surface area measurements are conventional characterization techniques for ceramic powders to predict sintering behaviour. Dilatometry is one of the most popular techniques in ceramics to study the sintering characteristics for optimization of firing processes. Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powders from different sources were characterized by conventional techniques and these characteristics were correlated with sintering behaviour, as measured with a dilatometer. The suitability of dilatometry to correlate the sintering characteristics of UO 2 powder with variations in the O/U ratio, particle size and green density was discussed. Explanations of features in the sintering profiles for UO 2 powders have been presented. (author)

  17. Determination of UO2F2, UO2 and UF4 in tetrafluoride of uranium samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras Guzman, Ariel; Arlegui Hormazabal, Oscar

    2003-01-01

    The combustible elements for investigation reactors that at the present are manufacturing by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) they are based on aluminum and silicide uranium powdered which is obtained from metallic uranium. At the present the Conversion Units, is developing the technology of transformation UF 6 in metallic Uranium, reason for which is necessary that the Chemical Analysis Laboratory have a methodology that allows to quantify the presence of UO 2 F 2 , UO 2 and UF 4 in the samples obtained in this transformation process. For this reason we are implements the methodology of sequential analysis that had been developed previously, for the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Investigations, IPEN Brasil, and to adapt it to the present conditions in the Laboratory of Chemical Analysis of the CCHEN. This method is based on the different solubilities that present those sample in front of solvents as ethanol and solutions of ammonium oxalate, what allows the separation of these compounds for a later analysis by means of the method of Davies and Gray. This method is based on the reduction of the uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with ferrous ion amid phosphoric acid, quantifying the present uranium in the samples by means of titration with potassium dicromate. With the purpose of checking the efficiency of the method, the sum of all values of uranium coming from each compound and compares it with the total uranium of the sample (author)

  18. UO2 leaching and radionuclide release modelling under high and low ionic strength solution and oxidation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the UO 2 dissolution under oxidizing conditions has been studied in order to compare these results to those obtained with spent fuel. Two different leaching solutions have been used, one with a high ionic strength trying to simulate the conditions expected in a saline repository and the other at low ionic strength much appropriate to granitic environments. In both cases, the dissolution has been studied studied as a function of pH, redox potential, oxidants, complexing agents, particle size as well as the experimental methodology. Results can be summarized as follows: a) The UO 2 dissolution is rather independent on ionic strength. b) Dissolution rates can be explained in general independent on the oxidant as: Log R=3DK [oxidant] Surface solid evolution is very important to understand the dissolution/oxidation mechanism of UO 2 . d) Under oxidizing conditions, the dissolution is H+ and HCO 3 promoted. e) In carbonate medium, both UO 2 and spent fuel dissolution rates are very similar, while in a non-complexing medium, spent fuel dissolution rate is much higher than the UO 2 one. This fact seems to indicate that radiolysis is much important non-complexing media. (Author)

  19. UO2/magnetite concrete interaction and penetration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    The concrete structure represents a line of defense in safety assessment of containment integrity and possible minimization of radiological releases following a reactor accident. The penetration study of hot UO 2 particles into limestone concrete and basalt concrete highlighted some major differences between the two concretes. These included penetration rate, melting and dissolution phenomena, released gases, pressurization of the UO 2 chamber, and characteristics of post-test concrete. The present study focuses on the phenomena associated with core debris interaction with and penetration into magnetite type concrete. The real material experiment was carried out with UO 2 particles and magnetite concrete in a test apparatus similar to the one utilized in the UO 2 /limestone experiment

  20. Dissolution kinetics of UO2: Flow-through tests on UO2.00 pellets and polycrystalline schoepite samples in oxygenated, carbonate/bicarbonate buffer solutions at 25 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, S.N.; Weed, H.C.; Leider, H.R.; Stout, R.B.

    1991-10-01

    The modelling of radionuclide release from waste forms is an important part of the performance assessment of a potential, high-level radioactive waste repository. Since spent fuel consists of UO 2 containing actinide elements and other fission products, it is necessary to determine the principal parameters affecting UO 2 dissolution and quantify their effects on the dissolution rate before any prediction of long term release rates of radionuclides from the spent fuel can be made. As part of a complex matrix to determine the dissolution kinetics of UO 2 as a function of time, pH, carbonate/bicarbonate concentration and oxygen activity, we have measured the dissolution rates at 25 degrees C of: (1) UO 2 pellets; (2) UO 2.00 powder and (3) synthetic dehydrated schoepite, UO 3 .H 2 O using a single-pass flow through system in an argon-atmosphere glove box. Carbonate, carbonate/bicarbonate, and bicarbonate buffers with concentrations ranging from 0.0002 M to 0.02 M and pH values form 8 to 11 have been used. Argon gas mixtures containing oxygen (from 0.002 to 0.2 atm) and carbon dioxide (from 0 to 0.011 atm) were bubbled through the buffers to stabilize their pH values. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  1. The use of medium enriched uranium fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation described in the present paper concerns the use of medium enriched uranium fuel for our research reactors. The underlying assumptions set up for the evaluation are as follows: (1) At first, the use of alternative fuel should not affect, even to a small extent, research and development programs in nuclear energy utilization, which were described in the previous paper. Hence the use of lower enrichment fuel should not cause any reduction in reactor performances. (2) The fuel cycle cost for operating research reactors with alternative fuel, excepting R and D cost for such fuel, should not increase beyond an acceptable limit. (3) The use of alternative fuel should be satisfactory with respect to non-proliferation purposes, to the almost same degree as the use of 20% enriched uranium fuel

  2. The fabrication of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amore, Mead

    1987-01-01

    The chronology of fuel product and core management development over the past 25 years in the USA is explained. Nuclear fuel for Westinghouse reactors is made by converting enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) into uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder. The powder is pressed into pellets which are loaded into zircalloy fuel tubes (typically over 14 million pellets in 50,952 rods). The fuel rods are arranged in fuel assemblies which are shipped to the reactor site (typically 193 fuel assemblies are needed for one 1000MWe reactor). Each stage of the fuel fabrication cycle (cladding manufacture, chemical conversion UF 6 - UO 2 , pellet production, fuel rod fabrication, grid assembly, skeleton assembly, fuel assembly) is described, with particular reference to the Westinghouse process and plant. (UK)

  3. Construction of the irradiation capsule and irradiation of the natural uranium fuel for verification of the procedure for irradiation of enriched fuel, Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasijevic, P.; Pavlovic, A.

    1967-11-01

    Capsule for irradiation of the natural uranium fuel described in this report was constructed according o the data and results of thermal calculations which are part of this report. Reconstructed reactor channel from the VISA project was used for constructing the capsule. The purpose for constructing this capsule was irradiation of sintered UO 2 fuel element in the RA reactor core [sr

  4. Use of low enriched fuel in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The possibility to operate the CEC Reactors HFR and ESSOR with a low enriched U,Alsub(x)/Al plate type fuel has been studied. Assuming that the long term reliable operation of such a fuel has been demonstrated, it is shown that in HFR, the use of a 20% enriched fuel would result in a non negligeable deterioration of the reactor irradiation capabilities. In the ESSOR reactor, with unchanged reactor power and flux levels, the fuel enrichment might be decreased to about 40% by increasing the U loading and the thickness of the cermet meat. Further reduction of uranium enrichment would require in this case a radical modification of the fuel element design

  5. Electrochemical studies of the effect of H2 on UO2 dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2004-09-01

    This report summarises evidence for the effect of H 2 on the oxidation and dissolution of UO 2 derived from electrochemical studies. In the presence of γ-radiation or with SIMFUEL electrodes containing ε-particles, the corrosion potential (E CORR ) of UO 2 is observed to be suppressed in the presence of H 2 by up to several hundred milli volts. This effect has been observed at room temperature with 5 MPa H 2 (in the case of γ-irradiated solutions) and at 60 deg C with a H 2 partial pressure of only 0.002-0.014 MPa H 2 with the SIMFUEL electrode. The suppression of E CORR in the presence of H 2 indicates that the degree of surface oxidation and the rate of dissolution of UO 2 is lower in the presence of H 2 .The precise mechanism of the effect of H 2 is unclear at this time. The mechanism appears to involve a surface heterogeneous process, rather than a homogeneous solution process. Under some circumstances the value of E CORR approaches the equilibrium potential for the H 2 /H + couple, suggesting galvanic coupling between sites on which this electrochemical process is catalysed and the rest of the UO 2 surface. It is also possible that H* radical species, either produced radiolytically from H 2 O or by dissociation of H 2 on ε-particles or surface-active UO 2+x sites, reduce oxidised U(V)/U(VI) surface states to U(IV). The effect of H 2 on reducing the degree of surface oxidation is only partially reversible, since surfaces reduced in H 2 atmospheres (re-)oxidise more slowly and to a lesser degree than surfaces not previously exposed to H 2 . Homogeneous reactions between dissolved H 2 and either oxidants or dissolved U(VI) cannot explain the observed effects.Regardless of the precise mechanism, the suppression of the degree of surface oxidation results in lower UO 2 dissolution rates in the presence of H 2 . Application of an electro-chemical dissolution model to the observed E CORR values suggests that the fractional dissolution rate of used fuel in the

  6. Simulation of LOF accidents with directly electrical heated UO2 pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexas, A.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior of directly electrical heated UO 2 pins has been investigated under loss of coolant conditions. Two types of hypothetical accidents have been simulated, first, a LOF accident without power excursion (LOF accident) and second, a LOF accident with subsequent power excursion (LOF-TOP accident). A high-speed film shows the sequence of events for two characteristic experiments. In consequence of the high-speed film analysis as well as the metallographical evaluation statements are given in respect to the cladding meltdown process, the fuel melt fraction and the energy input from the beginning of a power transient to the beginning of the molten fuel ejections

  7. Revisiting the diffusion mechanism of helium in UO 2 : A DFT+ U study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.-Y.; Andersson, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of migration properties of helium atoms after their generation through α-decay of actinides in spent nuclear fuels is important for the safety of nuclear fuel storage and disposal. The diffusion of helium in UO 2 is revisited by using the DFT+U simulation methodology employing the “U-ramping” method to address the issue of metastable energy states. A novel diffusion mechanism by helium interstitials, the “asymmetric hop” mechanism, is reported and compared to other diffusion mechanisms including an oxygen vacancy mediated mechanism and available experimental diffusion data. We show that the new mechanism is the dominant one over a wide temperature range.

  8. Revisiting the diffusion mechanism of helium in UO2: A DFT+U study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.-Y.; Andersson, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    The understanding of migration properties of helium atoms after their generation through α-decay of actinides in spent nuclear fuels is important for the safety of nuclear fuel storage and disposal. The diffusion of helium in UO2 is revisited by using the DFT+U simulation methodology employing the "U-ramping" method to address the issue of metastable energy states. A novel diffusion mechanism by helium interstitials, the "asymmetric hop" mechanism, is reported and compared to other diffusion mechanisms including an oxygen vacancy mediated mechanism and available experimental diffusion data. The new mechanism is shown to be the dominant one over a wide temperature range.

  9. Natural analogues to the spent fuel behaviour of radioactive wastes (MATRIX, FASES I y II projects); Analogos naturales de la liberacion y migracion del UO2 y elementos metalicos asociados (Proyecto MATRIX, FASES I y II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villa, L.; Campos, R.; Garralon, A.; Crespo, M. T.; Quejido, J. A.; Cozar, J. S.; Arcos, D.; Bruno, J.; Grive, M.; Domenech, C.; Duro, L.; Ruiz Sanchez-Prro, J.; Marin, F.; Izquierdo, A.; Cattetero, G.; Ortuno, F.; Floria, E.

    2005-07-01

    Uranium ore deposits have been extensively studied as natural analogues to the spent fuel behaviour of radioactive wastes. These investigations constitute an essential element of both national and international research programmes applied to the assessment of HLNW repositories and their interaction with the environment. The U ore deposit of Mina Fe (Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca) is hosted in highly fractured schistose rocks, a geological setting that has not been envisaged in the ENRESA option for nuclear waste disposal. However, the processes occurring at Mina Fe maintain some analogies with those occurring in a HLNW repository: The existence of large U concentrations as pitchblende (UO{sub 2}+x), which is chemically analogous to the main component of spent nuclear fuel, which has an oxidation degree of 2.25 < x < 2.66 as a result of radiolytic oxidation. The solubility behaviour of pitchblende as a result of interaction with groundwaters of varying chemical composition can be used to validate predictive models for spent fuel stability under severe alteration conditions. Some of the weathering products of pitchblende are similar to those that have been identified during the experimental oxidative dissolution of UO{sub 2}, Sim fuel, as well as natural uraninite and pitchblende. This is a subject that has been previously investigated in other research projects. Fe(III)-oxy hydroxides in the oxidised zone of the deposit could be similar to the spent fuel container corrosion products that could be formed under redox transition conditions. These corrosion products may act as radionuclide and trace metal scavengers. (Author)

  10. Onset conditions for flash sintering of UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Alicia M.; Pereira da Silva, João Gustavo; Byler, Darrin D.; Andersson, David A.; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.; McClellan, Kenneth J.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, flash sintering was demonstrated on stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide pellets at temperatures ranging from room temperature (26 °C) up to 600 °C . The onset conditions for flash sintering were determined for three stoichiometries (UO2.00, UO2.08, and UO2.16) and analyzed against an established thermal runaway model. The presence of excess oxygen was found to enhance the flash sintering onset behavior of uranium dioxide, lowering the field required to flash and shortening the time required for a flash to occur. The results from this study highlight the effect of stoichiometry on the flash sintering behavior of uranium dioxide and will serve as the foundation for future studies on this material.

  11. Thermal diffusivity of high burn-up UO2 pellet irradiated at HBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity of high burn-up UO 2 (63 MWd/kgU) irradiated at HBWR was measured from 290 to 1794 K by laser flash method. The thermal diffusivity of high burn-up UO 2 was lower than half that of unirradiated UO 2 at room temperature and the difference between them decreased as the measurement temperature increased. The measurements were repeated three or four times on the same sample, with increasing the maximum measurement temperature. Then, thermal diffusivity gradually increased at low temperature region. It was estimated that this increase of thermal diffusivity was mainly caused by the recovery of radiation damage. The thermal diffusivity data of the samples were separated into two groups. The difference of the thermal diffusivity of these groups was mostly explained by the effect of density difference. The present results on the samples measured after annealing at temperature between 700 and 1300 K were a little smaller than those of SIMFUEL, which chemically simulated the effects of burn-up by adding solid FPs. The relative degradation of thermal conductivity with burn-up estimated from the present data agreed well with that derived from fuel centre temperature measurement by expansion thermometer at HBWR. (author)

  12. The effect of U3O-8 addition on the UO2 pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrati, Y.T.; Syarif, D. G.; Handayani, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of varied U 3 O 8 addition on the UO 2 pellet fabrication is to from 1-3 mu pores. The green pellets, compacted with 3 ton/cm 2 , are a mixture powder of UO 2 , TiO 2 (0.1% weight) and varied U 3 O 8 (0-12.5% weight). The green pellets were presintered by H2 atmosphere. The presintered pellets were put on the ceramic crucibles and than those were put on the SS 316 tube with argon atmosphere. The 1400 o C sintering was hold with the soaking time 3 hr and the same rate of heating and cooling 150 o C/hr. The UO 2 pellet with 5% (weight) U 3 O 8 addition has 95.17% of theoretic density and 548.4 ±6.57 VH. Based on the identification of microstructure of pellet, it is not acceptable for nuclear fuel although pellet has 10.02 mu on grain size and 1.3 mu on closed pore size. By the diffractometer X-ray, crystal structure of pellet is face centered cubic (FCC) with the O/U ratio is 2.08

  13. Ab initio calculation of oxygen self-diffusion coefficient in uranium dioxide UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Boris; Garcia, Philippe; Torrent, Marc

    Uranium dioxide UO2 is the most widely used nuclear fuel worldwide and its atomic transport properties are relevant to practically all engineering aspects of the material. Although transport properties have already been studied in UO2 by means of first-principles calculations, the ab initio determination of self-diffusion coefficients has up to now remained unreachable because the relevant computational tools were neither available or adapted. The present work reports our results related to the ab initio calculation of the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient in UO2. We first determine the Gibbs free energies of formation of oxygen charged defects by calculating both the electronic and vibrational (hence entropic) contributions. Then, we use the transition state theory in order to compute the effective jump frequency of the defects, which in turn provides us with the value of the pre-exponential factor. The results are compared to self-diffusion data obtained experimentally with a careful monitoring of the relevant thermodynamic conditions (oxygen partial pressure, temperature, impurity content).

  14. In-pile vapor pressure measurements on UO2 and (U,Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.; Reil, K.O.

    1985-08-01

    The Effective-Equation-of-State (EEOS) experiments investigated the saturation vapor pressures of ultra pure UO 2 , reactor grade UO 2 , and reactor grade (Usub(.77)Pusub(.23))O2 using newly developed in-pile heating techniques. For enthalpies between 2150 and 3700 kJ/kg (about 4700 to 8500 K) vapor pressures from 1.3 to 54 MPa were measured. The p-h curves of all three fuel types were identical within the experimental uncertainties. An assessment of all published p-h measurements showed that the p-h saturation curve of UO 2 appears now well established by the EEOS and the CEA in-pile data. Using an estimate for the heat capacity of liquid UO 2 , the in-pile results were also compared to earlier p-T measurements. The assessments lead to proposal of two equations. Equation I, which includes a factor-of-2 uncertainty band, covers all p-T equilibrium evaporation measurements. Equation I yields 3817 K for the normal boiling point, 415.4 kJ/mol for the corresponding heat of vaporization, and 1.90 MPa for the vapor pressure at 5000 K. Equations I and II, which represent a parametric form of the p-h curve (T=parameter), also give a good description of the EEOS and CEA in-pile data. Thus the proposed equations allow a consistent representation of both p-T and p-h measurements, they are sufficiently precise for CDA analyses and cover the whole range of interest (3120-8500 K, 1400-3700 kJ/kg). (orig./HP) [de

  15. Thermal performance prediction of UO2 pellet partly containing 9%w tungsten network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwardi

    2008-01-01

    Sintered UO 2 exhibits very stable in reactor core compared to UC, UN, U metal and its alloys. However, its thermal conductivity is very low (2.about.5 W/m K), that limits its performance. UO 2 pellet containing Tungsten network invented by Song improves considerably its conductivity. The paper reports an analysis of thermal performance for UO 2 pellet that contains partly or wholly with 9% b. of Tungsten. The tungsten network having a high melting point and excellent thermal conductivity is continuously formed around UO 2 grains. Since the presence of network decreases the amount of fissile material and the burn up of fissile material is higher in the near surface zone of pellet but high temperature zone that releases low conductivity fission gas to the gap located in inner part of pellet, the analysis has been done for different outer radial-portion of tungsten-free pellet. The analysis takes into account the correction factor for pellet conductivity related to both pore and temperature distribution and high burn up effect. The gap conductance has been considered invariable since decrease caused by wider gap size related to lower pellet expansion is compensated by increase caused by fewer of refractory fission gas released. The results (47 kw/m, 40% burnup) show temperature decrease in all of pellet position containing W network. Pellet containing 9%b. tungsten network lower consecutively its center line temperature from 1578 to 1406, 1292, 1231, 1192, 1111, and 1038 deg C for 0, 50, 67, 75, 80, 90, and 100 % portion of network. An 80 to 90 % portion of inner pellet containing tungsten network can be considered a best fuel design. This preliminary analysis is prospective and more realistic one is recommended. (author)

  16. Determination of U235 enrichment from nuclear fuel by neutronic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.C.M. de.

    1988-01-01

    The enrichment of 235 U in UO 2 pellets samples through the instrumental neutron activation analysis method (I.N.A.A.) was determined. By high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (H.R.G.S.), from analysis of isotopic ratios between fission products peaks from 235 U and 239 Np different energies peaks from 238 U, the enrichment was achieved. The 'Boatstrap' statistics technique for the analytical results, which is based in shaping results of an unknown distribution to the Gaussian distribution by B replications in interested statistics such as: the mean and its standard error, was introduced. (M.J.C.) [pt

  17. Electrochemical Reduction of solid UO2 in Molten Fluoride Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibilaro, Mathieu; Cassayre, Laurent; Massot, Laurent; Chamelot, Pierre; Malmbeck, Rikard; Dugne, Olivier; Allegri, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The direct electrochemical reduction of UO 2 solid pellets was carried out in LiF-CaF 2 (+ 2wt % Li 2 O) at 850 deg. C. An inert gold anode was used instead of the usual reactive sacrificial carbon anode. In this case, reduction of oxide ions yields O 2 gas evolution on the anode. Electrochemical characterisations of UO 2 pellets have been performed by linear sweep voltammetry at 10 mV/s and reduction waves associated to its direct reduction have been observed at a potential 150 mV more positive in comparison with the solvent reduction. Then, galvano-static electrolyses runs have been realised and products were characterised by SEM-EDX, EPMA/WDS and XRD. In one of the runs, uranium oxide was partially reduced and three phases were observed: non reduced UO 2 in the centre, pure metallic uranium on the external layer and an intermediate phase representing the initial stage of reduction taking place at the grain boundaries. In another run, the UO 2 sample was fully reduced. Due to oxygen removal, the U matrix had a typical coral-like structure which is characteristic of the pattern observed after the electroreduction of solid oxides. (authors)

  18. Characterization of Compaction Process on UO2 Powder Pelletisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M; Langenati, R; Saputra, T.T; Mahpudin, A; Histori; Sutarya, D; Zahedi

    1998-01-01

    Determination of compaction pressure of pelletization which is based on density characterization in conjunction with satisfactory green strength of the UO 2 pellet, is carried out in this experiment. Cameco UO 2 powder has been mixed up with Zn-stearate lubricant prior to compaction process. The compaction pressure is varied from the range of 2 Mp up to 6 Mp. The mechanical strength is determined using diametral compression strength with the speed of loading of 0.1 mm.min 1 . The density measurement and compression strength test are performed on each of the applied pressure. The result shows that compaction at 5 Mp gives the maximum green strength of UO 2 pellet, while the maximum density is achieved at 5.7 Mp. The maximum green strength and green density of UO 2 (+ TiO 2 ) pellets is achieved at the addition of 0.25% and 0.125% TiO 2 respectively. The compaction pressure which is showing the maximum pellet green strength but still having the required density, is chosen to be the determinant compaction pressure in condition of pelletization

  19. Solid state reactions of monovalent sulphates with UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandakar, R.R.; Krishnan, K.; Singh Mudher, K.D.; Jayadevan, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    Solid state reactions of sulphates of Na + , K + , Rb + , Cs + and Tl + with UO 2 in presence of (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 lead to the formation of double sulphates at 400degC. The double sulphates decompose at higher temperatures to give metal uranates. Thermogravimetric, x-ray diffraction and chemical analysis have been used to characterise the compounds. (author). 5 refs

  20. Method for fluoride ion depletion of UO2 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutner, R.; Ploeger, F.

    1978-01-01

    The method described consists in removing the hydrogen still present from the reduction during the preparation of UO 2 as completely as possible and in performing a pyrohydrolysis at temperatures above 650 0 C for at least 45 minutes. The removal of fluorine is necessary in order to avoid cladding tube damaging. (UA) [de

  1. Thermodynamic state, specific heat, and enthalpy function of saturated UO2 vapor between 3,000 K and 5,000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1977-02-01

    The properties have been determined by means of statistical mechanics. The discussion of the thermodynamic state includes the evaluation of the plasma state and its contribution to the caloric variables-of-state of saturated oxide fuel vapor. Because of the extremely high ion and electron density due to thermal ionization, the ionized component of the fuel vapor does no more represent a perfect kinetic plasma. At temperatures around 5,000 K, UO 2 vapor reaches the collective plasma state and becomes increasingly 'metallic'. - Moreover, the nonuniform molecular equilibrium composition of UO 2 vapor has been taken into account in calculating its caloric functions-of-state. The contribution to specific heat and enthalpy of thermally excited electronic states of the vapor molecules has been derived by means of a Rydberg orbital model of the UO 2 molecule. The resulting enthalpy functions and specific heats for saturated UO 2 vapor of equilibrium composition and that for pure UO 2 gas are compared with the enthalpy and specific heat data of gaseous UO 2 at lower temperatures known from literature. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Phonon density of states and anharmonicity of UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Judy W. L.; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Larson, Bennett C.; Buyers, William J. L.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2014-03-01

    Phonon density of states (PDOS) measurements have been performed on polycrystalline UO2 at 295 and 1200 K using time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the impact of anharmonicity on the vibrational spectra and to benchmark ab initio PDOS simulations performed on this strongly correlated Mott insulator. Time-of-flight PDOS measurements include anharmonic linewidth broadening, inherently, and the factor of ˜7 enhancement of the oxygen spectrum relative to the uranium component by the increased neutron sensitivity to the oxygen-dominated optical phonon modes. The first-principles simulations of quasiharmonic PDOS spectra were neutron weighted and anharmonicity was introduced in an approximate way by convolution with wave-vector-weighted averages over our previously measured phonon linewidths for UO2, which are provided in numerical form. Comparisons between the PDOS measurements and the simulations show reasonable agreement overall, but they also reveal important areas of disagreement for both high and low temperatures. The discrepancies stem largely from a ˜10 meV compression in the overall bandwidth (energy range) of the oxygen-dominated optical phonons in the simulations. A similar linewidth-convoluted comparison performed with the PDOS spectrum of Dolling et al. obtained by shell-model fitting to their historical phonon dispersion measurements shows excellent agreement with the time-of-flight PDOS measurements reported here. In contrast, we show by comparisons of spectra in linewidth-convoluted form that recent first-principles simulations for UO2 fail to account for the PDOS spectrum determined from the measurements of Dolling et al. These results demonstrate PDOS measurements to be stringent tests for ab inito simulations of phonon physics in UO2 and they indicate further the need for advances in theory to address the lattice dynamics of UO2.

  3. Slave Boson Theory of Orbital Differentiation with Crystal Field Effects: Application to UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Deng, Xiaoyu; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    We derive an exact operatorial reformulation of the rotational invariant slave boson method, and we apply it to describe the orbital differentiation in strongly correlated electron systems starting from first principles. The approach enables us to treat strong electron correlations, spin-orbit coupling, and crystal field splittings on the same footing by exploiting the gauge invariance of the mean-field equations. We apply our theory to the archetypical nuclear fuel UO2 and show that the ground state of this system displays a pronounced orbital differentiation within the 5 f manifold, with Mott-localized Γ8 and extended Γ7 electrons.

  4. Slave Boson Theory of Orbital Differentiation with Crystal Field Effects: Application to UO_{2}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Deng, Xiaoyu; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2017-03-24

    We derive an exact operatorial reformulation of the rotational invariant slave boson method, and we apply it to describe the orbital differentiation in strongly correlated electron systems starting from first principles. The approach enables us to treat strong electron correlations, spin-orbit coupling, and crystal field splittings on the same footing by exploiting the gauge invariance of the mean-field equations. We apply our theory to the archetypical nuclear fuel UO_{2} and show that the ground state of this system displays a pronounced orbital differentiation within the 5f manifold, with Mott-localized Γ_{8} and extended Γ_{7} electrons.

  5. Optimization of a Wcl6 CVD System to Coat UO2 Powder with Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancik, Grace A.; Barnes, Marvin W.; Mireles, Omar; Hickman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve deep space exploration via Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing W-UO2 CERMET fuel elements, with focus on fabrication, testing, and process optimization. A risk of fuel loss is present due to the CTE mismatch between tungsten and UO2 in the W-60vol%UO2 fuel element, leading to high thermal stresses. This fuel loss can be reduced by coating the spherical UO2 particles with tungsten via H2/WCl6 reduction in a fluidized bed CVD system. Since the latest incarnation of the inverted reactor was completed, various minor modifications to the system design were completed, including an inverted frit sublimer. In order to optimize the parameters to achieve the desired tungsten coating thickness, a number of trials using surrogate HfO2 powder were performed. The furnace temperature was varied between 930 C and 1000degC, and the sublimer temperature was varied between 140 C and 200 C. Each trial lasted 73-82 minutes, with one lasting 205 minutes. A total of 13 trials were performed over the course of three months, two of which were re-coatings of previous trials. The powder samples were weighed before and after coating to roughly determine mass gain, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) data was also obtained. Initial mass results indicated that the rate of layer deposition was lower than desired in all of the trials. SEM confirmed that while a uniform coating was obtained, the average coating thickness was 9.1% of the goal. The two re-coating trials did increase the thickness of the tungsten layer, but only to an average 14.3% of the goal. Therefore, the number of CVD runs required to fully coat one batch of material with the current configuration is not feasible for high production rates. Therefore, the system will be modified to operate with a negative pressure environment. This will allow for better gas mixing and more efficient heating of the substrate material, yielding greater tungsten coating per trial.

  6. Fabrication of 0.5-inch diameter FBR mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Benecke, M.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Large diameter (0.535 inch) mixed oxide fuel pellets for Fast Breeder Reactor application were successfully fabricated by the cold-press-and-sinter technique. Enriched UO 2 , PuO 2 -UO 2 , and PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions were fabricated into nominally 90% theoretical density pellets for the UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 compositions, and 88% and 93% T.D. for the PuO 2 -ThO 2 compositions. Some processing adjustments were required to achieve satisfactory pellet quality and density. Furnace heating rate was reduced from 200 to 50 0 C/h for the organic binder burnout cycle for the large, 0.535-inch diameter pellets to eliminate pellet cracking during sintering. Additional preslugging steps and die wall lubrication during pressing were used to eliminate pressing cracks in the PuO 2 -ThO 2 pellets

  7. Reduced enriched fuel status at CERCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissier, A.; Fanjas, Y.

    1991-01-01

    CERCA's main objective is to satisfy its customers, improving quality of its products, and maintaining the costs as low as possible. Its Research and Development program reveals this goal. Different R and D topics under development at short (recycling of scraps), at medium (X-ray imaging machine) and at long term (improvement of fuel materials) are presented as evidence of this will. (orig.)

  8. (Alpha, gamma) irradiation effect on the alteration of high-level radioactive wastes matrices (UO2, hollandite, glass SON68)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the effect of irradiation on the alteration of high level nuclear waste forms matrices. The matrices investigated are UO 2 to simulate the spent fuel, the hollandite for the specific conditioning of Cs, and the inactive glass SON68 representing the nuclear glass R7T7) The alpha irradiation experiments on UO 2 colloids in aqueous carbonate media have enabled to distinguish between the oxidation of UO 2 matrix as initial and dissolution as subsequent step. The simultaneous presence of carbonate and H 2 O 2 (product resulting from water radiolysis) increased the dissolution rate of UO 2 to its maximum value governed by the oxidation rate. ii) The study of hollandite alteration under gamma irradiation confirmed the good retention capacity for Cs and Ba. Gamma irradiation had brought only a little influence on releasing of Cs and Ba in solution. Electronic irradiation had conducted to the amorphization of the hollandite only for a dose 1000 times higher than the auto-induced dose of Ba over millions of years. iii) The experiences of glass irradiation under alpha beam and of helium implantation in the glass SON68 were analyzed by positon annihilation spectroscopy. No effect has been observed on the solid surface for an irradiation dose equal to 1000 years of storage. (author)

  9. Densification behaviour of UO2 in six different atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.; Hegde, P.V.; Khan, K.B.; Basak, U.; Pillai, S.N.; Sengupta, A.K.; Jain, G.C.; Majumdar, S.; Kamath, H.S.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    2002-01-01

    The shrinkage behaviour of UO 2 has been studied using a dilatometer in various atmospheres of Ar, Ar-8%H 2 , vacuum, CO 2 , commercial N 2 and N 2 +1000 ppm of O 2 . The onset of shrinkage occurs at around 300-400 deg. C lower in oxidizing atmospheres such as CO 2 , commercial N 2 and N 2 +1000 ppm O 2 compared to that in reducing or inert atmospheres. Shrinkage behaviour of UO 2 is almost identical in Ar, Ar-8%H 2 and vacuum. The shrinkage in N 2 +1000 ppm O 2 begins at a lower temperature than that in the commercial N 2 . The mechanism of sintering in the reducing, inert and vacuum atmospheres is explained by diffusion of uranium vacancies and that in the oxidizing atmospheres by cluster formation

  10. Binding energy and formation heat of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.R. de; Veado, J.T.; Siqueira, M.L. de

    The Born-Haber cycle is utilized for the calculation of the heat of formation of UO 2 , on the assumption that the binding energy is predominantly ionic in character. The ionization potentials of U and the repulsion energy are two critical values that influence calculations. Calculations of the ionization potentials with non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Gaspar-Kohn-Sham approximation are presented [pt

  11. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, B.M.; Hilborn, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  12. Development of Low Thermal Expansion Tungsten UO 2 Cermet Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M O; Kaznoff, A I

    1970-03-31

    An attempt was made to develop a tungsten-uranium dioxide cermet of high fue 1 loading with thermal expansion approaching that of tungsten and with good dimensional stability on thermal cycling. These goals were sought through the use of tungsten-coated uranium dioxide particles with sufficient locally available void volume to accommodate the difference in thermal expansion between the uranium dioxide and the tungsten matrix and through limitation of plastic deformation in the particles during fabrication to avoid mechanical keying of the particles and the matrix. The particles were vibratorily compacted prior to hot pressing. The thermal expansion of the cermets was determined and they were thermal cycle tested. The thermal expansion of the cermets was considerably closer to that of tungsten than was observed with previously reported specimens of similar composition. However, the thermal cycling of the cermets resulted in intolerable growth. This growth could be accounted for by the agglomeration of gases trapped in the uranium dioxide particles during deposition of the tungsten coating.

  13. Low enrichment fuel conversion for Iowa State University. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullen, D.B.; Wendt, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The UTR-10 research and teaching reactor at Iowa State University (ISU) has been converted from high-enriched fuel (HEU) to low- enriched fuel (LEU) under Grant No. DE-FG702-87ER75360 from the Department of Energy (DOE). The original contract period was August 1, 1987 to July 31, 1989. The contract was extended to February 28, 1991 without additional funding. Because of delays in receiving the LEU fuel and the requirement for disassembly of the HEU assemblies, the contract was renewed first through May 31, 1992, then through May 31, 1993 with additional funding, and then again through July 31, 1994 with no additional funding. In mid-August the BMI cask was delivered to Iowa State. Preparations are underway to ship the HEU fuel when NRC license amendments for the cask are approved

  14. Critical experiments supporting underwater storage of tightly packed configurations of spent fuel pins. Technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Baldwin, M.N.

    1981-04-01

    Critical experiments are in progress on arrays of 2 1/2% enriched UO 2 fuel pins simulating underwater pin storage of spent power reactor fuel. Pin storage refers to a spent fuel storage concept in which the fuel assemblies are dismantled and the fuel pins are tightly packed into specially designed canisters. These experiments are providing benchmark data with which to validate nuclear codes used to design spent fuel pin storage racks

  15. MOX fuel design and development consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamate, K.; Abeta, S.; Suzuki, K.; Doi, S.

    1997-01-01

    Pu thermal utilization in Japan will be realized in several plants in late 1990's, and will be expanded gradually. For this target, adequacy of methods for MOX fuel design, nuclear design, and safety analysis has been evaluated by the committee of competent authorities organized by government in advance of the licensing application. There is no big difference of physical properties and irradiation behaviors between MOX fuel and UO 2 fuel, because Pu content of MOX fuel for Pu thermal utilization is low. The fuel design code for UO 2 fuel will be applied with some modifications, taking into account of characteristic of MOX fuel. For nuclear design, new code system is to be applied to treat the heterogeneity in MOX fuel assembly and the neutron spectrum interaction with UO 2 fuel more accurately. For 1/3 MOX fueled core in three loop plant, it was confirmed that the fuel rod mechanical design could meet the design criteria, with slight reduction of initial back-fitting pressure, and with appropriate fuel loading patterns in the core to match power with UO 2 fuel. With the increase of MOX fuel fraction in the core, control rod worth and boron worth decrease. Compensating the decrease by adding control rod and utilizing enriched B-10 in safety injection system, 100% MOX fueled core could be possible. Up to 1/3 MOX fueled core in three loop plant, no such modifications of the plant is necessary. The fraction of MOX fuel in PWR is designed to less than 1/3 in the present program. In order to improve Pu thermal utilization in future, various R and D program on fuel design and nuclear design are being performed, such as the irradiation program of MOX fuel manufactured through new process to the extent of high burnup. (author). 8 refs, 9 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Simulation of High Burnup Structure in UO2 Using Potts Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae Yong; Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of a high burnup structure (HBS) in a light water reactor (LWR) UO 2 fuel was simulated using the Potts model. A simulation system for the Potts model was defined as a two-dimensional triangular lattice, for which the stored energy was calculated from both the irradiation damage of the UO 2 matrix and the formation of a grain boundary in the newly recrystallized small HBS grains. In the simulation, the evolution probability of the HBS is calculated by the system energy difference between before and after the Monte Carlo simulation step. The simulated local threshold burnup for the HBS formation was 62 MWd/kgU, consistent with the observed threshold burnup range of 60-80 MWd/kgU. The simulation revealed that the HBS was heterogeneously nucleated on the intergranular bubbles in the proximity of the threshold burnup and then additionally on the intragranular bubbles for a burnup above 86 MWd/kgU. In addition, the simulation carried out under a condition of no bubbles indicated that the bubbles played an important role in lowering the threshold burnup for the HBS formation, thereby enabling the HBS to be observed in the burnup range of conventional high burnup fuels

  17. The treatment of large quantities of high fluorin contents UO2 by ammonium double uranate (ADU) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bangwu; Chen Ying

    2010-01-01

    The paper has discussed the sinter action of UO 2 in low temperature. The study indicates the over hot part of UO 2 by the deoxidization hot of oxidation uranate mostly results in the sinter in the process of trans form ADU into UO 2 . The UO 2 settling times in kiln little influences the sinter performance of UO 2 in the same condition of high fluorin contents UO 2 returning kiln, and high fluorin contents UO 2 returning kiln does not sinter UO 2 again. Experiment on large quantities of high fluorin contents UO 2 by Ammonium Double Uranate (ADU) techniques direct returning kiln, the result shows the sinter performance of UO 2 doesn't drop in the process of high fluor in contents UO 2 direct returning kiln, and the performance of UO 2 can meet specification. (authors)

  18. U3O8 and UO2 obtained from ADU (ammonium diuranate) ultrasonically treated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, N.; Sassone, A.; Mendez de Leo, L.; Novara, O.; Ramella, J.

    1996-01-01

    At present, obtention of U 3 O 8 used in the manufacturing of MTR plates nuclear fuels, is performed by hydrolysis of UF6 to obtain uranyl fluoride. Uranyl fluoride is precipitated with ammonium hydroxide to get ammonium polyuranate (ADU). Afterwards ADU is calcinated to U 3 O 8 and mechanical and thermally treated in order to obtain a powder in a determined specification. In the present work, ultrasound has been applied in the stage of precipitation of ADU and for different times in the stage of digestion in order to fasten the stages of ADU filtering and eliminate the U 3 O 8 milling and sieving. Experiences on UO 2 have also been performed. The aspect of ADU changes considerably when they have been ultrasonically treated, its filtering rate is faster and it is easier to dry as it contains less humidity. U 3 O 8 obtained after 800degreeC calcination of treated ADU results in an easy to desagregate powder. Only a soft mechanical treatment is needed to be performed on it before starting thermal treatment at 1400degreeC. After thermal treatment at 1400degreeC treated U 3 O 8 has shown adequate characteristics of size, shape and density (8.2 g/cm 3 ). Regarding UO 2 , the shape of the agglomerates is almost spherical, leading to a free-flowing powder, whose apparent and TAP density showed to be adequate. The characteristics of the different compounds were followed by electron scanning micrographies, X-Rays, specific area measurements and differential thermal analysis. The great advantage of ultrasound appliance is that hard mechanical treatment is avoided in the obtention of U 3 O 8 , saving time and effort. Furthermore, UO 2 proves to be adequate to make pellets, the same precursor could be used in the obtention of both uranium oxides. (author). 5 refs., 6 figs

  19. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  20. Neutron Flux Depression in the UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}(15 to 30%) Fuel Rods from IVO-FR2-Vg7-Irradiation Experiment; Depresion de flujo neutronico en las barras combustibles de UO2-PuO2(15 al 30%) del experimento de irradiacion IVO-FR2-Vg7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J.; Fernandez, J. L.

    1983-07-01

    The thermal-neutron flux depression within a fuel rod has a great influence in the radial temperature profile of the rod, especially for high enrichment fuel. For this reason, a study was made about the UO{sub 2}-PUO{sub 2} (15 to 30% PUO{sub 2}) fuel pins for the KfK-JEN joint irradiation program IVO, in the FR2 reactor. Different methods (diffusion, Bonalumi, successive generations) were compared and a new approach (parabolic approximation) was developed. (Author) 22 refs.

  1. Development for analysis system of rods enrichment of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear industry is strongly regulated all over the world and quality assurance is important in every nuclear installation or process related with it. Nuclear fuel manufacture is not the exception. ININ was committed to manufacture four nuclear fuel bundles for the CFE nucleo electric station at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, under General Electric specifications and fulfilling all the requirements of this industry. One of the quality control requisites in nuclear fuel manufacture deals with the enrichment of the pellets inside the fuel bundle rods. To achieve the quality demanded in this aspect, the system described in this work was developed. With this system, developed at ININ it is possible to detect enrichment spikes since 0.4 % in a column of pellets with a 95 % confidence interval and to identify enrichment differences greater than 0.2 % e between homogeneous segments, also with a 95 % confidence interval. ININ delivered the four nuclear fuel bundles to CFE and these were introduced in the core of the nuclear reactor of Unit 1 in the fifth cycle. Nowadays they are producing energy and have shown a correct mechanical performance and neutronic behavior. (Author)

  2. Determination of UO2 little quantity in UF4 by X-rays diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.I.; Sato, I.M.; Imakuma, K.

    1977-01-01

    In the fluorination process, the final product UF 4 contain different levels of UO 2 as a contaminant. A routine method for quantitative analysis by x-ray diffraction has been developed. Standard curves have been plotted using mixtures of UO 2 /UF 4 with measures of intensity of (III) peak of UO 2 by the step scanning process. The integrated intensity versus UO 2 concentration curves present a linear behavior in the range from 0 to 4%. A good reprodutibility of measuring process has been observed through statistical analysis which permits to determine low fractions of UO 2 in UF 4 with +- 0,08% of accuracy [pt

  3. Long term irradiation of SAP-clad, UO2 fuelled, trefoil bundles in the X-7 organic cooled loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.; Thexton, H.E.; Lew, D.E.; MacDonald, R.D.; Heal, K.G.

    1963-05-01

    An irradiation of experimental fuel bundles of UO 2 clad in Sintered Aluminium Product (SAP) sheaths was performed in the X-7 loop in the NRX Reactor from August to November 1961. The twofold objective of this irradiation was to gain confidence in the use of such a fuel in an organic coolant and to assess the fouling problem associated with a coolant which was as 'clean' as the existing technology could produce. The trefoil bundles successfully underwent an irradiation of 2400 MWD/Tonne U (max.). The maximum sheath temperature was 460 o C in a coolant temperature of about 310 o C. Surface heat fluxes were roughly 100 w/cm 2 . After irradiation a film of about 80 μm thickness was found covering the sheath over fuelled sections. The film was by weight 40% polymerized organic and 60% Fe 3 O 4 . The net effect of the film was to increase the pressure drop across the fuel by 50% and increase the sheath temperature by 60 o C. The SAP sheath showed no effects of irradiation except for small apparent increases in diameter at two out of eighteen planes measured. The appearance of the UO 2 was similar to that of UO 2 irradiated in pressurized water loops at similar heat ratings. (author)

  4. Development program for fuel elements with low enriched uranium for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The results of HTR fuel development taking place at the THTR's can be summarized as follows for the main points of core manufacture coating matrix and fuel emenent manufacture: 1. The well known gel precipitation process was modified for the manufacture of UO 2 cores. 2. The TRISO coating (additional SiC layer between two very dense PyC layers) can be applied with the required quality on an economical 10 kg scale. 3. The particle fracture in the complete fuel element due to manufacture was lowered during the course of the project to below the target values of -6 U/U total. For testing fuel elements, the required irradiation samples were designed in agreement with the reactor constructors, were prepared and the first phase of the irradiation program was successfully completed in the context of the HBK project. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of solid UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    1981-06-01

    New equations for the thermal conductivity of solid UO 2 were derived based upon a nonlinear least squares fit of the data available in the literature. In the development of these equations, consideration was given to their thermodynamic consistency with heat capacity and density and theoretical consistency with enthalpy and heat capacity. Consistent with our previous treatment of enthalpy and heat capacity, 2670 K was selected as the temperature of a phase transition. A nonlinear equation, whose terms represent contributions due to phonons and electrons, was selected for the temperature region below 2670 K. Above 2670 K, the data were fit by a linear equation

  6. Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts Model for Simulating a High Burnup Structure in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jae-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ho

    2008-01-01

    A Potts model, based on the kinetic Monte Carlo method, was originally developed for magnetic domain evolutions, but it was also proposed as a model for a grain growth in polycrystals due to similarities between Potts domain structures and grain structures. It has modeled various microstructural phenomena such as grain growths, a recrystallization, a sintering, and so on. A high burnup structure (HBS) is observed in the periphery of a high burnup UO 2 fuel. Although its formation mechanism is not clearly understood yet, its characteristics are well recognized: The HBS microstructure consists of very small grains and large bubbles instead of original as-sintered grains. A threshold burnup for the HBS is observed at a local burnup 60-80 Gwd/tM, and the threshold temperature is 1000-1200 .deg. C. Concerning a energy stability, the HBS can be created if the system energy of the HBS is lower than that of the original structure in an irradiated UO 2 . In this paper, a Potts model was implemented for simulating the HBS by calculating system energies, and the simulation results were compared with the HBS characteristics mentioned above

  7. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO2) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U VI corrosion product, [UO 2 ] 2+ . As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO 2 ) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U IV → U V → U VI ). At low potentials (≤250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U VI O 2 CO 3 surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  8. NDA (Non Destructive Assay) measurements for isotopic homogeneity of UO2 powder form mechanical blending and results comparison between gamma and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Carlos A.; Rojo, Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    Eight batches of 0.95% UO2 powder, obtained by mechanical blending of 3.5% and 0.711 % UO2 powders, were sampled. From each batch, samples at the top and the bottom from four drums were taken. Each sample was analysed using different measurement systems, two with NaI(Tl) detectors and another two with HPGe detectors. The Mini Multichannel Analyser (MMCA), model GBS 166, and the calculation codes NaIGEM and MEGAU-EM for peak area analysis and enrichment determination were used. For all cases the WinSPEC acquisition code was used. From the statistical analysis of the measurement results it arises that it is possible to determine the homogeneity grade of UO2 powder samples with a lower error than 0.5% for both types of detectors. The performance of the HPGe measurement system is only slightly more precise than the NaI system. (author)

  9. Low-enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Prokofiev, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the fabricability of low-enriched uranium-molybdenum powders, full-size 450 x 60 x 0.5-mm (17.7 x 2.4 x 0.020-in.) fuel zone test plates loaded to 6 g U/cm 3 were produced. U-10 wt.% Mo powders produced by two methods, centrifugal atomization and grinding, were tested. These powders were supplied at no cost to Argonne National Laboratory by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, respectively. Fuel homogeneity indicated that both of the powders produced acceptable fuel plates. Operator skill during loading of the powder into the compacting die and fuel powder morphology were found to be important when striving to achieve homogeneous fuel distribution. Smaller, 94 x 22 x 0.6-mm (3.7 x 0.87 x 0.025-in.) fuel zone, test plates were fabricated using U-10 wt.% Mo foil disks instead of a conventional powder metallurgy compact. Two fuel plates of this type are currently undergoing irradiation in the RERTR-4 high-density fuel experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor. (author)

  10. Irradiation effects in UO2 and CeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Bei; Oaks, Aaron; Kirk, Mark; Yun, Di; Chen, Wei-Ying; Holtzman, Benjamin; Stubbins, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Single crystal CeO 2 , as a surrogate material to UO 2 , was irradiated with 500 keV xenon ions at 800 °C while being observed using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Experimental results show the formation and growth of defect clusters including dislocation loops and cavities as a function of increasing atomic displacement dose. At high dose, the dislocation loop structure evolves into an extended dislocation line structure, which appears to remain stable to the high dose levels examined in this study. A high concentration of cavities was also present in the microstructure. Despite high atomic displacement doses, the specimen remained crystalline to a cumulated dose of 5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2 , which is consistent with the known stability of the fluorite structure under high dose irradiation. Kinetic Monte Carlo calculations show that oxygen mobility is substantially higher in hypo-stoichiometric UO 2 /CeO 2 than hyper-stoichiometric systems. This result is consistent with the ability of irradiation damage to recover even at intermediate irradiation temperatures

  11. Traceable Determination of the Absolute Neutron Emission Yields of UO2F2 Working Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFleur, A.M.; Swinhoe, M.T.; Mayo, D.R.; Sapp, B.A.; Croft, S.; Mayer, R.L.

    2013-06-01

    The nuclear material contained in the process equipment of a uranium enrichment plant (referred to as holdup) is an important component of the overall nuclear material inventory for the plant. Accurate quantification and verification of holdup is needed to improve international safeguards and nuclear material accountancy. This is also needed for criticality safety and waste disposition. Passive neutron and gamma-ray nondestructive assay (NDA) methods are used to measure the holdup in process equipment. A key advantage of neutron measurements is that neutrons are highly penetrating and can be measured through thick walled equipment. The dominant source of neutrons in the UO 2 F 2 holdup is from the 19 F(α, n) 22 Na reaction resulting from 234 U alpha decay when uranium is enriched. There is a considerable spread between different historic determinations of the 19 F(α, n) yield from uranium which limits the accuracy of modeling and the calibration of NDA instruments. Furthermore, the compound form and presence of water also significantly affects the neutron emission rate from the holdup. This paper describes a series of experimental measurements performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to determine the absolute neutron emission yield from 10 different UO 2 F 2 working reference materials (WRMs) fabricated at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The Mini Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (Mini ENMC) and a NIST certified 252 Cf neutron source were used for these measurements. The high efficiency and short die-away time of the Mini ENMC provides the high measurement precision needed to certify the neutron emission yield. The experiment was designed to achieve sub 1% accuracy in the net counting rate on each item and to provide assurance that important factors such as instrument stability, item placement and background were well understood. The traceable neutron yields measured from the WRMs were used to determine a more accurate neutron yield

  12. Evaluation of oxygen-enrichment system for alternative fuel vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.R.; Ng, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents results on the reduction in exhaust emissions achieved by using oxygen-enriched intake air on a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) that used Indolene and M85 as test fuels. The standard federal test procedure (FTP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) off-cycle (REP05) test were followed. The report also provides a review of literature on the oxygen membrane device and design considerations. It presents information on the sources and contributions of cold-phase emissions to the overall exhaust emissions from light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and on the various emission standards and present-day control technologies under consideration. The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FTP and off-cycle emissions are discussed on the basis of test results. Conclusions are drawn from the results and discussion, and different approaches for the practical application of this technology in LDVs are recommended.

  13. Low enriched uranium fuel conversion and fuel shipping guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of reactor core physics and thermal hydraulics was completed in 1993. A supplement to the Final Safety Analysis Report describing the results of these analyses was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission along with proposed Technical Specifications in May, 1993. Discussions with the NRC staff led to a submittal of revised proposed Technical Specifications in February, 1994. The analytical work is complete. A second portion of the grant was to develop a fuel shipping guide for university research reactors. Such a guide was developed and is available for use by the research reactor community

  14. A physical and chemical analysis of fast quenched particles of UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Beong Tae; Song, Jin Ho; Park, Yang Soon; Kim, Jong Gu

    2006-11-01

    An interaction between molten fuel of a nuclear reactor, which is called corium and mainly consisted of UO 2 and ZrO 2, and sub-cooled water may result in a steam explosion. It is one of the outstanding reactor safety issues. To investigate the fundamental mechanism behind the recent experimental observation that the composition of the material highly affected the strength of the steam explosion, a physical and chemical analysis for the fast quenched particles of UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixture at different compositions was performed. Six cases were selected for the study, in which the melt composition was changed, while other initial and boundary conditions of the molten fuel and water interaction tests were maintained the same. It was observed that the cases at eutectic composition resulted in a spontaneous steam explosion, while the cases at non-eutectic composition did not result in a spontaneous steam explosion. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was performed for fast quenched particles along a cross-section. Results demonstrated that the UO 2 and ZrO 2 mixtures formed a solid solution of U 1- xZr xO 2. The mechanism for the hydrogen generation during the molten material and water interaction was examined by thermogravity analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hydrogen reduction analysis. It was demonstrated that the hydrogen generation was not directly related to the oxidation of UO 2. Morphologies observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the particles from the eutectic mixture had many holes, while the particles at non-eutectic mixture did not. The existence of mush phase for the non-eutectic mixture is suggested to be the reason for the non-explosive nature.

  15. Delayed Fission Product Gamma-Ray Transmission Through Low Enriched UO2 Fuel Pin Lattices in Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumbull, TH [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2004-10-18

    The transmission of delayed fission-product gamma rays through various arrangements of low-enriched UO2 fuel pin lattices in an air medium was studied. Experimental measurements, point-kernel and Monte Carlo photon transport calculations were performed to demonstrate the shielding effect of ordered lattices of fuel pins on the resulting gamma-ray dose to a detector outside the lattice. The variation of the gamma-ray dose on the outside of the lattice as a function of radial position, the so-called “channeling” effect, was analyzed. Techniques for performing experimental measurements and data reduction at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Reactor Critical Facility (RCF) were derived. An experimental apparatus was constructed to hold the arrangements of fuel pins for the measurements. A gamma-ray spectroscopy system consisting of a sodium-iodide scintillation detector was used to collect data. Measurements were made with and without a collimator installed. A point-kernel transport code was developed to map the radial dependence of the gamma-ray flux. Input files for the Monte Carlo code, MCNP, were also developed to accurately model the experimental measurements. The results of the calculations were compared to the experimental measurements. In order to determine the delayed fission-product gamma-ray source for the calculations, a technique was developed using a previously written code, DELBG and the reactor state-point data obtained during the experimental measurements. Calculations were performed demonstrating the effects of material homogenization on the gamma-ray transmission through the fuel pin lattice.Homogeneous and heterogeneous calculations were performed for all RCF fuel pin lattices as well as for a typical commercial pressurized water reactor fuel bundle. The results of the study demonstrated the effectiveness of the experimental measurements to isolate the channeling effect of delayed fission-product gamma-rays through lattices of RCF fuel pins

  16. Oxidation of UO2 at 400 to 1000 degrees C in air and its relevance to fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, D.R.

    1985-07-01

    Currently there is great interest in the behaviour of UO 2 under oxidizing conditions because irradiated uranium dioxide fuel can conceivably be exposed to a hot oxidizing atmosphere as a result of accidents. The temperature range covered in this paper is 400 to 1000 degrees C. At these high temperatures, UO 2 in air can oxidize rapidly to U 3 O 8 via U 3 O 7 and/or U 4 O 9 . The accompanying volume increase and corresponding stresses lead to fragmentation of the fuel pellets. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dependence of UO 2 oxidation on temperature, rate of air supply and residence time at temperature; to determine the rate controlling steps and rate of oxygen penetration; and to characterize the oxidation products and size of fragments. In addition, detailed metallography was related to X-ray diffraction studies of the oxidized UO 2 to facilitate future study of irradiated fuel, which is easier to do by metallography in hot-cells than by X-ray diffraction. Samples were heated in argon, then once at temperature they were exposed to air at a controlled flow-rate. Studies of the oxidation of unirradiated UO 2 pellets in air show two distinct types of oxidation with a change in mechanism at 600-700 degrees C. At temperatures ≤ 600 degrees C fragmentation accompanies the formation of U 3 O 8 while at T ≥ 800 degrees C, rapid grain growth occurs. In the first temperature region, volatile fission product releases are small, while in the second region, 100% release can be correlated with U 3 O 8 formation. In the first region, only the grain boundary inventory is released while in the other, 100% of the Xe, Kr, Ru, Sb, Cs and I are released. It appears that, within the error of present measurements, burnup does not affect rates of fission product release and oxidation in air at 400 to 1000 degrees C, so that oxidation rate data gathered using unirradiated pellets can be applied to irradiated fuel. 33 refs

  17. Behaviour of (Th, U)O2 microspheres under compression tests and pelletization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.A.N.

    1982-12-01

    The interrelation between the behaviour of isolated microspheres in compression tests and the microstructure of sintered pellets obtained with these microspheres, was investigated. Various batches of (Th, 5 w/o U)O 2 microspheres were produced applying the so-called gel process. The production parameters were diversified both as to the composition and to the heat treatments. The resulting products underwent compression tests in an universal tension and compression machine as single microspheres and, as bulk material, were compacted and sintered. The results of the compression tests revealed the existence of two distinct classes of fragmentation behaviour. Each of these classes causes a distinct behaviour during the pelletization, too, resulting in fuel pellets with quite different microstructures. It was evidenced that there is a relationship between these differences in the microstructure and the behaviour of the single microspheres in the compression test. (Author) [pt

  18. Fabrication, characteristics, and in-pile performance of UO2 pellets prepared from dry route powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chotard, A.; Ledac, A.; Bernardin, M.

    1991-01-01

    The dry route conversion process of UF 6 to sinterable UO 2 powder has been used in France on a large scale for more than 10 years for the fabrication of PWR fuels. Thus, our fabrication and irradiation experience relates to more than 10,000 tons of fuel. As everyone knows, the dry route conversion process only involves gas-gas and gas-solid reactions which present the advantage of producing very little contaminated wastes and no liquid effluents. Powders obtained by this process are characterized by: - a very high purity, - a low specific surface area (around 2 m 2 /g), therefore a high resistance to spontaneous oxidation, - a good compressibility, - a very high sinterability (.98% T.D.), - a very high reproducibility. This powder also shows a high fineness which leads to very homogeneous blends with additives like pore former, U 3 O 8 or Gd 2 O 3 . On the other hand this fineness requires a granulation step which is actually not a disadvantage since it allows to adjust the granulate size to optimize the filling of press dies and so as to guarantee a good stability of the pellet dimensions and density. This pelletizing process leads to pellets characterized by: - a good thermal stability (0.5% T.D. after 34 hours at 1700degC), - no open porosity, - low H 2 content (0,3 ppm), - an homogeneous microstructure (grain size and porosity). Such characteristics mean that the UO 2 pellets from dry route conversion present an excellent in pile behaviour for high burnup up to 58,000 MWd/MtU in commercial plant, with: - low fission gas release, - good dimensional stability (densification, swelling), of which examples and results of PIE are described in the paper. The qualities of the dry route conversion powder and its flexibility of use make it possible to consider adjustment of the pellet characteristics, mainly: density, grain size and pore size distribution for specific uses or performance upgrade. (orig.)

  19. Photochemical assessment of UO2+2 complexation in Triton X-100 micellar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Ganguly, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report on the spectral characteristics of UO 2 +2 in the excited state in the Triton X-100 micellar medium. The downward curving of the Stern-Volmer plot explains the two kinds of populations of UO 2 +2 upon micellization. A blue shift of the quenched emission is ascribed due to the collisional encounter of UO 2 +2 with the head groups of Triton X-100. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs

  20. Remote Handling Devices for Disposition of Enriched Uranium Reactor Fuel Using Melt-Dilute Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckendorn, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    Remote handling equipment is required to achieve the processing of highly radioactive, post reactor, fuel for the melt-dilute process, which will convert high enrichment uranium fuel elements into lower enrichment forms for subsequent disposal. The melt-dilute process combines highly radioactive enriched uranium fuel elements with deleted uranium and aluminum for inductive melting and inductive stirring steps that produce a stable aluminum/uranium ingot of low enrichment

  1. Minimization of waste from uranium purification, enrichment and fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-10-01

    As any industry, nuclear industry generates a diverse range of waste which has to be managed in a safe manner to be acceptable to the public and the environment. The cost of waste management, the risks to the public and employees, and the detriment to the environment are dependent on the quantity and radioactive content of the waste generated. Waste minimization is a necessary activity needed to reduce the impact from nuclear fuel cycle operations and it is included in the national policy of some countries. In recognition of the importance of the subject, the IAEA has decided to review the current status of the work aimed at waste minimization in the nuclear fuel cycle. The waste minimization issues related to the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle are covered in Technical Reports Series No. 377 'Minimization of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Power Plants and the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle' published in 1995. The present report deals with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle, including existing options, approaches, developments and some specific considerations to be taken into account in decision making on waste minimization. It has been recognized that, in comparison with the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, much less information is available, and this report should be considered as a first attempt to analyse waste minimization practices and opportunities in uranium purification, conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication. Although mining and milling is an important part of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle, these activities are excluded from consideration since relevant activities are covered in other IAEA publications

  2. Pressing-sintering process of UO2 pellet of controllable microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhiming; Peng Qingshan

    1999-11-01

    The authors present the pressability and sinterability of two different matrix UO 2 powders from Ammonium Diuranate (ADU) process and the improvements by adding different quantities of additives. A focal point is made in the effect of the additives on the density, thermal stability and microstructure of UO 2 pellet. It is indicated by the results that a UO 2 pellet being of proper density, good thermal stability and better microstructure can be produced using of high sinterable UO 2 powder ex ADU, adding a certain quantity of pore former through calculation under conditions of high green density and high sintering temperature

  3. Preliminary study of determination of UO2 grain size using X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyana, T.; Sambodo, G. D.; Juanda, D.; Fatchatul, B.

    1998-01-01

    The determination of UO 2 grain size has accomplished using x-ray diffraction method. The UO 2 powder is obtained from sol-gel process. A copper target as radiation source in the x-ray diffractometer was used in this experiment with CμKα characteristic wavelength 1.54433 Angstrom. The result indicate that the UO 2 mean grain size on presintered (temperature 800 o C) has the value 456.8500 Angstrom and the UO 2 mean grain size on sintered (temperature 1700 o C) has value 651.4934 Angstrom

  4. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    The appendixes present the calculations that were used to derive the release factors discussed for each fuel cycle facility in Volume I. Appendix A presents release factor calculations for a surface mine, underground mine, milling facility, conversion facility, diffusion enrichment facility, fuel fabrication facility, PWR, BWR, and reprocessing facility. Appendix B contains additional release factors calculated for a BWR, PWR, and a reprocessing facility. Appendix C presents release factors for a UO 2 fuel fabrication facility

  5. Analysis of the performance of fuel cells PWR with a single enrichment and radial distribution of enrichments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, S.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Alonso, G.; Del Valle, E.; Xolocostli M, J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main challenges in the design of fuel assemblies is the efficient use of uranium achieving burnt homogeneous of the fuel rods as well as the burnt maximum possible of the same ones to the unload. In the case of the assemblies type PWR has been decided actually for fuel assemblies with a single radial enrichment. The present work has like effect to show the because of this decision, reason why a comparison of the neutronic performance of two fuel cells takes place with the same enrichment average but one of them with radial distribution of enrichment and the other with a single enrichment equal to the average. The results shown in the present study of the behavior of the neutron flow as well as the power distribution through of assembly sustain the because of a single radial enrichment. (Author)

  6. Kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The effects of using different low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density, on the kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Simulations were carried out to calculate prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed-neutron fraction, core excess reactivity and neutron flux spectrum. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were used to carry out these calculations. It was observed that both the silicide fuels had the same prompt neutron generation time 0.02% more than that of the original aluminide fuel, while the oxide fuel had a prompt neutron generation time 0.05% less than that of the original aluminide fuel. The effective delayed-neutron fraction decreased for all the fuels; the decrease was maximum at 0.06% for U 3 Si 2 -Al followed by 0.03% for U 3 Si-Al, and 0.01% for U 3 O 8 -Al fuel. The U 3 O 8 -Al fueled reactor gave the maximum ρ excess at BOL which was 21.67% more than the original fuel followed by U 3 Si-Al which was 2.55% more, while that of U 3 Si 2 -Al was 2.50% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The neutron flux of all the fuels was more thermalized, than in the original fuel, in the active fuel region of the core. The thermalization was maximum for U 3 O 8 -Al followed by U 3 Si-Al and then U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel.

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A.; Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A.; Elbardouni, T.; Elkhoukhi, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO 2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 ± 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO 2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO 2 lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the error to decrease when the

  8. Cation interdiffusion in the UO2 - (U, Pu)O2 and UO2 - PuO2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leme, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The interdiffusion of U and Pu ions in UO sub(2 +- x) - (U sub(0,83) Pu sub(0,17))O sub(2 + - x) and UO sub(2 + - x) -PuO sub(2 - x) sintered pellets and UO sub(2 +- x) -(U sub(0,82) Pu sub(0,18))O sub(2 + - x) single crystals has been studied as a function of the oxygen potential ΔG sup(-) (O 2 ) or the stoichiometric ratio O/M. The diffusion profiles of UO 2 /(U,Pu)O 2 and UO 2 /PuO 2 couples of different O/M ratios have been measured using high resolution α-spectrometer and microprobe. Thermal annealing of the specimens was performed in controlled atmospheres using either CO-CO 2 gas mixtures for constant O/M ratios or purified argon. The interdiffusion profiles have been analysed by means of the Boltzmann-Matano and Hall methods. The interdiffusion coefficient D sus(approx.) increases with increasing Pu content in sintered pellets (up to 17 wt. %PuO 2 ) showing a strong dependence of D sup(approx.) on the O/M ratio. The micropobe results show that the interdiffusion along grain boundaries is the main diffusion mechanism in the pellets. Experiments have also been carried out in single cristals to measure just the bulk-interdiffusion and avoiding effects due to grain boundaries. A marked dependence of D sup(approx.) on O/M ratio or on oxygen potential ΔG sup(-) (O 2 ), similar to the dependence already reported for self diffusion by means of radioactive tracers, has also been observed. (Author) [pt

  9. KARAKTERISASI LAPISAN PENYERAP DAPAT BAKAR PADA PERMUKAAN PELET UO2 + DOPAN TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkono Sungkono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK KARAKTERISASI LAPISAN PENYERAP DAPAT BAKAR PADA PERMUKAAN PELET UO2 + DOPAN TiO2. Lapisan penyerap dapat bakar pada permukaan pelet UO2 + dopan TiO2 telah berhasil dibuat dengan menggunakan mertoda RF sputtering. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendapatkan karakter mikrostruktur pelet UO2 + dopan, ketebalan, kekerasan mikro, komposisi kimia dan struktur kristal lapisan penyerap dapat bakar pada permukaan pelet UO2.  Penentuan mikrostruktur dan ketebalan lapisan dilakukan dengan menggunakan mikroskop optik, kekerasan lapisan dengan metode kekerasan mikro Vickers, komposisi kimia dengan spektrometri XRF dan struktur kristal dengan difraksi sinar-X. Hasil penelitian menunjukan bahwa semakin besar kandungan TiO2 dalam pelet maka semakin besar ukuran butir dalam mikrostruktur pelet dan semakin tebal lapisan yang terbentuk pada permukaan pelet UO2. Kekerasan lapisan permukaan pelet UO2 + dopan TiO2 sinter relatif sama dan tidak bergantung pada konsentrasi dopan TiO2. Lapisan permukaan pelet UO2 + 0,3 % TiO2, pelet UO2 + 0,5 % TiO2 dan pelet UO2 + 0,7 % TiO2 sinter mengandung unsur zirkonium masing-masing 1,97 mg, 2,47 mg dan 4,81 mg. Lapisan penyerap dapat bakar pada permukaan pelet UO2 + dopan TiO2 sinter mempunyai fasa ZrB2 dengan struktur kristal heksagonal. Kata Kunci: lapisan permukaan, penyerap dapat bakar, pelet UO2, mikrostruktur, kekerasan, komposisi kimia, struktur kristal. ABSTRACT CHARACTERIZATION OF BURNABLE ABSORBER LAYER ON THE SURFACE OF UO2 + DOPED TiO2 PELLETS. Burnable absorber layer on the surface of UO2 + doped TiO2 pellets have successfully created using RF sputtering methods. The objective of this research is to obtain of microstructure characters of UO2 + doped TiO2 pellets, thickness, micro hardness, chemical composition and crystal structure of burnable absorber layer on the surface of UO2 pellets. The methods used are the microstructure and layer thickness using optical microscopy, layer hardness with micro Vickers

  10. Neutronic analysis of a fuel element with variations in fuel enrichment and burnable poison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Martins, Felipe; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the goal was to evaluate the neutronic behavior during the fuel burnup changing the amount of burnable poison and fuel enrichment. For these analyses, it was used a 17 x 17 PWR fuel element, simulated using the 238 groups library cross-section collapsed from ENDF/BVII.0 and TRITON module of SCALE 6.0 code system. The results confirmed the effective action of the burnable poison in the criticality control, especially at Beginning Of Cycle (BOC) and in the burnup kinetics, because at the end of the fuel cycle there was a minimal residual amount of neutron absorbers ({sup 155}Gd and {sup 157}Gd), as expected. At the end of the cycle, the fuel element was still critical in all simulated situations, indicating the possibility of extending the fuel burn. (author)

  11. High-precision molecular dynamics simulation of UO2–PuO2: Anion self-diffusion in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potashnikov, S.I.; Boyarchenkov, A.S.; Nekrasov, K.A.; Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We perform MD simulation of oxygen diffusion in UO2 (up to 50 000 ions and 1 μs time). ► We reached 1400 K and 10 −12 cm 2 /sec, which allowed direct comparison to experiments. ► S-shaped T-dependence of activation energy and λ-peak of its derivative were obtained. ► Continual superionic phase transition (rather than first or second order) was proved. ► Activation energy of exchange diffusion equals anti-Frenkel defect formation energy. -- Abstract: Our series of articles is devoted to high-precision molecular dynamics simulation of mixed actinide-oxide (MOX) fuel in the approximation of rigid ions and pair interactions (RIPI) using high-performance graphics processors (GPU). In this article we study self-diffusion mechanisms of oxygen anions in uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) with the 10 recent and widely used sets of interatomic pair potentials (SPP) under periodic (PBC) and isolated (IBC) boundary conditions. Wide range of measured diffusion coefficients (from 10 −3 cm 2 /s at melting point down to 10 −12 cm 2 /s at 1400 K) made possible a direct comparison (without extrapolation) of the simulation results with the experimental data, which have been known only at low temperatures (T < 1500 K). A highly detailed (with the temperature step of 1 K) calculation of the diffusion coefficient allowed us to plot temperature dependences of the diffusion activation energy and its derivative, both of which show a wide (∼1000 K) superionic transition region confirming the broad λ-peaks of heat capacity obtained by us earlier. It is shown that regardless of SPP the anion self-diffusion in model crystals without surface or artificially embedded defects goes on via exchange mechanism, rather than interstitial or vacancy mechanisms suggested by the previous works. The activation energy of exchange diffusion turned out to coincide with the anti-Frenkel defect formation energy calculated by the lattice statics

  12. The low enriched uranium fuel cycle in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.

    1979-02-01

    Six fuel-cycle strategies for use in CANDU reactors are examined in terms of their uranium-conserving properties and their ease of commercialization for three assumed growth rates of installed nuclear capacity in Ontario. The fuel cycle strategies considered assume the continued use of the natural uranium cycle up to the mid-1990's. At that time, the low-enriched uranium (LEU) cycle is gradually introduced into the existing power generation grid. In the mid-2020's one of four advanced cycles is introduced. The advanced cycles considered are: mixed oxide, intermediate burn-up thorium (Pu topping), intermediate burn-up thorium (U topping), and LMFBR. For comparison purposes an all natural uranium strategy and a natural uranium-LEU strategy (with no advanced cycle) are also included. None of the strategies emerges as a clear, overall best choice. (LL)

  13. Inhibition of radiation induced dissolution of UO2 by sulfide - A comparison with the hydrogen effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Barreiro Fidalgo, Alexandre; Sundin, Sara; Jonsson, Mats

    2013-03-01

    In this work we have studied the influence of H2S on radiation induced dissolution of spent nuclear fuel using simple model systems. The reaction between H2O2 and H2S/HS- has been studied experimentally as well as the effect of H2S/HS- on γ-radiation induced dissolution of a UO2 pellet. The experiments clearly show that the reaction of H2O2 and H2S/HS- is fairly rapid and that H2O2 and H2S/HS- stoichiometry is favorable for inhibition. Radiolysis experiments show that H2S/HS- can effectively protect UO2 from oxidative dissolution. The effect depends on sulfide concentration in combination with dose rate. Autoclave experiments were also conducted to study the role of H2S/HS- in the reduction of U(VI) in the presence and absence of H2 and Pd particles in anoxic aqueous solution. The aqueous solutions were pressurized with H2 or N2 and two different concentrations of H2S/HS- were used in the presence and absence of Pd. No catalytic effect of Pd on the U(VI) reduction by H2S/HS- could be found in N2 atmosphere. U(VI) reduction was found to be proportional to H2S/HS- concentration in H2 and N2 atmosphere. It is clearly shown the Pd catalyzed H2 effect is more powerful than the effect of H2S/HS-. H2S/HS- poisoning of the Pd catalyst is not observed under the present conditions.

  14. Thermal ionization and plasma state of high temperature vapor of UO2, Cs, and Na: Effect on the heat and radiation transport properties of the vapor phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the question how far the thermophysical state and the convective and radiative heat transport properties of vaporized reactor core materials are affected by the thermal ionization existing in the actual vapor state. The materials under consideration here are: nuclear oxide fuel (UO 2 ), Na (as the LMFBR coolant material), and Cs (alkaline fission product, partly retained in the fuel of the core zone). (orig./RW) [de

  15. Radiolysis and corrosion of Pu-doped UO2 pellets in chloride brine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Radiolysis and corrosion of. 238. Pu-doped UO2 pellets in chloride brine. M KELM* and E BOHNERT. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung, Postfach. 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany e-mail: kelm@ine.f3k.de. Abstract. Deaerated 5 M NaCl solution is irradiated in the presence of UO2 pellets.

  16. Physicochemical study of UO2SO3·3H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatov, V.A.; Serezhkina, L.B.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal stability of UO 2 SO 3 x3H 2 O is studied and its crystallographical characteristics are determined. The UO 2 SO 3 xnH 2 O IR spectra (n=3 or 4, 5) are discussed. An assumption concerning the structure of uranyl sulfite hydrates and their affiliation to the crystal chemical group AT 3 M 2 1 is stated

  17. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  18. Equation of state for L.M.F.B.R. fuel (measurement of fission gas release during transients)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combette, P.; Barthelemy, P.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of fuel (UO 2 or UPuO 2 ) can be heated by fission in a heating transient up to energy deposition 4000 j/g, in the Silene reactor. The Kistler type capsule, the calorimeter device and the radiochemical analysis of fission products enable the pressure pulse and the fuel energy deposition to be measured. So, the relationship between the fuel vapour pressure and the fuel specific energy can be deduced. Peaks pressure (about 1 MPa) coming from fresh UO 2 vaporization, have been measured on a 7 milliseconds time scale. There is a good agreement with the E.O.S. for fresh UO 2 , which is well known for low pressure (1 MPa). Numerous tests have been done with 93% enriched UO 2 and a first test with highly active fuel containing plutonium (15 at %) has been performed. The capsule allows the released gas coming from the irradiated fuel to be retained for measurements and analysis. To investigate the mode of fuel disruption, in-pile fission-heated fuel pellets has been recorded by high speed cinematography

  19. Research reactor core conversion from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this document has been prepared to assist reactor operators in determining whether conversion to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel designs is technically feasible for their specific reactor, and to assist in making a smooth transition to the use of LEU fuel designs where appropriate

  20. Ion chromatographic determination of fluoride and chloride in UO2 using microbore anion exchange columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Meena, D.L.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    Chemical characterization of nuclear fuels is required to ensure that nuclear fuel meets the technical specifications of the fuel. Trace non- metallic impurities like Cl and F is important as they affect clad corrosion. Their effect is more severe in presence of moisture. Chlorine and Fluorine is routinely analysed by ion selective electrode or conventional ion chromatography after pyrohydrolyzing the sample in moist O 2 atmosphere at 950°. Both the technique generates large quantity of liquid waste. Generally 1 ml/min flow rate required for the separation of F - and Cl - in conventional ion-chromatographic separation of F - and Cl - on 4.6- 4.0 mm id analytical column. The waste produced per sample injection is ∼ 30-40 ml with suppressed conductivity detection in ion chromatography. There is a need to reduce this analytical waste in analyzing the radioactive samples for the determination of F - and Cl - . Waste generation could be effectively reduced by using microbore anion exchange analytical column. Present paper describe the use of Metrosep A Supp 16 - 100/2.0 column with Na 2 CO 3 +NaOH mobile phase for the determination of F - and Cl - in UO 2 samples using suppressed conductivity detection

  1. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  2. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF 6 . UF 6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF 6 is converted into UO 2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ''too-cheap to meter'' is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  3. Characterisation and compaction behaviour of UO2 powder prepared from ADU and AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachmawati, M.

    2000-01-01

    UO 2 powder prepared from ADU and AUC route process are characterised primarily in terms of compaction and sintering behaviour. Scientific understanding of the phenomena will give useful information leading to processing and product improvement. The investigation has been done by characterising the particle size/shape distribution using SEM and compacting the powder at 4 and 5.4 tons/cm 2 . The behaviour of the powder under compaction is observed by characterizing the pellet length, green density, microstructure, and the compression strength using micrometer SEM, and Universal Testing Machine. The results of the experiment show that the UO 2 powder ex-AUC has particles of spherical type and separate individually which provide the flowable characteristic, important for the die filling aspect during compaction step. The UO 2 powder ex-ADU is more or less agglomerated and contains very fine particles causing the difficulty in pressing. Therefore the green density resulted from UO 2 ex-AUC (6.415 g/cm 3 ) is higher than UO 2 powder of UO 2 ex-ADU (6.117 g/cm 3 . UO 2 at lower pressure (4 tons/cm 3 ) the compression strength ex-AUC green pellet (47.144 kgf) is lower than UO 2 ex-ADU (63,364 kgf), and at higher temperature the compression strength of ex-AUC (92.86 kgf) is higher than UO 2 ex-ADU (82.664 kgf). It is suggested that UO 2 ex-ADU has to be precompacted and granulated in order to increase its flowability so that the pellet length can easily be controlled during pressing (improve reproducibility). (author)

  4. The Surface Reactions of Ethanol over UO2(100) Thin Film

    KAUST Repository

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-10-08

    The study of the reactions of oxygenates on well-defined oxide surfaces is important for the fundamental understanding of heterogeneous chemical pathways that are influenced by atomic geometry, electronic structure and chemical composition. In this work, an ordered uranium oxide thin film surface terminated in the (100) orientation is prepared on a LaAlO3 substrate and studied for its reactivity with a C-2 oxygenate, ethanol (CH3CH2OH). With the use of synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have probed the adsorption and desorption processes observed in the valence band, C1s, O1s and U4f to investigate the bonding mode, surface composition, electronic structure and probable chemical changes to the stoichiometric-UO2(100) [smooth-UO2(100)] and Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) [rough-UO2(100)] surfaces. Unlike UO2(111) single crystal and UO2 thin film, Ar-ion sputtering of this UO2(100) did not result in noticeable reduction of U cations. The ethanol molecule has C-C, C-H, C-O and O-H bonds, and readily donates the hydroxyl H while interacting strongly with the UO2 surfaces. Upon ethanol adsorption (saturation occurred at 0.5 ML), only ethoxy (CH3CH2O-) species is formed on smooth-UO2(100) whereas initially formed ethoxy species are partially oxidized to surface acetate (CH3COO-) on the Ar+-sputtered UO2(100) surface. All ethoxy and acetate species are removed from the surface between 600 and 700 K.

  5. Assessment of Neutronic Characteristics of Accident-Tolerant Fuel and Claddings for CANDU Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Younan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate accident-tolerant fuel (ATF concepts being considered for CANDU reactors. Several concepts, including uranium dioxide/silicon carbide (UO2-SiC composite fuel, dense fuels, microencapsulated fuels, and ATF cladding, were modelled in Serpent 2 to obtain reactor physics parameters, including important feedback parameters such as coolant void reactivity and fuel temperature coefficient. In addition, fuel heat transfer was modelled, and a simple accident model was tested on several ATF cases to compare with UO2. Overall, several concepts would require enrichment of uranium to avoid significant burnup penalties, particularly uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo and fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM fuels. In addition, none of the fuel types have a significant advantage over UO2 in terms of overall accident response or coping time, though U-9Mo fuel melts significantly sooner due to its low melting point. Instead, the different ATF concepts appear to have more modest advantages, such as reduced fission product release upon cladding failure, or reduced hydrogen generation, though a proper risk assessment would be required to determine the magnitude of these advantages to weigh against economic disadvantages. The use of uranium nitride (UN enriched in N15 would increase exit burnup for natural uranium, providing a possible economic advantage depending on fuel manufacturing costs.

  6. The sintering blocking mechanism on the UO2-GD2O3 system. Part 1: the hypothesis of diffusion barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Riella, H.G.; Leal Neto, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The direct incorporation of gadolinium into nuclear power reactor fuel is important to the reactivity compensation and adjustment of power distribution thus enabling longer fuel cycles and optimized fuel utilization. Dry mechanical blending of Gd 2 O 3 and UO 2 powders is commercially the most attractive process route due to its simplicity. Nevertheless, processing by this route leads to difficulties in getting sintered pellets with the minimum required density due to a sintering blocking mechanism. Regarding this, there s little published information and the explanations are focused on the formation of a low diffusivity Gd-rich (U, Gd)O 2 phase during sintering process which decreases pellets density. An attempt to understand the mechanism for this effect was done in this work. Experimental evidences indicated the existence of phases in the (U, Gd)O 2 system with structure different from the fluorite-type UO 2 structure. These new phases were found for Gd molar fractions higher than 0,5, which coincide with the lowering of both the sintered density and the interdiffusion coefficient. However, it has been also shown that these new phases cannot be itself the cause for the density decrease observed. (author)

  7. Analysis of the effect of UO2 high burnup microstructure on fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernkvist, Lars Olof; Massih, Ali

    2002-10-01

    This report deals with high-burnup phenomena with relevance to fission gas release from UO 2 nuclear fuel. In particular, we study how the fission gas release is affected by local buildup of fissile plutonium isotopes and fission products at the fuel pellet periphery, with subsequent formation of a characteristic high-burnup rim zone micro-structure. An important aspect of these high-burnup effects is the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity, for which prevalent models are analysed and compared with respect to their theoretical bases and supporting experimental data. Moreover, the Halden IFA-429/519.9 high-burnup experiment is analysed by use of the FRAPCON3 computer code, into which modified and extended models for fission gas release are introduced. These models account for the change in Xe/Kr-ratio of produced and released fission gas with respect to time and space. In addition, several alternative correlations for fuel thermal conductivity are implemented, and their impact on calculated fission gas release is studied. The calculated fission gas release fraction in IFA-429/519.9 strongly depends on what correlation is used for the fuel thermal conductivity, since thermal release dominates over athermal release in this particular experiment. The conducted calculations show that athermal release processes account for less than 10% of the total gas release. However, athermal release from the fuel pellet rim zone is presumably underestimated by our models. This conclusion is corroborated by comparisons between measured and calculated Xe/Kr-ratios of the released fission gas

  8. Preliminary study of the economics of enriching PWR fuel with a fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.

    1978-09-01

    This study is a comparison of the economics of enriching uranium oxide for pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant fuel using a fusion hybrid reactor versus the present isotopic enrichment process. The conclusion is that privately owned hybrid fusion reactors, which simultaneously produce electrical power and enrich fuel, are competitive with the gaseous diffusion enrichment process if spent PWR fuel rods are reenriched without refabrication. Analysis of irradiation damage effects should be performed to determine if the fuel rod cladding can withstand the additional irradiation in the hybrid and second PWR power cycle. The cost competitiveness shown by this initial study clearly justifies further investigations

  9. Adsorptive recovery of UO2(2+) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Huang, Xin; Liao, Xue-pin; Shi, Bi

    2010-07-15

    Collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to UO(2)(2+) were investigated in detail, including pH effect, adsorption kinetics, adsorption equilibrium and column adsorption kinetics. The adsorption of UO(2)(2+) on CTR was pH-dependent, and the optimal pH range was 5.0-6.0. CTR exhibited excellent adsorption capacity to UO(2)(2+). For instance, the adsorption capacity obtained at 303 K and pH 6.0 was as high as 0.91 mmol UO(2)(2+)/g when the initial concentration of UO(2)(2+) was 1.0 mmol/L. In kinetics studies, the adsorption equilibrium can be reached within 300 min, and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model, and the equilibrium adsorption capacities calculated by the model were almost the same as those determined by experiments. The adsorption isotherms could be well described by the Freundlich equation with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) higher than 0.99, the adsorption behaviors of UO(2)(2+) on CTR column were investigated as well. Present study suggested that the CTR can be used for the adsorptive recovery of UO(2)(2+) from aqueous solutions. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. On the role of H2 as an inhibitor of UO2 matrix dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, Juan; Gaona, Xavier; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi; Martinez-Esparza, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    The study of spent fuel behaviour under disposal conditions is usually based on conservative approaches assuming oxidising conditions produced by water radiolysis at the fuel/water interface. However, the presence of H 2 from container corrosion can inhibit the dissolution of the UO 2 matrix and enhance its long-term stability. Several studies have confirmed the decrease in dissolution rates when H 2 is present in the system, although the exact mechanisms of interaction have not been fully established. This paper deals with a radiolytic modelling exercise to explore the consequences of the interaction of H 2 with radicals generated by radiolysis in the homogeneous phase. The main conclusion is that in all the modelled cases the presence of H 2 in the system leads to a decrease in matrix dissolution. The extent of the inhibition, and the threshold partial pressure for the inhibition to take place, both depend in a complex way on the chemical composition of the water and the type of radiation present in the system. (authors)

  11. Development of ultrasonic technique for measure of porosity of UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroni, Douglas Brandao

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of nuclear fuel is of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and even the safety in the power stations. At present, the techniques used implicate elevated costs with equipment, materials and installations of radiological protection. Besides, because of being destructive techniques, they impose that the checking of the characteristics of this material is done by sampling. In this work a not destructive technique was developed for measures of porosity in ceramic materials with efficiency and precision. The objective of this work is to this technique will be able to be used in laboratory practice for measures in UO 2 pellets, so it would become viable the inspection of up to 100% of the nuclear fuel, guaranteeing bigger control of the characteristics of the used material, turning in increasing safety, efficiency and economy. The innovation of the technique is due to the fact of analysing the specter of frequency of the ultrasonic wrist, and not his time of course in the material, frequently used. In this work 40 ceramic pellets of alumina were used with values of porosity between 5,09% and 37,30%. A system of recognition of signs using artificial neural networks made possible to distinguish pellets with differences of porosity of 0,04%. It was observed that this technique can be used for several others aims, for example, in the determination of the void fraction in regimen of two-phase flow, what is very important to guarantee the efficiency and safety of nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. A study on improvement of UO2 powder production process for high sintered density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hoh; Hwang, Sung Tae; Jun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Yoon Dong; Choi, Jong Hyun; Lee, Kyoo Il; Kim, Tae Joon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Kim, Kwang Lak; Kwon, Sang Woon; Kim, Byung Hoh; Hong, Soon Bok

    1995-01-01

    Various conversion processes were reviewed from the viewpoint of manufacturing cost, product quality and liquid waste. The MDD process was selected a suitable target process for the good quality of UO 2 powder and the recycling availability of nitric acid. The MDD process consists of two steps, double salt preparation [(NH 4 ) 2 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 4 ] from uranyl nitrate solution and thermal decomposition/reduction to UO 2 powder. The reaction mechanism and properties for the intermediates were analyzed to define the proposed operational conditions of the process. The conceptual process was proposed and experimental facility was designed and installed. 12 figs, 7 tabs, 7 refs. (Author)

  13. High-temperature studies of UO2 and ThO2 using neutron scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchings, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the results of recent neutron diffraction, coherent diffuse and inelastic scattering experiments on UO 2 and ThO 2 at temperatures between 293 K and 2930 K is given. These provide direct evidence for thermally induced Frenkel oxygen lattice disorder at temperatures > 2000 K and give data on the lattice expansion, ionic potentials and elastic stiffness constants to 2930 K for the first time. The results are important for an understanding of the thermophysical behaviour of UO 2 and contribute to the data base of thermodynamic properties of UO 2 . (author)

  14. Design and control of the oxygen partial pressure of UO2 in TGA using the humidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Knight, T.W.; Roberts, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We focus on measurement of oxygen partial pressure and change of O/M ratio under specific conditions produced by the humidification system. • This shows that the humidification system is stable, accurate, and reliable enough to be used for experiments of the oxygen partial pressure measurement for the oxide fuels. • The humidification system has benefits of easy control and flexibility for producing various oxygen partial pressures with fixed hydrogen gas flow rate. - Abstract: The oxygen to uranium (O/U) ratio of UO 2±x is determined by the oxygen content of the sample and is affected by oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) of the surrounding gas. Oxygen partial pressure is controllable by several methods. A common method to produce different oxygen partial pressures is the use of equilibria of different reaction gases. There are two common methods: H 2 O/H 2 reaction and CO 2 /CO reaction. In this work, H 2 O/H 2 reaction using a humidifier was employed and investigated to ensure that this humidification system for oxygen partial pressure is stable and accurate for use in Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) experiments with UO 2 . This approach has the further advantage of flexibility to make a wide range of oxygen partial pressure with fixed hydrogen gas flow rate only by varying temperature of water in the humidifier. The whole system for experiments was constructed and includes the humidification system, TGA, oxygen analyzer, and gas flow controller. Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) samples were used for experiments and oxygen partial pressure was measured at the equilibrium state of stoichiometric UO 2.0 . Oxygen partial pressures produced by humidification (wet gas) system were compared to the approach using mixed dry gases (without humidification system) to demonstrate that the humidification system provides for more stable and accurate oxygen partial pressure control. This work provides the design, method, and analysis of a humidification system for

  15. RA3: Application of a calculation model for fuel management with SEFE (Slightly Enriched Fuel Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, G.; Higa, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RA-3 (5 MW, MTR) reactor is mainly utilized to produce radioisotopes (Mo-99, I-131, etc.). It started operating with Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) in 1990, and spends around 12 fuels per year. Although this consumption is small compared to a nuclear power station. It is important to do a good management of them. The present report describes: - A reactor model to perform the Fuel Shuffling. - Results of fuel management simulations for 2 and a half years of operation. Some features of the calculations can be summarized as follows: 1) A 3D calculation model is used with the code PUMA. It does not have experimental adjustments, except for some approximations in the reflector representation and predicts: power, flux distributions and reactivity of the core in an acceptable way. 2) Comparisons have been made with the measurements done in the commissioning with LEU fuels, and it has also been compared with the empirical method (the previous one) which had been used in the former times of operation with LEU fuel. 3) The number of points of the model is approximately 13500, an it can be run in 80386 personal computer. The present method has been verified as a good tool to perform the simulations for the fuel management of RA-3 reactor. It is expected to produce some economic advantages in: - Achieving a better utilization of the fuels. - Leaving more time of operation for radioisotopes production. The activation measurements through the whole core required by the previous method can be significantly reduced. (author)

  16. The oxidative dissolution of unirradiated UO2 by hydrogen peroxide as a function of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarens, F.; Pablo, J. de; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Rovira, M.; Merino, J.; Cera, E.; Bruno, J.; Quinones, J.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2005-01-01

    The dissolution of non-irradiated UO 2 was studied as a function of both pH and hydrogen peroxide concentration (simulating radiolytic generated product). At acidic pH and a relatively low hydrogen peroxide concentration (10 -5 mol dm -3 ), the UO 2 dissolution rate decreases linearly with pH while at alkaline pH the dissolution rate increases linearly with pH. At higher H 2 O 2 concentrations (10 -3 mol dm -3 ) the dissolution rates are lower than the ones at 10 -5 mol dm -3 H 2 O 2 , which has been attributed to the precipitation at these conditions of studtite (UO 4 . 4H 2 O, which was identified by X-ray diffraction), together with the possibility of hydrogen peroxide decomposition. In the literature, spent fuel dissolution rates determined in the absence of carbonate fall in the H 2 O 2 concentration range 5 x 10 -7 - 5 x 10 -5 mol dm -3 according to our results, which is in agreement with H 2 O 2 concentrations determined in spent fuel leaching experiments

  17. Measurements of density and of thermal expansion coefficient of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO2 and of sodium metaborate-UO2 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.

    1980-12-01

    Measurements have been performed of the density and volumetric thermal expansion coefficient of liquid sodium tetraborate (borax) and of sodium metaborate both pure and with two different amounts of UO 2 dissolved in each. These data are required for the design of core-catchers based on sodium borates. The measurements have been performed with the buoyancy method in the temperature range from 850 0 C to 1325 0 C. The data for the pure borax and for the sodium metaborate agree reasonably well with the data from the literature, giving confidence that the measurements are correct and the new data for the salts with UO 2 are reliable. (orig.) [de

  18. Determination of Uranium In UO2 And U3O8 Powder Using UV-VIS Spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalia Adventini; Diah Dwiana Lestiani; Muhayatun; Endah Damastuti

    2009-01-01

    Lab. TAR PTNBR BATAN - Bandung has been accredited by National Accreditation Committee on May 2 nd , 2006 as a test laboratory with number LP-311-ID, has to maintain its laboratory performance by participating in a proficiency test. In this activity, the determination of uranium in 2 samples of UO 2 with A1 and A2 codes and other 2 samples of U 3 O 8 with B1 and B2 codes using UV-Vis spectrophotometry was carried out. Colouring method was used by reacting thiocyanate ion with the uranyl ion in acidic solution to develop a stable yellow colour of uranyl thiocyanate complex solution and measured at wavelength of 380 nm. The result gave that concentration of uranium in A1, A2, B1 and B2 samples were 77.95; 75.29; 64.58 and 63.69% respectively. The Z-score value for A samples was - 1.99, meanwhile for B samples the Z score value of between laboratory was −1.29 with intra laboratory was -1,09. It meant that Z-score values for both samples were in good category. From this result, it showed that UV-Vis spectrophotometry is one of the several methods that can be used to determine uranium in UO 2 and U 3 O 8 powder. The Lab. TAR’s proficiency test for determination of uranium in UO 2 and U 3 O 8 gave a good result and it was hoped to support BATAN's program in the nuclear fuel field. (author)

  19. Crystal structure of [UO2(NH35]NO3·NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Woidy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pentaammine dioxide uranium(V nitrate ammonia (1/1, [UO2(NH35]NO3·NH3, was obtained in the form of yellow crystals from the reaction of caesium uranyl nitrate, Cs[UO2(NO33], and uranium tetrafluoride, UF4, in dry liquid ammonia. The [UO2]+ cation is coordinated by five ammine ligands. The resulting [UO2(NH35] coordination polyhedron is best described as a pentagonal bipyramid with the O atoms forming the apices. In the crystal, numerous N—H...N and N—H...O hydrogen bonds are present between the cation, anion and solvent molecules, leading to a three-dimensional network.

  20. Effect of metallic iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 doped with a radioactive alpha emitter in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jegou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Jouan, Gauthier; Peuget, Sylvain; Martin, Christelle

    2017-12-01

    In the hypothesis of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological nuclear waste repository, interactions between the fuel mainly composed of UO2 and its environment must be understood. The dissolution rate of the UO2 matrix, which depends on the redox conditions on the fuel surface, will have a major impact on the release of radionuclides into the environment. The reducing conditions expected for a geological disposal situation would appear to be favorable as regards the solubility and stability of the UO2 matrix, but may be disturbed on the surface of irradiated fuel. In particular, the local redox conditions will result from a competition between the radiolysis effects of water under alpha irradiation (simultaneously producing oxidizing species like H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing species like H2, hydrogen) and those of redox active species from the environment. In particular, Fe2+, a strongly reducing aqueous species coming from the corrosion of the iron canister or from the host rock, could influence the dissolution of the fuel matrix. The effect of iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 was thus investigated under the conditions of the French disposal site, a Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation chosen by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), here tested under alpha irradiation. For this study, UO2 fuel pellets doped with a radioactive alpha emitter (238/239Pu) were leached in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater (representative of the French waste disposal site groundwater) in the presence of a metallic iron foil to simulate the steel canister. The pellets had varying levels of alpha activity, in order to modulate the concentrations of species produced by water radiolysis on the surface and to simulate the activity of aged spent fuel after 50 and 10,000 years of alpha radioactivity decay. The experimental data showed that whatever the sample alpha radioactivity, the presence of iron inhibits the oxidizing dissolution of

  1. Application of the Cold Crucible for Melting of UO2/ZrO2 Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S.W.; Min, B.T.; Shin, Y.S.; Park, I.K.; Kim, J.H.; Song, J.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2002-01-01

    The melting and discharge technique of UO 2 /ZrO 2 mixtures using the cold crucible melting method that does not need a separate crucible such as tungsten one with high melting point is developed and applied to the KAERI FCI test called TROI. To discharge the melt from a cold crucible into a fuel-coolant interaction chamber after melting, a plug is specially designed using the concept for electro-magnetic field characteristics so as to as thin as possible the crust that is formed between the melt and plug. Its function keeps the melt in the crucible during melting period and provides the melt discharge path. About 8.5 kg melt is discharged from the cold crucible to the melt-water interaction chamber through the punched hole with 8 cm in diameter. The melt temperature is also measured and analyzed from observation of the melt surface. The power balance using the operating parameters such as current, voltage and coupling factor of R.F generator is analyzed. (authors)

  2. Atomistic simulations of void migration under thermal gradient in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tapan G.; Millett, Paul; Tonks, Michael; Wolf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that within a few hours after startup of a nuclear reactor, the temperature gradient within a fuel element causes migration of voids/bubbles radially inwards to form a central hole. To understand the atomic processes that control this migration of voids, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on single crystal UO 2 with voids of diameter 2.2 nm. An external temperature gradient was applied across the simulation cell. At the end of the simulation run, it was observed that the voids had moved towards the hot end of the simulation cell. The void migration velocity obtained from the simulations was compared with the available phenomenological equations for void migration due to different transport mechanisms. Surface diffusion of the slowest moving specie, i.e. uranium, was found to be the dominant mechanism for void migration. The contribution from lattice diffusion and the thermal stress gradient to the void migration was analyzed and found to be negligible. By extrapolation, a crossover from the surface-diffusion-controlled mechanism to the lattice-diffusion-controlled mechanism was found to occur for voids with sizes in the μm range.

  3. Contribution of the study of a nuclear reactor accident: residual power aspects and thermodynamic of U-UO2 and UO2-ZrO2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baichi, Mehdi

    2001-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the study of early delocalization and fission product releases during the formation of corium coming from a nuclear reactor accident. The first part deals with an analysis of corium cooling. The contribution to the power of each corium element has been calculated with time. The main elements are represented but the addition of Pu, Mo and Nb has been proposed. The last release experimental data taken into account result in a loss of residual power of 25% exclusive of corium between the emergency stop and ten days. The second part deals with the early delocalization observed during Vercors experiments. A critical selection on the U-UO 2 and UO 2 -ZrO 2 systems has been carried out. In order to complete the small and inconsistent data, thermodynamic activity measurements have been performed by mass spectrometry. The UO 2 activity on UO 2 -ZrO 2 presents a positive deviation from ideality at 2200 K and approximates ideality at 2400 K. All the data have been used for optimizing the systems with Thermo-Calc. This work has allowed to calculate the ternary systems and to define the required approach to analyze the metallic phase and corium oxides densities. (author) [fr

  4. A semi-empirical model for the formation and depletion of the high burnup structure in UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzocri, D.; Cappia, F.; Luzzi, L.; Pastore, G.; Rondinella, V. V.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2017-04-01

    In the rim zone of UO2 nuclear fuel pellets, the combination of high burnup and low temperature drives a microstructural change, leading to the formation of the high burnup structure (HBS). In this work, we propose a semi-empirical model to describe the formation of the HBS, which embraces the polygonisation/recrystallization process and the depletion of intra-granular fission gas, describing them as inherently related. For this purpose, we performed grain-size measurements on samples at radial positions in which the restructuring was incomplete. Based on these new experimental data, we infer an exponential reduction of the average grain size with local effective burnup, paired with a simultaneous depletion of intra-granular fission gas driven by diffusion. The comparison with currently used models indicates the applicability of the herein developed model within integral fuel performance codes.

  5. Valence XPS structure and chemical bond in Cs2UO2Cl4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teterin Yury A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis was done of the valence electrons X-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE range of 0 eV to ~35 eV for crystalline dicaesium tetrachloro-dioxouranium (VI (Cs2UO2Cl4. This compound contains the uranyl group UO2. The BE and structure of the core electronic shells (~35 eV-1250 eV, as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the UO2Cl4(D4h cluster reflecting U close environment in Cs2UO2Cl4 were taken into account. The experimental data show that many-body effects due to the presence of cesium and chlorine contribute to the outer valence (0-~15 eV BE spectral structure much less than to the inner valence (~15 eV-~35 eV BE one. The filled U5f electronic states were theoretically calculated and experimentally confirmed to be present in the valence band of Cs2UO2Cl4. It corroborates the suggestion on the direct participation of the U5f electrons in the chemical bond. Electrons of the U6p atomic orbitals participate in formation of both the inner (IVMO and the outer (OVMO valence molecular orbitals (bands. The filled U6p and the O2s, Cl3s electronic shells were found to make the largest contributions to the IVMO formation. The molecular orbitals composition and the sequence order in the binding energy range 0 eV-~35 eV in the UO2Cl4 cluster were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative molecular orbitals scheme for the UO2Cl4 cluster in the BE range 0-~35 eV, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in Cs2UO2Cl4 and the interpretation of other X-ray spectra of Cs2UO2Cl4. The contributions to the chemical binding for the UO2Cl4 cluster were evaluated to be: the OVMO contribution - 76%, and the IVMO contribution - 24 %.

  6. Potential of duplex fuel in prebreeder, breeder, and power reactor designs: tests and analyses (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, T.L.; Brennan, J.J.; Duncombe, E.; Schneider, M.J.; Johnson, R.G.R.

    1982-09-01

    Dual region fuel pellets, called duplex pellets, are comprised of an outer annular region of relatively high uranium fuel enrichment and a center pellet of fertile material with no enrichment. UO 2 and ThO 2 are the fissile and fertile materials of interest. Both prebreeders and breeders are discussed as are the performance advantages of duplex pellets over solid pellets in these two pressurized water reactor types. Advantages of duplex pellets for commercial reactor fuel rods are also discussed. Both irradiation test data and analytical results are used in comparisons. Manufacturing of duplex fuel is discussed

  7. Effects of temperature and irradiation on the mobility of Xenon in UO2: Profilometric and microstructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, B.

    2012-01-01

    In France, electricity is mainly produced (78%) through the operation of 58 PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors). During reactor operation, many fission products (FP) are generated in the fuel which is, in most cases, UO 2 enriched to about 4% in 235 U. Among FPs, gaseous fission products as Xenon and Krypton, are abundantly produced (around 15% stable fission products). Because of their chemical nature, those two gases have a very low solubility in the fuel and therefore tend to form bubbles (to minimize surface tension) and can cause pellets swelling. The formed gas can also be released out of the pellet, and lead to a substantial increase in the pressure within the fuel cladding, thereby limiting the energy production. However, migration mechanisms, traditionally studied indirectly by measuring the amount of gas released after irradiation, are not yet fully understood. It is frequently assumed that atomic diffusion is the only mechanism that can lead to a migration of xenon. The objective of this thesis is to provide direct evidence of the different mechanisms controlling the behavior of Xenon during thermal annealing and irradiation. Therefore, we used ion implantation to introduce Xenon in uranium dioxide samples. After implantation, the Xenon distribution follows a quasi-Gaussian concentration profile (variation of the concentration regard to the depth) located in the first 300 nanometers of the sample. We have performed post-implantation annealing at 1400 C and 1600 C in order to study the impact of the temperature, and irradiation with ions to simulate the impact of fission products in the fuel. Subsequently, concentration depth profiles were measured by ion microprobe (SIMS). Although the feasibility of Xenon measurement has been demonstrated in several articles, no concentration profile had so far been presented in the literature because a classical data processing of SIMS data is not suitable in uranium dioxide. Therefore a new data processing software has

  8. Enriched uranium recovery at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Graphite casting scrap, fuel elements and nongraphite combustibles are calcined to impure oxides. These materials along with zircaloy fuel elements and refractory solids are leach-dissolved separately in HF-HNO 3 acid to solubilize the contained enriched uranium. The resulting slurry is filtered and the clear filtrate (to which mineral acid solutions bearing enriched uranium may be added) are passed through solvent extraction. The solvent extraction product is filtered, precipitated with H 2 O 2 and the precipitate calcined to U 3 O 8 . Metal is made from U 3 O 8 by conversion to UO 2 , hydrofluorination and reduction to metal. Throughput is 150 to 900 kg uranium per year depending on the type of scrap

  9. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the products of the interaction of gaseous IrF6 with fine UO2F2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prusakov Vladimir N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fuel reprocessing by fluorination, a dry method of regeneration of spent nuclear fuel, uses UO2F2 for the separation of plutonium from gaseous mixtures. Since plutonium requires special treatment, IrF6 was used as a thermodynamic model of PuF6. The model reaction of the interaction of gaseous IrF6 with fine UO2F2 in the sorption column revealed a change of color of the sorption column contents from pale-yellow to gray and black, indicating the formation of products of such an interaction. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study showed that the interaction of gaseous IrF6 with fine UO2F2 at 125 °C results in the formation of stable iridium compounds where the iridium oxidation state is close to Ir3+. The dependence of the elemental compositions of the layers in the sorption column on the penetration depth of IrF6 was established.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.; Erradi, L.; Bardouni, T El.; Khoukhi, T El.; Boukhal, H.; Meroun, O.; Bakkari, B El

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In a previous work, we have analysed the main french experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) : CREAOLE and Mistral experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO2 and UO2-PuO2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APPOLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/Deg C which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges : an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/Deg C is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3±2 pcm/Deg C is obtained for temperature higher than 250Deg C. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo Method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. Thus we have used the code MCNP5, for its recognized power and its availability. This analysis shows for the UO2 lattices, an average experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,5 pcm/Deg C, which is largely below the target accuracy for this type of lattices, that we estimate at approximately 1 pcm/Deg C. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the Endf/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment -calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/Deg C. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to 248 Deg C) and -1.2 pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to

  11. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Homan, F.J.; Balthesen, E.; Turner, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the development of HTGR fuel and fuel cycle. These accomplishments permit a wide choice of fuel designs, reactor concepts, and fuel cycles. Fuels capable of providing helium outlet temperatures of 750 0 C are available, and fuels capable of 1000 0 C outlet temperatures may be expected from extension of present technology. Fuels have been developed for two basic HTGR designs, one using a spherical (pebble bed) element and the other a prismatic element. Within each concept a number of variations of geometry, fuel composition, and structural materials are permitted. Potential fuel cycles include both low-enriched and high-enriched Th- 235 U, recycle Th- 233 U, and Th-Pu or U-Pu cycles. This flexibility offered by the HTGR is of great practical benefit considering the rapidly changing economics of power production. The inflation of ore prices has increased optimum conversion ratios, and increased the necessity of fuel recycle at an early date. Fuel element makeup is very similar for prismatic and spherical designs. Both use spherical fissile and fertile particles coated with combinations of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Both use carbonaceous binder materials, and graphite as the structural material. Weak-acid resin (WAR) UO 2 -UC 2 fissile fuels and sol-gel-derived ThO 2 fertile fuels have been selected for the Th- 233 U cycle in the prismatic design. Sol-gel-derived UO 2 UC 2 is the reference fissile fuel for the low-enriched pebble bed design. Both the United States and Federal Republic of Germany are developing technology for fuel cycle operations including fabrication, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste handling. Feasibility of basic processes has been established and designs developed for full-scale equipment. Fuel and fuel cycle technology provide the basis for a broad range of applications of the HTGR. Extension of the fuels to higher operating temperatures and development and commercial demonstration of fuel

  12. Critical experiments supporting underwater storage of tightly packed configurations of spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoovler, G.S.; Baldwin, M.N.

    1981-04-01

    Criticla arrays of 2.5%-enriched UO 2 fuel rods that simulate underwater rod storage of spent power reactor fuel are being constructed. Rod storage is a term used to describe a spent fuel storage concept in which the fuel bundles are disassembled and the rods are packed into specially designed cannisters. Rod storage would substantially increase the amount of fuel that could be stored in available space. These experiments are providing criticality data against which to benchmark nuclear codes used to design tightly packed rod storage racks

  13. Near Surface Stoichiometry in UO2: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of oxygen stoichiometry variation in UO2 at different temperature and oxygen partial pressure are important for understanding the dynamics of microstructure in these crystals. However, very limited experimental studies have been performed to understand the atomic structure of UO2 near surface and defect effects of near surface on stoichiometry in which the system can exchange atoms with the external reservoir. In this study, the near (110 surface relaxation and stoichiometry in UO2 have been studied with density functional theory (DFT calculations. On the basis of the point-defect model (PDM, a general expression for the near surface stoichiometric variation is derived by using DFT total-energy calculations and atomistic thermodynamics, in an attempt to pin down the mechanisms of oxygen exchange between the gas environment and defected UO2. By using the derived expression, it is observed that, under poor oxygen conditions, the stoichiometry of near surface is switched from hyperstoichiometric at 300 K with a depth around 3 nm to near-stoichiometric at 1000 K and hypostoichiometric at 2000 K. Furthermore, at very poor oxygen concentrations and high temperatures, our results also suggest that the bulk of the UO2 prefers to be hypostoichiometric, although the surface is near-stoichiometric.

  14. XPS study of the surface chemistry of UO2 (111) single crystal film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslakov, Konstantin I.; Teterin, Yury A.; Popel, Aleksej J.; Teterin, Anton Yu.; Ivanov, Kirill E.; Kalmykov, Stepan N.; Petrov, Vladimir G.; Springell, Ross; Scott, Thomas B.; Farnan, Ian

    2018-03-01

    A (111) air-exposed surface of UO2 thin film (150 nm) on (111) YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia) before and after the Ar+ etching and subsequent in situ annealing in the spectrometer analytic chamber was studied by XPS technique. The U 5f, U 4f and O 1s electron peak intensities were employed for determining the oxygen coefficient kO = 2 + x of a UO2+x oxide on the surface. It was found that initial surface (several nm) had kO = 2.20. A 20 s Ar+ etching led to formation of oxide UO2.12, whose composition does not depend significantly on the etching time (up to 180 s). Ar+ etching and subsequent annealing at temperatures 100-380 °C in vacuum was established to result in formation of stable well-organized structure UO2.12 reflected in the U 4f XPS spectra as high intensity (∼28% of the basic peak) shake-up satellites 6.9 eV away from the basic peaks, and virtually did not change the oxygen coefficient of the sample surface. This agrees with the suggestion that a stable (self-assembling) phase with the oxygen coefficient kO ≈ 2.12 forms on the UO2 surface.

  15. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-IV. 2. Micro-Reactor Physics of MOX-Fueled Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2001-01-01

    Recently, fuel assemblies of light water reactors have become complicated because of the extension of fuel burnup and the use of high-enriched Gd and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, etc. In conventional assembly calculations, the detailed flux distribution, spectrum distribution, and space dependence of self-shielding within a fuel pellet are not directly taken into account. The experimental and theoretical study of investigating these microscopic properties is named micro-reactor physics. The purpose of this work is to show the importance of micro-reactor physics in the analysis of MOX fuel assemblies. Several authors have done related studies; however, their studies are limited to fuel pin cells, and they are never mentioned with regard to burnup effect, which is important for actual core design. We used the subgroup method to treat the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of heavy nuclides, and we used the characteristics method to treat the angular dependence of neutron flux in a fuel pellet. Figure 1 compares the power distributions in MOX and UO 2 fuel cells at the beginning of burnup. The power is calculated with and without considering the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of the cross sections. For the MOX cell, the power distribution has a peak at the cell edge because of large Pu absorption especially when considering the spatial self-shielding effect. When a MOX rod is adjacent to UO 2 fuel rods, the flux distribution has an azimuthal dependence in addition to the radial dependence within a rod. For example, consider a 2x2 fuel assembly composed of three UO 2 rods and one MOX rod, with the mirror reflection boundary condition. A burnup calculation was done with the condition; the radius of the MOX pellet is divided into two regions, and the azimuthal angle is divided into eight. The number density of 239 Pu at 44 000 MWd/t for the MOX rod shows azimuthal dependence by 20%. The maximum burnup occurs in the direction of the UO 2 rods. This is

  16. Density, thermal expansion coefficient and viscosity of sodium tetraborate (borax)-UO2 and of sodium metaborate-UO2 solutions at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Roth, A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements have been performed of the density, of the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient and of the viscosity of liquid sodium tetraborate (borax) and of sodium metaborate both pure and with two different amounts of UO 2 dissolved in each. The viscosity measurements have been performed for the solution of sodium tetraborate with UO 2 and CeO 2 , and with CeO 2 only as well. These data are required for the design of core-catchers based on sodium borates. The density measurements have been performed with the buoyancy method in the temperature range from 825 0 C to 1300 0 C, the viscosity measurements in the temperature range 700-1250 0 C with a modified Haake viscosity balance. The balance was previously calibrated at ambient temperature with a standard calibration liquid and at high temperatures, with data for pure borax available from the literature. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of the parameters of the IR-8 reactor with different fuel assembly designs with LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatulin, A.; Stetsky, Y.; Dobrikova, I.

    1999-01-01

    The estimation of neutron-physical, heat and hydraulic parameters of the IR-8 research reactor with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was performed. Two fuel assembly (FA) designs were reviewed: IRT-4M with the tubular type fuel elements and IRT-MR with the rod type fuel elements. UO 2 -Al dispersion 19.75% enrichment fuel is used in both cases. The results of the calculations were compared with main parameters of the reactor, using the current IRT-3M FA with 90% high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. The results of these comparisons showed that during the LEU conversion of the reactor the cycle length, excess reactivity and peak power of the IRT-MR type FA are higher than for the IRT-3M type FA and IRT-4M type FA. (author)

  18. Optimization of fuel rod enrichment distribution to minimize rod power peaking throughout life within BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Yasushi; Hida, Kazuki; Sakurada, Koichi; Yamamoto, Munenari

    1997-01-01

    A practical method was developed for determining the optimum fuel enrichment distribution within a boiling water reactor fuel assembly. The method deals with two different optimization problems, i.e. a combinatorial optimization problem grouping fuel rods into a given number of rod groups with the same enrichment, and a problem determining an optimal enrichment for each fuel rod under the resultant rod-grouping pattern. In solving these problems, the primary goal is to minimize a predefined objective function over a given exposure period. The objective function used here is defined by a linear combination: C 1 X+C 2 X G , where X and X G stand for a control variable to give the constraint respectively for a local power peaking factor and a gadolinium rod power, and C 1 and C 2 are user-definable weighting factor to accommodate the design preference. The algorithm of solving the combinatorial optimization problem starts with finding the optimal enrichment vector without any rod-grouping, and promising candidates of rod-grouping patterns are found by exhaustive enumeration based on the resulting fuel enrichment ordering, and then the latter problem is solved by using the method of approximation programming. The practical application of the present method is shown for a contemporary 8x8 Pu mixed-oxide fuel assembly with 10 gadolinium-poisoned rods. (author)

  19. Proceedings of the international meeting on development, fabrication and application of reduced enrichment fuels for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the papers presented in the following areas: (1) Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program Status; (2) Fuel Development; (3) Fuel Demonstrations; (4) General Topics; and (5) Specific Reactor Applications

  20. Fuel assemblies for PWR type reactors: fuel rods, fuel plates. CEA work presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafosse, Jacques.

    1976-01-01

    French work on PWR type reactors is reported: basic knowledge on Zr and its alloys and on uranium oxide; experience gained on other programs (fast neutron and heavy water reactors); zircaloy-2 or zircaloy-4 clad UO 2 fuel rods; fuel plates consisting of zircaloy-2 clad UO 2 squares of thickness varying between 2 and 4mm [fr

  1. Technical evaluation of the direct denitration process to obtain ceramic-grade UO2 powders using microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo, Viviana J.; Marchi, Daniel E.; Menghini, Jorge E.

    1999-01-01

    The direct denitration process to obtain ceramic-grade UO 2 powders using microwaves has been studied and developed at laboratory scale. Conditions were given to obtain powders apt for fuel pellets fabrication within the required specifications, where mechanical treatments before pressing are not necessary. This work describes the equipment used in the process, evaluates the necessary supply and waste generation and describes the characteristics of the product obtained, as well as the conditions for its fabrication. Results show that this method allows to reduce the volume of liquid wastes generated due to their partial re-utilization, simplifying their final disposal treatment, which, in addition to their operational advantages, make this method attractive from the economical point of view. (author)

  2. The Effect of the O/U Ratio on the Sintered Density of the UO2 Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, S. H.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Park, C. J.; Song, K. C.; Yoo, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The sintered density of the UO 2 pellet is an important factor to assure a stable nuclear reactor control. There are some methods to control the sintered density of the UO 2 pellet, that is, a sintering temperature and its time, a green density, an addition of pore-former or U 3 O 8 , etc. In general, it is well known that the sintered density of UO 2 pellet increases as the sintering temperature and its time and the green density increases. However the addition of a pore-former or U 3 O 8 decreases the sintered density of the UO 2 pellet, due to the leave various sizes of pore in the UO 2 matrix during sintering. In this work, the effect of the O/U ratio on the sintered density of the UO 2 pellet are investigated

  3. Reducing the stoichiometric excess of HF in the hydrofluorination of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Qiu Lufu; Zhong Xing; Xu Heqing

    1989-11-01

    In a fluidized bed, UO 2 obtained from the decomposition-reduction of AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) was fed to absorb HF remaining in the exhaust gas of UF 4 production process. In the case of 60% conversion of UO 2 and the reaction temperature in the region of 300 deg C, HF remaining in the exhaust gas in absorbing fluidized bed was less than 7 ∼ 8% (w/w), i.e. apparent stoichiometric excess of HF had reduced to 0% more or less. Hence, with the high hydrofluorination reactivity of UO 2 obtained from the decomposition-reduction of AUC, it is possible to reduce evidently the stoichiometric excess of HF in the hydrofluorination process by two fluidized beds in series in which solids move against the gas flow

  4. Structure, conduct, and sustainability of the international low-enriched fuel fabrication industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the cost structures of fabricating Low-Enriched Uranium fuel (LEU, enriched to 5% enrichment) light water reactor fuels. The LEU industry is decades old, and (except for high entry cost, i.e., the cost of designing and licensing a fuel fabrication facility and its fuel), labor and additional fabrication lines can be added by industry incumbents at Nth-of-a-Kind cost to the maximum capacity allowed by the license. On the other hand, new entrants face higher First-of-a-Kind costs and high new-facility licensing costs, increasing the scale required for entry thus discouraging small scale entry by countries with only a few nuclear power plants. Therefore, the industry appears to be competitive with sustainable investment in fuel-cycle states, and structural barriers-to-entry increase its proliferation resistance. (author)

  5. Effects of two types of dryer on ADU and UO2 pellet manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhiming; He Zhengjie

    1995-05-01

    The concepts of spray drying process and pebble-bed fluidized drying process for ADU slurry is presented. And the effects of ADU powder and UO 2 powder/pellet by these processes using the statistic results from series production are discussed. It is believed that these drying methods have no influence on structure and shape of ADU particle, and thereby no difference will be made to the properties of UO 2 powder and pellet. Thus, spray drying process can really be replaced by pebble-bed fluidized drying process. (10 figs., 6 tabs.)

  6. Structure changes in UO2(hfa)2 NH3 near the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.A.; Taylor, J.C.; Waugh, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    A reversible colour change from lemon-yellow to orange was observed for polycrystalline UO 2 (hfa) 2 NH 3 at 100 0 C (hfa = (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedione)). The changes in the X-ray powder pattern between -196 0 and 130 0 C were followed with a Guinier-Simon focussing camera. The colour change was not due to an α - β type structural transition as found earlier in α and β-UO 2 (hfa) 2 tmp (tmp = trimethyl phosphate), but was considered to be due to changes in the hydrogen bonding of the ammonia molecules. (author)

  7. Thermally induced frenkel disorder in UO//2 and ThO//2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, J. Emyr; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Garrard, Barry

    1985-01-01

    Frenkel defect formation in the oxygen sublattice and the excitation of electronic defects in the form of small polarons are considered. A brief summary is given of the results of a recent investigation into possible oxygen lattice disorder in UO//2 and ThO//2 at temperatures up to 2930 K, using ...... neutron scattering techniques.......Frenkel defect formation in the oxygen sublattice and the excitation of electronic defects in the form of small polarons are considered. A brief summary is given of the results of a recent investigation into possible oxygen lattice disorder in UO//2 and ThO//2 at temperatures up to 2930 K, using...

  8. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-23

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4].

  9. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4

  10. Benchmark criticality experiments for fast fission configuration with high enriched nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorin, S.N.; Mandzik, S.G.; Polazau, S.A.; Hryharovich, T.K.; Damarad, Y.V.; Palahina, Y.A.

    2014-01-01

    Benchmark criticality experiments of fast heterogeneous configuration with high enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel were performed using the 'Giacint' critical assembly of the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research - Sosny (JIPNR-Sosny) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. The critical assembly core comprised fuel assemblies without a casing for the 34.8 mm wrench. Fuel assemblies contain 19 fuel rods of two types. The first type is metal uranium fuel rods with 90% enrichment by U-235; the second one is dioxide uranium fuel rods with 36% enrichment by U-235. The total fuel rods length is 620 mm, and the active fuel length is 500 mm. The outer fuel rods diameter is 7 mm, the wall is 0.2 mm thick, and the fuel material diameter is 6.4 mm. The clad material is stainless steel. The side radial reflector: the inner layer of beryllium, and the outer layer of stainless steel. The top and bottom axial reflectors are of stainless steel. The analysis of the experimental results obtained from these benchmark experiments by developing detailed calculation models and performing simulations for the different experiments is presented. The sensitivity of the obtained results for the material specifications and the modeling details were examined. The analyses used the MCNP and MCU computer programs. This paper presents the experimental and analytical results. (authors)

  11. Research and training reactors of GDR, use and fuel enrichment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, K.

    1991-01-01

    A short overview of the main characteristics of research and training reactors of GDR is given, including a description of their main use and fuel enrichment. From the point of view of Non - Proliferation Treaty and Physical Protection Agreements no objections exist against the use of MEU - fuel in two of the five research and training reactors. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear fuel cycle head-end enriched uranium purification and conversion into metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, A.; Cabrejas, J.; Lio, L. de; Dell'Occhio, L.; Devida, C.; Dupetit, G.; Falcon, M.; Gauna, A.; Gil, D.; Guzman, G.; Neuringer, P.; Pascale, A.; Stankevicius, A.

    1998-01-01

    The CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica - Argentina) operated two facilities at the Ezeiza Atomic Center which supply purified enriched uranium employed in the production of nuclear fuels. At one of those facilities, the Triple Height Laboratory scraps from the production of MTR type fuel elements (mainly out of specification U 3 O 8 plates or powder) are purified to nuclear grade. The purification is accomplished by a solvent extraction process. The other facility, the Enriched Uranium Laboratory produces 90% enriched uranium metal to be used in Mo 99 production (originally the uranium was used for the manufacture of MTR fuel elements made of aluminium-uranium alloy). This laboratory also provided metallic uranium with a lower enrichment (20%) for a first uranium-silicon testing fuel element, and in the near future it is going to recommence 20% enriched uranium related activities in order to provide the metal for the silicon-based fuel elements production (according to the policy of enrichment reduction for MTR reactors). (author)

  13. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  14. Fuel cycle in Japanese Fugen - HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    This paper describes the use of plutonium-bearing fuel in the Japanese Fugen-HWR. The Fugen-HWR is a pressure tube type, boiling light water cooled, and heavy water moderated reactor, which by using plutonium fuel (MOX) achieves the advantage of high neutron economy. The characteristics of the reactor are discussed, particularly its ability to operate with several different types of fuel - Pu-natural U MOX, Pu-Depleted U (from spent LWR fuel) MOX, Pu-Depleted U (from enrichment tails) MOX, and enriched UO 2 . The natural U and separative work units saved are given and the fuel management and control of the reactor discussed. Non-proliferation and safety considerations are given. The Fugen-HWR achieved 100% power rating in the autumn of 1979

  15. Atomics International fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program [contributed by T.A. Moss, AI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    The AI facility is approximately 30,000 square feet in area and consists of four general areas. One area is devoted to the production of UAl x powder. It consists of a series of arc melting furnaces, crushing lines, glove boxes, and compacting presses. The second area is used for the rolling of fuel plates. The third area is used for the machining of the plates to final size and also the machining of the fuel elements. In the fourth area the fuel plates are swaged into assemblies, and all welding and inspection operations are performed. As part of the lower enrichment program we are scheduled to put a second UAl x powder line into operation and we have had to expand some of our storage area. Under the low enrichment program the AI fuel facility will be modified to accommodate a separate low enrichment Al x production line and compacting line. This facility modification should be done by the end of the fiscal year. We anticipate producing fuel with an enrichment slightly less than 20% We anticipate powder being available for plate production shortly after the facility is completed. Atomics International is scheduled to conduct plate LEU verification work using fully enriched material in the June-July time period, at which time we will investigate what level of uranium loadings we can go to using the current process. It is anticipated that 55 volume percent uranium compound in our fuel form can be achieved

  16. Pebble bed modular reactor fuel enrichment discrimination using delayed neutrons - HTR2008-58133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoda, R.; Rataj, J.; Uhera, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature nuclear power reactor which utilise fuel in form of spheres that are randomly loaded and continuously circulated through the core until they reach their prescribed end-of-life burn-up limit. When the reactor is started up for the first time, the lower-enriched start-up fuel is used, mixed with graphite spheres, to bring the core to criticality. As the core criticality is established and the start-up fuel is burned-in, the graphite spheres are progressively removed and replaced with more start-up fuel. Once it becomes necessary for maintaining power output, the higher enriched equilibrium fuel is introduced to the reactor and the start-up fuel is removed. During the initial run of the reactor it is important to discriminate between the irradiated startup fuel and the irradiated equilibrium fuel to ensure that only the equilibrium fuel is returned to the reactor. There is therefore a need for an on-line enrichment discrimination device that can discriminate between irradiated start-up fuel spheres and irradiated equilibrium fuel spheres. The device must also not be confused by the presence of any remaining graphite spheres. Due to it's on-line nature the device must accomplish the discrimination within tight time limits. Theoretical calculations and experiments show that Fuel Enrichment Discrimination based on delayed neutrons detection is possible. The paper presents calculations and experiments showing viability of the method. (authors)

  17. Economical Feedback of Increasing Fuel Enrichment on Electricity Cost for VVER-1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Saad Dwiddar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A methodology of evaluating the economics of the front-end nuclear fuel cycle with a price change sensitivity analysis for a VVER-1000 reactor core as a case study is presented. The effect of increasing the fuel enrichment and its corresponding reactor cycle length on the energy cost is investigated. The enrichment component was found to represent the highly expenses dynamic component affecting the economics of the front-end fuel cycle. Nevertheless, the increase of the fuel enrichment will increase the reactor cycle length, which will have a positive feedback on the electricity generation cost (cent/KWh. A long reactor operation time with a cheaper energy cost set the nuclear energy as a competitive alternative when compared with other energy sources.

  18. Radiolysis and corrosion of 238 Pu-doped UO2 pellets in chloride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    radiation from 238Pu. Experiments are conducted with 238Pu doped pellets and others with 238Pu dissolved in the brine. The radiolysis products and yields of mobilized U and Pu from the oxidative dissolution of UO2 are determined. Results ...

  19. Dissolution of UO2 pellets by electrography for isotope ratio analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guereli, L.; Uzmen, R.; Colak, L.; Can, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A method for dissolving UO 2 pellets by using electrography is investigated. Electrography, a method used for rapid identification and qualitative analysis of certain materials was widely used in 1950s. However due to the limitations of the method it is rarely used today. The principle of the method involves anodic dissolution of metallic samples and transfer of the ions to a carrier medium usually a filter paper. Color development is used for identification. Sintered UO 2 pellets are difficult to dissolve and the procedure is time consuming. In case of illicit trafficking incidents, the amount of material may be limited and there usually is a deadline for the results, therefore dissolving the whole pellet is not preferred in most cases. In this study, a method rapid dissolving of UO 2 pellets by an electrograph is investigated. A sheet of qualitative filter paper is soaked in a suitable electrolyte and partially dried. It is placed on the cathode of the instrument. The pellet is placed between the anode and the cathode, a DC current is applied. The dissolved ions are transferred to the filter paper which is washed and diluted to the volume for analysis. Two different electrolytes, dissolving time and DC current were tried. The method is rapid, uses very little sample for analysis. Although it is usually applied to metals, acceptable dissolved amounts for analysis were obtained for UO 2 . 30-50 mA current for 2-5 minutes were sufficient for this application. (author)

  20. Nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics for an LMR core fueled with 20% enriched uranium metallic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-In; Kim, Young-Gyun; Kim, Sang-Ji; Kim, Young-Jin

    1999-05-01

    As a part of the core design development of KALIMER (150 MWe), the KALIMER core was initially designed with 20% enriched uranium metallic fuel. In this core design, the primary emphasis was given to realize the metallic fueled core design to meet the specific design requirements; 20% and below uranium enrichment and a minimum fuel cycle length of one year. The core was defined by a radially homogeneous core configuration incorporated with several passive design features to give inherent passive means of negative reactivity insertion. The core nuclear performance based on a once-through equilibrium fuel cycle scenario shows that the core has an average breeding ratio of 0.67 and maximum discharge burnup of 47.3 MWD/kg. When comparing with conventional plutonium metallic fueled cores of the same power level, the present uranium metallic fueled core has a lower power density due to its increased physical core size. The negative sodium void reactivity over the core shows a beneficial potential to assure inherent safety characteristics. The transition from the uranium startup to equilibrium cycle is feasible without any design change. Core nuclear performance characteristics in the present core design are attributed to the specific design requirements of enrichment restriction and fuel cycle length.

  1. Analysis of gas flow measurements from the IFA-633 UO2/MOX comparison test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiter, Glyn

    2005-01-01

    The release rate to birth rate ratio (R/B) results from the gas flow measurements performed during the joint programme irradiation of the IFA-633 UO 2 /MOX comparison test have been analysed using both classical and fractal methodologies. Possible calculational procedures for precursor enhancement factors and rod average diffusion coefficients were considered and suitable procedures were then implemented. The surface area to volume ratio (S/V) and recoil R/B values generated using the two methodologies have been compared to each other and to results obtained for other Halden Project gas flow rigs (IFAs 504, 558, 563, 569 and 655). The merits of the methodologies have then been discussed. It was found that the trends in the classical recoil R/B and in the fractal S/V for the shortest lived isotopes were in better agreement with the expected S/V behaviour than the trends in the classical S/V and in the fractal S/V for the longer lived isotopes. The beginning of life (BOL) S/V versus temperature behaviour for both IFA-633 and IFA-655 has been investigated and has been found to be more consistent with expectation when the fractal methodology is used. The peak fuel temperature versus rod average burnup behaviour of the IFA-633 fuel rods has been examined in order to investigate whether there is any correlation between the S/V results and the extent of periods during which the Halden (or Vitanza) threshold for significant fission gas release was exceeded. The behaviour was more consistent with the trends in the classical recoil R/B and fractal S/V for the shortest lived isotopes than with the trends in the classical S/V and the fractal S/V for the longer lived isotopes. The analysis of the through-life and BOL S/V and recoil R/B results generated using the classical and fractal methodologies has shown that the behaviour of the classical recoil R/B is difficult to explain. This is evidence that the classical recoil R/B results contain a diffusional release component

  2. Interactions with Small and Large Sodium to UO2 Mass Ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerici, G.; Holtbecker, H.; Schins, H.; Schlittenbardt, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper is divided into the following three parts: - Presentation of final results of the Ispra dropping experiments; - Discussion of preliminary Na entrapment tests; - Presentation of the Press I and II codes. The experiments for which the Ispra UO 2 dropping facility was originally designed were completed in 1975. The experimental facility which initially had had difficulties in reaching the predefined working conditions gave in the last year a series of results. For this reason Ispra decided to built a similar plant for dropping experiments into water which started working in 1975. Concerning the entrapment tests it was originally foreseen to built in collaboration with GfK Karlsruhe a test section having subassembly geometry and in which the UO 2 would have been violently dispersed into the surrounding Na by the expansion of a small quantity of superheated sodium. Preliminary tests and the design work for the facility could be completed. The Press I + II codes were developed to support the above mentioned experiment - al activity. A 1-D analysis is made to investigate phenomena like UO 2 crust formation and calculate delay times between the time of the Na injection into UO 2 and the violent expansion of superheated Na. An estimate was also made of the available mechanical work in such a process which should allow to get an idea of possible energy release in a reactor core. First conclusions can be drawn from this estimate concerning the mechanical energy release in a WCA due to SPI. The result is that considerably lower energies are calculated from Na entrapment in a reactor core due to the limited amount of molten UO 2 present in the core

  3. Cs2SeO4-UO2SeO4-H2O system at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkina, L.B.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Using the method of isothermal solubility at 25 deg C the interaction of cesium and uranyl selenates in aqueous solution is studied. Formation of congruently soluble Cs 2 UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 x2H 2 O and Cs 2 (UO 2 ) 2 x(SeO 4 ) 3 is ascertained, their crystallographic characteristics being determined

  4. Thermal expansion study of simulated DUPIC fuel using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Choi, Y. N.; Han, Y. S.; Oh, H. S.

    2001-07-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO2 and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO2. For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471 ''10-6 and 10.751 ''10-6 K-1, respectively

  5. Enrichment measurement in TRIGA type fuels; Medicion de enriquecimiento en combustibles tipo Triga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F.; Mazon R, R. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-05-15

    The Department of Energy of the United States of North America, through the program 'Idaho Operations Nuclear Spent Fuel Program' of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), in Idaho Falls; Idaho USA, hires to Global Technologies Inc. (GTI) to develop a prototype device of detection enrichment uranium (DEU Detection of Enrichment of Uranium) to determine quantitatively the enrichment in remainder U-235 in a TRIGA fuel element at the end of it useful life. The characteristics of the prototype developed by GTI are the following ones: It allows to carry out no-destructive measurements of TRIGA type fuel. Easily transportable due to that reduced of it size. The determination of the enrichment (in grams of U-235) it is obtained with a precision of 5%. The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), in its facilities of the Nuclear Center of Mexico, it has TRIGA type fuel of high and low enrichment (standard and FLIP) fresh and with burnt, it also has the infrastructure (hot cells, armor-plating of transport, etc) and qualified personnel to carry out the necessary maneuvers to prove the operation of the DEU prototype. For this its would be used standard type fuel elements and FLIP, so much fresh as with certain burnt one. In the case of the fresh fuels the measurement doesn't represent any risk, the fuels before and after the measurement its don't contain a quantity of fission products that its represent a radiological risk in its manipulation; but in the case of the fuels with burnt the handling of the same ones represents an important radiological risk reason why for its manipulation it was used the transport armor-plating and the hot cells. (Author)

  6. Transport of high enriched uranium fresh fuel from Yugoslavia to the Russian federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the relevant data related to the recent shipment (August 2002 of fresh highly enriched uranium fuel elements from Yugoslavia back to the Russian Federation for uranium down blending. In this way, Yugoslavia gave its contribution to the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR Program and to the world's joint efforts to prevent possible terrorist actions against nuclear material potentially usable for the production of nuclear weapons.

  7. Preliminary calculation for fission products generation and accumulation in different types of fuel rods by computer code FPRM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Nasumi

    1978-11-01

    The computer code ''FPRM-1'' has been developed for calculation of the quantities of fission products gases released from pellets into plenum in a fuel rod. On the assumption that the irradiation tests of plutonium fuel and others under development in an in-pile water loop were performed, FP generations and accumulations in the fuel rods were calculated by the code. The result of measurement of 131 I released from a fuel rod (UO 2 pellets, 235 U 1.5% Enriched) with an artificial hole through cladding in an in-pile water loop was compared with that of calculation by the code; both were in good agreement. (author)

  8. Performance and exhaust emission characteristics of direct-injection diesel engine fueled with enriched biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaie, Mohamad A. Hasan; Janius, Rimfiel B.; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Yunus, Robiah; Zakaria, Rabitah; Adam, Nor Mariah

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Enrichment of PME by MO addition leads to slightly improved BTE. • The enrichment leads to a remarkable reduction in BSFC. • The enrichment did not improve exhaust emissions relative to neat PME. • Cetane number shows to be the key properties that determined the emissions. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a renewable alternative diesel fuel derived from different feedstocks that may have significantly different fatty acid profiles and physiochemical properties. This study aimed to gain further insight into the use of biodiesel in a single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine. The influences of the properties and compound structure of neat and enriched components of biodiesel on engine performance and exhaust emissions were compared with that of petrodiesel under full load conditions. The enriched blends for testing were prepared by adding methyl oleate (MO) to palm oil methyl ester (PME) at specified volumetric ratios (vol/vol%): PME80:MO20, PME70:MO30, PME60:MO40, and PME50:MO50. Furthermore, various physiochemical properties of neat and enriched blends were evaluated against the ASTM D6751 standard. The impact of key fuel properties of neat and enriched blends associated with the performance of engine and exhaust emissions was discussed. The experimental results exhibited that enriched blends yielded a lower brake torque with higher brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) than the petroleum diesel because of lower calorific value. Intrinsic reductions in the carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions, and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) were also observed, as well as a slight increase in nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission. In addition, enriched blends showed a noticeable improvement in BSFC, with a slight increase in CO emission, HC emission, EGT, and NOx emission over individual PME as a result of lower ignition quality and lower oxygen content. Consequently, biodiesel that possesses more saturated components, and higher oxygen content yields

  9. Central fuel banking to reduce the number of proliferation sensitive enrichment activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cserhati, A.

    2008-01-01

    Central fuel banking is a complex international political, economic and technical concept that aims to reduce uncontrolled spreading of uranium enrichment technology in the world in order to prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons. This paper first gives an outline of the notions: 'non-proliferation', the 'front-end' of the fuel cycle, the scope of fuel baking, nuclear fuel and the 60 years of enrichment technology. Enrichment technology is highly concentrated in the nuclear weapon states and other developed countries, but this is not exclusive any more. The technology is spreading. The global demand for enrichment services - parallel to massive nuclear investments in the civil sector and the ageing of older facilities - is constantly growing. Proliferation sensitivity calls for an effective and comprehensive non-proliferation regime. The solution may be multilateralizing the nuclear fuel cycle. After a historical overview, the proposals on multilateral nuclear approaches are presented. The assessment of the proposals is complex in the dimensions of: the non-proliferation aim, the assurance of supply aspect and other variables such as legal issues and non-nuclear inducements. A general evaluation and the recommendations of the Expert Panel of the IAEA are introduced outlining a plan on a middle- and long-term basis. The conclusion of the paper stresses the importance and challenge in finding the 'new balance' between obligations and interests of the members of the global community stating that the answers will have a significant impact on the nuclear indus- try, world wide economics and security policy. (orig.)

  10. Preparation of UO2 dense spherical particles by sol-gel technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanek, V.; Dolezal, J.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the basic research and development of processes of preparation of dense UO 2 spherical particles by sol-gel technique are presented. Attention was paid to the study of chemistry of internal gelation step in the uranylnitrate-urea-hexamethylentetramine system. The existence regions of several stable gels with different properties were established in connection with variable ratio of basic gel's components and the appropriate ''Phase diagrams'' were drawn. From these diagrams, two of the most interesting types of uranyl gels were chosen for the subsequent thermal processing which included drying, reduction and sintering. The detailed studies of each step of the whole process enabled preparation of UO 2 dense spheres with well defined microstructure

  11. Studies of the role of molten materials in interactions with UO2 and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Heiberger, J.J.; Leibowitz, L.

    1979-01-01

    Graphite, which is being considered as a lower reactor shield in gas-cooled fast reactors, would be contacted by core debris during a core disruptive accident. Information on the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel is needed in assessing the safety of the GCFR. In an ongoing study of the interaction of graphite, UO 2 , and stainless steel, the effects of the steel components have been investigated by electron microprobe scans, x-ray diffraction, and reaction-rate measurements. Experiments to study the role of the reaction product, FeUC 2 , in the interaction suggested that FeUC 2 promotes the interaction by acting as a carrier to bring graphite to the reaction site. Additional experiments using pyrolytic graphite show that while the reaction rate is decreased at 2400 K, at higher temperatures the rate is similar to that using other grades of graphite

  12. The Fuel Performance Analysis of LWR Fuel containing High Thermal Conductivity Reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Su; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of fuel affects many performance parameters including the fuel centerline temperature, fission gas release and internal pressure. In addition, enhanced safety margin of fuel might be expected when the thermal conductivity of fuel is improved by the addition of high thermal conductivity reinforcements. Therefore, the effects of thermal conductivity enhancement on the fuel performance of reinforced UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity compounds should be analyzed. In this study, we analyzed the fuel performance of modified UO2 fuel with high thermal conductivity reinforcements by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The fissile density and mechanical properties of the modified fuel are considered the same with the standard UO2 fuel. The fuel performance of modified UO2 with high thermal conductivity reinforcements were analyzed by using the FRAPCON-3.5 code. The thermal conductivity enhancement factors of the modified fuels were obtained from the Maxwell model considering the volume fraction of reinforcements

  13. A charge-optimized many-body potential for the U-UO2-O2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangzhong; Liang, Tao; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2013-12-01

    Building on previous charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials for metallic α-U and gaseous O2, we have developed a new potential for UO2, which also allows the simulation of U-UO2-O2 systems. The UO2 lattice parameter, elastic constants and formation energies of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric intrinsic defects are well reproduced. Moreover, this is the first rigid-ion potential that produces the correct deviation of the Cauchy relation, as well as the first classical interatomic potential that is able to determine the defect energies of non-stoichiometric intrinsic point defects in UO2 with an appropriate reference state. The oxygen molecule interstitial in the α-U structure is shown to decompose, with some U-O bonds approaching the natural bond length of perfect UO2. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of this COMB potential to simulate a complex system by performing a simulation of the α-U + O2 → UO2 phase transformation. We also identify a possible mechanism for uranium oxidation and the orientation of the resulting fluorite UO2 structure relative to the coordinate system of orthorhombic α-U.

  14. The UO2 pellets plant experimental background of the established process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio Arroyo, E.; Alonso Folgueras, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    An account of the UO 2 research and development carried out at the JEN is first given. This includes a 10 tons/year pellet Plant construction. Experimental background of the process is established, pointing out both milling advantages and risks, granulation devices, automatic press selection, binder removing and sintering furnaces. Origin, surface area, grain size and 0/U rate are considered as raw material reception parameters, although this process shows a wide scope. (Author) 13 refs

  15. Determination of fluoride content in UO2F2 and ADUF solution by ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Papu; Kumar, Pradeep; Bagchi, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    During production of uranium metal powder, liquid solution UO 2 F 2 and ADUF containing high content of fluoride gets generated. Fluoride being corrosive in nature, fluorides concentration needs to determined. Ion selective electrode, LaF 3 (Eu) crystal, has been used. Uranium was found to interfere with fluoride analysis. Study was carried out to selectively remove uranium by solvent extraction employing D2EHPA+Cyanex 923 and TBP in dodecane. The TBP was found effective to remove uranium. (author)

  16. New fabrication method of UO2-Gd2O3 pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, M. J.; Yang, C. M.; Kim, Y. R.; Na, S. H.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, Y. W.

    2003-01-01

    UO 2 -8wt%Gd 2 O 3 pellets were fabricated by a new method. Two processes - milling by a continous-type attrition mill and spherodizing- were introduced in the fabrication method. The microstructure of sintered pellet appeared homogenous and showed larger grain size than that of conventional method which generally involves a mechanical mxing. And it appears that both precompacting process and granulating process can be avoided owing to good flow ability of the milled powder with the spherodizing treatment

  17. Neutron scattering investigation of disorder in UO2 and ThO2 at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, K.; Hayes, W.; Macdonald, J.E.; Schnabel, P.

    1983-01-01

    A brief account of the use of neutron scattering techniques to investigate anion lattice disorder and electronic disorder in UO 2 is given. Preliminary data on diffraction, diffuse scattering, and phonon mode behaviour at temperatures up to 2673 K are presented. The results show no direct evidence of Frenkel defect formation below 2400 K, but there are indications that some defect formation occurs above this temperature. (author)

  18. Cyclic process for re-use of waste water generated during the production of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, T.J.

    1976-01-01

    The process is described whereby waste water produced during the hydrolysis and ammonium hydroxide treatment of UF 6 to produce ammonium diuranate is recycled for reuse. The solution containing large amounts of ammonia and fluorides and trace amounts of uranium is first treated with lime to precipitate the fluoride. The ammonia is distilled off and recycled to UO 2 F 2 treatment vessel. The CaF 2 precipitate is separated by centrifugation and the aqueous portion is passed through cationic exchange beds

  19. Study of UO2 mechanical behaviour implanted with helium ions using X-ray micro-diffraction and mechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Marcelle

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the mechanical behavior of nuclear fuel during direct long term storage, UO 2 polycrystals were implanted with Helium ions at a thin surface layer (1 μm approximately), which leads to stress and strain fields in the layer. Strains were measured, at the grains scale, by X-ray micro-diffraction, using synchrotron radiation (ESRF). Image analysis methods were developed for an automatic analysis of the large number of diffraction patterns. Applying statistical tools to Laue patterns allows an automatic detection of low quality images, and enhances the measurement precision. At low layer thickness, the mechanical interaction between grains can be neglected. At higher thickness, experimental results showed a higher mechanical interaction near grain boundaries that can be modeled using finite elements method. Geostatistical tools were used to quantify these interactions. The swelling and the elastic constants in the implanted layer can be estimated through the measured strains on a large number of grains with different orientations. This work allows the determination of the swelling of nuclear fuel in irradiation conditions, as well as the modification of its elastic properties. (author) [fr

  20. High temperature thermal conductivity measurements of UO2 by Direct Electrical Heating. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B.

    1980-10-01

    High temperature properties of reactor type UO 2 pellets were measured using a Direct Electrical Heating (DEH) Facility. Modifications to the experimental apparatus have been made so that successful and reproducible DEH runs may be carried out while protecting the pellets from oxidation at high temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements on the UO 2 pellets have been made before and after runs to assure that sample oxidation has not occurred. A computer code has been developed that will model the experiment using equations that describe physical properties of the material. This code allows these equations to be checked by comparing the model results to collected data. The thermal conductivity equation for UO 2 proposed by Weilbacher has been used for this analysis. By adjusting the empirical parameters in Weilbacher's equation, experimental data can be matched by the code. From the several runs analyzed, the resulting thermal conductivity equation is lambda = 1/4.79 + 0.0247T/ + 1.06 x 10 -3 exp[-1.62/kT/] - 4410. exp[-3.71/kT/] where lambda is in w/cm K, k is the Boltzman constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin

  1. Neutron diffraction study of the in situ oxidation of UO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgranges, Lionel; Baldinozzi, Gianguido; Rousseau, Gurvan; Nièpce, Jean-Claude; Calvarin, Gilbert

    2009-08-17

    This paper discusses uranium oxide crystal structure modifications that are observed during the low-temperature oxidation which transforms UO(2) into U(3)O(8). The symmetries and the structural parameters of UO(2), beta-U(4)O(9), beta-U(3)O(7), and U(3)O(8) were determined by refining neutron diffraction patterns on pure single-phase samples. Neutron diffraction patterns were also collected during the in situ oxidation of powder samples at 483 K. The lattice parameters and relative ratios of the four pure phases were measured during the progression of the isothermal oxidation. The transformation of UO(2) into U(3)O(8) involves a complex modification of the oxygen sublattice and the onset of complex superstructures for U(4)O(9) and U(3)O(7), associated with regular stacks of complex defects known as cuboctahedra, which consist of 13 oxygen atoms. The kinetics of the oxidation process are discussed on the basis of the results of the structural analysis.

  2. Neutron Diffraction Study of the in Situ Oxidation of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, L; Rousseau, G.; Baldinozzi, G.; Calvarin, G.; Baldinozzi, G.; Calvarin, G.; Niepce, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses uranium oxide crystal structure modifications that are observed during the low-temperature oxidation which transforms UO 2 into U 3 O 8 . The symmetries and the structural parameters of UO 2 , β-U 4 O 9 , β-U 3 O 7 , and U 3 O 8 were determined by refining neutron diffraction patterns on pure single-phase samples. Neutron diffraction patterns were also collected during the in situ oxidation of powder samples at 483 K. The lattice parameters and relative ratios of the four pure phases were measured during the progression of the isothermal oxidation. The transformation of UO 2 into U 3 O 8 involves a complex modification of the oxygen sublattice and the onset of complex superstructures for U 4 O 9 and U 3 O 7 , associated with regular stacks of complex defects known as cub-octahedra, which consist of 13 oxygen atoms. The kinetics of the oxidation process are discussed on the basis of the results of the structural analysis. (authors)

  3. Thermodynamic stability of the UO2 surfaces: Interplay between over-stoichiometry and polarity compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottin, François; Geneste, Grégory; Jomard, Gérald

    2016-03-01

    The thermodynamic stability of UO2 surfaces is investigated using ab initio calculations. We employ the GGA+U framework to properly model the strong electronic correlations of the uranium 5 f electrons. Among the seven terminations of the (100), (110), and (111) orientations studied in this paper, we predict that the stoichiometric O-(111) is the most stable one under oxygen-poor or -intermediary environments. At odds with other fluorite surfaces, the overstoichiometric and polar O2-(100) and O2-(111) terminations become the most stable in oxygen-rich environments. For the latter, strong modifications of the electronic structure appear within the upper layers, in order to fulfill the polarity compensation criterion. Some U-5 f states are emptied, leading to higher oxidation 5 + and 6 + states for uranium in the outermost layers, but leaving the surface insulating. This unexpected polarity compensation mechanism is not observed for other charge transfer compounds (such as PuO2) and can be related to the f -f Mott-Hubbard band gap of the UO2 material. By considering the most stable stoichiometric and overstoichiometric terminations, the Castell's ratio can be fulfilled, explaining the Wulff shape of nanovoids in UO2 crystals.

  4. Theoretical comparative study of the industrial fabrication routes for UO2 powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Reinaldo; Goncalves, Joao da Silva

    2008-01-01

    UO 2 powder is produced in an industrial scale by different fabrication routes, divided into dry and wet routes, or a combination of both. The wet processes most often used industrially are the ADU and AUC processes, whose names originate in the intermediate precipitate obtained during powder fabrication, Ammonium Diuranate and Ammonium Uranil Carbonate. Considering the dry processes, the most widely used ones are the DC (Dry Conversion) and IDR (Integrate Dry Route) process. As to the differences and peculiarities among the fabrication routes, each has marked advantages and disadvantages that are of extreme importance when it comes to selecting and establishing a UO 2 powder production plant based on a particular fabrication route. Among the important factors of comparison to be considered are the product quality characteristics, production capability, quantity of waste, operating costs of each process with raw material, labor, etc. This paper is intended to make a theoretical comparison between wet and dry processes for UO 2 powder fabrication, taking as the basis the previously mentioned factors of comparison. (author)

  5. Reduced enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors - Fabrication and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.C.; Foo, M.T.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.; Schaefer, J.D.; Hawley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Our facilities have been upgraded to manufacture fuel rods comprising dispersions of U 3 Si in aluminum, to complement the dispersions of U 3 Si alloyed with 1.5 and 3.0 wt% Al fabricated and tested previously. Further advances have been made in process optimization particularly in core extrusion where production rate has been doubled while maintaining high quality standards. Our mini-element irradiations of Al-61.5 wt% (U,3.5 wt% Si, 1.5 wt% Al) and Al-62.4 wt% (U,3.2 wt% Si, 30 wt% Al) have been completed successfully up to the terminal burnup of 93 atomic percent. Fuel core swelling remained marginally below 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup over the whole irradiation. Also mini-elements containing Al-72.4 wt% USiAl and Al-73.4 wt% USi*Al have been irradiated to 82 atomic percent burnup, their swelling rate marginally exceeding 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup. Three full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-62.4 wt% USi*Al have been fabricated and installed in the NRU reactor where they have performed normally without problems. The cores for four more full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-61.0 wt% U 3 Si have been manufactured. (author)

  6. CONCEPTUAL PROCESS DESCRIPTION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Curtis R. Clark; Randall J. Dunavant

    2008-02-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is tasked with minimizing the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) worldwide. A key component of that effort is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program, previously known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program was initiated in 1978 by the United States Department of Energy to develop the nuclear fuels necessary to enable these conversions. The program cooperates with the research reactors’ operators to achieve this goal of HEU to LEU conversion without reduction in reactor performance. The programmatic mandate is to complete the conversion of all civilian domestic research reactors by 2014. These reactors include the five domestic high-performance research reactors (HPRR), namely: the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory, the National Bureau of Standards Reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Missouri University Research Reactor at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and the MIT Reactor-II at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Characteristics for each of the HPRRs are given in Appendix A. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program is currently engaged in the development of a novel nuclear fuel that will enable these conversions. The fuel design is based on a monolithic fuel meat (made from a uranium-molybdenum alloy) clad in Al-6061 that has shown excellent performance in irradiation testing. The unique aspects of the fuel design, however, necessitate the development and implementation of new fabrication techniques and, thus, establishment of the infrastructure to ensure adequate fuel fabrication capability. A conceptual fabrication process description and rough estimates of the total facility throughput are described in this document as a basis for

  7. Complexing in K2SeO4-UO2SeO4-H2O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkina, L.B.; Kuchumova, N.V.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Complexing in K 2 SeO 4 -UO 2 SeO 4 -H 2 O system was studied by the method of isothermal solubility at 25 deg C. Congruently soluble K 2 UO 2 (SeO 4 )2·4H 2 O (1) and incongruently soluble K 2 (UO 2 ) 2 (SeO 4 )3·6H 2 O (2) compounds were revealed in the system. It is shown that (1) and (2) complexes are the representatives of crystallochemical AB 2 2 M 1 and A 2 T 3 3 M 1 groups of uranyl complexes respectively

  8. Complexing in (NH4)2SeO4-UO2SeO4 H2O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkina, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    Isotherm of solubility in the (NH 4 ) 2 SeO 4 -UO 2 SeO 4 -H 2 O system has been constructed at 25 deg C. (NH 4 ) 2 (UO 2 ) 2 (SeO 4 ) 3 x6H 2 O formation is established for the first time and certain its physicochemical properties are determined. Regularities of complexing in the R 2 Se) 4 -UO 2 SeO 4 -H 2 O systems, where R-univalent cation are under discussion. 6 refs.; 3 tabs

  9. Irradiation program of slightly enriched fuel elements at the Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casario, J.A.; Cesario, R.H.; Perez, R.A.; Sidelnik, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation program of fuel elements with slightly enriched uranium is implemented, tending to the homogenization of core at Atucha I nuclear power plant. The main benefits of the enrichment program are: a) to extend the average discharge burnup of fuel elements, reducing the number of elements used to generate the same amount of energy. This implies a smaller annual consumption of elements and consequently the reduction of transport and replacement operations and of the storage pool systems as well as that of radioactive wastes; b) the saving of uranium and structural materials (Zircaloy and others). In the initial stage of program an homogeneous core enrichment of 0.85% by weight of U-235 is anticipated. The average discharge burnup of fuel elements, as estimated by previous studies, is approximately 11.6 MW d/kg U. The annual consumption of fuel elements is reduced from 396 of natural uranium to 205, with a load factor of 0.85. It is intended to reach the next equilibrium steps with an enrichment of 1.00 and 1.20% in U-235. (Author)

  10. Study of a Slightly Enriched R Reactor Fuel by Means of a Pulsed Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagot, M.; Tellier, H.

    1962-04-01

    A Be O moderated reactor using slightly enriched uranium oxide as fuel was studied by the pulsed neutron source technique. The neutron lifetime was measured in two different cores without reflector, then attempts were made at the measurement of great negative reactivities introduced into the reactor under the following forms: decrease of the volume of the un reflected core, introduction of absorbing cadmium rods, removal of fuel at the periphery of the critical core while maintaining a constant height, and substitution of fuel elements by less reactive elements. In all cases, the results are compared with the data obtained by another type of experiment or by computation. (author) [fr

  11. Homogeneity study of enriched uranium dioxide to be used in intercomparison programs in the brazilian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, Barbara F.G.; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2013-01-01

    The Brazilian nuclear facilities must dispose of measurement systems that allow the determination of their nuclear material inventories. The main goal of this work is the characterization of enriched uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) pellets to use as test sample to evaluate and verify these systems through the participation of the involved laboratories in interlaboratorial comparison programs. The programs are formed by a network of specialized laboratories in determining materials of the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, before being sent to laboratories, the materials must have their homogeneity confirmed. The homogeneity study of the UO 2 pellets has being carried out in the Safeguards Laboratory (LASAL) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) through Destructives Analysis technique. The technique used was Davies and Gray/NBL titrimetric method. For this purpose, 25 pellets of enriched uranium dioxide from two different batches were randomly chosen. The model for homogeneity study between-unit variation (between-bottle homogeneity study) and minimum sample intake (within-bottle homogeneity study) adopted is a one-way ANOVA. No statistical significant differences were observed in the results of total uranium concentration for both batches. Thus, the UO 2 pellets are considered homogeneous and can be used in a Brazilian measurement systems evaluation program.(author)

  12. Reimiep 87. An interlaboratory U-235 enrichment determination by gamma measurement on solid UF6 sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, M.; Cresti, P.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma spectroscopy technique, based on the measurement of U 235 186 KeV flux, is now currently used for the determination of Uranium enrichment in different material of nuclear fuel cycle, namely: Uranium metallic, UO 2 pellets, UF 6 liquid or solid. The present paper describes the use of such a technique and the obtained results in determining the U 235 /U atomic isotopic abundance on a certified UF 6 solid sample. The measurements have been carried out in the frame work of the partecipation to the ''UF 6 Interlaboratory Measurements Evaluation Programme'' organized by CBNM/Geel with the support of the ESARDA (European Safeguards Research and Development Association)

  13. Critical experiments in AQUILON with fuels slightly enriched in uranium 235 or in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabrillac, M.; Ledanois, G.; Lourme, P.; Naudet, R.

    1964-01-01

    Reactivity comparisons have been, made in Aquilon II between geometrically identical lattices differing only by the composition of the fuel. The fuel elements consist in metallic uranium single rods with either slight differences of the isotopic composition (0.69 - 0.71 - 0.83 - 0.86 per cent of uranium 235) or slight additions of plutonium (0.043 per cent). Five lattices pitches have bean used, in order to produce a large variation of spectrum. Two additional sets of plutonium fuels are prepared to be used in the same conditions. The double comparisons: natural enriched 235 versus natural-enriched plutonium are made in such a way that a very precise interpretation is permitted. The results are perfectly consistent which seems to prove that the calculation methods are convenient. Further it can been inferred that the usual data, namely for the ratio of the η of 235 U and 239 Pu seem reliable. (authors) [fr

  14. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years

  15. Operational experience with the first eighteen slightly enriched uranium fuel assemblies in the Atucha-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higa, M.; Perez, R.; Pineyro, J.; Sidelnik, J.; Fink, J.; Casario, J.A.; Alvarez, L.

    1997-01-01

    Atucha I is a 357 Mwe nuclear station, moderated and cooled with heavy water, pressure vessel type of German design, located in Argentina. Fuel assemblies (FA) are 36 active natural UO2 rod clusters, 5.3 meters long and fuel is on power. Average FA exit burnup is 6 MWd/kg U. The reactor core contains 252 FA. To reduce the fuel costs about 6 MU$S/yr a program of utilization of SEU (0.85 %w U235) fuel was started at the beginning of 1995 with the introduction of 12 FA in the first step. The exit burnup of FA is approx. 10 MWd/kgU. It is planned to increase gradually the number of them up to having a full core with SEU fuel with an expected FA average exit burnup of 11 MWd/kgU. The SEU program has also the advantage of a strong reduction of spent fuel volume, and a moderate reduction of fuelling machine use. This paper presents the satisfactory operation experience with the introduction of the first 12 SEU fuel assemblies and the planned activities for the future. The fresh SEU fuel assemblies were introduced in six fuel channels located in an intermediate zone located 136 cm from the center of the reactor and selected because they have higher margins to the channel powers limits to accommodate the initial 15 to 20 % relative channel power increase. To verify the design and fuel management calculations, comparisons have been made of the calculated and measured values of the variation of channel ΔT, regulating rods insertion and flux reading in in-core detectors near to the refueled channel. The agreement was good and in most of the cases within the measurement errors. Cell calculations were made with WIMS-D4, and reactor calculations with PUMA. a fuel management 3D diffusion program developed in Argentina. With SEU fuel with a greater burnup in the central high power core region, new operating procedures were developed to prevent PCI failures in fuel power ramps that arise during operation. Some fuel rod and structural assembly design changes were introduced on the

  16. Neutron source, linear-accelerator fuel enricher and regenerator and associated methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Kouts, H.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Takahashi, H.

    1982-01-01

    A device for producing fissile material inside of fabricated nuclear elements so that they can be used to produce power in nuclear power reactors. Fuel elements, for example, of a lwr are placed in pressure tubes in a vessel surrounding a liquid lead bismuth flowing columnar target. A linear-accelerator proton beam enters the side of the vessel and impinges on the dispersed liquid lead-bismuth columns and produces neutrons which radiate through the surrounding pressure tube assembly or blanket containing the nuclear fuel elements. These neutrons are absorbed by the natural fertile uranium-238 elements and are transformed to fissile plutonium-239. The fertile fuel is thus enriched in fissile material to a concentration whereby they can be used in power reactors. After use in the power reactors, dispensed depleted fuel elements can be reinserted into the pressure tubes surrounding the target and the nuclear fuel regenerated for further burning in the power reactor

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer R [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the complex aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present

  18. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

    2014-10-30

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the “complex” aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The

  19. On-Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2010-01-01

    Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (∼ 1-mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4%-10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  20. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  1. Nuclear fuel production at BNFL plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petritskij, E.P.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of nuclear fuel production at BNFL plants is described, as well as basic technological processes of UO 2 powder production including IDR process for automatic fabrication of fuel elements and fuel assemblies. Physical and chemical properties of UO 2 powder, fuel pellet sintering parameters, data on in-reactor operation of nuclear fuels fabricated from pellets of controlled porosity with CONPOR additives, are presented. 8 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Investigating microstructural evolution during the electroreduction of UO2 to U in LiCl-KCl eutectic using focused ion beam tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Tjaden, B.; Inman, D.; Brett, D. J. L.; Shearing, P. R.

    2016-11-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels using molten salt media is an attractive alternative to liquid-liquid extraction techniques. Pyroelectrochemical processing utilizes direct, selective, electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide, followed by selective electroplating of a uranium metal. Thermodynamic prediction of the electrochemical reduction of UO2 to U in LiCl-KCl eutectic has shown to be a function of the oxide ion activity. The pO2- of the salt may be affected by the microstructure of the UO2 electrode. A uranium dioxide filled "micro-bucket" electrode has been partially electroreduced to uranium metal in molten lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic. This partial electroreduction resulted in two distinct microstructures: a dense UO2 and a porous U metal structure were characterised by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Focused ion beam tomography was performed on five regions of this electrode which revealed an overall porosity ranging from 17.36% at the outer edge to 3.91% towards the centre, commensurate with the expected extent of reaction in each location. The pore connectivity was also seen to reduce from 88.32% to 17.86% in the same regions and the tortuosity through the sample was modelled along the axis of propagation of the electroreduction, which was seen to increase from a value of 4.42 to a value of infinity (disconnected pores). These microstructural characteristics could impede the transport of O2- ions resulting in a change in the local pO2- which could result in the inability to perform the electroreduction.

  3. High temperature investigation of the solid/liquid transition in the PuO2-UO2-ZrO2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaini, A.; Guéneau, C.; Gossé, S.; Sundman, B.; Manara, D.; Smith, A. L.; Bottomley, D.; Lajarge, P.; Ernstberger, M.; Hodaj, F.

    2015-12-01

    The solid/liquid transitions in the quaternary U-Pu-Zr-O system are of great interest for the analysis of core meltdown accidents in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) fuelled with uranium-dioxide and MOX. During a severe accident the Zr-based cladding can become completely oxidised due to the interaction with the oxide fuel and the water coolant. In this framework, the present analysis is focused on the pseudo-ternary system UO2-PuO2-ZrO2. The melting/solidification behaviour of five pseudo-ternary and one pseudo-binary ((PuO2)0.50(ZrO2)0.50) compositions have been investigated experimentally by a laser heating method under pre-set atmospheres. The effects of an oxidising or reducing atmosphere on the observed melting/freezing temperatures, as well as the amount of UO2 in the sample, have been clearly identified for the different compositions. The oxygen-to-metal ratio is a key parameter affecting the melting/freezing temperature because of incongruent vaporisation effects. In parallel, a detailed thermodynamic model for the UO2-PuO2-ZrO2 system has been developed using the CALPHAD method, and thermodynamic calculations have been performed to interpret the present laser heating results, as well as the high temperature behaviour of the cubic (Pu,U,Zr)O2±x-c mixed oxide phase. A good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data points. This work enables an improved understanding of the major factors relevant to severe accident in nuclear reactors.

  4. Serving the fuel cycle: preparing tomorrow's packagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, V.

    2001-01-01

    The main fleet of transport packagings serving today the fuel cycle was born more than 20 years ago. Or was it they? The present paper will show that serving the fuel cycle by preparing tomorrow's logistics is actually an on-going process, rather than a rupture. We shall review the great packagings of the fuel cycle: In the front end, the major actors are the UF 4 , UF 6 , enriched UF 6 , UO 2 powders, fresh fuel packagings. In the back end of the fuel cycle, we find the dry transport casks of the TN-12, TN-17, TN-13, family and also the Excellox wet flasks. In the waste management, a whole fleet of containers, culminating in the TN Gemini, are available or being created. (author)

  5. Fuel handling accident analysis for the University of Missouri Research Reactor's High Enriched Uranium to Low Enriched Uranium fuel conversion initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Benjamin

    In accordance with the 1986 amendment concerning licenses for research and test reactors, the MU Research Reactor (MURR) is planning to convert from using High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. Since the approval of a new LEU fuel that could meet the MURR's performance demands, the next phase of action for the fuel conversion process is to create a new Safety Analysis Report (SAR) with respect to the LEU fuel. A component of the SAR includes the Maximum Hypothetical Accident (MHA) and accidents that qualify under the class of Fuel Handling Accidents (FHA). In this work, the dose to occupational staff at the MURR is calculated for the FHAs. The radionuclide inventory for the proposed LEU fuel was calculated using the ORIGEN2 point-depletion code linked to the MURR neutron spectrum. The MURR spectrum was generated from a Monte Carlo Neutron transPort (MCNP) simulation. The coupling of these codes create MONTEBURNS, a time-dependent burnup code. The release fraction from each FHA within this analysis was established by the methodology of the 2006 HEU SAR, which was accepted by the NRC. The actual dose methodology was not recorded in the HEU SAR, so a conservative path was chosen. In compliance to NUREG 1537, when new methodology is used in a HEU to LEU analysis, it is necessary to re-evaluate the HEU accident. The Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) values were calculated in addition to the whole body dose and thyroid dose to operation personnel. The LEU FHA occupational TEDE dose was 349 mrem which is under the NRC regulatory occupational dose limit of 5 rem TEDE, and under the LEU MHA limit of 403 mrem. The re-evaluated HEU FHA occupational TEDE dose was 235 mrem, which is above the HEU MHA TEDE dose of 132 mrem. Since the new methodology produces a dose that is larger than the HEU MHA, we can safely assume that it is more conservative than the previous, unspecified dose.

  6. The MgSeO4-UO2SeO4-H2O system at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkina, L.B.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The method of isothermal solubility at 25 deg C has been used to study MgSeO 4 -UO 2 SeO 4 -H 2 O system. Formation of the new compound Mg 2 (UO 2 ) 3 (SeO 4 ) 5 X32H 2 O, congruently soluble in water is stated. Thermographic and X-ray diffraction investigations of the prepared magnesium selenato-uranylate and products of its dehydration are conducted

  7. A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel's waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts

  8. Status of the natural and enriched uranium market: the basic economical factor for the development of the fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nochev, T.

    1999-01-01

    Status of the Natural and Enriched Uranium Market - the Basic. Economical Factor for the Development of the Fuel Cycle An overview of the status of the natural and enriched uranium market has been performed and it offers a possibility to estimate the changes and tendencies, the knowledge of which is needed in negotiations about the fresh fuel. The simplified financial analysis presented here demonstrates the economical profitability of the storage of the spent fuel making now the allocations for the future reprocessing

  9. An enhanced search algorithm for the charged fuel enrichment in equilibrium cycle analysis of REBUS-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Tongkyu; Yang, Won Sik; Kim, Sang-Ji

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced search algorithm for charged fuel enrichment was developed for equilibrium cycle analysis with REBUS-3. • The new search algorithm is not sensitive to the user-specified initial guesses. • The new algorithm reduces the computational time by a factor of 2–3. - Abstract: This paper presents an enhanced search algorithm for the charged fuel enrichment in equilibrium cycle analysis of REBUS-3. The current enrichment search algorithm of REBUS-3 takes a large number of iterations to yield a converged solution or even terminates without a converged solution when the user-specified initial guesses are far from the solution. To resolve the convergence problem and to reduce the computational time, an enhanced search algorithm was developed. The enhanced algorithm is based on the idea of minimizing the number of enrichment estimates by allowing drastic enrichment changes and by optimizing the current search algorithm of REBUS-3. Three equilibrium cycle problems with recycling, without recycling and of high discharge burnup were defined and a series of sensitivity analyses were performed with a wide range of user-specified initial guesses. Test results showed that the enhanced search algorithm is able to produce a converged solution regardless of the initial guesses. In addition, it was able to reduce the number of flux calculations by a factor of 2.9, 1.8, and 1.7 for equilibrium cycle problems with recycling, without recycling, and of high discharge burnup, respectively, compared to the current search algorithm.

  10. Feasibility to convert an advanced PWR from UO2 to a mixed (U,Th)O2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefani, Giovanni Laranjo de; Maiorino, José Rubens; Moreira, João Manoel de Losada; Santos, Thiago Augusto dos; Rossi, Pedro Carlos Russo

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the neutronics and thermal hydraulics feasibility to convert the UO2 core of the Westinghouse AP1000 in a (U-Th)O 2 core, rather than the traditional uranium dioxide, for the purpose of reducing long-lived actinides, especially plutonium, and generates a stock pile of 233 U, which could in the future be used in advanced fuel cycles, in a more sustainable process and taking advantage of the large stock of thorium available on the planet and especially in Brazil. The reactor chosen as reference was the AP1000, which is considered to be one of the most reliable and modern reactor of the current Generation III, and its similarity to the reactors already consolidated and used in Brazil for electric power generation. The results show the feasibility and potentiality of the concept, without the necessity of changes in the core of the AP1000, and even with advantages over this. The neutron calculations were made by the SERPENT code. The results provided a maximum linear power density lower than the AP1000, favoring safety. In addition, the delayed neutron fraction and the reactivity coefficients proved to be adequate to ensure the safety of the concept. The results show that a production of about 260 Kg of 233 U per cycle is possible, with a minimum production of fissile plutonium that favors the use of the concept in U-Th cycles. (author)

  11. Chlorination of UO2, PuO2, and rare-earth oxides using ZrCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamura, Yoshiharu; Inoue, Tadashi; Iwai, Takashi; Moriyama, Hirotake

    2001-01-01

    A new chlorination method using ZrCl 4 , which has a high reactivity with oxygen, has been investigated for more efficient oxide treatment. After actinide oxides are chlorinated and dissolved in a molten salt bath, actinide metals can be selectively collected using the electrorefining process. This process is well suited for pyrochemical reprocessing of metallic fuels. In LiCl-KCI eutectic melts, rare-earth oxides (Y 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , and Nd 2 O 3 ) and actinide oxides (UO 2 and PuO 2 ) were chlorinated by adding ZrCl 4 . As a result, rare-earth and actinide elements were dissolved into the salt as trivalent ions and ZrO 2 was precipitated. When an excess of ZrCI 4 was added, oxides in powder form were completely chlorinated in five hours. It was demonstrated that the ZrCI 4 chlorination method, free from corrosive gas such as chlorine, was very simple and useful. (author)

  12. Optimization of axial enrichment distribution for BWR fuels using scoping libraries and block coordinate descent method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Wu-Hsiung, E-mail: wstong@iner.gov.tw; Lee, Tien-Tso; Kuo, Weng-Sheng; Yaur, Shung-Jung

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • An optimization method for axial enrichment distribution in a BWR fuel was developed. • Block coordinate descent method is employed to search for optimal solution. • Scoping libraries are used to reduce computational effort. • Optimization search space consists of enrichment difference parameters. • Capability of the method to find optimal solution is demonstrated. - Abstract: An optimization method has been developed to search for the optimal axial enrichment distribution in a fuel assembly for a boiling water reactor core. The optimization method features: (1) employing the block coordinate descent method to find the optimal solution in the space of enrichment difference parameters, (2) using scoping libraries to reduce the amount of CASMO-4 calculation, and (3) integrating a core critical constraint into the objective function that is used to quantify the quality of an axial enrichment design. The objective function consists of the weighted sum of core parameters such as shutdown margin and critical power ratio. The core parameters are evaluated by using SIMULATE-3, and the cross section data required for the SIMULATE-3 calculation are generated by using CASMO-4 and scoping libraries. The application of the method to a 4-segment fuel design (with the highest allowable segment enrichment relaxed to 5%) demonstrated that the method can obtain an axial enrichment design with improved thermal limit ratios and objective function value while satisfying the core design constraints and core critical requirement through the use of an objective function. The use of scoping libraries effectively reduced the number of CASMO-4 calculation, from 85 to 24, in the 4-segment optimization case. An exhausted search was performed to examine the capability of the method in finding the optimal solution for a 4-segment fuel design. The results show that the method found a solution very close to the optimum obtained by the exhausted search. The number of

  13. Manufacturing experience of PHWR and LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power contributes ∼ 16% to global electricity. Presently, some 441 nuclear power reactors, with total installed capacity of ∼ 358 GWe, are in operation in 32 countries. Nuclear energy is an inevitable option for meeting the ever-increasing demand of electricity without degrading the environment. For judicious utilization of natural uranium and thorium resources, it would be essential to adapt a closed nuclear fuel cycle in coming years. Natural and enriched uranium oxide fuels are likely to be replaced by mixed uranium plutonium oxide or ThO 2 -based mixed oxide fuels containing 235 U, 239 Pu or 233 U fissile material. The current powder-pellet-route is associated with the problem of radiotoxic dust hazard and should be replaced by dust-free advanced routes like SGMP for remote and automated manufacturing of highly radiotoxic 233 U or Pu-bearing mixed oxide fuels. The combined SGMP-LTS process for fabrication of UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 fuel pellets not only minimizes radiotoxic dust hazard but leads to significant energy saving. The ever-expanding nuclear power programme in India should see massive expansion in zirconium, UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 production in coming years

  14. Electrochemical system for the control of oxigen atmospheres in UO2 sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneiro, Alberto; Abriata, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The behaviour of an electrochemical pump and of an oxygen sensor, allowing a precise control of the UO 2 stoichiometry in the preparation and analysis of gaseous mixtures of low oxygen contents is described. The correct functioning of the system can be tested by applying Faraday's law. The oxygen partial pressures can be continuously controlled by the sole varation of the current applied to the electrochemical pump. The partial pressure of the system is within the range between x 10 -1 atm and 10 -27 atm at 800 deg C. This system may be utilized for sintering experiments at a laboratory scale. (M.E.L) [es

  15. Étude par calcul de structure électronique des dégâts d'irradiation dans le combustible nucléaire UO2 : comportement des défauts ponctuels et gaz de fission

    OpenAIRE

    VATHONNE, EMERSON

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is worldwide the most widely used fuel in nuclear plants in the world and in particular in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In-pile the fission of uranium nuclei creates fission products and point defects in the fuel. The understanding of the evolution of these radiation damages requires a multi-scale modelling approach of the nuclear fuel, from the scale of the pellet to the atomic scale. We used an electronic structure calculation method based on the density functiona...

  16. Proceedings of the third spent fuel workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werme, L.

    1984-03-01

    The third workshop, held in Boston, Mass. November 10-11, 1983 was organized by Battelle PNL. Questions concerning spent fuel behaviour in nuclear waste repositories were discussed. The following three lectures were presented. The corrosion of Spent UO 2 -Fuel in Synthetic Groundwater, R.S. Forsyth, K. Svanberg and L.O. Werme. Leaching and Radiolysis Studies on UO 2 Fuel, L.H. Johnson, S. Stroes-Gascoyne, D.W. Shoesmith, M.G. Bailey and D.M. Sellinger. Comparison of Spent Fuel and UO 2 Release in Salt Brines, W.J. Gray and G.L. McVay. (G.B.)

  17. Development of ISA procedure for uranium fuel fabrication and enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamate, Kazuki; Arakawa, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Masahiro; Sasaki, Noriaki; Hirano, Mitsumasa

    2011-01-01

    The integrated safety analysis (ISA) procedure has been developed to apply risk-informed regulation to uranium fuel fabrication and enrichment facilities. The major development efforts are as follows: (a) preparing the risk level matrix as an index for items-relied-on-for-safety (IROFS) identification, (b) defining requirements of IROFS, and (c) determining methods of IROFS importance based on the results of risk- and scenario-based analyses. For the risk level matrix, the consequence and likelihood categories have been defined by taking into account the Japanese regulatory laws, rules, and safety standards. The trial analyses using the developed procedure have been performed for several representative processes of the reference uranium fuel fabrication and enrichment facilities. This paper presents the results of the ISA for the sintering process of the reference fabrication facility. The results of the trial analyses have demonstrated the applicability of the procedure to the risk-informed regulation of these facilities. (author)

  18. Radiological health aspects of commercial uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Hoenes, G.R.; Cummings, F.M.; McCormack, W.D.

    1982-11-01

    Detailed information concerning occupational exposures, health physics practices, and regulatory procedures at commercial conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities is given. Sites visits were the primary source of information, which is divided into four sections. The first section discusses health physics practices that are common to the conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication phases of the commercial uranium industry. The next three sections review process descriptions, radiological health practices, and regulatory procedures for the three phases. Nonradiological exposures are considered only as they influence the interpretation of the health effects of radiological exposures. The review of regulatory procedures indicates the types of exposure evaluation records being kept on uranium workers and the responsibility for maintaining the records.

  19. Use of Low Enriched Uranium Fuel in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the results and conclusions of an international research collaboration devoted to gaining a better understanding of the physics of Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems (ADS), with particular emphasis on using low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The publication contains information on nine ADS facilities, including descriptions of the hardware deployed, experiments conducted, computational resources and procedures used in the analyses, principal results obtained, and conclusions drawn from the knowledge gained as a consequence of this work. It is intended to provide information for users of ADS systems and those involved in the design of new ADS facilities to use LEU fuel and in the conversion of some existing facilities from using highly enriched Uranium (HEU) to LEU.

  20. Atomics International fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Most of you know our company from the last meeting in May in Vienna, so I won't steal your time with explaining and demonstrating the same techniques that we have heard this morning f rom the other speakers. I would just take some words to explain the order of business with highly enriched uranium. NUKEM handles around almost two tons of highly enriched uranium a year and it was necessary to satisfy all the new physical protection philosophies. That means that we have to install storage and safe fabrication sites for a lot of money, 2.5 meter thick concrete walls, and different alarm systems. So just to demonstrate how silly this business is, we have just overcome this for highly enriched uranium, and now we speak about low enriched uranium for which we don't need all of these investments to make this business safe. I would just like to concentrate my words on the status of fabrication and considerations in my company concerning the medium enriched uranium and low enriched uranium. In TABLE I are the different fuel types (see column 1) and then we have the fabrication in column 2; (The reason that I use the blackboard this morning is that I try to demonstrate all the techniques. However, all the speakers before me did this and in theory we are not so far away from each other.) the experience of my company in kg. In column 3 is the irradiation experience of these fuels types. Column 4 shows the studies and calculations made in our company for lower and medium enriched fuels. The preliminary fabrication tests and calculations are in column 5, and in column 6 we have the delivery time for a prototype core in months after UF 6 supply. Column 7 shows the time for the development of specifications including irradiation time in years for 6 and 7, and column 8 is the estimated cost of 6 and 7. There is just one fuel that is not in this summary and that is U-Zr

  1. Atomics international fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program [contributed by H.W. Hassel, NUKEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    NUKEM handles around almost two tons of highly enriched uranium a year and it was necessary to satisfy all the new physical protection philosophies. That means that we have to install storage and safe fabrication sites for a lot of money, 25 meter thick concrete walls, and different alarm systems. So just to demonstrate how silly this business is, we have just overcome this for highly enriched uranium, and now we speak about low enriched uranium for which we don't need all of these investments to make this business safe. I would-just like to concentrate my words on the status of fabrication and considerations in my company concerning the medium enriched uranium and low enriched uranium. In the table are the different fuel types (see column) and then we have the fabrication in column 2 the experience of my comp any in kg. In column 3 is the irradiation experience of these fuels types. Column 4 shows the studies and calculations made in our company for lower and medium enriched fuels. The preliminary fabrication tests and calculations are in column 5, and in column 6 we have the delivery time for a prototype core in months after UF 6 supply. Column 7 shows the time for the development of specifications including irradiation time in years for 6 and 7 and column is the estimated cost of 6 and 7 There is just one fuel that is not in this summary and that is U-Zr. We now see how complex and sophisticated this business is. I have told you already that we have installed for a lot of millions of Deutsche Mark the physical protection, storage vaults and things like that. Now we have to investigate all these different types of fuels for, as you see, a lot of money. Maybe these are a lot of optimistic figures; anyway the question is, does this make all the overall nuclear situation worldwide easier or not. One cannot answer for the moment, but anyway we have a lot of problems

  2. Fuel production for LWRs - MOX fuel aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deramaix, P.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium recycling in Light Water Reactors is today an industrial reality. It is recycled in the form of (U, Pu)O 2 fuel pellets (MOX), fabricated to a large extent according to UO 2 technology and pellet design. The similarity of physical, chemical, and neutron properties of both fuels also allows MOX fuel to be burnt in nuclear plants originally designed to burn UO 2 . The industrial processes presently in use or planned are all based on a mechanical blending of UO 2 and PuO 2 powders. To obtain finely dispersed plutonium and to prevent high local concentration of plutonium, the feed materials are micronised. In the BNFL process, the whole (UO 2 , PuO 2 ) blend is micronised by attrition milling. According to the MIMAS process, developed by BELGONUCLEAIRE, a primary blend made of UO 2 containing about 30% PuO 2 is micronised in a ball mill, afterwards this primary blend is mechanically diluted in UO 2 to obtain the specified Pu content. After mixing, the (U, Pu)O 2 powder is pressed and the pellets are sintered. The sintering cover gas contains moisture and 5 v/o H 2 . Moisture increases the sintering process and the U-Pu interdiffusion. After sintering and grinding, the pellets are submitted to severe controls to verify conformity with customer specifications (fissile content, Pu distribution, surface condition, chemical purity, density, microstructure). (author)

  3. Progress in qualifying low-enriched U-Mo dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program is working to qualify dispersions of U-Mo alloys in aluminum with fuel-meat densities of 8 to 9 gU cm -3 . Post irradiation examinations of the small fuel plates irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor during the high-temperature RERTR-3 tests are virtually complete, and analysis of the large quantity of data obtained is underway. We have observed that the swelling of the fuel plates is stable and modest and that the swelling is dominated by the temperature-dependent interaction of the U-Mo fuel and the aluminum matrix. In order to extract detailed information about the behavior of these fuels from the data, a complex fuel-plate thermal model is being developed to account for the effects of the changing fission rate and thermal conductivity of the fuel meat during irradiation. This paper summarizes the empirical results of the post irradiation examinations and the preliminary results of the model development. In addition, the schedule for irradiation of full-sized elements in the HFR-Petten is briefly discussed. (author)

  4. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, M. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morrell, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jamison, R. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nef, E. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  5. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  6. Validation of the code ETOBOX/BOXER for UO2 LWR lattices based on the experiments TRX, BAPL-UO2 and other critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paratte, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    The EIR codes system for LWR arrays is based on cross sections taken out of ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5 by the code ETOBOX. The calculation method for the arrays (code BOXER) and the cross sections as well were applied to the CSEWG benchmark experiments TRX-1 to 4 and BAPL-UO/sub 2/-1 to 3. The results are compared to the measured values and to some calculations of other institutions as well. This demonstrates that the deviations of the parameters calculated by BOXER are typical for the cross sections used. A large number of critical experiments were calculated using the measured material bucklings in order to bring to light possible trends in the calculation of the multiplication factor k/sub eff/. First it came out that the error bounds of B/sub m//sup 2/ evalu-ated in the measurements are often optimistic. Two-dimensional calculations improved the results of the cell calculations. With a mean scattering of 4 to 5 mk in the normal arrays, the multiplication factors calculated by BOXER are satisfactory. However one has to take into account a slight trend of k/sub eff/ to grow with the moderator to fuel ratio and the enrichment. (author)

  7. Study and modelling of the in-pile densification of the UO2 and MOx nuclear oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulore, A.

    2001-03-01

    Amongst the many phenomena which take place in the course of the irradiation of UO 2 or (U, Pu)O 2 nuclear fuels, one of them involves the elimination of a fraction of the as-fabricated porosity. In-pile densification or sintering can reach 2.5%, i.e. approximately half the initial volume of pores is likely to disappear. Our literature survey indicates that the amplitude and kinetics of the phenomenon are both heavily dependent on the initial fuel microstructure. Micro-structural characterisation techniques of oxide fuels have therefore been developed in conjunction with quantitative image analysis methods. The ensuing methodology enables a quantitative comparison of micro-structural features in different fuels and has been applied to ascertaining the influence of the local fission rate and temperature on in-pile densification. It is thus revealed that in-pile operation eliminates a significant fraction of pores smaller than 3 microns in diameter. The experimental data generated has been used to set up a semi-empirical and a mechanistic model. The former is based on experimental results and is not essentially predictive. The inability of this model to predict the in-pile densification of oxide fuels is illustrated by the fact that the maximum fraction of pores that disappears is proportional to an empirical function of fission rate, and temperature. The proportionality factor appears to be difficult to correlate quantitatively to any given micro-structural feature. The model has however been applied to the interpretation of an in-pile densification experiment carried out in the Halden reactor (Norway). The latter model is mechanistic, i.e. it is based on the solution to a set of equations that describe the coupled temperature and radiation induced phenomena which occur in-pile. These can broadly be broken down into three categories: the fission fragment-pore interaction, the creation of point defects as the fission fragments slow down, and the diffusion of these

  8. Gas release from pressurized closed pores in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.; Donnelly, S.E.; Armour, D.G.; Matzke, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gas release from the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN out of pressurized closed pores produced by autoclave anneals has been studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). Investigation of gas release during heating and cooling has indicated stress related mechanical effects leading to gas release. This release occurred in a narrow temperature range between about 1000 and 1500 K for UO 2 , but it continued down to ambient temperature for UN. No burst release was observed above 1500 K for UO 2 . (orig.)

  9. Characterization and heading of irradiated fuels and their chemical analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    This work presents results of leaching experiments under deionized water and under synthetic granite at room temperature in air using spent fuel (UO 2 and MOX LWR fuels) and the chemical analogues, natural UO 2 and SIMFUEL. The experimental conditions and procedure for irradiated and non-irradiated materials were kept similar as much as possible. Also dissolution behaviour studies of preoxidised LWR UO 2 and MOX spent fuel up to different on the oxidation degree. For both fuel types, UO 2 and MOX, the fission products considered showed a fractional release normalised to uranium higher than 1, due to either the larger inventory at preferential leaching zones, such as, grain boundaries or to the inherent higher solubility of some of these elements. In contrast to fission products, the fractional release of PU from the UO 2 fuel was not affected by the oxidation level. Finally a thermodynamic study of the experimental leaching results obtained in this work was performed. (Author)

  10. Experimental and thermodynamic evaluation of the melting behavior of irradiated oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M.G.; Aitken, E.A.; Caputi, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Onset of melting is an important performance limit for irradiated UO 2 and UO 2 -based nuclear reactor fuels. Melting (solidus) temperatures are reasonably well known for starting fuel materials such as UO 2 and (U,PU)O 2 , however the influence of burnup on oxide fuel melting behavior continues to represent an area of considerable uncertainty. In this paper we report the results of a variety of melting temperature measurements on pseudo-binary fuel-fissia mixtures such as UO 2 -PUO 2 , UO 2 -CeO 2 , UO 2 -BaO, UO 2 -SrO, UO 2 -BaZrO 3 and UO 2 -SrZrO 3 . These measurements were performed using the thermal arrest technique on tungsten-encapsulated specimens. Several low melting eutectics, the existence of which had previously been inferred from post-irradiation examinations of high burnup mixed oxide fuels, were characterized in the course of the investigation. Also, an assessment of melting temperature changes in irradiated oxide fuels due to the production and incorporation of soluble oxidic fission products was performed by application of solution theory to the available pseudo-binary phase diagram data. The results of this assessment suggest that depression of oxide fuel solidus temperatures by dissolved fission products is substantially less than that indicated by earlier experimental studies. (orig.)

  11. Chemical and spectrochemical production analysis of ThO2 and 233UO2-ThO2 pellets for the light water breeder reactor core for Shippingport (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukowski, J.F.; Hollis, E.D.

    1975-06-01

    The Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory has utilized wet chemical, emission spectrochemical, and mass spectrometric analytical techniques for the production analysis of the ThO 2 and 233 UO 2 -ThO 2 (1 to 6 wt percent 233 UO 2 ) pellets for the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core for Shippingport. Proof of the fuel breeding concept necessitates measurement of precise and accurate chemical characterization of all fuel pellets before core life. Chemistry's efforts toward this goal are presented in three main sections: (1) general discussions relating the chemical requirements for ThO 2 and 233 UO 2 -ThO 2 core materials to the analytical capabilities, (2) technical discussions of the chemical and instrumental technology applied for the analysis of aluminum, boron, calcium, carbon, chloride plus bromide, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, iron, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen, samarium, silicon, titanium, vanadium, thorium, and uranium (total, trace, and uranium VI), and (3) a formal presentation of the analytical procedures as applied to the LWBR Development Program. (U.S.)

  12. Chiroptical luminescence spectra of UO22+ in cubic Na[UO2(CH3COO)3] crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.M.; Metcalf, D.H.; Richardson, F.S.

    1992-01-01

    Steady-state chiroptical luminescence measurements are reported for cubic crystals of Na[UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 ]. These crystals belong to the enantiomorphic space group P2 1 3, with four molecules per unit cell, and each UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 - coordination unit has a chiral tris-bidentate chelate structure of C 3 symmetry. The UO 2 O' 6 coordination clusters (where O' denotes an acetate oxygen donor atom) also have chiral structures of C 3 point-group symmetry, but they deviate only slightly from an achiral D 3h symmetry. The luminescence observed for Na[UO 2 (CH 3 COO) 3 ] is assigned to transitions that originate from the lowest electronic excited state (II g ) of UO 2 2+ and terminate on the ground electronic state (Σ g + ). At least two types of UO 2 2+ species contribute to this luminescence, but the luminescence spectra can be analyzed in terms of separate majority species (or bulk site) contributions and minority species (or defect site) contributions. The luminescence spectra show zero-phonon origin lines, one-phonon false-origin lines, and vibronic progressions in the symmetric stretching mode (ν s ) of UO 2 2+ . The false-origin lines and the progressions based on these lines are essentially unpolarized. However, the origin lines and their progressions exhibit a very large degree of circular polarization, with emission dissymmetry factors of g em = 1.31 (majority species) and g em = 0.96 (minority species). The circularly polarized luminescence results for Σ g + left-arrow II g emission are compared to circular dichroism results for Σ g + → II g absorption, and the distribution of Σ g + ↔ II g electronic rotary strength among origin and vibronic lines is discussed within the context of vibronic optical activity theory

  13. Positron annihilation method for α self radiation effect studies in doped actinide UO2 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roudil, D.; Vella, F.; Bonnal, M.; Broudic, V.; Barthe, M.F.; Gentils, A.; Moineau, V.; Jolly, L.

    2008-01-01

    Towards disposal problematic, fine understanding of the α aging of UO 2 and (U, Pu)O 2 remains a fundamental challenge for the prediction of the potential increase of the radionuclide source terms with presence of water. The intrinsic evolution of the matrix is closely related to the behavior of radiogenic helium produced by actinide decay. Interactions between helium atoms and vacancy defects are involved in these mechanisms. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy is also an appropriated method owing to its sensitivity to the vacancy type defects in solid materials. It is a non destructive technique with a remote acquiring data possibility. Because positron implanted in the material is sensitive to the electronic density, the positron lifetime method allows the characterization of the vacancy defects, namely size and concentration. Such equipment has been implemented in the L30 laboratory of the DHA facility in Atalante and will be applied on doped actinides samples, simulating α aging. This article presents, the analytical protocols and validation results on depleted UO 2 samples and highlights the perspectives on (U, Pu)O 2 for the investigation of different stages of self irradiation matrices and helium behavior. (authors)

  14. Determination of organic phosphorus in UO2C2O4·TRPO complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yifei; Yuan Jianhua; Liang Junfu; Jiao Rongzhou; Liu Xiuqin

    2001-01-01

    Organic phosphorus in UO 2 C 2 O 4 ·TRPO complex is converted to inorganic phosphorous with H 2 SO 4 -HNO 3 -H 2 O 2 wet cinefaction method. In 0.14 mol/L H 2 SO 4 solution containing water soluble poly vinylalcohol as stabilizing agent, the highly sensitive ion-associates are formed by the reaction of basic dye ethyl violet with heteropoly molybdophosphoric blue. Spectrophotometric method is used for determination of phosphorus with these ion-associates. The absorbance maximum is at 620 nm. Determination of phosphorus is not affected with mass ratios R(UO 2 2+ /P) ≤ 1.4 x 10 3 , R(C 2 O 4 2- /P) ≤ 8.8 x 10 2 and R(C 2 O 4 2- /P ≤ 3.6 x 10 4 (one time wet cinefaction must be carried out). In aqueous phase, phosphorus can be directly developed and determined. This method is contrasted with poly vinylalcohol-Rodamine B-heteropoly molybdophosphoric blue, analytical results are in good coincidence. Conversion ratio of phosphorus is 99.8% - 101.1%. The minimum detection limit is 0.02 mg/L. The relative standard deviation is 3%. The recovery ratio is 97% - 103%

  15. Origin of the second length scale found above TN in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.; Gaulin, B.D.; Gibbs, D.; Thurston, T.R.; Simpson, P.J.; Shapiro, S.M.; Lander, G.H.; Matzke, H.; Wang, S.; Dudley, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of x-ray- and neutron-scattering studies of the temperature dependence of the magnetic scattering exhibited by the type-I, triple-Q antiferromagnet UO 2 . Our neutron-scattering results are consistent with those of earlier studies, including the observation of short-ranged magnetic correlations at temperatures near and above T N . However, it is found by x-ray diffraction that a second, longer length scale is induced near T N when the near-surface volume of the sample is mechanically roughened. The longitudinal and transverse widths of the additional scattering increase continuously with increasing temperature above T N , similar to that which has been observed near the magnetic ordering transitions of Ho, Tb, and NpAs and near the tetragonal-to-cubic transitions of various perovskites. Another unusual feature of the present results for UO 2 involves the apparent shift with temperature of the magnetic scattering along the surface normal direction at the (1,1,0) reflection, but not at the (2,1,0) reflection. To our knowledge, this is the first observation of a second length scale near a first-order transition. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties of UO2Sb2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, Richard E.; King, Joseph E.; Illies, Andreas J.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01

    A new uranyl antimonite, UO 2 Sb 2 O 4 (1), has been prepared from the hydrothermal reaction of UO 3 with Sb 2 O 3 and KCl. The structure of 1 consists of neutral two-dimensional ∞ 2 [UO 2 Sb 2 O 4 ] layers. The U(VI) centers are ligated by two trans oxo ligands and four square pyramidal antimonite anions. In addition, the U(VI) also forms long contacts with two additional oxygen atoms that are distorted by 12.7(2) degree sign out of the equatorial plane perpendicular to the uranyl unit. These long interactions are significant owing to evidence supplied by bond valence sum calculations. The two-dimensional layers found in 1 are built from one-dimensional chains formed from edge-sharing UO 6 octahedra that run along the b-axis, and are linked together by [Sb 2 O 4 ] 2- chains. A flow microreactor system has been used to study the catalytic activity of 1, and these results show that it can be used as a catalyst in the conversion of propene and O 2 to acrolein. Crystallographic data: 1, monoclinic, space group C2/m, a=13.490(2) A, b=4.0034(6) A, c=5.1419(8) A, β=104.165(3) deg., Z=2, MoKα, λ=0.71073, R(F)=1.74% for 30 parameters with 365 reflections with I>2σ(I)

  17. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of ( Th, U)O2 fuel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-08

    Jan 8, 2013 ... 6Talca University, St. 720-747, Talca, Chile. ∗. Corresponding author. E-mail: cadmium_109@yahoo.com. MS received 12 December 2011; revised 29 May 2012; accepted 24 July 2012. Abstract. The small reactor design for the remote and less developed areas of the user countries should have simple ...

  18. A study of point defects in UO 2+x and their impact upon fuel properties

    OpenAIRE

    Ma , Yue

    2017-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is an oxygen excess, non-stoichiometric, fluorite material which exists over a wide range of compositions. At temperatures and oxygen activities that are relevant to its in-reactor behaviour, it has been reported that various types of point defects and clusters thereof may exist with different charge states and different compositions on both the anion and cation sublattices. These defects have a major influence on certain key engineering properties such as cation self -diffusi...

  19. How can Korea secure uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing rights?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Seungkook; Kim, Wonjoon

    2014-01-01

    South Korea is heavily dependent on energy resources from other countries and nuclear energy accounts for 31% of Korea's electric power generation as a major energy. However, Korea has many limitations in uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing under the current Korea-U.S. nuclear agreement, although they are economically and politically important to Korea due to a significant problems in nuclear fuel storages. Therefore, in this paper, we first examine those example countries – Japan, Vietnam, and Iran – that have made nuclear agreements with the U.S. or have changed their agreements to allow the enrichment of uranium and the reprocessing of spent fuel. Then, we analyze those countries' nuclear energy policies and review their strategic repositioning in the relationship with the U.S. We find that a strong political stance for peaceful usage of nuclear energy including the legislation of nuclear laws as was the case of Japan. In addition, it is important for Korea to acquire advanced technological capability such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) because SFR technologies require plutonium to be used as fuel rather than uranium-235. In addition, Korea needs to leverage its position in nuclear agreement between China and the U.S. as was the case of Vietnam

  20. Atomics International fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Al facility is approximately 30,000 square feet in area and consists of four general areas. One area is devoted to the production of UAl x powder. It consists of a series of arc melting furnaces, crushing lines, glove boxes, and compacting presses. The second area is used for the rolling of fuel plates. The third area is used for the machining of the plates to final size and also the machining of the fuel elements. In the fourth area the fuel plates are swaged into assemblies, and all welding and inspection operations are performed. As part of the lower enrichment program we are scheduled to put a second UAl x powder line into operation and we have had to expand some of our storage area

  1. Russian-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipment From Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, Kelly; Bolshinsky, Igor; Allen, Ken; Apostolov, Tihomir; Dimitrov, Ivaylo

    2009-01-01

    In July 2008, the Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the IRT 2000 research reactor in Sofia, Bulgaria, operated by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped 6.4 kilograms of Russian origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to the Russian Federation. The shipment, which resulted in the removal of all HEU from Bulgaria, was conducted by truck, barge, and rail modes of transport across two transit countries before reaching the final destination at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. This paper describes the work, equipment, organizations, and approvals that were required to complete the spent fuel shipment and provides lessons learned that might assist other research reactor operators with their own spent nuclear fuel shipments.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic investigation of anode exhaust of direct methanol fuel cells without isotope enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Young Seok; Hwang, Reo Yun; Han, Ochee [Western Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert the chemical energy of fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and methanol, into electricity. Fuel cells more efficiently use energy than internal combustion engines and do not produce undesirable pollutants, such as NO{sub x} ,SO{sub x} and particulates. Fuel cells can be distinguished from one another by their electrolytes. Among the various direct alcohol fuel cells, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have been developed most. However, DMFCs have several practical problems such as methanol crossove r from an anode to a cathode and slow methanol oxidation reaction rates. Therefore, understanding the electrochemical reaction mechanisms of DMFCs may provide clues to solve these problems, and various analytical methods have been employed to examine these mechanisms. We demonstrated that {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for analyzing anode exhausts of DMFCs operated with methanol without any isotope enrichment. However, the low sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy hindered our efforts to detect minor reaction intermediates. Therefore, sensitivity enhancement techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR methods and/or presaturation methods to increase the dynamic range of the proton spectra by pre-saturating large water signals, are expected to be useful to detect low-concentration species.

  3. Comparison between Experimentally Measured and Thermodynamically Calculated Solubilities of UO2 and ThO2 in KURT Ground Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Baik, Min Hoon; Kang, Kwang Cheol; Choi, Jong Won

    2009-01-01

    Solubility of a radionuclide is important for defining the release source term of a radioactive waste in the safety and performance assessments of a radioactive waste repository. When the pH and redox potential of the KURT groundwater were changed by an electrical method, the concentrations of uranium and thorium released from UO 2 (cr) and ThO 2 (cr) at alkali pH (8.1 ∼ 11.4) and reducing potential (Eh -7 mole/L. Unexpectedly, the concentration of tetravalent thorium is slightly higher than that of uranium at pH = 8.1 and Eh= -0.2 V conditions, and this difference may be due to the formation of hydroxide-carbonate complex ions. When UO 2 (s) and UO 2 (am, hyd.), and ThO 2 (s) and Th(OH) 4 (am) were assumed as solubility limiting solid phases, the concentrations of uranium and thorium in the KURT groundwater calculated by the PHREEQC code were comparable to the experimental results. The dominating aqueous species of uranium and thorium were presumed as UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- and Th(OH) 3 CO 3 - at pH = 8.1 ∼ 9.8, and UO 2 (OH) 3 - and Th(OH) 4 (aq) at pH = 11.4

  4. Leaching action of EJ-13 water on unirradiated UO2 surfaces under unsaturated conditions at 90 degree C: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Veleckis, E.; Tani, B.S.

    1991-07-01

    A set of experiments, based on the application of the Unsaturated Test method to the reaction of UO 2 with EJ-13 water, has been conducted over a period of 182.5 weeks. One half of the experiments have been terminated, while one half are still ongoing. Solutions that have dripped from UO 2 specimens have been analyzed for all experiments, while the reacted UO 2 surfaces have been examined for only the terminated experiments. A pulse of uranium release from the UO 2 solid, in conjunction with the formation of dehydrated schoepite on the surface of the UO 2 , was observed during the 39- to 96-week period. Thereafter, the uranium release decreased and a second set of secondary phases was observed. The latter phases incorporate cations from the EJ-13 water and include boltwoodite, uranophane, sklodowskite, compreignacite, and schoepite. The experiments are being continued to monitor for additional changes in solution composition and secondary phase formation, and have now reached the 319-week period. 9 refs., 17 figs., 25 tabs

  5. A data base for PHW reactor operating on a once-through, low enriched uranium-thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, S.

    1984-04-01

    The study of a detailed data base for a new once-through uranium-thorium cycle using low enriched uranium (4 and 5,5% wt. U-235) and distinct UO 2 and ThO 2 fuel channels has been performed. With reference to a standard 638 MWe CANDU-type PHWR with 380 channels, evaluation of economics, fuel behaviour and safety has been performed. The Feinberg-Galanin method (code FEINGAL) has been used for calculation of axial flux distribution. All parameters have been provided by LATREP code following up the irradiation history. Economical assessment has shown that this fuel cycle is competitive with the natural uranium fuel cycle for 1979-based values of the parameters. Fuel behaviour and safety features modelling has shown that core behaviour of the uranium-thorium reactor under abnormal and accident conditions would be at least as good as that of the standard natural uranium reactor

  6. Processing of irradiated, enriched uranium fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyder, M.L.; Perkins, W.C.; Thompson, M.C.; Burney, G.A.; Russell, E.R.; Holcomb, H.P.; Landon, L.F.

    1979-04-01

    Uranium fuels containing 235 U at enrichments from 1.1% to 94% are processed and recovered, along with neptunium and plutonium byproducts. The fuels to be processed are dissolved in nitric acid. Aluminum-clad fuels are disssolved using a mercury catalyst to give a solution rich in aluminum. Fuels clad in more resistant materials are dissolved in an electrolytic dissolver. The resulting solutions are subjected to head-end treatment, including clarification and adjustment of acid and uranium concentration before being fed to solvent extraction. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium are separated from fission products and from one another by multistage countercurrent solvent extraction with dilute tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Nitric acid is used as the salting agent in addition to aluminum or other metal nitrates present in the feed solution. Nuclear safety is maintained through conservative process design and the use of monitoring devices as secondary controls. The enriched uranium is recovered as a dilute solution and shipped off-site for further processing. Neptunium is concentrated and sent to HB-Line for recovery from solution. The relatively small quantities of plutonium present are normally discarded in aqueous waste, unless the content of 238 Pu is high enough to make its recovery desirable. Most of the 238 Pu can be recovered by batch extraction of the waste solution, purified by counter-current solvent extraction, and converted to oxide in HB-Line. By modifying the flowsheet, 239 Pu can be recovered from low-enriched uranium in the extraction cycle; neptunium is then not recovered. The solvent is subjected to an alkaline wash before reuse to remove degraded solvent and fission products. The aqueous waste is concentrated and partially deacidified by evaporation before being neutralized and sent to the waste tanks; nitric acid from the overheads is recovered for reuse

  7. Processing of irradiated, enriched uranium fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyder, M L; Perkins, W C; Thompson, M C; Burney, G A; Russell, E R; Holcomb, H P; Landon, L F

    1979-04-01

    Uranium fuels containing /sup 235/U at enrichments from 1.1% to 94% are processed and recovered, along with neptunium and plutonium byproducts. The fuels to be processed are dissolved in nitric acid. Aluminum-clad fuels are disssolved using a mercury catalyst to give a solution rich in aluminum. Fuels clad in more resistant materials are dissolved in an electrolytic dissolver. The resulting solutions are subjected to head-end treatment, including clarification and adjustment of acid and uranium concentration before being fed to solvent extraction. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium are separated from fission products and from one another by multistage countercurrent solvent extraction with dilute tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene. Nitric acid is used as the salting agent in addition to aluminum or other metal nitrates present in the feed solution. Nuclear safety is maintained through conservative process design and the use of monitoring devices as secondary controls. The enriched uranium is recovered as a dilute solution and shipped off-site for further processing. Neptunium is concentrated and sent to HB-Line for recovery from solution. The relatively small quantities of plutonium present are normally discarded in aqueous waste, unless the content of /sup 238/Pu is high enough to make its recovery desirable. Most of the /sup 238/Pu can be recovered by batch extraction of the waste solution, purified by counter-current solvent extraction, and converted to oxide in HB-Line. By modifying the flowsheet, /sup 239/Pu can be recovered from low-enriched uranium in the extraction cycle; neptunium is then not recovered. The solvent is subjected to an alkaline wash before reuse to remove degraded solvent and fission products. The aqueous waste is concentrated and partially deacidified by evaporation before being neutralized and sent to the waste tanks; nitric acid from the overheads is recovered for reuse.

  8. Microscopic Examination of a Corrosion Front in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.A. Fortner; A.J. Kropf; R.J. Finch; J.C. Cunnane

    2006-01-01

    Spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel hosts a variety of trace chemical constituents, many of which must be sequestered from the biosphere during fuel storage and disposal. In this paper we present synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy and microscopy findings that illuminate the resultant local chemistry of neptunium and plutonium within spent uranium oxide nuclear fuel before and after corrosive alteration in an air-saturated aqueous environment. We find the plutonium and neptunium in unaltered spent fuel to have a +4 oxidation state and an environment consistent with solid-solution in the UO 2 matrix. During corrosion in an air-saturated aqueous environment, the uranium matrix is converted to uranyl U(VI)O 2 2+ mineral assemblage that is depleted in plutonium and neptunium relative to the parent fuel. At the corrosion front interface between intact fuel and the uranyl-mineral corrosion layer, we find evidence of a thin (∼20 micrometer) layer that is enriched in plutonium and neptunium within a predominantly U 4+ environment. Available data for the standard reduction potentials for NpO 2+ /Np 4+ and UO 2 2+ /U 4+ couples indicate that Np(IV) may not be effectively oxidized to Np(V) at the corrosion potentials of uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel in air-saturated aqueous solutions. Neptunium is an important radionuclide in dose contribution according to performance assessment models of the proposed U. S. repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A scientific understanding of how the UO 2 matrix of spent nuclear fuel impacts the oxidative dissolution and reductive precipitation of neptunium is needed to predict its behavior at the fuel surface during aqueous corrosion. Neptunium would most likely be transported as aqueous Np(V) species, but for this to occur it must first be oxidized from the Np(IV) state found within the parent spent nuclear fuel [1]. In the immediate vicinity of the spent fuel's surface the redox and nucleation behavior is likely to promote

  9. Activity of the RA Reactor Physics group in 1980 - Definition of the Operation conditions for future safe and economical RA reactor operation with 80% enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.

    1980-01-01

    During 1980. the RA reactor was not in operation. That is why this period was devoted to definition of operating conditions for further reactor operation with 80% enriched fuel. The fuel elements which were in the core at the moment of shutdown in March 1979will not be used again (388 80% enriched fuel elements, and 511 2% enriched fuel elements). The reactor will be operated only with 80% enriched fuel, staring with initiat core configuration with 440 elements on the borders gradually changing to equi;librium core with 720 fuel elements. The analyses were concerned with safety issues of future operation [sr

  10. Criticality Calculations for a Typical Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant with Low Enriched Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, Hade; Nagy, Mohamed; Agamy, Said; Shaat, Mohmaed

    2013-01-01

    The operations with the fissile materials such as U 235 introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel and can lead the facility to shutdown. Therefore, the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The objectives of criticality safety are to prevent a self-sustained nuclear chain reaction and to minimize the consequences. Sixty criticality accidents were occurred in the world. These are accidents divided into two categories, 22 accidents occurred in process facilities and 38 accidents occurred during critical experiments or operations with research reactor. About 21 criticality accidents including Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co. (JCO) accident took place with fuel solution or slurry and only one accident occurred with metal fuel. In this study the nuclear criticality calculations have been performed for a typical nuclear fuel fabrication plant producing nuclear fuel elements for nuclear research reactors with low enriched uranium up to 20%. The calculations were performed for both normal and abnormal operation conditions. The effective multiplication factor (k eff ) during the nuclear fuel fabrication process (Uranium hexafluoride - Ammonium Diuranate conversion process) was determined. Several accident scenarios were postulated and the criticalities of these accidents were evaluated. The computer code MCNP-4B which based on Monte Carlo method was used to calculate neutron multiplication factor. The criticality calculations Monte Carlo method was used to calculate neutron multiplication factor. The criticality calculations were performed for the cases of, change of moderator to fuel ratio, solution density and concentration of the solute in order to prevent or mitigate criticality accidents during the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The calculation results are analyzed and discussed

  11. Study of the experimental parameters for the determination of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni on nuclear grade UO2 by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determinations of low concentrations of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni on the nuclear grade UO 2 by X-ray fluorescence technique, without the use of chemical treatment, is described. The optimization of the experimental conditions was established on the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and a low limit of detection (4 - 7 μg/gU) was achieved which satisfies the requirement in the nuclear fuel specification. The samples were prepared in the form of double layer pressed pellets using boric acid as a binding agent. The characteristic first order K sub(α) line intensity of each minor component was measured and the values of its concentrations were deduced using respective standard calibrations curves. The precision, accuracy and acceptability of the method were determined for all elements. The values of the precision are in the range of 2 - 10% and the accuracy are lower than 7%. (Author) [pt

  12. The distribution of Th(NO3)4, UO2(NO3)2 and HNO3 between an aqueous phase and an organic tributyl phosphate phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, T.; Zimmer, E.

    1984-05-01

    The distribution of Th(NO 3 ) 4 , UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 and HNO 3 between an aqueous phase and an organic phase, consisting of 30 Vol.% tributyl phosphate in dodecane, has been experimentally investigated. About 120 distribution data have been determined in the concentration ranges that can be seen in the THOREX process for reprocessing spent thorium bearing fuel. Based on the experimental data, two computer programs have been developed which make possible interpolations and, to some extent, extrapolations. With model 1, concentrations in the organic phase can be calculated if that in the aqueous phase are known. With model 2, concentrations in the aqueous phase can be calculated vice versa. Besides the description of the calculation models, a large body of calculated data can be found in this report. In a addition, a calculation mode is presented that makes possible the calculation of distribution data for very low thorium concentrations. (orig.) [de

  13. Canadian experience in irradiation and testing of MOX fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, S.; Floyd, M.; Dimayuga, F.

    2018-04-01

    Experimental irradiation and performance testing of Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) has taken place for more than 40 years. These experiments investigated MOX fuel behaviour and compared it with UO2 behaviour to develop and verify fuel performance models. This article compares the performance of MOX of various concentrations and homogeneities, under different irradiation conditions. These results can be applied to future fuel designs. MOX fuel irradiated by CNL was found to be comparable in performance to similarly designed and operated UO2 fuel. MOX differs in behaviour from UO2 fuel in several ways. Fission-gas release, grain growth and the thickness of zirconium oxide on the inner sheath appear to be related to MOX fuel homogeneity. Columnar grains formed at the pellet centre begin to develop at lower powers in MOX than in UO2 fuel.

  14. Adsorption of UO2+2 by polyethylene adsorbents with amidoxime, carboxyl, and amidoxime/carboxyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Nho, Young Chang

    2000-01-01

    The polyethylene (PE) adsorbents were prepared by a radiation-induced grafting of acrylonitrile (AN), acrylic acid (AA), and the mixture of AN/AA onto PE film, and by subsequent amidoximation of cyano groups of poly-AN graft chains. With an increase of AA composition in AN/AA monomer mixture, the water uptake of the grafted polyethylene film increased. In AN/AA mixture, the maximum adsorption of UO 2+ 2 was observed in the adsorbent with a ratio of AN/AA (50/50, mol%) in copolymer. The amidoxime, carboxyl, and amidoxime/carboxyl groups onto PE acted as a chelating site for the selected UO 2+ 2 . The complex structure of polyethylene with three functional groups and UO 2+ 2 was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. (author)

  15. Synthesis and crystal structure of [(NH4)(CH3H6)[UO2(SeO3)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marukhnov, A.V.; Pushkin, D.V.; Serezhkina, L.B.; Peresypkina, E.V.; Virovets, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis and X-ray structural analysis of monocrystals (NH 4 )(CN 3 H 6 ) [UO 2 (SeO 3 ) 2 ] (I) have been conducted. The compound is crystallized in triclinic lattice, a=7.0051(2), b=9.4234(3), c=9.5408(3) A, α=88.727(1), β=70.565(1), γ=77.034(1) Deg, sp. gr. P1-bar, Z=2, R=0.0224. Basic structural units of crystals I form chains of the [UO 2 (SeO 3 ) 2 ] 2- composition related to the crystallochemical group AB 2 B 11 (A=UO 2 2+ , B 2 =SeO 3 2- , B 11 =SeO 3 2- ) of uranyl complexes. Uranium-containing complexes is combined in three-dimensional frame by ammonium and guanidinium ions as well as by the systems of hydrogen bonds

  16. The fabrication process of ceramic grade UO2 powder via fluorid system AUC and the treatment on AUC precipitation filtrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinhong; Xu Kui; Li Zhiwan; Yi Wei; Tang Yueming; Li Guangrong; Lei Maolin; Cui Chuanjiang

    2006-10-01

    It is described about the technology of fabricating AUC powder by Circum-fluence Precipitation Reactor with Gas (CPRG) from UF 6 hydrolyzed liquid, manufacturing nuclear pure ceramic grade UO 2 powder via fluorid system AUC process with fluidized bed method, recovering U(VI) with ion exchange resin, depositing fluorin in an outflow of effusion wastewater from the ion exchange using calces. The primary control parameters on the fabricating AUC powder is study, it is discussed to character difference of AUC powder between fluorid system and nitrate. Result show that the composing the manufacture AUC powder is invariable by CORG, and that the AUC quality is consistent, and that by decomposition and reduction of AUC and stabilization of UO 2 powder with fluidized bed, through optimum technological parameters, the excellent UO 2 powder is obtained on the quality. (authors)

  17. Hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas (HCNG: A futuristic fuel for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthagopal Kasianantham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is fast becoming a serious global problem with increasing population and its subsequent demands. This has resulted in increased usage of hydrogen as fuel for internal combustion engines. Hydrogen resources are vast and it is considered as one of the most promising fuel for automotive sector. As the required hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations are not meeting the demand, widespread introduction of hydrogen vehicles is not possible in the near future. One of the solutions for this hurdle is to blend hydrogen with methane. Such types of blends take benefit of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and at the same time reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. Enriching natural gas with hydrogen could be a potential alternative to common hydrocarbon fuels for internal combustion engine applications. Many researchers are working on this for the last few years and work is now focused on how to use this kind of fuel to its maximum extent. This technical note is an assessment of HCNG usage in case of internal combustion engines. Several examples and their salient features have been discussed. Finally, overall effects of hydrogen addition on an engine fueled with HCNG under various conditions are illustrated. In addition, the scope and challenges being faced in this area of research are clearly described.

  18. The contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity of porous UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, K.; Kwast, H.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1994-09-01

    The influence of cylindrical, spherical and ellipsoidal inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity was computed with the finite element technique. The results of these calculations were compared with equations that describe the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. The analytical equation of Schulz that describes the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity is in good agreement with the results of the finite element computations. This good agreement shows that among a variety of porosity correction formulas, the equation of Schulz gives the best description of the effect of inclusions on the overall thermal conductivity. This equation and the results of finite element calculations allow us to compute the contribution of radiation to the overall thermal conductivity of UO 2 with oblate ellipsoidal porosity. The present radiation calculations show that Hayes and Peddicord overestimated the contribution of thermal radiation to the thermal conductivity. (orig.)

  19. Conversion of ammonium uranyl carbonate to UO2 in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Qiu Lufu; Zhong Xing; Xu Heqing

    1989-11-01

    The conversion of AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) to UO 2 was studied in a fluidized bed of 60 mm inner diameter based on the thermodynamics and kinetics data of decomposition-reduction of AUC. The influence of the reaction temperature, composition of fluidization gas and fluidization velocity on conversion were investigated by using N 2 , Ar and circulation gas (mixing gas of H 2 and CO obtained from the exhaust gas of the decomposition of AUC by catalyst crack-conversion) as the fluidization gas. The throughput is up to the high levels (3.32 kg(wet)/h·L) by using circulation gas or mixing of circulation gas and Ar (< 21%) as the fluidization gas when the reaction temperature exceeds 570 deg C

  20. Radiolytic syntheses of hollow UO2 nanospheres in Triton X-100-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongming; Chen, Qingde; Shen, Xinghai

    2017-01-01

    Hollow nanospheres (φ: 60-80 nm, wall thickness: 10-20 nm), consisted of UO 2 nanoparticles (φ: 3-5 nm), were successfully prepared in a Triton X-100-water (50:50, w/w) hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) by γ-irradiation, where water soluble ammonium uranyl tricarbonate was added as precursor. The product was stable at least up to 300 C. Furthermore, whether the nanospheres were hollow or not, and the wall thickness of the hollow nanospheres could be easily controlled via adjusting dose rate. While in the Triton X-100 based micellar systems, only solid nanospheres were obtained. At last, a possible combination mechanism containing adsorption, aggregation and fracturing processes was proposed.

  1. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  2. Studies on the kinetics of UO2 dissolution in carbonate-bicarbonate medium using sodium hypochlorite as oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, J.N.; Bhattacharya, K.; Swami, R.G.; Tangri, S.K.; Mukherjee, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The dissolution of UO 2 in carbonate-bicarbonate solutions containing sodium hypochlorite as an oxidant has been investigated. The effect of temperature, sodium hypochlorite concentration and stirring speed was examined. In the temperature range of 303 to 318 K, the leaching reaction displayed linear kinetics. Apparent activation energy obtained from the differential approach was found to be 57 kJ mol -1 . This relatively high activation energy value indicates a chemically controlled behavior of UO 2 dissolution. The order of reaction with respect to sodium hypochlorite concentration was found to be unity. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs

  3. Complexing in the system Rb2SeO4-UO2SeO4-H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchumova, N.V.; Shtokova, I.P.; Serezhkina, L.B.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Method of isothermal solubility at 25 deg C is used to study interaction of rubidium and uranyl selenates in aqueous solution. Formation of congruently soluble Rb 2 UO 2 (SeO 4 ) 2 x2H 2 O and Rb 2 (UO 2 ) 2 x(SeO 4 ) 3 x6H 2 O is stated. For the last compound crystallographic characteristics (a=10.668; b=14.935(9); c=13.891(7) A; β=104.94(1); Z=4, sp.gr. P2 1 /c) are determined. Thermal decomposition of a compound results in formation of Rb 2 U 2 O 7

  4. Estimation of optimum experimental parameters in chlorination of UO2 with Cl2 gas and carbon for UCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.S.; Kang, Y.H.; Lee, H.K.

    1997-01-01

    For the preparation of uranium tetrachloride, the chlorination of UO 2 was carried out and an appropriate reaction system was confirmed. The effects of reaction temperature, time, injection ratio of N 2 gas and appropriate amount of carbon using a reductant on the conversion ratio and volatilization were evaluated. The optimum reaction time and temperature in chlorination of UO 2 for the preparation of UCl 4 were 2 h and 500-700 C, respectively. Also 50% of N 2 gas in chlorine gas proved to be the appropriate injection ratio. (orig.)

  5. Development of empirical relation for isotope of uranium in enriched uranium matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.K.; Vidyasagar, D.; Jha, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2018-01-01

    Uranium enriched in 235 U is required in commercial light water reactors to produce a controlled nuclear reaction. Enrichment allows the 235 U isotopes to be increased from 0.71% to a range between 2% to 5% depending upon requirement. The enriched uranium in the form of sintered UO 2 pellet is used for any commercially operating boiling light water reactors. The enriched uranium fuel bundle surface swipes sample is being analysed to assess the tramp uranium as a quality control parameter. It is known that the 234 U isotope also enriched along with 235 U isotope in conventional gaseous diffusion enrichment process. The information about enrichment percentage of 234 U helps to characterize isotopic properties of enriched uranium. A few reports provide the empirical equation and graphs for finding out the specific activity, activity percentage, activity ratio of 234 U isotopes for enriched uranium. Most of them have not provided the reference for the data used and their source. An attempt has been made to model the relationship between 234 U and 235 U as a function of uranium enrichment at low level

  6. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  7. Reduction of gaseous pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors using hydrogen-enriched jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in an evaluation of the applicability of the hydrogen enrichment concept to achieve ultralow gaseous pollutant emission from gas turbine combustion systems is described. The target emission indexes for the program are 1.0 for oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, and 0.5 for unburned hydrocarbons. The basic concept utilizes premixed molecular hydrogen, conventional jet fuel, and air to depress the lean flammability limit of the mixed fuel. This is shown to permit very lean combustion with its low NOx production while simulataneously providing an increased flame stability margin with which to maintain low CO and HC emission. Experimental emission characteristics and selected analytical results are presented for a cylindrical research combustor designed for operation with inlet-air state conditions typical for a 30:1 compression ratio, high bypass ratio, turbofan commercial engine.

  8. Crystal chemistry of uranyl halides containing mixed(UO2)(XmOn)5 bipyramids (X = Cl,Br). Synthesis and crystal structure of Cs2(UO2)(NO3)Cl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarchuk, Evgeny V.; Siidra, Oleg I.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of Cs 2 (UO 2 )(NO 3 )Cl 3 were prepared by a hydrothermal method at 205 C. The crystal structure has been solved by Direct Methods: monoclinic, P2 1 /n, a = 10.3748(13), b = 9.4683(13), c = 12.5535(16) A β, = 110.280(2) , V = 1156.7(3) A 3 , R 1 = 0.029. In the structure, strongly bonded linear uranyl cations UO 2 2+ are equatorially coordinated by two O and three Cl atoms to form (UO 2 )Cl 3 O 2 pentagonal bipyramids. Each bipyramid shares its O.O edge with an adjacent (NO 3 ) - anion to form finite clusters with the chemical composition [(UO 2 )(NO 3 )Cl 3 ] 2- . The Cs + cations provide three-dimensional connectivity of the structure by forming Cs-O and Cs-Cl contacts to the uranyl nitrate chloride complexes. Related structures of mixed-ligand uranyl halides are compared. (orig.)

  9. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two UO2Zr BWR type test fuel rods were irradiated to a burn-up of about 38000 MWd/tUO2. After non-destructive characterization, the fission gas released to the internal free volume was extracted and analysed. The irradiation was simulated by means of the Danish fuel performance code WAFER-2, which...

  10. Study of production of fuel pellets for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Luiz F.F.; Conti, Thadeu N.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays the electrical energy was been used much on society. A method for getting elect