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Sample records for enhance antibody responses

  1. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... of the immunization in week 18, demonstrating the presence of memory cells following the two initial oral immunizations. Considering that oral immunization results in approximately ten times lower concentrations of immunospecific antibodies in the egg yolk, compared to traditional subcutaneous immunization schemes...... response, but oral booster immunizations lack efficiency. The aim of the present study was to develop immunization schemes in which the concentration of immunospecific IgY would increase following oral booster immunizations. Two groups of egg laying hens (5 in each group) were immunized orally (each...

  2. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

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    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: Can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J.E.; Ring, C.; Drayson, M.; Bosch, J.; Campbell, J.P.; Bhabra, J.; Browne, D.; Dawson, J.; Harding, S.; Lau, J.; Burns, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty

  4. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

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    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A weak neutralizing antibody response to hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein enhances virus infection.

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    Keith Meyer

    Full Text Available We have completed a phase 1 safety and immunogenicity trial with hepatitis C virus (HCV envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2, with MF59 adjuvant as a candidate vaccine. Neutralizing activity to HCV genotype 1a was detected in approximately 25% of the vaccinee sera. In this study, we evaluated vaccinee sera from poor responders as a potential source of antibody dependent enhancement (ADE of HCV infection. Sera with poor neutralizing activity enhanced cell culture grown HCV genotype 1a or 2a, and surrogate VSV/HCV pseudotype infection titer, in a dilution dependent manner. Surrogate pseudotypes generated from individual HCV glycoproteins suggested that antibody to the E2 glycoprotein; but not the E1 glycoprotein, was the principle target for enhancing infection. Antibody specific to FcRII expressed on the hepatic cell surface or to the Fc portion of Ig blocked enhancement of HCV infection by vaccinee sera. Together, the results from in vitro studies suggested that enhancement of viral infectivity may occur in the absence of a strong antibody response to HCV envelope glycoproteins.

  6. Vaccination response following aerobic exercise: can a brisk walk enhance antibody response to pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations?

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    Long, Joanna E; Ring, Christopher; Drayson, Mark; Bosch, Jos; Campbell, John P; Bhabra, Jagraj; Browne, David; Dawson, Joel; Harding, Sarah; Lau, Jamie; Burns, Victoria E

    2012-05-01

    High intensity acute exercise at the time of vaccination has been shown to enhance the subsequent antibody response. This study examines whether an acute moderate intensity aerobic intervention prior to vaccination can enhance antibody response to pneumonia and half dose influenza vaccination. Sixty young (age (SD)=22.0 (6.1) years) and 60 older (age (SD)=57.5 (6.5) years) adults attended the laboratory on two separate occasions. At the first session, baseline antibody titres were determined, before participants completed either a brisk walk around campus at >55% of their age-predicted heart rate maximum, or a resting control condition, for 45 min. After the intervention, all participants received a full-dose pneumococcal vaccination and a half-dose influenza vaccination. Four weeks later, participants returned for a follow up blood sample. Multivariate ANOVA revealed an increase in total antibody titres against the influenza vaccine (F((12,106))=25.76, p.15), indicating that a 45 min brisk walk prior to vaccination did not affect antibody response to either the influenza or pneumonia vaccine. The results suggest that higher intensity exercise is necessary to augment antibody response to vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sustained antigen availability during germinal center initiation enhances antibody responses to vaccination

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    Kang, Myungsun; Pelet, Jeisa M.; Ruda, Vera M.; Foley, Maria H.; Hu, Joyce K.; Kumari, Sudha; Crampton, Jordan; Baldeon, Alexis D.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Crotty, Shane; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural infections expose the immune system to escalating antigen and inflammation over days to weeks, whereas nonlive vaccines are single bolus events. We explored whether the immune system responds optimally to antigen kinetics most similar to replicating infections, rather than a bolus dose. Using HIV antigens, we found that administering a given total dose of antigen and adjuvant over 1–2 wk through repeated injections or osmotic pumps enhanced humoral responses, with exponentially increasing (exp-inc) dosing profiles eliciting >10-fold increases in antibody production relative to bolus vaccination post prime. Computational modeling of the germinal center response suggested that antigen availability as higher-affinity antibodies evolve enhances antigen capture in lymph nodes. Consistent with these predictions, we found that exp-inc dosing led to prolonged antigen retention in lymph nodes and increased Tfh cell and germinal center B-cell numbers. Thus, regulating the antigen and adjuvant kinetics may enable increased vaccine potency. PMID:27702895

  8. Development of enhanced antibody response toward dual delivery of nano-adjuvant adsorbed human Enterovirus-71 vaccine encapsulated carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Mohamed I; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Hussein, Mohd Z; Elkhidir, Isam M.; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach for enhancing immunity toward mucosal vaccines. HEV71 killed vaccine that is formulated with nanosize calcium phosphate adjuvant and encapsulated onto chitosan and alginate delivery carriers was examined for eliciting antibody responses in serum and saliva collected at weeks 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 for viral-specific IgA & IgG levels and viral neutralizing antibody titers. The antibody responses induced in rabbits by the different formulations delivered by a s...

  9. Enhanced sensitivity in detection of antiviral antibody responses using biotinylation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids.

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    Kenney, Mary; Waters, Ryan A; Rieder, Elizabeth; Pega, Juan; Perez-Filguera, Mariano; Golde, William T

    2017-11-01

    Analysis of the immune response to infection of livestock by foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is most often reported as the serum antibody response to the virus. While measurement of neutralizing antibody has been sensitive and specific, measurements of the quality of the antibody response are less robust. Determining the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype of the serum antibody response provides a deeper understanding of the biology of the response and more sensitive methods for these assays will facilitate analyses of B cell mediated immunity. We tested the hypothesis that using the virus as the molecular probe could be achieved by adding tags to the surface of the FMDV capsid, and that would enhance sensitivity in assays for anti-FMDV antibody responses. The use of a FLAG-tagged virus in these assays failed to yield improvement whereas chemically biotinylating the virus capsid resulted in significant enhancement of the signal. Here we describe methods using biotinylated virus for measuring anti-viral antibody in serum and antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in blood that are sensitive and specific. Finally, we describe using the biotinylated virus in flow cytometry where such assays should greatly enhance the analysis of anti-virus antibody producing B cells, allowing the investigator to focus on only the FMDV specific B cells when analyzing the development of the B cell response to either infection or vaccination. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

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    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  11. Development of enhanced antibody response toward dual delivery of nano-adjuvant adsorbed human Enterovirus-71 vaccine encapsulated carrier

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    Saeed, Mohamed I; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Hussein, Mohd Z; Elkhidir, Isam M; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach for enhancing immunity toward mucosal vaccines. HEV71 killed vaccine that is formulated with nanosize calcium phosphate adjuvant and encapsulated onto chitosan and alginate delivery carriers was examined for eliciting antibody responses in serum and saliva collected at weeks 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 for viral-specific IgA & IgG levels and viral neutralizing antibody titers. The antibody responses induced in rabbits by the different formulations delivered by a single (buccal) route were compared to those of dual immunization (intradermal / mucosal) and un-immunized control. Chitosan-loaded vaccine adjuvant induced elevated IgA antibody, while Alginate-adjuvant irreversible bonding sequestered the vaccine and markedly reduced immunogenicity. The induced mucosal and parenteral antibody profiles appeared in an inverse manner of enhanced mucosal IgA antibody accompanied by lower systemic IgG following a single oral immunization route. The combined intradermal and oral dual-immunized group developed an elevated salivary IgA, systemic IgG, and virus neutralizing response. A reduced salivary neutralizing antibody titer was observed and attributed to the continual secretion exchanges in saliva. Designing a successful mucosal delivery formulation needs to take into account the vaccine delivery site, dosage, adjuvant and carrier particle size, charge, and the reversibility of component interactions. The dual immunization seems superior and is a important approach for modulating the antibody response and boosting mucosal protection against HEV71 and similar pathogens based on their transmission mode, tissue tropism and shedding sites. Finally, the study has highlighted the significant role of dual immunization for simultaneous inducing and modulating the systemic and mucosal immune responses to EV71. PMID:26186664

  12. Neutralizing and enhancing antibody responses to five genotypes of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) in DENV-1 patients.

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    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has four distinct serotypes, DENV-1-4, with four to six genotypes in each serotype. The World Health Organization recommends tetravalent formulations including one genotype of each serotype as safe and effective dengue vaccines. Here, we investigated the impact of genotype on the neutralizing antibody responses to DENV-1 in humans. Convalescent sera collected from patients with primary infection of DENV-1 were examined for neutralizing antibody against single-round infectious particles of the five DENV-1 genotypes (GI-GV). In both GI- and GIV-infected patients, their neutralizing antibody titres against the five genotypes were similar, differing ≤4-fold from the homogenotypic responses. The enhancing activities against the five genotypes were also similar in these sera. Thus, the genotype strains of DENV-1 showed no significant antigenic differences in these patients, suggesting that GI- or GIV-derived vaccine antigens should induce equivalent levels of neutralizing antibodies against all DENV-1 genotypes.

  13. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins.

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    Antonella Antignani

    Full Text Available The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE, potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as 'enhancers' and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided.

  14. B Cell Depletion With an Anti-CD20 Antibody Enhances Alloreactive Memory T Cell Responses After Transplantation.

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    Marino, J; Paster, J T; Trowell, A; Maxwell, L; Briggs, K H; Crosby Bertorini, P; Benichou, G

    2016-02-01

    Alloreactive memory T cells mediate accelerated allograft rejection and transplant tolerance resistance. Recent studies have shown that B cell deficient-μMT mice fail to mount donor-specific memory T cell responses after transplantation. At the same time, other studies showed that pretransplant B cell depletion using rituximab (IgG1 anti-CD20 mAb) combined with cyclosporine A promoted the survival of islet allografts in monkeys. In this study, we investigated the effect of anti-CD20 antibody-mediated B cell depletion on the memory T cell alloresponse in mice. Wild-type and anti-OVA TCR transgenic mice were treated with an IgG2a anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, which depleted nearly all B cells in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid organs but spared some B cells in the bone marrow. B cell depletion did not affect the direct alloresponse but resulted in a marked increase of indirect alloresponse after skin transplantation of naïve mice. Furthermore, in allosensitized mice, anti-CD20 mAb treatment enhanced the reactivation of allospecific memory T cells and accelerated second set rejection of skin allografts. This suggests that the effect of anti-CD20 antibodies on alloimmunity and allograft rejection might vary upon the nature of the antibodies as well as the circumstances under which they are delivered. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

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    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Outer membrane protein complex of Meningococcus enhances the antipolysaccharide antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharide-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine.

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    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial polysaccharides (PS) are T cell-independent antigens that do not induce immunologic memory and are poor immunogens in infants. Conjugate vaccines in which the PS is covalently linked to a carrier protein have enhanced immunogenicity that resembles that of T cell-dependent antigens. The Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine, which uses the outer membrane protein complex (OMPC) from meningococcus as a carrier protein, elicits protective levels of anti-capsular PS antibody (Ab) after a single dose, in contrast to other conjugate vaccines, which require multiple doses. We have previously shown that OMPC robustly engages Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and enhances the early anti-Hib PS Ab titer associated with an increase in TLR2-mediated induction of cytokines. We now show that the addition of OMPC to the 7-valent pneumococcal PS-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine during immunization significantly increases the anti-PS IgG and IgM responses to most serotypes of pneumococcus contained in the vaccine. The addition of OMPC also increased the likelihood of anti-PS IgG3 production against serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 18C, 19F, and 23F. Splenocytes from mice who had received OMPC with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine produced significantly more interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) than splenocytes from mice who received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) plus the conjugate vaccine. We conclude that OMPC enhances the anti-PS Ab response to pneumococcal PS-CRM₁₉₇ conjugate vaccine, an effect associated with a distinct change in cytokine profile. It may be possible to reduce the number of conjugate vaccine doses required to achieve protective Ab levels by priming with adjuvants that are TLR2 ligands.

  17. IL-15 enhances cross-reactive antibody recall responses to seasonal H3 influenza viruses in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Junqiong Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, several human monoclonal antibodies that target conserved epitopes on the stalk region of influenza hemagglutinin (HA have shown broad reactivity to influenza A subtypes. Also, vaccination with recombinant chimeric HA or stem fragments from H3 influenza viruses induce broad immune protection in mice and humans. However, it is unclear whether stalk-binding antibodies can be induced in human memory B cells by seasonal H3N2 viruses. Methods: In this study, we recruited 13 donors previously exposed to H3 viruses, the majority (12 of 13 of which had been immunized with seasonal influenza vaccines. We evaluated plasma baseline strain-specific and stalk-reactive anti-HA antibodies and B cell recall responses to inactivated H3N2 A/Victoria/361/2011 virus in vitro using a high throughput multiplex (mPlex-Flu assay. Results: Stalk-reactive IgG was detected in the plasma of 7 of the subjects. Inactivated H3 viral particles rapidly induced clade cross-reactive antibodies in B cell cultures derived from all 13 donors. In addition, H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in culture supernatants from 7 of the 13 donors (53.8%.  H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were also induced by H1 and H7 subtypes. Interestingly, broadly cross-reactive antibody recall responses to H3 strains were also enhanced by stimulating B cells in vitro with CpG2006 ODN in the presence of IL-15. H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in  CpG2006 ODN + IL-15 stimulated B cell cultures derived from 12 of the 13 donors (92.3%, with high levels detected in cultures from 7 of the 13 donors. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that stalk-reactive antibody recall responses induced by seasonal H3 viruses and CpG2006 ODN can be enhanced by IL-15.

  18. Enhanced Antibody Responses in a Novel NOG Transgenic Mouse with Restored Lymph Node Organogenesis

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    Takeshi Takahashi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph nodes (LNs are at the center of adaptive immune responses. Various exogenous substances are transported into LNs and a series of immune responses ensue after recognition by antigen–specific lymphocytes. Although humanized mice have been used to reconstitute the human immune system, most lack LNs due to deficiency of the interleukin (IL-2Rγ gene (cytokine common γ chain, γc. In this study, we established a transgenic strain, NOG-pRORγt-γc, in the NOD/shi-scid-IL-2Rγnull (NOG background, in which the γc gene was expressed in a lymph-tissue inducer (LTi lineage by the endogenous promoter of RORγt. In this strain, LN organogenesis was normalized and the number of human T cells substantially increased in the periphery after reconstitution of the human immune system by human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The distribution of human T cells differed between NOG-pRORγt-γc Tg and NOG-non Tg mice. About 40% of human T cells resided in LNs, primarily the mesenteric LNs. The LN-complemented humanized mice exhibited antigen-specific immunoglobulin G responses together and an increased number of IL-21+–producing CD4+ T cells in LNs. This novel mouse strain will facilitate recapitulation of human immune responses.

  19. Carrier priming or suppression: understanding carrier priming enhancement of anti-polysaccharide antibody response to conjugate vaccines.

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    Pobre, Karl; Tashani, Mohamed; Ridda, Iman; Rashid, Harunor; Wong, Melanie; Booy, Robert

    2014-03-14

    With the availability of newer conjugate vaccines, immunization schedules have become increasingly complex due to the potential for unpredictable immunologic interference such as 'carrier priming' and 'carrier induced epitopic suppression'. Carrier priming refers to an augmented antibody response to a carbohydrate portion of a glycoconjugate vaccine in an individual previously primed with the carrier protein. This review aims to provide a critical evaluation of the available data on carrier priming (and suppression) and conceptualize ways by which this phenomenon can be utilized to strengthen vaccination schedules. We conducted this literature review by searching well-known databases to date to identify relevant studies, then extracted and synthesized the data on carrier priming of widely used conjugate polysaccharide vaccines, such as, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenCV) and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines (HibV). We found evidence of carrier priming with some conjugate vaccines, particularly HibV and PCV, in both animal and human models but controversy surrounds MenCV. This has implications for the immunogenicity of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines following the administration of tetanus-toxoid or diphtheria-toxoid containing vaccine (such as DTP). Available evidence supports a promising role for carrier priming in terms of maximizing the immunogenicity of conjugate vaccines and enhancing immunization schedule by making it more efficient and cost effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel strategy for inducing enhanced mucosal HIV-1 antibody responses in an anti-inflammatory environment.

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    Frank Wegmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccination against HIV-1 sexual transmission will probably require antibody elicitation at genital mucosal surfaces. However, HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env-based antigens are weakly immunogenic, particularly when applied mucosally. The polyanion PRO 2000 is safe for human vaginal application, and thus may represent a potential formulating agent for vaginal delivery of experimental vaccine immunogens. Based upon its biochemical properties, we hypothesized that PRO 2000 might enhance mucosal immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env-based antigens, promoting local and systemic immune responses. Vaginal immunization with Env-PRO 2000 resulted in significantly increased titres of Env-specific mucosal IgA and IgG in mice and rabbits, respectively, compared to Env alone, revealing modest but significant mucosal adjuvant activity for PRO 2000. In vitro, PRO 2000 associated with Env, protecting the glycoprotein from proteolytic degradation in human vaginal lavage. Unexpectedly, PRO 2000 antagonized TLR4 activation, suppressing local production of inflammatory cytokines. Since inflammation-mediated recruitment of viral target cells is a major risk factor in HIV-1 transmission, the immune modulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of PRO 2000 combined with its intravaginal safety profile suggests promise as an HIV-1 mucosal vaccine formulating agent.

  1. A dual vaccine against influenza & Alzheimer's disease failed to enhance anti-β-amyloid antibody responses in mice with pre-existing virus specific memory.

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    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Cadagan, Richard; Marleau, Annette M; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-12-15

    Novel dual vaccine, WSN-Aβ(1-10), based on the recombinant influenza virus, expressing immunodominant B-cell epitope of β-amyloid, simultaneously induced therapeutically potent anti-Aβ and anti-influenza antibodies. In this study we showed that boosting of WSN-WT primed mice with WSN-Aβ(1-10) enhances anti-viral, but fails to induce anti-Aβ antibody responses. This inhibition is associated with expression of Aβ(1-10) within the context of an inactivated influenza virus vaccine. These results demonstrate that the use of an inactivated influenza virus as a carrier for AD vaccine may not be applicable due to the possible inhibition of anti-Aβ antibody response in individuals previously vaccinated or infected with influenza. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

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    Guohong Ge

    Full Text Available Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L, expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T, which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens.

  3. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

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    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  4. Antibody Blockade of Semaphorin 4D Promotes Immune Infiltration into Tumor and Enhances Response to Other Immunomodulatory Therapies.

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    Evans, Elizabeth E; Jonason, Alan S; Bussler, Holm; Torno, Sebold; Veeraraghavan, Janaki; Reilly, Christine; Doherty, Michael A; Seils, Jennifer; Winter, Laurie A; Mallow, Crystal; Kirk, Renee; Howell, Alan; Giralico, Susan; Scrivens, Maria; Klimatcheva, Katya; Fisher, Terrence L; Bowers, William J; Paris, Mark; Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-06-01

    Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D, CD100) and its receptor plexin-B1 (PLXNB1) are broadly expressed in murine and human tumors, and their expression has been shown to correlate with invasive disease in several human tumors. SEMA4D normally functions to regulate the motility and differentiation of multiple cell types, including those of the immune, vascular, and nervous systems. In the setting of cancer, SEMA4D-PLXNB1 interactions have been reported to affect vascular stabilization and transactivation of ERBB2, but effects on immune-cell trafficking in the tumor microenvironment (TME) have not been investigated. We describe a novel immunomodulatory function of SEMA4D, whereby strong expression of SEMA4D at the invasive margins of actively growing tumors influences the infiltration and distribution of leukocytes in the TME. Antibody neutralization of SEMA4D disrupts this gradient of expression, enhances recruitment of activated monocytes and lymphocytes into the tumor, and shifts the balance of cells and cytokines toward a proinflammatory and antitumor milieu within the TME. This orchestrated change in the tumor architecture was associated with durable tumor rejection in murine Colon26 and ERBB2(+) mammary carcinoma models. The immunomodulatory activity of anti-SEMA4D antibody can be enhanced by combination with other immunotherapies, including immune checkpoint inhibition and chemotherapy. Strikingly, the combination of anti-SEMA4D antibody with antibody to CTLA-4 acts synergistically to promote complete tumor rejection and survival. Inhibition of SEMA4D represents a novel mechanism and therapeutic strategy to promote functional immune infiltration into the TME and inhibit tumor progression. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. QS-21 enhances the early antibody response to oil adjuvant foot-and-mouth disease vaccine in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çokçalışkan, Can; Türkoğlu, Tunçer; Sareyyüpoğlu, Beyhan; Uzunlu, Ergün; Babak, Ayca; Özbilge, Banu B; Gülyaz, Veli

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important tools against foot-and-mouth disease, a highly contagious and variable viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals, is vaccination. However, the effectiveness of foot-and-mouth disease vaccines on slowing the spread of the disease is questionable. In contrast, high potency vaccines providing early protection may solve issues with the spread of the disease, escaping mutants, and persistency. To increase the potency of the vaccine, additives such as saponin and aluminium hydroxide are used. However, the use of saponin with an oil adjuvant is not common and is sometimes linked to toxicity. QS-21, which is less toxic than Quil A, has been presented as an alternative for use with saponin. In this study, the addition of QS-21 to a commercially available foot-and-mouth disease water-in-oil-in-water emulsion vaccine was evaluated in cattle. After vaccination, serum samples were collected periodically over 3 months. Sera of the QS-21 and normal oil vaccine groups were compared via serum virus neutralization antibody titre and liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titre. The results showed that there was a significant early antibody increase in the QS-21 group. Strong early virus neutralizing antibody response will be useful for emergency or ring vaccinations against foot-and-mouth disease in target animals.

  6. Antibodies to the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120 suppress gp120-specific CD4 T cell response while enhancing antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hioe Catarina E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of Abs to the CD4-binding site (CD4bs of HIV-1 envelope gp120 has been shown to obstruct the processing and generation of helper epitopes from this antigen, resulting in poor presentation of various gp120 epitopes by MHC class II to CD4 T cells. However, the physiologic significance of these inhibitory anti-CD4bs Abs in vivo has remained unclear. In this study, we evaluated the immunologic effects of anti-CD4bs Abs in vivo using a murine model. Results Animals were immunized with recombinant envelope proteins with or without CD4-binding activity (designated CD4bs+ Env and CD4bs– Env, respectively. As expected, anti-CD4bs Abs were generated only after immunization with CD4bs+ Env and not with CD4bs– Env. The presence of anti-CD4bs Abs was associated with lower levels of envelope-specific lymphoproliferation in animals immunized with CD4bs+ Env. To further determine the specific role of the anti-CD4bs Abs, we immunized mice with gp120 in the presence of an inhibitory anti-CD4bs mAb or a non-inhibitory anti-gp120 mAb. The data show that the presence of anti-CD4bs mAb reduced CD4 T cell responses to gp120. However, we also detected significantly higher titers of anti-gp120 Abs following immunization with gp120 and the anti-CD4bs mAb. Conclusion Anti-CD4bs Abs can exert discordant effects on the gp120-specific CD4 T cell and Ab responses in vivo, indicating the importance of these particular Abs in influencing both the cellular and the humoral immune responses against HIV-1.

  7. Combination of poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 enhances activation of B cells in vitro and boosts antibody responses to protein vaccines in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve M Weir

    Full Text Available Vaccines that can rapidly induce strong and robust antibody-mediated immunity could improve protection from certain infectious diseases for which current vaccine formulations are inefficient. For indications such as anthrax and influenza, antibody production in vivo is a correlate of efficacy. Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists are frequently studied for their role as vaccine adjuvants, largely because of their ability to enhance initiation of immune responses to antigens by activating dendritic cells. However, TLRs are also expressed on B cells and may contribute to effective B cell activation and promote differentiation into antigen-specific antibody producing plasma cells in vivo. We sought to discover an adjuvant system that could be used to augment antibody responses to influenza and anthrax vaccines. We first characterized an adjuvant system in vitro which consisted of two TLR ligands, poly I:C (TLR3 and Pam3CSK4 (TLR2, by evaluating its effects on B cell activation. Each agonist enhanced B cell activation through increased expression of surface receptors, cytokine secretion and proliferation. However, when B cells were stimulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in combination, further enhancement to cell activation was observed. Using B cells isolated from knockout mice we confirmed that poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 were signaling through TLR3 and TLR2, respectively. B cells activated with Poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 displayed enhanced capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation and differentiate into antibody-producing plasma cells in vitro. Mice vaccinated with influenza or anthrax antigens formulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in DepoVax™ vaccine platform developed a rapid and strong antigen-specific serum antibody titer that persisted for at least 12 weeks after a single immunization. These results demonstrate that combinations of TLR adjuvants promote more effective B cell activation in vitro and can be used to augment antibody responses

  8. Antibody dependent enhancement of frog virus 3 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Emily

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses included in the family Iridoviridae are large, icosahedral, dsDNA viruses that are subdivided into 5 genera. Frog virus 3 (FV3 is the type species of the genus Ranavirus and the best studied iridovirus at the molecular level. Typically, antibodies directed against a virus act to neutralize the virus and limit infection. Antibody dependent enhancement occurs when viral antibodies enhance infectivity of the virus rather than neutralize it. Results Here we show that anti-FV3 serum present at the time of FV3 infection enhances infectivity of the virus in two non-immune teleost cell lines. We found that antibody dependent enhancement of FV3 was dependent on the Fc portion of anti-FV3 antibodies but not related to complement. Furthermore, the presence of anti-FV3 serum during an FV3 infection in a non-immune mammalian cell line resulted in neutralization of the virus. Our results suggest that a cell surface receptor specific to teleost cell lines is responsible for the enhancement. Conclusions This report represents the first evidence of antibody dependent enhancement in iridoviruses. The data suggests that anti-FV3 serum can either neutralize or enhance viral infection and that enhancement is related to a novel antibody dependent enhancement pathway found in teleosts that is Fc dependent.

  9. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8⁺ T Cell Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Pablo D; Nörder, Miriam; Weissmann, Sebastian; Ljapoci, Ronny; Erfle, Volker; Drexler, Ingo; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2014-07-22

    Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8⁺ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags) are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5). Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5) and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  10. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Pablo D.; Nörder, Miriam; Weissmann, Sebastian; Ljapoci, Ronny; Erfle, Volker; Drexler, Ingo; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags) are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5). Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5) and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector. PMID:26344747

  11. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo D. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5. Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5 and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  12. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  13. First Phase I human clinical trial of a killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine: demonstration of its safety and enhancement of anti-HIV antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsil; Michalski, Chad J; Choo, Seung Ho; Kim, Gyoung Nyoun; Banasikowska, Elizabeth; Lee, Sangkyun; Wu, Kunyu; An, Hwa-Yong; Mills, Anthony; Schneider, Stefan; Bredeek, U Fritz; Coulston, Daniel R; Ding, Shilei; Finzi, Andrés; Tian, Meijuan; Klein, Katja; Arts, Eric J; Mann, Jamie F S; Gao, Yong; Kang, C Yong

    2016-11-28

    Vaccination with inactivated (killed) whole-virus particles has been used to prevent a wide range of viral diseases. However, for an HIV vaccine this approach has been largely negated due to inherent safety concerns, despite the ability of killed whole-virus vaccines to generate a strong, predominantly antibody-mediated immune response in vivo. HIV-1 Clade B NL4-3 was genetically modified by deleting the nef and vpu genes and substituting the coding sequence for the Env signal peptide with that of honeybee melittin signal peptide to produce a less virulent and more replication efficient virus. This genetically modified virus (gmHIV-1NL4-3) was inactivated and formulated as a killed whole-HIV vaccine, and then used for a Phase I human clinical trial (Trial Registration: Clinical Trials NCT01546818). The gmHIV-1NL4-3 was propagated in the A3.01 human T cell line followed by virus purification and inactivation with aldrithiol-2 and γ-irradiation. Thirty-three HIV-1 positive volunteers receiving cART were recruited for this observer-blinded, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial to assess the safety and immunogenicity. Genetically modified and killed whole-HIV-1 vaccine, SAV001, was well tolerated with no serious adverse events. HIV-1NL4-3-specific PCR showed neither evidence of vaccine virus replication in the vaccine virus-infected human T lymphocytes in vitro nor in the participating volunteers receiving SAV001 vaccine. Furthermore, SAV001 with adjuvant significantly increased the pre-existing antibody response to HIV-1 proteins. Antibodies in the plasma of vaccinees were also found to recognize HIV-1 envelope protein on the surface of infected cells as well as showing an enhancement of broadly neutralizing antibodies inhibiting tier I and II of HIV-1 B, D, and A subtypes. The killed whole-HIV vaccine, SAV001, is safe and triggers anti-HIV immune responses. It remains to be determined through an appropriate trial whether this immune response prevents HIV

  14. Enhanced antibody responses elicited by a CpG adjuvant do not improve the protective effect of an aldrithiol-2-inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus therapeutic AIDS vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yichuan; Blozis, Shelley A; Lederman, Michael; Krieg, Arthur; Landay, Alan; Miller, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    The potential benefit of using unmethylated CpG oligoribodeoxynucleotides (ODN) as an adjuvant in a therapeutic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaccine consisting of AT2-inactivated SIVmac239 was evaluated in SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that using CpG ODN as an adjuvant in therapeutic vaccination would enhance SIV-specific immune responses and suppress SIV replication after ART was stopped. To test our hypothesis, we immunized chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving ART with one of the following therapeutic vaccines: (i) AT2-inactivated SIVmac239, (ii) CpG10103 plus AT2-inactivated SIVmac239, (iii) CpG10103, and (iv) saline. While immunization with CpG plus AT2-SIVmac239 significantly increased SIV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers, the mean plasma viral RNA (vRNA) level in these animals after ART did not differ from those of saline-treated animals. The AT2-inactivated SIVmac239-immunized animal group had a significantly higher mean SIV-specific gamma interferon T-cell response after three immunizations and lower plasma vRNA levels for 6 weeks after ART was withdrawn compared to the saline-treated animal group. Compared to the saline control group, the animal group treated with CpG alone had a significantly higher mean SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferation index and a higher rate of plasma vRNA rebound after ART. These results demonstrate that while the use of CpG as an adjuvant enhances SIV-specific antibody responses, this does not improve the control of SIV replication after ART is stopped. The lack of benefit may be related to the high levels of SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferation in the CpG adjuvant group.

  15. The sickle cell trait is associated with enhanced immunoglobulin G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrera, G.; Cot, M.; Migot-Nabias, F.; Kremsner, P.G.; Deloron, P.; Luty, A.J.F.

    2005-01-01

    The sickle cell trait (HbAS) protects against severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in young African children. We investigated the extent of the association between HbAS and antibodies directed to parasite-derived variant surface antigens (VSAs) on the membrane of infected erythrocytes. We measured

  16. Enhanced Phagocytosis and Antibody Production by Tinospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tinospora cordifolia (guduchi) is a widely used shrub in ayurvedic systems of medicine known to possess immunomodulatory properties. In the present study the aqueous extract of T. cordifolia was found to enhance phagocytosis in vitro. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts also induced an increase in antibody production ...

  17. Enhanced and persistent antibody response against homologous and heterologous strains elicited by a MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry; Bravo, Lulu; Ceballos, Ana; Mitha, Essack; Gray, Glenda; Quiambao, Beatriz; Patel, Sanjay S; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Bock, Hans; Nazaire-Bermal, Nancy; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Cioppa, Giovanni Della; Narasimhan, Vas

    2014-10-21

    Non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines show only modest efficacy in young children. This study compared the immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety of the MF59-adjuvanted trivalent subunit vaccine (aTIV) with two non-adjuvanted trivalent vaccines, TIV-1, the non-adjuvanted version of aTIV, and TIV-2, a split virion vaccine. 6078 children received two doses of aTIV (n=3125), TIV-1 (n=1479), or TIV-2 (n=1474) four weeks apart (Days 1 and 29). Children aged 6 to vaccination (Day 50), the aTIV group showed significantly higher geometric mean HI titers and seroconversion rates than the TIV-1 or TIV-2 groups against all homologous and heterologous strains. The difference was enhanced at HI titers ≥110. aTIV elicited a faster, more persistent antibody response, with significantly higher titers in the aTIV group after one vaccination (Day 29) and after six months (Day 209) than in either TIV group. aTIV was more reactogenic than were TIV-1 and TIV-2 but rates of severe adverse events were very low for all three vaccines. In infants and young children, the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine induced substantially faster (after one dose), higher, persistent HI titers than the non-adjuvanted vaccines, with consistently higher seroprotection rates at increased threshold HI titers. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01346592. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, EE137, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Yao-Ching [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, China Medical University and Hospital, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wei-Hsu [Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guewha Steven, E-mail: gstevehuang@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China (China)

    2010-05-14

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  19. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Lin, Wei-Hsu; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2010-05-01

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  20. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFranco, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  1. Low-dose adenovirus vaccine encoding chimeric hepatitis B virus surface antigen-human papillomavirus type 16 E7 proteins induces enhanced E7-specific antibody and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Astúa, Andrés; Herráez-Hernández, Elsa; Garbi, Natalio; Pasolli, Hilda A; Juárez, Victoria; Zur Hausen, Harald; Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2005-10-01

    Induction of effective immune responses may help prevent cancer progression. Tumor-specific antigens, such as those of human papillomaviruses involved in cervical cancer, are targets with limited intrinsic immunogenicity. Here we show that immunization with low doses (10(6) infectious units/dose) of a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 encoding a fusion of the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 to the carboxyl terminus of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) induces remarkable E7-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The HBsAg/E7 fusion protein assembled efficiently into virus-like particles, which stimulated antibody responses against both carrier and foreign antigens, and evoked antigen-specific kill of an indicator cell population in vivo. Antibody and T-cell responses were significantly higher than those induced by a control adenovirus vector expressing wild-type E7. Such responses were not affected by preexisting immunity against either HBsAg or adenovirus. These data demonstrate that the presence of E7 on HBsAg particles does not interfere with particle secretion, as it occurs with bigger proteins fused to the C terminus of HBsAg, and results in enhancement of CD8(+)-mediated T-cell responses to E7. Thus, fusion to HBsAg is a convenient strategy for developing cervical cancer therapeutic vaccines, since it enhances the immunogenicity of E7 while turning it into an innocuous secreted fusion protein.

  2. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-enhanced humoral immune response and production of antibodies to prion protein PrPSc in mice immunized with 139A scrapie-associated fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Regina B; Lafauci, Giuseppe; Meeker, Harry C; Ye, Xuemin; Flory, Michael J; Kim, Jae Il; Schuller-Levis, Georgia B; Levis, William R; Wisniewski, Thomas; Carp, Richard I; Kascsak, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to a protease-resistant conformer, the srapie form of PrP (PrP(Sc)). Humoral immune responses to nondenatured forms of PrP(Sc) have never been fully characterized. We investigated whether production of antibodies to PrP(Sc) could occur in PrP null (Prnp(-/-)) mice and further, whether innate immune stimulation with the TLR9 agonist CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 1826 could enhance this process. Whether such stimulation could raise anti-PrP(Sc) antibody levels in wild-type (Prnp(+/+)) mice was also investigated. Prnp(-/-) and Prnp(+/+) mice were immunized with nondenatured 139A scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF), with or without ODN 1826, and were tested for titers of PrP-specific antibodies. In Prnp(-/-) mice, inclusion of ODN 1826 in the immunization regime increased anti-PrP titers more than 13-fold after two immunizations and induced, among others, antibodies to an N-terminal epitope, which were only present in the immune repertoire of mice receiving ODN 1826. mAb 6D11, derived from such a mouse, reacts with the N-terminal epitope QWNK in native and denatured forms of PrP(Sc) and recombinant PrP and exhibits a K(d) in the 10(-)(11) M range. In Prnp(+/+) mice, ODN 1826 increased anti-PrP levels as much as 84% after a single immunization. Thus, ODN 1826 potentiates adaptive immune responses to PrP(Sc) in 139A SAF-immunized mice. These results represent the first characterization of humoral immune responses to nondenatured, infectious PrP(Sc) and suggest methods for optimizing the generation of mAbs to PrP(Sc), many of which could be used for diagnosis and treatment of prion diseases.

  3. Antibody-dependent enhancement of severe dengue disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzelnick, Leah C; Gresh, Lionel; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Mercado, Juan Carlos; Kuan, Guillermina; Gordon, Aubree; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2017-11-17

    For dengue viruses 1 to 4 (DENV1-4), a specific range of antibody titer has been shown to enhance viral replication in vitro and severe disease in animal models. Although suspected, such antibody-dependent enhancement of severe disease has not been shown to occur in humans. Using multiple statistical approaches to study a long-term pediatric cohort in Nicaragua, we show that risk of severe dengue disease is highest within a narrow range of preexisting anti-DENV antibody titers. By contrast, we observe protection from all symptomatic dengue disease at high antibody titers. Thus, immune correlates of severe dengue must be evaluated separately from correlates of protection against symptomatic disease. These results have implications for studies of dengue pathogenesis and for vaccine development, because enhancement, not just lack of protection, is of concern. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Phosphocholine-specific antibodies improve T-dependent antibody responses against OVA encapsulated into phosphatidylcholine-containing liposomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoelys Cruz-Leal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine have been widely used as adjuvants. Recently, we demonstrated that B-1 cells produce dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC-specific IgM upon immunization of BALB/c mice with DPPC-liposomes encapsulating ovalbumin (OVA. Although this preparation enhanced the OVA-specific humoral response, the contribution of anti-DPPC antibodies to this effect was unclear. Here, we demonstrate that these antibodies are secreted by B-1 cells independently of the presence of OVA in the formulation. We also confirm that these antibodies are specific for phosphocholine. The anti-OVA humoral response was partially restored in B-1 cells-deficient BALB/xid mice by immunization with the liposomes opsonized with the serum total immunoglobulin (Ig fraction containing anti-phosphocholine antibodies, generated in wild type animals. This result could be related to the increased phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages of the particles opsonized with the serum total Ig or IgM fractions, both containing anti-phosphocholine antibodies. In conclusion, in the present work it has been demonstrated that phosphocholine-specific antibodies improve T-dependent antibody responses against OVA carried by DPPC-liposomes.

  5. Strategies for enhancing antibody delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Richard T; Aboody, Karen S; Najbauer, Joseph

    2011-12-01

    Antibodies and antibody conjugates have emerged as important tools for cancer therapy. However, a major therapeutic challenge for the use of antibodies is their inability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach tumors localized in the central nervous system (CNS). Multiple methods have been developed to enhance antibody delivery to the CNS, including direct injection, mechanical or biochemical disruption of the BBB, conjugation to a 'molecular Trojan horse', cationization, encapsulation in nanoparticles and liposomes, and more recently, stem cell-mediated antibody delivery. In this review, we discuss each of these approaches, highlighting their successes and the obstacles that remain to be overcome. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Dengue Virus-Specific Antibodies Enhance Brazilian Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanha, Priscila M S; Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Braga, Cynthia; Cordeiro, Marli T; de Carvalho, Otávio V; de Mendonça, Leila R; Azevedo, Elisa A N; França, Rafael F O; Dhalia, Rafael; Marques, Ernesto T A

    2017-03-01

    Anti-Flavivirus antibodies are highly cross-reactive and may facilitate Zika virus (ZIKV) infection through the antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) mechanism. We demonstrate that dengue-specific antibodies enhance the infection of a primary Brazilian ZIKV isolate in a FcγRII-expressing K562 cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that serum samples from dengue-immune pregnant women enhanced ZIKV infection. These findings highlight the need for epidemiological studies and animal models to further confirm the role of ADE in the development of congenital and neurological complications associated with ZIKV infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Enhanced Phagocytosis and Antibody Production by Tinospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... One of the most important components of immune system in the initial stages of the defense is phagocytosis and it is an innate response. Phagocytic cells include neutrophils, eosinophils, macrophages and monocytes that recognize foreign substances and invading microor- ganisms. These cells engulf ...

  8. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  9. How Innate Immune Mechanisms Contribute to Antibody-Enhanced Viral Infections ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubol, Sukathida; Halstead, Scott B.

    2010-01-01

    Preexisting antibodies may enhance viral infections. In dengue, nonneutralizing antibodies raised by natural infection with one of four dengue viruses (DENVs) may enhance infection with a different virus by a process we term “intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement” (iADE). In addition, nonprotective antibodies raised by formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and measles virus vaccines have led to enhanced disease during breakthrough infections. Infections under iADE conditions not only facilitate the process of viral entry into monocytes and macrophages but also modify innate and adaptive intracellular antiviral mechanisms, suppressing type 1 interferon (IFN) production and resulting in enhanced DENV replication. The suppression observed in vitro has been documented in patients with severe (dengue hemorrhagic fever [DHF]) but not in patient with mild (dengue fever [DF]) secondary dengue virus infections. Important veterinary viral infections also may exhibit iADE. It is thought that use of formalin deconforms viral epitopes of RSV, resulting in poor Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation; suboptimal maturation of dendritic cells with reduced production of activation factors CD40, CD80, and CD86; decreased germinal center formation in lymph nodes; and the production of nonprotective antibodies. These antibodies fail to neutralize RSV, allowing replication with secondary stimulation of RSV-primed Th2 cells producing more low-avidity antibody, resulting in immune complexes deposited into affected tissue. However, when formalin-inactivated RSV was administered with a TLR agonist to mice, they were protected against wild-type virus challenge. Safe and effective vaccines against RSV/measles virus and dengue virus may benefit from a better understanding of how innate immune responses can promote production of protective antibodies. PMID:20876821

  10. In-depth analysis of the antibody response of individuals exposed to primary dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruklanthi de Alwis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans who experience a primary dengue virus (DENV infection develop antibodies that preferentially neutralize the homologous serotype responsible for infection. Affected individuals also generate cross-reactive antibodies against heterologous DENV serotypes, which are non-neutralizing. Dengue cross-reactive, non-neutralizing antibodies can enhance infection of Fc receptor bearing cells and, potentially, exacerbate disease. The actual binding sites of human antibody on the DENV particle are not well defined. We characterized the specificity and neutralization potency of polyclonal serum antibodies and memory B-cell derived monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs from 2 individuals exposed to primary DENV infections. Most DENV-specific hMAbs were serotype cross-reactive and weakly neutralizing. Moreover, many hMAbs bound to the viral pre-membrane protein and other sites on the virus that were not preserved when the viral envelope protein was produced as a soluble, recombinant antigen (rE protein. Nonetheless, by modifying the screening procedure to detect rare antibodies that bound to rE, we were able to isolate and map human antibodies that strongly neutralized the homologous serotype of DENV. Our MAbs results indicate that, in these two individuals exposed to primary DENV infections, a small fraction of the total antibody response was responsible for virus neutralization.

  11. In-Depth Analysis of the Antibody Response of Individuals Exposed to Primary Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Beltramello, Martina; Messer, William B.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Wahala, Wahala M. P. B.; Kraus, Annette; Olivarez, Nicholas P.; Pham, Quang; Brian, James; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Wang, Wei-Kung; Halstead, Scott; Kliks, Srisakul; Diamond, Michael S.; Baric, Ralph; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2011-01-01

    Humans who experience a primary dengue virus (DENV) infection develop antibodies that preferentially neutralize the homologous serotype responsible for infection. Affected individuals also generate cross-reactive antibodies against heterologous DENV serotypes, which are non-neutralizing. Dengue cross-reactive, non-neutralizing antibodies can enhance infection of Fc receptor bearing cells and, potentially, exacerbate disease. The actual binding sites of human antibody on the DENV particle are not well defined. We characterized the specificity and neutralization potency of polyclonal serum antibodies and memory B-cell derived monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) from 2 individuals exposed to primary DENV infections. Most DENV-specific hMAbs were serotype cross-reactive and weakly neutralizing. Moreover, many hMAbs bound to the viral pre-membrane protein and other sites on the virus that were not preserved when the viral envelope protein was produced as a soluble, recombinant antigen (rE protein). Nonetheless, by modifying the screening procedure to detect rare antibodies that bound to rE, we were able to isolate and map human antibodies that strongly neutralized the homologous serotype of DENV. Our MAbs results indicate that, in these two individuals exposed to primary DENV infections, a small fraction of the total antibody response was responsible for virus neutralization. PMID:21713020

  12. Enhancement of antitumor immune response by targeted interleukin-12 electrogene transfer through antiHER2 single-chain antibody in a murine bladder tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuh-Shyan; Shiau, Ai-Li; Chen, Yu-Fon; Tsai, Hsin-Tzu; Lee, Hwei-Ling; Tzai, Tzong-Shin; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2009-08-27

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12), despite exerting antitumor activity, has limited therapeutic uses due to its systemic toxicity. Since HER2 (also known as ErbB-2, neu, and HER2/neu) is frequently overexpressed on cancer cells, HER2-targeted delivery of IL-12 to tumors may be a promising strategy for enhancing antitumor immunity. Here we showed that intramuscular electrogene transfer of an expression vector encoding a fusion protein antiHER2scFv-IL12, which consists of antiHER2 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and single-chain IL-12, significantly retarded tumor growth and prolonged the survival in a syngeneic bladder tumor model. Elevated IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) levels, increased infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the tumors, as well as enhanced cytolytic activity of splenocytes were noted in the treated mice. Our results suggest that this approach may be effective for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing tumors.

  13. Antibody-mediated enhancement of Wesselsbron virus in P388D1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbami, A H; Halstead, S B

    1986-01-01

    Antibody-mediated enhancement of Wesselsbron virus was investigated in P388D1 cell cultures. Virus infection was enhanced in culture by various dilutions of homologous and heterologous flavivirus antibody. Highest enhancement ratios and enhancing antibody titres were obtained with the homologous antibody. Enhancement of Wesselsbron virus infection in P388D1 cultures was also dependent on the multiplicity of infection (MOI) used; cultures infected at the lowest MOI produced the highest enhancement ratios. Of the four heterologous flavivirus IMAF tested for ability to enhance Wesselsbron virus infection, Potiskum virus antibody produced highest fold enhancement and possessed the highest enhancing antibody titre. Zika, Uganda S and Dakar bat IMAF produced lower fold enhancement and had lower enhancing antibody titres.

  14. Vaccination of horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs induces short-lasting antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra; Asbie, Sanda; Rohde, Jennifer; Glaser, Amy; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-07-24

    Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subsequently, four experimental vaccination trials were performed. First, we investigated antibody responses to three canine vaccines in B. burgdorferi-naïve horses. One killed bacterin vaccine induced antibodies against OspC. OspA antibodies were low for all three vaccines and lasted less than 16weeks. The second trial tested the impact of the vaccine dose using the OspA/OspC inducing bacterin vaccine in horses. A 2mL dose produced higher OspA and OspC antibody values than a 1mL dose. However, the antibody response again quickly declined, independent of dose. Third, the horses were vaccinated with 2 doses of a recombinant OspA vaccine. Previous vaccination and/or environmental exposure enhanced the magnitude and longevity of the OspA antibody response to about 20weeks. Last, the influence of intramuscular versus subcutaneous vaccine administration was investigated for the recombinant OspA vaccine. OspA antibody responses were not influenced by injection route. The current work highlights that commercial Lyme vaccines for dogs induce only transient antibody responses in horses which can also be of low magnitude. Protection from infection with B. burgdorferi should not be automatically assumed after vaccinating horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Specificity of the autologous neutralizing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny L; Gray, Elin S; Morris, Lynn

    2009-09-01

    It has long been known that autologous neutralizing antibodies (AnAbs) exert pressure on the envelope of HIV, resulting in neutralization escape. However, recently, progress has been made in uncovering the precise targets of these potent early antibodies. AnAbs primarily target variable regions of the HIV-1 envelope, explaining the strain-specificity of these antibodies. Despite high neutralizing potential and cross-reactivity, anti-V3 antibodies do not contribute to autologous neutralization. The V1V2 is commonly immunogenic in early HIV-1 and simian human immunodeficiency virus infections, though the nature of these epitopes remains to be determined. In subtype C viruses, the C3 region is a neutralization target, possibly as a result of its more exposed and amphipathic structure. Autologous neutralization appears to be mediated by very few AnAb specificities that develop sequentially suggesting the possibility of immunological hierarchies for both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The role of AnAbs in preventing superinfection and in restricting virus replication is reexamined in the context of recent data. New studies have greatly contributed toward our understanding of the specificities mediating autologous neutralization and highlighted potential vulnerabilities on transmitted viruses. However, the contribution of AnAbs to the development of neutralization breadth remains to be characterized.

  16. Human antibody response to Lethocerus salivary antigens as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interestingly in addition to a few immunogenic salivary proteins (85, 64, 37 and 33 kDa bands), a 28 kDa protein derived from salivary glands homogenate of aquatic insects was able to bind to Mycobacterium ulcerans and to be recognized by IgG antibodies of healthy subjects in endemic areas. The antibody responses to ...

  17. Involvement of gamma interferon in antibody enhancement by adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odean, M J; Frane, C M; Van derVieren, M; Tomai, M A; Johnson, A G

    1990-02-01

    In a previous study the adjuvant action of a monophosphoryl lipid A, a nontoxic derivative of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was found to be negated by a monoclonal anti-gamma interferon (anti-IFN-gamma) antibody. The present investigation centered on three other adjuvants of diverse microbial origins, testing for their capacity to affect the release of IFN-gamma as an explanation for their antibody-enhancing action. The adjuvant action of each of the three, a wild-type LPS, synthetic poly(A)-poly(U) complexes, and a synthetic muramyl dipeptide, n-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-glutaminyl-n-butyl ester (murabutide), was transferable by adjuvant-stimulated T cells to normal spleen cells on coculture. Supernatant fluids from these T cells contained increased levels of IFN-gamma. Addition of a monoclonal anti-IFN-gamma antibody to adjuvant-stimulated spleen cell cultures reduced the adjuvant action by approximately one-half. Removal of natural killer cells from spleen cell populations prior to culture with antigen had no effect on the enhancement induced by LPS and monophosphoryl lipid A. It was concluded that the enhancement induced by the adjuvants LPS, poly(A)-poly(U), and murabutide is mediated in part by their action on T cells resulting in release of IFN-gamma suggesting activation of a common transmembrane signal.

  18. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  19. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  20. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    to their occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained...

  1. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibody response after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Song; Sasaki, Sanae; Narvaez, Carlos F; Zhang, Caiqiu; Liu, Hui; Woo, Jennifer C; Kemble, George W; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Greenberg, Harry B

    2011-02-28

    Conventional measurement of antibody responses to vaccines largely relies on serum antibodies, which are primarily produced by bone marrow plasma cells and may not represent the entire vaccine-induced B cell repertoire, including important functional components such as those targeted to mucosal sites. After immunization or infection, activated B cells differentiate into plasmablasts in local lymphoid organs, then traffic through circulation to the target sites where they further develop into plasma cells. On day 7 after influenza vaccination, a burst of plasmablasts, highly enriched for vaccine-specific antibody secreting cells, appears in the peripheral blood. This provides a unique window to the overall B cell response to the vaccine, without interference of pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibody. In this study we isolated B cells from volunteers on day 7 after immunization with the inactivated influenza vaccine and cultured them ex vivo to collect plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAb). The PPAb contained secreted IgG and IgA, which was approximately 0.2ng per antibody secreting cell. Influenza-specific IgG and IgA binding activity was detected in PPAb at dilutions up to 10(5) by ELISA. The ratio of the titers of influenza-specific IgA to IgG by ELISA was 4-fold higher in PPAb than in day 28 post-vaccination sera, suggesting that vaccine-induced IgA is enriched in PPAb compared to sera. Functional activity was also detected in PPAb as determined by microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. In addition to bulk B cell cultures, we also cultured plasmablast subsets sorted by cell surface markers to generate PPAb. These results suggest that PPAb better reflects the mucosal IgA response than serum samples. Since PPAb are exclusively produced by recently activated B cells, it allows assessing vaccine-induced antibody response without interference from pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibodies and permits an assessment of antibody

  2. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. Copyright © 2010 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  4. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. DeFranco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  5. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  6. New vaccine strategies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: II: Enhanced systemic and secreted antibody responses against the CFA/I fimbriae by priming with DNA and boosting with a live recombinant Salmonella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Lásaro

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic (IgG and mucosal (IgA antibody responses against the colonization factor I antigen (CFA/I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC was evaluated in mice primed with an intramuscularly delivered CFA/I-encoding DNA vaccine followed by two oral immunizations with a live recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the ETEC antigen. The booster effect induced by the oral immunization was detected two weeks and one year after the administration of the DNA vaccine. The DNA-primed/Salmonella-boosted vaccination regime showed a synergistic effect on the induced CFA/I-specific systemic and secreted antibody levels which could not be attained by either immunization strategy alone. These results suggest that the combined use of DNA vaccines and recombinant Salmonella vaccine strains can be a useful immunization strategy against enteric pathogens.

  7. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-08-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We have adapted the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to measure this response without the difficulties associated with measurement of antibodies in intestinal contents or the artifacts associated with culturing of lymphocytes. The predominant response in terms of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) is seen in the small intestine lamina propria, which can be measured within 4 days of infection, peaks 3 weeks after infection, and remains near that level for longer than 8 weeks. The magnitude of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) cell response is approximately 10 times greater than the intestinal IgG cell response, and IgM cells are rare. Virus-specific ASC constitute approximately 50% of all ASC in the gut at the peak of the virus-specific response. This response is considerably greater than responses to nonreplicating mucosal antigens measured by similar techniques. Enteral infection engenders minimal virus-specific ASC response in the spleen. Rhesus rotavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralization assays of serum and intestinal contents did not correlate with virus-specific ASC response.

  8. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  9. Evaluation of chimeric DNA vaccines consisting of premembrane and envelope genes of Japanese encephalitis and dengue viruses as a strategy for reducing induction of dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Kuwahara, Miwa; Sudiro, T Mirawati; Kameoka, Masanori; Konishi, Eiji

    2014-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies induced by dengue virus (DENV) infection show viral infection-enhancing activities at sub-neutralizing doses. On the other hand, preimmunity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a congener of DENV, does not increase the severity of DENV infection. Several studies have demonstrated that neutralizing epitopes in the genus Flavivirus are mainly located in domain III (DIII) of the envelope (E) protein. In this study, chimeric premembrane and envelope (prM-E) gene-based expression plasmids of JEV and DENV1 with DIII substitution of each virus were constructed for use as DNA vaccines and their immunogenicity evaluated. Sera from C3H/He and ICR mice immunized with a chimeric gene containing DENV1 DIII on a JEV prM-E gene backbone showed high neutralizing antibody titers with less DENV infection-enhancing activity. Our results confirm the applicability of this approach as a new dengue vaccine development strategy. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Dietary cinnamaldehyde enhances acquisition of specific antibodies following helminth infection in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Andrew R.; Hansen, Tina V. A.; Krych, Lukasz

    2017-01-01

    Dietary phytonutrients such as cinnamaldehyde (CA) may contribute to immune function during pathogen infections, and CA has been reported to have positive effects on gut health when used as feed additive for livestock. Here, we investigated whether CA could enhance antibody production and specific...... immune responses during infection with an enteric pathogen. We examined the effect of dietary CA on plasma antibody levels in parasite-naïve pigs, and subsequently acquisition of humoral immune responses during infection with the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Parasite-naïve pigs fed diets supplemented......) and glucose transporter 2 (SLC2A2) in the jejunal mucosa of A.suum-infected pigs. Dietary CA induced only limited changes in the composition of the prokaryotic gut microbiota of A. suum-infected pigs, and in vitro experiments showed that CA did not directly induce proliferation or increase secretion of Ig...

  11. The bright and the dark side of human antibody responses to flaviviruses: lessons for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Dellarole, Mariano; Heinz, Franz X

    2018-02-01

    Zika and dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus genus, a close group of antigenically related viruses that cause significant arthropod-transmitted diseases throughout the globe. Although infection by a given flavivirus is thought to confer lifelong protection, some of the patient's antibodies cross-react with other flaviviruses without cross-neutralizing. The original antigenic sin phenomenon may amplify such antibodies upon subsequent heterologous flavivirus infection, potentially aggravating disease by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The most striking example is provided by the four different dengue viruses, where infection by one serotype appears to predispose to more severe disease upon infection by a second one. A similar effect was postulated for sequential infections with Zika and dengue viruses. In this review, we analyze the molecular determinants of the dual antibody response to flavivirus infection or vaccination in humans. We highlight the role of conserved partially cryptic epitopes giving rise to cross-reacting and poorly neutralizing, ADE-prone antibodies. We end by proposing a strategy for developing an epitope-focused vaccine approach to avoid eliciting undesirable antibodies while focusing the immune system on producing protective antibodies only. © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  12. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  13. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-08

    Feb 8, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vacci- nation in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency.

  14. Association of LEI0258 microsatellite alleles with antibody response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... improving primary antibody response against Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine and body weight in two Tanzania chicken ecotypes, .... The chicks were vaccinated with Newcastle disease virus vaccine. (La Sota) according to ..... Heller ED, Uni Z, Bacon LD (1991). Serological evidence for Major.

  15. Focused antibody response to influenza linked to antigenic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Ying A; Rijal, Pramila; Schimanski, Lisa; Powell, Timothy J; Lin, Tzou-Yien; McCauley, John W; Daniels, Rodney S; Townsend, Alain R

    2015-07-01

    The selective pressure that drives antigenic changes in influenza viruses is thought to originate from the human immune response. Here, we have characterized the B cell repertoire from a previously vaccinated donor whose serum had reduced neutralizing activity against the recently evolved clade 6B H1N1pdm09 viruses. While the response was markedly polyclonal, 88% of clones failed to recognize clade 6B viruses; however, the ability to neutralize A/USSR/90/1977 influenza, to which the donor would have been exposed in childhood, was retained. In vitro selection of virus variants with representative monoclonal antibodies revealed that a single amino acid replacement at residue K163 in the Sa antigenic site, which is characteristic of the clade 6B viruses, was responsible for resistance to neutralization by multiple monoclonal antibodies and the donor serum. The K163 residue lies in a part of a conserved surface that is common to the hemagglutinins of the 1977 and 2009 H1N1 viruses. Vaccination with the 2009 hemagglutinin induced an antibody response tightly focused on this common surface that is capable of selecting current antigenic drift variants in H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses. Moreover, amino acid replacement at K163 was not highlighted by standard ferret antisera. Human monoclonal antibodies may be a useful adjunct to ferret antisera for detecting antigenic drift in influenza viruses.

  16. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  17. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vaccination in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency. Methods: A prospective ...

  18. Intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement of microbial infection in macrophages: disease regulation by immune complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Mahalingam, Prof Suresh; Marovich, Mary A; Ubol, Sukathida; Mosser, Prof David M

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of microorganisms can replicate in macrophages, and cell entry of these pathogens via non-neutralising IgG antibody complexes can result in increased intracellular infection through idiosyncratic Fcγ-receptor signalling. The activation of Fcγ receptors usually leads to phagocytosis. Paradoxically, the ligation of monocyte or macrophage Fcγ receptors by IgG immune complexes, rather than aiding host defences, can suppress innate immunity, increase production of interleukin 10, and bias T-helper-1 (Th1) responses to Th2 responses, leading to increased infectious output by infected cells. This intrinsic antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection modulates the severity of diseases as disparate as dengue haemorrhagic fever and leishmaniasis. Intrinsic ADE is distinct from extrinsic ADE, whereby complexes of infectious agents with non-neutralising antibodies lead to an increased number of infected cells. Intrinsic ADE might be involved in many protozoan, bacterial, and viral infections. We review insights into intracellular mechanisms and implications of enhanced pathogenesis after ligation of macrophage Fcγ receptors by infectious immune complexes. PMID:20883967

  19. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  20. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We ha...

  1. Hydrogel Tethering Enhances Interdomain Stabilization of Single-Chain Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yijia [Department; Ford, Nicole R. [Marine; Hecht, Karen A. [Marine; Roesijadi, Guritno [Marine; Department; Squier, Thomas C. [Department

    2017-10-12

    Self-assembly of recombinant proteins within the biosilica of living diatoms represents a means to construct functional materials in a reproducible and scalable manner that enable applications that harness the inherent specificities of proteins to sense and respond to environmental cues. Here we describe the use of a silaffin-derived lysine-rich 39 amino-acid targeting sequence (Sil3T8) to direct a single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to assemble within the biosilica frustule, resulting in abundances in excess of 200,000 proteins per frustule. The fluorescence of either a derivative of trinitrotoluene (TNT) bound to the scFv or the endogenous fluorescence of EGFP was used to monitor pro-tein conformational dynamics, accessibility to external quenchers, binding affinity, and conformational stability. We find that proteins within isolated frustules undergo isotropic rotational motions with two-fold increases in rotational correlation times, which are indicative of weak macromolecular associations within the biosilica. Solvent accessibilities and high-affinity (pM) binding are comparable to those in solution. In contrast to solution conditions, scFv antibod-ies within the biosilica matrix retain their binding affinity in the presence of chaotropic agents (i.e., 8 M urea). These results argue that dramatic increases in protein conforma-tional stability within the biosilica frustule matrices arise through molecular crowding, acting to retain native protein folds and associated functionality to allow the utility of engineered proteins under a range of harsh environmental conditions associated with environmental sensing and industrial catalytic transformations.

  2. Effect of maternal antibodies and pig age on the antibody response after vaccination against Glässers disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2011-08-01

    The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the development and duration of postvaccinal antibody response against Glässer's disease were investigated. Pigs born to immune (MDA-positive) and non-immune (MDA-negative) sows were vaccinated with inactivated vaccine. Vaccination was done according to three different protocols: at 1 and 4, at 2 and 5 or at 4 and 7 weeks of age. There were also two control groups for MDA-negative and MDA-positive pigs. The level of Haemophilus parasuis (Hps) specific antibodies were determined using commercial ELISA test. No serological responses were seen in any of the groups after the first vaccination. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) against Hps were above the positive level until approximately 3 weeks of life in MDA-positive pigs. In those pigs the strongest postvaccinal humoral response was observed in piglets vaccinated at 4 and 7 weeks of age. In the remaining MDA-positive piglets only slight seroconversion was noted but levels of antibodies never exceeded values considered as positive. All MDA-negative pigs produced Hps-specific antibodies after the second vaccination. The results of the present study indicated that MDA may alter the development and duration of active postvaccinal antibody response. Age of pigs at the moment of vaccination was not associated with the significant differences in the magnitude of antibody response, however influenced the kinetics of decline of Hps-specific antibodies.

  3. Antibody Responses to Zika Virus Infections in Environments of Flavivirus Endemicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keasey, Sarah L; Pugh, Christine L; Jensen, Stig M R; Smith, Jessica L; Hontz, Robert D; Durbin, Anna P; Dudley, Dawn M; O'Connor, David H; Ulrich, Robert G

    2017-04-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infections occur in areas where dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), yellow fever virus (YFV), and other viruses of the genus Flavivirus cocirculate. The envelope (E) proteins of these closely related flaviviruses induce specific long-term immunity, yet subsequent infections are associated with cross-reactive antibody responses that may enhance disease susceptibility and severity. To gain a better understanding of ZIKV infections against a background of similar viral diseases, we examined serological immune responses to ZIKV, WNV, DENV, and YFV infections of humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Using printed microarrays, we detected very specific antibody responses to primary infections with probes of recombinant E proteins from 15 species and lineages of flaviviruses pathogenic to humans, while high cross-reactivity between ZIKV and DENV was observed with 11 printed native viruses. Notably, antibodies from human primary ZIKV or secondary DENV infections that occurred in areas where flavivirus is endemic broadly recognized E proteins from many flaviviruses, especially DENV, indicating a strong influence of infection history on immune responses. A predictive algorithm was used to tentatively identify previous encounters with specific flaviviruses based on serum antibody interactions with the multispecies panel of E proteins. These results illustrate the potential impact of exposure to related viruses on the outcome of ZIKV infection and offer considerations for development of vaccines and diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  5. Poly(I:C) adjuvant strongly enhances parasite-inhibitory antibodies and Th1 response against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-1 (42-kDa fragment) in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrizi, Akram Abouie; Rezvani, Niloufar; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Gholami, Atefeh; Babaeekhou, Laleh

    Malaria vaccine development has been confronted with various challenges such as poor immunogenicity of malaria vaccine candidate antigens, which is considered as the main challenge. However, this problem can be managed using appropriate formulations of antigens and adjuvants. Poly(I:C) is a potent Th1 inducer and a human compatible adjuvant capable of stimulating both B- and T-cell immunity. Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 142 (PfMSP-142) is a promising vaccine candidate for blood stage of malaria that has faced several difficulties in clinical trials, mainly due to improper adjuvants. Therefore, in the current study, poly(I:C), as a potent Th1 inducer adjuvant, was evaluated to improve the immunogenicity of recombinant PfMSP-142, when compared to CFA/IFA, as reference adjuvant. Poly(I:C) produced high level and titers of anti-PfMSP-142 IgG antibodies in which was comparable to CFA/IFA adjuvant. In addition, PfMSP-142 formulated with poly(I:C) elicited a higher ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 (23.9) and IgG2a/IgG1 (3.77) with more persistent, higher avidity, and titer of IgG2a relative to CFA/IFA, indicating a potent Th1 immune response. Poly(I:C) could also help to induce anti-PfMSP-142 antibodies with higher growth-inhibitory activity than CFA/IFA. Altogether, the results of the current study demonstrated that poly(I:C) is a potent adjuvant that can be appropriate for being used in PfMSP-142-based vaccine formulations.

  6. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juli Broggi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects. However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers.

  7. Requirement for continuous antigenic stimulation in the development and differentiation of antibody-forming cells. The effect of passive antibody on the primary and secondary response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, M G; Nettesheim, P; Francis, M W

    1969-05-01

    The essential role of continuous antigenic stimulation in the development and differentiation of antibody-forming cells as defined in the X-Y-Z immune cell maturation scheme was examined in these studies. Mice were primed with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) in an attempt to induce maximum immune progenitor cell conversion (X --> Y). Subsequently antigen was depleted at 1 or 4 days after priming with isologous specific antibody in order to interrupt further immune cell differentiation (Y --> Z). It was reasoned that this condition would result in depression of the functional antibody-producing cell compartment as measured in the intact mice and subsequently in enhancement of the sensitized (Y cell) compartment as measured in the spleen cell transfer system. These data were also correlated with systematic studies of the hyperplasia of the spleen germinal centers. The effect of passive antibody on the primary response to SRBC was a marked decrease indirect and indirect hemolysin-producing cells (DPFC and IPFC). However, there was a lack of correlation in the degree of antibody-mediated 19S and 7S immune cell suppression during the primary response, the DPFC being much less depressed than the IPFC. As measured in the transfer system there was an enhanced 19S sensitized cell compartment and a depressed 7S sensitized cell compartment in 1 day passively immunized mice. This was true whether or not transfers were performed 1, 2, or 4 wk after priming. Similarly, there was an enhanced 19S-sensitized cell compartment with little or no effect on the 7S-sensitized. cell compartment in 4 day passively immunized mice. These data suggest that progeny of the antigen-stimulated progenitor cells (X cell), as a consequence of lack of further antigenic stimulation, were forced into maturation arrest. These studies further demonstrate that isologous passive antibody suppresses germinal center growth regardless of whether the antibody is infused 1, 2, or 4 days after priming. In terms of

  8. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  9. Improved method to raise polyclonal antibody using enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianke; Wang, Long; Liu, Guoxiang; Zhang, Wen; Sheng, Zhejin; Wang, Zhugang; Fei, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant fusion protein is widely used as an antigen to raise antibodies against the epitope of a target protein. However, the concomitant anticarrier antibody in resulting antiserum reduces the production of the desired antibody and brings about unwanted non-specific immune reactions. It is proposed that the carrier protein transgenic animal could be used to solve this problem. To validate this hypothesis, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgenic mice were produced. By immunizing the mice with fusion protein His6HAtag-EGFP, we showed that the antiserum from the transgenic mice had higher titer antibody against His6HA tag and lower titer antibody against EGFP compared with that from wild-type mice. Therefore, this report describes an improved method to raise high titer antipeptide polyclonal antibody using EGFP transgenic mice that could have application potential in antibody preparation.

  10. Antibody-nanoparticle conjugates to enhance the sensitivity of ELISA-based detection methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M Billingsley

    Full Text Available Accurate antigen detection is imperative for clinicians to diagnose disease, assess treatment success, and predict patient prognosis. The most common technique used for the detection of disease-associated biomarkers is the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In an ELISA, primary antibodies are incubated with biological samples containing the biomarker of interest. Then, detectible secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP bind the primary antibodies. Upon addition of a color-changing substrate, the samples provide a colorimetric signal that directly correlates to the targeted biomarker concentration. While ELISAs are effective for analyzing samples with high biomarker content, they lack the sensitivity required to analyze samples with low antigen levels. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of ELISAs could be enhanced by replacing freely delivered primary antibodies with antibody-nanoparticle conjugates that provide excess binding sites for detectible secondary antibodies, ultimately leading to increased signal. Here, we investigated the use of nanoshells (NS decorated with antibodies specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as a model system (EGFR-NS. We incubated one healthy and two breast cancer cell lines, each expressing different levels of EGFR, with EGFR-NS, untargeted NS, or unconjugated EGFR antibodies, as well as detectable secondary antibodies. We found that EGFR-NS consistently increased signal intensity relative to unconjugated EGFR antibodies, with a substantial 13-fold enhancement from cells expressing high levels of EGFR. Additionally, 40x more unconjugated antibodies were required to detect EGFR compared to those conjugated to NS. Our results demonstrate that antibody-nanoparticle conjugates lower the detection limit of traditional ELISAs and support further investigation of this strategy with other antibodies and nanoparticles. Owing to their enhanced sensitivity, we anticipate that

  11. Non-HLA Antibodies May Accelerate Immune Responses After Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Undine Ariane; Lachmann, Nils; Ranucci, Giuseppina; Sawitzki, Birgit; Schoenemann, Constanze; Pratschke, Johann; Dragun, Duska; Pascher, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Non-HLA alloantibodies and autoantibodies are involved in allograft rejection in kidney and heart transplantation. Their role in intestinal transplantation has not yet been described. We examined the development of antiangiotensin II type I receptor antibodies (anti-AT1R) and antiendothelin type A receptor antibodies associated with the clinical course and histopathological findings of intestinal transplantation recipients. Thirty-seven patients underwent intestinal or multivisceral transplantation. Non-HLA antibodies (non-HLAabs) were screened in 29 transplant recipients. Antibody-levels greater than 12 U/L were considered positive and were evaluated retrospectively regarding rejection episodes. Twenty patients developed anti-AT1R and/or antiendothelin type A receptor antibodies (non-HLAabs group), 9 did not (control group). The non-HLAabs group had a higher rate of allograft rejection than controls (80% vs 55%), especially a higher rate of antibody-mediated rejections (55% vs 11%, P < 0.01) with detection of donor-specific anti-HLAabs. All rejection episodes in the non-HLAabs group appeared around the time of positive non-HLAabs detection. Five patients had acute cellular rejections at the time of non-HLAabs development, 4 had viral infections. Our data suggest that antibody-mediated mechanisms targeting antigens beyond HLA may trigger and accelerate immune responses. Given the possibility of pharmacologic targeting of non-HLA receptors, future studies will focus on the explanation of mechanisms how non-HLAabs may enhance rejection and affect long-term allograft survival.

  12. Iodoacetyl-functionalized pullulan: A supplemental enhancer for single-domain antibody-polyclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Takahiko; Arai, Hidenao; Koyama, Tetsuo; Hatano, Ken; Nemoto, Naoto; Matsuoka, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Survivin, an inhibitor of the apoptosis protein family, is a potent tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is one of the methods that has been used for detection of survivin. However, ELISA has several disadvantages caused by the use of conventional antibodies, and we have therefore been trying to develop a novel ELISA system using camelid single-domain antibodies (VHHs) as advantageous replacements. Here we report a supplemental approach to improve the VHH-polyclonal antibody sandwich ELISA for survivin detection. Iodoacetyl-functionalized pullulan was synthesized, and its thiol reactivity was characterized by a model reaction with l-cysteine. The thiophilic pullulan was applied to an immunoassay asan additive upon coating of standard assay plates with an anti-survivin VHH fusion protein with C-terminal cysteine. The results showed that the mole ratio of the additive to VHH had a significant effect on the consequent response. Mole ratios of 0.07, 0.7, and 7 led to 90% lower, 15% higher, and 69% lower responses, respectively, than the response of a positive control in which no additive was used. The background levels observed in any additive conditions were as low as that of a negative control lacking both VHH and the additive. These results indicate the applicability of the thiol-reactive pullulan as a response enhancer to VHH-based ELISA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Envelope deglycosylation enhances antigenicity of HIV-1 gp41 epitopes for both broad neutralizing antibodies and their unmutated ancestor antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Jiang Ma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env membrane proximal external region (MPER is an important vaccine target that in rare subjects can elicit neutralizing antibodies. One mechanism proposed for rarity of MPER neutralizing antibody generation is lack of reverted unmutated ancestor (putative naive B cell receptor antibody reactivity with HIV-1 envelope. We have studied the effect of partial deglycosylation under non-denaturing (native conditions on gp140 Env antigenicity for MPER neutralizing antibodies and their reverted unmutated ancestor antibodies. We found that native deglycosylation of clade B JRFL gp140 as well as group M consensus gp140 Env CON-S selectively increased the reactivity of Env with the broad neutralizing human mAbs, 2F5 and 4E10. Whereas fully glycosylated gp140 Env either did not bind (JRFL, or weakly bound (CON-S, 2F5 and 4E10 reverted unmutated ancestors, natively deglycosylated JRFL and CON-S gp140 Envs did bind well to these putative mimics of naive B cell receptors. These data predict that partially deglycoslated Env would bind better than fully glycosylated Env to gp41-specific naïve B cells with improved immunogenicity. In this regard, immunization of rhesus macaques demonstrated enhanced immunogenicity of the 2F5 MPER epitope on deglyosylated JRFL gp140 compared to glycosylated JRFL gp140. Thus, the lack of 2F5 and 4E10 reverted unmutated ancestor binding to gp140 Env may not always be due to lack of unmutated ancestor antibody reactivity with gp41 peptide epitopes, but rather, may be due to glycan interference of binding of unmutated ancestor antibodies of broad neutralizing mAb to Env gp41.

  14. Novel chemiluminescent Western blot blocking and antibody incubation solution for enhanced antibody-antigen interaction and increased specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kimberly; Bochkariov, Dmitry

    2017-10-01

    Western blotting is a ubiquitous tool used in protein and molecular biology research, providing information about the presence, size, relative abundance, and state of a protein in a mixture. First, the proteins in a sample are separated by size using SDS-PAGE then transferred onto a membrane for detection with a set of primary and secondary antibodies. High-quality Western data requires high signal-to-noise ratios, which depend upon reduction of nonspecific antibody interactions. Blocking is a critical step in the Western blot method as it prevents the antibodies from binding nonspecifically to the membrane and irrelevant proteins. A solution of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) in physiological buffer is commonly used for this purpose, but does not perform well with every type of antibody and is not optimal for low-abundance proteins. We present a novel blocking solution for chemiluminescent Western blots, AdvanBlock™-chemi, which outperforms NFDM in experiments with 20 unique antibodies by increasing signal-to-noise ratios and minimizing nonspecific binding. This solution enhances protein detection by Western blot and provides consistent results for detection of low abundant and modified proteins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Serum and intestinal isotype antibody responses to Wa human rotavirus in gnotobiotic pigs are modulated by maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Hodgins, D C; de Arriba, L; Kang, S Y; Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Tô, T L; Saif, L J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of passive antibodies on protection and active immune responses to human rotavirus were studied in gnotobiotic pigs. Pigs were injected at birth with saline or sow serum of high (immunized) or low (control) antibody titre and subsets of pigs were fed colostrum and milk from immunized or control sows. Pigs were inoculated at 3-5 days of age and challenged at 21 days post-inoculation (p.i.) with virulent Wa human rotavirus. Pigs receiving immune serum with or without immune colostrum/milk were partially protected against diarrhoea and virus shedding after inoculation, but had significantly lower IgA antibody titres in serum and small intestinal contents at 21 days p.i. and lower protection rates after challenge compared with pigs given control or no maternal antibodies. IgG antibody titres were consistently higher in small than in large intestinal contents. Pigs given control serum with control colostrum/milk had lower rates of virus shedding after inoculation than those given control serum alone. In summary, high titres of circulating maternal antibodies with or without local (milk) antibodies provided passive protection after inoculation but suppressed active mucosal antibody responses. These findings may have implications for the use of live, oral rotavirus vaccines in breast-fed infants.

  16. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  17. Defensins Potentiate a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Enteric Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu P Gounder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available α-defensins are abundant antimicrobial peptides with broad, potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities in vitro. Although their contribution to host defense against bacteria in vivo has been demonstrated, comparable studies of their antiviral activity in vivo are lacking. Using a mouse model deficient in activated α-defensins in the small intestine, we show that Paneth cell α-defensins protect mice from oral infection by a pathogenic virus, mouse adenovirus 1 (MAdV-1. Survival differences between mouse genotypes are lost upon parenteral MAdV-1 infection, strongly implicating a role for intestinal defenses in attenuating pathogenesis. Although differences in α-defensin expression impact the composition of the ileal commensal bacterial population, depletion studies using broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed no effect of the microbiota on α-defensin-dependent viral pathogenesis. Moreover, despite the sensitivity of MAdV-1 infection to α-defensin neutralization in cell culture, we observed no barrier effect due to Paneth cell α-defensin activation on the kinetics and magnitude of MAdV-1 dissemination to the brain. Rather, a protective neutralizing antibody response was delayed in the absence of α-defensins. This effect was specific to oral viral infection, because antibody responses to parenteral or mucosal ovalbumin exposure were not affected by α-defensin deficiency. Thus, α-defensins play an important role as adjuvants in antiviral immunity in vivo that is distinct from their direct antiviral activity observed in cell culture.

  18. The cellular bases of antibody responses during dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Yam-Puc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic or memory B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections.This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events like the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation and germinal centers (GCs formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs, till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  19. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  20. Defining New Therapeutics Using a More Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Amelia K; Brien, James D; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Johnson, Syd; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John; Sarathy, Vanessa V; Barrett, Alan D; Shresta, Sujan; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    With over 3.5 billion people at risk and approximately 390 million human infections per year, dengue virus (DENV) disease strains health care resources worldwide. Previously, we and others established models for DENV pathogenesis in mice that completely lack subunits of the receptors (Ifnar and Ifngr) for type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling; however, the utility of these models is limited by the pleotropic effect of these cytokines on innate and adaptive immune system development and function. Here, we demonstrate that the specific deletion of Ifnar expression on subsets of murine myeloid cells (LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(flox/flox) [denoted as Ifnar(f/f) herein]) resulted in enhanced DENV replication in vivo. The administration of subneutralizing amounts of cross-reactive anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies to LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(f/f) mice prior to infection with DENV serotype 2 or 3 resulted in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection with many of the characteristics associated with severe DENV disease in humans, including plasma leakage, hypercytokinemia, liver injury, hemoconcentration, and thrombocytopenia. Notably, the pathogenesis of severe DENV-2 or DENV-3 infection in LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(f/f) mice was blocked by pre- or postexposure administration of a bispecific dual-affinity retargeting molecule (DART) or an optimized RIG-I receptor agonist that stimulates innate immune responses. Our findings establish a more immunocompetent animal model of ADE of infection with multiple DENV serotypes in which disease is inhibited by treatment with broad-spectrum antibody derivatives or innate immune stimulatory agents. Although dengue virus (DENV) infects hundreds of millions of people annually and results in morbidity and mortality on a global scale, there are no approved antiviral treatments or vaccines. Part of the difficulty in evaluating therapeutic candidates is the lack of small animal models that are permissive to DENV and recapitulate the clinical features

  1. Evaluation of human antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) on a carbohydrate microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) is used as a vaccine adjuvant, as a carrier protein for small haptens, and as a treatment for bladder cancer. Immunization with KLH produces antibodies to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens in animals, and these antibodies have been postulated as the basis of efficacy for bladder cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antibody responses to KLH in humans. Experimental Design A carbohydrate microarray was used to profile antibody responses in 14 individuals immunized with KLH plus alum adjuvant. Results 8/14 individuals produced antibodies to at least one tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Increases to Lewis X, Lewis Y, GA1di, GM3, and sialyl Lewis A were observed in certain individuals, but, in general, antibody profiles were highly variable. Pre-immunization antibody levels to a subset of array antigens had a statistically significant correlation with the magnitude of the antibody response to KLH. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Antibodies to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens can be produced in humans, but antibody profiles differ considerably from person to person, which may contribute to variable clinical responses with KLH. Pre-treatment antibody levels to certain antigens may be useful for predicting which patients will respond favorably to KLH. PMID:21137049

  2. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2017-11-09

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  3. Hyperthermia Using Antibody-Conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles and Its Enhanced Effect with Cryptotanshinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ota

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heat dissipation by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under an alternating magnetic field can be used to selectively treat cancer tissues. Antibodies conjugated to MNPs can enhance the therapeutic effects of hyperthermia by altering antibody-antigen interactions. Fe3O4 nanoparticles (primary diameter, 20–30 nm coated with polyethylenimine (PEI were prepared and conjugated with CH11, an anti-Fas monoclonal antibody. HeLa cell growth was then evaluated as a function of antibody and MNP/antibody complex doses. HeLa cell growth decreased with increased doses of the antibody and complexes. However, MNPs alone did not affect cell growth; thus, only the antibody affected cell growth. In hyperthermia experiments conducted using an alternating magnetic field frequency of 210 kHz, cell viability varied with the intensity of the applied alternating magnetic field, because the temperature increase of the culture medium with added complexes was dependent on magnetic field intensity. The HeLa cell death rate with added complexes was significantly greater as compared with that with MNPs alone. Cryptotanshinone, an anti-apoptotic factor blocker, was also added to cell cultures, which provided an additional anti-cancer cell effect. Thus, an anti-cancer cell effect using a combination of magnetic hyperthermia, an anti-Fas antibody and cryptotanshinone was established.

  4. Investigation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera against anthrax toxins resulted in identification of an anti-lethal factor antibody with disease-enhancing characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Parul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Priyanka; Joon, Shikha; Sinha, Subrata; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Hybridomas were created using spleen of mice that were actively immunized with rLFn (recombinant N-terminal domain of lethal factor). Later on, separate group of mice were immunized with rLFn to obtain a polyclonal control for passive immunization studies of monoclonal antibodies. This led to the identification of one cohort of rLFn-immnized mice that harboured disease-enhancing polyclonal antibodies. At the same time, the monoclonal antibodies secreted by all the hybridomas were being tested. Two hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies (H10 and H8) that were cross-reactive with EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor), while the other two hybridomas secreted LF-specific antibodies (H7 and H11). Single chain variable fragment (LETscFv) was derived from H10 hybridoma. H11 was found to have disease-enhancing property. Combination of H11 with protective monoclonal antibodies (H8 and H10) reduced its disease enhancing nature. This in vitro abrogation of disease-enhancement provides the proof of concept that in polyclonal sera the disease enhancing character of a fraction of antibodies is overshadowed by the protective nature of the rest of the antibodies generated on active immunization. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Complement receptors 1 and 2 in murine antibody responses to IgM-complexed and uncomplexed sheep erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rutemark

    Full Text Available Early complement components are important for normal antibody responses. In this process, complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2, expressed on B cells and follicular dendritic cells (FDCs in mice, play a central role. Complement-activating IgM administered with the antigen it is specific for, enhances the antibody response to this antigen. Here, bone marrow chimeras between Cr2(-/- and wildtype mice were used to analyze whether FDCs or B cells must express CR1/2 for antibody responses to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC, either administered alone or together with specific IgM. For robust IgG anti-SRBC responses, CR1/2 must be expressed on FDCs. Occasionally, weak antibody responses were seen when only B cells expressed CR1/2, probably reflecting extrafollicular antibody production enabled by co-crosslinking of CR2/CD19/CD81 and the BCR. When SRBC alone was administered to mice with CR1/2(+ FDCs, B cells from wildtype and Cr2(-/- mice produced equal amounts of antibodies. Most likely antigen is then deposited on FDCs in a way that optimizes engagement of the B cell receptor, making CR2-facilitated signaling to the B cell superfluous. SRBC bound to IgM will have more C3 fragments, the ligands for CR1/2, on their surface than SRBC administered alone. Specific IgM, forming a complex with SRBC, enhances antibody responses in two ways when FDCs express CR1/2. One is dependent on CR1/2(+ B cells and probably acts via increased transport of IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bound to CR1/2 on marginal zone B cells. The other is independent on CR1/2(+ B cells and the likely mechanism is that IgM-SRBC-complement complexes bind better to FDCs than SRBC administered alone. These observations suggest that the immune system uses three different CR1/2-mediated effector functions to generate optimal antibody responses: capture by FDCs (playing a dominant role, transport by marginal zone B cells and enhanced B cell signaling.

  6. Enhanced inflammation in New Zealand white rabbits when MERS-CoV reinfection occurs in the absence of neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Katherine V; Broadbent, Andrew J; Gretebeck, Lisa; Vogel, Leatrice; Lamirande, Elaine W; Sutton, Troy; Bock, Kevin W; Minai, Mahnaz; Orandle, Marlene; Moore, Ian N; Subbarao, Kanta

    2017-08-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a zoonotic betacoronavirus that was first detected in humans in 2012 as a cause of severe acute respiratory disease. As of July 28, 2017, there have been 2,040 confirmed cases with 712 reported deaths. While many infections have been fatal, there have also been a large number of mild or asymptomatic cases discovered through monitoring and contact tracing. New Zealand white rabbits are a possible model for asymptomatic infection with MERS-CoV. In order to discover more about non-lethal infections and to learn whether a single infection with MERS-CoV would protect against reinfection, we inoculated rabbits with MERS-CoV and monitored the antibody and inflammatory response. Following intranasal infection, rabbits developed a transient dose-dependent pulmonary infection with moderately high levels of viral RNA, viral antigen, and perivascular inflammation in multiple lung lobes that was not associated with clinical signs. The rabbits developed antibodies against viral proteins that lacked neutralizing activity and the animals were not protected from reinfection. In fact, reinfection resulted in enhanced pulmonary inflammation, without an associated increase in viral RNA titers. Interestingly, passive transfer of serum from previously infected rabbits to naïve rabbits was associated with enhanced inflammation upon infection. We further found this inflammation was accompanied by increased recruitment of complement proteins compared to primary infection. However, reinfection elicited neutralizing antibodies that protected rabbits from subsequent viral challenge. Our data from the rabbit model suggests that people exposed to MERS-CoV who fail to develop a neutralizing antibody response, or persons whose neutralizing antibody titers have waned, may be at risk for severe lung disease on re-exposure to MERS-CoV.

  7. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (t...... (MS), and 48 healthy controls (HC). RESULTS: Thirty-seven percentages of patients with AQP4-seropositive NMO/NMO-SD and 28% of patients with MS had at least one particular antibody in contrast to 8% of HC (P ...

  8. Plant-produced anti-dengue virus monoclonal antibodies exhibit reduced antibody-dependent enhancement of infection activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Paul, Amber M; Sun, Haiyan; Lai, Huafang; Yang, Ming; Esqueda, Adrian; Bai, Fengwei; Steinkellner, Herta; Chen, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The mAb E60 has the potential to be a desirable therapeutic molecule since it efficiently neutralizes all four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV). However, mammalian-cell-produced E60 exhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) activity, rendering it inefficacious in vivo, and treated animals more susceptible to developing more severe diseases during secondary infection. In this study, we evaluated a plant-based expression system for the production of therapeutically suitable E60. The mAb was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamianaWT and a ∆XFT line, a glycosylation mutant lacking plant-specific N-glycan residues. The mAb was efficiently expressed and assembled in leaves and exhibited highly homogenous N-glycosylation profiles, i.e. GnGnXF3 or GnGn structures, depending on the expression host. Both E60 glycovariants demonstrated equivalent antigen-binding specificity and in vitro neutralization potency against DENV serotypes 2 and 4 compared with their mammalian-cell-produced counterpart. By contrast, plant-produced E60 exhibited reduced ADE activity in Fc gamma receptor expressing human cells. Our results suggest the ability of plant-produced antibodies to minimize ADE, which may lead to the development of safe and highly efficacious antibody-based therapeutics against DENV and other ADE-prone viral diseases. Our study provides so far unknown insight into the relationship between mAb N-glycosylation and ADE, which contributes to our understanding of how sugar moieties of antibodies modulate Fc-mediated functions and viral pathogenesis.

  9. Improving effector functions of antibodies for cancer treatment: Enhancing ADCC and CDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Natsume

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Akito Natsume, Rinpei Niwa, Mitsuo SatohAntibody Research Laboratories, Research Division, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd.,/Machida-shi, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: As platforms for therapeutic agents, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have already been approved, and several MAbs have demonstrated clinical effectiveness in a variety of malignancies. However, several issues have also been emerging in antibody therapy, such as high cost and insufficient drug action. Recently, to improve MAb activity in humans, effector functions have been subjects of focus, especially antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. Extensive efforts have been made to enhance these effector functions of MAbs, and successful approaches have been reported by us and others, wherein the binding activity of MAbs to FcγRIIIa or C1q is increased by introducing amino acid mutations into heavy chain constant regions or through glyco-modification of Fc-linked oligosaccharides. In addition, one of the next approaches to optimizing therapeutic antibodies would be to combine multiple enhancing modifications into a single antibody platform to overcome the diverse mechanisms of clinical resistance of tumor cells. For this aim, we have recently developed a successful combination composed of ADCC-enhancing modification by the fucose depletion from Fc-linked oligosaccharides and CDC-enhancing modification by IgG1 and IgG3 isotype shuffling in heavy chains, which could be of great value for the development of third-generation antibody therapeutics.Keywords: ADCC, CDC, effector functions, Fc oligosaccharides, IgG isotypes, nonfucosylated IgG

  10. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3, high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglutinin (PHA and high phagocytic activity, measured as carbone clearance (CC. Line ND3-L was selected on ND3, line PHA-L was selected on PHA, and line CC-L on CC, but all lines were measured for all three traits. The fourth line was a contemporary random bred control maintained throughout the selection experiment. Principal component analysis was used to distinguish clusters based on the overall set of immune measures. Results In the KLH immunised group, no differences were present between lines for natural antibodies binding to KLH and LPS, and, lines ND3-L and PHA-L had higher titers to LTA and anti-Gal titers measured before the immunisation protocol. The measure of ND3 was correlated positively with LPS titers measured post KLH immunisation and with the difference between LPS titers measured at day 0 and 7 post immunisation. In the M. butyricum immunised group, Line ND3-L showed significantly higher specific antibody response to M. butyricum, and this result agrees well with the hypothesis that the Th-1 pathway was expected to be selected for in this line. Conclusion This study has shown that the two different antigens KLH and M. butyricum gave rise to different responses in the set of selected lines, and that the response was only enhanced for the antigen associated with the same response mechanism as that for the trait (ND3, PHA or CC for which the line was selected. Interactions between innate and acquired immunity have been observed mainly for the

  11. Maternal immunity enhances systemic recall immune responses upon oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ut V; Melkebeek, Vesna; Devriendt, Bert; Goetstouwers, Tiphanie; Van Poucke, Mario; Peelman, Luc; Goddeeris, Bruno M; Cox, Eric

    2015-06-23

    F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) cause diarrhoea and mortality in piglets leading to severe economic losses. Oral immunization of piglets with F4 fimbriae induces a protective intestinal immune response evidenced by an F4-specific serum and intestinal IgA response. However, successful oral immunization of pigs with F4 fimbriae in the presence of maternal immunity has not been demonstrated yet. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of maternal immunity on the induction of a systemic immune response upon oral immunization of piglets. Whereas F4-specific IgG and IgA could be induced by oral immunization of pigs without maternal antibodies and by intramuscular immunization of pigs with maternal antibodies, no such response was seen in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Since maternal antibodies can mask an antibody response, we also looked by ELIspot assays for circulating F4-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs). Enumerating the F4-specific ASCs within the circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the number of F4-specific IgA ASCs within the circulating IgA(+) B-cells revealed an F4-specific immune response in the orally immunized animals with maternal antibodies. Interestingly, results suggest a more robust IgA booster response by oral immunization of pigs with than without maternal antibodies. These results demonstrate that oral immunization of piglets with F4-specific maternal antibodies is feasible and that these maternal antibodies seem to enhance the secondary systemic immune response. Furthermore, our ELIspot assay on enriched IgA(+) B-cells could be used as a screening procedure to optimize mucosal immunization protocols in pigs with maternal immunity.

  12. Source and Purity of Dengue-Viral Preparations Impact Requirement for Enhancing Antibody to Induce Elevated IL-1β Secretion: A Primary Human Monocyte Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Justin B; Smith, Scott A; Widman, Douglas G; McKinnon, Karen P; Scholle, Frank; Sempowski, Gregory D; Dittmer, Dirk P; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus is a major global health threat and can lead to life-threatening hemorrhagic complications due to immune activation and cytokine production. Cross-reactive antibodies to an earlier dengue virus infection are a recognized risk factor for severe disease. These antibodies bind heterologous dengue serotypes and enhance infection into Fc-receptor-bearing cells, a process known as antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. One crucial cytokine seen elevated in severe dengue patients is IL-1β, a potent inflammatory cytokine matured by the inflammasome. We used a highly-physiologic system by studying antibody-dependent enhancement of IL-1β in primary human monocytes with anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies isolated from patients. Antibody-enhancement increased viral replication in primary human monocytes inoculated with supernatant harvested from Vero cells infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) 16681. Surprisingly, IL-1β secretion induced by infectious supernatant harvested from two independent Vero cell lines was not enhanced by antibody. Secretion of multiple other inflammatory cytokines was also independent of antibody signaling. However, IL-1β secretion did require NLRP3 and caspase-1 activity. Immunodepletion of dengue virions from the infectious supernatant confirmed that virus was not the main IL-1β-inducing agent, suggesting that a supernatant component(s) not associated with the virion induced IL-1β production. We excluded RNA, DNA, contaminating LPS, viral NS1 protein, complement, and cytokines. In contrast, purified Vero-derived DENV-2 16681 exhibited antibody-enhancement of both infection and IL-1β induction. Furthermore, C6/36 mosquito cells did not produce such an inflammatory component, as crude supernatant harvested from insect cells infected with DENV-2 16681 induced antibody-dependent IL-1β secretion. This study indicates that Vero cells infected with DENV-2 16681 may produce inflammatory components during dengue virus

  13. Source and Purity of Dengue-Viral Preparations Impact Requirement for Enhancing Antibody to Induce Elevated IL-1β Secretion: A Primary Human Monocyte Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin B Callaway

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is a major global health threat and can lead to life-threatening hemorrhagic complications due to immune activation and cytokine production. Cross-reactive antibodies to an earlier dengue virus infection are a recognized risk factor for severe disease. These antibodies bind heterologous dengue serotypes and enhance infection into Fc-receptor-bearing cells, a process known as antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. One crucial cytokine seen elevated in severe dengue patients is IL-1β, a potent inflammatory cytokine matured by the inflammasome. We used a highly-physiologic system by studying antibody-dependent enhancement of IL-1β in primary human monocytes with anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies isolated from patients. Antibody-enhancement increased viral replication in primary human monocytes inoculated with supernatant harvested from Vero cells infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2 16681. Surprisingly, IL-1β secretion induced by infectious supernatant harvested from two independent Vero cell lines was not enhanced by antibody. Secretion of multiple other inflammatory cytokines was also independent of antibody signaling. However, IL-1β secretion did require NLRP3 and caspase-1 activity. Immunodepletion of dengue virions from the infectious supernatant confirmed that virus was not the main IL-1β-inducing agent, suggesting that a supernatant component(s not associated with the virion induced IL-1β production. We excluded RNA, DNA, contaminating LPS, viral NS1 protein, complement, and cytokines. In contrast, purified Vero-derived DENV-2 16681 exhibited antibody-enhancement of both infection and IL-1β induction. Furthermore, C6/36 mosquito cells did not produce such an inflammatory component, as crude supernatant harvested from insect cells infected with DENV-2 16681 induced antibody-dependent IL-1β secretion. This study indicates that Vero cells infected with DENV-2 16681 may produce inflammatory components

  14. Enhanced mucosal antibody production and protection against respiratory infections following an orally administered bacterial extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin John Marsland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentate immune responses and protect against primary infection with Influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B cells characterised by increases in MHC II, CD86, CD40 and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against Influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralising the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae.

  15. Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection is inhibited by SA-17, a doxorubicin derivative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Jarupathirun, Patsaporn; Kaptein, Suzanne; Neyts, Johan; Smit, Jolanda

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to play a critical role in the exacerbation of dengue virus (DENV)-induced disease during a heterologous re-infection. Despite ADE's clinical impact, only a few antiviral compounds have been assessed for their anti-ADE activity. We reported earlier

  16. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B; Specht, L; Henrichsen, J

    1989-01-01

    response to pneumococcal type antigens was similar in healthy adults and in patients with early stage HD before therapy. After treatment, postvaccination antibody response became negligible. Even up to 7 years after cessation of therapy patients were not able to raise a significant antibody response.......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  17. Effects of cold stress on immune responses and body weight of chicken lines divergently selected for antibody responses to sheep red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangalapura, B N; Nieuwland, M G B; de Vries Reilingh, G; Heetkamp, M J W; van den Brand, H; Kemp, B; Parmentier, H K

    2003-11-01

    Effects of cold stress (CS) on the immune system of chicken lines divergently selected for high (H line) and low (L line) antibody responses to SRBC next to a randombred control (C) line were studied. Three- to four-week-old growing chicks of the three lines were feed-restricted at 80% ad libitum and subjected to CS at 10 degrees C continuously for 7, 5, 3, 1, or 0 d prior to immunization with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Specific and natural antibodies were measured in the three chicken lines subjected to or not subjected to various durations of CS prior to immunization. In addition to antibodies we also measured in vitro lymphocyte proliferation as a measure of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), zymosan-induced reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) production as a measure of phagocytosis, and BW gain as a measure of production trait. In general, significantly higher antibody responses to KLH and natural antigens were found in the H line as compared to the other two lines. Specific antibody responses to KLH were not significantly affected by CS, but an acute transient increase in natural antibody titers to ovalbumin was found in H line birds subjected to 1 d of CS, which was not found in C or L line birds. On the other hand, an acute significant increase in natural antibody titers to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was found in C and L line birds subjected to 1 d CS but not in H line birds. Cold stress enhanced the ROI production. In addition, 7 d of CS significantly enhanced cellular immunity in vitro, but no significant line effects with respect to cellular immunity were found. BW gain was negatively affected by CS, especially when CS was applied for longer periods. We concluded that birds responded immediately to CS with enhanced innate (phagocyte and natural antibody) immunity, irrespective of genetic background. When CS is prolonged, the cellular adaptive immune response is affected also. Although reallocation of energy was not measured, our data suggested that under

  18. Immunoglobulin E Antileishmanial Antibody Response in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Atta, Maria L. B.; Salamé, Gregório S.; D’Oliveira, Argemiro; Almeida, Roque P.; Atta, Ajax M.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of antileishmanial immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are associated with disease activity in visceral leishmaniasis. Herein, we report our observations about the relationship between antileishmanial IgE antibodies and clinical aspects of cutaneous leishmaniasis. This study was carried out with 45 patients (29 male and 16 female), with ages ranging from 11 to 48 years. All subjects were from an area to which leishmaniasis is endemic, Corte de Pedra (Bahia, Brazil), and the duration of the illness was ≤30 days. The patients were classified as positive or negative for IgE serology in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with leishmanial antigens. IgE antibodies were detected in 18 patients (optical density, 0.421 ± 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.27 to 0.57), and only 3 (17%) had more than one ulcer. In this group the diameter of Montenegro’s reaction was 18 ± 12.2 mm. In the group with negative IgE serology, 11 of 27 patients (48%) presented two or more cutaneous ulcers, and the mean of the skin test result was 9 ± 6.9 mm. There was a positive correlation between IgE antibody levels and Montenegro’s reaction size and an inverse correlation between IgE antileishmanial antibodies and the number of skin ulcers. The presence of antileishmanial IgE antibodies in cutaneous leishmaniasis may be a result of immunoregulatory events with clinical implications. PMID:11777837

  19. Different levels of natural antibodies in chickens divergently selected for specific antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Lammers, A.; Hoekman, J.J.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Zaanen, I.T.A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the presence of Natural antibodies in plasma samples from individual birds from selected chicken lines at young and old age. Binding, specificity, and relative affinity to various antigens were determined in plasma from non-immunized female chickens at 5 weeks of age, and in plasma

  20. Tracking serum antibody response to viral antigens with arrayed imaging reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Charles R.; Rose, Robert C.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-02-01

    Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry, or "AIR", is a new label-free technique for detecting proteins that relies on bindinginduced changes in the response of an antireflective coating on the surface of a silicon ship. Because the technique provides high sensitivity, excellent dynamic range, and readily integrates with standard silicon wafer processing technology, it is an exceptionally attractive platform on which to build systems for detecting proteins in complex solutions. In our early research, we used AIR chips bearing secreted receptor proteins from enteropathogenic E. coli to develop sensors for this pathogen. Recently, we have been exploring an alternative strategy: Rather than detecting the pathogen directly, can one immobilize antigens from a pathogen, and employ AIR to detect antibody responses to those antigens? Such a strategy would provide enhanced sensitivity for pathogen detection (as the immune system essentially amplifies the "signal" caused by the presence of an organism to which it responds), and would also potentially prove useful in the process of vaccine development. We describe herein preliminary results in the application of such a strategy to the detection of antibodies to human papillomavirus (HPV).

  1. Masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies shapes the humoral immune response to influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Ellebedy, Ali H.; Davis, Carl; Jacob, Joshy; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2015-01-01

    The immune responses to influenza, a virus that exhibits strain variation, show complex dynamics where prior immunity shapes the response to the subsequent infecting strains. Original antigenic sin (OAS) describes the observation that antibodies to the first encountered influenza strain, specifically antibodies to the epitopes on the head of influenza's main surface glycoprotein, haemagglutinin (HA), dominate following infection with new drifted strains. OAS suggests that responses to the original strain are preferentially boosted. Recent studies also show limited boosting of the antibodies to conserved epitopes on the stem of HA, which are attractive targets for a ‘universal vaccine’. We develop multi-epitope models to explore how pre-existing immunity modulates the immune response to new strains following immunization. Our models suggest that the masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies may play an important role in describing the complex dynamics of OAS and limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA. Analysis of recently published data confirms model predictions for how pre-existing antibodies to an epitope on HA decrease the magnitude of boosting of the antibody response to this epitope following immunization. We explore strategies for boosting of antibodies to conserved epitopes and generating broadly protective immunity to multiple strains. PMID:26194761

  2. Enhancing antibody folding and secretion by tailoring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruijter, Jorg C; Koskela, Essi V; Frey, Alexander D

    2016-05-23

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides intriguing possibilities for synthetic biology and bioprocess applications, but its use is still constrained by cellular characteristics that limit the product yields. Considering the production of advanced biopharmaceuticals, a major hindrance lies in the yeast endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as it is not equipped for efficient and large scale folding of complex proteins, such as human antibodies. Following the example of professional secretory cells, we show that inducing an ER expansion in yeast by deleting the lipid-regulator gene OPI1 can improve the secretion capacity of full-length antibodies up to fourfold. Based on wild-type and ER-enlarged yeast strains, we conducted a screening of a folding factor overexpression library to identify proteins and their expression levels that enhance the secretion of antibodies. Out of six genes tested, addition of the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase CPR5 provided the most beneficial effect on specific product yield while PDI1, ERO1, KAR2, LHS1 and SIL1 had a mild or even negative effect to antibody secretion efficiency. Combining genes for ER enhancement did not induce any significant additional effect compared to addition of just one element. By combining the Δopi1 strain, with the enlarged ER, with CPR5 overexpression, we were able to boost the specific antibody product yield by a factor of 10 relative to the non-engineered strain. Engineering protein folding in vivo is a major task for biopharmaceuticals production in yeast and needs to be optimized at several levels. By rational strain design and high-throughput screening applications we were able to increase the specific secreted antibody yields of S. cerevisiae up to 10-fold, providing a promising strain for further process optimization and platform development for antibody production.

  3. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    Introduction BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG......) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Methods Within 7 days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination...... included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by ‘age at randomisation’ we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B...

  4. Enhanced neutralizing antibody titers and Th1 polarization from a novel Escherichia coli derived pandemic influenza vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A G Skibinski

    Full Text Available Influenza pandemics can spread quickly and cost millions of lives; the 2009 H1N1 pandemic highlighted the shortfall in the current vaccine strategy and the need for an improved global response in terms of shortening the time required to manufacture the vaccine and increasing production capacity. Here we describe the pre-clinical assessment of a novel 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine based on the E. coli-produced HA globular head domain covalently linked to virus-like particles derived from the bacteriophage Qβ. When formulated with alum adjuvant and used to immunize mice, dose finding studies found that a 10 µg dose of this vaccine (3.7 µg globular HA content induced antibody titers comparable to a 1.5 µg dose (0.7 µg globular HA content of the licensed 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccine Panvax, and significantly reduced viral titers in the lung following challenge with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza A/California/07/2009 virus. While Panvax failed to induce marked T cell responses, the novel vaccine stimulated substantial antigen-specific interferon-γ production in splenocytes from immunized mice, alongside enhanced IgG2a antibody production. In ferrets the vaccine elicited neutralizing antibodies, and following challenge with influenza A/California/07/2009 virus reduced morbidity and lowered viral titers in nasal lavages.

  5. Serum and skin surface antibody responses in merino sheep given three successive inoculations with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S S; Ellis, T M; Robertson, G M; Gregory, A R

    1987-11-01

    Three antigens prepared from different phases of the life cycle of Dermatophilus congolensis were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum and skin surface antibody responses in sheep after a first, second and third inoculation with D. congolensis. After the first inoculation, a strong antibody response to the flagella, filament and soluble antigens was detected after 7-21 days in the sera from sheep that were regularly biopsied; the antibody response at the skin surface was detected 28-42 days after inoculation, when the lesions were resolving. Strong anamnestic responses were detected in the serum of sheep that were biopsied and some of the nonbiopsied sheep after the second and third inoculations, but the skin surface antibody response at these times was variable.

  6. Antibody response to equine coronavirus in horses inoculated with a bovine coronavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Manabu; Kanno, Toru; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kokado, Hiroshi

    2017-11-17

    A vaccine for equine coronavirus (ECoV) is so far unavailable. Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is antigenically related to ECoV; it is therefore possible that BCoV vaccine will induce antibodies against ECoV in horses. This study investigated antibody response to ECoV in horses inoculated with BCoV vaccine. Virus neutralization tests showed that antibody titers against ECoV increased in all six horses tested at 14 days post inoculation, although the antibody titers were lower against ECoV than against BCoV. This study showed that BCoV vaccine provides horses with antibodies against ECoV to some extent. It is unclear whether antibodies provided by BCoV vaccine are effective against ECoV, and therefore ECoV challenge studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine in the future.

  7. Antibody response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in vaccinated pigs with or without maternal antibodies induced by sow vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Terreni, M; Guazzetti, S; Cavirani, S

    2006-06-01

    Vaccination with bacterins is an important tool for the control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection of pigs. Because such vaccination often involves piglets that have suckled M. hyopneumoniae antibody-positive dams it is important to understand the effect of pre-existing (passively acquired) antibody on vaccine-induced immunity. To investigate this issue experimentally, 20 sows that were seronegative for M. hyopneumoniae were selected from a M. hyopneumoniae-infected herd and then randomly allocated to one of four treatment groups (five sows/group): Group A, vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group B, vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets; Group C, non-vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group D, non-vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets. Sows (Groups A and B) were vaccinated 14 days before farrowing and seroconverted within the next 14 days. Conversely, none of the non-vaccinated sows was seropositive at farrowing. Piglets (Groups A and C) were vaccinated when they were 7 days of age. Regardless of treatments none of the piglets had any evidence of an active immune response until many of those of Groups A and C and a few of those of Groups B and D seroconverted after it had been shown that at least some pigs of all groups had been naturally infected with a field strain of M. hyopneumoniae. This pattern of immune responsiveness (i.e. the collective results of Groups A, B, C and D) suggested that vaccination of pigs had primed their immune system for subsequent exposure to M. hyopneumoniae, and that passively acquired antibody had little or no effect on either a vaccine-induced priming or a subsequent anamnestic response. According to the statistical analysis sow serological status did not interfere with the antibody response in early vaccinated piglets. In conclusion, the results pointed out that early vaccination of piglets may assist M. hyopneumoniae control independently from the serological status of sows.

  8. Ganglioside GQ1b enhances anti-double-stranded DNA antibody and IgG production of PBMCs from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, N; Watanabe, S

    2000-03-01

    Previously, we reported that ganglioside GQ1b greatly enhanced spontaneous immunoglobulin production in vitro by PBMCs from normal human subjects. We examined in vitro effects of GQ1b on anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody production by PBMCs from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PBMCs from patients with SLE were cultured with GQ1b. IgG anti-dsDNA antibody, total IgG, and cytokine amounts in the culture supernatants and protein kinase C (PKC) activity of T cells were measured by using ELISA. GQ1b enhanced both anti-dsDNA and total IgG production of PBMCs from patients with SLE who were seropositive for anti-dsDNA. Among the seropositive patients, the active patients were more responsive to GQ1b in anti-dsDNA production than the inactive patients. GQ1b also enhanced total IgG production of PBMCs from patients with SLE who were seronegative for anti-dsDNA but did not induce their anti-dsDNA production. In contrast to PBMCs, GQ1b did not affect the antibody production either of purified CD5(+) or of CD5(-) B cells. Anti-IL-6 or anti-IL-10 antibody each partially blocked the GQ1b-induced enhancement of antibody production in PBMCs, and the addition of both antibodies completely blocked the enhancement. GQ1b increased IL-6 and IL-10 production of T cells. The supernatant from GQ1b-treated T cells enhanced antibody production both of CD5(+) and of CD5(-) B cells to a greater extent than that from medium-treated T cells. Exogenous IL-6 and IL-10 additively increased the antibody production both of CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. GQ1b-induced increases in IL-6 and IL-10 production of T cells were both blocked by PKC inhibitors, calphostin C and staurosporine. GQ1b enhanced PKC activity of T cells. These results suggest that GQ1b may polyclonally increase the production of IgG, including IgG anti-dsDNA antibody, in PBMCs from patients with SLE by promoting IL-6 and IL-10 production of T cells through the enhancement of their PKC activity.

  9. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  10. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  11. Factors influencing the antibody response to vaccination against rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakel, V; König, M; Cussler, K; Hanschmann, K; Thiel, H-J

    2008-01-01

    Preventive vaccination against rabies virus is a highly effective method for preventing rabies in humans and animals. For travel purposes, vaccination of domestic carnivores is obligatory. In addition, some countries require testing for neutralizing antibodies against rabies. The minimal threshold level accepted by WHO/OIE is 0.5 IU/ml. Despite proper vaccination some animals do not reach the threshold. The objective of this study was to identify specific risk factors in dogs and cats for post-vaccination rabies antibody titres below 0.5 IU/ml by FAVN test. Rabies vaccination protocols and recommendations were reviewed with regard to travel regulations. Comprehensive data was collected on animals tested for rabies antibodies via a questionnaire sent to veterinarians who submitted sera for rabies titration. The questionnaire included data on species, age, sex, breed, vaccine used, date of last vaccination and blood sampling, vaccination history and further medical treatments at time of vaccination. Data on around 1,200 animals was analysed. Most animals older than one year had already received more than one rabies vaccination. The influence of breed and sex on antibody titre seems to be insignificant. Young dogs have a high risk of results below 0.5 IU/ml after their first vaccination. This risk can be minimised by the application of a second vaccination and blood sampling according to the manufacturer's recommendations. An important factor for the test outcome might be the virus strain used in the vaccine.

  12. Evaluation of antibody response by dogs vaccinated with low egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve dogs were immunized with live attenuated flury strain antirabies vaccine using single, double and triple inoculation sites of the recommended dose, but in divided doses for the double and triple sites. All the dogs were screened for neutralizing antibodies against rabies before immunization, while sera were collected ...

  13. Diagnostics for Lassa Fever: Detecting Host Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S; Medina-Moreno, Sandra; Zapata, Juan Carlos

    2018-01-01

    There are two types of viral diagnostics: (1) those that detect components of the pathogen (like viral RNA or proteins) and (2) those that detect host molecules that rise or fall as a consequence of pathogen infection (like anti-viral antibodies or virus-induced inflammatory cytokines). Quantitative PCR to detect Lassa RNA, and clinical chemistry to detect high liver enzymes (AST/ALT) are commonly used to diagnose Lassa fever. Here, we discuss the various types of diagnostics for Lassa fever and the urgent need for early diagnosis. We also describe a protocol for using the attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate, ML29 , as an antigen for detecting Lassa-specific antibodies. Since antibodies are developed late in the progression of Lassa fever disease, this is not an early diagnostic, but is more useful in surveillance of the population to determine the sero-prevalence of antibodies to Lassa virus (LASV ), and to define treatment options for people in close contact with a Lassa-infected person.

  14. Seasonal variations in antibody response to a Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), employing a recombinant peptide capture antigen (R32tet32) was used to detect antibodies against the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum in 169 serum samples from 16 subjects from two villages, Afefu (FA) and Tobalogbo (TB) ...

  15. Comparing antibody responses to Onchocerca volvulus and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum antibodies to parasite-specific and non-parasite antigens were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of the 470 sera collected, 409 were from residents of an onchocerciasis hyper-endemic area, 55 non-endemic and 6 European normal sera served as control. The patients' age, sex, skin ...

  16. Memory B-Cell and Antibody Responses Induced by Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoite Immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahrendorf, W.; Scholzen, A.; Bijker, E.M.; Teirlinck, A.C.; Bastiaens, G.J.H.; Schats, R.; Hermsen, C.C.; Visser, L.G.; Langhorne, J.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunization of healthy volunteers during receipt of chemoprophylaxis with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (CPS-immunization) induces sterile protection from malaria. Antibody responses have long been known to contribute to naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their

  17. Multisensory integration produces an initial response enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Rowland

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The brain has evolved the ability to integrate information across the senses in order to improve the detection and disambiguation of biologically significant events. This multisensory synthesis of information leads to faster (and more accurate behavioral responses, yet the underlying neural mechanisms by which these responses are speeded are as yet unclear. The aim of these experiments was to evaluate the temporal properties of multisensory enhancement in the physiological responses of neuron in the superior colliculus (SC. Of specific interest was the temporal evolution of their responses to individual modality-specific stimuli as well as to cross-modal combinations of these stimuli. The results demonstrate that cross-modal stimuli typically elicit faster, more robust, and more reliable physiological responses than do their modality-specific component stimuli. Response measures sensitive to the time domain showed that these multisensory responses were enhanced from their very onset, and that the acceleration of the enhancement was greatest within the first 40 ms (or 50% of the response. The latter half of the multisensory response was typically only as robust and informative as predicted by a linear combination of the unisensory component responses. These results may reveal some of the key physiological changes underlying many of the SC-mediated behavioral benefits of multisensory integration.

  18. Murine CR1/2 targeted antigenized single-chain antibody fragments induce transient low affinity antibodies and negatively influence an ongoing immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Molnár, Eszter; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Isaák, Andrea; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Péter; Erdei, Anna

    2007-01-01

    We have generated a single-chain antibody which recognizes murine CR1/2 and carries a genetically fused influenza hemagglutinin derived peptide. Theoretically such a construct is able to crosslink the B cell antigen receptor and CR1/2 on peptide specific B cells. The construct was able to reach its CR1/2 positive target cells, yet intraperitoneal delivery of the construct elicited an IgM response only slightly exceeding that induced by the free peptide. Providing T cell help by the injection of peptide specific lymphocytes did not alter the response in essence, that is anti-peptide IgG was not detectable even after booster immunizations. When used as a booster vaccine following injection of the peptide in adjuvant, the construct even inhibited the development of IgG1 and IgG3 anti-peptide antibodies. These data indicate that although targeting of antigen to CR1/2 on B cells can enhance transient proliferation or differentiation of antigen specific B cells it cannot induce strong, longlasting humoral immune responses. Furthermore, CR1/2 targeting constructs may negatively influence an ongoing immune reaction.

  19. Developmental toxicity testing of monoclonal antibodies: an enhanced pre- and postnatal study design option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jane

    2009-09-01

    For many monoclonal antibodies (mAb), the preferred species for general and reproductive safety testing is often the cynomolgus monkey. This article describes the rationale for combining the traditional "segmented" embryofetal development study with the pre- and postnatal development (PPND) study into a single "enhanced" PPND study design in the cynomolgus monkey where a single cohort of animals is exposed throughout gestation and allowed to give birth naturally. The proposed "enhanced" PPND study design evaluates all the stages of the traditional two study design using fewer animals. It also assesses the functional consequences of mid to late gestational exposure. This is of particular relevance to the risk assessment of monoclonal antibodies where fetal exposure to maternal IgG increases as pregnancy progresses and where morphologic examination of a pre-term fetus may not be adequate to reveal the presence of adverse effects on functional development of key target organs.

  20. Smoking and periodontal disease: discrimination of antibody responses to pathogenic and commensal oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, L; Steffen, M J; Stevens, J; Badger, E; Tempro, P; Fuller, B; McGuire, A; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Thomas, M V; Ebersole, J L

    2011-04-01

    Smoking is an independent risk factor for the initiation, extent and severity of periodontal disease. This study examined the ability of the host immune system to discriminate commensal oral bacteria from pathogens at mucosal surfaces, i.e. oral cavity. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody reactive with three pathogenic and five commensal oral bacteria in 301 current smokers (age range 21-66 years) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical features of periodontal health were used as measures of periodontitis. Antibody to the pathogens and salivary cotinine levels were related positively to disease severity; however, the antibody levels were best described by the clinical disease unrelated to the amount of smoking. The data showed a greater immune response to pathogens than commensals that was related specifically to disease extent, and most noted in black males. Significant correlations in individual patient responses to the pathogens and commensals were lost with an increasing extent of periodontitis and serum antibody to the pathogens. Antibody to Porphyromonas gingivalis was particularly distinct with respect to the discriminatory nature of the immune responses in recognizing the pathogens. Antibody responses to selected pathogenic and commensal oral microorganisms differed among racial groups and genders. The antibody response to the pathogens was related to disease severity. The level of antibody to the pathogens, and in particular P. gingivalis, was correlated with disease severity in black and male subsets of patients. The amount of smoking did not appear to impact directly serum antibody levels to these oral bacteria. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  1. Cytokine profiles and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimated higher ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-12 were also observed in the symptomatic children while the asymptomatic controls had higher IL-12/IL-10 ratio. The mean concentration levels of anti-P. falciparum IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 antibodies were statistically significantly higher in the individuals >5 years of age than <5 ...

  2. A tetravalent virus-like particle vaccine designed to display domain III of dengue envelope proteins induces multi-serotype neutralizing antibodies in mice and macaques which confer protection against antibody dependent enhancement in AG129 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Ramasamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the fastest spreading vector-borne diseases, caused by four antigenically distinct dengue viruses (DENVs. Antibodies against DENVs are responsible for both protection as well as pathogenesis. A vaccine that is safe for and efficacious in all people irrespective of their age and domicile is still an unmet need. It is becoming increasingly apparent that vaccine design must eliminate epitopes implicated in the induction of infection-enhancing antibodies.We report a Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue immunogen, DSV4, based on DENV envelope protein domain III (EDIII, which contains well-characterized serotype-specific and cross-reactive epitopes. In natural infection, <10% of the total neutralizing antibody response is EDIII-directed. Yet, this is a functionally relevant domain which interacts with the host cell surface receptor. DSV4 was designed by in-frame fusion of EDIII of all four DENV serotypes and hepatitis B surface (S antigen and co-expressed with unfused S antigen to form mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs. These VLPs displayed EDIIIs of all four DENV serotypes based on probing with a battery of serotype-specific anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies. The DSV4 VLPs were highly immunogenic, inducing potent and durable neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes encompassing multiple genotypes, in mice and macaques. DSV4-induced murine antibodies suppressed viremia in AG129 mice and conferred protection against lethal DENV-4 virus challenge. Further, neither murine nor macaque anti-DSV4 antibodies promoted mortality or inflammatory cytokine production when passively transferred and tested in an in vivo dengue disease enhancement model of AG129 mice.Directing the immune response to a non-immunodominant but functionally relevant serotype-specific dengue epitope of the four DENV serotypes, displayed on a VLP platform, can help minimize the risk of inducing disease-enhancing antibodies while eliciting effective tetravalent

  3. Vaccine and Monoclonal Antibody That Enhance Mouse Resistance to Candidiasis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong; Cutler, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    Previously we showed that antibodies specific for the glycan β-1,2-mannotriose [β-(Man)3] on the cell surface of Candida albicans protect mice against disseminated candidiasis (H. Xin, S. Dziadek, D. R. Bundle, and J. E. Cutler, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:13526–13531, 2008). Furthermore, six 14-mer peptides that are within the N-terminal portion of C. albicans wall proteins were conjugated to the glycan in an attempt to create immunogenic glycopeptide conjugates. By a dendritic cell (DC)-based immunization approach, all were immunogenic and three of the six conjugates induced a high degree of protection in mice. Interestingly, whereas all six peptides induced antibody responses when used alone to pulse DCs for subsequent immunizations, three peptides induced protection, and one in particular, peptide Fba (derived from fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), induced robust protective responses and is the focus of the current work. Fba peptide is not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), as it induced anti-Fba antibodies in mice of different H-2 haplotypes and in rabbits. Furthermore, the peptide induced protection against disease caused by different C. albicans strains. Partial protection was achieved when alum was used in place of DCs for Fba immunizations. The passive transfer of immune sera from Fba-vaccinated mice, but not immune serum preabsorbed with fungal cells, conferred protection in naïve mice. This result, along with our finding that a monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide, E2-9 (IgM), protected mice against candidiasis, provide strong evidence that antibodies contribute to protection. Our work demonstrates the utility of cell wall peptides alone or as glycopeptides in vaccines designed for the induction of immunity against candidiasis and monoclonal antibodies as a rapid immunoprotective approach against the disease. PMID:21832099

  4. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  5. Characteristics of antibody responses in West Nile virus-seropositive blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Paul J; Prince, Harry E; Biggerstaff, Brad J; Lanciotti, Robert; Tobler, Leslie H; Busch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is now endemic in the United States. Protection against infection is thought to be conferred in part by humoral immunity. An understanding of the durability and specificity of the humoral response is not well established. We studied the magnitude and specificity of antibody responses in 370 WNV-seropositive blood donors. We also recalled 18 donors who were infected in 2005 to compare their antibody responses at 6 months following infection versus at 5 years postinfection. There were no significant differences in IgG antibody levels based on age, sex, or recent infection (as evidenced by IgM positivity). Specific antibody responses by viral plaque reduction neutralization testing (PRNT) were seen in 51/54 subjects evaluated. All donors who were seropositive in 2005 remained seropositive at 5 years and maintained neutralizing antibodies. IgG levels at 5 years postinfection showed fairly minimal decreases compared with the paired levels at 6 months postinfection (mean of paired differences,-0.54 signal-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) units [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.86 to -0.21 S/CO units]) and only minimal decreases in PRNT titers. WNV induces a significant antibody response that remains present even 5 years after infection.

  6. A high affinity recombinant antibody to the human EphA3 receptor with enhanced ADCC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasevic, Nenad; Luehrsen, Kenneth; Baer, Mark; Palath, Varghese; Martinez, David; Williams, Jason; Yi, Christina; Sujatha-Bhaskar, Swathi; Lanke, Rohini; Leung, John; Ching, Wendy; Lee, Andreia; Bai, Lu; Yarranton, Geoffrey; Bebbington, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    EphA3 is expressed in solid tumors and leukemias and is an attractive target for the therapy. We have generated a panel of Humaneered® antibodies to the ligand-binding domain using a Fab epitope-focused library that has the same specificity as monoclonal antibody mIIIA4. A high-affinity antibody was selected that competes with the mIIIA4 antibody for binding to EphA3 and has an improved affinity of ∼1 nM. In order to generate an antibody with potent cell-killing activity the variable regions were assembled with human IgG1k constant regions and expressed in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line deficient in fucosyl transferase. Non-fucosylated antibodies have been reported to have enhanced binding affinity for the IgG receptor CD16a (FcγRIIIa). The affinity of the antibody for recombinant CD16a was enhanced approximately 10-fold. This resulted in enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity against EphA3-expressing leukemic cells, providing a potent antibody for the evaluation as a therapeutic agent.

  7. Longitudinal studies of neutralizing antibody responses to rotavirus in stools and sera of children following severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, B S

    1998-11-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a useful measure of rotavirus immunity.

  8. Longitudinal Studies of Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Rotavirus in Stools and Sera of Children following Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson, Barbara S.

    1998-01-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a use...

  9. Anti-CD22/CD20 Bispecific antibody with enhanced trogocytosis for treatment of Lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund A Rossi

    Full Text Available The humanized anti-CD22 antibody, epratuzumab, has demonstrated therapeutic activity in clinical trials of lymphoma, leukemia and autoimmune diseases, treating currently over 1500 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemias, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Because epratuzumab reduces on average only 35% of circulating B cells in patients, and has minimal antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and negligible complement-dependent cytotoxicity when evaluated in vitro, its therapeutic activity may not result completely from B-cell depletion. We reported recently that epratuzumab mediates Fc/FcR-dependent membrane transfer from B cells to effector cells via trogocytosis, resulting in a substantial reduction of multiple BCR modulators, including CD22, CD19, CD21, and CD79b, as well as key cell adhesion molecules, including CD44, CD62L, and β7 integrin, on the surface of B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from normal donors or SLE patients. Rituximab has clinical activity in lupus, but failed to achieve primary endpoints in a Phase III trial. This is the first study of trogocytosis mediated by bispecific antibodies targeting neighboring cell-surface proteins, CD22, CD20, and CD19, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that, compared to epratuzumab, a bispecific hexavalent antibody comprising epratuzumab and veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 mAb exhibits enhanced trogocytosis resulting in major reductions in B-cell surface levels of CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22, CD79b, CD44, CD62L and β7-integrin, and with considerably less immunocompromising B-cell depletion that would result with anti-CD20 mAbs such as veltuzumab or rituximab, given either alone or in combination with epratuzumab. A CD22/CD19 bispecific hexavalent antibody, which exhibited enhanced trogocytosis of some antigens and minimal B-cell depletion, may also be

  10. Mass spectrometric detection of neuropeptides using affinity-enhanced microdialysis with antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerberg, Claire M; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-15

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p < 0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4 to 18 h in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding.

  11. Maternal antibodies: clinical significance, mechanism of interference with immune responses, and possible vaccination strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eNiewiesk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonates have an immature immune system which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is examplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B-cell receptor (BCR with the Fcg receptor IIB (FcgRIIB by a vaccine-antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B-cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2 signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing

  12. Dengue virus sero-cross-reactivity drives antibody-dependent enhancement of infection with zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Supasa, Piyada; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Rouvinski, Alexander; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duangchinda, Thaneeya; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Malasit, Prida; Rey, Felix A; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R

    2016-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) was discovered in 1947 and was thought to lead to relatively mild disease. The recent explosive outbreak of ZIKV in South America has led to widespread concern, with reports of neurological sequelae ranging from Guillain Barré syndrome to microcephaly. ZIKV infection has occurred in areas previously exposed to dengue virus (DENV), a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV. Here we investigated the serological cross-reaction between the two viruses. Plasma immune to DENV showed substantial cross-reaction to ZIKV and was able to drive antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of ZIKV infection. Using a panel of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to DENV, we showed that most antibodies that reacted to DENV envelope protein also reacted to ZIKV. Antibodies to linear epitopes, including the immunodominant fusion-loop epitope, were able to bind ZIKV but were unable to neutralize the virus and instead promoted ADE. Our data indicate that immunity to DENV might drive greater ZIKV replication and have clear implications for disease pathogenesis and future vaccine programs for ZIKV and DENV.

  13. Antibody secreting B cells and plasma antibody response to rotavirus vaccination in infants from Kolkata India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Sinha

    2018-01-01

    Discussion: Our results suggest that virus-specific blood gut homing ASCs were detected and provide insight into mucosal immune response after rotavirus vaccination. Further studies are needed to evaluate the duration of such immune responses and to assess the programmatic utility of this whole blood-based mucosal ASC testing for the rotavirus immunization program.

  14. Functional analysis of the anti-adalimumab response using patient-derived monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Kruithof, Simone; Votsmeier, Christian; van Schie, Karin; Hart, Margreet H; de Jong, Rob N; van Buren, Esther E L; van Ham, Marieke; Aarden, Lucien; Wolbink, Gertjan; Wouters, Diana; Rispens, Theo

    2014-12-12

    The production of antibodies to adalimumab in autoimmune patients treated with adalimumab is shown to diminish treatment efficacy. We previously showed that these antibodies are almost exclusively neutralizing, indicating a restricted response. Here, we investigated the characteristics of a panel of patient-derived monoclonal antibodies for binding to adalimumab. Single B-cells were isolated from two patients, cultured, and screened for adalimumab specificity. Analysis of variable region sequences of 16 clones suggests that the immune response against adalimumab is broad, involving multiple B-cell clones each using different combinations of V(D)J segments. A strong bias for replacement mutations in the complementarity determining regions was found, indicating an antigen-driven response. We recombinantly expressed 11 different monoclonal antibodies and investigated their affinity and specificity. All clones except one are of high affinity (Kd between 0.6 and 233 pm) and compete with TNF as well as each other for binding to adalimumab. However, binding to a panel of single-point mutants of adalimumab indicates markedly different fine specificities that also result in a differential tendency of each clone to form dimeric and multimeric immune complexes. We conclude that although all anti-adalimumab antibodies compete for binding to TNF, the response is clonally diverse and involves multiple epitopes on adalimumab. These results are important for understanding the relationship between self and non-self or idiotypic determinants on therapeutic antibodies and their potential immunogenicity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Equine allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells elicit antibody responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzanite, Lynn M; Fortier, Lisa A; Antczak, Douglas F; Cassano, Jennifer M; Brosnahan, Margaret M; Miller, Donald; Schnabel, Lauren V

    2015-04-12

    This study tested the hypothesis that Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) incompatible equine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) would induce cytotoxic antibodies to donor MHC antigens in recipient horses after intradermal injection. No studies to date have explored recipient antibody responses to allogeneic donor MSC transplantation in the horse. This information is critical because the horse is a valuable species for assessing the safety and efficacy of MSC treatment prior to human clinical application. Six MHC heterozygote horses were identified as non-ELA-A2 haplotype by microsatellite typing and used as allogeneic MHC-mismatched MSC recipients. MHC homozygote horses of known ELA-A2 haplotype were used as MSC and peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) donors. One MHC homozygote horse of the ELA-A2 haplotype was the recipient of ELA-A2 donor MSCs as an MHC-matched control. Donor MSCs, which were previously isolated and immunophenotyped, were thawed and culture expanded to achieve between 30x10(6) and 50x10(6) cells for intradermal injection into the recipient's neck. Recipient serum was collected and tested for the presence of anti-donor antibodies prior to MSC injection and every 7 days after MSC injection for the duration of the 8-week study using the standard two-stage lymphocyte microcytotoxicity dye-exclusion test. In addition to anti-ELA-A2 antibodies, recipient serum was examined for the presence of cross-reactive antibodies including anti-ELA-A3 and anti-RBC antibodies. All MHC-mismatched recipient horses produced anti-ELA-A2 antibodies following injection of ELA-A2 MSCs and developed a wheal at the injection site that persisted for the duration of the experiment. Anti-ELA-A2 antibody responses were varied both in terms of strength and timing. Four recipient horses had high-titered anti-ELA-A2 antibody responses resulting in greater than 80% donor PBL death in the microcytotoxicity assays and one of these horses also developed antibodies that cross

  16. Serial Killing of Tumor Cells by Human Natural Killer Cells – Enhancement by Therapeutic Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rauf; Watzl, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Natural killer cells are an important component of the innate immune system. Anti-cancer therapies utilizing monoclonal antibodies also rely on the cytotoxicity of NK cells for their effectiveness. Here, we study the dynamics of NK cell cytotoxicity. Methodology/Principal Findings We observe that IL-2 activated human NK cells can serially hit multiple targets. Using functional assays, we demonstrate that on an average, a single IL-2 activated NK cell can kill four target cells. Data using live video microscopy suggest that an individual NK cell can make serial contacts with multiple targets and majority of contacts lead to lysis of target cells. Serial killing is associated with a loss of Perforin and Granzyme B content. A large majority of NK cells survive serial killing, and IL-2 can replenish their granular stock and restore the diminished cytotoxicity of ‘exhausted’ NK cells. IL-2 and IL-15 are equally effective in enhancing the killing frequency of resting NK cells. Significantly, Rituximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody increases the killing frequency of both resting and IL-2 activated NK cells. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that NK cell-based therapies for overcoming tumors rely on their serial killing ability. Therefore, strategies augmenting the killing ability of NK cells can boost the immune system and enhance the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. PMID:17389917

  17. Serial killing of tumor cells by human natural killer cells--enhancement by therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rauf; Watzl, Carsten

    2007-03-28

    Natural killer cells are an important component of the innate immune system. Anti-cancer therapies utilizing monoclonal antibodies also rely on the cytotoxicity of NK cells for their effectiveness. Here, we study the dynamics of NK cell cytotoxicity. We observe that IL-2 activated human NK cells can serially hit multiple targets. Using functional assays, we demonstrate that on an average, a single IL-2 activated NK cell can kill four target cells. Data using live video microscopy suggest that an individual NK cell can make serial contacts with multiple targets and majority of contacts lead to lysis of target cells. Serial killing is associated with a loss of Perforin and Granzyme B content. A large majority of NK cells survive serial killing, and IL-2 can replenish their granular stock and restore the diminished cytotoxicity of 'exhausted' NK cells. IL-2 and IL-15 are equally effective in enhancing the killing frequency of resting NK cells. Significantly, Rituximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody increases the killing frequency of both resting and IL-2 activated NK cells. Our data suggest that NK cell-based therapies for overcoming tumors rely on their serial killing ability. Therefore, strategies augmenting the killing ability of NK cells can boost the immune system and enhance the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody-based therapies.

  18. Serial killing of tumor cells by human natural killer cells--enhancement by therapeutic antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Bhat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural killer cells are an important component of the innate immune system. Anti-cancer therapies utilizing monoclonal antibodies also rely on the cytotoxicity of NK cells for their effectiveness. Here, we study the dynamics of NK cell cytotoxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observe that IL-2 activated human NK cells can serially hit multiple targets. Using functional assays, we demonstrate that on an average, a single IL-2 activated NK cell can kill four target cells. Data using live video microscopy suggest that an individual NK cell can make serial contacts with multiple targets and majority of contacts lead to lysis of target cells. Serial killing is associated with a loss of Perforin and Granzyme B content. A large majority of NK cells survive serial killing, and IL-2 can replenish their granular stock and restore the diminished cytotoxicity of 'exhausted' NK cells. IL-2 and IL-15 are equally effective in enhancing the killing frequency of resting NK cells. Significantly, Rituximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody increases the killing frequency of both resting and IL-2 activated NK cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that NK cell-based therapies for overcoming tumors rely on their serial killing ability. Therefore, strategies augmenting the killing ability of NK cells can boost the immune system and enhance the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody-based therapies.

  19. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    ) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Methods Within 7 days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination...... included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by ‘age at randomisation’ we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B......-protective levels in almost all children. No overall effect of neonatal BCG vaccination was observed....

  20. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against accumulation-associated protein affect EPS biosynthesis and enhance bacterial accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn(2+-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5 were generated. MAb(18B6 inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9 enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb(18B6, which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9. Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections.

  2. Antibody response against saliva antigens of Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti in travellers in tropical Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi-Pradines, Eve; Almeras, Lionel; Denis de Senneville, Laure; Barbe, Solenne; Remoué, Franck; Villard, Claude; Cornelie, Sylvie; Penhoat, Kristell; Pascual, Aurélie; Bourgouin, Catherine; Fontenille, Didier; Bonnet, Julien; Corre-Catelin, Nicole; Reiter, Paul; Pagés, Frederic; Laffite, Daniel; Boulanger, Denis; Simondon, François; Pradines, Bruno; Fusaï, Thierry; Rogier, Christophe

    2007-10-01

    Exposure to vectors of infectious diseases has been associated with antibody responses against salivary antigens of arthropods among people living in endemic areas. This immune response has been proposed as a surrogate marker of exposure to vectors appropriate for evaluating the protective efficacy of antivectorial devices. The existence and potential use of such antibody responses in travellers transiently exposed to Plasmodium or arbovirus vectors in tropical areas has never been investigated. The IgM and IgG antibody responses of 88 French soldiers against the saliva of Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti were evaluated before and after a 5-month journey in tropical Africa. Antibody responses against Anopheles and Aedes saliva increased significantly in 41% and 15% of the individuals, respectively, and appeared to be specific to the mosquito genus. A proteomic and immunoproteomic analysis of anopheles and Aedes saliva allowed for the identification of some antigens that were recognized by most of the exposed individuals. These results suggest that antibody responses to the saliva of mosquitoes could be considered as specific surrogate markers of exposure of travellers to mosquito vectors that transmit arthropod borne infections.

  3. Ontogeny of adaptive antibody response to a model antigen in captive altricial zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess L Killpack

    Full Text Available Based on studies from the poultry literature, all birds are hypothesized to require at least 4 weeks to develop circulating mature B-cell lineages that express functionally different immunoglobulin specificities. However, many altricial passerines fledge at adult size less than four weeks after the start of embryonic development, and therefore may experience a period of susceptibility during the nestling and post-fledging periods. We present the first study, to our knowledge, to detail the age-related changes in adaptive antibody response in an altricial passerine. Using repeated vaccinations with non-infectious keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH antigen, we studied the ontogeny of specific adaptive immune response in altricial zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. Nestling zebra finches were first injected at 7 days (7d, 14 days (14d, or 21 days post-hatch (21d with KLH-adjuvant emulsions, and boosted 7 days later. Adults were vaccinated in the same manner. Induced KLH-specific IgY antibodies were measured using ELISA. Comparisons within age groups revealed no significant increase in KLH-specific antibody levels between vaccination and boost in 7d birds, yet significant increases between vaccination and boost were observed in 14d, 21d, and adult groups. There was no significant difference among age groups in KLH antibody response to priming vaccination, yet KLH antibody response post-boost significantly increased with age among groups. Post-boost antibody response in all nestling age groups was significantly lower than in adults, indicating that mature adult secondary antibody response level was not achieved in zebra finches prior to fledging (21 days post-hatch in zebra finches. Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny.

  4. Ontogeny of adaptive antibody response to a model antigen in captive altricial zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killpack, Tess L; Karasov, William H

    2012-01-01

    Based on studies from the poultry literature, all birds are hypothesized to require at least 4 weeks to develop circulating mature B-cell lineages that express functionally different immunoglobulin specificities. However, many altricial passerines fledge at adult size less than four weeks after the start of embryonic development, and therefore may experience a period of susceptibility during the nestling and post-fledging periods. We present the first study, to our knowledge, to detail the age-related changes in adaptive antibody response in an altricial passerine. Using repeated vaccinations with non-infectious keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen, we studied the ontogeny of specific adaptive immune response in altricial zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. Nestling zebra finches were first injected at 7 days (7d), 14 days (14d), or 21 days post-hatch (21d) with KLH-adjuvant emulsions, and boosted 7 days later. Adults were vaccinated in the same manner. Induced KLH-specific IgY antibodies were measured using ELISA. Comparisons within age groups revealed no significant increase in KLH-specific antibody levels between vaccination and boost in 7d birds, yet significant increases between vaccination and boost were observed in 14d, 21d, and adult groups. There was no significant difference among age groups in KLH antibody response to priming vaccination, yet KLH antibody response post-boost significantly increased with age among groups. Post-boost antibody response in all nestling age groups was significantly lower than in adults, indicating that mature adult secondary antibody response level was not achieved in zebra finches prior to fledging (21 days post-hatch in zebra finches). Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny.

  5. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts.

  6. Global Dynamics of Virus Infection Model with Antibody Immune Response and Distributed Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present qualitative behavior of virus infection model with antibody immune response. The incidence rate of infection is given by saturation functional response. Two types of distributed delays are incorporated into the model to account for the time delay between the time when uninfected cells are contacted by the virus particle and the time when emission of infectious (matures virus particles. Using the method of Lyapunov functional, we have established that the global stability of the steady states of the model is determined by two threshold numbers, the basic reproduction number R0 and antibody immune response reproduction number R1. We have proven that if R0≤1, then the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable (GAS, if R1≤11, then the infected steady state with antibody immune response is GAS.

  7. Enhancing blockade of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion: assessing combinations of antibodies against PfRH5 and other merozoite antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Williams

    Full Text Available No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC(50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines.

  8. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Mucosal IgA Antibody Responses in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Alistair J.; Husband, Alan J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.; Bao, Shisan; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Koehler, Georges; Kopf, Manfred

    1994-04-01

    In mice with targeted disruption of the gene that encodes interleukin-6 (IL-6), greatly reduced numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells were observed at mucosae and grossly deficient local antibody responses were recorded after mucosal challenge with either ovalbumin or vaccinia virus. The IgA response in the lungs was completely restored after intranasal infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses engineered to express IL-6. These findings demonstrate a critical role for IL-6 in vivo in the development of local IgA antibody responses and illustrate the effectiveness of vector-directed cytokine gene therapy.

  9. Antibody Response to Human Extracellular HER2 Subdomain Proteins in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadri-Ardalani, Fateme; Ahmadi, Moslem; Hemmati, Azam; Emami, Shaghayegh; Farid, Samira; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shabani, Mahdi; Shokri, Fazel

    2017-06-01

    In addition to passive immunotherapy using anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies, active immunotherapy via HER2 targeting is an interesting approach to inducing specific anti-tumor immune responses. We have recently reported the immunogenicity of HER2 subdomains following DNA immunization and HER2 protein boosting. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of different HER2 extracellular subdomains for the induction of anti-HER2 antibody response in BALB/c mice. To investigate and characterize antibody responses to human recombinant proteins of HER2 extracellular subdomains in immunized mice. Four subdomains of HER2 extracellular domain were expressed in E.coli; subsequently, purified recombinant proteins were intraperitoneally injected in BALB/c mice with Freund's adjuvant. The anti-HER2 antibody response was detected by ELISA, immunoblotting and flow cytometry. All the four HER2 subdomains along with the full extracellular domain (fECD) were able to induce specific anti-HER2 antibodies. Although anti-HER2 subdomains antibodies could not react with eukaryotic recombinant fECD protein by ELISA, they were able to recognize this protein by immunoblotting under both reduced and non-reduced conditions. Furthermore, only the sera of mice immunized with fECD protein could recognize native HER2 on HER2 overexpressing tumor cells (>99%) by flow cytometry. Moreover, fECD immunized mice sera inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells by XTT assay. The prokaryotic recombinant proteins of HER2 extracellular subdomains are immunogenic, yet the induced specific antibodies do not react with the native HER2 protein due to the paucity of post-translation modifications and /or distortion of the native conformation of isolated HER2 extracellular subdomains which might be potentially effective for induction of cell mediated immune response against HER2.

  10. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  11. Antibody responses to Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface proteins C and F in experimentally infected Beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Steven M; LaFleur, Rhonda L; Jobe, Dean A; Lovrich, Steven D; Wasmoen, Terri L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody levels to outer surface proteins C and F (OspC and OspF, respectively) in sera collected from laboratory Beagle dogs at 1, 2, and 4 months after challenge with infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) were determined. Each dog was confirmed by culture to harbor Borrelia burgdorferi in the skin (n = 10) or the skin and joints (n = 14). Significant levels of immunoglobulin M (Ig)M or IgG anti-OspC antibodies were detected in single serum samples from only 3 (13%) dogs. Similarly, IgM anti-OspF antibodies were detected in only 1 (4%) serum sample collected from a dog with B. burgdorferi in the skin and joints. In contrast, 4 (29%) dogs with skin and joint infections produced IgG anti-OspF antibodies after 2 months, and the response expanded to include 2 (20%) dogs with skin infection and 4 additional dogs with skin and joint infections (overall sensitivity = 62%) after 4 months. The findings failed to support the utility of OspC-based antibody tests for diagnosing canine Lyme disease, but demonstrated that dogs with B. burgdorferi colonizing joint tissue most often produced significant levels of IgG anti-OspF antibodies. Therefore, additional studies to more thoroughly evaluate the clinical utility of OspF-based antibody tests are warranted. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. The relationship of the possible allergic response to jellyfish envenomation and serum antibody titers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, A J; Calton, G J; Burnett, J W

    1983-01-01

    The sera of patients envenomated by the sea nettle (Chrysaora quinquecirrha) or the Portuguese man-o'war (Physalia physalis) were investigated for immune specific and cross-reacting antibodies. Crude or partially purified (SP-Sephadex column chromatography) nematocyst venom was used as antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to detect IgG and IgE antibodies. The sera of 66 patients who exhibited strictly cutaneous, extracutaneous or anaphylactoid reactions to envenomation were studied. Most of the subjects developed an IgG antibody and many developed an IgE antibody to the venom of the offending animal. The titer of both immunoglobulins correlated directly with the severity of symptoms. Cross-reacting antibodies to these two jellyfish were apparent in a significant number of patients, but detectable cross-reacting IgE antibodies were rare in patients severely stung by the sea nettle. The titer of specific IgG antibody was higher against the partially purified lethal sea nettle venom than fractions lacking lethal activity. These results may support the hypothesis that some of the visible response to jellyfish envenomation may be allergic in nature and that cross-reactivity to these venoms may be clinically important.

  13. LSD enhances the emotional response to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelen, M; Barrett, F S; Roseman, L; Lorenz, R; Family, N; Bolstridge, M; Curran, H V; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J; Carhart-Harris, R L

    2015-10-01

    There is renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of psychedelic drugs such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). LSD was used extensively in the 1950s and 1960s as an adjunct in psychotherapy, reportedly enhancing emotionality. Music is an effective tool to evoke and study emotion and is considered an important element in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy; however, the hypothesis that psychedelics enhance the emotional response to music has yet to be investigated in a modern placebo-controlled study. The present study sought to test the hypothesis that music-evoked emotions are enhanced under LSD. Ten healthy volunteers listened to five different tracks of instrumental music during each of two study days, a placebo day followed by an LSD day, separated by 5-7 days. Subjective ratings were completed after each music track and included a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the nine-item Geneva Emotional Music Scale (GEMS-9). Results demonstrated that the emotional response to music is enhanced by LSD, especially the emotions "wonder", "transcendence", "power" and "tenderness". These findings reinforce the long-held assumption that psychedelics enhance music-evoked emotion, and provide tentative and indirect support for the notion that this effect can be harnessed in the context of psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy. Further research is required to test this link directly.

  14. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  15. In Vitro Enhancement of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection by Maternal Antibodies Does Not Explain Disease Severity in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kasteren, Puck B.; Guichelaar, Teun; Ahout, Inge M. L.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Luytjes, Willem; Ferwerda, Gerben; Wicht, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe respiratory illness in infants. At this young age, infants typically depend on maternally transferred antibodies (matAbs) and their innate immune system for protection against infections. RSV-specific matAbs are thought to protect from severe illness, yet severe RSV disease occurs mainly below 6 months of age, when neutralizing matAb levels are present. To investigate this discrepancy, we asked if disease severity is related to antibody properties other than neutralization. Some antibody effector functions are mediated via their Fc binding region. However, it has been shown that this binding may lead to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection or reduction of neutralization, both possibly leading to more disease. In this study, we first showed that high levels of ADE of RSV infection occur in monocytic THP-1 cells in the presence of RSV antibodies and that neutralization by these antibodies was reduced in Vero cells when they were transduced with Fc gamma receptors. We then demonstrated that antibodies from cotton rats with formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV-induced pulmonary pathology were capable of causing ADE. Human matAbs also caused ADE and were less neutralizing in vitro in cells that carry Fc receptors. However, these effects were unrelated to disease severity because they were seen both in uninfected controls and in infants hospitalized with different levels of RSV disease severity. We conclude that ADE and reduction of neutralization are unlikely to be involved in RSV disease in infants with neutralizing matAbs. IMPORTANCE It is unclear why severity of RSV disease peaks at the age when infants have neutralizing levels of maternal antibodies. Additionally, the exact reason for FI-RSV-induced enhanced disease, as seen in the 1960s vaccine trials, is still unclear. We hypothesized that antibodies present under either of these conditions could contribute to disease severity

  16. In Vitro Enhancement of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection by Maternal Antibodies Does Not Explain Disease Severity in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Elisabeth A; van Kasteren, Puck B; Guichelaar, Teun; Ahout, Inge M L; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Luytjes, Willem; Ferwerda, Gerben; Wicht, Oliver

    2017-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe respiratory illness in infants. At this young age, infants typically depend on maternally transferred antibodies (matAbs) and their innate immune system for protection against infections. RSV-specific matAbs are thought to protect from severe illness, yet severe RSV disease occurs mainly below 6 months of age, when neutralizing matAb levels are present. To investigate this discrepancy, we asked if disease severity is related to antibody properties other than neutralization. Some antibody effector functions are mediated via their Fc binding region. However, it has been shown that this binding may lead to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection or reduction of neutralization, both possibly leading to more disease. In this study, we first showed that high levels of ADE of RSV infection occur in monocytic THP-1 cells in the presence of RSV antibodies and that neutralization by these antibodies was reduced in Vero cells when they were transduced with Fc gamma receptors. We then demonstrated that antibodies from cotton rats with formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV-induced pulmonary pathology were capable of causing ADE. Human matAbs also caused ADE and were less neutralizing in vitro in cells that carry Fc receptors. However, these effects were unrelated to disease severity because they were seen both in uninfected controls and in infants hospitalized with different levels of RSV disease severity. We conclude that ADE and reduction of neutralization are unlikely to be involved in RSV disease in infants with neutralizing matAbs.IMPORTANCE It is unclear why severity of RSV disease peaks at the age when infants have neutralizing levels of maternal antibodies. Additionally, the exact reason for FI-RSV-induced enhanced disease, as seen in the 1960s vaccine trials, is still unclear. We hypothesized that antibodies present under either of these conditions could contribute to disease severity. Antibodies can

  17. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  18. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  19. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-07

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinct antibody responses of patients with mild and severe leptospirosis determined by whole proteome microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessa-Aquino, Carolina; Lindow, Janet C; Randall, Arlo; Wunder, Elsio; Pablo, Jozelyn; Nakajima, Rie; Jasinskas, Algis; Cruz, Jaqueline S; Damião, Alcineia O; Nery, Nívison; Ribeiro, Guilherme S; Costa, Federico; Hagan, José E; Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Ko, Albert I; Medeiros, Marco Alberto; Felgner, Philip L

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease worldwide. Humans usually present a mild non-specific febrile illness, but a proportion of them develop more severe outcomes, such as multi-organ failure, lung hemorrhage and death. Such complications are thought to depend on several factors, including the host immunity. Protective immunity is associated with humoral immune response, but little is known about the immune response mounted during naturally-acquired Leptospira infection. Here, we used protein microarray chip to profile the antibody responses of patients with severe and mild leptospirosis against the complete Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni predicted ORFeome. We discovered a limited number of immunodominant antigens, with 36 antigens specific to patients, of which 11 were potential serodiagnostic antigens, identified at acute phase, and 33 were potential subunit vaccine targets, detected after recovery. Moreover, we found distinct antibody profiles in patients with different clinical outcomes: in the severe group, overall IgM responses do not change and IgG responses increase over time, while both IgM and IgG responses remain stable in the mild patient group. Analyses of individual patients' responses showed that >74% of patients in the severe group had significant IgG increases over time compared to 29% of patients in the mild group. Additionally, 90% of IgM responses did not change over time in the mild group, compared to ~51% in the severe group. In the present study, we detected antibody profiles associated with disease severity and speculate that patients with mild disease were protected from severe outcomes due to pre-existing antibodies, while patients with severe leptospirosis demonstrated an antibody profile typical of first exposure. Our findings represent a significant advance in the understanding of the humoral immune response to Leptospira infection, and we have identified new targets for the development of subunit vaccines and

  1. Fc Engineering Approaches to Enhance the Agonism and Effector Functions of an Anti-OX40 Antibody*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Goldberg, Monica V.; Chiu, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Agonistic antibodies directed against immunostimulatory receptors belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. Several Fc engineering approaches discovered recently can augment the anti-tumor activities of TNFR antibodies by enhancing their agonistic activities and/or effector functions. In this study, we compared these approaches for their effects on an anti-OX40 antibody. Both S267E/L328F and V12 mutations facilitated enhanced binding to FcγRIIB and thus increased FcγRIIB cross-linking mediated agonist activity. However, both mutations abrogated the binding to FcγRIIIA and thereby decreasing the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activities. In contrast, the E345R mutation, which can promote antibody multimerization upon receptor binding, facilitated anti-OX40 antibody to have increased agonism by promoting the clustering of OX40 receptors without the dependence on FcγRIIB cross-linking. Nonetheless, cross-linking to FcγRIIB can lead to a further boost of the agonism of the anti-OX40 antibody with IgG1 Fc but not with the silent IgG2σ Fc. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity activities of the anti-OX40 antibody with the E345R mutation were affected by the choice of IgG subtypes. However, there was little change in the antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity. In summary, different Fc engineering approaches can guide the design of engineered antibodies to OX40 and other TNFR with improved anti-tumor activity. PMID:27856634

  2. Fc Engineering Approaches to Enhance the Agonism and Effector Functions of an Anti-OX40 Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Goldberg, Monica V; Chiu, Mark L

    2016-12-30

    Agonistic antibodies directed against immunostimulatory receptors belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily are emerging as promising cancer immunotherapies. Several Fc engineering approaches discovered recently can augment the anti-tumor activities of TNFR antibodies by enhancing their agonistic activities and/or effector functions. In this study, we compared these approaches for their effects on an anti-OX40 antibody. Both S267E/L328F and V12 mutations facilitated enhanced binding to FcγRIIB and thus increased FcγRIIB cross-linking mediated agonist activity. However, both mutations abrogated the binding to FcγRIIIA and thereby decreasing the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activities. In contrast, the E345R mutation, which can promote antibody multimerization upon receptor binding, facilitated anti-OX40 antibody to have increased agonism by promoting the clustering of OX40 receptors without the dependence on FcγRIIB cross-linking. Nonetheless, cross-linking to FcγRIIB can lead to a further boost of the agonism of the anti-OX40 antibody with IgG1 Fc but not with the silent IgG2σ Fc. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity activities of the anti-OX40 antibody with the E345R mutation were affected by the choice of IgG subtypes. However, there was little change in the antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis activity. In summary, different Fc engineering approaches can guide the design of engineered antibodies to OX40 and other TNFR with improved anti-tumor activity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  4. c-Myb Regulates the T-Bet-Dependent Differentiation Program in B Cells to Coordinate Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Piovesan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Humoral immune responses are tailored to the invading pathogen through regulation of key transcription factors and their networks. This is critical to establishing effective antibody-mediated responses, yet it is unknown how B cells integrate pathogen-induced signals to drive or suppress transcriptional programs specialized for each class of pathogen. Here, we detail the key role of the transcription factor c-Myb in regulating the T-bet-mediated anti-viral program. Deletion of c-Myb in mature B cells significantly increased serum IgG2c and CXCR3 expression by upregulating T-bet, normally suppressed during Th2-cell-mediated responses. Enhanced expression of T-bet resulted in aberrant plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center, mediated by CXCR3 expression. These findings identify a dual role for c-Myb in limiting inappropriate effector responses while coordinating plasma cell differentiation with germinal center egress. Identifying such intrinsic regulators of specialized antibody responses can assist in vaccine design and therapeutic intervention in B-cell-mediated immune disorders.

  5. c-Myb Regulates the T-Bet-Dependent Differentiation Program in B Cells to Coordinate Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Dana; Tempany, Jessica; Di Pietro, Andrea; Baas, Inge; Yiannis, Callisthenis; O'Donnell, Kristy; Chen, Yunshun; Peperzak, Victor; Belz, Gabrielle T; Mackay, Charles R; Smyth, Gordon K; Groom, Joanna R; Tarlinton, David M; Good-Jacobson, Kim L

    2017-04-18

    Humoral immune responses are tailored to the invading pathogen through regulation of key transcription factors and their networks. This is critical to establishing effective antibody-mediated responses, yet it is unknown how B cells integrate pathogen-induced signals to drive or suppress transcriptional programs specialized for each class of pathogen. Here, we detail the key role of the transcription factor c-Myb in regulating the T-bet-mediated anti-viral program. Deletion of c-Myb in mature B cells significantly increased serum IgG2c and CXCR3 expression by upregulating T-bet, normally suppressed during Th2-cell-mediated responses. Enhanced expression of T-bet resulted in aberrant plasma cell differentiation within the germinal center, mediated by CXCR3 expression. These findings identify a dual role for c-Myb in limiting inappropriate effector responses while coordinating plasma cell differentiation with germinal center egress. Identifying such intrinsic regulators of specialized antibody responses can assist in vaccine design and therapeutic intervention in B-cell-mediated immune disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  7. Specific inhibition of wheal-and-erythema responses with univalent haptens and univalent antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FARAH, F S; KERN, M; EISEN, H N

    1960-12-01

    Wheal-and-erythema responses were studied in normal human volunteers and in a single human subject who is sensitive to the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. In the normal subjects, reactive skin sites were established by intradermal injection of purified rabbit antibody specific for the 2,4-dinitrophenyl group. In both the active and passively sensitized subjects, wheal-and-erythema was elicited by intradermal injection of a 2,4-dinitrophenyl protein, but not by injection of the same conjugate mixed with certain low molecular weight 2,4-dinitrophenyl haptens or with univalent fragments split by papain from anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibody. The latter fragments, unlike intact, bivalent, antibody, do not sensitize normal human skin sites. From these and other observations it is concluded that the wheal-and-erythema response in human skin requires mutually multivalent antigen and antibody. This requirement suggests that multimolecular complexes, containing at least 2 antigen and 2 antibody molecules, are essential in the pathogenesis of this allergic response.

  8. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kaval; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Smith, Kenneth; Huang, Min; Li, Lie; Pauli, Noel T; Henry Dunand, Carole J; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Morrissey, Michael; Wu, Yixuan; Joachims, Michelle L; Munroe, Melissa E; Lau, Denise; Qu, Xinyan; Krammer, Florian; Wrammert, Jens; Palese, Peter; Ahmed, Rafi; James, Judith A; Wilson, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC) reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus.

  9. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaval Kaur

    Full Text Available Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus.

  10. AML-specific cytotoxic antibodies in patients with durable graft versus leukemia responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillissen, Marijn A; Kedde, Martijn; de Jong, Greta; Moiset, Gemma; Yasuda, Etsuko; Levie, Sophie E; Bakker, Arjen Q; Claassen, Yvonne B; Wagner, Koen; Böhne, Martino; Hensbergen, Paul J; Speijer, Dave; van Helden, Pauline M; Beaumont, Tim; Spits, Hergen; Hazenberg, Mette D

    2017-10-23

    Most acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients can only be cured when an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) induces a graft versus leukemia immune response (GvL). While the role of T cells and NK cells in tumor immunology has been established, less is known about the contribution of B cells. From B cells of high-risk AML patients with potent and lasting GvL responses we isolated monoclonal antibodies directed against antigens expressed on the cell surface of AML cells but not on normal hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. A number of these donor-derived antibodies recognized the U5 snRNP200 complex, a component of the spliceosome that in normal cells is found in the cell. In AML however, the U5 snRNP200 complex is exposed on the cell membrane of leukemic blasts. U5 snRNP200 complex-specific antibodies induced death of AML cells in a FcR dependent way in the absence of cytotoxic leukocytes or complement. In an AML mouse model, treatment with U5 snRNP200 complex-specific antibodies led to significant tumor growth inhibition. Thus, donor derived U5 snRNP200 complex-recognizing AML-specific antibodies may contribute to anti-tumor responses. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  11. Cytokine profiles and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    †Mathematical Statistics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Abstract. Background: The ability of the host immune system to efficiently clear Plasmodium falciparum parasites during a malaria infection depends on the type of immune response mounted by the host. Study design: In a cross-sectional study, ...

  12. Antibody response to booster vaccination with tetanus and diphtheria in adults exposed to perfluorinated alkylates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) may induce immunosuppression in humans and animal models. In this exploratory study, 12 healthy adult volunteers were recruited. With each subject, serum-PFAS concentrations were measured and their antibody responses...... prospectively followed for 30 days after a booster vaccination with diphtheria and tetanus. The results indicated that serum-PFAS concentrations were positively correlated and positively associated with age and male sex. The specific antibody concentrations in serum were increased from Day 4 to Day 10 post......-booster, after which a constant concentration was reached. Serum PFAS concentrations showed significant negative associations with the rate of increase in the antibody responses. Interestingly, this effect was particularly strong for the longer-chain PFASs. All significant associations remained significant after...

  13. Assay signal as an alternative to titer for assessment of magnitude of an antidrug antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcevic Manning, Marta; Kroenke, Mark A; Lee, Stephanie A; Harrison, Simon E; Hoofring, Sarah A; Mytych, Daniel T; Jawa, Vibha

    2017-10-12

    Titer methods are commonly used to characterize the magnitude of an antidrug antibody response. Assay S/N is an appealing alternative, but the circumstances under which use of signal-to-noise (S/N) is appropriate have not been well defined. We validated both titer and S/N-based methods for several therapeutics. S/N correlated strongly with titer both in aggregate and when examined on a per subject basis. Analysis of impact of antibody magnitude on pharmacokinetics yielded the same result using either method. Each assay demonstrated excellent precision, good linearity, and adequate drug tolerance. Under these circumstances, assay S/N is a valid alternative to titer for assessment of the magnitude of an antidrug antibody response.

  14. Antibodies against a surface protein of Streptococcus pyogenes promote a pathological inflammatory response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Kahn

    Full Text Available Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS caused by Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinical condition with a high mortality rate despite modern intensive care. A key feature of STSS is excessive plasma leakage leading to hypovolemic hypotension, disturbed microcirculation and multiorgan failure. Previous work has identified a virulence mechanism in STSS where M1 protein of S. pyogenes forms complexes with fibrinogen that activate neutrophils to release heparin-binding protein (HBP, an inducer of vascular leakage. Here, we report a marked inter-individual difference in the response to M1 protein-induced HBP release, a difference found to be related to IgG antibodies directed against the central region of the M1 protein. To elicit massive HBP release, such antibodies need to be part of the M1 protein-fibrinogen complexes. The data add a novel aspect to bacterial pathogenesis where antibodies contribute to the severity of disease by promoting a pathologic inflammatory response.

  15. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice...... protein-free feed before mating, the F1 and F2 offspring generations showed no significantly different response, indicating that soya-specific immune components were not maternally transmitted. However, the ingestion of dietary soya protein by F1 mice during late pregnancy and lactation caused a lasting...... antibody response in the offspring, bat in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy...

  16. Antibody Responses with Fc-Mediated Functions after Vaccination of HIV-Infected Subjects with Trivalent Influenza Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the ability of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) to induce nonneutralizing antibodies (Abs) with Fc-mediated functions in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects. Functional influenza-specific Ab responses were studied in 30 HIV-negative and 27 HIV......-positive subjects immunized against seasonal influenza. All 57 subjects received the 2015 TIV. Fc-mediated antihemagglutinin (anti-HA) Ab activity was measured in plasma before and 4 weeks after vaccination using Fc-receptor-binding assays, NK cell activation assays, and phagocytosis assays. At baseline, the HIV......-positive group had detectable but reduced functional Ab responses to both vaccine and nonvaccine influenza antigens. TIV enhanced Fc-mediated Ab responses in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups. A larger rise was generally observed in the HIV-positive group, such that there was no difference in functional...

  17. An evaluation of circulating bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 maternal antibody level and response to vaccination in Angus calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, E D; Tait, R G; Mayes, M S; Park, C A; Ridpath, J F; Garrick, D J; Reecy, J M

    2013-09-01

    Vaccination against viruses has been shown to help prevent bovine respiratory disease in cattle. However, both passively acquired maternal antibody concentration and calf age have been shown to impact the ability of the immune system of a calf to respond to vaccination. The objectives of this study were to identify and evaluate environmental and management factors that affect 1) passively acquired bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 2 antibody level, 2) decay rate of passively acquired BVDV type 2 antibody level, and 3) responses to BVDV type 2 vaccinations. A 2-shot modified live vaccine was administered to 1,004 Angus calves that were weaned at either the initial vaccination (n = 508) or the booster vaccination (n = 496). Calves weaned at the initial vaccination averaged 139 d whereas calves weaned at booster vaccination averaged 128 d of age. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2 antibodies were measured in 3 approximately 21-d intervals, serially collected serum samples to quantify antibody levels at initiation and end of vaccination protocol in addition to responses to initial, booster, and overall vaccination protocol. Amount of passively transferred antibody in the calf increased as dam age increased from 2 to 6 yr (P 0.05). Calf age nested within birth year-season and dam age affected both initial and final antibody level, initial response, booster response, and overall antibody response to vaccination. The level of circulating, passively acquired maternal antibodies present at the time of vaccination had a significant (P calf to mount an overall antibody response to vaccination, maternal antibodies in circulation need to be less than 3.12 titers. However, the age at which a calf reached this antibody threshold was dependent on dam age. This information will help cattle managers and consultants design vaccination protocols to successfully mount an antibody response to vaccination.

  18. Comparison of neutralizing antibody responses elicited from highly diverse polyvalent heterotrimeric HIV-1 gp140 cocktail immunogens versus a monovalent counterpart in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J Bowles

    Full Text Available Eliciting neutralizing antibodies capable of inactivating a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine design. The challenge is that envelopes (Envs of circulating viruses are almost certainly different from any Env used in a vaccine. A novel immunogen composed of a highly diverse set of gp140 Envs including subtypes A, B, C, D and F was developed to stimulate a more cross-neutralizing antibody response. Env heterotrimers composed of up to 54 different gp140s were produced with the aim of focusing the response to the conserved regions of Env while reducing the dominance of any individual hypervariable region. Heterotrimeric gp140 Envs of inter- and intra-subtype combinations were shown to bind CD4 and a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies with similar affinity to monovalent UG37 gp140. Macaques immunized with six groups of heterotrimer mixtures showed slightly more potent neutralizing antibody responses in TZM-BL tier 1 and A3R5 tier 2 pseudovirus assays than macaques immunized with monovalent Env gp140, and exhibited a marginally greater focus on the CD4-binding site. Carbopol enhanced neutralization when used as an adjuvant instead of RIBI in combination with UG37 gp140. These data indicate that cross-subtype heterotrimeric gp140 Envs may elicit some improvement of the neutralizing antibody response in macaques compared to monovalent gp140 Env.

  19. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  20. Antibody Responses to Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Taiwanese Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Taiwanese elderly adults with COPD, even in advanced age, can mount a significant antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. This study may support the existing recommendation that pneumococcal vaccine be offered to persons ≥ 65 years old with COPD. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(3: 196-203

  1. Selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells and layer age affect egg quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. After 22 generations of divergent selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC), hatchability differed between the selected lines. Whether there is a relationship between hatchability and egg traits in these lines is not clear. 2. The aim of the present study was to

  2. Directional Selection for Specific Sheep Cell Antibody Responses Affects Natural Rabbit Agglutinins of Chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, P.F.; Ayoub, J.; Parmentier, H.K.

    2005-01-01

    Agglutination data from generations 8 through 19 indicate that bidirectional selection for specific SRBC antibody responses was successful in a line cross of ISA × Warren medium heavy layers. After 11 generations titers of the high SRBC selected line (H line) were nearly 1:32,000; those of the low

  3. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from...

  4. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were

  5. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2014-03-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn's disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn's disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF(+) immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF(+) cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF(+) cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders.

  6. Influence of routes and administration parameters on antibody response of pigs following DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Kirstensen, Birte; Dannemann-Jensen, Tove

    2004-01-01

    by histology. For selected combinations, vaccination efficiency in terms of antibody response was studied. Gene gun vaccination on ear alone was as efficient as a multi-site (ear, thorax, inguinal area, tongue mucosa) gene gun approach, and more efficient than combined intramuscular (i.m.)/intradermal (i...

  7. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...

  8. Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses to Soluble and Nanoparticle-Conjugated Antigens Administered Intranasally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E. Howe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are increasingly being used for drug delivery, as well as antigen carriers and immunostimulants for the purpose of developing vaccines. In this work, we examined how intranasal (i.n. priming followed by i.n. or subcutaneous (s.c. boosting immunization affects the humoral immune response to chicken ovalbumin (Ova and Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova. We show that i.n. priming with 20 mg of soluble Ova, a dose known to trigger oral tolerance when administered via gastric gavage, induced substantial systemic IgG1 and IgG2c, as well as mucosal antibodies. These responses were further boosted following a s.c. immunization with Ova and complete Freund’s adjuvant (Ova+CFA. In contrast, 100 µg of Ova delivered via NPs induced an IgG1-dominated systemic response, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. Following a secondary s.c. or i.n. immunization with Ova+CFA or NP-Ova, systemic IgG1 titers significantly increased, and serum IgG2c and intestinal antibodies were induced in mice primed nasally with NP-Ova. Only Ova- and NP-Ova-primed mice that were s.c.-boosted exhibited substantial systemic and mucosal titers for up to 6 months after priming, whereas the antibodies of i.n.-boosted mice declined over time. Our results indicate that although the amount of Ova delivered by NPs was 1000-fold less than Ova delivered in soluble form, the antigen-specific antibody responses, both systemic and mucosal, are essentially identical by 6 months following the initial priming immunization. Additionally, both i.n.- and s.c.-boosting strategies for NP-Ova-primed mice were capable of inducing a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal antibodies; however, it is only by using a heterogeneous prime-boost strategy that long-lasting antibody responses were initiated. These results provide valuable insight for future mucosal vaccine development, as well as furthering our understanding of mucosal antibody responses.

  9. Mapping Polyclonal HIV-1 Antibody Responses via Next-Generation Neutralization Fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Doria-Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c identification of sera with potentially novel epitope specificities. At the individual donor level, the next-generation NFP algorithms particularly improved the ability to detect multiple epitope specificities in a sample, as confirmed both for computationally simulated polyclonal sera and for samples from HIV-infected donors. Specifically, the next-generation NFP algorithms detected multiple specificities in twice as many samples of simulated sera. Further, unlike the first-generation NFP, the new algorithms were able to detect both of the previously confirmed antibody specificities, VRC01-like and PG9-like, in donor CHAVI 0219. At the cohort level, analysis of ~150 broadly neutralizing HIV-infected donor samples suggested a potential connection between clade of infection and types of elicited epitope specificities. Most notably, while 10E8-like antibodies were observed in infections from different clades, an enrichment of such antibodies was predicted for clade B samples. Ultimately, such large-scale analyses of antibody responses to HIV-1 infection can help guide the design of epitope-specific vaccines that are tailored to take into account the prevalence of infecting clades within a specific geographic region. Overall, the next-generation NFP technology will be an important tool for the analysis of broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody responses against HIV-1.

  10. Correlation of pharmacodynamic activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses to anti-IL-21R antibody therapeutics following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaulding Vikki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IL-21R antibodies are potential therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This study evaluated correlations between the pharmacodynamic (PD activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses of human anti-IL-21R antibodies Ab-01 and Ab-02 following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys. Methods The PD assay was based on the ability of recombinant human IL-21 (rhuIL-21 to induce expression of the IL-2RA gene in cynomolgus monkey whole blood samples ex vivo. Monkeys screened for responsiveness to rhuIL-21 stimulation using the PD assay, were given a single 10 mg/kg IV dosage of Ab-01, Ab-02, or a control antibody (3/group, and blood samples were evaluated for PD activity (inhibition of IL-2RA expression for up to 148 days. Anti-IL-21R antibody concentrations and anti-product antibody responses were measured in serum using immunoassays and flow cytometry. Results Following IV administration of Ab-01 and Ab-02 to cynomolgus monkeys, PD activity was observed as early as 5 minutes (first time point sampled. This PD activity had good correlation with the serum concentrations and anti-product antibody responses throughout the study. The mean terminal half-life (t1/2 was ~10.6 and 2.3 days for Ab-01 and Ab-02, respectively. PD activity was lost at ~5-13 weeks for Ab-01 and at ~2 weeks for Ab-02, when serum concentrations were relatively low. The estimated minimum concentrations needed to maintain PD activity were ~4-6 nM for Ab-01 and ~2.5 nM for Ab-02, and were consistent with the respective KD values for binding to human IL-21R. For Ab-01, there was noticeable inter-animal variability in t1/2 values (~6-14 days and the resulting PD profiles, which correlated with the onset of anti-product antibody formation. While all three Ab-01-dosed animals were positive for anti-Ab-01 antibodies, only one monkey (with the shortest t1/2 and the earliest loss of PD activity had evidence of neutralizing anti-Ab-01

  11. Reduced antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens in the presence of Trichuris trichiura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esen, Meral; Mordmüller, Benjamin; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helminth infections are highly prevalent in the tropics and may have an effect on immune responses to vaccines due to their immunomodulatory effect. The prevalence of helminth infections in young children, the target group for malaria and most other vaccines, is high. Therefore we...... assessed the influence of helminth infection on vaccine-induced immune responses in a phase I clinical trial of the malaria vaccine candidate GMZ2. METHODS: Twenty Gabonese preschool-age children were vaccinated with GMZ2, a blood stage malaria vaccine candidate. Humoral immune response against the vaccine...... antigens and parasitological status were assessed. Vaccine-specific antibody concentrations and memory B-cell numbers were compared in worm infected and non-infected participants. RESULTS: Antibody response to GMZ2 was 3.4-fold (95% confidence interval: 1.6, 7.4) higher in Trichuris trichiura negative...

  12. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  13. A crucial role for infected-cell/antibody immune complexes in the enhancement of endogenous antiviral immunity by short passive immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri-Alexandre Michaud

    Full Text Available Antiviral monoclonal antibodies (mAbs represent promising therapeutics. However, most mAbs-based immunotherapies conducted so far have only considered the blunting of viral propagation and not other possible therapeutic effects independent of virus neutralization, namely the modulation of the endogenous immune response. As induction of long-term antiviral immunity still remains a paramount challenge for treating chronic infections, we have asked here whether neutralizing mAbs can, in addition to blunting viral propagation, exert immunomodulatory effects with protective outcomes. Supporting this idea, we report here that mice infected with the FrCas(E murine retrovirus on day 8 after birth die of leukemia within 4-5 months and mount a non-protective immune response, whereas those rapidly subjected to short immunotherapy with a neutralizing mAb survive healthy and mount a long-lasting protective antiviral immunity with strong humoral and cellular immune responses. Interestingly, the administered mAb mediates lysis of infected cells through an antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC mechanism. In addition, it forms immune complexes (ICs with infected cells that enhance antiviral CTL responses through Fc gammaR-mediated binding to dendritic cells (DCs. Importantly, the endogenous antiviral antibodies generated in mAb-treated mice also display the same properties, allowing containment of viral propagation and enhancement of memory cellular responses after disappearance of the administered mAb. Thus, our data demonstrate that neutralizing antiviral mAbs can act as immunomodulatory agents capable of stimulating a protective immunity lasting long after the end of the treatment. They also show an important role of infected-cells/antibody complexes in the induction and the maintenance of protective immunity through enhancement of both primary and memory antiviral T-cell responses. They also indicate that targeting infected cells, and not just viruses

  14. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species.

  15. MINOR HUMAN-ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO A MOUSE AND CHIMERIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AFTER A SINGLE IV INFUSION IN OVARIAN-CARCINOMA PATIENTS - A COMPARISON OF 5 ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUIST, MR; KENEMANS, P; VANKAMP, GJ; Haisma, Hidde

    The human anti-(mouse Ig) antibody (HAMA) response was measured in serum of 52 patients suspected of having ovarian carcinoma who had received an i.v. injection of either the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) OV-TL 3 F(ab')(2) (n = 28, 1 mg) or the chimeric mouse/human mAb MOv18 (cMOv18; n = 24, 3

  16. Enhancing Stability of Camelid and Shark Single Domain Antibodies: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies (sdAbs are gaining a reputation as superior recognition elements as they combine the advantages of the specificity and affinity found in conventional antibodies with high stability and solubility. Melting temperatures (Tms of sdAbs cover a wide range from below 50 to over 80°C. Many sdAbs have been engineered to increase their Tm, making them stable until exposed to extreme temperatures. SdAbs derived from the variable heavy chains of camelid and shark heavy chain-only antibodies are termed VHH and VNAR, respectively, and generally exhibit some ability to refold and bind antigen after heat denaturation. This ability to refold varies from 0 to 100% and is a property dependent on both intrinsic factors of the sdAb and extrinsic conditions such as the sample buffer ionic strength, pH, and sdAb concentration. SdAbs have also been engineered to increase their solubility and refolding ability, which enable them to function even after exposure to temperatures that exceed their melting point. In addition, efforts to improve their stability at extreme pH and in the presence of chemical denaturants or proteases have been undertaken. Multiple routes have been employed to engineer sdAbs with these enhanced stabilities. The methods utilized to achieve these goals include grafting complementarity-determining regions onto stable frameworks, introduction of non-canonical disulfide bonds, random mutagenesis combined with stringent selection, point mutations such as inclusion of negative charges, and genetic fusions. Increases of up to 20°C have been realized, pushing the Tm of some sdAbs to over 90°C. Herein, we present an overview of the work done to stabilize sdAbs derived from camelids and sharks. Utilizing these various strategies sdAbs have been stabilized without significantly compromising their affinity, thereby providing superior reagents for detection, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications.

  17. The Complexity of Antibody Responses Elicited against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoproteins in Hospitalized Children Younger than 2 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsina Trento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the antibody responses to human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV glycoproteins in very young children has been a matter of controversy. Both, immaturity of the immune system at very early age and suppression of the host immune response by high level of maternal antibodies have been claimed to limit the host antibody response to virus infection and to jeopardize the use of hRSV vaccines under development in that age group. Hence, the antibody responses to the two major hRSV glycoproteins (F and G were evaluated in children younger than 2 years, hospitalized with laboratory confirmed hRSV bronchiolitis. A strong negative correlation was found between the titre of circulating ELISA antibodies directed against either prefusion or postfusion F in the acute phase, but not age, and their fold change at convalescence. These changes correlated also with the level of circulating neutralizing antibodies in sera. As reported in adults, most neutralizing antibodies in a subset of tested sera could not be depleted with postfusion F, suggesting that they were mostly directed against prefusion-specific epitopes. In contrast, a weak negative association was found for group-specific anti-G antibodies in the acute phase and their fold change at convalescence only after correcting for the antigenic group of the infecting virus. In addition, large discrepancies were observed in some individuals between the antibody responses specific for F and G glycoproteins. These results illustrate the complexity of the anti-hRSV antibody responses in children experiencing a primary severe infection and the influence of preexisting maternal antibodies on the host response, factors that should influence hRSV serological studies as well as vaccine development.

  18. Network response synchronization enhanced by synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobov, S.; Simonov, A.; Kastalskiy, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Synchronization of neural network response on spatially localized periodic stimulation was studied. The network consisted of synaptically coupled spiking neurons with spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP). Network connectivity was defined by time evolving matrix of synaptic weights. We found that the steady-state spatial pattern of the weights could be rearranged due to locally applied external periodic stimulation. A method for visualization of synaptic weights as vector field was introduced to monitor the evolving connectivity matrix. We demonstrated that changes in the vector field and associated weight rearrangements underlay an enhancement of synchronization range.

  19. Antibodies against glycolipids enhance antifungal activity of macrophages and reduce fungal burden after infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Amelia eBueno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus.

  20. Effect of a second, booster, influenza vaccination on antibody responses in quiescent systemic lupus erythematosus : An open, prospective, controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; van Assen, Sander; de Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. In SLE, a decreased antibody response on influenza vaccination has been reported. In this study, we assessed whether a booster vaccination could improve antibody responses, as determined by seroprotection rates, in SLE patients. Methods. SLE patients (n = 52) with quiescent disease

  1. Antibody response to the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax in naturally infected humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, E D; Lucas, C M; Chauca, G; Wirtz, R A; Hinostroza, S

    1992-03-01

    The circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium vivax consists of a central repeat region flanked by highly conserved non-repeat regions. Serum samples from 33 individuals with naturally acquired infections of P. vivax were tested for antibodies to four antigens representing the vivax CS protein. Three recombinant proteins containing different overlapping sequences in the non-repeat regions and either the entire central repeat region (vivax-1 and vivax-2) or two of the repeat sequences (vivax-3) were used as antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antibodies to two other proteins, one (NS1(81)V20) containing the entire predominant repeat region (GDRAA/DGQPA) and the other (Pvk247) containing the variant repeat sequence (ANGAGNQPG) that was recently reported from Thailand were also measured by ELISA. Immunoglobulin G antibodies to the antigen representing the predominant repeat were present in 15% of the patients on the first day of treatment (day 0) and in 24% of the patients two weeks later (post-treatment). Six and 12% of the patients had IgG antibodies to the antigen containing the variant repeat on day 0 and post-treatment, respectively. A larger proportion of the sera had antibodies to the three antigens containing the non-repeat sequences; on the first day of treatment and two weeks later, 79 and 97% of the patients, respectively, had antibodies to vivax-1, vivax-2, and vivax-3. In this sample of Peruvians naturally infected with P. vivax, the most prevalent antibody responses were targeted to epitopes in the non-repeat region of the CS protein rather than to epitopes in the repeat region.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Human Onchocerciasis and Tetanus Vaccination: Impact on the Postvaccination Antitetanus Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Philip J.; Espinel, Ivan; Wieseman, Moira; Paredes, Wilson; Espinel, Mauricio; Guderian, Ronald H.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate whether helminth infections may affect the efficacy of vaccines by impairing the immune response to nonparasite vaccine antigens, we compared the antibody responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) after tetanus vaccination in 193 subjects with Onchocerca volvulus infection with 85 comparable noninfected controls. After vaccination, the proportions of subjects in each group attaining protective levels of antitetanus antibodies were similar (96.9% infected versus 97.6% noninfected). Postvaccination increases in antitetanus immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the predominant IgG isotype, IgG1, were equivalent in both groups, as were increases in specific IgG4 and IgE; however, significantly greater increases in specific IgG2 (P volvulus-infected group into two groups representing light and heavy infections revealed a significantly impaired antitetanus IgG response in those with heavy infections compared to those with light infections (P volvulus does not prevent the development of a protective antitetanus response, although heavier O. volvulus infections are able to alter the magnitude of this response, and concurrent helminth infections (O. volvulus and intestinal helminths) may alter TT-specific antibody isotype responses. PMID:10531253

  3. Enhanced embodied response following ambiguous emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffara, Brice; Ouellet, Marc; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Basu, Anamitra; Morisseau, Tiffany; Mermillod, Martial

    2012-08-01

    It has generally been assumed that high-level cognitive and emotional processes are based on amodal conceptual information. In contrast, however, "embodied simulation" theory states that the perception of an emotional signal can trigger a simulation of the related state in the motor, somatosensory, and affective systems. To study the effect of social context on the mimicry effect predicted by the "embodied simulation" theory, we recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity of participants when looking at emotional facial expressions. We observed an increase in embodied responses when the participants were exposed to a context involving social valence before seeing the emotional facial expressions. An examination of the dynamic EMG activity induced by two socially relevant emotional expressions (namely joy and anger) revealed enhanced EMG responses of the facial muscles associated with the related social prime (either positive or negative). These results are discussed within the general framework of embodiment theory.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies against peptidorhamnomannans of Scedosporium apiospermum enhance the pathogenicity of the fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia C L Lopes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Scedosporium apiospermum is part of the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex. Peptidorhamnomannans (PRMs are cell wall glycopeptides present in some fungi, and their structures have been characterized in S. apiospermum, S. prolificans and Sporothrix schenckii. Prior work shows that PRMs can interact with host cells and that the glycopeptides are antigenic. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, IgG1 to S. apiospermum derived PRM were generated and their effects on S. apiospermum were examined in vitro and in vivo. The mAbs recognized a carbohydrate epitope on PRM. In culture, addition of the PRM mAbs increased S. apiospermum conidia germination and reduced conidial phagocytosis by J774.16 macrophages. In a murine infection model, mice treated with antibodies to PRM died prior to control animals. Thus, PRM is involved in morphogenesis and the binding of this glycopeptide by mAbs enhanced the virulence of the fungus. Further insights into the effects of these glycopeptides on the pathobiology of S. apiospermum may lead to new avenues for preventing and treating scedosporiosis.

  5. Distinct human antibody response to the biological warfare agent Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, John J; Vigil, Adam; DeShazer, David; Waag, David M; Felgner, Philip; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2012-10-01

    The genetic similarity between Burkholderia mallei (glanders) and Burkholderia pseudomallei (melioidosis) had led to the general assumption that pathogenesis of each bacterium would be similar. In 2000, the first human case of glanders in North America since 1945 was reported in a microbiology laboratory worker. Leveraging the availability of pre-exposure sera for this individual and employing the same well-characterized protein array platform that has been previously used to study a large cohort of melioidosis patients in southeast Asia, we describe the antibody response in a human with glanders. Analysis of 156 peptides present on the array revealed antibodies against 17 peptides with a > 2-fold increase in this infection. Unexpectedly, when the glanders data were compared with a previous data set from B. pseudomallei infections, there were only two highly increased antibodies shared between these two infections. These findings have implications in the diagnosis and treatment of B. mallei and B. pseudomallei infections.

  6. Serotype-Specific and Age-Dependent Generation of Pneumococcal Polysaccharide-Specific Memory B-Cell and Antibody Responses to Immunization with a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Oh, Sarah; Hamaluba, Mainga; Westcar, Sharon; Beverley, Peter C. L.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoconjugate vaccines have dramatically reduced the incidence of encapsulated bacterial diseases in toddlers under 2 years of age, but vaccine-induced antibody levels in this age group wane rapidly. We immunized adults and 12-month-old toddlers with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to determine differences in B-cell and antibody responses. The adults and 12-month-old toddlers received a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. The toddlers received a second dose at 14 months of age. The frequencies of diphtheria toxoid and serotype 4, 14, and 23F polysaccharide-specific plasma cells and memory B cells were determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The toddlers had no preexisting polysaccharide-specific memory B cells or serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody but had good diphtheria toxoid-specific memory responses. The frequencies of plasma cells and memory B cells increased by day 7 (P < 0.0001) in the adults and the toddlers following a single dose of conjugate, but the polysaccharide responses were significantly lower in the toddlers than in the adults (P = 0.009 to <0.001). IgM dominated the toddler antibody responses, and class switching to the IgG was serotype dependent. A second dose of vaccine enhanced the antibody and memory B-cell responses in the toddlers but not the ex vivo plasma cell responses. Two doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine are required in toddlers to generate memory B-cell frequencies and antibody class switching for each pneumococcal polysaccharide equivalent to that seen in adults. PMID:18032593

  7. Anti-Borna disease virus antibody responses in psychiatric patients: long-term follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Alexander; Adamaszek, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Data suggesting a pathogenetic role for Borna disease virus (BDV) in neuropsychiatric diseases are still inconclusive and it is unknown whether humans become persistently infected or clear the virus infection. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate long-term BDV-specific antibody responses in psychiatric patients in order to gain new insights into human BDV infection and its pathogenicity. BDV-specific antibody titers and associations with clinical conditions were studied retrospectively in 94 seropositive patients with schizophrenia (n = 46), affective disorders (n = 19) and other psychiatric disorders (n = 29) who had been repeatedly tested for the presence of BDV-specific antibodies on indirect immunofluorescence assay between 1985 and 2006. Long-term titer dynamics were studied in 46 patients followed up for a period of >36 months. A total of 25 of these 46 patients (54.3%) had persistent seropositivity, whereas seroreversion from positive to negative was observed in 21 (45.7%). Patients in the early course of schizophrenia had lower antibody titers compared to patients in the advanced course (P = 0.017), while a higher proportion of patients in the early course had titer increases (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in antibody titers between patient subgroups with clinically stable and acute psychiatric disorders. Persistent seropositivity in a subgroup of psychiatric patients in the long-term analysis suggests chronic BDV infection in humans.

  8. Prospective evaluation of antibody response to Streptococcus gallolyticus and risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Julia; Jenab, Mazda; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Severi, Gianluca; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; la Vecchia, Carlo; Karakatsani, Anna; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, Maria-José; Bonet Bonet, Catalina; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Bradbury, Kathryn; Gunter, Marc; Murphy, Neil; Freisling, Heinz; Riboli, Elio; Tsilidis, Kostas; Aune, Dagfinn; Waterboer, Tim; Hughes, David J

    2018-01-29

    The gut microbiome is increasingly implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with CRC show high antibody responses to Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG). However, it is unclear whether the association is also present pre-diagnostically. We assessed the association of antibody responses to SGG proteins in pre-diagnostic serum samples with CRC risk in a case-control study nested within a prospective cohort. Pre-diagnostic serum samples from 485 first incident CRC cases (mean time between blood draw and diagnosis 3.4 years) and 485 matched controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study were analyzed for antibody responses to 11 SGG proteins using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models. Antibody positivity for any of the 11 SGG proteins was significantly associated with CRC risk with 56% positive controls compared to 63% positive cases (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.77). Positivity for two or more proteins of a previously identified SGG 6-marker panel with greater CRC-specificity was also observed among 9% of controls compared to 17% of CRC cases, corresponding to a significantly increased CRC risk (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.44-3.27). In this prospective nested case-control study, we observed a positive association between antibody responses to SGG and CRC development in serum samples taken before evident disease onset. Further work is required to establish the possibly etiological significance of these observations and whether SGG serology may be applicable for CRC risk stratification. © 2018 UICC.

  9. Antibody responses to periodontopathic bacteria in relation to rheumatoid arthritis in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Moe; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Ito, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Tomoko; Komatsu, Yasutaka; Abe, Asami; Murasawa, Akira; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2011-10-01

    Periodontopathic bacteria have been implicated as contributory to the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Anticyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies and rheumatoid factor (RF) were shown to be associated with RA. This study examines whether serum levels of antibodies to periodontopathic bacteria may affect clinical and laboratory profiles of RA. The study participants consisted of 80 patients with RA, and 38 age-, sex-, smoking status-, and periodontal condition-balanced healthy controls. After periodontal and rheumatologic examination, serum levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), and Eikenella corrodens (Ec) and those of anti-CCP antibodies and RF were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patients with RA showed significantly higher levels of anti-Pg and anti-CCP antibodies than controls (P = 0.04 and P <0.0001). In contrast, IgG responses to Aa and Ec in patients with RA were significantly lower than those in controls (P <0.0001 and P = 0.0001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association of anti-Pg and anti-Aa IgG responses with RA, after adjustment for age, sex, and smoking (P = 0.005 and P = 0.02). Anti-Pg titer displayed a significant correlation with RF levels, probing depth, and clinical attachment level (P = 0.03, P = 0.03, and P = 0.02). These results suggest that serum levels of anti-Pg IgG antibodies were associated with RA, and might affect serum levels of RF and periodontal condition in patients with RA.

  10. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minozzi, G.; Parmentier, H.K.; Mignon-Grasteau, S.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Bed'hom, B.; Gourichon, D.; Minvielle, F.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three

  11. Development of Patient-specific AAV Vectors After Neutralizing Antibody Selection for Enhanced Muscle Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Wu, Shuqing; Albright, Blake; Hirsch, Matthew; Li, Wuping; Tseng, Yu-Shan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; McPhee, Scott; Asokan, Aravind; Samulski, R Jude

    2016-02-01

    A major hindrance in gene therapy trials with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that inhibit AAV transduction. In this study, we used directed evolution techniques in vitro and in mouse muscle to select novel NAb escape AAV chimeric capsid mutants in the presence of individual patient serum. AAV mutants isolated in vitro escaped broad patient-specific NAb activity but had poor transduction ability in vivo. AAV mutants isolated in vivo had enhanced NAb evasion from cognate serum and had high muscle transduction ability. More importantly, structural modeling identified a 100 amino acid motif from AAV6 in variable region (VR) III that confers this enhanced muscle tropism. In addition, a predominantly AAV8 capsid beta barrel template with a specific preference for AAV1/AAV9 in VR VII located at threefold symmetry axis facilitates NAb escape. Our data strongly support that chimeric AAV capsids composed of modular and nonoverlapping domains from various serotypes are capable of evading patient-specific NAbs and have enhanced muscle transduction.

  12. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of emulsions with different physicochemical properties on the antibody response towards the venom of West African carpet viper (Echis ocellatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez, Karina; Herrera, María; Segura, Álvaro; Vargas, Mariángela; Villalta, Mauren; Montero, Mavis; Gutiérrez, Jose María; León, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Adjuvant emulsions are widely used to enhance the antibody response of the animals used as immunoglobulin source for producing antivenoms. Usually, the adjuvant activity of emulsions is attributed both to their ability to trigger "danger" signals from cells in which they induce death, and to form depots from which immunogens are slowly released. However, there is contradictory evidence suggesting that adjuvant activity of emulsions is independent of the dispersion type and the rate of immunogen release. In order to test how physical properties of emulsions, composed of mineral oil and water, affect their ability to enhance the antibody response towards snake venoms, we compared water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions prepared at volume ratios of 70/30, 50/50 or 30/70, a 50/50 oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion, and a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion. Comparison included their droplet-size, viscosity, rate of immunogen release and ability to enhance the antibody response of mice immunized with the venom of the African viperid snake Echis ocellatus. It was found that all emulsions released a low amount of venom, and that the 50/50 (W/O) and the multiple emulsion (W/O/W) were those that induced the higher anti-venom antibody response. Our results suggest that the ability of emulsions to enhance the anti-venom response is not associated to their ability to form depots from which the venom is slowly released. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of concurrent intratracheal lipopolysaccharide and human serum albumin challenge on primary and secondary antibody responses in poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Klompen, A.L.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Lammers, A.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may direct specific immune responses and as a consequence probably significantly affect vaccination. Previously, we described modulation of specific antibody responses to systemically administered model antigens

  14. Humoral antibody response to glutaraldehyde-treated antigens of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A; Molokwu, J U; Ezeh, A O

    1986-04-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated whole cell antigens (GA.WcA) of Dermatophilus congolensis induced in guinea pigs immunological memory in contrast to cell wall antigens treated similarly (GA.CwA). However, GA.WcA could not induce a secondary response in animals primed with untreated WcA while GA.CwA on the other hand did stimulate a secondary response in animals primed with untreated CwA. Primary antibody production was induced by both GA.CwA and untreated CwA to a similar level in their respective hosts but it was the secondary response that was found similar in response to GA.WcA and untreated WcA. However, both untreated WcA and CwA induced primary and secondary antibody production in their respective hosts though these responses were considerably higher in guinea pigs given untreated CwA. This study showed that both untreated and GA-treated antigens of D. congolensis are capable of stimulating antibody production in guinea pigs but they differ in their levels of stimulation.

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1)-deficient mice demonstrate abnormal antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Helen E; Willimott, Shaun; Beswick, Richard W; Dantzer, Françoise; de Murcia, Josiane Ménissier; Yelamos, José; Wagner, Simon D

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) of acceptor proteins is an epigenetic modification involved in DNA strand break repair, recombination and transcription. Here we provide evidence for the involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1) in antibody responses. Parp-1−/− mice had increased numbers of T cells and normal numbers of total B cells. Marginal zone B cells were mildly reduced in number, and numbers of follicular B cells were preserved. There were abnormal levels of basal immunoglobulins, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) and increased levels of IgA and IgG2b. Analysis of specific antibody responses showed that T cell-independent responses were normal but T cell-dependent responses were markedly reduced. Germinal centres were normal in size and number. In vitro purified B cells from Parp-1−/− mice proliferated normally and showed normal IgM secretion, decreased switching to IgG2a but increased IgA secretion. Collectively our results demonstrate that Parp-1 has essential roles in normal T cell-dependent antibody responses and the regulation of isotype expression. We speculate that Parp-1 forms a component of the protein complex involved in resolving the DNA double-strand breaks that occur during class switch recombination. PMID:18778284

  16. HIV-1 Cross-Reactive Primary Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response Elicited by Immunization in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; O'Dell, Sijy; Turner, Hannah L; Chiang, Chi-I; Lei, Lin; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Martinez-Murillo, Paola; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Li, Yuxing

    2017-11-01

    Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses is a major goal for the development of an HIV-1 vaccine. Current HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) vaccine candidates elicit predominantly tier 1 and/or autologous tier 2 virus neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses, as well as weak and/or sporadic cross-reactive tier 2 virus NAb responses with unknown specificity. To delineate the specificity of vaccine-elicited cross-reactive tier 2 virus NAb responses, we performed single memory B cell sorting from the peripheral blood of a rhesus macaque immunized with YU2gp140-F trimers in adjuvant, using JR-FL SOSIP.664, a native Env trimer mimetic, as a sorting probe to isolate monoclonal Abs (MAbs). We found striking genetic and functional convergence of the SOSIP-sorted Ig repertoire, with predominant VH4 or VH5 gene family usage and Env V3 specificity. Of these vaccine-elicited V3-specific MAbs, nearly 20% (6/33) displayed cross-reactive tier 2 virus neutralization, which recapitulated the serum neutralization capacity. Substantial similarities in binding specificity, neutralization breadth and potency, and sequence/structural homology were observed between selected macaque cross-reactive V3 NAbs elicited by vaccination and prototypic V3 NAbs derived from natural infections in humans, highlighting the convergence of this subset of primate V3-specific B cell repertories. Our study demonstrated that cross-reactive primary virus neutralizing B cell lineages could be elicited by vaccination as detected using a standardized panel of tier 2 viruses. Whether these lineages could be expanded to acquire increased breadth and potency of neutralization merits further investigation.IMPORTANCE Elicitation of antibody responses capable of neutralizing diverse HIV-1 primary virus isolates (designated broadly neutralizing antibodies [bNAbs]) remains a high priority for the vaccine field. bNAb responses were so far observed only in response to natural infection within a subset

  17. A sensitive three monoclonal antibodies based automatic latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay for Golgi protein 73 detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yanyan; Shen, Han; Zhu, Yefei; Xu, Hongpan; Li, Zhiyang; Si, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Golgi protein 73 (GP73) is a novel and potential marker for diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that has been found to be abnormally elevated in liver disease. A latex particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (LTIA) was recently introduced and licensed for application in a variety of automated clinical chemistry analyzers. However, no studies have reported sufficient data on analytical performance of this method when using 3 monoclonal antibodies for GP73 measurement. The experimental conditions were firstly optimized and range of linearity, diagnostic potential, clinical relevance were compared with the LTIA based on polyclonal antibodies and ELISA. Dilution tests for the LTIA using 3 monoclonal antibodies produced a calibration curve from 10 to 350 ng/mL while the polyclonal antibodies produced the curve from 20 to 320 ng/mL. The detection limit was achieved at 1.82 ng/mL concentration. Within-run CV was obtained in the range of 1.5–2.9% and ROC curves indicated sensitivity and specificity of the LTIA based on 3 monoclonal antibodies were 96.7% and 93.3%, respectively, higher than for the polyclonal antibodies (94.6% and 72.4%) and ELISA (70.0% and 83.3%). Therefore, the LTIA assay based on 3 monoclonal antibodies is thus applicable in quantification of GP73 concentration in automated biochemistry analyzers. PMID:28054632

  18. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  19. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  20. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Danielle E.; Levinson, Kara J.

    2018-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM) when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS). Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule) possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment. PMID:29293563

  1. Multiple Myeloma Baseline Immunoglobulin G Level and Pneumococcal Vaccination Antibody Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Thompson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in multiple myeloma (MM, a cancer of the immune system. Vaccination clinical efficacy endpoints have not been demonstrated, and there are limited data on surrogate markers of efficacy. This pilot study evaluated sequential immunologic markers after standard pneumococcal vaccination (PV in patients with MM and non-MM controls. Vaccination was standard for PV (PCV13 or PPV23, with laboratory testing at baseline and at 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after vaccination. Immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies to pneumococcal antigens were detected by ELISA. Prevaccination total IgG levels and IgG subclass levels were also measured by ELISA. Four of 6 controls responded with at least a 2-fold increase in antibody concentration; only 2 controls had a sustained increase in concentration. Six of 8 patients with MM had at least a 2-fold antibody increase; however, only 2 of these patients showed a sustained increase of antipneumococcal antibody. Response rate differences were not statistically significant in this small pilot, and there was no relationship between responsiveness to PV and initial serum total IgG levels or IgG subclasses at study entry. Future prospective studies are needed to ascertain the immunological and clinical efficacy and effectiveness of various vaccines and vaccination strategies in MM.

  2. Autoimmune response of IgE antibodies to cellular self-antigens in systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Ajax Mercês; Santiago, Mittermayer Barreto; Guerra, Fernanda Garcia; Pereira, Mariana Menezes; Sousa Atta, Maria Luiza B

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients may exhibit high total IgE and antinuclear IgE antibodies (ANA-IgE). Here, we investigated the specificity of ANA-IgE in SLE patients and the involvement of cytokines in this immune response. Sera from 92 SLE patients and 68 healthy controls were evaluated for the presence of antinuclear IgE antibodies by immunoperoxidase with HEp-2,000(R) cells and immunoblotting with IgG-depleted sera. Total IgE, IgE specific to allergens, and serum cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. Antinuclear IgE antibodies were detected only in SLE patients (29/92, 31.5%). High total IgE was associated with ANA-IgE (p seronegative patients (p seronegative patients (p < 0.05) or healthy controls (p = 0.001). Controls displayed higher IL-5/IFN-gamma ratios than either SLE patients with ANA-IgE (p < 0.05) or patients without these immunoglobulins (p < 0.01). We conclude that IgE antibodies against cell autoantigens involved in protein expression, cellular proliferation, and cell death are present in patients with SLE. Interleukin-10 seems to down-regulate this IgE autoimmune response in SLE. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Induction of neutralising antibodies and cellular immune responses against SARS coronavirus by recombinant measles viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liniger, Matthias; Zuniga, Armando; Tamin, Azaibi; Azzouz-Morin, Teldja N; Knuchel, Marlyse; Marty, Rene R; Wiegand, Marian; Weibel, Sara; Kelvin, David; Rota, Paul A; Naim, Hussein Y

    2008-04-16

    Live attenuated recombinant measles viruses (rMV) expressing a codon-optimised spike glycoprotein (S) or nucleocapsid protein (N) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) were generated (rMV-S and rMV-N). Both recombinant viruses stably expressed the corresponding SARS-CoV proteins, grew to similar end titres as the parental strain and induced high antibody titres against MV and the vectored SARS-CoV antigens (S and N) in transgenic mice susceptible to measles infection. The antibodies induced by rMV-S had a high neutralising effect on SARS-CoV as well as on MV. Moreover, significant N-specific cellular immune responses were measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays. The pre-existence of anti-MV antibodies induced by the initial immunisation dose did not inhibit boost of anti-S and anti-N antibodies. Immunisations comprising a mixture of rMV-S and rMV-N induced immune responses similar in magnitude to that of vaccine components administered separately. These data support the suitability of MV as a bivalent candidate vaccine vector against MV and emerging viruses such as SARS-CoV.

  4. Steroid-Responsive Chronic Schizophreniform Syndrome in the Context of Mildly Increased Antithyroid Peroxidase Antibodies

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    Ludger Tebartz van Elst

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSchizophreniform syndromes can be divided into primary forms from polygenic causes or secondary forms due to immunological, epileptiform, monogenic, or degenerative causes. Steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT is a secondary immunological form associated with increased thyroid antibodies, such as antithyroid peroxidase antibodies and shows a good response to corticosteroids.Case presentationWe present the case of a 41-year-old woman suffering from a schizophreniform syndrome. Starting at the age of 35, she developed psychotic exacerbations with formal thought disorder, acoustic hallucinations, cenesthopathic experiences, and loss of ego boundaries. At the same time, she began to suffer from chronic sexual delusions and olfactory hallucinations, which did not respond to neuroleptic medication. Her levels of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were slightly increased, and the blood–brain barrier was disturbed. An electroencephalogram (EEG showed intermittent generalized slowing, and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI depicted mild temporolateral atrophy. High-dose corticosteroid treatment led to convincing improvement of attentional performance and the disappearance of delusions and olfactory hallucinations.ConclusionSREAT can mimic typical symptoms of schizophreniform syndromes. The increased titer of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies in combination with the EEG slowing, blood–brain barrier dysfunction, and the cMRI alterations were the basis for suspecting an immunological cause in our patient. Chronic delusions, olfactory hallucinations, and cognitive deficits were successfully treated with corticosteroids. The occurrence of secondary immunological forms of schizophreniform syndromes demonstrates the need for innovative immunosuppressive treatment options.

  5. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination.

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    Danielle E Baranova

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment.

  6. Antibody response against Trichinella spiralis in experimentally infected rats is dose dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Domestic pigs are the main representatives of the domestic cycle of Trichinella spiralis that play a role in transmission to humans. In Europe, backyard pigs of small household farms are the most important risks for humans to obtain trichinellosis. Rats might play a role in the transmission of Trichinella spiralis from domestic to sylvatic animals and vice versa. In order to be able to investigate the role of wild rats in the epidemiology of T. spiralis in The Netherlands, we studied the dynamics of antibody response after T. spiralis infections in experimental rats, using infection doses ranging from very low (10 muscle larvae, ML, per rat) to very high (16 000 ML per rat). To evaluate the feasibility of rats surviving high infection doses with T. spiralis, clinical and pathological parameters were quantified. Serological tools for detecting T. spiralis in rats were developed to quantitatively study the correlation between parasite load and immunological response. The results show that an infection dose-dependent antibody response was developed in rats after infection with as low as 10 ML up to a level of 10 000 ML. A positive correlation was found between the number of recovered ML and serum antibody levels, although specific measured antibody levels correspond to a wide range of LPG values. Serum antibodies of rats that were infected even with 10 or 25 ML could readily be detected by use of the T. spiralis western blot 2 weeks post infection. We conclude that based on these low infection doses, serologic tests are a useful tool to survey T. spiralis in wild rats. PMID:22129040

  7. B-cell abnormalities and impact on antibody response in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Alessandra; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present review is to provide an update on the current development in the field of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) and their potential use in the prevention and therapeutic settings, and an evaluation of the B-cell abnormalities that may impair antibody responses in HIV infection. Major advances have been achieved in the characterization of bNabs directed against different vulnerable regions of HIV Envelope (Env). Recent observations have clearly demonstrated the ability of bNabs to prevent HIV infection in the nonhuman primate model of HIV infection and to suppress viremia in individuals with chronic HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, substantial advances have also been obtained in the development of HIV Env proteins and immunization strategies inducing bNabs in small animal models. Several studies have also shed light on the B-cell abnormalities associated with the viremic phase of HIV infection that cause impaired B-cell maturation and antibody responses. Of note, preliminary observations have provided evidence for a correlation between the expansion of a specific population of B cells, for example, germinal center B cells, the expansion of T follicular helper cells (Tfh), and the generation of neutralizing antibodies. The recent observations on the antiviral effects of bNabs in vivo indicate that bNabs may play a central role in both the prevention and the therapeutic settings. The identification of the role of germinal center B cells and Tfh cells as critical components of the immune response leading to the generation of neutralizing antibodies, will allow the development of specific immunization strategies for the stimulation of germinal center B cells and Tfh cells. A lot of work still remains to be done for the delineation of B-cell and Tfh cell biology from human lymphoid tissues and in the development of HIV Env proteins and immunization strategies leading to the generation of bNabs.

  8. Regulation of IgE antibody production by serum molecules. I. Serum from complete Freund's adjuvant-immune donors suppresses irradiation-enhanced IgE production in low responder mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, A.S.; Chiorazzi, N.; Katz, D.H.

    1978-06-01

    Exposure of mice to low doses of x irradiation at or near the time of primary immunization with 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP)-Ascaris suum extract (ASC) results in substantial enhancement of IgE anti-DNP antibody responses; the IgG antibody responses of such mice do not increase after such manipulations. This selective enhancement of IgE antibody production occurs in mice of both high and low IgE responder phenotype, although the extent of enhancement compared to unmanipulated control animals is more striking in low IgE responder mice. The studies presented here demonstrate that the irradiation-enhanced IgE antibody responses of low responder SJL and C57BL/6 mice as well as of intermediate responder AKR mice can be effectively suppressed by passive transfer of CFA-immune serum obtained from isologous donor mice. Moreover, adoptive secondary IgE antibody responses in SJL recipients of primed syngeneic spleen cells can be totally abolished by passive transfer of CFA-immune serum or ascitic fluid from CFA-immune mice. The suppressive activity of CFA-immune serum can be diminished or eliminated by exposure of CFA-primed donor mice to low dose x irradiation at an appropriate point during the priming regimen, after a single inoculation of CFA, and before collection of serum. Low dose x irradiation was not effective in eliminating suppressive activity of CFA-induced ascites fluid obtained from donor mice inoculated repeatedly with CFA. In contrast to the capacity of CFA-immune serum from isologous donors to suppress irradiation-enhanced IgE responses of low responder mice, similar sera or ascites fluids were ineffective in suppressing irradiation-enhanced responses of high responder BALB/c or (SJL x BALB/c)F/sub 1/ hybrid mice.

  9. Respons Antibodi Sekunder Terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam Petelur Pascavaksinasi Ulangan dengan Vaksin Tetelo Aktif (NEWCASTLE DISEASESECONDARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE AFTER REVACCINATION IN LAYER WITH THE ACTIVE ND VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Budi Kurnianto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Revaccination is required in order to preventNewcastle Disease (ND reccurence inlayers chickens. Oneof vaccine for ND revaccination is freeze-died ND active vaccine containing e” 106,5EID50. Revaccinationisdone to trigger a faster secondary antibody responses in layers and can achieve protective antibody titersagainst ND that can be monitored by a hemagglutinationinhibition (HI. The aim of this study was todetermine the ND secondary antibody responses in layers after revaccination with ND active vaccine.Antibody titer of 20 layers chickens of 20 week old were determined before revaccinations (week 0 andafter revaccinations (week 1 until week 9. The first vaccination was conducted using ND-IB (NewcastleDisease-Infectious Bronchitis at the age of 2 days through eye drops and subcutaneous injection at the ageof 5 days using a dose of 1 ampoule.Vaccination is repeated at the age of 20 weeks at a dose of 1 ½ ampoule through drinking water. Blood samples were collected on the wing vein (venous cutane ulnar and left for 5-10 minutes at room temperature.Sera were then collected and stored at -20oC until use. HI antibody titerwas determined by micro titeration system. The HI mean titers were analyzed by Duncan test. The studyresults showed that antibody titer before revaccination was3,47 HI log 2 and the HI titers after revaccinationwere 4,02; 5,22; 6,52; 7,85; 8,4; 8,6; 7,7; 5,92; dan 3,87 HI log 2 respectivelly at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and9.The NDV revaccination with ND active vaccine significantly (P <0.01 increased in antibody titer inlayers starting from week 1 to week 6, but decreased following week 7 to week-9. It can be concluded thatrevaccinantion with ND active vaccine increases the antibody titers in layer chickens.

  10. Serum antibody responses to periodontal microbiota in chronic and aggressive periodontitis: a postulate revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Andrew M; Stoupel, Janet; Celenti, Romanita; Demmer, Ryan T; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-04-01

    The authors revisited the 1999 International Workshop postulate of robust serum antibody responses to infecting agents in localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) and weak responses in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). Antibody responses were further examined in localized and generalized chronic periodontitis (LCP and GCP). The study includes 119 patients (60 males and 59 females, aged 11 to 76 years), 18 with LAgP, 37 with GAgP, 37 with LCP, and 27 with GCP. Multiple subgingival plaque samples/patient (1,057 in total) were analyzed with respect to 11 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations, and serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels were measured against the same bacteria using checkerboard immunoblotting. Further, infection ratios (antibody level over the average bacterial colonization by the homologous species) were computed for each patient. Comparisons of bacterial colonization, serum IgG levels, and infection ratios were made across the diagnostic categories using multivariable linear regression models adjusting for age and race/ethnicity. There were no statistically significant differences in serum IgG levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among the four diagnostic categories. IgG levels to several species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Campylobacter rectus, were highest in patients with GAgP and significantly different from LCP and GCP, but not from LAgP. Comparisons based on infection ratios showed no statistically significant differences for any species between GAgP and LAgP. This study provides evidence against the 1999 Workshop's postulate of weak serum antibody responses in patients with GAgP and shows that serum IgG responses in GAgP are comparable to those in LAgP, but higher than in GCP or LCP for several species.

  11. Molecular signatures of antibody responses derived from a systems biology study of five human vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuzhao; Rouphael, Nadine; Duraisingham, Sai; Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Presnell, Scott; Davis, Carl; Schmidt, Daniel S; Johnson, Scott E; Milton, Andrea; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Kasturi, Sudhir; Carlone, George M; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien; Palucka, A Karolina; Mulligan, Mark J; Ahmed, Rafi; Stephens, David S; Nakaya, Helder I; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-02-01

    Many vaccines induce protective immunity via antibodies. Systems biology approaches have been used to determine signatures that can be used to predict vaccine-induced immunity in humans, but whether there is a 'universal signature' that can be used to predict antibody responses to any vaccine is unknown. Here we did systems analyses of immune responses to the polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines against meningococcus in healthy adults, in the broader context of published studies of vaccines against yellow fever virus and influenza virus. To achieve this, we did a large-scale network integration of publicly available human blood transcriptomes and systems-scale databases in specific biological contexts and deduced a set of transcription modules in blood. Those modules revealed distinct transcriptional signatures of antibody responses to different classes of vaccines, which provided key insights into primary viral, protein recall and anti-polysaccharide responses. Our results elucidate the early transcriptional programs that orchestrate vaccine immunity in humans and demonstrate the power of integrative network modeling.

  12. Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hoon; Raybuck, Ariel L; Stengel, Kristy; Wei, Mei; Beck, Thomas C; Volanakis, Emmanuel; Thomas, James W; Hiebert, Scott; Haase, Volker H; Boothby, Mark R

    2016-09-08

    Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.

  13. Precisely Molded Nanoparticle Displaying DENV-E Proteins Induces Robust Serotype-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic in over 120 countries, causing over 350 million infections per year. Dengue vaccine development is challenging because of the need to induce simultaneous protection against four antigenically distinct DENV serotypes and evidence that, under some conditions, vaccination can enhance disease due to specific immunity to the virus. While several live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus vaccines display partial efficacy, it has been challenging to induce balanced protective immunity to all 4 serotypes. Instead of using whole-virus formulations, we are exploring the potentials for a particulate subunit vaccine, based on DENV E-protein displayed on nanoparticles that have been precisely molded using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT technology. Here we describe immunization studies with a DENV2-nanoparticle vaccine candidate. The ectodomain of DENV2-E protein was expressed as a secreted recombinant protein (sRecE, purified and adsorbed to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles of different sizes and shape. We show that PRINT nanoparticle adsorbed sRecE without any adjuvant induces higher IgG titers and a more potent DENV2-specific neutralizing antibody response compared to the soluble sRecE protein alone. Antigen trafficking indicate that PRINT nanoparticle display of sRecE prolongs the bio-availability of the antigen in the draining lymph nodes by creating an antigen depot. Our results demonstrate that PRINT nanoparticles are a promising platform for delivering subunit vaccines against flaviviruses such as dengue and Zika.

  14. Elicitation of Robust Tier 2 Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Nonhuman Primates by HIV Envelope Trimer Immunization Using Optimized Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Sok, Devin; Nkolola, Joseph P; Bastidas, Raiza; Boopathy, Archana V; Carnathan, Diane G; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Cirelli, Kimberly M; Cottrell, Christopher A; Eroshkin, Alexey M; Guenaga, Javier; Kaushik, Kirti; Kulp, Daniel W; Liu, Jinyan; McCoy, Laura E; Oom, Aaron L; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Post, Kai W; Sharma, Shailendra K; Steichen, Jon M; de Taeye, Steven W; Tokatlian, Talar; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Butera, Salvatore T; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Silvestri, Guido; Wilson, Ian A; Irvine, Darrell J; Sanders, Rogier W; Schief, William R; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T; Barouch, Dan H; Crotty, Shane; Burton, Dennis R

    2017-06-20

    The development of stabilized recombinant HIV envelope trimers that mimic the virion surface molecule has increased enthusiasm for a neutralizing antibody (nAb)-based HIV vaccine. However, there is limited experience with recombinant trimers as immunogens in nonhuman primates, which are typically used as a model for humans. Here, we tested multiple immunogens and immunization strategies head-to-head to determine their impact on the quantity, quality, and kinetics of autologous tier 2 nAb development. A bilateral, adjuvanted, subcutaneous immunization protocol induced reproducible tier 2 nAb responses after only two immunizations 8 weeks apart, and these were further enhanced by a third immunization with BG505 SOSIP trimer. We identified immunogens that minimized non-neutralizing V3 responses and demonstrated that continuous immunogen delivery could enhance nAb responses. nAb responses were strongly associated with germinal center reactions, as assessed by lymph node fine needle aspiration. This study provides a framework for preclinical and clinical vaccine studies targeting nAb elicitation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fast response cavity enhanced ozone monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Gomez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an important atmospheric gas due to its role in air quality and radiative forcing. A new method for sensitive, rapid monitoring of ambient ozone has been developed using a compact platform and relatively inexpensive components. Based on incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB-CEAS, the device utilizes an optical cavity of just 14.5 cm and 99.3% reflective mirrors. Performance of the instrument has been validated against direct absorption measurements in a single-pass measurement cell. Currently, the IBB-CEAS ozone instrument can achieve ∼1 ppb sensitivities at 0.1 s integration time with a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude, accessing relevant ozone concentrations in both the stratosphere and troposphere. This new device offers improved sensitivity and time response for mapping ozone aboard airborne platforms.

  16. Understanding Transcriptional Enhancement in Monoclonal Antibody-Producing Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Sarah E.

    With the demand for monoclonal antibody (mAB) therapeutics continually increasing, the need to better understand what makes a high productivity clone has gained substantial interest. Monoclonal antibody producing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with different productivities were provided by a biopharmaceutical company for investigation. Gene copy numbers, mRNA levels, and mAb productivities were previously determined for two low producing clones and their amplified progeny. These results showed an increase in mRNA copy number in amplified clones, which correlated to the observed increases in specific productivity of these clones. The presence of multiple copies of mRNA per one copy of DNA in the higher productivity clones has been coined as transcriptional enhancement. The methylation status of the CMV promoter as well as transcription factor/promoter interactions were evaluated to determine the cause of transcriptional enhancement. Methylation analysis via bisulfite sequencing revealed no significant difference in overall methylation status of the CMV promoter. These data did, however, reveal the possibility of differential interactions of transcription factors between the high and low productivity cell clones. This finding was further supported by chromatin immunoprecipitations previously performed in the lab, as well as literature studies. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) binding proteins were constructed and utilized to selectively immunoprecipitate the CMV promoter along with its associated transcription factors in the different CHO cell clones. Cells were transfected with the TALE proteins, harvested and subjected to a ChIP-like procedure. Results obtained from the TALE ChIP demonstrated the lack of binding of the protein to the promoter and the need to redesign the TALE. Overall, results obtained from this study were unable to give a clear indication as to the causes of transcriptional enhancement in the amplified CHO cell clones. Further

  17. Antibody Response to Actinomyces Antigen and Dental Caries Experience: Implications for Caries Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L.; Avery, Kevin T.

    2005-01-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health and exposure to fluoridated water. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between A-Ab response, oral hygiene, S-Ab response, and caries experience. Measurements were made of A-Ab and S-Ab concentrations, caries experience (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth [DMFT], number of teeth surfaces [DMFS], and number of decayed teeth needing treated [DT]), exposure to fluoridated water (Flu), mean clinical pocket depth (PD; in millimeters), and extent of plaque (PL) and gingival bleeding on probing (BOP). A-Ab concentration, the dependent variable in a multiple regression analysis, increased with S-Ab concentration and decreased with PL and DMFT adjusted for Flu (R2 = 0.51, P < 0.002). Residual associations with age, DMFS, DT, and BOP were not significant. In addition, an elevated A-Ab response, defined from immunoprecipitation and immunoassay measurements, indicated a significant, 30% reduction in DMFT after adjustment for significant age and Flu covariance (analysis of variance with covariance F statistic = 10.6, P < 0.003; S-Ab response and interactions not significant). Thus, an elevated A-Ab response indicates less caries in subjects performing effective oral hygiene using fluoridated dentifrices. Conversely, a low A-Ab response is suggestive of decreased A. naeslundii binding to saliva-coated apatite and greater caries experience, as reported by others. PMID:15939752

  18. Mixed adjuvant formulations reveal a new combination that elicit antibody response comparable to Freund's adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    Full Text Available Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA, are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (p<0.05. Sequential prime-boost immunizations with different adjuvants did not offer improvements over the use of FCA/FIA or MF59. Remarkably however, the concurrent use of the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (p<0.05. This combination was not associated with any obvious local or systemic adverse effects. Antibody competition indicated that the majority of the neutralizing activities were directed to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Increased antibody titers to the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER and gp120 V3 were detected when the more potent adjuvants were used. These data reveal that the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes.

  19. Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarthi, Usha K; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Widman, Douglas; Gallichotte, Emily; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Steve S; Baric, Ralph; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-03-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses

  20. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    also enhanced infection, a human/mouse chimeric antibody and a fully humanized antibody had no enhancing effect on free virus infection. We suggest that binding of anti-Le(y) ABL 364 or its F(ab)2 fragment induced a conformational change in the gp120 oligomers facilitating the process of infection......, and that this function was abrogated by the IgG1 Fc of the chimeric and the humanized antibodies. The observations indicate that the non-paratope domains of antiviral antibodies can influence their function as neutralizing or enhancing for infection....

  1. Intranasal administration of antibody-bound respiratory syncytial virus particles efficiently primes virus-specific immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijsen, Debby; Einarsdottir, Helga K; Schijf, Marcel A; Coenjaerts, Frank E; van der Schoot, Ellen C; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Bleek, Grada M

    2013-07-01

    Infants are protected from a severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in the first months of life by maternal antibodies or by prophylactically administered neutralizing antibodies. Efforts are under way to produce RSV-specific antibodies with increased neutralizing capacity compared to the currently licensed palivizumab. While clearly beneficial during primary infections, preexisting antibodies might affect the onset of adaptive immune responses and the ability to resist subsequent RSV infections. Therefore, we addressed the question of how virus neutralizing antibodies influence the priming of subsequent adaptive immune responses. To test a possible role of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in this process, we compared the responses in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and FcRn(-/-) mice. We observed substantial virus-specific T-cell priming and B-cell responses in mice primed with RSV IgG immune complexes resulting in predominantly Th1-type CD4(+) T-cell and IgG2c antibody responses upon live-virus challenge. RSV-specific CD8(+) T cells were primed as well. Activation of these adaptive immune responses was independent of FcRn. Thus, neutralizing antibodies that localize to the airways and prevent infection-related routes of antigen processing can still facilitate antigen presentation of neutralized virus particles and initiate adaptive immune responses against RSV.

  2. Antibody Responses in the Nonhuman Primate, Macaca Fascicularis, to Protein Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    avidity in rabbits after immunization with dinitrophenyl bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) using equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence quenching...MacDonald (1988) compared this modified EUSA to a very accurate contemporary but more cumbersome technique (equilibrium dialysis ) and demonstrated similar...antibody does not necessarily confer functional adequacy. The response must fulfill tr-e criteria in order to confront the antigenic challenge

  3. Systemic antibody response to nano-size calcium phospate biocompatible adjuvant adsorbed HEV-71 killed vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed, Mohamed Ibrahim; Omar, Abd Rahaman; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Elkhidir, Isam Mohamed; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Since 1980s, human enterovirus-71 virus (HEV-71) is one of the common infectious disease in Asian Pacific region since late 1970s without effective commercial antiviral or protective vaccine is unavailable yet. The work examines the role of vaccine adjuvant particle size and the route of administration on postvaccination antibody response towards HEV-71 vaccine adsorbed to calcium phosphate (CaP) adjuvant. Materials and Methods First, CaP nano-particles were compared to a commercial m...

  4. Observed parent-child relationship quality predicts antibody response to vaccination in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Wang, Hongyue; Moynihan, Jan A; Wyman, Peter A; Carnahan, Jennifer; Lofthus, Gerry; Quataert, Sally A; Bowman, Melissa; Burke, Anne S; Caserta, Mary T

    2015-08-01

    Quality of the parent-child relationship is a robust predictor of behavioral and emotional health for children and adolescents; the application to physical health is less clear. We investigated the links between observed parent-child relationship quality in an interaction task and antibody response to meningococcal conjugate vaccine in a longitudinal study of 164 ambulatory 10-11 year-old children; additional analyses examine associations with cortisol reactivity, BMI, and somatic illness. Observed Negative/Conflict behavior in the interaction task predicted a less robust antibody response to meningococcal serotype C vaccine in the child over a 6 month-period, after controlling for socio-economic and other covariates. Observer rated interaction conflict also predicted increased cortisol reactivity following the interaction task and higher BMI, but these factors did not account for the link between relationship quality and antibody response. The results begin to document the degree to which a major source of child stress exposure, parent-child relationship conflict, is associated with altered immune system development in children, and may constitute an important public health consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antibody response to booster vaccination with tetanus and diphtheria in adults exposed to perfluorinated alkylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P; Nielsen, Flemming; Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Heilmann, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) may induce immunosuppression in humans and animal models. In this exploratory study, 12 healthy adult volunteers were recruited. With each subject, serum-PFAS concentrations were measured and their antibody responses prospectively followed for 30 days after a booster vaccination with diphtheria and tetanus. The results indicated that serum-PFAS concentrations were positively correlated and positively associated with age and male sex. The specific antibody concentrations in serum were increased from Day 4 to Day 10 post-booster, after which a constant concentration was reached. Serum PFAS concentrations showed significant negative associations with the rate of increase in the antibody responses. Interestingly, this effect was particularly strong for the longer-chain PFASs. All significant associations remained significant after adjustment for sex and age. Although the study involved a small number of subjects, these findings of a PFAS-associated reduction of the early humoral immune response to booster vaccination in healthy adults supported previous findings of PFAS immunosuppression in larger cohorts. Furthermore, the results suggested that cellular mechanisms right after antigen exposure should be investigated more closely to identify possible mechanisms of immunosuppression from PFAS.

  6. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  7. Antibody responses to Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein in a porcine model: relevance to immunodiagnosis of recent infection.

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    Melanie Rampton

    Full Text Available No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA. Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8-16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations.

  8. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  9. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-06

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed.

  10. Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody and cytokine responses in Bangladeshi children with rotavirus diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Tasnim; Zaki, M Hasan; Podder, Goutam; Sultana, Novera; Salam, M Abdus; Rahman, S Moshfiqur; Sefat-e-Khuda; Sack, David A

    2003-02-01

    Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody responses and cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-10, were measured in children 7-24 months of age with rotavirus diarrhoea (n = 29); the responses were compared with children with watery diarrhoea from whom no enteric pathogens were isolated (controls; n = 11). All children had diarrhoea for or = 4-fold rise in antibody titre between the acute and convalescent stages were considered to have a response. The numbers of children with rotavirus-specific IgA and IgA1 responses in stool were similar in the two groups of children. In the plasma, more children with rotavirus diarrhoea had rotavirus-specific IgA, IgA1, IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 responses than did control children (P = 0.049, 0.007, 0.001, 0.002, and 0.012, respectively). IgA2 was not detectable. Among cytokines measured in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured for 6 and 24 hr, IFN-gamma was the only cytokine that was higher in children with rotavirus diarrhoea compared with controls (P = 0.013). Severity of illness did not correlate with nutritional status or antibody titres, but severity did correlate with TNF-alpha during the acute stage of illness. IFN-gamma correlated positively with IgG1 titres. These findings suggest a role for IFN-gamma in the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection, but this needs confirmation by other studies. The immune responses described are relevant to future vaccine trials, as immune responses in vaccinees should mimic those in natural infection.

  11. Enhanced antigen detection in immunohistochemical staining using a 'digitized' chimeric antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Hui-Yan; Wang, Cheng-I; Xue, Yuezhen; Lee, Chia-Yin; Zulkifli, Sarah Binte; Chiam, Poh-Cheang; Ghadessy, Farid J; Lane, David P

    2016-01-01

    The immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of mouse tissue sections using antibodies of mouse origin can result in high nonspecific background due to the staining of endogenous immunoglobulins (Igs) by enzyme-conjugated secondary antibodies. In order to obviate this issue, we developed a chimeric mouse-human anti-p53 monoclonal antibody (MH242) by grafting the variable regions of a known mouse antibody into a human Ig scaffold. This facilitated use of an anti-human secondary antibody, and resulted in near-zero background when compared with its parental mouse monoclonal antibody (PAb242). Furthermore, the chimeric antibody enabled reproducible detection of mutant p53 (homozygous R172H) expression in mouse tissue, an observation hitherto largely equivocal based on the use of existing antibodies. The approach we describe leads to the generation of tractable antibody reagents, whose integrity can be readily verified through DNA sequencing of expressor plasmids. The wide-spread adoption of such 'digitized' antibodies should reduce experimental disparities that can commonly arise through variations in antibody quality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Enzymatic Inactivation of Endogenous IgG by IdeS Enhances Therapeutic Antibody Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järnum, Sofia; Runström, Anna; Bockermann, Robert; Winstedt, Lena; Crispin, Max; Kjellman, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Endogenous plasma IgG sets an immunologic threshold that dictates the activity of tumor-directed therapeutic antibodies. Saturation of cellular antibody receptors by endogenous antibody limits antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Here, we show how enzymatic cleavage of IgG using the bacterial enzyme IdeS can be utilized to empty both high and low affinity Fcγ-receptors and clear the entire endogenous antibody pool. Using in vitro models, tumor animal models as well as ex vivo analysis of sera collected during a previous clinical trial with IdeS, we show how clearing of competing plasma antibody levels with IdeS unblocks cellular antibody receptors. We show that therapeutic antibodies against breast cancer (trastuzumab), colon cancer (cetuximab), and lymphomas (rituximab and alemtuzumab) can be potentiated when endogenous IgG is removed. Overall, IdeS is shown to be a potent tool to reboot the human antibody repertoire and to generate a window to preferentially load therapeutic antibodies onto effector cells and thereby create an armada of dedicated tumor-seeking immune cells. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(9); 1887-97. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Modulation of innate immune responses by influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies used for prophylaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Rinaldi

    Full Text Available In the event of a novel influenza A virus pandemic, prophylaxis mediated by antibodies provides an adjunct control option to vaccines and antivirals. This strategy is particularly pertinent to unvaccinated populations at risk during the lag time to produce and distribute an effective vaccine. Therefore, development of effective prophylactic therapies is of high importance. Although previous approaches have used systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies or convalescent sera, available supply is a serious limitation. Here, we have investigated intranasal delivery of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal IgG antibodies for their efficacy against homologous influenza virus challenge in a mouse model. Both influenza-specific IgG and F(ab'2 reduced clinical scores, body weight loss and lung viral loads in mice treated 1 hour before virus exposure. Full protection from disease was also observed when antibody was delivered up to 3 days prior to virus infection. Furthermore, effective prophylaxis was independent of a strong innate immune response. This strategy presents a further option for prophylactic intervention against influenza A virus using ruminants to generate a bulk supply that could potentially be used in a pandemic setting, to slow virus transmission and reduce morbidity associated with a high cytokine phenotype.

  14. Impaired antibody response causes persistence of prototypic T cell-contained virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bergthaler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cells are recognized key players in control of persistent virus infections, but increasing evidence suggests that assistance from other immune mediators is also needed. Here, we investigated whether specific antibody responses contribute to control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, a prototypic mouse model of systemic persistent infection. Mice expressing transgenic B cell receptors of LCMV-unrelated specificity, and mice unable to produce soluble immunoglobulin M (IgM exhibited protracted viremia or failed to resolve LCMV. Virus control depended on immunoglobulin class switch, but neither on complement cascades nor on Fc receptor gamma chain or Fc gamma receptor IIB. Cessation of viremia concurred with the emergence of viral envelope-specific antibodies, rather than with neutralizing serum activity, and even early nonneutralizing IgM impeded viral persistence. This important role for virus-specific antibodies may be similarly underappreciated in other primarily T cell-controlled infections such as HIV and hepatitis C virus, and we suggest this contribution of antibodies be given consideration in future strategies for vaccination and immunotherapy.

  15. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  16. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  17. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Norton

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1 to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1, on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1. We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV, rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3 focus forming units (ffu/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a

  18. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, James E; Lytle, Andrew G; Shen, Shixue; Tzvetkov, Evgeni P; Dorfmeier, Corin L; McGettigan, James P

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1), on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1). We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV), rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3) focus forming units (ffu)/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a single-dose RABV

  19. Neutralizing antibody responses against autologous and heterologous viruses in acute versus chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection: evidence for a constraint on the ability of HIV to completely evade neutralizing antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G; Schweighardt, Becky; Wrin, Terri; Galovich, Justin; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hunt, Peter; McCune, Joseph M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Petropoulos, Christos J; Hecht, Frederick M

    2006-06-01

    Acute human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with the rapid development of neutralization escape mutations. The degree to which viral evolution persists in chronic infection has not been well characterized, nor is it clear if all patients develop high-level neutralization antibody escape. We therefore measured neutralizing antibody responses against autologous and heterologous viruses in a cohort of acutely and chronically infected subjects (n = 65). Neutralizing antibody responses against both autologous virus and heterologous viruses were lower among individuals with acute infection than among those with chronic infection. Among chronically infected individuals, there was a negative correlation between the level of neutralizing antibodies against autologous virus and the level of viremia. In contrast, there was a positive correlation between the level of neutralizing antibodies against a panel of heterologous viruses and the level of viremia. Viral evolution, as defined by the presence of higher neutralizing titers directed against earlier viruses than against contemporaneous viruses, was evident for subjects with recent infection but absent for those with chronic infection. In summary, neutralizing antibody responses against contemporaneous autologous viruses are absent in early HIV infection but can be detected at low levels in chronic infection, particularly among those controlling HIV in the absence of therapy. HIV replication either directly or indirectly drives the production of increasing levels of antibodies that cross-neutralize heterologous primary isolates. Collectively, these observations indicate that although HIV continuously drives the production of neutralizing antibodies, there may be limits to the capacity of the virus to evolve continuously in response to these antibodies. These observations also suggest that the neutralizing antibody response may contribute to the long-term control of HIV in some patients while protecting

  20. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  1. Immunotargeting with CD154 (CD40 ligand) enhances DNA vaccine responses in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gares, Sheryl L; Fischer, Karl P; Congly, Stephen E; Lacoste, Stacey; Addison, William R; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Gutfreund, Klaus S

    2006-08-01

    Engagement of CD154 on activated T cells with CD40 on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) potentiates adaptive immune responses in mammals. Soluble multimeric forms of CD154 have been used as an adjuvant or in immunotargeting strategies to enhance vaccine responses. The objective of our study was to examine the ability of duck CD154 (DuCD154) to enhance DNA vaccine responses in the duck hepatitis B model. Constructs were generated to express the functional domain of DuCD154 (tCD154), truncated duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core antigen (tcore) and chimera of tcore fused to tCD154 (tcore-tCD154). Expression in LMH cells demonstrated that all proteins were secreted and that tCD154 and tcore-tCD154 formed multimers. Ducks immunized with the plasmid ptcore-tCD154 developed accelerated and enhanced core-specific antibody responses compared to ducks immunized with ptcore or ptcore plus ptCD154. Antibody responses were better sustained in both ptcore-tCD154- and ptcore plus ptCD154-immunized ducks. Core-specific proliferative responses of duck peripheral blood mononuclear cells were enhanced in ducks immunized with ptcore-tCD154 or ptcore alone. This study suggests that the role of CD154 in the regulation of adaptive immune responses had already evolved before the divergence of birds and mammals. Thus, targeting of antigens to APCs with CD154 is an effective strategy to enhance DNA vaccine responses not only in mammalian species but also in avian species.

  2. The allergy adjuvant effect of particles – genetic factors influence antibody and cytokine responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Løvik Martinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing epidemiological and experimental evidence for an aggravating effect of particulate air pollution on asthma and allergic symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on allergic sensitization. Genetic factors appear to influence not only the magnitude, but also the quality of the adjuvant effect of particles with respect to allergen-specific IgE (Th2-associated and IgG2a (Th1-associated responses. In the present study, we aimed to investigate how the genetic background influences the responses to the allergen and particles alone and in combination. We examined how polystyrene particles (PSP affected the IgE and IgG2a responses against the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA, after subcutaneous injection into the footpad of BALB/cA, BALB/cJ, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, Further, ex vivo IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokine secretion by Con A-stimulated cells from the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN five days after injection of OVA and PSP separately or in combination was determined. Results PSP injected with OVA increased the levels of OVA-specific IgE antibodies in all strains examined. In contrast, the IgG2a levels were significantly increased only in NIH and C3H/HeN mice. PSP in the presence of OVA increased cell numbers and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels in BALB/cA, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, with the exception of IFN-γ in NIH mice. However, each mouse strain had their unique pattern of response to OVA+PSP, OVA and PSP, and also their unique background cytokine response (i.e. the cytokine response in cells from mice injected with buffer only. Conclusion Genetic factors (i.e. the strain of mice influenced the susceptibility to the adjuvant effect of PSP on both secondary antibody responses and primary cellular responses in the lymph node, as well as the cellular responses to both OVA and PSP given separately. Interestingly, PSP alone induced cytokine responses in the lymph node in some of the mouse strains. Furthermore, we found that

  3. HDAC inhibitors enhance neratinib activity and when combined enhance the actions of an anti-PD-1 immunomodulatory antibody in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Poklepovic, Andrew; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Dent, Paul

    2017-10-27

    Patients whose NSCLC tumors become afatinib resistant presently have few effective therapeutic options to extend their survival. Afatinib resistant NSCLC cells were sensitive to clinically relevant concentrations of the irreversible pan-HER inhibitor neratinib, but not by the first generation ERBB1/2/4 inhibitor lapatinib. In multiple afatinib resistant NSCLC clones, HDAC inhibitors reduced the expression of ERBB1/3/4, but activated c-SRC, which resulted in higher total levels of ERBB1/3 phosphorylation. Neratinib also rapidly reduced the expression of ERBB1/2/3/4, c-MET and of mutant K-/N-RAS; K-RAS co-localized with phosphorylated ATG13 and with cathepsin B in vesicles. Combined exposure of cells to [neratinib + HDAC inhibitors] caused inactivation of mTORC1 and mTORC2, enhanced autophagosome and subsequently autolysosome formation, and caused an additive to greater than additive induction of cell death. Knock down of Beclin1 or ATG5 prevented HDAC inhibitors or neratinib from reducing ERBB1/3/4 and K-/N-RAS expression and reduced [neratinib + HDAC inhibitor] lethality. Neratinib and HDAC inhibitors reduced the expression of multiple HDAC proteins via autophagy that was causal in the reduced expression of PD-L1, PD-L2 and ornithine decarboxylase, and increased expression of Class I MHCA. In vivo, neratinib and HDAC inhibitors interacted to suppress the growth of 4T1 mammary tumors, an effect that was enhanced by an anti-PD-1 antibody. Our data support the premises that neratinib lethality can be enhanced by HDAC inhibitors, that neratinib may be a useful therapeutic tool in afatinib resistant NSCLC, and that [neratinib + HDAC inhibitor] exposure facilitates anti-tumor immune responses.

  4. The IgM Response to Modified LDL in Experimental Atherosclerosis Hypochlorite-modified LDL IgM Antibodies versus Classical Natural T15 IgM Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Damoiseaux, Jan; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Heeringa, Peter; Gijbels, Marion; de Winther, Menno; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It is hypothesized that IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL are anti-atherogenic. Myeloperoxidase from plaque-infiltrating neutrophils catalyzes the production of hypochlorite (HOCl), which oxidizes LDL. Here we study the IgM response to HOCl-modified LDL in comparison to titers of T15

  5. The IgM response to modified LDL in experimental atherosclerosis: hypochlorite-modified LDL IgM antibodies versus classical natural T15 IgM antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Damoiseaux, Jan; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Heeringa, Peter; Gijbels, Marion; de Winther, Menno; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen

    2009-01-01

    It is hypothesized that IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL are anti-atherogenic. Myeloperoxidase from plaque-infiltrating neutrophils catalyzes the production of hypochlorite (HOCl), which oxidizes LDL. Here we study the IgM response to HOCl-modified LDL in comparison to titers of T15 clonotypic natural

  6. Combining Active Immunization with Monoclonal Antibody Therapy To Facilitate Early Initiation of a Long-Acting Anti-Methamphetamine Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambuchen, Michael D; Carroll, F Ivy; Rüedi-Bettschen, Daniela; Hendrickson, Howard P; Hennings, Leah J; Blough, Bruce E; Brieaddy, Lawrence E; Pidaparthi, Ramakrishna R; Owens, S Michael

    2015-06-11

    We hypothesized that an anti-METH mAb could be used in combination with a METH-conjugate vaccine (MCV) to safely improve the overall quality and magnitude of the anti-METH immune response. The benefits would include immediate onset of action (from the mAb), timely increases in the immune responses (from the combined therapy) and duration of antibody response that could last for months (from the MCV). A novel METH-like hapten (METH-SSOO9) was synthesized and then conjugated to immunocyanin monomers of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (IC(KLH)) to create the MCV ICKLH-SOO9. The vaccine, in combination with previously discovered anti-METH mAb7F9, was then tested in rats for safety and potential efficacy. The combination antibody therapy allowed safe achievement of an early high anti-METH antibody response, which persisted throughout the study. Indeed, even after 4 months the METH vaccine antibodies still had the capacity to significantly reduce METH brain concentrations resulting from a 0.56 mg/kg METH dose.

  7. Kinetics of circulating antibody response to Trichomonas vaginalis: clinical and diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton Nu, Phuong Anh; Rappelli, Paola; Dessì, Daniele; Nguyen, Vu Quoc Huy; Fiori, Pier Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Persistence of antibodies against pathogens after antimicrobial treatment is a marker of therapy failure or evolution to a chronic infection. The kinetics of antibody production decrease following antigen elimination is highly variable, and predicting the duration of soluble immunity in infectious diseases is often impossible. This hampers the development and use of immunoassays for diagnostic and seroepidemiological purposes. In the case of Trichomonas vaginalis infection, the kinetics of antibody levels decrease following therapy has never been studied. We thus investigated the clearance of circulating anti-T. vaginalis IgGs after pharmacological treatment in patients affected by trichomoniasis. 18 female patients affected by acute trichomoniasis were enrolled in this study. After metronidazole therapy administration, subjects were followed up monthly up to 5 months, and serum levels of anti-T. vaginalis IgGs were measured by ELISA. We showed that a successful therapy is characterised by a relatively fast decline of specific antibodies, until turning into negative by ELISA in 1-3 months. In a few patients we observed that the persistence of anti-T. vaginalis antibodies was associated with an evolution to chronic infection, which may be due to treatment failure or to reinfection by untreated sexual partners. Our results describe the direct correlation between the decline of a specific humoral anti-T. vaginalis response and an effective antimicrobial therapy. These findings may facilitate the follow-up approach to circumvent limitations in developing new diagnostic tools and techniques routinely used in microbiology laboratories to assess the presence of T. vaginalis in clinical samples. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. λ Light Chain Bias Associated With Enhanced Binding and Function of Anti-HIV Env Glycoprotein Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Farshidpour, Maham; Brown, Eric P; Ouyang, Xin; Seaman, Michael S; Pazgier, Marzena; Ackerman, Margaret E; Robinson, Harriet; Tomaras, Georgia; Parsons, Matthew S; Charurat, Manhattan; DeVico, Anthony L; Redfield, Robert R; Lewis, George K

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains incompletely understood. In this report, we describe biased λ light chain use during the HIV Env glycoprotein (Env) response in HIV infection and vaccination. We examined HIV Env binding (and neutralization) in the context of light chain use in subjects with acute HIV infection, chronic HIV infection, and among HIV vaccinees. In all populations tested, there was a λ chain bias for HIV Env binding antibodies, compared with other HIV antigens (such as p24) or tetanus toxoid. In subjects with chronic HIV infection, a λ bias was noted for neutralization, with λ antibodies accounting for up to 90% of all neutralization activity observed. This is the first report of antibody function in a human infection being tied to light chain use. In HIV infection, antibodies expressing λ light chains tended to have longer CDRL3s, increased light chain contact with HIV Env, and less hypermutation in the heavy chain, compared with antibodies using the κ light chain. These data also support an evolutionary model for the understanding the various κ to λ light chain ratios observed across species and suggest that the λ light chain bias against HIV provides the host an advantage in developing a more efficient humoral response. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients......(264-272) in breast cancer patients and against HLA-A*01:01 binding peptide wt p53(226-234) and HLA-B*07:02 binding peptide wt p53(74-82) in renal cell cancer and breast cancer patients, respectively. Finally, we analyzed antibody and T-cell responses against wt p53 15-mer peptides in patients with metastatic renal...

  10. Mixed Adjuvant Formulations Reveal a New Combination That Elicit Antibody Response Comparable to Freund's Adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Tonks, Paul; Wegmann, Frank; Seilly, David J.; Frost, Simon D. W.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Dey, Antu K.; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Sattentau, Quentin; Barnett, Susan W.; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA), are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (pCarbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (pCarbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes. PMID:22509385

  11. Mixed adjuvant formulations reveal a new combination that elicit antibody response comparable to Freund's adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Rachel P J; Seaman, Michael S; Tonks, Paul; Wegmann, Frank; Seilly, David J; Frost, Simon D W; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Dey, Antu K; Srivastava, Indresh K; Sattentau, Quentin; Barnett, Susan W; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA), are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (pCarbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (pCarbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes.

  12. LOCAL ANTIBODY AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES TO INFLUENZA INFECTION AND VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Petukhova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Local immune responses of mucous membranes of an organism are the first and most significant barriers preventing many virus infections, including influenza. The barrier against influenza infection is the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue of the upper airways. It is considered, that nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT in rodents is an equivalent of lymphoid tissue in human Waldeyer’s ring. Present work is the first attempt to analyze and compare the development of cellular and antibody immune responses in NALT in a mouse model of experimental influenza infection using a pathogenic influenza A (H1N1 virus and an attenuated reassorted (2/6 genetic formula live influenza A (H1N1 vaccine.It was shown, that the vaccine strain inherits the ability to induce high-grade local antibody responses like as the virulent parental strain. However, the vaccine strain is inferior to virulent parental strain in capacity to stimulate production of circulating antibodies. Both parental and Р 2/6 strains are equally able to induce lymphoproliferative immune response in NALT lymphocytes. The attenuated reassortant virus is able to stimulate proliferation of Th (CD4+, B-cells (CD19+ and CTL (CD8+ in NALT. As shown by the cytokine activity testing (IFN-γ, IL-6, the attenuated reassortant virus activates both Th1- and Th2-lymphocytes in NALT.This data suggest that intranasal immunization with live attenuated reassortant viruses (genetic formula 2/6 results into active and balanced stimulation of both Th1-and Th2-immune responses at the primary site of infection (NALT.

  13. Oral administration of transgenic barley expressing a Culicoides allergen induces specific antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, S; Svansson, V; Stefansdottir, S B; Mäntylä, E; Marti, E; Torsteinsdottir, S

    2017-07-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity is an immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated dermatitis of horses initiated by bites of midges of the genus Culicoides. Culicoides spp. are not indigenous to Iceland and the prevalence of insect bite hypersensitivity is much higher in horses born in Iceland and exported as compared to Icelandic horses born in a Culicoides rich environment. Immunotherapy is therefore needed. The aim of the study was to express an allergen from Culicoides in barley grain and investigate whether an immune response could be obtained in healthy Icelandic horses by oral treatment with transgenic barley expressing the allergen. In vivo experiment. The allergen was expressed in barley grain with the Orfeus technique. A device was developed to treat horses orally with barley flour. Four Icelandic horses were treated with transgenic barley and 3 with control barley, in total 500 g in 7 feedings. Serum and saliva samples were collected for measuring specific antibodies. The allergen Cul n 2, a hyaluronidase originating from the salivary gland of Culicoides nubeculosus, was expressed in barley. Horses treated with the transgenic barley mounted a Cul n 2 specific IgG1 and IgG4/7 response in serum and saliva. The serum response was significantly different between the transgenic and control barley treated horses for both subclasses and the saliva response for IgG1. The induced serum antibodies bound to the corresponding allergen from Culicoides obsoletus, rCul o 2 and were able to partially block binding of Cul n 2 as well as Cul o 2 specific IgE from insect bite hypersensitivity affected horses. Small number of horses. This study shows that specific antibody response can be induced in horses not exposed to Culicoides, using oral treatment with transgenic barley expressing an allergen. Further studies will determine whether this approach is a useful alternative for prevention and treatment of equine insect bite hypersensitivity. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Phenotypic responses of chickens to long-term selection for high or low antibody titers to sheep red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X L; Honaker, C F; Siegel, P B

    2012-05-01

    A long-term bidirectional selection experiment was conducted to study antibody response to SRBC. Lines, high antibody selection (HAS) and low antibody selection (LAS), originating from the same White Leghorn base population had undergone 37 generations of selection for either high or low antibody response 5 d after a single intravenous injection of 0.1 mL of a 0.25% suspension of SRBC antigen. Subpopulations, where selection was relaxed, were maintained as contemporaries with the selected lines from generations 16 to 24 [high antibody relaxed (HAR) and low antibody relaxed (LAR)] and 24 to 37. Body weights were obtained at 4, 24, and 38 wk of age and at the onset of lay (BW at first egg). Also measured were age in days to first egg, percentages of hen-day ovulations and normal egg production, and percentages of normal and defective eggs from total ovulation (PNE and PDE). Selection lead to a large divergence in antibody titers between the selected lines, with a plateau reached in line LAS. Line HAS and HAR females displayed higher antibody titers, lower BW4, and matured at older ages than those from LAS and LAR (P selected lines, being positive in line LAS and negative in line HAS. Quadratic regression models fit well with antibody titers, BW4, and PNE, with limiting values for these traits calculated based on regression curves. For line HAS, plots showed that an increased tendency of antibody titers was followed by decreased BW4 and increased PNE. For line LAS, however, antibody titers and BW4 decreased in parallel while PNE increased. It appears that at the phenotypic level there was a resource balance between immune response, growth, and reproductive traits, which during long-term selection, individuals altered their dynamic of resource allocations to satisfy certain needs.

  15. Small amounts of sub-visible aggregates enhance the immunogenic potential of monoclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Bryson, Christine J; Cloake, Edward A; Welch, Katie; Filipe, Vasco; Romeijn, Stefan; Hawe, Andrea; Jiskoot, Wim; Baker, Matthew P; Fogg, Mark H

    2015-04-01

    Determine the effect of minute quantities of sub-visible aggregates on the in vitro immunogenicity of clinically relevant protein therapeutics. Monoclonal chimeric (rituximab) and humanized (trastuzumab) antibodies were subjected to fine-tuned stress conditions to achieve low levels (aggregates. The effect of stimulating human dendritic cells (DC) and CD4(+) T cells with the aggregates was measured in vitro using cytokine secretion, proliferation and confocal microscopy. Due to its intrinsic high clinical immunogenicity, aggregation of rituximab had minimal effects on DC activation and T cell responses compared to monomeric rituximab. However, in the case of trastuzumab (low clinical immunogenicity) small quantities of aggregates led to potent CD4(+) T cell proliferation as a result of strong cytokine and co-stimulatory signals derived from DC. Consistent with this, confocal studies showed that stir-stressed rituximab was rapidly internalised and associated with late endosomes of DC. These data link minute amounts of aggregates with activation of the innate immune response, involving DC, resulting in T cell activation. Thus, when protein therapeutics with little or no clinical immunogenicity, such as trastuzumab, contain minute amounts of sub-visible aggregates, they are associated with significantly increased potential risk of clinical immunogenicity.

  16. Anti-α-galactosidase A antibody response to agalsidase beta treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Linthorst, Gabor E; Germain, Dominique P

    2012-01-01

    Agalsidase beta, a form of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (αGAL), is approved for use as enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease. An immunogenic response against a therapeutic protein could potentially impact its efficacy or safety. The development of anti-αGAL IgG antibodies...... was evaluated in 571 men and 251 women from the Fabry Registry who were treated with agalsidase beta. Most men developed antibodies (416 of 571, 73%), whereas most women did not (31 of 251, 12%). Women were also significantly more likely to tolerize than men; whereas 18 of 31 women tolerized (58%, 95%CI: 52...... were more likely to experience IARs compared to those who remained seronegative. Nine percent of seronegative men and women (34 of 375) reported IARs. The majority of IARs occurred during the first 6 to 12 months of agalsidase beta treatment and decreased over time, in both seroconverted...

  17. The antibody response to Dracunculus medinensis in an endemic human population of northern Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, P.; Simonsen, P. E.; Vennervald, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    The serum antibody response (total, and isotypes IgG1, IgG4, IgM, IgA and IgE) to Guinea worm infection was examined in humans from a highly endemic area of northern Ghana by ELISA and SDS-PAGE/Western blot techniques using an adult D. medinensis antigen. Sera were obtained early and late...... worm from patients with hookworm, O. voivuhis and W. bancrofti infections, and from noninfected controls. Sera from persons living in the Guinea worm endemic area reacted extensively with Guinea worm antigen in both tests, and large numbers of bands were produced in the Western blots (up to 35...... and postpatent categories. The highest specificity in the ELISA and the most homogenous Western blots were obtained when detecting for antibodies of the IgG4 isotype....

  18. HIV-antibody complexes enhance production of type I interferon by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenhuis, Rebecca T; Freeman, Zachary T; Korleski, Jack; Cohen, Laura K; Massaccesi, Guido; Tomasi, Alessandra; Boesch, Austin W; Ackerman, Margaret E; Margolick, Joseph B; Blankson, Joel N; Chattergoon, Michael A; Cox, Andrea L

    2017-10-30

    Type I IFN production is essential for innate control of acute viral infection; however, prolonged high-level IFN production is associated with chronic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Although plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) are a primary source of IFN, the mechanisms that regulate IFN levels following the acute phase are unknown. We hypothesized that HIV-specific Ab responses regulate late IFN production. We evaluated the mechanism through which HIV-activated pDCs produce IFN as well as how both monoclonal HIV-specific Abs and Abs produced in natural HIV infection modulated normal pDC sensing of HIV. We found that HIV-induced IFN production required TLR7 signaling, receptor-mediated entry, fusion, and viral uncoating, but not endocytosis or HIV life cycle stages after uncoating. Abs directed against the HIV envelope that do not interfere with CD4 binding markedly enhanced the IFN response, irrespective of their ability to neutralize CD4+ T cell infection. Ab-mediated enhancement of IFN production required Fc γ receptor engagement, bypassed fusion, and initiated signaling through both TLR7 and TLR9, which was not utilized in the absence of Ab. Polyclonal Abs isolated from HIV-infected subjects also enhanced pDC production of IFN in response to HIV. Our data provide an explanation for high levels of IFN production and immune activation in chronic HIV infection.

  19. Pairing Alpaca and Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies to Enhance Immunoassays for Ricin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick B. Turner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, our group isolated and evaluated anti-ricin single domain antibodies (sdAbs derived from llamas, engineered them to further increase their thermal stability, and utilized them for the development of sensitive immunoassays. In work focused on the development of therapeutics, Vance et al. 2013 described anti-ricin sdAbs derived from alpacas. Herein, we evaluated the utility of selected alpaca-derived anti-ricin sdAbs for detection applications, and engineered an alpaca-derived sdAb to increase its melting temperature, providing a highly thermal stable reagent for use in ricin detection. Four of the alpaca-derived anti-ricin A-chain sdAbs were produced and characterized. All four bound to epitopes that overlapped with our previously described llama sdAbs. One alpaca sdAb, F6, was found to possess both a high melting temperature (73 °C and to work optimally with a thermally stable llama anti-ricin sdAb in sandwich assays for ricin detection. We employed a combination of consensus sequence mutagenesis and the addition of a non-canonical disulfide bond to further enhance the thermal stability of F6 to 85 °C. It is advantageous to have a choice of recognition reagents when developing assays. This work resulted in defining an additional pair of highly thermal stable sdAbs for the sensitive detection of ricin.

  20. Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-08-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are small antigen-binding domains derived from naturally occurring, heavy chain-only immunoglobulins isolated from camelid and sharks. They maintain the same binding capability of full-length IgGs but with improved thermal stability and permeability, which justifies their scientific, medical and industrial interest. Several described recombinant forms of sdAbs have been produced in different hosts and with different strategies. Here we present an optimized method for a time-saving, high yield production and extraction of a poly-histidine-tagged sdAb from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies. Protein expression and extraction were attempted using 4 different methods (e.g. autoinducing or IPTG-induced soluble expression, non-classical and classical inclusion bodies). The best method resulted to be expression in classical inclusion bodies and urea-mediated protein extraction which yielded 60-70 mg/l bacterial culture. The method we here describe can be of general interest for an enhanced and efficient heterologous expression of sdAbs for research and industrial purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Erythropoietin enhances nerve repair in anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated models of immune neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is a monophasic immune neuropathic disorder in which a significant proportion of patients have incomplete recovery. The patients with incomplete recovery almost always have some degree of failure of axon regeneration and target reinnervation. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (Abs are the most commonly recognized autoimmune markers in all forms of GBS and specific Abs are associated with the slow/poor recovery. We recently demonstrated that specific anti-ganglioside Abs inhibit axonal regeneration and nerve repair in preclinical models by activation of small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effectors. The objective of this study was to determine whether erythropoietin (EPO, a pleiotropic cytokine with neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, enhances nerve regeneration in preclinical cell culture and animal models of autoimmune neuropathy/nerve repair generated with monoclonal and patient derived Abs. Primary neuronal cultures and a standardized sciatic crush nerve model were used to assess the efficacy of EPO in reversing inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on nerve repair. We found that EPO completely reversed the inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on axon regeneration in cell culture models and significantly improved nerve regeneration/repair in an animal model. Moreover, EPO-induced proregenerative effects in nerve cells are through EPO receptors and Janus kinase 2/Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 pathway and not via early direct modulation of small GTPase RhoA. These preclinical studies indicate that EPO is a viable candidate drug to develop further for neuroprotection and enhancing nerve repair in patients with GBS.

  2. Comparison of Platforms for Testing Antibody Responses against the Chlamydia trachomatis Antigen Pgp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwyn, Sarah; Cooley, Gretchen; Goodhew, Brook; Kohlhoff, Stephan; Banniettis, Natalie; Wiegand, Ryan; Martin, Diana L

    2017-12-01

    Antibody responses to Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) antigens may be useful tools for surveillance of trachoma by estimating cumulative prevalence of infection within a population. Data were compared from three different platforms-multiplex bead array (MBA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and lateral flow assay (LFA)-measuring antibody responses against the CT antigen protein plasmid gene product 3 (Pgp3). Sensitivity was defined as the proportion of specimens testing antibody positive from a set of dried blood spots from Tanzanian 1-9-year olds who were positive for CT nucleic acid of all nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT)-positive individuals (N = 103). The sensitivity of the LFA could not be determined because of the use of dried blood spots for this test; this specimen type has yet to be adapted to LFA. Specificity was defined as the proportion of sera from U.S. and Bolivian 1-9-year olds that had previously tested negative by the Chlamydia microimmunofluorescence (MIF) assay testing negative to Pgp3-specific antibodies (N = 154). The sensitivity for MBA and ELISA was the same-93.2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 88.3-98.1). Specificity ranged across platforms from 96.1 (95% CI: 91.8-98.2) to 99.4% (95% CI: 98.2-100). ELISA performance was similar regardless of whether the plates were precoated or freshly coated with antigen. Sensitivity and specificity of control panels were similar if the cutoff was determined using receiver operator curves or a finite mixture model, but the cutoffs themselves differed by approximately 0.5 OD using the different methodologies. These platforms show good sensitivity and specificity and show good agreement between tests at a population level, but indicate variability for ELISA outcomes depending on the cutoff determination methodology.

  3. Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.

  4. Genomic selection for the improvement of antibody response to Newcastle disease and avian influenza virus in chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Tianfei; Qu, Hao; Luo, Chenglong; Li, Xuewei; Shu, Dingming; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Su, Guosheng

    2014-01-01

    .... They can cause flock mortality up to 100%, resulting in a catastrophic economic loss. This is the first study to investigate the feasibility of genomic selection for antibody response to Newcastle disease virus (Ab-NDV...

  5. Modeling of EBV Infection and Antibody Responses in Kenyan Infants With Different Levels of Malaria Exposure Shows Maternal Antibody Decay is a Major Determinant of Early EBV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaldi, Arnold; Schlub, Timothy E; Piriou, Erwan; Ogolla, Sidney; Sumba, Odada P; Moormann, Ann M; Rochford, Rosemary; Davenport, Miles P

    2016-11-01

    The combination of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and high malaria exposure are risk factors for endemic Burkitt lymphoma, and evidence suggests that infants in regions of high malaria exposure have earlier EBV infection and increased EBV reactivation. In this study we analyzed the longitudinal antibody response to EBV in Kenyan infants with different levels of malaria exposure. We found that high malaria exposure was associated with a faster decline of maternally derived immunoglobulin G antibody to both the EBV viral capsid antigen and EBV nuclear antigen, followed by a more rapid rise in antibody response to EBV antigens in children from the high-malaria-transmission region. We also observed the long-term persistence of anti-viral capsid antigen immunoglobulin M responses in children from the high-malaria region. More rapid decay of maternal antibodies was a major predictor of EBV infection outcome, because decay predicted time to EBV DNA detection, independent of high or low malaria exposure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  7. Targeting antibody responses to the membrane proximal external region of the envelope glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatien Kamdem Toukam

    Full Text Available Although human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1 infection induces strong antibody responses to the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env only a few of these antibodies possess the capacity to neutralize a broad range of strains. The induction of such antibodies represents an important goal in the development of a preventive vaccine against the infection. Among the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies discovered so far, three (2F5, Z13 and 4E10 target the short and hidden membrane proximal external region (MPER of the gp41 transmembrane protein. Antibody responses to MPER are rarely observed in HIV-infected individuals or after immunization with Env immunogens. To initiate antibody responses to MPER in its membrane-embedded native conformation, we generated expression plasmids encoding the membrane-anchored ectodomain of gp41 with N-terminal deletions of various sizes. Following transfection of these plasmids, the MPER domains are displayed on the cell surface and incorporated into HIV virus like particles (VLP. Transfected cells displaying MPER mutants bound as efficiently to both 2F5 and 4E10 as cells transfected with a plasmid encoding full-length Env. Mice immunized with VLPs containing the MPER mutants produced MPER-specific antibodies, the levels of which could be increased by the trimerization of the displayed proteins as well as by a DNA prime-VLP boost immunization strategy. Although 2F5 competed for binding to MPER with antibodies in sera of some of the immunized mice, neutralizing activity could not be detected. Whether this is due to inefficient binding of the induced antibodies to MPER in the context of wild type Env or whether the overall MPER-specific antibody response induced by the MPER display mutants is too low to reveal neutralizing activity, remains to be determined.

  8. Oxidation-sensitive polymersomes as vaccine nanocarriers enhance humoral responses against Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Navarro, Clara; Rincon-Restrepo, Marcela; Zimmer, Gert; Ollmann Saphire, Erica; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Hirosue, Sachiko; Swartz, Melody A; Kunz, Stefan

    2017-12-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality, yet no vaccine currently exists. Antibodies targeting viral attachment proteins are crucial for protection against many viral infections. However, the envelope glycoprotein (GP)-1 of LASV elicits weak antibody responses due to extensive glycan shielding. Here, we explored a novel vaccine strategy to enhance humoral immunity against LASV GP1. Using structural information, we designed a recombinant GP1 immunogen, and then encapsulated it into oxidation-sensitive polymersomes (PS) as nanocarriers that promote intracellular MHCII loading. Mice immunized with adjuvanted PS (LASV GP1) showed superior humoral responses than free LASV GP1, including antibodies with higher binding affinity to virion GP1, increased levels of polyfunctional anti-viral CD4 T cells, and IgG-secreting B cells. PS (LASV GP1) elicited a more diverse epitope repertoire of anti-viral IgG. Together, these data demonstrate the potential of our nanocarrier vaccine platform for generating virus-specific antibodies against weakly immunogenic viral antigens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. XGFR*, a novel affinity-matured bispecific antibody targeting IGF-1R and EGFR with combined signaling inhibition and enhanced immune activation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Juergen M.; Wartha, Katharina; Moessner, Ekkehard; Hosse, Ralf J.; Moser, Samuel; Croasdale, Rebecca; Trochanowska, Halina; Shao, Cuiying; Wang, Peng; Shi, Lei; Weinzierl, Tina; Rieder, Natascha; Bacac, Marina; Ries, Carola H.; Kettenberger, Hubert; Schlothauer, Tilman; Friess, Thomas; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) play critical roles in tumor growth, providing a strong rationale for the combined inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR signaling in cancer therapy. We describe the design, affinity maturation, in vitro and in vivo characterization of the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR*. XGFR* is based on the bispecific IgG antibody XGFR, which enabled heterodimerization of an IGF-1R binding scFab heavy chain with an EGFR-binding light and heavy chain by the “knobs-into-holes” technology. XGFR* is optimized for monovalent binding of human EGFR and IGF-1R with increased binding affinity for IGF-1R due to affinity maturation and highly improved protein stability to oxidative and thermal stress. It bears an afucosylated Fc-portion for optimal induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Stable Chinese hamster ovary cell clones with production yields of 2–3 g/L were generated, allowing for large scale production of the bispecific antibody. XGFR* potently inhibits EGFR- and IGF-1R-dependent receptor phosphorylation, reduces tumor cell proliferation in cells with heterogeneous levels of IGF-1R and EGFR receptor expression and induces strong ADCC in vitro. A comparison of pancreatic and colorectal cancer lines demonstrated superior responsiveness to XGFR*-mediated signaling and tumor growth inhibition in pancreatic cancers that frequently show a high degree of IGF-1R/EGFR co-expression. XGFR* showed potent anti-tumoral efficacy in the orthotopic MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic xenograft model, resulting in nearly complete tumor growth inhibition with significant number of tumor remissions. In summary, the bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR antibody XGFR* combines potent signaling and tumor growth inhibition with enhanced ADCC induction and represents a clinical development candidate for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26984378

  10. Liposomal co-entrapment of CD40mAb induces enhanced IgG responses against bacterial polysaccharide and protein.

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    Caterina Hatzifoti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibody against CD40 is effective in enhancing immune responses to vaccines when chemically conjugated to the vaccine antigen. Unfortunately the requirement for chemical conjugation presents some difficulties in vaccine production and quality control which are compounded when multivalent vaccines are required. We explore here an alternative to chemical conjugation, involving the co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody and antigens in liposomal vehicles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anti-mouse CD40 mAb or isotype control mAb were co-entrapped individually in cationic liposomal vehicles with pneumococcal polysaccharides or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. Retention of CD40 binding activity upon liposomal entrapment was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. After subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c female mice, anti-polysaccharide and DT/TT responses were measured by ELISA. Simple co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody allowed for the retention of CD40 binding on the liposome surface, and also produced vaccines with enhanced imunogenicity. Antibody responses against both co-entrapped protein in the form of tetanus toxoid, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide, were enhanced by co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody. Surprisingly, liposomal encapsulation also appeared to decrease the toxicity of high doses of CD40 antibody as assessed by the degree of splenomegaly induced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Liposomal co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody may represent a practical means of producing more immunogenic multivalent vaccines and inducing IgG responses against polysaccharides without the need for conjugation.

  11. Chronic spinal cord injury impairs primary antibody responses, but spares existing humoral immunity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropallo, Michael A.; Held, Katherine S.; Goenka, Radhika; Ahmad, Sifat A.; O’Neill, Patrick J.; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E.; Cancro, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in immune depression. To better understand how injury inhibits humoral immunity, the effects of chronic thoracic SCI on B cell development and immune responses to thymus-independent (TI) type-2 and thymus-dependent (TD) antigens were determined. Mice received complete crush injury or control laminectomy at either thoracic level 3 (T3), which disrupts descending autonomic control of the spleen, or at T9, which conserves most splenic sympathetic activity. Although mature B cell numbers were only mildly reduced, bone marrow B cell production was transiently but profoundly depressed immediately after injury. Despite the return of normal B cell production four weeks after SCI, mice receiving T3-injury showed a significant reduction in their ability to mount primary TI-2 or TD immune responses. The latter were marked by decreases in germinal center B cells as well as class switched high-affinity antibody secreting cells. Importantly, injury did not affect affinity maturation per se, pre-existing B cell memory, or secondary humoral immune responses. Together, these findings show that chronic high thoracic SCI impairs the ability to mount optimal antibody responses to new antigenic challenges, but spares previously established humoral immunity. PMID:22523388

  12. Measuring Response to Therapy by Near-Infrared Imaging of Tumors Using a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody Fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jian; Archer, Richard; Brown, Michael; Fisher, Seth; Chang, Connie; Peacock, Matthew; Hughes, Christopher C.W.; Freimark, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Imaging tumors and their response to treatment could be a valuable biomarker toward early assessment of therapy in patients with cancer. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in normal cells but is externalized on tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and tumor cells, and PS exposure is further enhanced in response to radiation and chemotherapy. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a PS-targeting human F(ab′)2 antibody fragment, PGN650, to detect exposure of PS in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was measured by near-infrared optical imaging in human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. PGN650 specifically targeted tumors and was shown to target CD31-positive ECs and tumor cells. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was significantly higher in animals pretreated with docetaxel. The peak tumor to normal tissue (T/N) ratio of probe was observed at 24 hours postinjection of probe, and tumor binding was detected for at least 120 hours. In repeat dose studies, PGN650 uptake in tumors was significantly higher following pretreatment with docetaxel compared to baseline uptake prior to treatment. PGN650 may be a useful probe to detect PS exposed in tumors and to monitor enhanced PS exposure to optimize therapeutic agents to treat tumors. PMID:23651502

  13. Measuring Response to Therapy by Near-Infrared Imaging of Tumors Using a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody Fragment

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    Jian Gong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging tumors and their response to treatment could be a valuable biomarker toward early assessment of therapy in patients with cancer. Phosphatidylserine (PS is confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in normal cells but is externalized on tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs and tumor cells, and PS exposure is further enhanced in response to radiation and chemotherapy. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a PS-targeting human F(ab'2 antibody fragment, PGN650, to detect exposure of PS in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was measured by near-infrared optical imaging in human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. PGN650 specifically targeted tumors and was shown to target CD31-positive ECs and tumor cells. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was significantly higher in animals pretreated with docetaxel. The peak tumor to normal tissue (T/N ratio of probe was observed at 24 hours postinjection of probe, and tumor binding was detected for at least 120 hours. In repeat dose studies, PGN650 uptake in tumors was significantly higher following pretreatment with docetaxel compared to baseline uptake prior to treatment. PGN650 may be a useful probe to detect PS exposed in tumors and to monitor enhanced PS exposure to optimize therapeutic agents to treat tumors.

  14. Antibodies to gp350/220 enhance the ability of Epstein-Barr virus to infect epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Susan M; Jiang, Ru; Chesnokova, Liudmila S; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2006-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a persistent, orally transmitted herpesvirus that replicates in B cells and epithelial cells and is associated with lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. The virus binds to CD21 on B cells via glycoprotein gp350/220 and infects efficiently. Infection of cultured epithelial cells has not typically been efficient but can occur in the absence of gp350/220 and CD21 and in vivo is thought to be important to the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We report here that antibodies to gp350/220, which inhibit EBV infection of B cells, enhance infection of epithelial cells. The effect is not mediated by Fc receptor binding but is further enhanced by antibody cross-linking, which may patch gp350/220 in the virus envelope. Saliva from EBV-seropositive individuals has similar effects that can be reversed by depletion of antibody. The results are consistent with a model in which gp350/220 interferes with the access of other important players to the epithelial cell surface. The results may have implications for the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in high-risk populations in which elevated titers of antibody to EBV lytic cycle proteins are prognostic.

  15. Immunization of humans with polysaccharide vaccines induces systemic, predominantly polymeric IgA2-subclass antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkowski, A; Lue, C; Moldoveanu, Z; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R; Mestecky, J

    1990-05-15

    Ig class- and IgA subclass-specific immune responses to protein and polysaccharide Ag were studied in serum, external secretions, and at the single cell level in peripheral blood of systemically immunized adults. Immunization with tetanus toxoid induced predominantly IgG antibody responses in serum and in the PBMC. The IgA antibody response was low, and was mostly of the IgA1 subclass. In contrast, immunization with polysaccharide Ag (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A, C, Y, W-135, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides) elicited a major IgA response predominantly of the IgA2 isotype. Analysis of the molecular forms of secreted IgA antibodies indicated that polymers were produced early after immunization, irrespective of the nature of the Ag. When compared with serum antibody and to PBMC cell responses, systemic immunization with polysaccharides induced a minor salivary response dominated by IgG and IgM antibodies. In contrast, the presence of antipolysaccharide antibodies in bile, irrespective of their isotype, paralleled the serum response 14 days after the immunization with polysaccharide Ag. These results suggest that biliary Ig were mostly derived from serum. Different patterns of the expression of MHC class II Ag on T cells, B cells, and monocytes during the course of immunization with protein or polysaccharide Ag were observed: whereas protein Ag induced a high frequency of HLA-DP- and HLA-DR-expressing cells early in the course of immunization, polysaccharide vaccines elicited low and protracted increases of HLA-DP+ T cells. Polysaccharide vaccine covalently coupled to a protein carrier induced a higher frequency of antipolysaccharide antibody-secreting cells in peripheral blood and increased the IgG to IgA ratio among polysaccharide-specific antibody-secreting cells.

  16. Recombinant antibody production in Arabidopsis seeds triggers an unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Kirsten; De Buck, Sylvie; Vanneste, Kevin; Depicker, Ann

    2013-02-01

    Among the many plant-based production systems that are being tested for molecular farming, seeds are very attractive, as they provide a stable environment in which the accumulating recombinant proteins can be stored. However, it is not known exactly how high production levels of recombinant antibodies influence the endogenous transcriptome and proteome of the developing seed. To address this question, we studied the transcriptomic status in developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds 13 d post anthesis of three transgenic lines, producing varying levels of recombinant VHH or single-chain Fv antibody fragments fused to the human immunoglobulin G1-derived Fc fragment under the control of the β-PHASEOLIN seed-specific promoter. Using genome-wide Tiling arrays, we demonstrated that only a small proportion of the transcriptome was significantly changed in each of the lines compared with the wild type. Strikingly, in all three lines, we found a large overlap of up-regulated genes corresponding to protein folding, glycosylation/modification, translocation, vesicle transport, and protein degradation, suggestive of a state of cellular stress called the unfolded protein response. Moreover, the gene up-regulation amplitude was similar in all three lines. We hypothesize that the production of recombinant antibodies in the endoplasmic reticulum triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress, causing a disturbance of the normal cellular homeostasis.

  17. A De-O-acylated Lipooligosaccharide-Based Adjuvant System Promotes Antibody and Th1-Type Immune Responses to H1N1 Pandemic Influenza Vaccine in Mice

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    Ji In Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine adjuvants are agents that are used to promote immune responses to vaccine antigens and thereby to enhance the protective efficacy of the vaccines. In this study, we investigated the adjuvant activity of CIA06, an adjuvant system that is composed of a toll-like receptor 4 agonist de-O-acylated lipooligosaccharide (dLOS and aluminum hydroxide, on the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine Greenflu-S® in mice. CIA06 significantly enhanced influenza-specific serum IgG, hemagglutination-inhibition, and virus-neutralizing antibody titers, which eliminated vaccine dose-dependency in the antibody response. Mice immunized with the CIA06-adjuvanted Greenflu-S showed Th1-type-predominant cytokine profiles, and both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses were induced. Immunization of mice with the CIA06-adjuvanted vaccine reduced the mortality and morbidity of mice upon lethal challenges with influenza virus, and no excessive inflammatory responses were observed in the lung tissues of the immunized mice after viral infection. These data suggest that the dLOS-based adjuvant system CIA06 can be used to promote the immune responses to influenza vaccine or to spare antigen dose without causing harmful inflammatory responses.

  18. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

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    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  19. Nonhuman primate infants have an impaired respiratory but not systemic IgG antibody response following influenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Beth C.; Hayward, Sarah L.; Blevins, Lance K.; Kock, Nancy; Aycock, Tyler; Parks, Griffith D.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infection of young infants results in increased morbidity and mortality compared to infection of adults. In spite of the significance of this health issue, our understanding of the immune response elicited in infants, especially in the respiratory tract is highly limited. We developed a nonhuman primate model to probe the virus-specific antibody response in infants following infection with influenza virus. Infection of infants resulted in more pulmonary damage and higher viral loads compared to adults. While the systemic IgG antibody response was similar in infant and adult animals, the response in the upper respiratory tract of the infant was compromised. This lower response was associated with an increased prevalence of Treg cells and low levels of BALT. These data suggest a defect in the ability to produce effective virus-specific antibody responses at the local infection site is a contributor to increased pulmonary damage in the at-risk infant population. PMID:25543963

  20. Duration of protective immunity and antibody responses in cattle immunised against alcelaphine herpesvirus-1-induced malignant catarrhal fever

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    Russell George C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protection of cattle from alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AlHV-1-induced malignant catarrhal fever (MCF has been described previously, using an attenuated virus vaccine in an unlicensed adjuvant. The vaccine was hypothesised to induce a protective barrier of virus-neutralising antibody in the oro-nasal region, supported by the observation of high titre neutralising antibodies in nasal secretions of protected animals. Here we describe further analysis of this vaccine strategy, studying the effectiveness of the vaccine formulated with a licensed adjuvant; the duration of immunity induced; and the virus-specific antibody responses in plasma and nasal secretions. The results presented here show that the attenuated AlHV-1 vaccine in a licensed adjuvant protected cattle from fatal intranasal challenge with pathogenic AlHV-1 at three or six months. In addition, animals protected from MCF had significantly higher initial anti-viral antibody titres than animals that succumbed to disease; and these antibody titres remained relatively stable after challenge, while titres in vaccinated animals with MCF increased significantly prior to the onset of clinical disease. These data support the view that a mucosal barrier of neutralising antibody blocks infection of vaccinated animals and suggests that the magnitude of the initial response may correlate with long-term protection. Interestingly, the high titre virus-neutralising antibody responses seen in animals that succumbed to MCF after vaccination were not protective.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

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    Beth Holder

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines.Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses.The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  2. Antibody response to Plasmodium vivax antigens in Fy-negative individuals from the Colombian Pacific coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sócrates; Gómez, Andrés; Vera, Omaira; Vergara, Juana; Valderrama-Aguirre, Augusto; Maestre, Amanda; Méndez, Fabián; Wang, Ruobing; Chitnis, Chetan E; Yazdani, Syed S; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2005-11-01

    The Duffy antigen (Fy) is necessary for Plasmodium vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. Some populations have a highly prevalent Fy-negative phenotype; such persons are naturally protected from P. vivax blood infection but are expected to completely support the P. vivax pre-erythrocytic cycle, representing a valuable model for studying the immune response during these parasitic stages. We typed 214 individuals, mostly Afro-Colombians, from a P. vivax-endemic area for Fy expression and determined the antibody response to P. vivax pre-erythrocytic (sporozoites and CS) and blood-stage antigens (blood forms, P. vivax merozoite surface protein 1, and P. vivax Duffy binding protein [PvDBP]). Antibody titers to P. vivax circumsporozoite protein, P11, and N-terminal peptides and the number of responders were similar in Fy-negative and Fy-positive individuals. The number of responders to sporozoites, blood forms, and PvDBP were different between these groups. Thus, Fy-negative individuals from malaria-endemic areas can be used to study the immune response to the P. vivax liver phase without interference of the erythrocytic cycle.

  3. Autophagy, a new determinant of plasma cell differentiation and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Simone

    2014-12-01

    Plasma cells, the terminal effectors of the B lymphoid lineage, are responsible for the humoral arm of adaptive immunity. Their differentiation from B cells entails a profound cellular reshaping inherently associated with stress. Autophagy is a conserved adaptive cellular strategy recently implicated in differentiation and immunity. We identified a novel autophagic function in plasma cells. Autophagy restricts the expression of the transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 and immunoglobulins through a selective negative control on the endoplasmic reticulum and its stress signaling response, thereby optimizing energy and viability. As a result, autophagy in vivo sustains antibody responses, and is an essential intrinsic determinant of the bone marrow long-lived plasma cell niche. Here, I discuss several immune and biomedical implications, and experimental issues to be addressed in the near future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Novel antibody conjugates for enhanced tumor uptake. Final report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, M.

    1997-12-31

    Progress in three areas of research is summarized. These are as follows: Labeling Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with Tc-99m and Re-186; human melanoma tumors and specific MAbs; evaluation of biological response modifiers (BRM). The techniques of labeling MAbs (IgM, IgG, F(ab{prime}){sub 2} or F(ab{prime})) with Tc-99m was developed in the author`s laboratory in 1989 and that with Re-186 in 1992. The techniques are in daily use in the laboratory since then and are adapted to a convenient kit formulation. The metal ions are bound at MAb sulfhydryls generated by a controlled reduction of a pair of disulfide groups. At least two types of MAbs labeled with Tc-99m by this method have been administered into patients and excellent diagnostic results have been obtained. Over the past two and a half years the author has been successfully growing human melanoma tumors in athymic Balb/c nude mice. The cell LINE, WM-9, was obtained from Dr. D Herlyn`s laboratory at Wistar Institute in Philadelphia. Sufficient quantities of antihuman melanoma specific antibodies ME 31.3 (Wistar, IgG-1) and MEM-136 (Hybritech, IgG-2A) and their F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments are also available in the laboratory. The use of BRM is a rapidly evolving field. Over the past four years, the author has evaluated a number of BRMs in a quest for agents that may augment MAb tumor uptake. These included interferon-{alpha}; a pokeweed mitogen and Ukrain, an alkaloid separated from a plant Chelideonium Majis. In these preliminary studies, normal Balb/c mice were used and the BRMs were given i.p. one hour prior to the i.v. administration of tumor necrosis factor or an MAb (TNT-F(ab{prime}){sub 2}) labeled with Tc-99m which served as an imaging agent. Animals were sacrificed at 1.5 hr or 4 hrs post-injection. Highlights of the work are given here in a table.

  5. Serologic profile of a cohort of pigs and antibody response to an autogenous vaccine for Actinobacillus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, L; D'Allaire, S; Lacouture, S; Gottschalk, M

    2001-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis is a commensal opportunistic pathogen in swine. However, in recent years, an increasing prevalence of clinical signs associated with A. suis has been observed in high health status herds in North America. The objectives of the study were to assess the kinetics of antibodies to A. suis in pigs from a herd showing clinical signs of A. suis infection and, to evaluate the antibody response in gilts following vaccination with an autogenous vaccine. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a saline extract of boiled-formalinized whole cells of a field strain as the coating antigen was standardized. This ELISA was used as a tool for monitoring, in a comparative way, the variations in A. suis antibody levels. The herd selected for the serologic profile was negative for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection and showed clinical signs of A. suis infection in 16 to 19-week-old pigs. A cohort of 20 pigs was blood sampled at 5, 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. The lowest level of serum antibodies was observed between weeks 8 and 12, this probably corresponding to a decrease in maternal immunity. A marked increase in the antibody response was seen at 16-week of age, at the approximate time of onset of A. suis clinical signs in the herd. The evaluation of serum antibody responses to an autogenous vaccine revealed that the humoral immunity of gilts further increased following vaccination although the level of antibodies was already high prior to vaccination. The magnitude of the response to vaccination was higher when the level of antibodies was low prior to the first injection. The ELISA test seems to detect antibodies against the O-chain LPS.

  6. Development of a Fully Human Anti-PDGFRβ Antibody That Suppresses Growth of Human Tumor Xenografts and Enhances Antitumor Activity of an Anti-VEGFR2 Antibody

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    Juqun Shen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ is upregulated in most of solid tumors. It is expressed by pericytes/smooth muscle cells, fibroblast, macrophage, and certain tumor cells. Several PDGF receptor-related antagonists are being developed as potential antitumor agents and have demonstrated promising antitumor activity in both preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we produced a fully human neutralizing antibody, IMC-2C5, directed against PDGFRβ from an antibody phage display library. IMC-2C5 binds to both human and mouse PDGFRβ and blocks PDGF-B from binding to the receptor. IMC-2C5 also blocks ligand-stimulated activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules in tumor cells. In animal studies, IMC-2C5 significantly delayed the growth of OVCAR-8 and NCI-H460 human tumor xenografts in nude mice but failed to show antitumor activities in OVCAR-5 and Caki-1 xenografts. Our results indicate that the antitumor efficacy of IMC-2C5 is primarily due to its effects on tumor stroma, rather than on tumor cells directly. Combination of IMC-2C5 and DC101, an anti-mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody, resulted in significantly enhanced antitumor activity in BxPC-3, NCI-H460, and HCT-116 xenografts, compared with DC101 alone, and the trend of additive effects to DC101 treatment in several other tumor models. ELISA analysis of NCI-H460 tumor homogenates showed that IMC-2C5 attenuated protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor elevated by DC101 treatment. Finally, IMC-2C5 showed a trend of additive effects when combined with DC101/chemotherapy in MIA-PaCa-2 and NCI-H460 models. Taken together, these results lend great support to the use of PDGFRβ antagonists in combination with other antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of a broad range of human cancers.

  7. Simulation of B Cell Affinity Maturation Explains Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Enhanced Antibody Cross-Reactivity Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Induced by the Polyvalent Malaria Vaccine AMA1 Sidhartha Chaudhury, Jaques Reifman, and Anders Wallqvist Polyvalent vaccines use a mixture of Ags... vaccine based on the highly polymorphic malaria Ag apical membrane antigen-1. Our simulations show how polyvalent apical membrane Ag-1 vaccination

  8. BAFF aids generation of IgG anti-ganglioside antibodies in response to Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukie; Kobata, Tetsuji; Odaka, Masaaki; Furukawa, Koichi; Hirata, Koichi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2010-01-25

    Ganglioside mimicry of Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) can induce the production of IgG anti-ganglioside antibodies, but the generation mechanism has yet to be clarified. B-cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) helped murine B cells produce anti-ganglioside antibodies against C. jejuni LOS. In splenocyte culture, however, anti-ganglioside antibodies were produced in the presence of a soluble transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating and cyclophilin ligand interactor immunoadhesin (TACI-Ig), a receptor for BAFF. TACI-Ig adenoviral vectors failed to decrease production of anti-ganglioside antibodies in mice sensitized with C. jejuni LOS and did not alter IgG subclasses, evidence that BAFF aids but is not essential for the generation of IgG anti-ganglioside antibodies in response to C. jejuni LOS. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Malaria Derived Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Enhances Anti-Pfs25 Functional Antibodies That Block Malaria Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Neeraj; Vanjak, Ivana; Rozzelle, James; Berges, Aym; Chan, Wei; Yin, Gang; Tran, Cuong; Sato, Aaron K; Steiner, Alexander R; Pham, Thao P; Birkett, Ashley J; Long, Carole A; Fairman, Jeff; Miura, Kazutoyo

    2018-01-16

    Malaria, one of the most common vector borne human diseases, is a major world health issue. In 2015 alone, more than 200 million people were infected with malaria, out of which, 429 000 died. Even though artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) are highly effective at treating malaria infections, novel efforts toward development of vaccines to prevent transmission are still needed. Pfs25, a postfertilization stage parasite surface antigen, is a leading transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV) candidate. It is postulated that Pfs25 anchors to the cell membrane using a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linker, which itself possesses pro-inflammatory properties. In this study, Escherichia coli derived extract (XtractCF+TM) was used in cell free protein synthesis [CFPS] to successfully express >200 mg/L of recombinant Pfs25 with a C-terminal non-natural amino acid (nnAA), namely, p-azidomethyl phenylalanine (pAMF), which possesses a reactive azide group. Thereafter, a unique conjugate vaccine (CV), namely, Pfs25-GPI was generated with dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) derivatized glycan core of malaria GPI using a simple but highly efficient copper free click chemistry reaction. In mice immunized with Pfs25 or Pfs25-GPI, the Pfs25-GPI group showed significantly higher titers compared to the Pfs25 group. Moreover, only purified IgGs from Pfs25-GPI group were able to significantly block transmission of parasites to mosquitoes, as judged by a standard membrane feeding assay [SMFA]. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the generation of a CV using Pfs25 and malaria specific GPI where the GPI is shown to enhance the ability of Pfs25 to elicit transmission blocking antibodies.

  10. Integrated NY-ESO-1 antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses correlate with clinical benefit in advanced melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda; Adamow, Matthew; Ginsberg, Brian A; Rasalan, Teresa S; Ritter, Erika; Gallardo, Humilidad F; Xu, Yinyan; Pogoriler, Evelina; Terzulli, Stephanie L; Kuk, Deborah; Panageas, Katherine S; Ritter, Gerd; Sznol, Mario; Halaban, Ruth; Jungbluth, Achim A; Allison, James P; Old, Lloyd J; Wolchok, Jedd D; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2011-10-04

    Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), has been shown to improve survival in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. It also enhances immunity to NY-ESO-1, a cancer/testis antigen expressed in a subset of patients with melanoma. To characterize the association between immune response and clinical outcome, we first analyzed NY-ESO-1 serum antibody by ELISA in 144 ipilimumab-treated patients with melanoma and found 22 of 140 (16%) seropositive at baseline and 31 of 144 (22%) seropositive following treatment. These NY-ESO-1-seropositive patients had a greater likelihood of experiencing clinical benefit 24 wk after ipilimumab treatment than NY-ESO-1-seronegative patients (P = 0.02, relative risk = 1.8, two-tailed Fisher test). To understand why some patients with NY-ESO-1 antibody failed to experience clinical benefit, we analyzed NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses by intracellular multicytokine staining in 20 NY-ESO-1-seropositive patients and found a surprising dissociation between NY-ESO-1 antibody and CD8 responses in some patients. NY-ESO-1-seropositive patients with associated CD8(+) T cells experienced more frequent clinical benefit (10 of 13; 77%) than those with undetectable CD8(+) T-cell response (one of seven; 14%; P = 0.02; relative risk = 5.4, two-tailed Fisher test), as well as a significant survival advantage (P = 0.01; hazard ratio = 0.2, time-dependent Cox model). Together, our data suggest that integrated NY-ESO-1 immune responses may have predictive value for ipilimumab treatment and argue for prospective studies in patients with established NY-ESO-1 immunity. The current findings provide a strong rationale for the clinical use of modulators of immunosuppression with concurrent approaches to favor tumor antigen-specific immune responses, such as vaccines or adoptive transfer, in patients with cancer.

  11. Modulation of immune response to Lol p I by pretreatment with anti-idiotypic antibody is not restricted to the idiotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Hébert, J

    1994-05-01

    To study the role of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the regulation of the immune response to Lol p I (the major allergenic component of rye grass pollen), we have recently generated a panel of three MoAbs directed against distinct epitopes of Lolp I and an anti-idiotypic MoAb directed against the idiotype borne by one of the anti-Lol p I MoAbs (290A-167). The effects of pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb in BALB/c mice before immunization with the antigen have been examined. The anti-idiotypic MoAb or unrelated MoAb were given weekly for 8 weeks intraperitoneally. Mice then received the antigen (2 micrograms) adsorbed with alum (2 mg) at weeks 9, 11 and 13. Serum anti-Lol p I antibodies (IgG or IgE) and specific idiotypic responses were measured. Anti-Lol p I IgG antibodies could be detected before immunization with Lol p I only in mice pretreated with anti-idiotypic MoAb. Immunization with Lol p I induced an anti-Lol p I IgG response in both groups, but this response was higher in mice that received anti-idiotypic MoAb. Similar profiles were seen for specific IgE antibodies and idiotypic responses. Surprisingly, idiotypes borne by other anti-Lol p I MoAbs (539A-6 and 348A-6) had also been enhanced after pretreatment with the anti-290A-167 MoAb. These observations suggested that the pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb modulates not only the expression of the respective idiotype, but also affects other idiotype responses.

  12. Antibody administration in experimental influenza increases survival and enhances the effect of oseltamivir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pourroy, Brit Naldahl Jessen; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2012-01-01

    and treatment of a number of infectious diseases. In this experimental study anti-influenza antibodies were passively administrated to mice, subsequently they were infected with influenza virus and treated with oseltamivir. The aim was to investigate, if anti-influenza antibodies influenced the out come...... of oseltamivir treatment and development of resistance towards oseltamivir. We show, that oseltamivir alone was not able to effectively prevent a fatal outcome, but that oseltamivir administered together with a limited amount of antibodies, resulted in improvement of the clinical condition of the mice...

  13. Diversity of the murine antibody response targeting influenza A(H1N1pdm09) hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason R; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Spesock, April; Music, Nedzad; Guo, Zhu; Barrington, Robert; Stevens, James; Donis, Ruben O; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We infected mice with the 2009 influenza A pandemic virus (H1N1pdm09), boosted with an inactivated vaccine, and cloned immunoglobulins (Igs) from HA-specific B cells. Based on the redundancy in germline gene utilization, we inferred that between 72-130 unique IgH VDJ and 35 different IgL VJ combinations comprised the anti-HA recall response. The IgH VH1 and IgL VK14 variable gene families were employed most frequently. A representative panel of antibodies were cloned and expressed to confirm reactivity with H1N1pdm09 HA. The majority of the recombinant antibodies were of high avidity and capable of inhibiting H1N1pdm09 hemagglutination. Three of these antibodies were subtype-specific cross-reactive, binding to the HA of A/South Carolina/1/1918(H1N1), and one further reacted with A/swine/Iowa/15/1930(H1N1). These results help to define the genetic diversity of the influenza anti-HA antibody repertoire profile induced following infection and vaccination, which may facilitate the development of influenza vaccines that are more protective and broadly neutralizing. Protection against influenza viruses is mediated mainly by antibodies, and in most cases this antibody response is narrow, only providing protection against closely related viruses. In spite of this limited range of protection, recent findings indicate that individuals immune to one influenza virus may contain antibodies (generally a minority of the overall response) that are more broadly reactive. These findings have raised the possibility that influenza vaccines could induce a more broadly protective response, reducing the need for frequent vaccine strain changes. However, interpretation of these observations is hampered by the lack of quantitative characterization of the antibody repertoire. In this study, we used single-cell cloning of influenza HA-specific B cells to assess the diversity and nature of the antibody response to influenza hemagglutinin in mice. Our findings help to put bounds on the

  14. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  15. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858-mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2016-06-09

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858-opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858-induced NK-cell-mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858-mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858-mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Immunoglobulin G1 Allotype Influences Antibody Subclass Distribution in Response to HIV gp140 Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kratochvil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody subclasses exhibit extensive polymorphisms (allotypes that could potentially impact the quality of HIV-vaccine induced B cell responses. Allotypes of immunoglobulin (Ig G1, the most abundant serum antibody, have been shown to display altered functional properties in regard to serum half-life, Fc-receptor binding and FcRn-mediated mucosal transcytosis. To investigate the potential link between allotypic IgG1-variants and vaccine-generated humoral responses in a cohort of 14 HIV vaccine recipients, we developed a novel protocol for rapid IgG1-allotyping. We combined PCR and ELISA assays in a dual approach to determine the IgG1 allotype identity (G1m3 and/or G1m1 of trial participants, using human plasma and RNA isolated from PBMC. The IgG1-allotype distribution of our participants mirrored previously reported results for caucasoid populations. We observed elevated levels of HIV gp140-specific IgG1 and decreased IgG2 levels associated with the G1m1-allele, in contrast to G1m3 carriers. These data suggest that vaccinees homozygous for G1m1 are predisposed to develop elevated Ag-specific IgG1:IgG2 ratios compared to G1m3-carriers. This elevated IgG1:IgG2 ratio was further associated with higher FcγR-dimer engagement, a surrogate for potential antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP function. Although preliminary, these results suggest that IgG1 allotype may have a significant impact on IgG subclass distribution in response to vaccination and associated Fc-mediated effector functions. These results have important implications for ongoing HIV vaccine efficacy studies predicated on engagement of FcγR-mediated cellular functions including ADCC and ADCP, and warrant further investigation. Our novel allotyping protocol provides new tools to determine the potential impact of IgG1 allotypes on vaccine efficacy.

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus Particles Treated with Specific Antibodies Induce Intrinsic and Adaptive but Not Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zeguang; Qin, Ruifang; Wang, Li; Bosso, Matteo; Scherer, Myriam; Stamminger, Thomas; Hotter, Dominik; Mertens, Thomas; Frascaroli, Giada

    2017-11-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persistently infects 40% to 100% of the human population worldwide. Experimental and clinical evidence indicates that humoral immunity to HCMV plays an important role in restricting virus dissemination and protecting the infected host from disease. Specific immunoglobulin preparations from pooled plasma of adults selected for high titers of HCMV antibodies have been used for the prevention of CMV disease in transplant recipients and pregnant women. Even though incubation of HCMV particles with these preparations leads to the neutralization of viral infectivity, it is still unclear whether the antibody-treated HCMV particles (referred to here as HCMV-Ab) enter the cells and modulate antiviral immune responses. Here we demonstrate that HCMV-Ab did enter macrophages. HCMV-Ab did not initiate the expression of immediate early antigens (IEAs) in macrophages, but they induced an antiviral state and rendered the cells less susceptible to HCMV infection upon challenge. Resistance to HCMV infection seemed to be due to the activation of intrinsic restriction factors and was independent of interferons. In contrast to actively infected cells, autologous NK cells did not degranulate against HCMV-Ab-treated macrophages, suggesting that these cells may not be eliminated by innate effector cells. Interestingly, HCMV-Ab-treated macrophages stimulated the proliferation of autologous adaptive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Our findings not only expand the current knowledge on virus-antibody immunity but may also be relevant for future vaccination strategies.IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a common herpesvirus, establishes benign but persistent infections in immunocompetent hosts. However, in subjects with an immature or dysfunctional immune system, HCMV is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Passive immunization has been used in different clinical settings with variable clinical results. Intravenous hyperimmune globulin preparations (IVIg) are

  18. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is not uniformly......The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP......, and a synthetic peptide (EENV)6 representing the C-terminal repeats from Pf155/RESA, were investigated longitudinally in 13 children and 7 adults living under conditions of continuous, intense malaria transmission. Some subjects did not recognize the antigens after malaria infection, and in subjects recognizing...

  19. Clinical laboratory application of a reporter-gene assay for measurement of functional activity and neutralizing antibody response to infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Igor Y; Carper, James; Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Delgado, Julio C

    2016-01-30

    TNF-α antagonists such as infliximab are effective for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Development of an immune response and subsequent neutralizing antibodies against these protein-based drugs is a major impediment that contributes to therapeutic failure, or adverse effects such as hypersensitivity reactions. As opposed to empirical dose-escalation strategies, rational and cost-effective evaluation of clinical non-responsiveness includes measurement of serum drug levels, and detection of drug-specific antibodies. We present the validation and 2-y experience using a functional, cell-based reporter gene assay (RGA) developed for measuring the biological activity and antibody response to serum infliximab. The RGA was used to test 4699 clinical specimens from patients suspected of therapeutic failure. In contrast to binding assays, which detect an overall antibody response, the RGA specifically detects those antibodies that have drug-neutralizing function, and thus, poses higher risk for therapeutic failure. The RGA presented here is currently the only functional clinical test available to measure serum infliximab activity and neutralizing antibodies. Due to its accuracy and precision, and suitability for high-throughput testing, this robust platform can be applied to any TNF-α antagonist, providing an invaluable tool for the clinical management of patients with treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. How germinal centers evolve broadly neutralizing antibodies: the breadth of the follicular helper T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Rob J; Perelson, Alan S

    2017-09-06

    Many HIV-1 infected patients evolve broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). This evolutionary process typically takes several years, and is poorly understood as selection taking place in germinal centers occurs on the basis of antibody affinity. B cells with the highest affinity receptors tend to acquire the most antigen from the FDC network, and present the highest density of cognate peptides to follicular helper T cells (Tfh), which provide survival signals to the B cell. BnAbs are therefore only expected to evolve when the B cell lineage evolving breadth is consistently capturing and presenting more peptides to Tfh cells than other lineages of more specific B cells. Here we develop mathematical models of Tfh in germinal centers to explicitly define the mechanisms of selection in this complex evolutionary process.Our results suggest that broadly reactive B cells presenting a high density of pMHC are readily outcompeted by B cells responding to lineages of HIV-1 that transiently dominate the within host viral population. Conversely, if broadly reactive B cells acquire a large variety of several HIV-1 proteins from the FDC network and present a high diversity of several pMHC, they be rescued by a large fraction of the Tfh repertoire in the germinal center. Under such circumstances the evolution of bnAbs is much more consistent. Increasing the magnitude of the Tfh response, or the breadth of the Tfh repertoire, both markedly facilitate the evolution of bnAbs. Because both can be increased by vaccination with several HIV-1 proteins, this calls for experiments testing.Importance Many HIV-infected patients slowly evolve antibodies that can neutralize a large variety of viruses. Such "broadly neutralizing antibodies" (bnAbs) could in the future become therapeutic agents. BnAbs appear very late and patients are typically not protected by them. At the moment we fail to understand why this takes so long, and how the immune system selects for broadly neutralizing capacity

  1. Serum antibody responses of high-risk children and adults to vaccination with capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebink, G S; Le, C T; Cosio, F G; Spika, J S; Schiffman, G

    1981-01-01

    Pneumococcal antibody was measured in the sera of splenectomized children, children with neprotic syndrome, adult with chronic renal failure, adults maintained on hemodialysis, adult recipients of renal allografts, and normal children and adults before and after vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The medical conditions of these patients are associated with increased morbidity and mortality due to pneumococcal disease. Nonimmunosuppressed splenectomized children, children with steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome, and adults maintained on hemodialysis had normal concentrations of antibody in serum and normal antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccine. Children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and adult recipients of renal allografts had low concentrations of antibody in serum before and after vaccination but showed an antibody increase after vaccination. During the first year after vaccination of the splenectomized patients, serum antibody concentrations declined linearly by 24%-32% from the peak antibody level. These results suggest that immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharides may reduce the indicence of pneumococcal disease in some high-risk patients but not in others.

  2. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...... antibody clones against GroEL. The appearance of new clones with time reflected the long duration of the chronic infection. A striking addition of new clonotypes during the observation period occurred when a new unrelated bacterium (Burkholderia cepacia) had become established as a cause of the pulmonary...

  3. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  4. Whole-Cell Cancer Vaccines Induce Large Antibody Responses to Carbohydrates and Glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li; Schrump, David S; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2016-12-22

    Whole-cell cancer vaccines are a promising strategy for treating cancer, but the characteristics of a favorable immune response are not fully understood. New insights could enable development of better vaccines, discovery of new antigens, and identification of biomarkers of efficacy. Using glyco-antigen microarrays, we demonstrate that GVAX Pancreas (a granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-modified whole-cell tumor vaccine) induces large immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M responses to many antigens, including tumor-associated carbohydrates, blood group antigens, α-Gal, and bovine fetuin. Antibody responses to α-Gal, a glycan found in fetal bovine serum (FBS) used to produce the vaccine, correlated inversely with overall survival and appear to compete with productive responses to the vaccine. H1299 lysate vaccine, produced with FBS, also induced responses to α-Gal and fetuin but not K562-GM, which is produced in serum-free medium. Our results provide new potential biomarkers to evaluate productive/unproductive immune responses and suggest that removal/reduction of FBS could improve the efficacy of whole-cell vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Major role of local immune responses in antibody formation to factor IX in AAV gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Cao, O; Swalm, B; Dobrzynski, E; Mingozzi, F; Herzog, R W

    2005-10-01

    The risk of an immune response to the coagulation factor IX (F.IX) transgene product is a concern in gene therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B. In order to investigate the mechanism of F.IX-specific lymphocyte activation in the context of adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene transfer to skeletal muscle, we injected AAV-2 vector expressing human F.IX (hF.IX) into outbred immune-competent mice. Systemic hF.IX levels were transiently detected in the circulation, but diminished concomitant with activation of CD4+ T and B cells. ELISPOT assays documented robust responses to hF.IX in the draining lymph nodes of injected muscle by day 14. Formation of inhibitory antibodies to hF.IX was observed over a wide range of vector doses, with increased doses causing stronger immune responses. A prolonged inflammatory reaction in muscle started at 1.5-2 months, but ultimately failed to eliminate transgene expression. By 1.5 months, hF.IX antigen re-emerged in circulation in approximately 70% of animals injected with high vector dose. Hepatic gene transfer elicited only infrequent and weaker immune responses, with higher vector doses causing a reduction in T-cell responses to hF.IX. In summary, the data document substantial influence of target tissue, local antigen presentation, and antigen levels on lymphocyte responses to F.IX.

  6. A consensus envelope protein domain III can induce neutralizing antibody responses against serotype 2 of dengue virus in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jen; Li, Yi-Shiuan; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Chiang, Chen-Yi; Chen, Mei-Yu; Hwang, Chyi-Sing; Huang, Chin-Cheng; Hu, Hui-Mei; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Wu, Sze-Hsien; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2013-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that vaccination with a subunit dengue vaccine containing a consensus envelope domain III with aluminum phosphate elicits neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of dengue virus in mice. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of the subunit dengue vaccine in non-human primates. After vaccination, monkeys that received the subunit vaccine with aluminum phosphate developed a significantly strong and long-lasting antibody response. A specific T cell response with cytokine production was also induced, and this correlated with the antibody response. Additionally, neutralizing antibodies against serotype 2 were detected in two of three monkeys. The increase in serotype-2-specific antibody titers and avidity observed in these two monkeys suggested that a serotype-2-biased antibody response occurs. These data provide evidence that a protective neutralizing antibody response was successfully elicited in non-human primates by the dengue subunit vaccine with aluminum phosphate adjuvant.

  7. Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    protection against rotavirus infection of mice stimulated by intranasal immunization with chimeric VP4 or VP6 protein. J Virol 1999;73(9):7574–81. [13] Choi...McNeal MM, Rae MN, Bean JA, Ward RL. Antibody-dependent and -independent protection following intranasal immunization of mice with rotavirus particles. J...Williamson ED, Sharp GJ, Eley SM, Vesey PM, Pepper TC, Titball RW, et al. Local and systemic immune response to a microencapsu- lated sub-unit vaccine for

  8. An H7N1 Influenza Virus Vaccine Induces Broadly Reactive Antibody Responses against H7N9 in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Margine, Irina; Hirsh, Ariana; Sjursen, Haakon; Zambon, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Emerging H7N9 influenza virus infections in Asia have once more spurred the development of effective prepandemic H7 vaccines. However, many vaccines based on avian influenza viruses—including H7—are poorly immunogenic, as measured by traditional correlates of protection. Here we reevaluated sera from an H7N1 human vaccine trial performed in 2006. We examined cross-reactive antibody responses to divergent H7 strains, including H7N9, dissected the antibody response into head- and stalk-reactive antibodies, and tested the in vivo potency of these human sera in a passive-transfer H7N9 challenge experiment with mice. Although only a low percentage of vaccinees induced neutralizing antibody responses against the homologous vaccine strain and also H7N9, we detected strong cross-reactivity to divergent H7 hemagglutinins (HAs) in a large proportion of the cohort with a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, H7N1 vaccination induced antibodies to both the head and stalk domains of the HA, which is in sharp contrast to seasonal inactivated vaccines. Finally, we were able to show that both neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies improved in vivo virus clearance in a passive-transfer H7N9 challenge mouse model. PMID:24943383

  9. Antigen-specific antibody response in juvenile-onset SLE patients following routine immunization with tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Sara; Ghazizadeh, Farid; Derakhshan, Ali; Farjadian, Shirin; Alyasin, Soheila

    2008-09-01

    Infection is now the most common cause of morbidity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is lack of information regarding the specific antibody formation in response to vaccines in young SLE patients. To determine the efficacy of anti-tetanus antibody response in young patients with SLE. Forty SLE patients with mean age of 14.1 years (range: 7-21) and 60 age and sex matched normal controls were enrolled in this study over a period of one year. Diagnosis was made according to the ACR criteria and disease activity was determined based on SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). All patients and controls had received the complete schedule of tetanus vaccinations consisting of three primary doses and two boosters by the age of six. Serum immunoglobulins and anti-tetanus antibody titers were determined by Nephelometry and ELISA. Anti-tetanus antibody levels greater than 0.1 IU/ml have been suggested as protective. In all of the patients and controls anti-tetanus antibody titer was > 0.1 IU/ml. IgG, IgA, and IgM levels were in the normal range for their age. Mean disease activity score was 4.9 (range: 0-16). There was no association between SLEDAI score and anti-tetanus antibody response. School age onset and immunosuppressive therapy does not seem to interfere with development of consistent immunity to tetanus vaccine in young SLE patients.

  10. Povidone Iodine Ointment Application to the Vaccination Site Does Not Alter Immunoglobulin G Antibody Response to Smallpox Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Christine; Brown, Elizabeth S; Quinn, Xiaofei; Korman, Lawrence; Dyas, Beverly K; Ulrich, Robert G; Pittman, Phillip R

    2016-01-01

    U.S. military personnel deployed to high-risk areas receive the live vaccinia virus (VACV) smallpox vaccine ACAM2000. VACV shedding from the vaccination site can result in autoinoculation and contact transmission. We previously found that the application of povidone iodine ointment (PIO) to the scarification site reduced viral shedding without altering the antibody response, as measured by plaque reduction neutralization or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. In this study, we used protein microarray assays to measure the amount of immunoglobulin G antibody bound to (1) ACAM2000 itself and (2) individual VACV antigens that are present within ACAM2000. We assessed antibody binding in sera from primary smallpox vaccinees who applied PIO to the scarification site beginning on day 7 (PIO group) and from those who did not apply PIO (control group). In both cohorts, the postvaccination antibody response-in terms of antibody binding, both to ACAM2000 and to 11 individual VACV antigens-was significantly greater than the prevaccination response (all p < 0.0001). The postvaccination antibody binding levels of vaccinees in the PIO group did not differ from those of control vaccinees. These findings further support the topical application of PIO, starting on day 7, to reduce the viral shedding associated with smallpox vaccination.

  11. Optimization of BY-2 cell suspension culture medium for the production of a human antibody using a combination of fractional factorial designs and the response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilev, Nikolay; Grömping, Ulrike; Lipperts, Anja; Raven, Nicole; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a strategy for the optimization of plant cell suspension culture media using a combination of fractional factorial designs (FFDs) and response surface methodology (RSM). This sequential approach was applied to transformed tobacco BY-2 cells secreting a human antibody (M12) into the culture medium, in an effort to maximize yields. We found that the nutrients KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂ and the hormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) had the most significant impact on antibody accumulation. The factorial screening revealed strong interactions within the nutrients group (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and CaCl₂) and also individually between 2,4-D and three other components (KNO₃, NH₄NO₃ and BAP). The RSM design resulted in a fivefold increase in the antibody concentration after 5 days and a twofold reduction in the packed cell volume (PCV). Longer cultivation in the optimized medium led to the further accumulation of antibody M12 in the culture medium (up to 107 μg/mL, day 10). Because the packed cell volume was reduced in the optimized medium, this enhanced the overall yield by 20-fold (day 7) and 31-fold (day 10) compared to the conventional MS medium. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Monoclonal Antibody against G Glycoprotein Increases Respiratory Syncytial Virus Clearance In Vivo and Prevents Vaccine-Enhanced Diseases.

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    Hyo-Jeong Lee

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a common cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants, young children, and the elderly. The G glycoprotein plays a role in host cell attachment and also modulates the host immune response, thereby inducing disease pathogenesis. We generated two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; 5H6 and 3A5 against G protein core fragment (Gcf, which consisted of amino acid residues 131 to 230 from RSV A2 G protein. Epitope mapping study revealed that 5H6 specifically binds to the G/164-176 peptide that includes conserved sequences shared by both RSV A and B subtypes, and 3A5 binds to the G/190-204 peptide. Studies with mutant Gcf proteins in which cysteine residues were substituted with alanine revealed that 5H6 requires four cysteines for binding and 3A5 binds to Gcf variants with alanine substitutions better than wild-type. To determine if these mAbs reduce pulmonary viral infection, BALB/c mice were administered mAb and subsequently challenged with RSV. On day 4 post-infection, lung viral titers were reduced by up to 93% with the 5H6 injection and 90% with the 3A5 injection, indicating that prophylactic injection of these mAbs contributes to RSV clearance in vivo. Importantly, 5H6 injection reduced vaccine-enhanced diseases. Overall, our results suggest that this novel anti-G mAb could be used as a prophylactic regimen against RSV diseases.

  13. Gene silencing of CD47 and antibody ligation of thrombospondin-1 enhance ischemic tissue survival in a porcine model: implications for human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Jeff S; Romeo, Martin J; Maxhimer, Justin B; Smedley, Jeremy; Frazier, William A; Roberts, David D

    2008-05-01

    Insufficient tissue perfusion underlies many acute and chronic diseases. Tissue perfusion in turn requires adequate blood flow, determined in large part by the relative state of relaxation or constriction of arterial vessels. Nitric oxide (NO) produced by vascular cells modulates blood flow and tissue perfusion by relaxing and dilating arteries. Recently, we reported that the secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through its cell surface receptor CD47, limits the ability of NO to relax and dilate blood vessels and thus decreases tissue perfusion. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that blocking TSP1-CD47 signaling increases ischemic tissue survival in random cutaneous porcine flaps. Random cutaneous flaps 2 x 10 cm2 were raised in white hairless Yucatan miniature pigs and were treated with a monoclonal antibody to TSP1, an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide to CD47 or control agents and tissue survival assessed. Primary vascular smooth muscle cell cultured from Yucatan pigs were also treated with the same agents +/- and an NO donor (DEA/NO) and cGMP quantified. Antibody blockade of TSP1 or morpholino suppression of CD47 dramatically enhanced survival of random tissue flaps. These responses correlated with increased blood vessel patency and tissue blood flow on vessel injection studies. NO-stimulated cGMP flux in Yucatan vascular smooth muscle cell was abrogated after antibody or morpholino treatment. Antibody ligation of TSP1 or antisense morpholino knock down of CD47 greatly increased tissue survival to ischemia. Given the similarity between porcine and human soft tissues these results suggest significant therapeutic potential for people.

  14. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mast cell activation is enhanced by Tim1:Tim4 interaction but not by Tim-1 antibodies [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Binh Phong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in the T cell (or transmembrane immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1 gene, particularly in the mucin domain, have been associated with atopy and allergic diseases in mice and human. Genetic- and antibody-mediated studies revealed that Tim-1 functions as a positive regulator of Th2 responses, while certain antibodies to Tim-1 can exacerbate or reduce allergic lung inflammation. Tim-1 can also positively regulate the function of B cells, NKT cells, dendritic cells and mast cells. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which Tim-1 modulates immune cell function are currently unknown. In this study, we have focused on defining Tim-1-mediated signaling pathways that enhance mast cell activation through the high affinity IgE receptor (FceRI. Using a Tim-1 mouse model lacking the mucin domain (Tim-1Dmucin, we show for the first time that the polymorphic Tim-1 mucin region is dispensable for normal mast cell activation. We further show that Tim-4 cross-linking of Tim-1 enhances select signaling pathways downstream of FceRI in mast cells, including mTOR-dependent signaling, leading to increased cytokine production but without affecting degranulation.

  16. Novel CH1:CL interfaces that enhance correct light chain pairing in heterodimeric bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönisch, Maximilian; Sellmann, Carolin; Maresch, Daniel; Halbig, Claudia; Becker, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Hock, Björn; Rüker, Florian

    2017-09-01

    Targeting two unique antigens with a single bispecific antibody is an attractive approach with potential broad therapeutic applicability. However, the production of heterodimeric bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) presents a challenge, requiring the co-expression and accurate pairing of two distinct heavy and light chain units. Several undesirable by-products can be formed in the production process, including heavy chain homodimers and non-cognate light chain pairings. Although additional downstream purification methods exist, they are often time consuming and restrict practical large-scale production. In this study, we identify and validate novel Fab interface mutations that increase cognate light chain pairing efficiencies within heterodimeric bsAbs. Importantly, the variable domains remain unaltered as interface mutations were restricted to the CH1 and CL domains. We performed several biochemical assays to demonstrate that the novel engineered interfaces do not adversely impact bispecific antibody expression, stability, affinity and biological function. The designs reported here can easily be applied in a generic manner to use existing antibodies as building blocks for bsAbs which will help to accelerate the identification and production of next generation bispecific antibody therapeutics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. AAV natural infection induces broad cross-neutralizing antibody responses to multiple AAV serotypes in chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to sero-negative nonhuman primates which is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified three distinct groups of animals: those which never sero-converted to AAV (naïve); those which were persistently seropositive (chronic); and those that seroconverted during the 10 year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad sero-response characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes.

  18. Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae triggers dendritic cell dependent antibody responses against invasive disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Anne; Ding, Nadine; Tort Tarres, Meritxell; Bittersohl, Lara F; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Jonigk, Danny; Braubach, Peter; Lippmann, Torsten; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A

    2017-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) is an important precondition for the development of pneumococcal pneumonia. At the same time, nasopharyngeal colonization with Spn has been shown to mount adaptive immune responses against Spn in mice and humans. Cellular responses of the nasopharyngeal compartment, including the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, to pneumococcal colonization and their importance for developing adaptive immune responses are poorly defined. We show that nasopharyngeal colonization with S. pneumoniae led to substantial expansion of dendritic cells (DCs) both in nasopharyngeal tissue and nasal-associated lymphoid tissue of mice. Depletion of DCs achieved by either diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment of chimeric zDC+/DTR mice, or by use of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) KO mice exhibiting congenitally reduced DC pool sizes, significantly diminished antibody responses after colonization with Spn, along with impaired protective immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease. Collectively, the data show that classical DCs contribute to pneumococcal colonization induced adaptive immune responses against invasive pneumococcal disease in two different mouse models. These data may be useful for future nasopharyngeal vaccination strategies against pneumococcal diseases in humans. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Treatment with belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus does not impair antibody response to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, J; Saxne, T; Geborek, P; Bengtsson, A A; Jacobsen, S; Svaerke Joergensen, C; Nilsson, J-Å; Skattum, L; Jönsen, A; Kapetanovic, M C

    2017-09-01

    Background/purpose The objective of this study was to explore the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus and belimumab given in addition to standard of care therapy on 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) response. Methods Forty-seven systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 21 healthy controls were immunized with a single dose of 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine. Forty systemic lupus erythematosus patients were treated with traditional disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs, 11 of those received belimumab in addition, and 32 patients were treated with concomitant prednisolone. Quantification of serotype specific IgG levels to 12 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides was performed in serum taken before and four to six weeks after vaccination using multiplex fluorescent microsphere immunoassay. IgG levels against serotypes 23F and 6B were also analyzed using standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Opsonophagocytic assay was performed on serotype 23F to evaluate the functionality of the antibodies. Pre- and post-vaccination log transformed antibody levels were compared to determine the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis and different treatments on antibody response. Results Systemic lupus erythematosus patients as a group showed lower post-vaccination antibody levels and lower fold increase of antibody levels after vaccination compared to controls ( p = 0.02 and p = 0.009, respectively). Systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated with belimumab in addition to standard of care therapy or with only hydroxychloroquine did not differ compared to controls, whereas the other treatment groups had significantly lower fold increase of post-vaccination antibody levels. Higher age was associated with lower post-vaccination antibody levels among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Conclusion Belimumab given in addition to traditional disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs or prednisolone did not further impair antibody

  20. Responsive Copolymers for Enhanced Petroleum Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

    2001-02-27

    The objectives of this work was to: synthesize responsive copolymer systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of aqueous fluids in fixed geometry flow profiles; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated conditions. This report focuses on the synthesis and characterization of novel stimuli responsive copolymers, the investigation of dilute polymer solutions in extensional flow and the design of a rheometer capable of measuring very dilute aqueous polymer solutions at low torque.

  1. Proprietary arabinogalactan extract increases antibody response to the pneumonia vaccine: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study in healthy volunteers

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    Udani Jay K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabinogalactan from Larch tree (Larix spp. bark has previously demonstrated immunostimulatory activity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that ingestion of a proprietary arabinogalactan extract, ResistAid™, would selectively enhance the antibody response to the pneumococcal (pneumonia vaccine in healthy adults. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group pilot study included 45 healthy adults who had not previously been vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The volunteers began taking the study product or placebo (daily dosage 4.5 g at the screening visit (V1-Day 0 and continued over the entire 72 day study period. After 30 days the subjects received the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (V2. They were monitored the following day (V3-Day 31, as well as 21 days (V4-Day 51 and 42 days (V5-Day 72 after vaccination. Responses by the adaptive immune system (antigen specific were measured via pneumococcal IgG antibodies (subtypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F and salivary IgA levels. Responses by the innate immune system (non-specific were measured via white blood cell counts, inflammatory cytokines and the complement system. Results Vaccination significantly increased pneumococcal IgG levels as expected. The arabinogalactan group demonstrated a statistically significant greater IgG antibody response than the placebo group in two antibodies subtypes (18C and 23F at both Day 51 (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002 and at Day 72 (p = 0.008 and p = 0.041. These same subtypes (18C and 23F also demonstrated change scores from baseline which were significant, in favor of the arabinogalactan group, at Day 51 (p = 0.033 and 0.001 and at Day 72 (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003. Change scores from baseline and mean values were greater in the arabinogalactan group than placebo for most time points in antibody subtypes 4, 6B, 9V, and 19F, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. There

  2. Influence of protein expression system on elicitation of IgE antibody responses: experience with lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Rachael J; Flanagan, Brian F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-11-15

    With increased interest in genetically modified (GM) crop plants there is an important need to understand the properties that contribute to the ability of such novel proteins to provoke immune and/or allergic responses. One characteristic that may be relevant is glycosylation, particularly as novel expression systems (e.g. bacterial to plant) will impact on the protein glycoprofile. The allergenicity (IgE inducing) and immunogenicity (IgG inducing) properties of wild type native human lactoferrin (NLF) from human milk (hm) and neutrophil granules (n) and a recombinant molecule produced in rice (RLF) have been assessed. These forms of lactoferrin have identical amino acid sequences, but different glycosylation patterns: hmNLF and nNLF have complex glycoprofiles including Lewis (Le)(x) structures, with particularly high levels of Le(x) expressed by nNLF, whereas RLF is simpler and rich in mannose residues. Antibody responses induced in BALB/c strain mice by intraperitoneal exposure to the different forms of lactoferrin were characterised. Immunisation with both forms of NLF stimulated substantial IgG and IgE antibody responses. In contrast, the recombinant molecule was considerably less immunogenic and failed to stimulate detectable IgE, irrespective of endotoxin and iron content. The glycans did not contribute to epitope formation, with equivalent IgE and IgG binding recorded for high titre anti-NLF antisera regardless of whether the immunising NLF or the recombinant molecule were used substrates in the analyses. These data demonstrate that differential glycosylation profiles can have a profound impact on protein allergenicity and immunogenicity, with mannose and Le(x) exhibiting opposing effects. These results have clear relevance for characterising the allergenic hazards of novel proteins in GM crops. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SYSTEMIC ANTIBODY AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES IN INFLUENZA INFECTION AND POSTSVACCINATION

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    S. A. Donina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Post-infection immunity represents an immunogenicity standard for antiviral vaccines, including those against influenza. To estimate the immunogenic properties of vaccine preparations, it is necessary to compare the quantitative and qualitative parameters of immune responses to the vaccine strain and the virulent virus from which it is prepared. However, for ethical reasons, such human studies are difficult, because there is the possibility of pathogenic viral infection.The aim of this experimental work was to compare systemic immune responses to the pathogenic mouse influenza virus A (H1N1, and an attenuated reassortant virus, genetic formula 2/6 (R 2/6, an experimental analogue to the live influenza vaccine.It was shown, that R 2/6 lagged behind the pathogenic parental virus (PPV in activated induction of circulating IgG-antibodies, secretion of a marker Th1-cytokine IFN-γ by splenocytes, and CTL (CD8+ production in the spleen. On the other hand, R 2/6 was highly competitive with PPV, with regard to quantitative proliferative parameters of pooled splenocytes, stimulation of Th (CD4+ cells, B-cells (CD19+, and Th2-cytokine IL-2. IL-6 production in the spleen was poorly induced by both viruses.Thus, attenuation of influenza A (H1N1 virus by the 2/6 genetic reassortment differentially influences the induction of systemic immunity constituents. i.e., some parameters of immune response may be reduced, while others are not altered. When preparing vaccine strains for live influenza vaccines, an attention should be given first of all to increased induction of circulating antibodies that comprise the major components of antiviral immunity.

  4. Early antibody response against Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis antigens in subclinical cattle

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    Stabel Judith R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our laboratories have previously reported on the experimental infection of cattle with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis using an intratonsillar infection model. In addition, we have recently developed a partial protein array representing 92 M. paratuberculosis coding sequences. These combined tools have enabled a unique look at the temporal analysis of M. paratuberculosis antigens within the native host. The primary objective of this study was to identify M. paratuberculosis antigens detected by cattle early during infection. A secondary objective was to evaluate the humoral immune response in cattle during the initial year of infection. Results Sera from two experimentally infected cattle, taken pre-inoculation and at day 70, 194 and 321 post infection, identified dynamic antibody reactivity among antigens with some showing an increased response over time and others showing declining levels of reactivity over the same time period. A M. paratuberculosis specific protein, encoded by MAP0862, was strongly detected initially, but the antibody response became weaker with time. The most reactive protein was a putative surface antigen encoded by MAP1087. A second protein, MAP1204, implicated in virulence, was also strongly detected by day 70 in both cattle. Subsequent experiments showed that these two proteins were detected with sera from 5 of 9 naturally infected cattle in the subclinical stage of Johne's disease. Conclusion Collectively these results demonstrate that M. paratuberculosis proteins are detected by sera from experimentally infected cattle as early as 70 days after exposure. These data further suggest at least two antigens may be useful in the early diagnosis of M. paratuberculosis infections. Finally, the construction and use of a protein array in this pilot study has led to a novel approach for discovery of M. paratuberculosis antigens.

  5. HIV-1 superinfection in women broadens and strengthens the neutralizing antibody response.

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    Valerie Cortez

    Full Text Available Identifying naturally-occurring neutralizing antibodies (NAb that are cross-reactive against all global subtypes of HIV-1 is an important step toward the development of a vaccine. Establishing the host and viral determinants for eliciting such broadly NAbs is also critical for immunogen design. NAb breadth has previously been shown to be positively associated with viral diversity. Therefore, we hypothesized that superinfected individuals develop a broad NAb response as a result of increased antigenic stimulation by two distinct viruses. To test this hypothesis, plasma samples from 12 superinfected women each assigned to three singly infected women were tested against a panel of eight viruses representing four different HIV-1 subtypes at matched time points post-superinfection (~5 years post-initial infection. Here we show superinfected individuals develop significantly broader NAb responses post-superinfection when compared to singly infected individuals (RR = 1.68, CI: 1.23-2.30, p = 0.001. This was true even after controlling for NAb breadth developed prior to superinfection, contemporaneous CD4+ T cell count and viral load. Similarly, both unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed significantly greater potency in superinfected cases compared to controls. Notably, two superinfected individuals were able to neutralize variants from four different subtypes at plasma dilutions >1∶300, suggesting that their NAbs exhibit elite activity. Cross-subtype breadth was detected within a year of superinfection in both of these individuals, which was within 1.5 years of their initial infection. These data suggest that sequential infections lead to augmentation of the NAb response, a process that may provide insight into potential mechanisms that contribute to the development of antibody breadth. Therefore, a successful vaccination strategy that mimics superinfection may lead to the development of broad NAbs in immunized individuals.

  6. The Use of Poly-L-Lysine as a Capture Agent to Enhance the Detection of Antinuclear Antibodies by ELISA.

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    Nancy A Stearns

    Full Text Available Antibodies to nuclear antigens (antinuclear antibodies or ANAs are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. These antibodies bind diverse nuclear antigens that include DNA, histones and non-histone proteins as well as complexes of proteins with DNA and RNA. Because of the frequency of ANA expression in SLE, testing is an important component of clinical evaluation as well as determination of eligibility for clinical trials or utilization of certain therapies. Immunofluorescence assays have been commonly used for this purpose although this approach can be limited by issues of throughput, variability and difficulty in determining positivity. ELISA and multiplex assays are also useful approaches although these assays may give an incomplete picture of antibodies present. To develop a sensitive and quantitative ANA assay, we have explored an ELISA platform in which plates are pre-coated with a positively charged nucleic acid binding polymer (NABP to increase adherence of antigens containing DNA or RNA. As a source of antigens, we have used supernatants of Jurkat cells undergoing apoptosis in vitro. As results presented show, a poly-L-lysine (PLL pre-coat significantly enhances detection of antibodies to DNA as well as antigens such as histones, SSA, SSB and RNP. Comparison of the ELISA assay with the PLL pre-coat with a multiplex assay using the BioPlex® 2200 system indicated good agreement in results for a panel of lupus sera. Together, these studies indicate that a pre-coat with a positively charged polymer can increase the sensitivity of an ANA ELISA using as antigens molecules released from dead and dying cells. This assay platform may facilitate ANA testing by providing an ensemble of antigens more similar in composition and structure with antigens present in vivo, with a NABP promoting adherence via charge-charge interactions.

  7. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibody response to rabies vaccination in captive and freeranging wolves (Canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen captive and five free-ranging Minnesota gray wolves (Canis lupus) were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) after vaccination with an inactivated canine rabies vaccine. Blood was collected from all wolves prior to vaccination and at 1 mo postvaccination (PV) and from all captive and three wild wolves at 3 mo PV. In addition, one free-ranging wolf was sampled at 4 mo PV, and two free-ranging wolves were sampled at 6 mo PV. All wolves were seronegative prior to vaccination. RVNA were detected in 14 (100%) captive wolves and in four of five (80%) free-ranging wolves. The geometric mean titer of the captive wolves at 1 mo PV was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than in the free-ranging wolves. Five of 13 (38.5%) captive wolves and none of the three (0%) free-ranging wolves had measurable RVNA at 3 mo PV. No measurable RVNA were detected in the serum samples collected from the free-ranging wolves at 4 and 6 mo PV. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of free-ranging wolves tested. Further research is needed to properly assess immune function and antibody response to vaccination in captive wolves in comparison with their free-ranging counterparts.

  9. The Antibody Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

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    Mehmet Aşık

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to investigate the presence of antibodies (Anti-BIP against binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone with immune modulator and anti-apoptotic effects in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT patients. Material and Method: We included sixty-two autoimmune thyroiditis patients, 20 with euthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, 27 with subclinical hypothyroidism and 15 with hypothyroid, and a control group of 37 healthy subjects. Results: No statistically significant difference was determined in anti-BIP levels among the HT subgroups or in comparison with the control group (p=0.889.Discussion: Although BIP activation has been shown in vitro in thyroid cells, no difference was determined in our study in anti-BIP levels between the HT patient subgroups and the control group. This suggests that antibodies developing against BIP through apoptosis and/or T cell response are either not related to HT or at levels that cannot be determined by measuring serum. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 53-6

  10. Antibody response to rabies vaccination in captive and free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N E

    2001-03-01

    Fourteen captive and five free-ranging Minnesota gray wolves (Canis lupus) were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) after vaccination with an inactivated canine rabies vaccine. Blood was collected from all wolves prior to vaccination and at 1 mo postvaccination (PV) and from all captive and three wild wolves at 3 mo PV. In addition, one free-ranging wolf was sampled at 4 mo PV, and two free-ranging wolves were sampled at 6 mo PV. All wolves were seronegative prior to vaccination. RVNA were detected in 14 (100%) captive wolves and in four of five (80%) free-ranging wolves. The geometric mean titer of the captive wolves at 1 mo PV was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than in the free-ranging wolves. Five of 13 (38.5%) captive wolves and none of the three (0%) free-ranging wolves had measurable RVNA at 3 mo PV. No measurable RVNA were detected in the serum samples collected from the free-ranging wolves at 4 and 6 mo PV. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of free-ranging wolves tested. Further research is needed to properly assess immune function and antibody response to vaccination in captive wolves in comparison with their free-ranging counterparts.

  11. Supramolecular peptide hydrogel adjuvanted subunit vaccine elicits protective antibody responses against West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Brian M; Beasley, David W C; Rudra, Jai S

    2016-11-04

    A crucial issue in vaccine development is to balance safety with immunogenicity. The low immunogenicity of most subunit antigens warrants a search for adjuvants able to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. In recent years, successful applications of nanotechnology and bioengineering in the field of vaccine development have enabled the production of novel adjuvant technologies. In this work, we investigated totally synthetic and supramolecular peptide hydrogels as novel vaccine adjuvants in conjunction with the immunoprotective envelope protein domain III (EIII) of West Nile virus as an immunogen in a mouse model. Our results indicate that, compared to the clinically approved adjuvant alum, peptide hydrogel adjuvanted antigen elicited stronger antibody responses and conferred significant protection against mortality after virus challenge. The high chemical definition and biocompatibility of self-assembling peptide hydrogels makes them attractive as immune adjuvants for the production of subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial infections where antibody-mediated protection is desirable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibody responses in New World camelids with tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium microti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashchenko, K P; Greenwald, R; Esfandiari, J; Meylan, M; Burri, I Hengrave; Zanolari, P

    2007-12-15

    Antibody responses in New World camelids (NWC) infected with Mycobacterium microti were studied by two serological methods, multiantigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) and lateral-flow-based rapid test (RT). Serum samples were collected during 2004-2006 from 87 animals including 1 alpaca and 7 llamas with confirmed or suspected M. microti infection, 33 potentially exposed but clinically healthy animals from known infected herds, and 46 control NWC from herds where infection had not been previously diagnosed. The serological assays correctly identified infection status in 97% (MAPIA) or 87% (RT) cases. In three llamas with confirmed M. microti infection and one llama with gross pathology suggestive of disease, for which multiple serum samples collected over time were available, the antibody-based tests showed positive results 1-2 years prior to the onset of clinical signs or being found dead. In MAPIA, MPB83 protein was identified to be an immunodominant serological target antigen recognized in NWC infected with M. microti. With the limited number of animals tested in this study, the serological assays demonstrated the potential for convenient, rapid, and accurate diagnosis of M. microti infection in live llamas and alpacas.

  13. A Live Vector Expressing HPV16 L1 Generates an Adjuvant-Induced Antibody Response In-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbaghaee, Zeinab; Bolhassani, Azam; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Zohrei, Negar

    2015-12-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer has suggested the design of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against genital warts. The HPV capsid has made of two L1 and L2 coat proteins that have produced late in viral infections. Regarding to the recent studies, two commercial prophylactic vaccines have based on L1 viral like particles (VLPs) could strongly induce antibody responses, and protect human body from HPV infections. However, the use of these HPV vaccines has hindered due to their high cost and some limitations. Currently, among various vaccination strategies, live vector-based vaccines have attracted a great attention. Herein, a non-pathogenic strain of the protozoan organism known as Leishmania tarentolae has utilized to induce potent humoral immunity in mice model. At first, cloning of HPV16 L1 gene into Leishmania expression vector has performed and confirmed by PCR and digestion with restriction enzymes. The promastigotes of Leishmania tarentolae (L.tar) have transfected with linearized DNA construct by electroporation. Protein expression has analyzed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Then, the immunogenicity of leishmania expressing L1 protein (L.tar-L1) has assessed in mice model. Our data has indicated that subcutaneous immunization of mice with the recombinant L.tar-L1 has led to enhance the levels of IgG1 and lgG2a in comparison with control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant increase in antibody levels between two and three times of immunizations. The recombinant live vector was able to induce humoral immunity in mice without need of any adjuvant. However, further studies have required to increase its efficiency.

  14. Expression of bioactive anti-CD20 antibody fragments and induction of ER stress response in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dezhong; Ma, Jisheng; Sun, Difei; Li, Haiyan; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2015-08-01

    Seed-based expression system is an attractive platform for the production of recombinant proteins in molecular farming. Despite the many advantages of molecular farming, little is known about the effect of the different subcellular accumulation of recombinant proteins on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system in host plants. In this study, we analyzed the expression of anti-CD20 antibody fragments in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia) and corresponding glycosylation mutants, and evaluated the influence of three different signal sequences on the expression levels of scFv-Fc of C2B8. The highest protein accumulation level, with a maximum of 6.12 % total soluble proteins, was observed upon fusing proteins to the signal peptide of Arabidopsis seed storage albumin 2. The ER stress responses in developing seeds at 13 days post-anthesis were also compared across different transgenic lines under normal and heat shock conditions. Based on the gene expression profiles of ER stress transducers, our results suggest that accumulation of antibody fragments in the ER exerts more stress on ER homeostasis. In addition, quantitative PCR results also implicate enhanced activation of ER-associated degradation in transgenic lines. Last but not the least, we also demonstrate the anti-tumor potency of plant-derived proteins by showing the anti-tumor activity of purified scFv-Fc proteins against Daudi cells. Together, our data implies that better understanding of the interaction between exogenous protein production and the cellular quality control system of the host plant is necessary for the development of an optimal expression strategy that will be especially beneficial to commercial protein manufacturing.

  15. An HIV gp120-CD4 Immunogen Does Not Elicit Autoimmune Antibody Responses in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer A; Prado, Ilia; Misamore, Johnathan; Weiss, Deborah; Francis, Jesse; Pal, Ranajit; Huaman, Maria; Cristillo, Anthony; Lewis, George K; Gallo, Robert C; DeVico, Anthony L; Fouts, Timothy R

    2016-07-01

    A promising concept for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines focuses immunity on the highly conserved transition state structures and epitopes that appear when the HIV glycoprotein gp120 binds to its receptor, CD4. We are developing chimeric antigens (full-length single chain, or FLSC) in which gp120 and CD4 sequences are flexibly linked to allow stable intrachain complex formation between the two moieties (A. DeVico et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104:17477-17482, 2007, doi:10.1073/pnas.0707399104; T. R. Fouts et al., J Virol 74:11427-11436, 2000, doi:10.1128/JVI.74.24.11427-11436.2000). Proof of concept studies with nonhuman primates show that FLSC elicited heterologous protection against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (T. R. Fouts et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:E992-E999, 2016, doi:10.1073/pnas.1423669112), which correlated with antibodies against transition state gp120 epitopes. Nevertheless, advancement of any vaccine that comprises gp120-CD4 complexes must consider whether the CD4 component breaks tolerance and becomes immunogenic in the autologous host. To address this, we performed an immunotoxicology study with cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with either FLSC or a rhesus variant of FLSC containing macaque CD4 sequences (rhFLSC). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding titers, primary CD3(+) T cell staining, and temporal trends in T cell subset frequencies served to assess whether anti-CD4 autoantibody responses were elicited by vaccination. We find that immunization with multiple high doses of rhFLSC did not elicit detectable antibody titers despite robust responses to rhFLSC. In accordance with these findings, immunized animals had no changes in circulating CD4(+) T cell counts or evidence of autoantibody reactivity with cell surface CD4 on primary naive macaque T cells. Collectively, these studies show that antigens using CD4 sequences to stabilize transition state gp120 structures

  16. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients have a preserved cytomegalovirus-specific antibody response despite progressive hypogammaglobulinemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Vanura

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is characterized by progressive hypogammaglobulinemia predisposing affected patients to a variety of infectious diseases but paradoxically not to cytomegalovirus (CMV disease. Moreover, we found reactivity of a panel of CLL recombinant antibodies (CLL-rAbs encoded by a germ-line allele with a single CMV protein, pUL32, despite differing antibody binding motifs. To put these findings into perspective, we studied prospectively relative frequency of viremia, kinetics of total and virus-specific IgG over time, and UL32 genetic variation in a cohort of therapy-naive patients (n=200. CMV-DNA was detected in 3% (6/200 of patients. The decay of total IgG was uniform (mean, 0.03; SD, 0.03 and correlated with that of IgG subclasses 1-4 in the paired samples available (n=64; p<0.001. Total CMV-specific IgG kinetics were more variable (mean, 0,02; SD, 0,06 and mean decay values differed significantly from those of total IgG (p=0.034. Boosts of CMV-specific antibody levels were observed in 49% (22/45 of CMV-seropositive patients. In contrast, VZV- and EBV-specific IgG levels decayed in parallel with total IgG levels (p=0.003 and p=0.001, respectively. VZV-specific IgG even became undetectable in 18% (9/50 of patients whereas CMV-specific ones remained detectable in all seropositive patients. The observed CMV-specific IgG kinetics were predicated upon the highly divergent kinetics of IgG specific for individual antigens - glycoprotein B-specific IgG were boosted in 51% and pUL32-specific IgG in 32% of patients. In conclusion, CLL patients have a preserved CMV-specific antibody response despite progressive decay of total IgG and IgG subclasses. CMV-specific IgG levels are frequently boosted in contrast to that of other herpesviruses indicative of a higher rate of CMV reactivation and antigen-presentation. In contrast to the reactivity of multiple different CLL-rAbs with pUL32, boosts of humoral immunity are triggered

  17. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  18. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the im...

  19. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; Van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues1–3. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption4–6, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa)7 to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs. PMID:28854172

  20. Discovery of stimulation-responsive immune enhancers with CRISPR activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Gowen, Benjamin G.; Boontanrart, Mandy; Roth, Theodore L.; Gagnon, John D.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Lee, Youjin; Bray, Nicolas L.; Chan, Alice Y.; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Nguyen, Michelle L.; Gate, Rachel E.; Subramaniam, Meena; Li, Zhongmei; Woo, Jonathan M.; Mitros, Therese; Ray, Graham J.; Curie, Gemma L.; Naddaf, Nicki; Chu, Julia S.; Ma, Hong; Boyer, Eric; van Gool, Frederic; Huang, Hailiang; Liu, Ruize; Tobin, Victoria R.; Schumann, Kathrin; Daly, Mark J.; Farh, Kyle K.; Ansel, K. Mark; Ye, Chun J.; Greenleaf, William J.; Anderson, Mark S.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Chang, Howard Y.; Corn, Jacob E.; Marson, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The majority of genetic variants associated with common human diseases map to enhancers, non-coding elements that shape cell-type-specific transcriptional programs and responses to extracellular cues. Systematic mapping of functional enhancers and their biological contexts is required to understand the mechanisms by which variation in non-coding genetic sequences contributes to disease. Functional enhancers can be mapped by genomic sequence disruption, but this approach is limited to the subset of enhancers that are necessary in the particular cellular context being studied. We hypothesized that recruitment of a strong transcriptional activator to an enhancer would be sufficient to drive target gene expression, even if that enhancer was not currently active in the assayed cells. Here we describe a discovery platform that can identify stimulus-responsive enhancers for a target gene independent of stimulus exposure. We used tiled CRISPR activation (CRISPRa) to synthetically recruit a transcriptional activator to sites across large genomic regions (more than 100 kilobases) surrounding two key autoimmunity risk loci, CD69 and IL2RA. We identified several CRISPRa-responsive elements with chromatin features of stimulus-responsive enhancers, including an IL2RA enhancer that harbours an autoimmunity risk variant. Using engineered mouse models, we found that sequence perturbation of the disease-associated Il2ra enhancer did not entirely block Il2ra expression, but rather delayed the timing of gene activation in response to specific extracellular signals. Enhancer deletion skewed polarization of naive T cells towards a pro-inflammatory T helper (TH17) cell state and away from a regulatory T cell state. This integrated approach identifies functional enhancers and reveals how non-coding variation associated with human immune dysfunction alters context-specific gene programs.

  1. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa

    2015-01-01

    for the future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. METHODS: We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso......OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences....... CONCLUSIONS: We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity....

  2. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... intravenously at 3 mg/kg at baseline and after 2, 6 and 14 weeks. Adalimumab was administered as 40 mg biweekly subcutaneously. Concomitant drug treatment was monitored and continued at constant dosage during the study. All serum samples were tested for infliximab/adalimumab levels and anti...... 16 (47%), 8 (24%) and 10 (29%). Clinical responses correlated with the levels of S-infliximab/adalimumab and the formation of anti-infliximab/anti-adalimumab antibodies. CONCLUSION: The clinical response to two anti-TNFalpha biological agents closely follows the trough drug levels and the presence...

  3. Human IgG antibody response to Glossina saliva: an epidemiologic marker of exposure to Glossina bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsignon, Anne; Remoue, Franck; Rossignol, Marie; Cornelie, Sylvie; Courtin, David; Grébaut, Pascal; Garcia, Andre; Simondon, Francois

    2008-05-01

    The evaluation of human antibody response specific to arthropod saliva may be a useful marker of exposure to vector-borne disease. Such an immunologic tool, applied to the evaluation of the exposure to Glossina bites, could be integrated in the control of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). The antibody (IgG) response specific to uninfected Glossina fuscipes fuscipes saliva was evaluated according to the vector exposure and trypanic status in individuals residing in an HAT-endemic area. A high level of anti-saliva IgG antibodies was only detected in exposed individuals, whether infected or not by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. In addition, the evaluation of specific IgG response represented spatial heterogeneity according to studied sites. These results suggest that the evaluation of anti-saliva IgG could be an indicator of Glossina exposure and thus could be integrated in other available tools to identify populations presenting risks of HAT transmission.

  4. IgE and IgG4 antibody responses to Aedes saliva in African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remoue, Franck; Alix, Eric; Cornelie, Sylvie; Sokhna, Cheikh; Cisse, Badara; Doucoure, Souleymane; Mouchet, François; Boulanger, Denis; Simondon, François

    2007-01-01

    Aedes mosquitoes are the major vectors of (re)-emerging infections including arboviruses (dengue, Chikungunya, yellow fever) in developing countries. Moreover, the emergence of Aedes-borne diseases in the developed world is currently a source of concern. Evaluation of human immune responses to Aedes bites could be a useful immuno-epidemiological tool for evaluating exposure to Aedes-borne diseases and thus predicting the risk of such emerging diseases. Specific IgE and IgG4 antibody (Ab) responses to Aedes aegypti saliva were evaluated in young Senegalese children living in an area of exposure to the Aedes vector. Specific IgE and IgG4 responses increased during rainy season of high exposure to Aedes bites. In addition, the evolution of anti-saliva isotype levels during the rainy season presented spatial heterogeneity between the studied villages. These preliminaries results support the potential approach of using anti-saliva Ab responses for evaluating exposure to Aedes vectors and risks of emerging arbovirus infections.

  5. Aversive Life Events Enhance Human Freezing Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of prior aversive life events on freezing-like responses. Fifty healthy females were presented neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant images from the International Affective Picture System while standing on a stabilometric platform and wearing a polar band

  6. Aversive life events enhance human freezing responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of prior aversive life events on freezing-like responses. Fifty healthy females were presented neutral, pleasant, and unpleasant images from the International Affective Picture System while standing on a stabilometric platform and wearing a polar band

  7. C3 polymorphism in a Danish cystic fibrosis population and its possible association with antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Morling, N

    1978-01-01

    The C3 types of human serum are reported for a material of 113 Danish cystic fibrosis patients, age 0-30 years. The frequency of the C3F gene was 0.2832 which was significantly higher (p less than 0.0005) than the frequency found in a control group of 224 healthy babies (C3F = 0.1585). It also...... differed significantly (p less than 0.01) from the C3F gene frequency of 0.1780 found in 177 blood donors, age 20-24 years. A significant association between any of the C3 phenotypes and the most serious infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic mucoid P. aeruginosa infection, or the antibody response against...

  8. Systemic antibody responses of calves to low molecular weight Cooperia oncophora antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwland, M G; Ploeger, H W; Kloosterman, A; Parmentier, H K

    1995-10-01

    The systemic antibody responses to adult Cooperia oncophora antigen were studied using sera obtained from calves during a 6-week period following a single oral infection with either 20,000 or 100,000 third-stage C. oncophora larvae. Dose dependent increasing titres of IgG binding complete adult Cooperia antigen were found in the sera of Cooperia-infected calves. SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, followed by Western blotting, revealed that the increase of IgG binding Cooperia antigens could be attributed mainly to specific binding of IgG to a complex of 12-15 kDa protein fragments of Cooperia adult antigen. This protein may represent a Cooperia oncophora-specific component that can be used for serodiagnosis.

  9. Comparison of specificities of serum antibody responses of horses to clinical infections caused by Streptococcus equi or zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velineni, Sridhar; DeNegri, Rafaela; Artiushin, Sergey C; Timoney, John F

    2015-11-18

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Sz) and its clonal derivative Streptococcus equi (Se) share greater than 96% DNA identity and elicit immune responses to many shared proteins. Identification of proteins uniquely targeted by the immune response to each infection would have diagnostic value. The aim of the study was to compare serum antibody responses of horses infected by Se or Sz. Antibody levels were measured to panels of recombinant proteins of Sz and Se in sera of horses and ponies before and after experimental and naturally occurring invasive infections by these organisms. Antibody responses to an Se extract vaccine were also measured. Sera diluted 1:200 were assayed in triplicate using optimum concentrations of 9 and 14 immunoreactive proteins of Se and Sz, respectively. Bound IgG was detected using HRP-Protein G conjugate. Antibodies specific for SeM-N2, IdeE2, Se42.0 and Se75.3 (SEQ2190) were elicited by Se but not by Sz infection. Commercial Se extract vaccine did not elicit responses to IdeE2 or Se75.3. Sz infections resulted in significant (pScpC, SzP, MAP and streptokinase an indication these proteins are expressed during opportunistic invasions of the respiratory tract. FSR and HylC specific responses were unique to infections by Sz. The data indicate antibodies to IdeE2, Se75.3 and SeM-N2 may be used to distinguish infection by Se from that caused by the closely related Sz. Se infection, but not vaccination with Se extract elicits antibody to IdeE2 and Se75.3. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Pyriproxyfen enhances the immunoglobulin G immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Tanjina; Satho, Tomomitsu; Irie, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mineo; Hosokawa, Masato; Hiramatsu, Yukihiro; Talukder, Parimal; Okuno, Takahiro; Tsuruda, Shodai; Uyeda, Saori; Fukmits, Yuki; Tamura, Yukie; Nakashima, Yukihiko; Imoto, Masumi; Toda, Akihisa; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Miake, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Pyriproxyfen is a juvenile hormone mimic of vital importance for insect development with little risk to humans. This study was performed to investigate whether large doses of pyriproxyfen affect the immune response in mammals. Mice were immunized thrice with ovalbumin in 5% ethanol, with or without pyriproxyfen or alum. Large doses of pyriproxyfen (9 or 15 mM) significantly enhanced specific total IgG immune response. This enhancement was no longer present 24 hr after treatment with pyriproxyfen. These results suggest that pyriproxyfen is a safe chemical. Moreover, pyriproxyfen induced higher titers of IgG2a and enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and gamma-interferon responses whereas alum induced IgG1 with enhanced interleukin-4 and -10. These observations indicate that the mechanism of immune enhancement by pyriproxyfen may differ from that of alum. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Troy J.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that Cervarix® elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix®-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. Methods A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. Results In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. Conclusions The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in

  12. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Troy J; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A

    2012-12-17

    We previously demonstrated that Cervarix(®) elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix(®)-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in protection against infection. Copyright

  13. Diversity of the antibody response to tetanus toxoid: comparison of hybridoma library to phage display library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sorouri

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are important tools in research and since the 1990s have been an important therapeutic class targeting a wide variety of diseases. Earlier methods of mAb production relied exclusively on the lengthy process of making hybridomas. The advent of phage display technology introduced an alternative approach for mAb production. A potential concern with this approach is its complete dependence on an in vitro selection process, which may result in selection of V(H-V(L pairs normally eliminated during the in vivo selection process. The diversity of V(H-V(L pairs selected from phage display libraries relative to an endogenous response is unknown. To address these questions, we constructed a panel of hybridomas and a phage display library using the spleen of a single tetanus toxoid-immunized mouse and compared the diversity of the immune response generated using each technique. Surprisingly, the tetanus toxoid-specific antibodies produced by the hybridoma library exhibited a higher degree of V(H-V(L genetic diversity than their phage display-derived counterparts. Furthermore, the overlap among the V-genes from each library was very limited. Consistent with the notion that accumulation of many small DNA changes lead to increased antigen specificity and affinity, the phage clones displayed substantial micro-heterogeneity. Contrary to previous reports, we found that antigen specificity against tetanus toxoid is encoded by both V(κ and V(H genes. Finally, the phage-derived tetanus-specific clones had a lower binding affinity than the hybridomas, a phenomenon thought to be the result of random pairing of the V-genes.

  14. Cationic lipid/DNA complexes (JVRS-100) combined with influenza vaccine (Fluzone) increases antibody response, cellular immunity, and antigenically drifted protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Marla; Callejo, Bernadette; Chang, Stella; Hong, David K; Lewis, David B; Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon; Fritts, Linda; Miller, Christopher J; Warner, John F; Liang, Lily; Fairman, Jeffery

    2009-06-12

    Safe and effective adjuvants for influenza vaccines that could increase both the levels of neutralizing antibody, including against drifted viral subtypes, and T-cell immunity would be a major advance in vaccine design. The JVRS-100 adjuvant, consisting of DOTIM/cholesterol cationic liposome-DNA complexes, is particularly promising for vaccines that require induction of high levels of antibody and T-cell immunity, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Inclusion of protein antigens with JVRS-100 results in the induction of enhanced humoral and cell-mediated (i.e., CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells) immune responses. The JVRS-100 adjuvant combined with a split trivalent influenza vaccine (Fluzone-sanofi pasteur) elicited increased antibody and T-cell responses in mice and non-human primates compared to vaccination with Fluzone alone. Mice vaccinated with JVRS-100-Fluzone and challenged with antigenically drifted strains of H1N1 (PR/8/34) and influenza B (B/Lee/40) viruses had higher grade protection, as measured by attenuation of weight loss and increased survival, compared to recipients of unadjuvanted vaccine. The results indicate that the JVRS-100 adjuvant substantially increases immunogenicity and protection from drifted-strain challenge using an existing influenza vaccine.

  15. High antibody responses against Plasmodium falciparum in immigrants after extended periods of interrupted exposure to malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Moncunill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria immunity is commonly believed to wane in the absence of Plasmodium falciparum exposure, based on limited epidemiological data and short-lived antibody responses in some longitudinal studies in endemic areas. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among sub-Saharan African adults residing in Spain for 1 up to 38 years (immigrants with clinical malaria (n=55 or without malaria (n=37, naïve adults (travelers with a first clinical malaria episode (n=20 and life-long malaria exposed adults from Mozambique (semi-immune adults without malaria (n=27 or with clinical malaria (n=50. Blood samples were collected and IgG levels against the erythrocytic antigens AMA-1 and MSP-1₄₂ (3D7 and FVO strains, EBA-175 and DBL-α were determined by Luminex. IgG levels against antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs were measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Immigrants without malaria had lower IgG levels than healthy semi-immune adults regardless of the antigen tested (P≤0.026, but no correlation was found between IgG levels and time since migration. Upon reinfection, immigrants with malaria had higher levels of IgG against all antigens than immigrants without malaria. However, the magnitude of the response compared to semi-immune adults with malaria depended on the antigen tested. Thus, immigrants had higher IgG levels against AMA-1 and MSP-1₄₂ (P≤0.015, similar levels against EBA-175 and DBL-α, and lower levels against IEs (P≤0.016. Immigrants had higher IgG levels against all antigens tested compared to travelers (P≤0.001, both with malaria. CONCLUSIONS: Upon cessation of malaria exposure, IgG responses to malaria-specific antigens were maintained to a large extent, although the conservation and the magnitude of the recall response depended on the nature of the antigen. Studies on immigrant populations can shed light on the factors that determine the duration of malaria specific antibody responses and its

  16. Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Charles; Hester, Roger

    2000-06-13

    The objectives of this work were to: synthesize responsive, amphiphilic systems; characterize molecular structure and solution behavior; measure rheological properties of the aqueous fluids including behavior in fixed geometry flow profiles and beds; and to tailor final polymer compositions for in situ rheology control under simulated reservoir conditions. This report focuses on the first phase of the research emphasizing synthesis and the development of photophysical techniques and rheological means of following segmental organization at the structural level.

  17. Impact of child malnutrition on the specific anti-Plasmodium falciparum antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillol Florie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, preschool children represent the population most vulnerable to malaria and malnutrition. It is widely recognized that malnutrition compromises the immune function, resulting in higher risk of infection. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between malaria, malnutrition and specific immunity. In the present study, the anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG antibody (Ab response was evaluated in children according to the type of malnutrition. Methods Anthropometric assessment and blood sample collection were carried out during a cross-sectional survey including rural Senegalese preschool children. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in July 2003 at the onset of the rainy season. Malnutrition was defined as stunting (height-for-age P. falciparum whole extracts (schizont antigens was assessed by ELISA in sera of the included children. Results Both the prevalence of anti-malarial immune responders and specific IgG Ab levels were significantly lower in malnourished children than in controls. Depending on the type of malnutrition, wasted children and stunted children presented a lower specific IgG Ab response than their respective controls, but this difference was significant only in stunted children (P = 0.026. This down-regulation of the specific Ab response seemed to be explained by severely stunted children (HAZ ≤ -2.5 compared to their controls (P = 0.03, while no significant difference was observed in mildly stunted children (-2.5 P. falciparum Ab response appeared to be independent of the intensity of infection. Conclusion Child malnutrition, and particularly stunting, may down-regulate the anti-P. falciparum Ab response, both in terms of prevalence of immune responders and specific IgG Ab levels. This study provides further evidence for the influence of malnutrition on the specific anti-malarial immune response and points to the importance of taking into account child

  18. Revaccination with a 23-Valent Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Induces Elevated and Persistent Functional Antibody Responses in Adults Aged ⩾65 Years

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Susan B. Manoff; Charles Liss; Michael J. Caulfield; Rocio D. Marchese; Jeffrey Silber; John Boslego; Sandra Romero-Steiner; Gowrisankar Rajam; Nina E. Glass; Cynthia G. Whitney; George M. Carlone

    2010-01-01

    .... We compared revaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PN23) with primary vaccination for eliciting initial and persistent functional antibody responses. Methods. Subjects aged...

  19. Illness severity, viral shedding, and antibody responses in infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis caused by respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peter F; Gruber, William C; Peters, Melissa; Reed, George; Zhu, Yuwei; Robinson, Frances; Coleman-Dockery, Shanita; Graham, Barney S

    2002-04-15

    The relationships between host factors, viral shedding, illness severity, and antibody response in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced bronchiolitis are poorly defined. These relationships were prospectively evaluated in 77 infants hospitalized with RSV bronchiolitis in multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of RSV immunoglobulin therapy. Severity of illness was influenced by age and host risk factors but was not influenced by RSV neutralizing antibody titer or by the amount of virus in nasal secretions at enrollment. Virus recovery in nasal secretions was variable but was highest at enrollment. Viral shedding was not influenced by primary diagnosis, antibody titer, age, or duration of acute respiratory illness before enrollment. In intubated patients, the amounts of virus recovered in nasal secretions and endotracheal aspirates were highly correlated. A serum neutralizing antibody response was seen in 64% of subjects who received placebo. The response was not influenced by age, primary diagnosis, amount of virus recovered, or severity of illness but was suppressed by preexisting antibody.

  20. Refined analysis of antigen-specific antibody responses--a new one-step tool in immunogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granath, Britta; Holgersson, Jan; Brenden, Nina

    2011-10-09

    Immunogenicity is a continuous efficacy and safety issue of biopharmaceuticals. Pre-clinical models for prediction of immunogenicity itself as well as biomarkers to reveal potential mechanisms behind an already existing antibody response are still needed. A sensitive, robust and specific immunogenicity assay has therefore been developed that can detect and measure antibodies of five classes against an administered recombinant human protein drug. Additionally, a validation was performed to evaluate the reproducibility and specificity of this newly developed assay. The production of drug-induced antibodies in mice injected with a recombinant human protein drug has been measured by using a modified version of a multi-parametric bead analysis technique. Competitive binding was used to verify drug-specificity of the antibodies. Results showed that the mouse response against the recombinant human protein was IgG1- and IgG2b-specific, suggesting that the drug-induced response was driven by both Th1/Th2 cells; a finding confirmed by measurement of the cytokine profile. With this assay, anti-drug antibody class and subclass screening may be executed in one step. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure-activity relations of water-in-oil vaccine formulations and induced antigen-specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Theo; Hofmans, Marij P M; Theelen, Marc J G; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2005-01-11

    Water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions are known as most effective adjuvants to generate high and durable antibody responses to vaccine antigens following a single immunization. However, their structural requirements remain poorly understood. Here we addressed the significance of certain pharmaceutical characteristics including water/oil ratios--ranging from 60/40 to 30/70 (w/w(%))--droplet size and type of oil, i.e. non-metabolizable (mineral oil) versus metabolizable (Miglyol 840). Stability of emulsions was accomplished by the use of a polymeric emulsifier. Distinct W/O emulsions were formulated with inactivated (i) infectious bronchitis virus (iIBV) and Newcastle disease virus (iNDV), and evaluated in immunized chickens for magnitude and duration of in vivo antiviral antibody formation and local reactions. A high mineral oil content proved most effective for antibody response formation. In general, a larger droplet size evoked higher antibody responses for both oil types. Inoculum residues proved lower using biodegradable Miglyol, when compared to mineral oil, for all emulsion variants. Especially water-to-oil ratio and droplet size may provide useful parameters for improving (antiviral) antibody production by W/O emulsions.

  2. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby; Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Netea, Mihai G; van der Klis, Fiona; Benn, Christine Stabell; Pryds, Ole

    2017-04-11

    BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Within 7days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination or to the control group (no intervention). After three routine vaccinations given at age 3, 5 and 12months, antibodies against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 (Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype type 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) were measured 4weeks after the third vaccine dose. Among the 300 included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by 'age at randomisation' we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B. pertussis and all pneumococcal serotypes, when BCG was given after the first day of life. Girls had significantly higher antibody levels for Haemophilus influenza type b and pneumococcus than boys. Three routine vaccinations with DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 induced sero-protective levels in almost all children. No overall effect of neonatal BCG vaccination was observed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. CD4+ levels control the odds of induction of humoral immune responses to tracer doses of therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasula, Sharat; Gabriel, Erin; Kim, Insook; DeGrange, Paula; St Claire, Alexis; Mallow, Candace; Donahue, Robert E; Paik, Chang; Lane, H C; Di Mascio, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Rapidly increasing number of therapeutic antibodies are being repurposed to imaging probes for noninvasive diagnosis, as well as monitoring during treatment or disease recurrence. Though antibody-based imaging involves tracer doses (~3 log lower than therapeutic doses), and immune responses are severely reduced in patients with impaired immunity, formation of anti-tracer antibodies (ATA) has been observed hampering further diagnostic monitoring. Here, we explored the potential to develop humoral responses to intravenously administered tracer dose of a monoclonal antibody F(ab΄)2 fragment, and associated with host related immune measures in 49 rhesus macaques categorized into healthy (uninfected controls), SIV-progressors, SIV non-progressors, or total body irradiated (TBI). Antibody fragment administered in tracer amount (~100μg) induced immune responses with significantly lower odds in SIV-progressors or TBI macaques (P<0.005) as compared to healthy animals. Peripheral blood (PB) CD4+ cell counts, but not CD20+ cell levels, were associated with significantly higher risk of developing a humoral response (P<0.001). Doubling the PB CD4+ counts is associated with an odds ratio of developing an immune response of 1.73. Among SIV-infected animals, CD4+ cell count was a stronger predictor of immune response than plasma SIV-RNA levels. Both SIV-progressors and TBI macaques showed higher odds of responses with increasing CD4+ counts, however when compared to healthy or SIV non-progressors with similar CD4+ count, they were still functionally incompetent in generating a response (P<0.01). Moreover, presence of ATA in systemic circulation altered the in vivo biodistribution by increasing hepatic uptake and decreasing plasma radiotracer clearance, with minimal to no binding detected in targeted tissues.

  4. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Xuan Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers.

  5. The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the postvaccinal response against swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2011-07-15

    The influence of age and maternal immunity on the development and duration of postvaccinal humoral response against swine influenza viruses (SIV) were investigated under experimental conditions. Piglets born to immune and non-immune sows were vaccinated twice with bivalent inactivated vaccine. Vaccination was done according to 5 different schedules: 1+4, 1+8, 4+8, 8+10 or 8+12 weeks of age. Antibodies to the haemagglutinin type 1 and 3 were determined using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) against H1N1 and H3N2 in the serum of unvaccinated piglets born to immune sows were above the positive level until about 13-14 and 9-10 weeks of life, respectively. No serological responses were seen in any of the groups after the first vaccination. After the second dose of vaccine production of antibodies was observed even before the complete disappearance of maternal antibodies. MDA, however, were associated with reduced antibody response. In MDA-negative piglets, an active humoral postvaccinal response was developed in all vaccinated pigs. The age at which the vaccine was given was associated with the differences in the magnitude of antibody response to SIV. In general those pigs that were vaccinated for the first time at the age of 1 week, developed lower maximum titres after the second vaccination, and become seronegative earlier than pigs that were vaccinated for the first time at 4 or 8 weeks of age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibody responses in humans infected with newly emerging strains of West Nile Virus in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Chabierski

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile Virus (WNV affects an increasing number of countries worldwide. Although most human infections result in no or mild flu-like symptoms, the elderly and those with a weakened immune system are at higher risk for developing severe neurological disease. Since its introduction into North America in 1999, WNV has spread across the continental United States and caused annual outbreaks with a total of 36,000 documented clinical cases and ∼1,500 deaths. In recent years, outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease also have been reported in Europe. The WNV strains isolated during these outbreaks differ from those in North America, as sequencing has revealed that distinct phylogenetic lineages of WNV concurrently circulate in Europe, which has potential implications for the development of vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostic tests. Here, we studied the human antibody response to European WNV strains responsible for outbreaks in Italy and Greece in 2010, caused by lineage 1 and 2 strains, respectively. The WNV structural proteins were expressed as a series of overlapping fragments fused to a carrier-protein, and binding of IgG in sera from infected persons was analyzed. The results demonstrate that, although the humoral immune response to WNV in humans is heterogeneous, several dominant peptides are recognized.

  7. Antibody responses in humans infected with newly emerging strains of West Nile Virus in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabierski, Stefan; Makert, Gustavo R; Kerzhner, Alexandra; Barzon, Luisa; Fiebig, Petra; Liebert, Uwe G; Papa, Anna; Richner, Justin M; Niedrig, Matthias; Diamond, Michael S; Palù, Giorgio; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Infection with West Nile Virus (WNV) affects an increasing number of countries worldwide. Although most human infections result in no or mild flu-like symptoms, the elderly and those with a weakened immune system are at higher risk for developing severe neurological disease. Since its introduction into North America in 1999, WNV has spread across the continental United States and caused annual outbreaks with a total of 36,000 documented clinical cases and ∼1,500 deaths. In recent years, outbreaks of neuroinvasive disease also have been reported in Europe. The WNV strains isolated during these outbreaks differ from those in North America, as sequencing has revealed that distinct phylogenetic lineages of WNV concurrently circulate in Europe, which has potential implications for the development of vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostic tests. Here, we studied the human antibody response to European WNV strains responsible for outbreaks in Italy and Greece in 2010, caused by lineage 1 and 2 strains, respectively. The WNV structural proteins were expressed as a series of overlapping fragments fused to a carrier-protein, and binding of IgG in sera from infected persons was analyzed. The results demonstrate that, although the humoral immune response to WNV in humans is heterogeneous, several dominant peptides are recognized.

  8. Increased half-life and enhanced potency of Fc-modified human PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Shen

    Full Text Available Blocking proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9 binding to low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR can profoundly lower plasma LDL levels. Two anti-PCKS9 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, alirocumab and evolocumab, were approved by the FDA in 2015. The recommended dose is 75 mg to 150 mg every two weeks for alirocumab and 140mg every two weeks or 420 mg once a month for evolocumab. This study attempted to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of F0016A, an IgG1 anti-PCKS9 mAb, to generate biologically superior molecules. We engineered several variants with two or three amino acid substitutions in the Fc fragment based on prior knowledge. The Fc-modified mAbs exhibited increased binding to FcRn, resulting in prolonged serum half-life and enhanced efficacy in vivo. These results demonstrate that Fc-modified anti-PCKS9 antibodies may enable less frequent or lower dosing of antibodies by improved recycling into the blood.

  9. Data on enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain antibodies from Escherichia coli classical inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Maristella; Scotti, Claudia

    2017-06-01

    Heterologous expression of high amounts of recombinant proteins is a milestone for research and industrial purposes. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are heavy-chain only antibody fragments with applications in the biotechnological, medical and industrial fields. The simple nature and small size of sdAbs allows for efficient expression of the soluble molecule in different hosts. However, in some cases, it results in low functional protein yield. To overcome this limitation, expression of a 6xHistag sdAb was attempted in different conditions in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Data showed that high amount of sdAb can be expressed in E. coli classical inclusion bodies, efficiently extracted by urea in a short-time, and properly purified by metal ion affinity chromatography. These data originate from the research article "Enhanced expression and purification of camelid single domain VHH antibodies from classical inclusion bodies" Maggi and Scotti (2017) [1] (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2017.02.007).

  10. Protective antibody responses against A(H1N1)pdm09 primed by infection and recalled by intranasal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kazuyuki; Ainai, Akira; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2015-11-09

    This study investigated the effects of preceding infection and administration of whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine on immune responses against influenza virus challenge. Preceding infection alone provided minimal reduction in virus titer following viral challenge. Single administration of intranasal or subcutaneous WIV vaccine alone failed to reduce virus titers and induce antibody responses. Subcutaneous administration of A/Narita/1/09 (A/NRT)-WIV after A/NRT infection provided complete protection against infection and yielded low nasal IgA and high serum IgG antibody responses. Subcutaneous administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (A/PR8) infection provided no protection. Conversely, intranasal administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/NRT infection provided complete protection and high nasal IgA and serum IgG antibody responses. While, intranasal administration of A/NRT-WIV after A/PR8 infection provided moderate reduction in viral titer with moderate increases in nasal IgA antibodies. These results indicate that intranasal vaccination is superior to subcutaneous vaccination in inducing protective immune responses after preceding heterologous infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG......) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. METHODS: Within 7days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination...... or to the control group (no intervention). After three routine vaccinations given at age 3, 5 and 12months, antibodies against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 (Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype type 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) were measured 4weeks after the third vaccine dose. RESULTS: Among the 300 included...

  12. Function-triggering antibodies to the adhesion molecule L1 enhance recovery after injury of the adult mouse femoral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Guseva

    Full Text Available L1 is among the few adhesion molecules that favors repair after trauma in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates by promoting neuritogenesis and neuronal survival, among other beneficial features. In the peripheral nervous system, L1 is up-regulated in Schwann cells and regrowing axons after nerve damage, but the functional consequences of this expression remain unclear. Our previous study of L1-deficient mice in a femoral nerve injury model showed an unexpected improved functional recovery, attenuated motoneuronal cell death, and enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, being attributed to the persistent synthesis of neurotrophic factors. On the other hand, transgenic mice over-expressing L1 in neurons led to improved remyelination, but not improved functional recovery. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the monoclonal L1 antibody 557 that triggers beneficial L1 functions in vitro would trigger these also in femoral nerve repair. We analyzed femoral nerve regeneration in C57BL/6J mice that received this antibody in a hydrogel filled conduit connecting the cut and sutured nerve before its bifurcation, leading to short-term release of antibody by diffusion. Video-based quantitative analysis of motor functions showed improved recovery when compared to mice treated with conduits containing PBS in the hydrogel scaffold, as a vehicle control. This improved recovery was associated with attenuated motoneuron loss, remyelination and improved precision of preferential motor reinnervation. We suggest that function-triggering L1 antibodies applied to the lesion site at the time of injury over a limited time period will not only be beneficial in peripheral, but also central nervous system regeneration.

  13. Enhanced in vitro antiproliferative effects of EpCAM antibody-functionalized paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in retinoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Moutushy; Misra, Ranjita; Harilal, Anju; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    To specifically deliver paclitaxel (PTX) to retinoblastoma (RB) cells, the anionic surface-charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with paclitaxel were conjugated with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody for enhancing site-specific intracellular delivery of paclitaxel against EpCAM overexpressing RB cells. PTX-loaded PLGA NPs were prepared by the oil-in-water single emulsion solvent evaporation method, and the PTX content in NPs was estimated by the reverse phase isocratic mode of high performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry was employed for the covalent attachment of monoclonal EpCAM antibody onto the NP surface. In vitro cytotoxicity of native PTX, unconjugated PTX-loaded NPs (PTX-NPs), and EpCAM antibody-conjugated PTX-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-NP-EpCAM) were evaluated on a Y79 RB cell line by a dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, while cellular apoptosis, cysteinyl-aspartic acid protease (caspase)-3 activation, Poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and cell-cycle arrest were quantified by flow cytometry. By employing flow cytometry and fluorescence image analyses, the extent of cellular uptake was comparatively evaluated. PTX-NP-EpCAM had superior antiproliferation activity, increased arrested cell population at the G(2)-M phase, and increased activation of caspase-3, followed by PARP cleavage in parallel with the induction of apoptosis. Increased uptake of PTX-Np-EpCAM by the cells suggests that they were mainly taken up through EpCAM mediated endocytosis. EpCAM antibody-functionalized biodegradable NPs for tumor-selective drug delivery and overcoming drug resistance could be an efficient therapeutic strategy for retinoblastoma treatment.

  14. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with enhanced affinity for CD16 activates NK cells at lower concentrations and more effectively than rituximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Julie A.; Wang, Siao-Yi; Link, Brian K.; Allan, Barrett; Beuerlein, Gregory; Campbell, Mary-Ann; Marquis, David; Ondek, Brian; Wooldridge, James E.; Smith, Brian J.; Breitmeyer, James B.; Weiner, George J.

    2006-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the affinity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for CD16 (FcγRIII) plays a central role in the ability of the mAb to mediate antitumor activity. We evaluated how CD16 polymorphisms, and mAb with modified affinity for target antigen and CD16, affect natural killer (NK) cell phenotype when CD20+ malignant B cells were also present. The mAb consisted of rituximab (R), anti-CD20 with enhanced affinity for CD20 (AME-B), and anti-CD20 with enhanced affinity for both CD20 and CD16 (AME-D). Higher concentrations of mAb were needed to induce CD16 modulation, CD54 up-regulation, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) on NK cells from subjects with the lower affinity CD16 polymorphism. The dose of mAb needed to induce NK activation was lower with AME-D irrespective of CD16 polymorphism. At saturating mAb concentrations, peak NK activation was greater for AME-D. Similar results were found with measurement of CD16 modulation, CD54 up-regulation, and ADCC. These data demonstrate that cells coated with mAb with enhanced affinity for CD16 are more effective at activating NK cells at both low and saturating mAb concentrations irrespective of CD16 polymorphism, and they provide further evidence for the clinical development of such mAbs with the goal of improving clinical response to mAb. PMID:16825493

  15. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  16. [Enhancement of immune responses in rabbits with a targeted anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rong; Fan, Ming-wen; Guo, Ji-hua; Bian, Zhuan; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Fei

    2004-05-01

    To detect the immunoreactivity of targeted fusion anti-caries DNA vaccine pGJA-P in vitro, and the ability to enhance the immune responses compared with the non-targeted fusion anti-caries DNA vaccine pGLUA-P. The CHO cells were transfected with pGJA-P and the expression of recombinant protein in cultured supernatants were detected using Western blotting. 5 to 6-month-old female Japanese rabbits were immunized with either pGJA-P or pGLUA-P via either intramuscular injection (i.m.) or intranasal route (i.n.). The sera and saliva were collected and the antibody responses were checked by ELISA. The effect of immune sera on the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan by glucosyltransferase of S. mutans was examined. The expressed protein could response to specific anti-GTF antibody. The antibody responses in serum generated by pGJA-P via i.m. were significantly higher than those generated by pGLUA-P (P vaccine, pGLUA-P. High titres of specific mucosal antibodies were found in rabbits immunized with pGJA-P via i.m. The immune sera of rabbits immunized by pGJA-P via i.m. displayed the ability of inhibiting the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan by glucosyltransferase.

  17. Study on Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Titer and Specific Interferon Gamma Response Among Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Makvandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major problem for healthcare workers worldwide, and among them, dentists are at risk of acquiring HBV infection. The prevalence of HBV infection has been reported among the dentists in different regions of the world. Since none of the available drugs can clear HBV infection, the presence of effective immunity against HBV infection is important to prevent HBV infection. Objectives This study aimed at determining HBs antibody and specific HBV gamma interferon among the dentists, who received hepatitis B vaccine. Methods The blood samples were collected from 40 dentists, including 7 endodontics, 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologist, 4 periodontics, 11 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 6 implantologists, 3 orthodontics, 1 oral and maxillofacial pathologist, 2 esthetic and restorative dentists, and 4 doctors of dental surgery (DDS at from dental college of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran during December, 2013. Overall, 31 (77.5% dentists had already received 3 doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, and 9 (22.5% had received only two doses of the vaccine. Their sera were tested for HBsAb and anti-HBc-IgG by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. The lymphocyte of individuals was separated from their blood sample by Ficoll-Hypaque, cells were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS by centrifugation, and finally the pellet cells was resuspended in RPMI-1640 media. Separated cells were exposed to 2.5 µg of purified recombinant HBs antigen, and supernatants were collected after 72 hours and tested for detection of specific interferon γ level by ELISA test. Results Overall, 97.5% of dentists showed positive HBs antibody test results while 36 showed (90% positive test results for specific interferon γ against hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusions High coverage of 97.5% immune response against hepatitis B infection was found, indicating high efficacy of recombinant

  18. Prevention and Reversal of Antibody Responses Against Factor IX in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushrusha eNayak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular (IM administration of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector represents a simple and safe method of gene transfer for treatment of the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B (factor IX, F.IX, deficiency. However, the approach is hampered by an increased risk of immune responses against F.IX. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug cocktail of immune suppressants rapamycin, IL-10, and a specific peptide (encoding a dominant CD4+ T cell epitope caused an induction of regulatory T cells (Treg with a concomitant apoptosis of antigen-specific effector T cells (J. Thromb. Haemost. 7:1523, 2009. This protocol was effective in preventing inhibitory antibody formation against human F.IX (hF.IX in muscle gene transfer to C3H/HeJ hemophilia B mice (with targeted F9 gene deletion. Here, we show that this protocol can also be used to reverse inhibitor formation. IM injection of AAV1-hF.IX vector resulted in inhibitors of on average 8-10 BU within 1 month. Subsequent treatment with the tolerogenic cocktail accomplished a rapid reduction of hF.IX-specific antibodies to <2 BU, which lasted for >4.5 months. Systemic hF.IX expression increased from undetectable to >200 ng/ml, and coagulation times improved. In addition, we developed an alternative prophylactic protocol against inhibitor formation that did not require knowledge of T cell epitopes, consisting of daily oral administration of rapamycin for 1-month combined with frequent, low-dose intravenous injection of hF.IX protein. Experiments in T cell receptor transgenic mice showed that the route and dosing schedule of drug administration substantially affected Treg induction. When combined with intravenous antigen administration, oral delivery of rapamycin had to be performed daily in order to induce Treg, which were suppressive and phenotypically comparable to natural Treg.

  19. Antigenic Fingerprinting of Antibody Response in Humans following Exposure to Highly Pathogenic H7N7 Avian Influenza Virus: Evidence for Anti-PA-X Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka Yan; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Meijer, Adam; Golding, Hana

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infections with H7 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses remain a major public health concern. Adaptation of low-pathogenic H7N7 to highly pathogenic H7N7 in Europe in 2015 raised further alarm for a potential pandemic. An in-depth understanding of antibody responses to HPAI H7 virus following infection in humans could provide important insight into virus gene expression as well as define key protective and serodiagnostic targets. Here we used whole-genome gene fragment phage display libraries (GFPDLs) expressing peptides of 15 to 350 amino acids across the complete genome of the HPAI H7N7 A/Netherlands/33/03 virus. The hemagglutinin (HA) antibody epitope repertoires of 15 H7N7-exposed humans identified clear differences between individuals with no hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers (1:40. Several potentially protective H7N7 epitopes close to the HA receptor binding domain (RBD) and neuraminidase (NA) catalytic site were identified. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis identified a strong correlation between HA1 (but not HA2) binding antibodies and H7N7 HI titers. A proportion of HA1 binding in plasma was contributed by IgA antibodies. Antibodies against the N7 neuraminidase were less frequent but targeted sites close to the sialic acid binding site. Importantly, we identified strong antibody reactivity against PA-X, a putative virulence factor, in most H7N7-exposed individuals, providing the first evidence for in vivo expression of PA-X and its recognition by the immune system during human influenza A virus infection. This knowledge can help inform the development and selection of the most effective countermeasures for prophylactic as well as therapeutic treatments of HPAI H7N7 avian influenza virus. IMPORTANCE An outbreak of pathogenic H7N7 virus occurred in poultry farms in The Netherlands in 2003. Severe outcome included conjunctivitis, influenza-like illness, and one lethal infection. In this study, we investigated convalescent

  20. An inter-laboratory retrospective analysis of immunotoxicological endpoints in non-human primates: T-cell-dependent antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrec, Hervé; Cowan, Laine; Lagrou, Michelle; Krejsa, Cecile; Neradilek, Moni B; Polissar, Nayak L; Black, Lauren; Bussiere, Jeanine

    2011-01-01

    The Immunotoxicology Technical Committee of HESI sponsored a retrospective analysis of T-cell-dependent antibody responses in non-human primates (NHP). Antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), tetanus toxoid (TT), and/or sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in 178 NHP (from 8 sponsors, 13 testing sites, 30 studies) were statistically analyzed. Rates of positive or negative anti-KLH, -TT, and -SRBC primary and secondary IgM and IgG responses were compared. The influence of gender, country of origin, and previous immunization with a different antigen on response rate and kinetics of anti-KLH and anti-TT responses were analyzed. In addition, the magnitude of the antibody responses and the impact of the above-mentioned factors were analyzed. In addition, based upon the inter-individual variability of the peak response values, power calculations were conducted. The analysis demonstrated that the rates of positive responses were similar between the two genders, were high for KLH, SRBC, and TT challenges by 21 days following immunization (87, 100, and 84%, respectively, for IgGs) and did not include statistically significant differences based on NHP country of origin. Mean peak secondary responses were greater than peak primary responses; the magnitude of the response to KLH was increased by incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). Gender had little effect on the magnitude and variability of these responses. KLH and TT were associated with similar inter-animal variability, whereas in some situations KLH responses were less variable than responses to SRBC. The data suggested that inter-animal variability with KLH was similar with or without IFA. Power analysis illustrated that animal group sizes of typical standard toxicology studies (generally ≤ 4/sex) are likely to detect only fairly large treatment effects. However, combining males and females, when appropriate, will improve the power: an N of 8 to 12 could detect ≤ 3.1-fold differences in anti-KLH IgG responses.

  1. Delayed BCG immunization does not alter antibody responses to EPI vaccines in HIV-exposed and -unexposed South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesseling, Anneke C; Blakney, Anna K; Jones, Christine E; Esser, Monika M; de Beer, Corena; Kuhn, Louise; Cotton, Mark F; Jaspan, Heather B

    2016-07-12

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is routinely given at birth in tuberculosis-endemic settings due to its protective effect against disseminated tuberculosis in infants. BCG is however contraindicated in HIV-infected infants. We investigated whether delaying BCG vaccination to 14 weeks of age affected vaccine-induced antibody responses to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-conjugate, pertussis, tetanus and Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccines, in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and -unexposed uninfected (HUU) infants. Infants were randomized to receive BCG at birth or at 14 weeks of age. Blood was taken at 14, 24, and 52 weeks of age and analyzed for Hib, pertussis, tetanus and HBV specific antibodies. BCG was given either at birth (106 infants, 51 HEU) or at 14 weeks of age (74 infants, 50 HEU). The timing of BCG vaccination did not influence the antibody response to any antigen studied. However, in a non-randomized comparison, HEU infants had higher Hib antibody concentrations at weeks 14 and 24 (p=0.001 and BCG vaccination, was associated with antibody concentrations to Hib, pertussis, HBV and tetanus primary immunization. DOH-27-1106-1520. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of antibody response to vaccination against West Nile virus in thick billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavis, Jennifer; Larsen, R Scott; Lamberski, Nadine; Gaffney, Patricia; Gardner, Ian

    2011-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first documented in North America in New York City in 1999. Several deaths attributable to WNV have been reported in captive thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha), an endangered psittacine native to North America. The serologic responses in 12 captive adult thick-billed parrots after a series of three initial WNV vaccine injections with annual boosters over 6 yr was evaluated. In addition, the serologic responses of 11 thick-billed parrot chicks following an initial vaccination series to determine if there were seroconversions were also reported. Most adults (67%) had seroconverted after 5 yr of annual vaccination, with a median titer of 1:80 (range 1:40-1:160) for those that seroconverted. After the first year, birds were likely naturally exposed to WNV, which limited interpretation of titers. None of the chicks seroconverted during the initial three-vaccine series; only two of four chicks (50%) had seroconverted when tested at the 1-yr yearly booster, and at 2 yr, three of four chicks had seroconverted. Although some birds had detectable antibody titers, it is unclear whether this vaccine can reliably provide protection against WNV in thick-billed parrots.

  3. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  4. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal mouse IgG3 antibody (ABL 364) against the carbohydrate Le(y) antigen enhanced infection in vitro with HTLV-1 and with HIV-1 when propagated in both transformed and normal lymphocytes. Enhancement was independent of complement, occurred with both lymphocytes and monocytes as target cells...

  5. Different sources of dietary n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and their effects on antibody responses in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Awati, A.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Schrama, J.W.; Sijben, J.W.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. Effects of linoleic and linolenic acid provided via different oil sources on total antibody (Ab) titres, Ab isotypes after primary and secondary immunisation, and cutaneous hypersensitivity (CH) responses to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and maleyl-BSA, respectively, were studied in pullets fed on

  6. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nissen, T.N.; Birk, N.M.; Smits, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.; Stensballe, L.G.; Netea, M.G.; Klis, F. van der; Benn, C.S.; Pryds, O.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

  7. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2015-01-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn’s disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn’s disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF+ immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF+ cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF+ cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn’s disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. PMID:24562382

  8. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus

    2015-01-01

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens...

  9. The Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin enhances the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated activation of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, Francisco; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Sanchez-Garcia, Francisco Javier; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Garfias, Yonathan; Lascurain, Ricardo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-08-01

    Activation of CD4(+) T cells plays a main role in adaptive immune response by regulating cellular and humoral immunity via processes associated with changes in cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Lectins are glycoproteins that specifically recognize oligosaccharides and have been used to characterize changes in oligosaccharides present on T cell surface and their effects on activation. A lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus seeds (ALL) is specific for glycoprotein structures containing galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and is able to bind to human and murine CD4(+) T cells, however, its effect on activation remains unclear. We examined the effect of ALL on the activation of peripheral blood human CD4(+) T cells and analyzed cell proliferation, expression of the activation-associated molecule CD25, secretion of the activation-dependent cytokine interleukin (IL)-2 and intracellular calcium influx changes using flow cytometry. CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies that provided the first activation signal in the presence or absence of ALL. ALL alone did not induce CD4(+) T cell activation but when also stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies, ALL up-regulated CD25 expression, cell proliferation, IL-2 secretion and an intracellular calcium influx in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ALL recognized CD4(+) T cells expressing the CD69 and Ki67 molecules expressed only by activated T cells and induced production of the TH1-type cytokine interferon-gamma. Our findings indicate that ALL binds to human activated CD4(+) T cells and enhances the degree of activation of CD4(+) T cells that are stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies. ALL provides a new tool for analyzing T cell activation mechanisms.

  10. Impact of child malnutrition on the specific anti-Plasmodium falciparum antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillol, Florie; Sarr, Jean Biram; Boulanger, Denis; Cisse, Badara; Sokhna, Cheikh; Riveau, Gilles; Simondon, Kirsten Bork; Remoué, Franck

    2009-06-02

    In sub-Saharan Africa, preschool children represent the population most vulnerable to malaria and malnutrition. It is widely recognized that malnutrition compromises the immune function, resulting in higher risk of infection. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between malaria, malnutrition and specific immunity. In the present study, the anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG antibody (Ab) response was evaluated in children according to the type of malnutrition. Anthropometric assessment and blood sample collection were carried out during a cross-sectional survey including rural Senegalese preschool children. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in July 2003 at the onset of the rainy season. Malnutrition was defined as stunting (height-for-age <-2 z-scores) or wasting (weight-for-height <-2 z-scores). The analysis was performed on all malnourished children in July (n = 161, either stunted, n = 142 or wasted, n = 19), pair-matched to well-nourished controls. The IgG Ab response to P. falciparum whole extracts (schizont antigens) was assessed by ELISA in sera of the included children. Both the prevalence of anti-malarial immune responders and specific IgG Ab levels were significantly lower in malnourished children than in controls. Depending on the type of malnutrition, wasted children and stunted children presented a lower specific IgG Ab response than their respective controls, but this difference was significant only in stunted children (P = 0.026). This down-regulation of the specific Ab response seemed to be explained by severely stunted children (HAZ < or = -2.5) compared to their controls (P = 0.03), while no significant difference was observed in mildly stunted children (-2.5 < HAZ <-2.0). The influence of child malnutrition on the specific anti-P. falciparum Ab response appeared to be independent of the intensity of infection. Child malnutrition, and particularly stunting, may down-regulate the anti-P. falciparum Ab response, both in

  11. Measurement of platelet responsiveness using antibody-coated magnetic beads for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zijp, Helena M; Schot, Claudia C M M; De Jong, Arthur M; Jongmans, Nona; Van Holten, Thijs C; Roest, Mark; Prins, Menno W J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate novel methods for the quantification of platelet responsiveness that are suited for implementation in lab-on-a-chip devices. Magnetic beads are convenient carriers for rapid capture and manipulation of biological cells in a miniaturized system. In this article, we demonstrate that antibody-coated magnetic beads can be used to quantify platelet responsiveness. We use anti-CD62P coated beads to capture activated platelets from samples stimulated with a PAR-1 specific agonist SFLLRN, also known as thrombin receptor activator peptide. The responsiveness of the platelets is analyzed via the remaining unbound platelets in the solution and compared to a reference method in which the number of activated platelets is analyzed via fluorescent labeling. The effective concentrations for platelet activation are in agreement for the two assay types, proving that platelet responsiveness can be quantified using antibody-coated magnetic beads. We discuss the outlook for application in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. Cryptic genetic gluten intolerance revealed by intestinal antitransglutaminase antibodies and response to gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not, Tarcisio; Ziberna, Fabiana; Vatta, Serena; Quaglia, Sara; Martelossi, Stefano; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Marzari, Roberto; Florian, Fiorella; Vecchiet, Monica; Sulic, Ana-Marija; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew; Sblattero, Daniele; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-11-01

    Antitransglutaminase (anti-TG2) antibodies are synthesised in the intestine and their presence seems predictive of future coeliac disease (CD). This study investigates whether mucosal antibodies represent an early stage of gluten intolerance even in the absence of intestinal damage and serum anti-TG2 antibodies. This study investigated 22 relatives of patients with CD genetically predisposed to gluten intolerance but negative for both serum anti-TG2 antibodies and intestinal abnormalities. Fifteen subjects were symptomatic and seven were asymptomatic. The presence of immunoglobulin A anti-TG2 antibodies in the intestine was studied by creating phage-antibody libraries against TG-2. The presence of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies was compared with the serum concentration of the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), a marker for early intestinal mucosal damage. The effects of a 12-month gluten-free diet on anti-TG2 antibody production and the subjects' clinical condition was monitored. Twelve subjects entered the study as controls. The intestinal mucosa appeared normal in 18/22; 4 had a slight increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes. Mucosal anti-TG2 antibodies were isolated in 15/22 subjects (68%); in particular symptomatic subjects were positive in 13/15 cases and asymptomatic subjects in 2/7 cases (p=0.01). No mucosal antibodies were selected from the controls' biopsies. There was significant correlation between the presence of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies and positive concentrations of I-FABP (p=0.0008). After a gluten-free diet, 19/22 subjects underwent a second intestinal biopsy, which showed that anti-TG2 antibodies had disappeared in 12/15 (p=0.002), while I-FABP decreased significantly (pgluten intolerance has been described in which none of the usual diagnostic markers is present. Symptoms and intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies respond to a gluten free-diet. The detection of intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies by the phage-antibody libraries has an

  13. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B

    1993-01-01

    demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A......The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...

  14. Stimulation of the primary anti-HIV antibody response by IFN-{alpha} in patients with acute HIV-1 infection

    OpenAIRE

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Godot, Véronique; Colin, Céline; Krzysiek, Roman; Tran, Thi; Poignard, Pascal; Venet, Alain; Hosmalin, Anne; Lebon, Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Chêne, Geneviève; Emilie, Dominique; The Interprim Anrs 112 Study Group,

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Type I IFNs are needed for the production of antiviral antibodies in mice; whether they also stimulate primary antibody responses in vivo during human viral infections is unknown. This was assessed in patients acutely infected with HIV-1 and treated with IFN-alpha2b. Patients with acute HIV-1 infection were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy alone (Group A, n=60) or combined for 14 weeks with pegylated-IFN-alpha2b (Group B, n=30). Emergence of anti-HIV antibo...

  15. Salivary IgA antibody responses to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus mutans in preterm and fullterm newborn children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Sesso, Maria Lucia Talarico; Borges, Mariana Castro Loureiro; Mattos-Graner, Renata O; Smith, Daniel James; Ferriani, Virginia Paes Leme

    2012-06-01

    The intensities and specificities of salivary IgA antibody responses to antigens of Streptococcus mutans, the main pathogen of dental caries, may influence colonization by these organisms during the first 1.5 year of life. Thus, the ontogeny of salivary IgA responses to oral colonizers continues to warrant investigation, especially with regard to the influence of birth conditions, e.g. prematurity, on the ability of children to efficiently respond to oral microorganisms. In this study, we characterised the salivary antibody responses to two bacterial species which are prototypes of pioneer and pathogenic microorganisms of the oral cavity (Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus mutans, respectively) in fullterm (FT) and preterm (PT) newborn children. Salivas from 123 infants (70 FT and 53 PT) were collected during the first 10h after birth and levels of IgA and IgM antibodies and the presence of S. mutans and S. mitis were analysed respectively by ELISA and by chequerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Two subgroups of 24 FT and 24 PT children were compared with respect to patterns of antibody specificities against S. mutans and S. mitis antigens, using Western blot assays. Cross-adsorption of 10 infant's saliva was tested to S. mitis, S. mutans and Enterococcus faecalis antigens. Salivary levels of IgA at birth were 2.5-fold higher in FT than in PT children (Mann-Whitney; P<0.05). Salivary IgA antibodies reactive with several antigens of S. mitis and S. mutans were detected at birth in children with undetectable levels of those bacteria. Adsorption of infant saliva with cells of S. mutans produced a reduction of antibodies recognizing S. mitis antigens in half of the neonates. The diversity and intensity of IgA responses were lower in PT compared to FT children, although those differences were not significant. These data provide evidence that children have salivary IgA antibodies shortly after birth, which might influence the establishment of the oral microbiota, and that

  16. Effect of Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae aqueous extract on antibody response to Bothrops asper venom and immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Chaves

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea roots on the murine antibody response to Bothrops asper snake venom in vivo was studied. Three groups were used. Group #1, baseline control, was treated with snake venom plus PBS. Group #2 was treated with snake venom plus sodium alginate as adjuvant (routine method used at Instituto Clodomiro Picado, and group #3 or experimental group, was treated with snake venom plus aqueous extract of E. purpurea root as adjuvant. In all groups, the first inoculation was done with Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA. By the time of the second bleeding, mice in group #3 showed a remarkable increment in the level of anti-venom antibodies compared with those in groups #1 or #2. In vitro immune cell proliferation as a response to aqueous extract of E. purpurea root was studied using human lymphocytes activated with different lectins (Con A, PHA and PWM. In all cases, increase in percentage of lymphoproliferation was greater when E. purpurea root extract was used in addition to individual lectins. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (1: 113-119. Epub 2007 March. 31.Se estudió in vivo, el efecto del extracto acuoso de las raíces de Echinacea purpurea en la respuesta de los anticuerpos murinos al veneno de la serpiente Bothrops asper. El grupo 1 control, fue tratado con el veneno y PBS. El grupo 2 con veneno y alginato de sodio (método utilizado en el Instituto Clodomiro Picado, y el grupo 3 o experimental, con veneno y extracto acuoso de las raíces de E. purpurea. En todos los grupos, la primera inmunización fue hecha con FCA (Freund’s Complete Adjuvant. En las muestras correspondientes a la segunda sangría, los ratones del grupo 3 mostraron un marcado incremento en el nivel de anticuerpos, en comparación con los ratones de los otros grupos. También se determinó la proliferación de células inmunes in vitro, como respuesta al extracto acuoso de la raíz de E. purpurea, utilizando linfocitos humanos activados con

  17. H. pylori-infection and antibody immune response in a rural Tanzanian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggar Robert J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is ubiquitous in sub-Saharan Africa, but paradoxically gastric cancer is rare. Methods Sera collected during a household-based survey in rural Tanzania in 1985 were tested for anti-H. pylori IgG and IgG subclass antibodies by enzyme immunoassay. Odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI of association of seropositivity with demographic variables were computed by logistic regression models. Results Of 788 participants, 513 were aged ≤17 years. H. pylori seropositivity increased from 76% at 0–4 years to 99% by ≥18 years of age. Seropositivity was associated with age (OR 11.5, 95% CI 4.2–31.4 for 10–17 vs. 0–4 years, higher birth-order (11.1; 3.6–34.1 for ≥3rd vs. 1st born, and having a seropositive next-older sibling (2.7; 0.9–8.3. Median values of IgG subclass were 7.2 for IgG1 and 2.0 for IgG2. The median IgG1/IgG2 ratio was 3.1 (IQR: 1.7–5.6, consistent with a Th2-dominant immune profile. Th2-dominant response was more frequent in children than adults (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3–4.4. Conclusion H. pylori seropositivity was highly prevalent in Tanzania and the immunological response was Th2-dominant. Th2-dominant immune response, possibly caused by concurrent bacterial or parasitic infections, could explain, in part, the lower risk of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer in Africa.

  18. Expression of a single-chain variable-fragment antibody against a Fusarium virguliforme toxin peptide enhances tolerance to sudden death syndrome in transgenic soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Hargeet K; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2012-06-01

    Plants do not produce antibodies. However, plants can correctly assemble functional antibody molecules encoded by mammalian antibody genes. Many plant diseases are caused by pathogen toxins. One such disease is the soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). SDS is a serious disease caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. The pathogen, however, has never been isolated from diseased foliar tissues. Thus, one or more toxins produced by the pathogen have been considered to cause foliar SDS. One of these possible toxins, FvTox1, was recently identified. We investigated whether expression of anti-FvTox1 single-chain variable-fragment (scFv) antibody in transgenic soybean can confer resistance to foliar SDS. We have created two scFv antibody genes, Anti-FvTox1-1 and Anti-FvTox1-2, encoding anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies from RNAs of a hybridoma cell line that expresses mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Both anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies interacted with an antigenic site of FvTox1 that binds to mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Binding of FvTox1 by the anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies, expressed in either Escherichia coli or transgenic soybean roots, was initially verified on nitrocellulose membranes. Expression of anti-FvTox1-1 in stable transgenic soybean plants resulted in enhanced foliar SDS resistance compared with that in nontransgenic control plants. Our results suggest that i) FvTox1 is an important pathogenicity factor for foliar SDS development and ii) expression of scFv antibodies against pathogen toxins could be a suitable biotechnology approach for protecting crop plants from toxin-induced diseases.

  19. Antibody responses to vaccination and immune function in patients with haematological malignancies - studies in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia autologous stem cell recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, A.M.T. van der

    2007-01-01

    This thesis concerns the antibody responses to vaccination and immune function of patients with several forms of haematological diseases. Antibody responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and in autologous stem cell transplant recipients were studied. In the autologous stem

  20. Specific serum antibody responses following a Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis co-infection in swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokken, G.C.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838578; van Eerden, E.; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Augustijn, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836680; Graat, E.A.M.; Franssen, F.F.J.; Gorlich, K.; Buschtöns, S.; Tenter, A.M.; van der Giessen, J.W.B.; Bergwerff, A.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125023553; van Knapen, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114749

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the dynamics of parasite specific antibody development in Trichinella spiralis and Toxoplasma gondii co-infections in pigs and to compare these with antibody dynamics in T. spiralis and T. gondii single infections. In this experiment, fifty-four pigs were divided

  1. Specific serum antibody responses following a Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis co-infection in swine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokken, G.; Eerden, van E.; Opsteegh, M.; Augustijn, M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Franssen, F.; Görlich, K.; Buschtöns, S.; Tenter, A.M.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.; Bergwerff, A.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the dynamics of parasite specific antibody development in Trichinella spiralis and Toxoplasma gondii co-infections in pigs and to compare these with antibody dynamics in T. spiralis and T. gondii single infections. In this experiment, fiftyfour pigs were divided

  2. Characterization of Zika virus binding and enhancement potential of a large panel of flavivirus murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Elinor; Hensley, Scott E

    2017-08-01

    Zika viruses (ZIKVs) are circulating in parts of the world endemic for other flavivirus infections. Some cross-reactive antibodies (Abs) elicited by prior flavivirus exposures can bind to ZIKV and enhance infection of Fc receptor-bearing cells. Here, we measured ZIKV binding of 54 murine monoclonal Abs (mAbs) elicited by exposure with Dengue virus and West Nile virus antigens. We found that 8 of 54 mAbs recognized the envelope protein of ZIKV in conventional binding assays. These 8 cross-reactive mAbs have different specificities; most recognize the DI/II region of the envelope protein but one mAb recognized the DIII lateral ridge of the envelope protein. Interestingly, only 3 of these cross-reactive mAbs were able to enhance ZIKV infection in vitro, and enhancing potential was not strictly correlated with relative binding ability. These data suggest that the ability of flavivirus Abs to enhance ZIKV is dependent on multiple factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibodies targeting dengue virus envelope domain III are not required for serotype-specific protection or prevention of enhancement in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Katherine L; Wahala, Wahala M P B; Orozco, Susana; de Silva, Aravinda M; Harris, Eva

    2012-07-20

    The envelope (E) protein of dengue virus (DENV) is composed of three domains (EDI, EDII, EDIII) and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Many monoclonal antibodies that bind EDIII strongly neutralize DENV. However in vitro studies indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing potency of human DENV-immune serum. In this study, we assess the role of anti-EDIII antibodies in mouse and human DENV-immune serum in neutralizing or enhancing DENV infection in mice. We demonstrate that EDIII-depleted human DENV-immune serum was protective against homologous DENV infection in vivo. Although EDIII-depleted DENV-immune mouse serum demonstrated decreased neutralization potency in vitro, reduced protection in some organs, and enhanced disease in vivo, administration of increased volumes of EDIII-depleted serum abrogated these effects. These data indicate that anti-EDIII antibodies contribute to protection and minimize enhancement when present, but can be replaced by neutralizing antibodies targeting other epitopes on the dengue virion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel variable antibody fragment dimerized by leucine zippers with enhanced neutralizing potency against rabies virus G protein compared to its corresponding single-chain variable antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuang; Cheng, Yue; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2015-12-01

    Fatal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragments (scFv), which are composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and a variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, can potentially be used to replace RIG. However, in our previous study, a scFv (scFV57S) specific for the rabies virus (RV) G protein showed a lower neutralizing potency than that of its parent IgG due to lower stability and altered peptide assembly pattern. In monoclonal antibodies, the VH and VL interact non-covalently, while in scFvs the VH is connected covalently with the VL by the artificial linker. In this study, we constructed and expressed two peptides 57VL-JUN-HIS and 57VH-FOS-HA in Escherichia coli. The well-known Fos and Jun leucine zippers were utilized to dimerize VH and VL similarly to the IgG counterpart. The two peptides assembled to form zipFv57S in vitro. Due to the greater similarity in structure with IgG, the zipFv57S protein showed a higher binding ability and affinity resulting in notable improvement of in vitro neutralizing activity over its corresponding scFv. The zipFv57S protein was also found to be more stable and showed similar protective rate as RIG in mice challenged with a lethal dose of RV. Our results not only indicated zipFv57S as an ideal alternative for RIG in PEP but also offered a novel and efficient hetero-dimerization pattern of VH and VL leading to enhanced neutralizing potency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Monitoring the bulk milk antibody response to bovine viral diarrhea in dairy herds vaccinated with inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A M; Arnaiz, I; Eiras, C; Camino, F; Sanjuán, M L; Yus, E; Diéguez, F J

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine long-term responses in dairy herds after vaccination with 1 of 3 inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccines with regard to antibodies against p80 protein in bulk tank milk samples, as detected by ELISA. In the present study, 29 dairy herds were vaccinated with Bovilis BVD (MSD Animal Health, Milton Keynes, UK), 11 with Hiprabovis Balance (Laboratorios Hipra, Amer, Spain), and 9 with Pregsure BVD (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ). In these herds, bulk tank milk samples were collected and examined at the time of the first vaccination and every 6 mo during a 3-yr period. Samples were analyzed with a commercial ELISA test for the p80 protein of BVDV. The results demonstrated that vaccination affected the level of antibodies against p80. Hence, vaccination status should be taken into consideration when interpreting bulk tank milk antibody tests. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variation and heritability of the antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Danish Hostein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanne; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Berg, Peer

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic variation and the heritability of the ability to establish an immune response by producing antibodies to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Antibody levels were determined using an ELISA and measuring optical density (OD) values from...... milk samples of 11,535 cows from 99 herds. The pedigree of the 11,535 cows and information about days in milk, parity, milk yield, and others were obtained from the Danish Cattle database. The statistical analyses were made using a bivari