WorldWideScience

Sample records for energy nuclear reactor

  1. Energy from nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hospe, J.

    1977-01-01

    This VDI-Nachrichten series has the target to provide a technical-objective basis for the discussion of the pros and cons of nuclear power. The first part deals with LWR-type reactors which so far have prevailed in nuclear power generation. (orig.) [de

  2. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers

  3. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Jimenez, J.; Cobian, J.

    2007-01-01

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)

  4. Hybrid reactors: Nuclear breeding or energy production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Lafuente, Antonio; Abanades, Alberto; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the long-standing tradition on hybrid research, an assessment model is presented in order to characterize the hybrid performance under different objectives. In hybrids, neutron multiplication in the subcritical blanket plays a major role, not only for energy production and nuclear breeding, but also for tritium breeding, which is fundamental requirement in fusion-fission hybrids. All three objectives are better achieved with high values of the neutron multiplication factor (k-eff) with the obvious and fundamental limitation that it cannot reach criticality under any event, particularly, in the case of a loss of coolant accident. This limitation will be very important in the selection of the coolant. Some general considerations will be proposed, as guidelines for assessing the hybrid potential in a given scenario. Those guidelines point out that hybrids can be of great interest for the future of nuclear energy in a framework of Sustainable Development, because they can contribute to the efficient exploitation of nuclear fuels, with very high safety features. Additionally, a proposal is presented on a blanket specially suited for fusion-fission hybrids, although this reactor concept is still under review, and new work is needed for identifying the most suitable blanket composition, which can vary depending on the main objective of the hybrid.

  5. An energy amplifier fluidized bed nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.; Seifritz, W.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of a fluidized bed nuclear reactor driven by an energy amplifier system is described. The reactor has promising characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum in order to be a plutonium burner or have it operate with thorium fuel cycle. (orig.) [de

  6. Advanced energy system with nuclear reactors as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Nikitin, K.

    2007-01-01

    recovery system is also applicable to a fast reactor (FR) with a supercritical CO 2 gas turbine that achieves higher cycle efficiency than conventional sodium cooled FRs with steam turbines. The FR will eliminate problems of conventional FRs related to safety, plant maintenance, and construction costs. The FR consumes efficiently trans-uranium elements (TRU) produced in light water reactors as fuel and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. An Advanced Energy System (AES) with nuclear reactors as an energy source has been proposed which supply electricity and heat to cities. The AES has three objectives: 1. Save energy resources and reduce green house gas emissions, attaining total energy utilization efficiency higher than 85% through waste heat recovery and utilization. 2. Foster a recycling society that produces methane and methanol for fuel cells from waste products of cities and farms. 3. Consume TRU produced in LWRs as fuel for FRs, and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. References 1. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and K. Fujima, 'Zero Waste Heat Release Nuclear Cogeneration System, 'Proc. 2003 Intl. Congress on Advanced Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP'03), Cordoba, Spain, May 4-7, 2003, Paper 3313. 2. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and Y. Muto, 'Medium Temperature Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Reactor, 'Nucl. Eng. Design, 230, pp. 195-207 (2004). 3. H. N. Tran and Y. Kato, 'New 2 37Np Burning Strategy in a Supercritical CO 2 Cooled Fast Reactor Core Attaining Zero Burnup Reactivity Loss,' Proc. American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics (PHYSOR 2006), Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 10-14, 2006

  7. Reactor, radioactive isotopes and nuclear energy: their avatars in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, M.

    1981-01-01

    A brief history of nuclear affairs in Venezuela, since the decision to bring a research reactor (3MW) to Venezuela (1954) to current situation, is presented. Since the establishment of the National Council for Nuclear Affairs (CONAN) and then of the National Council for the Development of Nuclear Industry (CONADIN), steps are being taken to train nuclear engineers, since most studies thus far indicate the last few years of the Century as the time when nuclear energy will have to supplement other sources

  8. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  9. Nuclear energy renaissance and reactor physics. Enlightenment of PHYSOR'08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Feng

    2010-01-01

    In relation to world's growing energy demands and concerns on global warming, nuclear energy as a sustainable resource is in its new period of renaissance. This is reflected in the record number of 447 papers on the International Conference on the Physics of Reactors--PHYSOR'08 held in Switzerland in 2008. The contents of these papers include the developments and frontiers in various directions of reactor physics. Featured by vast area of subjects, these emphasize the fact that the scope of the reactor physicist's R and D interests has expands considerably in recent years. The main keynote addresses and technical plenary lectures are briefly introduced. Some items concerned by the conference, such as: the status and perspective of nuclear energy's R and D, deployment and policy in main nuclear nations, the potential role of nuclear energy in mitigation global warming and slow down the GHG release, the sustainability of resource for nuclear energy utilization. Status and outlook about the needs of research and test facilities required in nuclear energy development, etc. are discussed. (authors)

  10. Fast reactors: the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, H.G. de.

    1988-08-01

    The main problems to be solved for FBR type reactors become viable economically, presenting the research programs of Europe, United States of America, Japan and Brazil are described. The cooperations between interested countries for improving FBR type reactors, and the financial and human resources necessaries for the development of programs, are evaluated. The fuel cycle is also analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. Integral Fast Reactor: A future source of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southon, R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a reactor concept that would be an important part of the worlds energy future. This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept which provides significant improvements over current generation reactors in reactor safety, plant complexity, nuclear proliferation, and waste generation. Two major facilities, a reactor and a fuel cycle facility, make up the IFR concept. The reactor uses fast neutrons and metal fuel in a sodium coolant at atmospheric pressure that relies on laws of physics to keep it safe. The fuel cycle facility is a hot cell using remote handling techniques for fabricating reactor fuel. The fuel feed stock includes spent fuel from the reactor, and potentially, spent light water reactor fuel and plutonium from weapons. This paper discusses the unique features of the IFR concept and the differences the quality assurance program has from current commercial practices. The IFR concept provides an opportunity to design a quality assurance program that makes use of the best contemporary ideas on management and quality

  12. The generation IV nuclear reactor systems - Energy of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru; Jianu, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Ten nations joined within the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), agreeing on a framework for international cooperation in research. Their goal is to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in an economically competitive way while addressing the issues of safety, proliferation, and other public perception concerns. The objective is for the Gen IV systems to be available for deployment by 2030. Using more than 100 nuclear experts from its 10 member nations, the GIF has developed a Gen IV Technology Roadmap to guide the research and development of the world's most advanced, efficient and safe nuclear power systems. The Gen IV Technology Roadmap calls for extensive research and development of six different potential future reactor systems. These include water-cooled, gas-cooled, liquid metal-cooled and nonclassical systems. One or more of these reactor systems will provide the best combination of safety, reliability, efficiency and proliferation resistance at a competitive cost. The main goals for the Gen IV Nuclear Energy Systems are: - Provide sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel use for worldwide energy production; - Minimize and manage their nuclear waste and noticeably reduce the long-term stewardship burden in the future, improving the protection of public health and the environment; - Increase the assurance that these reactors are very unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased protection against acts of terrorism; - Have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; - Have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects; - Excel in safety and reliability; - Have a low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage. (authors)

  13. Effects of Nuclear Energy on Sustainable Development and Energy Security: Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjoo Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a stepwise method of selecting appropriate indicators to measure effects of a specific nuclear energy option on sustainable development and energy security, and also to compare an energy option with another. Focusing on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, one of the highlighted Generation IV reactors, we measure and compare its effects with the standard pressurized water reactor-based nuclear power, and then with coal power. Collecting 36 indicators, five experts select seven key indicators to meet data availability, nuclear energy relevancy, comparability among energy options, and fit with Korean energy policy objectives. The results show that sodium-cooled fast reactors is a better alternative than existing nuclear power as well as coal electricity generation across social, economic and environmental dimensions. Our method makes comparison between energy alternatives easier, thereby clarifying consequences of different energy policy decisions.

  14. Pursuing nuclear energy with no nuclear contamination - from neutron flux reactor to deuteron flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X. Z.; Wei, Q. M.; Liu, B.; Zhu, X. G.; Ren, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Pursuing nuclear energy with no nuclear contamination has been a long endeavor since the first fission reactor in 1942. Four major concepts have been the key issues: i.e. resonance, negative feed back, self-sustaining, nuclear radiation. When nuclear energy was just discovered in laboratory, the key issue was to enlarge it from the micro-scale to the macro-scale. Slowing-down the neutrons was the key issue to enhance the fission cross-section in order to build-up the neutron flux through the chain-reactions using resonance between neutron and fissile materials. Once the chain-reaction was realized, the negative feed-back was the key issue to keep the neutron flux at the allowable level. The negative reaction coefficient was introduced by the thermal expansion, and the resonant absorption in cadmium or boron was used to have a self-sustaining fission reactor with neutron flux. Then the strong neutron flux became the origin of all nuclear contamination, and a heavy shielding limits the application of the nuclear energy. The fusion approach to nuclear energy was much longer; nevertheless, it evolved with the similar issues. The resonance between deuteron and triton was resorted to enlarge the fusion cross section in order to keep a self-sustaining hot plasma. However, the 14 MeV neutron emission became the origin of all nuclear contamination again. Deuteron plus helium-3 fusion reaction was proposed to avoid neutron emission although there are two more difficulties: the helium-3 is supposed to be carried back from the moon; and much more higher temperature plasma has to be confined while 50 years needed to realized the deuteron-triton plasma already. Even if deuteron plus helium-3 fusion plasma might be realized in a much higher temperature plasma, we still have the neutron emission from the deuteron-deuteron fusion reaction in the deuteron plus helium-3 fusion plasma. Polarized deuteron-deuteron fusion reaction was proposed early in 1980's to select the neutron

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, Ross.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is treated under the headings: nuclear energy -what is it; fusion (principles; practice); fission (principles); reactor types and systems (fast (neutron) reactors as breeders; fast reactors; thermal reactors; graphite-moderated thermal reactors; the CANDU reactor; light water reactors - the BWR and the PWR); the nuclear fuel cycle (waste storage; fuel element manufacture; enrichment processes; uranium mining); safety and risk assessment; the nuclear power industry and the economy (regulating authorities; economics; advantages and disadvantages). (U.K.)

  16. Innovative Energy Planning and Nuclear Option Using CANDLE Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, H; Nagata, A; Mingyu, Y [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A new reactor burn-up strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burn-up strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burn-up is theoretically zero for ideal equilibrium condition, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed during life of operation. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors. The infinite-medium neutron multiplication factor of replacing fuel is less than unity. Therefore, the transportation and storage of replacing fuels becomes easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. Small long life fast reactor with CANDLE burn-up concept has investigated with depleted uranium as a replacing fuel. Both core diameter and height are chosen to be 2.0 m, and the thermal power is 200 MW. Lead-bismuth is used as a coolant, and nitride (enriched N-15) fuel are employed. The velocity of burning region along burn-up is less than 1.0 cm/year that enables a long life design easily. The core averaged discharged fuel burn-up is about 40 percent. It is about ten times of light water reactor burn-up. The spent fuel volume becomes one-tenth of light water reactor spent fuel. If a light water reactor with a certain power output has been operated for 40 years, the CANDLE reactor can be operated for 2000 years with the same power output and with only depleted uranium left after fuel production for the light water reactor. The system does not need any reprocessing or enrichment. Therefore, the reactor operation becomes very safe, the waste

  17. Innovative Energy Planning and Nuclear Option Using CANDLE Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.; Nagata, A.; Mingyu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A new reactor burn-up strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move upward (or downward) along its core axis. This burn-up strategy can derive many merits. The change of excess reactivity along burn-up is theoretically zero for ideal equilibrium condition, and shim rods will not be required for this reactor. The reactor becomes free from accidents induced by unexpected control rods withdrawal. The core characteristics, such as power feedback coefficients and power peaking factor, are not changed during life of operation. Therefore, the operation of the reactor becomes much easier than the conventional reactors. The infinite-medium neutron multiplication factor of replacing fuel is less than unity. Therefore, the transportation and storage of replacing fuels becomes easy and safe, since they are free from criticality accidents. Small long life fast reactor with CANDLE burn-up concept has investigated with depleted uranium as a replacing fuel. Both core diameter and height are chosen to be 2.0 m, and the thermal power is 200 MW. Lead-bismuth is used as a coolant, and nitride (enriched N-15) fuel are employed. The velocity of burning region along burn-up is less than 1.0 cm/year that enables a long life design easily. The core averaged discharged fuel burn-up is about 40 percent. It is about ten times of light water reactor burn-up. The spent fuel volume becomes one-tenth of light water reactor spent fuel. If a light water reactor with a certain power output has been operated for 40 years, the CANDLE reactor can be operated for 2000 years with the same power output and with only depleted uranium left after fuel production for the light water reactor. The system does not need any reprocessing or enrichment. Therefore, the reactor operation becomes very safe, the waste

  18. Encapsulated nuclear heat source reactors for energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Susplugas, A.; Hong, S.G.; Monti, L.; Sumini, M.; Okawa, T.

    2006-01-01

    A spectrum of Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactors have been conceptually designed over the last few years; they span a power range from 10 MWe to -200 MWe and consider a number of coolants and fuel types. Common features of all these designs include very long life cores - exceeding 20 effective full power years; nearly zero burnup reactivity swing; natural circulation; superb safety; autonomous load following capability; simplicity of operation and maintenance. ENHS reactors could be of particular interest for providing electricity, thermal energy and, possibly, desalinated water to communities that are not connected to a central electricity grid such as to many pacific islands and to remote communities in the mainland of different countries. ENHS reactors provide energy security by virtue of a couple of features: (1) Once an ENHS reactor is commissioned, the community has assured clean energy supply for at least 20 years without needing fuel supply. (2) The energy value of the fuel loaded (in the factory) in the ENHS module is preserved; what is needed for generating energy for additional 20+ years is to remove the fission products, add depleted uranium for makeup fuel, refabricate fuel rods and load into a new module. This fuel recycling is envisioned done by either the supplier country or by a regional or international fuel cycle centre. As the ENHS module is replaced at its entirety at the end of the core life - that is brought about by radiation damage, the ENHS plant life is likely to last for over 100 years. The above features also offer exceptional stability in the price of energy generated by the ENHS reactor. The reference ENHS design will be described followed by a brief description of the design options developed and a summary of their performance characteristics

  19. Innovative Nuclear Reactors Implementation in the Armenian Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate the importance of nuclear energy development in Armenia with the use of innovative nuclear reactors when considering the long-term energy planning, taking into account the specific conditions and tendencies, which are formed and developed in economy of Armenia and, in particular, in fuel-energy complex of the country. When developing the long-term program, the main factors among others considered were assumed to be the energy independence and energy security of a country, and not only the least 'cost factor', as it was usually done before. When that program was under development, such social aspects as application of the infrastructure existing within the relevant sphere, and financing of decommissioning of existing units of the Armenian NNP were also took into consideration. The studies performed have shown that implementation of innovative medium size reactors would enable the energy sector of Armenia to meet all those requirements. The issues of environmental protection were also taken into consideration when developing that program. (authors)

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  1. Reactor, radioactive isotopes and nuclear energy: their avatars in Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, M

    1981-03-01

    The decision to bring a fair sized (3MW) research reactor to Venezuela, made in 1954 by a single, ambitious and prestige seeking individual working with a dictatorial government, is a clear case of cargo cult, an implicit desire to import industralized countries' science and technology by purchasing key in hand their expensive machine. The reactor has never ceased to experience difficulties since then, not so much of a physical or mechanical, but rather of a human nature and due to the almost grotesque distance between the machine's potentialities and the quantity and quality of personnel available. Demand and motivation have been scarce, because fossil and hydro energy have been so far plentiful. Military motivation was in theory absent. Perspectives have apparently improved, not that a scientific community has been trained and an infrastructure exists. Radioactive isotopes have been widely used in Venezuela, beginning in 1953, for medical practice and biological research. At present about 2.5 million bolivars worth of radioisotopes are imported annually, mostly from the US and to a lesser extent, from UK. Steps are being taken to train nuclear engineers, since most studies thus far indicate the last few years of the century as the time when nuclear energy will begin to enter the picture, and since a period of at least ten years is needed between the decision to build an atomic power plant and the time it goes into operation. Choice of technique has not been made, but an active, although still small, uranium prospecting program has been initiated. It seems as if, by the end of the century, either nuclear energy will have to supplement other sources, or standard of living of Venezuelans - at least that relative minority who can afford to live well - will drop. 2 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Energy-analysis of the total nuclear energy cycle based on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistemaker, J.

    1975-01-01

    The energy economy of the total nuclear energy cycle is investigated. Attention is paid to the importance of fossil fuel saving by using nuclear energy. The energy analysis is based on the construction and operation of power plants with an electric output of 1000MWe. Light water moderated reactors with a 2.7 - 3.2% enriched uranium core are considered. Additionally, the whole fuel cycle including ore winning and refining, enrichment and fuel element manufacturing and reprocessing has been taken into account. Neither radioactive waste storage problems nor safety problems related to the nuclear energy cycle and safeguarding have been dealt with, as exhaustive treatments can be found elswhere

  3. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presby, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    .... This has potential benefits for space nuclear reactor power systems currently in development. The primary obstacle to space operation of thermophotovoltaic devices appears to be the low heat rejection temperatures which necessitate large radiator areas...

  4. Nuclear energy. The innovations of the N4 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The coupling to the electric network of the two first units of N4 type reactors, on the site of Chooz in the Ardennes, marks the third great step of the French nuclear programme of PWR type reactors, after the realization of 34 units of 900 MWe and 20 units of 1300 M We. The nuclear boiler N4, realizes a new evolution in power, in performances and in reliability. (N.C.)

  5. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0055] Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of Final Design Approval The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a final design approval (FDA) to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic...

  6. Analysis of reactor strategies to meet world nuclear energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligon, D.M.; Brogli, R.H.

    1979-07-01

    A number of reactor deployment strategies for long-term nuclear system development are analyzed from a global perspective in terms of resource utilization and economic benefits. Two time frames are chosen: 1975 - 2025 and 1975 - 2050. Uranium demand for various strategies is compared with uranium supply assuming different production capabilities and resource base. The analysis shows that a given reactor deployment strategy could strongly influence the extent of uranium exploration and production. Power systems cost comparisons are made to identify clearly competitive or non-competitive reactors. The sensitivity of power cost to different uranium price projections and nuclear demands is also examined. The results indicate that breeders are necessary to support a long-term nuclear power system. Advanced converter-breeder symbiotic systems, particularly those operating on the Th/U-233 cycle, have clear advantages in terms of resources and economics

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batheja, P.; Huber, R.; Rau, P.

    1985-01-01

    Particularly for nuclear reactors of small output, the reactor pressure vessel contains at least two heat exchangers, which have coolant flowing through them in a circuit through the reactor core. The circuit of at least one heat exchanger is controlled by a slide valve, so that even for low drive forces, particularly in natural circulation, the required even loading of the heat exchanger is possible. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  9. Space nuclear reactors: energy gateway into the next millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1981-01-01

    Power - reliable, abundant and economic - is the key to man's conquest of the Solar System. Space activities of the next few decades will be highlighted by the creation of the extraterrestrial phase of human civilization. Nuclear power is needed both to propel massive quantities of materials through cislunar and eventually translunar space, and to power the sophisticated satellites, space platforms, and space stations of tomorrow. To meet these anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100-kW(e) heat pipe nuclear reactor. The objectives of this program are to develop components for a space nuclear power plant capable of unattended operation for 7 to 10 years; having a reliability of greater than 0.95; and weighing less than 1910 kg. In addition, this heat pipe reactor is also compatible for launch by the US Space Transportation System

  10. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Safety overview and management function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, M.; Brodsky, R.S.; Frankhouser, W.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Under Secretary of Energy established the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee in October, 1979, in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear accident, to assess the adequacy of training of personnel at DOE nuclear facilities. Subsequently, in February, 1980, the charge to this Committee was modified to assess all implications of the Kemeny Commission report on TMI with regard to DOE nuclear reactors, excluding those in the Division of Naval Reactors. The modified charge was also limited, for the time being, to reactor facilities instead of all nuclear facilities. This report describes the portion of the revised assessment activities that was assigned to the Assessment Support Team

  11. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Activities Related to Fast Reactor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dujardin, Thierry; Gulliford, Jim

    2013-01-01

    • Despite impact of Fukushima, there remains a high level of interest in continued development of advanced nuclear systems and fuel cycles: – better use of natural resources; – minimisation of waste and reduction of constraints on deep geological repositories. • Ambitious R&D programmes on-going at national level in many countries, also through international projects: – expected to lead to development of advanced reactors and fuel cycle facilities. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in field of fast reactor development and related advanced fuel cycles: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  12. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  13. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Procedures, operations and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Lindgren, A.J.

    1981-02-01

    The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island commercial nuclear power plant has led to a number of studies of nuclear reactors, in both the public and private sectors. One of these is that of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, which has outlined tasks for assessment of 13 reactors owned by DOE and operated by contractors. This report covers one of the tasks, the assessment of procedures, operations, and maintenance at the DOE reactor facilities, based on a review of actual documents used at the reactor sites

  14. World energy needs and their impact on nuclear reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foell, W.K.

    1977-01-01

    This presentation will place primary emphasis upon energy demand. The presentation will cover the following areas: energy reserves and resources; energy demand: past and future (mid-and long-term); industrialized regions of the world; developing countries: Mexico and Iran as examples; and potential impact on nuclear development

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  17. Sustainable and safe nuclear fission energy technology and safety of fast and thermal nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Kessler, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Unlike existing books of nuclear reactor physics, nuclear engineering and nuclear chemical engineering this book covers a complete description and evaluation of nuclear fission power generation. It covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle, from the extraction of natural uranium from ore mines, uranium conversion and enrichment up to the fabrication of fuel elements for the cores of various types of fission reactors. This is followed by the description of the different fuel cycle options and the final storage in nuclear waste repositories. In addition the release of radioactivity under normal and possible accidental conditions is given for all parts of the nuclear fuel cycle and especially for the different fission reactor types.

  18. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  19. Aerosol core nuclear reactor for space-based high energy/power nuclear-pumped lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.; Boody, F.P.; Zediker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol core reactor concept can overcome the efficiency and/or chemical activity problems of other fuel-reactant interface concepts. In the design of a laser using the nuclear energy for a photon-intermediate pumping scheme, several features of the aerosol core reactor concept are attractive. First, the photon-intermediate pumping concept coupled with photon concentration methods and the aerosol fuel can provide the high power densities required to drive high energy/power lasers efficiently (about 25 to 100 kW/cu cm). Secondly, the intermediate photons should have relatively large mean free paths in the aerosol fuel which will allow the concept to scale more favorably. Finally, the aerosol core reactor concept can use materials which should allow the system to operate at high temperatures. An excimer laser pumped by the photons created in the fluorescer driven by a self-critical aerosol core reactor would have reasonable dimensions (finite cylinder of height 245 cm and radius of 245 cm), reasonable laser energy (1 MJ in approximately a 1 millisecond pulse), and reasonable mass (21 kg uranium, 8280 kg moderator, 460 kg fluorescer, 450 kg laser medium, and 3233 kg reflector). 12 references

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment vessel faced internally with a metal liner is provided with thermal insulation for the liner, comprising one or more layers of compressible material such as ceramic fiber, such as would be conventional in an advanced gas-cooled reactor and also a superposed layer of ceramic bricks or tiles in combination with retention means therefor, the retention means (comprising studs projecting from the liner, and bolts or nuts in threaded engagement with the studs) being themselves insulated from the vessel interior so that the coolant temperatures achieved in a High-Temperature Reactor or a Fast Reactor can be tolerated with the vessel. The layer(s) of compressible material is held under a degree of compression either by the ceramic bricks or tiles themselves or by cover plates held on the studs, in which case the bricks or tiles are preferably bedded on a yielding layer (for example of carbon fibers) rather than directly on the cover plates

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Akio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate and accelerate a leakage test of valves of a main steam pipe by adding a leakage test partition valve thereto. Constitution: A leakage testing partition valve is provided between a pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor and the most upstream side valve of a plurality of valves to be tested for leakage, a testing branch pipe is communicated with the downstream side of the partition valve, and the testing water for preventing leakage is introduced thereto through the branch pipe. Since main steam pipe can be simply isolated by closing the partition valve in the leakage test, the leakage test can be conducted without raising or lowering the water level in the pressure vessel, and since interference with other work in the reactor can be eliminated, the leakage test can be readily conducted parallel with other work in the reactor in a short time. Clean water can be used without using reactor water as the test water. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  3. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement of the accessibility of that part of a nuclear reactor serving for biological shield is proposed. It is intended to provide within the biological shield, distributed around the circumference of the reactor pressure vessel, several shielding chambers filled with shielding material, which are isolated gastight from the outside by means of glass panes with a given bursting strength. It is advantageous that, on the one hand, inspection and maintenance will be possible without great effort and, on the other, a large relief cross section will be at desposal if required. (UWI) [de

  5. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants operate most economically at a constant power level, providing base load electric power. In an energy grid containing a high fraction of renewable power sources, nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling a nuclear reactor to a large thermal energy storage block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this paper, a Prismatic core Advanced High Temperature Reactor supplies constant power to a lithium chloride molten salt thermal energy storage block that provides thermal power as needed to a closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system. During normal operation, the thermal energy storage block stores thermal energy during the night for use in the times of peak demand during the day. In this case, the nuclear reactor stays at a constant thermal power level. After a loss of forced circulation, the reactor reaches a shut down state in less than half an hour and the average fuel, graphite and coolant temperatures remain well within the design limits over the duration of the transient, demonstrating the inherent safety of the coupled system. (author)

  6. Indian advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable development of nuclear energy, a number of important issues like safety, waste management, economics etc. are to be addressed. To do this, a number of advanced reactor designs as well as fuel cycle technologies are being pursued worldwide. The advanced reactors being developed in India are the AHWR and the CHTR. Both the reactors use thorium based fuel and have many passive features. This paper describes the Indian advanced reactors and gives a brief account of the international initiatives for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the nuclear reactor availability by enabling to continuously exchange fuels in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region during operation. Constitution: A control rod is withdrawn to the midway of a highly enriched uranium region by means of control rod drives and the highly enriched uranium region is burnt to maintain the nuclear reactor always at a critical state. At the same time, fresh uranium-slightly enriched uranium is continuously supplied gravitationally from a fresh fuel reservoir through fuel reservoir to each of fuel pipes in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region. Then, spent fuels reduced with the reactivity by the burn up are successively taken out from the bottom of each of the fuel pipes through an exit duct and a solenoid valve to the inside of a spent fuel reservoir and the burn up in the natural-slightly enriched uranium region is conducted continuously. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. New options for developing of nuclear energy using an accelerator-driven reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor. Thus, the necessity of early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. High reliability of the proton accelerator, which is essential to implementing an accelerator-driven reactor in the nuclear energy field can be achieved by a slight extension of the accelerator's length, with only a small economical penalty. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options including high neutron economy producing the fuel, transmuting high-level wastes, such as minor actinides, and of converting efficiently the excess Pu and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, P.; Davidson, D.F.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-01-01

    The cooling system of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor of the pool kind is described. It has an intermediate heat exchange module comprising a tube-in-shell heat exchanger and an electromagnetic flow coupler in the base region of the module. Primary coolant is flowed through the heat exchanger being driven by electromagnetic interaction with secondary liquid metal coolant flow effected by a mechanical pump. (author)

  12. Refurbish research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Oyama, Yukio; Okamoto, Koji; Yamana, Hajime; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2011-01-01

    This special article featured arguments for refurbishment of research and test reactors corresponding to global age of nuclear energy, based on the report: 'Investigation of research facilities necessary for future joint usage' issued by the special committee of Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) in September 2010. It consisted of six papers titled as 'Introduction-establishment of AESJ special committee for investigation', 'State of research and test reactors in Japan', 'State of overseas research and test reactors', 'Needs analysis for research and test reactors', 'Proposal of AESJ special committee' and 'Summary and future issues'. In order to develop human resources and promote research and development needed in global age of nuclear energy, research and test reactors would be refurbished as an Asian regional center of excellence. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Energy distribution of antineutrinos originating from the decay of fission products in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudstam, G.; Aleklett, K.

    1979-01-01

    The energy spectrum of antineutrinos around a nuclear reactor has been derived by summing contributions from individual fission products. The resulting spectrum is weaker at energies above approx. 8 MeV than earlier published antineutrino spectra. The reason may be connected to the strong feeding of high-lying daughter states in the beta decay of fission products with high disintegration energies

  14. Contribution of recently measured nuclear data to reactor antineutrino energy spectra predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallot M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to summarize the actual problematic of reactor antineutrino energy spectra in the frame of fundamental and applied neutrino physics. Nuclear physics is an important ingredient of reactor antineutrino experiments. These experiments are motivated by neutrino oscillations, i.e. the measure of the θ13 mixing angle. In 2011, after a new computation of the reactor antineutrino energy spectra, based on the conversion of integral data of the beta spectra from 235U, and 239;241Pu, a deficit of reactor antineutrinos measured by short baseline experiments was pointed out. This is called the “reactor anomaly”, a new puzzle in the neutrino physics area. Since then, numerous new experimental neutrino projects have emerged. In parallel, computations of the antineutrino spectra independant from the ILL data would be desirable. One possibility is the use of the summation method, summing all the contributions of the fission product beta decay branches that can be found in nuclear databases. Studies have shown that in order to obtain reliable summation antineutrino energy spectra, new nuclear physics measurements of selected fission product beta decay properties are required. In these proceedings, we will present the computation methods of reactor antineutrino energy spectra and the impact of recent beta decay measurements on summation method spectra. The link of these nuclear physics studies with short baseline line oscillation search will be drawn and new neutrino physics projects at research reactors will be briefly presented.

  15. Linear programming optimization of nuclear energy strategy with sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Whan; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Yoon Il; Chang, Soon Heung

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power has become an essential part of electricity generation to meet the continuous growth of electricity demand. A Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) was developed to extend uranium resource utilization under a growing nuclear energy scenario while concomitantly providing a nuclear waste management solution. Key questions in this scenario are when to introduce SFRs and how many reactors should be introduced. In this study, a methodology using Linear Programming is employed in order to quantify an optimized growth pattern of a nuclear energy system comprising light water reactors and SFRs. The optimization involves tradeoffs between SFR capital cost premiums and the total system U3O8 price premiums. Optimum nuclear growth patterns for several scenarios are presented, as well as sensitivity analyses of important input parameters

  16. Potential of small nuclear reactors for future clean and safe energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, H.

    1992-01-01

    To cope with the various kinds of energy demands expected in the 21st century, it is necessary to explore the potential of small nuclear reactors and to find a way of promoting their introduction to society. The main goal of current research activities is 'the constitution of the self-consistent nuclear energy system'. These activities can be understood by realizing that the nuclear community is facing a turning point for its survival in the 21st century. Self-consistency can be manifested by investigating and developing the potential advantages of the nuclear fission reaction and lessening the potential disadvantages. The contributions in this volume discuss concepts of small reactors, applications of small reactors, and consistency with conventional energy supply systems

  17. The prospects for using nuclear reactors to provide energy to petrochemical factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feygin, Ye.A.; Barashkov, R.Ya.; Chernovisov, G.N.; Deyneko, P.S.; Lemayev, N.V.; Raud, E.A.; Romanova, Ye.G.; Vernov, P.A.; Zlotnikov, L.Ye.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering level of the development of atomic rocket engineering has made it possible to consider various types of nuclear reactors as possible electricity sources to support petrochemical processes at petrochemical plants (using vapor, heat, electricity and radiation energies). The use of energy from nuclear reactors in combination with the elimination of liquid and gas fuels used in the furnaces will make it possible to improve the ecological situation in the vicinity of the plant, to accelerate petroleum processing and oil processing processes and to improve the cost effectiveness of nuclear engineering complexes to a degree related to the total capacity of the industrial complexes and the degree of comprehensive utilization of energy from the nuclear reactors.

  18. Fast reactors as a solution for future small-scale nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtseva, A.; Danilenko, K.; Dorofeev, K.

    2013-01-01

    Small nuclear power plants can provide a future platform for decentralized energy supply providing better levels of accessibility, safety and environmental friendliness. The optimal solution for SMR deployment is fast reactors with inherent safety. To compete alternative solutions SMRs must exhibit some evident advantages in: safety, technology, and economic. Small modular reactors with lead-bismuth coolant (SVBR-100) under development in Russia can be a prospective solution for future small and decentralized energy

  19. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  1. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  2. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  4. Public's right to information: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokely, E.

    1981-02-01

    The events at TMI prompted the Under Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee. This Committee was assigned the task of assessing the adequacy of nuclear facility personnel qualification and training at DOE-owned reactors in light of the Three Mile Island accident. The Committee was also asked to review recommendations and identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities

  5. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  6. Development or Deployment of 'Grid-Appropriate' Reactors for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D. T.

    2008-01-01

    The world energy demand is expected to nearly double by 2030, largely driven by rapidly increasing demand in the developing parts of the world. Many of the countries that will experience the greatest growth in energy demand have little or no current nuclear power experience and have significant constraints on the size and type of power plant that can be accommodated. Although a few reactor vendors are beginning to address this market need, most traditional vendors continue to offer only very large nuclear power plants with capacities exceeding 1500 MWe per unit. The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which was initiated in the United States and now includes a partnership of 20 countries, seeks to facilitate the large-scale global growth in nuclear power. Within the GNEP program, the 'grid-appropriate' reactors (GAR) campaign has been initiated to coordinate and facilitate the development, demonstration, and deployment of reactor designs that are better suited for those countries that need or prefer smaller power plant capacities. The GNEP/GAR program addresses the full spectrum of issues for the deployment of new reactor designs to new nuclear power countries, including: reactor technology and engineering, licensing and regulatory impacts, and infrastructure needs (physical, workforce, and institutional). Initially, the program is focused on meeting the current global demand for small or medium-sized reactors using demonstrated technologies. The program will also address the development of new reactor technologies that will further enhance the safety, security, and proliferation resistance of future designs. International collaborations are being established to: (1) develop suitable requirements and criteria for GAR designs, (2) conduct R and D for longer-term reactor technologies and innovative designs, and (3) assisting new nuclear power countries in assessing their infrastructure needs. The status of these activities will be presented and future program

  7. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor has an upper and a lower grid plate. Protrusions project from the upper grid plate. Fuel assemblies having end fittings fit between the grid plates. An arrangement is provided for accepting axial forces generated during the operation of the nuclear reactor by the flow of the cooling medium and thermal expansion and irradiation-induced growth of the fuel assembly, which comprises rods. Each fuel assembly rests on the lower grid plate and its upper end is elastically supported against the upper grid plate by the above-mentioned arrangement. The arrangement comprises four (for example) torsion springs each having a torsion tube and a torsion bar nested within the torsion tube and connected at one end thereto. The other end of the torsion bar is connected to an associated one of four lever arms. The torsion tube is rigidly connected to the other end fitting and the springs are disposed such that the lever arms are biassed against the protrusions. (author)

  9. Meteorological evaluation of multiple reactor contamination probabilities for a Hanford Nuclear Energy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Diebel, D.I.

    1978-03-01

    The conceptual Hanford energy center is composed of nuclear power plants, hence the name Hanford Nuclear Energy Center (HNEC). Previous topical reports have covered a variety of subjects related to the HNEC including: electric power transmission, fuel cycle, and heat disposal. This report discusses the probability that a radiation release from a single reactor in the HNEC would contaminate other facilities in the center. The risks, in terms of reliability of generation, of this potential contamination are examined by Clark and Dowis

  10. Safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    One of the first tasks of the NFPQT Committee was to determine which DOE reactors would be assessed. The Committee determined that in view of the limited time available to conduct the assessment, 13 DOE reactors were of such size (physical, power or fission product inventory) to warrant review. This determination was approved by the Under Secretary. A decision was also made in the cases of three weapons material production reactors, C, K and P, to concentrate on the K reactor only, since all three are of the same basic design, have the same operating features, are all at the same site, and are all operated by the same contractor. The assessment was accomplished in the following ways: reviewing the results of assessments conducted by the DOE organizations with reactor safety responsibilities, which were undertaken in compliance with the request of the various program directors; reviewing selected documents that were requested by the Committee and assembled at DOE Headquarters; interviewing DOE Headquarters and Field Office personnel; and conducting on-site reviews of four reactors located at four different sites. The four reactors for on-site reviews were: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); K Production Reactor; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Specific findings and recommendations from the assessment are presented

  11. Role of Halden Reactor Project for world-wide nuclear energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M.A.; Volkov, B.

    2011-07-01

    The great interest for utilization of nuclear materials to produce energy in the middle of last century needed special investigations using first class research facilities. Common problems in the area of nuclear fuel development motivated the establishment of joint research efforts. The OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a good example of such a cooperative research effort, which has been performing for more than 50 years. During that time, the Halden Reactor evolved from a prototype heavy water reactor envisaged as a power source for different applications to a research reactor that is able to simulate in-core conditions of modern commercial power reactors. The adaptability of the Halden Reactor enables the HRP to be an important international test facility for nuclear fuels and materials development. The long-term international cooperation is based on the flexible HRP organizational structure which also provides the continued success. [1,2] This paper gives a brief history of the Halden Reactor Project and its contribution to world-wide nuclear energy development. Recent expansion of the Project to the East and Asian countries may also assist and stimulate the development of a nuclear industry within these countries. The achievements of the HRP rely on the versatility of the research carried out in the reactor with reliable testing techniques and in-pile instrumentation. Diversification of scientific activity in the areas of development of alternative energy resources and man-machine technology also provide the HRP with a stable position as one of the leaders in the world scientific community. All of these aspects are described in this paper together with current experimental works, including the investigation of ULBA (Kazakhstan) production fuel in comparison with other world fuel suppliers, as well as other future and prospective plans of the Project.(Author)

  12. Role of Halden Reactor Project for world-wide nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, M.A.; Volkov, B.

    2011-01-01

    The great interest for utilization of nuclear materials to produce energy in the middle of last century needed special investigations using first class research facilities. Common problems in the area of nuclear fuel development motivated the establishment of joint research efforts. The OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) is a good example of such a cooperative research effort, which has been performing for more than 50 years. During that time, the Halden Reactor evolved from a prototype heavy water reactor envisaged as a power source for different applications to a research reactor that is able to simulate in-core conditions of modern commercial power reactors. The adaptability of the Halden Reactor enables the HRP to be an important international test facility for nuclear fuels and materials development. The long-term international cooperation is based on the flexible HRP organizational structure which also provides the continued success. [1,2] This paper gives a brief history of the Halden Reactor Project and its contribution to world-wide nuclear energy development. Recent expansion of the Project to the East and Asian countries may also assist and stimulate the development of a nuclear industry within these countries. The achievements of the HRP rely on the versatility of the research carried out in the reactor with reliable testing techniques and in-pile instrumentation. Diversification of scientific activity in the areas of development of alternative energy resources and man-machine technology also provide the HRP with a stable position as one of the leaders in the world scientific community. All of these aspects are described in this paper together with current experimental works, including the investigation of ULBA (Kazakhstan) production fuel in comparison with other world fuel suppliers, as well as other future and prospective plans of the Project.(Author)

  13. A cost and safety superiority of fusion-fission hybrid reactor in China nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtszev, P.E.; Luan Guishi; Xia Chengang

    1994-08-01

    Considering economy and safety, an optimization model of nuclear energy developing scenarios of China was set up. An objective function to optimize was determined. Three prospective developing scenarios of China nuclear energy system including hybrid reactor were calculated and discussed. In the system which has no fissile material exchange with other system, a smooth developing model has a smooth distribution of inventory of Pu, thus the potential danger of whole nuclear energy system will be decreased. This scheme will improve investment effectiveness. Result shows that the optimization is necessary and the significant profit in cost and safety can be obtained. (5 tabs., 8 figs., 12 refs.)

  14. Emergency planning and response: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the recommendations contained in the President's Commission Report on the Three Mile Island (TMI) Accident (the Kemeny Commission report) that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors have been reviewed. The assessments of the 13 facilities are based on information provided by the individual operator organizations and/or cognizant DOE Field Offices. Additional clarifying information was supplied in some, but not all, instances. This report indicates how these 13 reactor facilities measure up in light of the Kemeny and other TMI-related studies and recommendations, particularly those that have resulted in upgraded Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements in the area of emergency planning and response

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  16. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor (e.g. one having coolant down-flow through a core to a hearth below) thermal insulation (e.g. of a floor of the hearth) comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles thereon, with smaller clearances between the tiles than between the bricks but with the bricks being of reduced cross-section immediately adjacent the tiles so as to be surrounded by interconnected passages, of relatively large dimensions, constituting a continuous chamber extending behind the layer of tiles. By this arrangement, lateral coolant flow in the inter-brick clearances is much reduced. The reactor core is preferably formed of hexagonal columns, supported on diamond-shaped plates each supported on a pillar resting on one of the hearth-floor tiles. Each plate has an internal duct, four upper channels connecting the duct with coolant ducts in four core columns supported by the plate, and lower channels connecting the duct to a downwardly-open recess common to three plates, grouped to form a hexagon, at their mutually-adjacent corners. This provides mixing, and temperature-averaging, of coolant from twelve columns

  17. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Du Hwan

    1987-01-01

    This book gives descriptions of explanations of terminologies concerning to nuclear energy such as analysis of financial safety of nuclear energy, radwaste disposal, fast breeder reactor, nuclear reactor and device, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy radiation and measurement, plan for development of nuclear energy and international institution. This book includes 160 terms on nuclear energy and arranges in Korean alphabetical order.

  18. Bridging the energy gap through small and medium sized nuclear reactors in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1987-01-01

    India is the only country in the world which is employing small sized nuclear reactors for its nuclear power programme. It has now embarked on a programme of augmenting the contribution of the nuclear power by way of employing both medium and small sized nuclear reactors in the next 15 years. This paper discusses the Indian experience and its efforts for industrial mobilisation for rapidly constructing 235/500 MWe nuclear reactor units in a period of about 8 to 9 years. The current energy situation in India and this context the near term role of nuclear power for supplementing the existing sources of commercial energy have been evaluated. Nuclear power has reached such a stage of maturity whereby it has now become a commercially viable source of electricity and it could be utilised on large scale to bridge the energy gap. At present six reactor units of 210/235 MWe capacity are in operation and eight more are in different stages of construction. While we are continuing with the construction of 235 MWe units, a programme of being pursued to construct 550 MWe capacity reactor units from midnineties onwards. This has become possible with the strengthening of regional electricity grids and simultaneous efforts undertaken for augmentation of fuel supply, heavy water production and industrial infrastructure. For a developing country like India, implementation of a sizable nuclear power programme has posed certain special challenges as major inputs are required to be made available with indigeneous efforts. This paper discusses such challenges and presents the ways and means adopted to surmount them. Other developing countries with conditions comparable to those in India could benefit from Indian experience in this regard. This paper also proposes India's willingness to cooperate with other countries for exchange of information and assistance in terms of technical knowhow. (author)

  19. GNES-R: Global nuclear energy simulator for reactors task 1: High-fidelity neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarno, K.; De Almeida, V.; D'Azevedo, E.; De Oliveira, C.; Hamilton, S.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-laboratory, multi-university collaboration has formed to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity, coupled-physics simulation of nuclear energy systems. We are embarking on the first-phase in the development of a new suite of simulation tools dedicated to the advancement of nuclear science and engineering technologies. We seek to develop and demonstrate a new generation of multi-physics simulation tools that will explore the scientific phenomena of tightly coupled physics parameters within nuclear systems, support the design and licensing of advanced nuclear reactors, and provide benchmark quality solutions for code validation. In this paper, we have presented the general scope of the collaborative project and discuss the specific challenges of high-fidelity neutronics for nuclear reactor simulation and the inroads we have made along this path. The high-performance computing neutronics code system utilizes the latest version of SCALE to generate accurate, problem-dependent cross sections, which are used in NEWTRNX - a new 3-D, general-geometry, discrete-ordinates solver based on the Slice-Balance Approach. The Global Nuclear Energy Simulator for Reactors (GNES-R) team is embarking on a long-term simulation development project that encompasses multiple laboratories and universities for the expansion of high-fidelity coupled-physics simulation of nuclear energy systems. (authors)

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  1. The encapsulated nuclear heat source reactor for proliferation-resistant nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, N.W.; Hossain, Q.; Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.; Dzodzo, M.; Greenspan, E.; Saphier, D.

    2001-01-01

    The encapsulated nuclear heat source (ENHS) is a modular reactor that was selected by the 1999 DOE NERI program as a candidate ''Generation-IV'' reactor concept. It is a fast neutron spectrum reactor cooled by Pb-Bi using natural circulation. It is designed for passive load following, for high level of passive safety, and for 15 years without refueling. One of the unique features of the ENHS is that the fission-generated heat is transferred from the primary coolant to the secondary coolant across the reactor vessel wall by conduction-providing for an essentially sealed module that is easy to install and replace. Because the fuel is encapsulated within a heavy steel container throughout its life it provides a unique improvement to the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle. This paper presents the innovative technology of the ENHS. (author)

  2. Process for the transport of heat energy released by a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberg, H.W.; Wolff, G.

    1978-01-01

    The heat produced in a nuclear reactor is converted into latent chemical binding energy. The heat can be released again below 400 0 C by recombination after transport by decomposition of ethane or propane into ethylene or propylene and hydrogen. (TK) [de

  3. Replacement energy, capacity, and reliability costs for permanent nuclear reactor shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C., Buehring, W.A.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Cavallo, J.D.; Veselka, T.D.; Willing, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Average replacement power costs are estimated for potential permanent shutdowns of nuclear electricity-generating units. Replacement power costs are considered to include replacement energy, capacity, and reliability cost components. These estimates were developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in evaluating regulatory issues that potentially affect changes in serious reactor accident frequencies. Cost estimates were derived from long-term production-cost and capacity expansion simulations of pooled utility-system operations. Factors that affect replacement power cost, such as load growth, replacement sources of generation, and capital costs for replacement capacity, were treated in the analysis. Costs are presented for a representative reactor and for selected subcategories of reactors, based on estimates for 112 individual reactors

  4. Reactor units for power supply to the Russian Arctic regions: Priority assessment of nuclear energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel'nikov N. N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of competitiveness of small nuclear power plants (SNPP and feasibility of their use to supply power to remote and inaccessible regions the competition occurs between nuclear energy sources, which is caused by a wide range of proposals for solving the problem of power supply to different consumers in the decentralized area of the Russian Arctic power complex. The paper suggests a methodological approach for expert assessment of the priority of small power reactor units based on the application of the point system. The priority types of the reactor units have been determined based on evaluation of the unit's conformity to the following criteria: the level of referentiality and readiness degree of reactor units to implementation; duration of the fuel cycle, which largely determines an autonomy level of the nuclear energy source; the possibility of creating a modular block structure of SNPP; the maximum weight of a transported single equipment for the reactor unit; service life of the main equipment. Within the proposed methodological approach the authors have performed a preliminary ranking of the reactor units according to various criteria, which allows quantitatively determining relative difference and priority of the small nuclear power plants projects aimed at energy supply to the Russian Arctic. To assess the sensitivity of the ranking results to the parameters of the point system the authors have observed the five-point and ten-point scales under variations of importance (weights of different criteria. The paper presents the results of preliminary ranking, which have allowed distinguishing the following types of the reactor units in order of their priority: ABV-6E (ABV-6M, "Uniterm" and SVBR-10 in the energy range up to 20 MW; RITM-200 (RITM-200M, KLT-40S and SVBR-100 in the energy range above 20 MW.

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  7. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor and the future of nuclear fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chuanhong

    2010-01-01

    Energy shortage and environmental problems are now the two largest challenges for human beings. Magnetic confinement nuclear fusion, which has achieved great progress since the 1990's, is anticipated to be a way to realize an ideal source of energy in the future because of its abundance, environmental compatibility, and zero carbon release. Exemplified by the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the development of nuclear fusion energy is now in its engineering phase, and should be realized by the middle of this century if all objectives of the ITER project are met. (author)

  8. Economics of seawater desalination with innovative nuclear reactors and other energy sources: the EURODESAL project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Volpi, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarises our recent investigations undertaken as part of the EURODESAL project on nuclear desalination, which were carried out by a consortium of four EU and one Canadian, Industrials and two leading EU R and D organisations. Major results of the project, in particular of its economic evaluation work package as discussed in this paper, are: 1. A coherent demonstration of the technical feasibility of nuclear desalination through the development of technical principles for the optimum cogeneration of electricity and water and by exploring the unique capabilities of the innovative nuclear reactors and desalination technologies; verification that the integrated system design does not adversely affect nuclear reactor safety. 2. The development of codes and methods for an objective assessment of the competitiveness and sustainability of proposed solutions through comparison, in European conditions, with fossil and renewable energy based solutions. The results obtained so far seem to be quite encouraging as regards the economical viability of nuclear desalination options. Thus, for example, specific desalination costs ($/m 3 of desalted water) for nuclear systems such as the AP600 and the French PWR900 (reference base case), coupled to Multiple Effect Distillation (MED) or the Reverse Osmosis (RO) processes, are 30% to 60% lower than fossil energy based systems using pulverised coal and natural gas with combined cycle, at low discount rates and recommended fuel prices. Even in the most unfavourable scenarios for nuclear energy (discount rates = 10%, low fossil fuel prices) desalination costs with the nuclear options with the nuclear reactors are 7% to 15% lower, depending upon the desalination capacities. Furthermore, with the high performance coupling schemes developed by the EURODESAL partners, the specific desalination costs of nuclear systems are reduced by another 2% to 14%, even without system and design optimisation. (author)

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  10. Source driven breeding fission power reactors and the nuclear energy strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    The nuclear energy economy is facing severe difficulties associated with low utilization of uranium resources, safety, non-proliferation and environmental issues. Energy policy makers face the dilemma: commercialize LMFBRs immediately with the risk of negative economical, proliferation or other consequences, or continue with R and D programs that will provide the information needed for sounder decisions, but now taking the risk of running out of economically exploitable uranium ore resources. The development of hybrid reactors can provide an assurance against the latter risk and offers many interesting new options for the nuclear energy strategy. Being based on the technology of LWRs and HWRs, Light Water Hybrid Reactors (LWHR) provide a most natural link between the fission reactor technology of the present and the fusion power technology of the future. The investment in their development in excess of that required for the development of fusion power reactors is expected to be relatively small, thus making the development of LWHRs potentially a high benefit-to-cost ratio program. It is recommended that the fission and fusion communities will cooperate in hybrids R and D programs aimed at assessing the technological and economical viability of hybrid reactors as reliably and soon as possible. (author)

  11. Economics of nuclear energy production systems: reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Proust, E.; Gautrot, J.J.; Tinturier, B.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper relies on the main European economic studies on the comparative costs of electricity generation, published over the last six years, to show that nuclear power meets the challenge and is an economically competitive choice in the European electricity market. Indeed, although these studies were made for different purposes, by different actors and based on different methods, they all converge to show that the total base-load generation cost for new nuclear plants build in Europe is projected to be in the range of 22 to 32 euros/MWh, a total generation cost that may be 20% cheaper than the cost for combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) units. Moreover, the prospects of internalization of the greenhouse gas emission cost in the total generation cost will boost even further the competitiveness of nuclear against gas-fired plants in Europe. All this is confirmed by the most recent French detailed study (DIDEME 2003), essentially performed from an investor standpoint, which concludes, for base-load generation units starting operation around 2015, that nuclear power, with a levelled generation cost of 28,4 euros/MWh, is more competitive than CCGTs (35 euros/MWh). This study also shows an overnight investment cost for nuclear power, based on the considered scenario (a series of 10 EPR units including a ''demonstrator''), of less than 1300 euros/kWe. The other major challenge, waste management obviously also includes an economic dimension. This issue is addressed in the present paper which provides a synthesis of relevant detailed French and OECD economic studies on the cost assessment of the fuel cycle back-end. (author)

  12. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  13. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias

    2011-01-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  14. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  15. Utilization of nuclear energy for generating electric power in the FRG, with special regard to LWR-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollradt, J.

    1977-01-01

    Comments on interdependencies in energy industry and energy generation as seen by energy supply utilities, stating that the generation of electric power in Germany can only be based on coal and nuclear energy in the long run, are followed by the most important, fundamental, nuclear-physical, technological and in part political interdependencies prevailing in the starting situation of 1955/58 when the construction of nuclear power plant reactors began. Then the development ranging to the 28000 MW nuclear power output to be expected in 1985 is outlined, totalling in 115000 MW electric power in the FRG. Finally, using the respectively latest order, the technical set up of each of the reactor types with 1300 MWe unit power offered by German manufacturers are described: BBC/BBR PWR-type reactor Neupotz, KWU-PWR-type reactor Hamm and KWU PWR-type reactor double unit B+C Gundremmingen. (orig.) [de

  16. Nuclear calculation for employing medium enrichment in reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Yasuhiko

    1979-01-01

    The fuel used for the research reactors of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is presently highly enriched uranium of 93%. However, the U.S. government (the supplier of fuel) is claiming to utilize low or medium enriched uranium from the viewpoint of resistivity to nuclear proliferation, and the availability of highly enriched uranium is becoming hard owing to the required procedure. This report is described on the results of nuclear calculation which is the basis of fuel design in the countermeasures to the reduction of enrichment. The basic conception in the reduction of enrichment is three-fold: to lower the latent potential of nuclear proliferation as far as possible, to hold the present reactor performance as far as possible, and to limit the reduction in the range which is not accompanied by the modification of reactor core construction and cooling system. This time, the increase of the density and thickness of fuel plates and the effect of enrichment change to 45% on reactivity and neutron flux were investigated. The fuel of UAl sub(x) - Al system was assumed, which was produced by powder metallurgical method. The results of investigations on JRR-2 and JMTR reactors revealed that 45% enriched fuel does not affect the performances much. However, deterioration of the performances is not neglegible if further reduction is needed. In future, the influence of the burn-up effect of fuel on the life of reactor cores must be investigated. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, I.; Gutscher, E.

    1980-01-01

    The core contains a critical mass of UN or U 2 N 3 in the form of a noncritical solution with melted Sn being kept below a N atmosphere. The lining of the reactor core consists of graphite. If fission progresses part of the melted metal solution is removed and cleaned from fission products. The reactor temperatures lie in the range of 300 to 2000 0 C. (Examples and tables). (RW) [de

  18. Modification of the Japanese first nuclear ship reactor for a regional energy supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Shimazu, Y.; Narabayashi, T.; Tsuji, M.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear Ship Mutsu was developed as the first experimental nuclear ship of Japan. It has several advantages as a prototype for regional energy supply system. Considering the attractive advantages of the Mutsu reactor, we investigated the feasibility of development of a small regional energy system by adopting the Mutsu reactor as a starting model. The system could supply with not only electricity but also heat. Heat could be used for hot-water supply, a heating system of a house, melting snow and so on, especially for those in northern part of Japan. The system should satisfy the requirements for GEN IV systems and the current regulations. From this point of view, the modification of the reactor was initiated by taking into improvements and technology of the state of arts to fulfill the requirements such as (1) Longer core life without refueling, (2) Reactivity adjustment for load change without control rods or soluble boron, (3) Simpler operations for load changes and (4) Ultimate safety with sufficient passive capability. Currently it is assumed to use basic standard 17x17 fuel assembly design for WH type PWRs. Nuclear design calculations are carried out by 'SRAC 2002 ', which has been developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Several problems have not been solved yet, but we confirmed the proposed core has about 10 years life time. So the proposed core has a possibility to be used for a small regional energy system. (authors)

  19. Technical Requirements For Reactors To Be Deployed Internationally For the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) seeks to create an international regime to support large-scale growth in the worldwide use of nuclear energy. Fully meeting the GNEP vision may require the deployment of thousands of reactors in scores of countries, many of which do not use nuclear energy currently. Some of these needs will be met by large-scale Generation III and III+ reactors (>1000 MWe) and Generation IV reactors when they are available. However, because many developing countries have small and immature electricity grids, the currently available Generation III(+) reactors may be unsuitable since they are too large, too expensive, and too complex. Therefore, GNEP envisions new types of reactors that must be developed for international deployment that are 'right sized' for the developing countries and that are based on technologies, designs, and policies focused on reducing proliferation risk. The first step in developing such systems is the generation of technical requirements that will ensure that the systems meet both the GNEP policy goals and the power needs of the recipient countries. Reactor systems deployed internationally within the GNEP context must meet a number of requirements similar to the safety, reliability, economics, and proliferation goals established for the DOE Generation IV program. Because of the emphasis on deployment to nonnuclear developing countries, the requirements will be weighted differently than with Generation IV, especially regarding safety and non-proliferation goals. Also, the reactors should be sized for market conditions in developing countries where energy demand per capita, institutional maturity and industrial infrastructure vary considerably, and must utilize fuel that is compatible with the fuel recycle technologies being developed by GNEP. Arrangements are already underway to establish Working Groups jointly with Japan and Russia to develop requirements for reactor systems. Additional bilateral and multilateral

  20. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

  1. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs

  2. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 1 report, Light water reactor utilization and improvement: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested that the Office of Nuclear Energy prepare a strategic national plan that outlines the Department's role in the future development of civilian nuclear power and that the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad hoc panel to review and comment on this plan. The Energy Research Advisory Board formed a panel for this review and three subpanels were formed. One subpanel was formed to address the institutional issues surrounding nuclear power, one on research and development for advanced nuclear power plants and a third subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. The subpanel on light water reactors held two meetings at which representatives of the DOE, the NRC, EPRI, industry and academic groups made presentations. This is the report of the subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. This report presents the subpanel's assessment of initiatives which the Department of Energy should undertake in the national interest, to develop and support light water reactor technologies

  3. The effect of heavy water reactors and liquid fuel reactors on the long-term development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.; Wiechers, W.K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the rates at which various combinations of power reactor types are installed on the long-range (to the year 2040) uranium and plutonium inventory requirements are examined. Consideration is given to light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heavy water reactors, and thermal breeder reactors, in various combinations, and assuming alternatively a 3% and a 5% growth in energy demand

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  5. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sekine, Katsuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the thickness of a reactor container and reduce the height and the height and plate thickness of a roof slab without using mechanical vibration stoppers. Constitution: Earthquake proofness is improved by filling fluids such as liquid metal between a reactor container and a secondary container and connecting the outer surface of the reactor container with the inner surface of the secondary container by means of bellows. That is, for the horizontal seismic vibrations, horizontal loads can be supported by the secondary container without providing mechanical vibration stoppers to the reactor container and the wall thickness can be reduced thereby enabling to simplify thermal insulation structure for the reduction of thermal stresses. Further, for the vertical seismic vibrations, verical loads can be transmitted to the secondary container thereby enabling to reduce the wall thickness in the same manner as for the horizontal load. By the effect of transferring the point of action of the container load applied to the roof slab to the outer circumferential portion, the intended purpose can be attained and, in addition, the radiation dose rate at the upper surface of the roof slab can be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  7. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  8. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait, A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a general report presenting the section VII entitled Nuclear Power of the National Conference on Energy (CNE '94) held in Neptun, Romania, on 13-16 June 1994. The problems addressed were those relating to electric power produced by nuclear power plant, to heat secondary generation, to quality assurance, to safety, etc. A special attention was paid to the commissioning of the first Romanian nuclear power unit, the Cernavoda-1 reactor of CANDU type. The communications were grouped in four subsections. These were: 1. Quality assurance, nuclear safety, and environmental protection; 2. Nuclear power plant, commissioning, and operation; 3. Nuclear power plant inspection, maintenance, and repairs, heavy water technology; 4. Public opinion education. There were 22 reports, altogether

  9. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the channel stability and the reactor core stability in a spontaneous circulation state of coolants. Constitution: A reactor core stabilizing device comprising a differential pressure automatic ON-OFF valve is disposed between each of a plurality of jet pumps arranged on a pump deck. The stabilizing device comprises a piston exerted with a pressure on the lower side of the pump deck by way of a pipeway and a valve for flowing coolants through the bypass opening disposed to the pump deck by the opening and closure of the valve ON-OFF. In a case where the jet pumps are stopped, since the differential pressure between the upper and the lower sides of the pump deck is removed, the valve lowers gravitationally into an opened state, whereby the coolants flow through the bypass opening to increase the spontaneous circulation amount thereby improve the stability. (Yoshino, Y.)

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Between a PWR's reactor pressure vessel made of steel and the biological shield made of concrete there is a gap. This gap is filled up with a heat insulation facting the reactor pressure vessel, for example with insulating concrete segments jacketed with sheet steel and with an additional layer. This layer serves for smooth absorption of compressive forces originating in radial direction from the reactor pressure vessel. It consists of cylinder-segment shaped bricks made of on situ concrete, for instance. The bricks have cooling agent ports in one or several rows which run parallel to the wall of the pressure vessel and in alignment with superposed bricks. Between the layer of bricks and the biological shield or rather the heat insulation, there are joints which are filled, however, with injected mortar. That guarantees a smooth series of connected components resistant tom compression. Besides, a slip foil can be set between the heat insulation and the joining joint filled with mortar for the reduction of the friction at thermal expansions. (TK) [de

  11. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemard, B.

    1978-01-01

    After having described the nuclear partners in Japan, the author analyzes the main aspects of Japan's nuclear energy: nuclear power plants construction program; developping of light water reactors; fuel cycle politics [fr

  13. Reports and operational engineering: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, A.; Washburn, B.W.

    1981-02-01

    The Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, established via an October 24, 1979 memorandum from the Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary, was instructed to review the ''Kemeny Commission'' recommendations and to identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities. As a result of this review, the Committee recommended that DOE carry out assessments in seven categories. The assessments would address specific topics identified for each category as delineated in the NFPQT ''Guidelines for Assessing the Safe Operation of DOE-Owned Reactors,'' dated May 7, 1980. The Committee recognized that similar assessments had been ongoing in the DOE program and safety overview organizations since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and it was the Committee's intent to use the results of those ongoing assessments as an input to their evaluations. This information would be supplemented by additional studies consisting of the subject-related documents used at each reactor facility studied, and an on-site review of these reactor facilities by professional personnel within the Department of Energy, its operating contractors and independent consultants. 1 tab

  14. Nuclear reactor operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursey, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, which was amended in 1974 by the Energy Reorganization Act, established the requirement that individuals who had the responsibility of operating the reactors in nuclear power plants must be licensed. Section 107 of the act states ''the Commission shall (1) prescribe uniform conditions for licensing individuals; (2) determine the qualifications of such individuals; and (3) issue licenses to such individuals in such form as the Commission may prescribe.'' The article discusses the types of licenses, the selection and training of individuals, and the administration of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing examinations

  15. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    1979-01-01

    The support grid for the fuel rods of a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor has a regular hexagonal contour and contains a large number of unit cells arranged honeycomb fashion. The totality of these cells make up a hexagonal shape. The grid contains a number of strips of material, and there is a window in each of three sidewalls staggered by one sidewall. The other sidewalls have embossed protrusions, thus generating a guide lining or guide bead. The windows reduce the rigidity of the areas in the middle between the ends of the cells. (DG) [de

  16. Results on the neutron energy distribution measurements at the RECH-1 Chilean nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilera, P., E-mail: paguilera87@gmail.com; Romero-Barrientos, J. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile); Universidad de Chile, Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Las Palmeras 3425, Nuñoa, Santiago (Chile); Molina, F. [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Nueva Bilbao 12501, La Reina, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-07-07

    Neutron activations experiments has been perform at the RECH-1 Chilean Nuclear Reactor to measure its neutron flux energy distribution. Samples of pure elements was activated to obtain the saturation activities for each reaction. Using - ray spectroscopy we identify and measure the activity of the reaction product nuclei, obtaining the saturation activities of 20 reactions. GEANT4 and MCNP was used to compute the self shielding factor to correct the cross section for each element. With the Expectation-Maximization algorithm (EM) we were able to unfold the neutron flux energy distribution at dry tube position, near the RECH-1 core. In this work, we present the unfolding results using the EM algorithm.

  17. Nuclear rocket engine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-07-01

    Covers a new technology of nuclear reactors and the related materials aspects. Integrates physics, materials science and engineering Serves as a basic book for nuclear engineers and nuclear physicists. The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  18. Moderator for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, M.S.; Dunn, J.T.; Hart, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a moderator for a nuclear reactor and more specifically, to a composite moderator. A moderator is designed to slow down, or thermalize, neutrons which are released during nuclear reactions in the reactor fuel. Pure or almost pure materials like light water, heavy water, beryllium or graphite are used singly as moderators at present. All these materials, are used widely. Graphite has a good mechanical strength at high temperatures encountered in the nuclear core and therefore is used as both the moderator and core structural material. It also exhibits a low neutron-capture cross section and high neutron scattering cross section. However, graphite is susceptible to attach by carbon dioxide and/or oxygen where applicable, and releases stress energy under certain circumstances, although under normal operating conditions these reactions can be controlled. (author). 1 tab

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  20. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    In the system described the fuel elements are arranged vertically in groups and are supported in such a manner as to tend to tilt them towards the center of the respective group, the fuel elements being urged laterally into abutment with one another. The elements have interlocking bearing pads, whereby lateral movement of adjacent elements is resisted; this improves the stability of the reactor core during refuelling operations. Fuel elements may comprise clusters of parallel fuel pins enclosed in a wrapper of hexagonal cross section, with bearing pads in the form of spline-like ribs located on each side of the wrapper and extending parallel to the longitudinal axis of the fuel element, being interlockable with ribs on pads of adjacent fuel elements. The arrangement is applicable to a reactor core in which fuel elements and control rod guide tubes are arranged in modules each of which comprises a cluster of at least three fuel elements, one of which is rigidly supported whilst the others are resiliently tilted towards the center of the cluster so as to lean on the rigidly supported element. It is also applicable to modules comprising a cluster of six fuel elements, each resiliently tilted towards a central void to form a circular arch. The modules may include additional fuel elements located outside the clusters and also resiliently tilted towards the central voids, the latter being used to accommodate control rod guide tubes. The need for separate structural members to act as leaning posts is thus avoided. Such structural members are liable to irradiation embrittlement, that could lead to core failure. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  3. Small Modular Reactors: Nuclear Energy Market Potential for Near-term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokhov, Alexey; Sozoniuk, Vladislav; Rothwell, Geoffrey; ); Cometto, Marco; Paillere, Henri; ); Crozat, Matt; Genoa, Paul; Joon Kim, Tae; McGough, Mike; Ingersoll, Dan; Rickman, Robin; Stout, Dan; Halnon, Greg; Chenais, Jacques; Briffod, Francois-Xavier; Perrier, Sylvain; Shahrokhi, Farshid; Kaufer, Barry; Wasylyk, Andrew; Shropshire, David; ); Danrong, Song; Swinburn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in small modular reactors (SMRs) is being driven by a desire to reduce the total capital costs associated with nuclear power plants and to provide power to small grid systems. According to estimates available today, if all the competitive advantages of SMRs were realised, including serial production, optimised supply chains and smaller financing costs, SMRs could be expected to have lower absolute and specific (per-kWe) construction costs than large reactors. Although the economic parameters of SMRs are not yet fully determined, a potential market exists for this technology, particularly in energy mixes with large shares of renewables. This report assesses the size of the market for SMRs that are currently being developed and that have the potential to broaden the ways of deploying nuclear power in different parts of the world. The study focuses on light water SMRs that are expected to be constructed in the coming decades and that strongly rely on serial, factory-based production of reactor modules. In a high-case scenario, up to 21 GWe of SMRs could be added globally by 2035, representing approximately 3% of total installed nuclear capacity. (authors)

  4. Materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Kamath, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy/materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear reactor materials (fuels and structural materials), are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO 2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO 2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques and in-reactor degradation mechanisms. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. The presentation will conclude by listing various materials related phenomena, which have a strong bearing on the successful development of future nuclear energy systems. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  6. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  8. Analysis of a Spanish energy scenario with Generation IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Raquel; Jimenez, Gonzalo; Perez-Martin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Spanish energy scenario for the hypothetical deployment of Gen-IV SFR reactors. • Availability of national resources is assessed, considering SFR’s breeding. • An assessment of the impact of transmuting MA on the final repository. • SERPENT code with own pre- and post-processing tools were employed. • The employed SFR core design is based on the specifications of the CP-ESFR. - Abstract: The advantages of fast-spectrum reactors consist not only of an efficient use of fuel through the breeding of fissile material and the use of natural or depleted uranium, but also of the potential reduction of the amount of actinides such as americium and neptunium contained in the irradiated fuel. The first aspect means a guaranteed future nuclear fuel supply. The second fact is key for high-level radioactive waste management, because these elements are the main responsible for the radioactivity of the irradiated fuel in the long term. The present study aims to analyze the hypothetical deployment of a Gen-IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fleet in Spain. A nuclear fleet of fast reactors would enable a fuel cycle strategy different than the open cycle, currently adopted by most of the countries with nuclear power. A transition from the current Gen-II to Gen-IV fleet is envisaged through an intermediate deployment of Gen-III reactors. Fuel reprocessing from the Gen-II and Gen-III Light Water Reactors (LWR) has been considered. In the so-called advanced fuel cycle, the reprocessed fuel used to produce energy will breed new fissile fuel and transmute minor actinides at the same time. A reference case scenario has been postulated and further sensitivity studies have been performed to analyze the impact of the different parameters on the required reactor fleet. The potential capability of Spain to supply the required fleet for the reference scenario using national resources has been verified. Finally, some consequences on irradiated final fuel inventory are assessed

  9. Virtual nuclear reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Narabayashi, Takashi; Shimazu, Youichiro

    2008-01-01

    As one of projects that were programmed in the cultivation program for human resources in nuclear engineering sponsored by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the development of a virtual reactor for education of nuclear reactor physics started in 2007. The purpose of the virtual nuclear reactor is to make nuclear reactor physics easily understood with aid of visualization. In the first year of this project, the neutron slowing down process was visualized. The data needed for visualization are provided by Monte Carlo calculations; The flights of the respective neutrons generated by nuclear fissions are traced through a reactor core until they disappear by neutron absorption or slow down to a thermal energy. With this visualization and an attached supplement textbook, it is expected that the learners can learn more clearly the physical implication of neutron slowing process that is mathematically described by the Boltzmann neutron transport equation. (author)

  10. Energies and media nr 31. The EPR. Its role in the nuclear sector. Finland, Flamanville, Abu Dhabi. The reactor range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (energy policy and projects in the USA, China, Italy, UK, Germany), this publication discusses the role of the EPR. It briefly outlines the characteristics of the third generation reactors compared with that of the first and second ones, evokes the influence of September 11 on design specifications, and evokes the international discussions about the project of fourth-generation reactors and the researches on nuclear fusion. It outlines the current context and the role of nuclear energy in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, briefly describes the opportunities offered by the use of thorium, and by fast neutron reactors. It comments the construction of the EPRs in Finland and in Flamanville, some characteristics of the EPR control system, and how France failed in selling the EPR to Abu Dhabi. It finally evokes the French offer in terms of nuclear reactors

  11. Energy production and reactor efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Doubts have been raised in relation to the economic and energetic efficiency of nuclear reactors. Some economists are questioning whether, when all the capital and material inputs to fission technology are considered, nuclear reactors yield sufficiently large amounts of energy to show a nett gain of energy. (author)

  12. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear Reactor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2001-02-01

    An authoritative textbook and up-to-date professional's guide to basic and advanced principles and practices Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering, and as the first comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics to appear in a quarter century, this book fills a large gap in the professional literature. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a textbook for students new to the subject, for others who need a basic understanding of how nuclear reactors work, as well as for those who are, or wish to become, specialists in nuclear reactor physics and reactor physics computations. It is also a valuable resource for engineers responsible for the operation of nuclear reactors. Dr. Weston Stacey begins with clear presentations of the basic physical principles, nuclear data, and computational methodology needed to understand both the static and dynamic behaviors of nuclear reactors. This is followed by in-depth discussions of advanced concepts, including extensive treatment of neutron transport computational methods. As an aid to comprehension and quick mastery of computational skills, he provides numerous examples illustrating step-by-step procedures for performing the calculations described and chapter-end problems. Nuclear Reactor Physics is a useful textbook and working reference. It is an excellent self-teaching guide for research scientists, engineers, and technicians involved in industrial, research, and military applications of nuclear reactors, as well as government regulators who wish to increase their understanding of nuclear reactors.

  14. Physics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This course gives an introduction to Nuclear Reactor Physics. The first chapter explains the most important parameters and concepts in nuclear reactor physics such as fission, cross sections and the effective multiplication factor. Further on, in the second chapter, the flux distributions in a stationary reactor are derived from the diffusion equation. Reactor kinetics, reactor control and reactor dynamics (feedback effects) are described in the following three chapters. The course concludes with a short description of the different types of existing and future reactors. (author)

  15. Research on nuclear energy in the fields of fuel cycle, PWR reactors and LMFBR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Camarcat, N.

    1995-01-01

    In this article we present the CEA research programs to improve the safety of the next generation of reactors, to manage the Plutonium and the wastes of the fuel cycle end and to ameliorate the competitiveness. 6 refs

  16. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  17. Control for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, E.B.; Bernath, L.; Facha, J.V.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is provided with several hydraulically-supported spherical bodies having a high neutron absorption cross section, which fall by gravity into the core region of the reactor when the flow of supporting fluid is shut off. (auth)

  18. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Training of operating personnel and personnel selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drain, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This study has been prepared for the Department of Energy's Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee. Its purpose is to provide the Committee with background information on, and assessment of, the selection, training, and qualification of nuclear reactor operating personnel at DOE-owned facilities

  19. Thermodynamic exergy analysis for small modular reactor in nuclear hybrid energy system - 15110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldon, L.; Liu, L.; Sabharwall, P.; Rabiti, C.; Bragg-Sitton, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the inherent value of energy in a thermal system, it is necessary to understand both the quantity and quality of energy available or the exergy. We study the case where nuclear energy through a small modular reactor (SMR) is supplementing the available wind energy through storage to meet the needs of the electrical grid. Nuclear power is also being used for the production of hydrogen via high temperature steam electrolysis. For a SMR exergy analysis, both the physical and economic environments must be considered. The physical environment incorporates the energy, raw materials, and reference environment, where the reference environment refers to natural resources available without limit and without cost. This paper aims to explore the use of exergy analysis methods to estimate and optimize SMR resources and costs for individual subsystems, based on thermodynamic principles-resource utilization and efficiency. The paper will present background information on exergy theory; identify the core subsystems in an SMR plant coupled with storage systems in support of renewable energy and hydrogen production; perform a thermodynamic exergy analysis; determine the cost allocation among these subsystems; and calculate unit 'exergetic' costs, unit 'exergo-economic' costs, and first and second law efficiencies. Exergetic and 'exergo-economic' costs ultimately determine how individual subsystems contribute to overall profitability and how efficiencies and consumption may be optimized to improve profitability, making SMRs more competitive with other generation technologies

  20. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-05-15

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  1. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  2. A vision of inexhaustible energy: The fast breeder reactor in Swedish nuclear power history 1945-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fjaestad, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The fast breeder is a type of nuclear reactor that aroused much attention in the 1950s and 1960s. Its ability to produce more nuclear fuel than it consumes offered promises of cheap and reliable energy, and thereby connected it to utopian ideas about an eternal supply of energy, Furthermore. the ideas of breeder reactors were a vital part of the post-war visions about the nuclear future. This dissertation investigates the plans for breeder reactors in Sweden, connecting them to the contemporary development of nuclear power with heavy or light water and the discussions of nuclear weapons, as well as to the general visions of a prosperous technological future. The history of the Swedish breeder reactor is traced from high hopes in the beginning, via the fiasco of the Swedish heavy water program, partly focusing on the activities at the company AB Atomenergi and investigating how it planned and argued for its breeder program and how this was received by the politicians. The story continues into the intensive environmental movement in the 1970s, ending with the Swedish referendum on nuclear energy in 1980, which can be seen as the final point for the Swedish breeder. The thesis discusses how the nuclear breeder reactor was transformed from an argument for nuclear power to an argument against it. The breeder began as a part of the vision of a society with abundant energy, but was later seen as a threat against the new sustainable world. The nuclear breeder reactor is an example of a technological vision that did not meet its industrial expectations. But that does not prevent the fact that breeder was an influential technology in an age where important decisions about nuclear energy were made. The thesis argues that important decisions about the contemporary reactors were taken with the idea that they in a foreseeable future would be replaced with the efficient breeder. And the last word on the breeder reactor is not said - today, reactor engineers around the world are

  3. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  4. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  5. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future

  7. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  8. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  9. Nuclear energy - some aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-01

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy

  10. Molten salt reactor technology for long-range and wide-scale nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatiev, V.; Alexseev, P.; Menshikov, L.; Prusakov, V.; Subbotine, S.

    1997-01-01

    A possibility of creation of multi-component nuclear power system in which alongside with thermal and fast reactors, molten salt burner reactors, for incineration of weapon grade plutonium, some minor actinides and transmutation of some fission products will be presented. The purposes of this work are to review the present status of the molten salt reactor technology and innovative non-aqueous chemical processing methods, to indicate the importance of the uncertainties remaining, to identify the additional work needed, and to evaluate the probability of success in obtaining improved safety characteristics for new concept of molten salt - burner reactor with external neutron source. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  11. The risks of nuclear energy technology. Safety concepts of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnk (IKET); Kessler, Guenter; Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-11-01

    Analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. Discusses the security concept of reactors. Analyzes possible crash of air planes on a reactor containment. Presents measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident. Written in engaging style for professionals and policy makers. The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on a reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: - A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These safety concepts are also compared with the experiences of the Fukushima accidents. In addition, the safety design concepts of the future modern European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and of the future modern Boiling Water Reactor SWR-1000 (KERENA) are presented. These are based on new safety research results of the past decades. - In a second, part the possible crash of military or heavy commercial air planes on a reactor containment is analyzed. It is shown that reactor containments can be designed to resist to such an airplane crash. - In a third part, an online decision system is presented. It allows to analyze the distribution of radioactivity in the atmosphere and to the environment after a severe reactor accident. It provides data for decisions to be taken by authorities for the minimization of radiobiological effects to the population. This book appeals to readers who have an interest in save living conditions and some understanding for physics or engineering.

  12. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  13. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    A general view about the use of energy for brazilian development is presented. The international situation of the nuclear field and the pacific utilization of nuclear energy in Brazil are commented. The safety concepts used for reactor and nuclear facilities licensing, the environmental monitoring program and radiation protection program used in Brazil are described. (E.G.) [pt

  14. HYPER (hybrid power extraction reactor): a system for clean nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.S.; Shin, U.; Han, S.-J.; Song, T.Y.; Choi, B.H.; Park, C.K.

    2000-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been performing accelerator driven system related research and development (RID) called HYPER (hybrid power extraction reactor) for the transmutation of nuclear waste and energy production through the transmutation process. HYPER program is within the frame work of the national mid and long-term nuclear research plan. KAERI is aiming to develop the elemental technologies for the subcritical transmutation system by the year of 2001 and build a small bench scale test facility (∝5 MW) by the year of 2006. Some major features of HYPER have been developed and employed. On-power fueling concepts are employed to keep system power constant with a minimum variation of accelerator power. A hollow cylinder-type metal fuel is designed for the on-line refueling concept. Lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi) is adopted as a coolant and spallation target material. 1 GeV 16 mA proton beam is designed to be provided for HYPER. HYPER is to transmute about 380 kg of TRU a year and produce 1000 MW of power. The support ratio of HYPER for LWR units producing the same power is believed to be 5∝6. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  16. The future of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1989-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards began work in early 1948 with the firm and unanimous conviction that nuclear power could not survive a significant damaging accident. They as a committee felt that their job was to make reactors so safe that no such event would ever occur. However, ambitious reactor planners did not like all the buts and cautions that the committee was raising. They seemed to delay unduly their setting sail into the brave new world of clean, cheap, safe nuclear energy. The committee was soon nicknamed the Committee on Reactor Prevention. Reactors, of course, represented a tremendous step into the future. To an unprecedented extent, they were based on theory. But the committee did not have the luxury of putting a preliminary model into operation and waiting for difficulties to show up. In assessing new designs and developments, they had to anticipate future difficulties. Their proposals in good part were accepted, but their deep emphasis on safety did not become a part of the program. Today, forty years later, the author still believes both in the need for nuclear reactors and in the need of a thorough-going, pervasive emphasis on their safety. Real, understandable safety can be achieved, and that achievement is the key to our nuclear future. The details he gives are only examples. The need for reactors that are not only safe but obviously safe can be ignored only at our peril

  17. Reactors. Nuclear propulsion ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This article has for object the development of nuclear-powered ships and the conception of the nuclear-powered ship. The technology of the naval propulsion P.W.R. type reactor is described in the article B.N.3 141 'Nuclear Boilers ships'. (N.C.)

  18. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials

  19. Nuclear reactor safety program in US department of energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and implement DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Department, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The Application of artificial intelligence technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs

  20. Nuclear reactor safety program in U.S. Department of Energy and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.T.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) establishes policy, issues orders, and assures compliance with requirements. The contractors who design, construct, modify, operate, maintain and decommission DOE reactors, set forth the assessment of the safety of cognizant reactors and impliment DOE orders. Teams of experts in the Depatment, through scheduled and unscheduled review programs, reassess the safety of reactors in every phases of their lives. As new technology develops, the safety programs are reevaluated and policies are modified to accommodate these new technologies. The diagnostic capabilities of the computer using multiple alarms to enhance detection of defects and control of a reactor have been greatly utilized in reactor operating systems. The application of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for diagnostic and even for the decision making process in the event of reactor accidents would be one of the future trends in reactor safety programs. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  2. Overview of Nuclear Reactor Technologies Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Office of Nuclear Energy Roadmap R&D Objectives: • Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; • Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; • Develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; • Develop capabilities to reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism

  3. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  5. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    A brief indication is given of the United Kingdom nuclear power programme including descriptions of the fission process, the Magnox, AGR and PWR type reactors, the recycling process, waste management and decommissioning, safety precautions, the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and the JET fusion experiment. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  9. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  10. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  11. Separated type nuclear superheating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hida, Kazuki.

    1993-01-01

    In a separated type nuclear superheating reactor, fuel assemblies used in a reactor core comprise fuel rods made of nuclear fuel materials and moderator rods made of solid moderating materials such as hydrogenated zirconium. Since the moderating rods are fixed or made detachable, high energy neutrons generated from the fuel rods are moderated by the moderating rods to promote fission reaction of the fuel rods. Saturated steams supplied from the BWR type reactor by the fission energy are converted to high temperature superheated steams while passing through a steam channel disposed between the fuel rods and the moderating rods and supplied to a turbine. Since water is not used but solid moderating materials sealed in a cladding tube are used as moderation materials, isolation between superheated steams and water as moderators is not necessary. Further, since leakage of heat is reduced to improve a heat efficiency, the structure of the reactor core is simplified and fuel exchange is facilitated. (N.H.)

  12. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Vinicius Damas

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  13. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  14. Innovative designs of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabaraev, B.A.; Cherepnin, Y.S.

    2010-01-01

    The world development scenarios predict at least a 2.5 time increase in the global consumption of primary energy in the first half of the twenty-first century. Much of this growth can be provided by the nuclear power which possesses important advantages over other energy technologies. However, the large deployment of nuclear sources may take place only when the new generation of reactors appears on the market and will be free of the shortcomings found in the existing nuclear power installations. The public will be more inclined to accept nuclear plants that have better economics; higher safety; more efficient management of the radioactive waste; lower risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, and provided that the focus is made on the energy option free of ∇ e 2 generation. Currently, the future of nuclear power is trusted to the technology based on fast reactors and closed fuel cycle. The latter implies reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of the nuclear plants and re-use of plutonium produced in power reactors

  15. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  16. Analysis of Russian transition scenarios to innovative nuclear energy system based on thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle using INPRO methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Poplavskaya, E.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Moseev, A.L.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Andreeva-Andrievskaya, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of modeling of Russian nuclear energy (NE) scenarios on the basis of thermal and fast reactors with closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). Modeling has been carried out with use of CYCLE code (SSC RF IPPE's tool) designed for analysis of Nuclear Energy System (NES) with closed NFC taking into account plutonium and minor actinides (MA) isotopic composition change during multi-recycling of fuel in fast reactors. When considering fast reactor introduction scenarios, one of important questions is to define optimal time for their introduction and related NFC's facilities. Analysis of the results obtained has been fulfilled using the key INPRO indicators for sustainable energy development. It was shown that a delay in fast reactor introduction led to serious ecological, social and finally economic risks for providing energy security and sustainable development of Russia in long-term prospects and loss of knowledge and experience in mastering innovative technologies of fast reactors and related nuclear fuel cycle. (author)

  17. Thermodynamic exergy analysis for small modular reactor in nuclear hybrid energy system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boldon Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs provide a unique opportunity for future nuclear development with reduced financial risks, allowing the United States to meet growing energy demands through safe, reliable, clean air electricity generation while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the reliance on unstable fossil fuel prices. A nuclear power plant is comprised of several complex subsystems which utilize materials from other subsystems and their surroundings. The economic utility of resources, or thermoeconomics, is extremely difficult to analyze, particularly when trying to optimize resources and costs among individual subsystems and determine prices for products. Economics and thermodynamics cannot provide this information individually. Thermoeconomics, however, provides a method of coupling the quality of energy available based on exergy and the value of this available energy – “exergetic costs”. For an SMR exergy analysis, both the physical and economic environments must be considered. The physical environment incorporates the energy, raw materials, and reference environment, where the reference environment refers to natural resources available without limit and without cost, such as air input to a boiler. The economic environment includes market influences and prices in addition to installation, operation, and maintenance costs required for production to occur. The exergetic cost or the required exergy for production may be determined by analyzing the physical environment alone. However, to optimize the system economics, this environment must be coupled with the economic environment. A balance exists between enhancing systems to improve efficiency and optimizing costs. Prior research into SMR thermodynamics has not detailed methods on improving exergetic costs for an SMR coupled with storage technologies and renewable energy such as wind or solar in a hybrid energy system. This process requires balancing technological efficiencies and

  18. Research Reactors for the Development of Materials and Fuels for Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication presents an overview of research reactor capabilities and capacities in the development of fuels and materials for innovative nuclear reactors, such as GenIV reactors. The compendium provides comprehensive information on the potential for materials and fuel testing research of 30 research reactors, both operational and in development. This information includes their power levels, mode of operation, current status, availability and historical overview of their utilization. A summary of these capabilities and capacities is presented in the overview tables of section 6. Papers providing a technical description of the research reactors, including their specific features for utilization are collected as profiles on a CD-ROM and represent an integral part of this publication. The publication is intended to foster wider access to information on existing research reactors with capacity for advanced material testing research and thus ensure their increased utilization in this particular domain. It is expected that it can also serve as a supporting tool for the establishment of regional and international networking through research reactor coalitions and IAEA designated international centres based on research reactors.

  19. The effects of radiation on aluminium alloys in the core of energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrossian, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    One of the attractive directions in the worldwide practice of nuclear installations is the replacement of expensive zirconium alloy with more cheap materials, particularly aluminium allo. For Heat Supply Nuclear Plants (HSNP) with approximately 473 K core temperatures, the use of heat-resistant aluminium alloys seems to be reasonable. The present work is concerned with the studies on radiation effects on aluminium alloy, and interaction between the alloy and coolant in the reactor core. (author). 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  1. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  2. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24

  3. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  4. 9th international conference on high-temperature reactors - coal and nuclear energy for electricity and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The site of the high-temperatur reactor in the Ruhr region neighbouring on a coal-fired power plant is not accidental. The potential of the high-temperature reactor as a central plant element for the supply of heat for heating purposes and process heat covers also the possibility of coal gasification and liquefaction. Therefore the high-temperature reactor is, in the long term, a ray of hope for the coal region, able to compensate for the production-related competitive disadvantages of local coal. It can contribute to guaranteeing in the long term the task of German hard coal as an essential pillar of our energy supply. The VGB as a technical association of thermal power plant operators is particularly committed to the integration of coal and nuclear energy. Within the bounds of its possibilities, it will contribute to promoting the safe and environmentally beneficial generation of electricity from the two primary energy sources. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Japan: The institute for the economy of energy recommends a quick re-start of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Institute for the Economy of the Energy (IEEJ) considers that the sooner the nuclear reactors will re-start, the better the Japanese economy and environment will be. The 48 Japanese reactors were stopped after the Fukushima accident and their restart is linked to the implementation of new measures for reinforcing safety. Until now only 2 reactors Sendai 1 and Sendai 2 have been allowed to re-start. The procedure for the safety assessment of the reactors is slower than expected. A study shows that only 7 reactors may be allowed to re-start before march 2015 and a total of 19 units may be operating in march 2016. In this scenario 2% of the electricity will come from nuclear energy in 2014 and 15% in 2015, natural gas imports will still be necessary for the production of electricity and their global cost is estimated to reach 56 billions euros while Japan's rate of energy independence will drop by 4.6%. (A.C.)

  6. Deliberations about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boskma, P.; Smit, W.A.; Vries, G.H. de; Dijk, G. van; Groenewold, H.J.; Jelsma, J.; Tans, P.P.; Doorn, W. van

    1975-01-01

    This report is a discussion of points raised in three safety studies dealing with nuclear energy. It reviews the problems that must be faced in order to form a safe and practical energy policy with regard to health and the environment (potential hazards, biological effects and radiation dose norms), the proliferation of nuclear weapons, reactor accidents (including their causes, consequences and evacuation problems that arise), the fallout and contamination problems, and security (both reactor security and national security)

  7. Soft energy vs nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    During the early 1960s, a plentiful, inexpensive supply of petroleum enabled Japanese industry to progress rapidly; however, almost all of this petroleum was imported. Even after the first oil crisis of 1973, the recent annual energy consumption of Japan is calculated to be about 360 million tons in terms of petroleum, and actual petroleum forms 73% of total energy. It is necessary for Japan to reduce reliance on petroleum and to diversify energy resources. The use of other fossil fuels, such as coal, LNG and LPG, and hydraulic energy, is considered as an established alternative. In this presentation, the author deals with new energy, namely soft energy and nuclear energy, and discusses their characteristics and problems. The following kinds of energy are dealt with: a) Solar energy, b) Geothermal energy, c) Ocean energy (tidal, thermal, wave), d) Wind energy, e) Biomass energy, f) Hydrogen, g) Nuclear (thermal, fast, fusion). To solve the energy problem in future, assiduous efforts should be made to develop new energy systems. Among them, the most promising alternative energy is nuclear energy, and various kinds of thermal reactor systems have been developed for practical application. As a solution to the long-term future energy problem, research on and development of fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are going on. (author)

  8. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  9. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  10. Nuclear energy. Economical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.

    2010-01-01

    This document present 43 slides of a power point presentation containing detailed data on economical and cost data for nuclear energy and nuclear power plants: evolution from 1971 to 2007 of world total primary energy supply, development of nuclear energy in the world, nuclear power plants in the world in 2009, service life of nuclear power plants and its extension; nuclear energy market and perspectives at 2030, the EPR concept (generation III) and its perspectives at 2030 in the world; cost assessment (power generation cost, nuclear power generation cost, costs due to nuclear safety, comparison of investment costs for gas, coal and nuclear power generation, costs for building a nuclear reactor and general cost; cost for the entire fuel cycle, the case of the closed cycle with recycling (MOX); costs for radioactive waste storage; financial costs and other costs such as environmental impacts, strategic stocks, comparative evaluation of the competitiveness of nuclear versus coal and gas

  11. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100{sup th} nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were replaced by U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to

  12. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100 th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U 3 O 8 were replaced by U 3 Si 2 -based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is

  13. Nuclear energy in view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This leaflet advertises the availability of the following from UKAEA: film and video titles (nuclear fuel cycle; energy for all; power from the atom; using radioactivity; fast reactor; energy - the nuclear option; principles of fission; radiation); slide-tape packs (16 titles); other information services. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear energy questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work pack contains illustrated booklets entitled: 'Uranium mining'; 'Reactors and radiation'; 'Nuclear waste'; 'Work book on energy'; 'Alternatives now'; 'Future energy choices'; 'Resources handbook'; and 'Tutors' guidelines': a map entitled 'Nuclear power in Britain': and two coloured pictures entitled 'Nuclear prospects' and 'Safe energy'. A cover note states that the material has been prepared for use in schools and study groups. (U.K.)

  15. Gas Turbine Energy Conversion Systems for Nuclear Power Plants Applicable to LiFTR Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    This panel plans to cover thermal energy and electric power production issues facing our nation and the world over the next decades, with relevant technologies ranging from near term to mid-and far term.Although the main focus will be on ground based plants to provide baseload electric power, energy conversion systems (ECS) for space are also included, with solar- or nuclear energy sources for output power levels ranging tens of Watts to kilo-Watts for unmanned spacecraft, and eventual mega-Watts for lunar outposts and planetary surface colonies. Implications of these technologies on future terrestrial energy systems, combined with advanced fracking, are touched upon.Thorium based reactors, and nuclear fusion along with suitable gas turbine energy conversion systems (ECS) will also be considered by the panelists. The characteristics of the above mentioned ECS will be described, both in terms of their overall energy utilization effectiveness and also with regard to climactic effects due to exhaust emissions.

  16. Nuclear Reactors and Technology; (USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cason, D.L.; Hicks, S.C. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on EDB and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to EDB, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user's needs.

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterfield, C.E.; Waite, E.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, C.N.; Bybee, R.T.; Mason, F.L.; Worsham, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention pertains to an improved monitoring system for the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor. It is proposed to combine neutron flux detectors, a thermoelement, and a background radiation detector in one measuring unit. The spatial arrangement of these elements is fixed with great exactness; they are enclosed by an elastic cover and are brought into position in the reactor with the aid of a bent tube. The arrangement has a low failure rate and is easy to maintain. (HP) [de

  19. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, Seiichi.

    1988-01-01

    Cables coverd with non-halogen covering material are used as electric wire cables wired for supplying electric power to a reactor recycling pump. Silicone rubber having specified molecular formula is used for the non-halogen covering material. As a result, formation of chlorine in a nuclear reactor container can be eliminated and increase in the deposited salts to SUS pipeways, etc. can be prevented, to avoid the occurrence of stress corrosion cracks. (H.T.)

  20. Technology of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelet, F.

    2016-01-01

    This academic report for graduation in engineering first presents operation principles of a nuclear reactor core. It presents core components, atomic nuclei, the notions of transmutation and radioactivity, quantities used to characterize ionizing radiations, the nuclear fission, statistical aspects of fission and differences between fast and slow neutrons, a comparison between various heat transfer fluids, the uranium enrichment process, and different types of reactor (boiling water, natural uranium and heavy water, pressurized water, and fourth generation). Then, after having recalled the French installed power, the author proposes an analysis of a typical 900 MWe nuclear power plant: primary circuit, reactor, fuel, spent fuel, pressurizer and primary pump, secondary circuit, aspects related to control-command, regulation, safety and exploitation. The last part proposes a modelling of the thermodynamic cycle of a pressurized water plant by using an equivalent Carnot cycle, a Rankine cycle, and a two-phase expansion cycle with drying-overheating

  1. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  2. Nuclear reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Shoji; Kato, Ryoichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the cost of reactor buildings and satisfy the severe seismic demands in tank type FBR type reactors. Constitution: In usual nuclear reactor buildings of a flat bottom embedding structure, the flat bottom is entirely embedded into the rock below the soils down to the deck level of the nuclear reactor. As a result, although the weight of the seismic structure can be decreased, the amount of excavating the cavity is significantly increased to inevitably increase the plant construction cost. Cross-like intersecting foundation mats are embedded to the building rock into a thickness capable withstanding to earthquakes while maintaining the arrangement of equipments around the reactor core in the nuclear buildings required by the system design, such as vertical relationship between the equipments, fuel exchange systems and sponteneous drainings. Since the rock is hard and less deformable, the rigidity of the walls and the support structures of the reactor buildings can be increased by the embedding into the rock substrate and floor responsivity can be reduced. This enables to reduce the cost and increasing the seismic proofness. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12 ENFIR), 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  4. Role of small lead-cooled fast reactors for international deployment in worldwide sustainable nuclear energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Wade, D.C.; Moisseytsev, A.

    2008-01-01

    Most recently, the global nuclear energy partnership (GNEP) has identified, as one of its key objectives, the development and demonstration of concepts for small and medium-sized reactors (SMRs) that can be globally deployed while assuring a high level of proliferation resistance. Lead-cooled systems offer several key advantages in meeting these goals. The small lead-cooled fast reactor concept known as the small secure transportable autonomous reactor (SSTAR) has been under ongoing development as part of the US advanced nuclear energy systems programs. Meeting future worldwide projected energy demands during this century (e.g., 1000 to 2000 GWe by 2050) in a sustainable manner while maintaining CO2 emissions at or below today's level will require massive deployments of nuclear reactors in non-fuel cycle states as well as fuel cycle states. The projected energy demands of non-fuel cycle states will not be met solely through the deployment of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in those states without using up the world's resources of fissile material (e.g., known plus speculative virgin uranium resources = 15 million tonnes). The present U.S. policy is focused upon domestic deployment of large-scale LWRs and sodium-cooled fast spectrum Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) working in a symbiotic relationship that burns existing fissile material while destroying the actinides which are generated. Other major nuclear nations are carrying out the development and deployment of SFR breeders as witness the planning for SFR breeder deployments in France, Japan, China, India, and Russia. Small (less that 300 MWe) and medium (300 to 700 MWe) size reactors are better suited to the growing economies and infrastructures of many non-fuel cycle states and developing nations. For those deployments, fast reactor converters which are fissile self-sufficient by creating as much fissile material as they consume are preferred to breeders that create more fissile material than they consume. Thus

  5. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  6. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  7. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  8. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group

  9. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-15

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group.

  10. The study on the role of very high temperature reactor and nuclear process heat utilization in future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukawa, Sigeru; Mankin, Shuichi; Tadokoro, Yoshihiro; Sato, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Ueno, Seiichi

    1986-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results being made in the study on the role of Very High Temperature Reactor and nuclear process heat utilization in future energy system, which is aimed at zero emission. In the former part of the report, the modeling of the reference energy system, main characteristics of energy technologies, and scenario indicators as well as system behavioral objectives for optimization are explained. In the latter part, analytical results such as the time-period variation of overall energy utilization efficiency, energy supply/demand structure in long-terms, energy contribution and economic competition of new energy technologies, environmental effluents released through verious energy activities, impacts to and from national economy, and some sensitivity analyses, are reviewed. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration; Reactor nuclear PBMR y cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  12. The geo-reactor. A link between nuclear fission and geothermal energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fiorina, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-precision isotope analysis data suggests the potential occurrence of a geo-reactor. Specific gas isotopes that could have been generated by binary and ternary fissions were identified in volcano emanations or as soluble/associated species in crystalline rocks and semi-quantitatively evaluated as isotopic ratio or estimated amounts. Presently if it is evident that according to the actinide inventory on the Earth, local potential criticality of the geo-system may have been reached, several questions remain such as why, where and when did a geo-reactor be operational? Even if the hypothesis of a geo-reactor operation in the proto-Earth period should be acceptable, it could be difficult to anticipate that a geo-reactor is still operating today. This could be tested in the future by assessing and reconstructing the system by antineutrino detection and tomography through the Earth. The present paper focuses on the geo-reactor conditions including history, spatial extension and regimes. The discussion based on recent calculations involves investigations on the limits in term of fissile inventory, size and power, based on stratification through the gravitational field and the various features through the inner mantel, the boundary with the core, the external part and the inner-core. the reconstruction allows to formulating that from the history point of view there are possibilities that the geo-reactor reached criticality in a proto-Earth period as a thorium/uranium reactor triggered by an under-layer with heavier actinides. The geo-reactor should be a key component of geothermal energy sources. (author)

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  14. Decommissioning of Salaspils nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.; Malnachs, J.; Popelis, A.

    2002-01-01

    In May 1995, the Latvian Government decided to shut down the Research Reactor Salaspils (SRR) and to dispense with nuclear energy in future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH from 1998-1999. he Latvian Government decided on 26 October 1999 to start the direct dismantling to 'green field' in 2001. The results of decommissioning and dismantling performed in 1999-2001 are presented and discussed. The main efforts were devoted to collecting and conditioning 'historical' radioactive waste from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall. All radioactive material more than 20 tons were conditioned in concrete containers for disposal in the radioactive waste depository 'Radons' in the Baldone site. Personal protective and radiation measurement equipment was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and material outside the reactor buildings were free-released and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Weakly contaminated material from the reactor hall was collected and removed for free-release measurements. The technology of dismantling of the reactor's systems, i.e. second cooling circuit, zero power reactors and equipment, is discussed in the paper. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  16. Future nuclear systems, Astrid, an option for the fourth generation: preparing the future of nuclear energy, sustainably optimising resources, defining technological options, sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter Minassian, Vahe

    2016-01-01

    Energy independence and security of supplies, improved safety standards, sustainably optimised material management, minimal waste production - all without greenhouse gas emissions. These are the Generation IV International Forum specifications for nuclear energy of the future. The CEA is responsible for designing Astrid, an integrated technology demonstrator for the 4. generation of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in accordance with the French Sustainable Nuclear Materials and Waste Management Act of June 28, 2006, and funded as part of the Investments for the Future programme enacted by the French parliament in 2010. Energy management - a vital need and a factor of economic growth - is a major challenge for the world of tomorrow. The nuclear industry has significant advantages in this regard, although it faces safety, resource sustainability, and waste management issues that must be met through continuing technological innovation. Fast reactors are also of interest to the nuclear industry because their recycling capability would solve a number of problems related to the stockpiles of uranium and plutonium. After the resumption of R and D work with EDF and AREVA in 2006, the Astrid design studies began in 2010. The CEA, as owner and contracting authority for this programme, is now in a position to define the broad outlines of the demonstrator 4. generation reactor that could be commissioned during the next decade. A sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) operates in the same way as a conventional nuclear reactor: fission reactions in the atoms of fuel in the core generate heat, which is conveyed to a turbine generator to produce electricity. In the context of 4. generation technology, SFRs represent an innovative solution for optimising the use of raw materials as well as for enhancing safety. Here are a few ideas advanced by the CEA. (authors)

  17. Nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor assembly includes a reactor pressure tank having a substantially cylindrical side wall surrounded by the wall of a cylindrical cavity formed by a biological shield. A rotative cylindrical wall is interposed between the walls and has means for rotating it from outside of the shield, and a probe is carried by the rotative wall for monitoring the pressure tank's wall. The probe is vertically movable relative to the rotative cylindrical wall, so that by the probe's vertical movement and rotation of the rotative cylinder, the reactor's wall can be very extensively monitored. If the reactor pressure tank's wall fails, it is contained by the rotative wall which is backed-up by the shield cavity wall. (Official Gazette)

  18. Aiming at super long term application of nuclear energy. Scope and subjects on the water cooled breeder reactor, the 'reduced moderation water reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Tatematsu, Kenji; Tanaka, Yoji

    2001-01-01

    In order to make possible on nuclear energy application for super long term, development of sodium cooling type fast breeder reactor (FBR) has been carried out before today. However, as it was found that its commercialization was technically and economically difficult beyond expectation, a number of nations withdrew from its development. And, as Japan has continued its development, scope of its actual application is not found yet. Now, a research and development on a water cooling type breeder reactor, the reduced moderation water reactor (RMWR)' using LWR technology has now been progressed under a center of JAERI. This RMWR is a reactor intending a jumping upgrade of conversion ratio by densely arranging fuel bars to shift neutron spectrum to faster region. The RMWR has a potential realizable on full-dress plutonium application at earlier timing through its high conversion ratio, high combustion degree, plutonium multi-recycling, and so on. And, it has also feasibility to solve uranium resource problem by realization of conversion ratio with more than 1.0, to contribute to super long term application of nuclear energy. Here was investigated on an effect of reactor core on RMWR, especially of its conversion ratio and plutonium loading on introduction effect as well as on how RMWR could be contributed to reduction of uranium resource consumption, by drawing some scenario on development of power generation reactor and fuel cycle in Japan under scope of super long term with more than 100 years in future. And, trial calculation on power generation cost of the RMWR was carried out to investigate some subjects at a viewpoint of upgrading on economy. (G.K.)

  19. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakaria, B. K.

    1994-01-01

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  20. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These notes have been prepared by the Department of Energy to provide information and to answer questions often raised about nuclear energy and the nuclear industry and in the hope that they will contribute to the public debate about the future of nuclear energy in the UK. The subject is dealt with under the headings; contribution of nuclear power, energy forecasts, nuclear fuels and reactor types, cost, thermal reactor strategy, planning margin, safety, nuclear licensing, unlike an atomic bomb, radiation, waste disposal, transport of nuclear materials, emergency arrangements at nuclear sites, siting of nuclear stations, security of nuclear installations, world nuclear programmes, international regulation and non-proliferation, IAEA safeguards arrangements in the UK, INFCE, and uranium supplies. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor built, being built, or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1990. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE, from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations, from US and foreign embassies, and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly

  2. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  3. Nuclear waste management, reactor decommisioning, nuclear liability and public attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with several issues that are frequently raised by the public in any discussion of nuclear energy, and explores some aspects of public attitudes towards nuclear-related activities. The characteristics of the three types of waste associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, i.e. mine/mill tailings, reactor wastes and nuclear fuel wastes, are defined, and the methods currently being proposed for their safe handling and disposal are outlined. The activities associated with reactor decommissioning are also described, as well as the Canadian approach to nuclear liability. The costs associated with nuclear waste management, reactor decommissioning and nuclear liability are also discussed. Finally, the issue of public attitudes towards nuclear energy is addressed. It is concluded that a simple and comprehensive information program is needed to overcome many of the misconceptions that exist about nuclear energy and to provide the public with a more balanced information base on which to make decisions

  4. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  5. Nuclear reactor PBMR and cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Alonso V, G.

    2013-10-01

    In recent years the nuclear reactor designs for the electricity generation have increased their costs, so that at the moment costs are managed of around the 5000 US D for installed kw, reason for which a big nuclear plant requires of investments of the order of billions of dollars, the designed reactors as modular of low power seek to lighten the initial investment of a big reactor dividing the power in parts and dividing in modules the components to lower the production costs, this way it can begin to build a module and finished this to build other, differing the long term investment, getting less risk therefore in the investment. On the other hand the reactors of low power can be very useful in regions where is difficult to have access to the electric net being able to take advantage of the thermal energy of the reactor to feed other processes like the water desalination or the vapor generation for the processes industry like the petrochemical, or even more the possible hydrogen production to be used as fuel. In this work the possibility to generate vapor of high quality for the petrochemical industry is described using a spheres bed reactor of high temperature. (Author)

  6. Nuclear power reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon, G.A.

    1976-10-01

    This report is based on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submission to the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning on the safety of CANDU reactors. It discusses normal operating conditions, postulated accident conditions, and safety systems. The release of radioactivity under normal and accident conditions is compared to the limits set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  8. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  9. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on energy futures; energy demand, energy supplies; exclusive paths and difficult choices--hard, soft, and moderate energy paths; an energy-deficient society; energy shortages; economics of light-water reactors; fast breeder reactor economics; international cooperation in the nuclear field; nuclear recycling; alternative fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors; the nuclear weapons proliferation issue; paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards; the homemade bomb issue; LWR risk assessment; accident analysis and risk assessment; the waste disposal risk; radon problems; risks in our society; health effects of low-level radiation; routine releases of radioactivity from the nuclear industry; low-level radioactivity and infant mortality; the myth of plutonium toxicity; myths about high-level radioactive waste; the aging reactor myth; the police state myth; insurance and nuclear power--the Price-Anderson Act; and solar and nuclear power as partners

  10. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor construction comprising a reactor core submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is suspended from the roof structure of a containment vault. Control rods supported from the roof structure are insertable in the core which is carried on a support structure from the wall of the primary vessel. To prevent excessive relaxation of the support structure whereby the control rods would be displaced relative to the core, the support structure incorporates a normally inactive secondary structure designed to become effective in bracing the primary structure against further relaxation beyond a predetermined limit. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installation includes a pressurized-water coolant reactor vessel and a concrete biological shield surrounding this vessel. The shield forms a space between it and the vessel large enough to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant therefrom in the event the vessel ruptures. Struts extend radially between the vessel and shield for a distance permitting normal radial thermal movement of the vessel, while containing the vessel in the event it ruptures, the struts being interspaced from each other to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant from the space between the shield and the vessel

  12. Australia's new nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    On 19 and 20 April 2007, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) celebrated the recent commissioning of its new, world-class, OPAL (Open Pool Australian Lightwater) research reactor at the Lucas Heights. On the 19th, scientists, business leaders and academics were introduced to the reactor and its technical capacity for the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals, its material science applications, its environmental services and its neutron scattering facilities for business applications. The formal OPAL opening function took place that evening and, on the 20th, Prime Minister John Howard visited ANSTO to be briefed about OPAL and to be shown the work being carried out at Lucas Heights

  13. Refueling of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, J.W.; Swidwa, K.J.; Hornak, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for refueling a nuclear reactor, the reactor being disposed for refueling under water in a pit in a containment, the apparatus including a bridge to be mounted moveably over the pit on the containment, first means connected to the bridge, for moving the bridge forward and backward on the containment over the pit along a first path, a first pulse generator, connected to the moving means, responsive to the movement of the bridge, for producing pulses, means, connected to the generator,for counting the pulses, the count of the pulses being dependent on the distance of the movement of the bridge

  14. Introduction to the use of the INPRO methodology in a nuclear energy system assessment. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of an IAEA General Conference resolution in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since that time been continuously endorsed by resolutions of the IAEA General Conference and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting energy needs in the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required to ensure the sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfil these objectives, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, along with an assessment method, which are the basis of the INPRO methodology for evaluation of the sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology, the nine volume INPRO Manual was developed; it consists of an overview volume and eight volumes covering the areas of economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (including the impact of stressors and the availability of resources), reactor safety, and the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. To assist Member States in applying the INPRO methodology, the nuclear energy system assessment (NESA) support package is being developed. This includes a database (containing input data for assessment), provision of training courses in the INPRO methodology and examples of comprehensive assessments. This publication provides guidance on how a variety of potential users, including nuclear technology developers, experienced users and prospective first time nuclear technology users (newcomers) can apply the INPRO methodology for

  15. Possible development of nuclear energy in the European Community and consequences of different reactor strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decressin, A.; Haytinck, B.; Orlowski, S.

    1974-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities recommended to stimulate the development of the nuclear energy, in order to ensure in the middle or long term, a diversification of the energy supply sources of the Community. According to such a policy, nuclear energy could cover nearly 80% of the Community needs in electrical power in the year 2000 - these being estimated at 50% of total energy needs of the Community - and correspond to 1,3 billion tep for that year alone. In the year 2000, the installed nuclear capacity in the Community (i.e. nearly 1000 GWe) would imply the consumption of roughly 150.000 metric tons of natural uranium and necessitate 90.000 tons of SWU in enrichment services, whatever ''average'' strategy is considered for the period 1980 - 2000. The choices between these various strategies made by public or industrial decision centers, will be the result of a complex assessment of many factors. In any case, the flow of nuclear material between countries will remain very important and a Community nuclear self sufficiency based on breeding is not conceivable before the time at which new energy sources could be brought in effective uses

  16. Modeling Chilled-Water Storage System Components for Coupling to a Small Modular Reactor in a Nuclear Hybrid Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misenheimer, Corey Thomas

    The intermittency of wind and solar power puts strain on electric grids, often forcing carbonbased and nuclear sources of energy to operate in a load-follow mode. Operating nuclear reactors in a load-follow fashion is undesirable due to the associated thermal and mechanical stresses placed on the fuel and other reactor components. Various Thermal Energy Storage (TES) elements and ancillary energy applications can be coupled to nuclear (or renewable) power sources to help absorb grid instabilities caused by daily electric demand changes and renewable intermittency, thereby forming the basis of a candidate Nuclear Hybrid Energy System (NHES). During the warmer months of the year in many parts of the country, facility air-conditioning loads are significant contributors to the increase in the daily peak electric demand. Previous research demonstrated that a stratified chilled-water storage tank can displace peak cooling loads to off-peak hours. Based on these findings, the objective of this work is to evaluate the prospect of using a stratified chilled-water storage tank as a potential TES reservoir for a nuclear reactor in a NHES. This is accomplished by developing time-dependent models of chilled-water system components, including absorption chillers, cooling towers, a storage tank, and facility cooling loads appropriate for a large office space or college campus, as a callable FORTRAN subroutine. The resulting TES model is coupled to a high-fidelity mPower-sized Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Simulator, with the goal of utilizing excess reactor capacity to operate several sizable chillers in order to keep reactor power constant. Chilled-water production via single effect, lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chillers is primarily examined in this study, although the use of electric chillers is briefly explored. Absorption chillers use hot water or low-pressure steam to drive an absorption-refrigeration cycle. The mathematical framework for a high-fidelity dynamic

  17. Reactor use in nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear reactors for dual use in training and research were established at about 50 universities in the period since 1950, with assistance by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the National Science Foundation. Most of the reactors are in active use for a variety of educational functions--laboratory teaching of undergraduates and graduate students, graduate research, orientation of visitors, and nuclear power plant reactor operator training, along with service to the technical community. As expected, the higher power reactors enjoy a larger average weekly use. Among special programs are reactor sharing and high-school teachers' workshops

  18. Total energy supply-system for manned spaceship using nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narabayashi, Tadashi; Honma, Yuji; Yoshida, Yutaka; Shimazu, Yoichiro

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the deep space, such as Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, etc in the future, a spacecraft that will be driven by nuclear power should be developed. At present, satellites or space probes have been using mainly electric source of chemical battery, fuel battery, solar battery, and RI battery. However, considering highly developed and extensive space exploration in the future, it is obvious that larger electric power is required over the long term space travel more than several years. Additionally, the solar battery used in space will be fundamentally impossible to use in planetary exploration father away form Mars because sunlight is attenuated. Therefore, larger electric power source must be installed in the space craft. In this study, we consider about co-generation system for heat and electricity using nuclear power. We think that the nuclear power is appropriate for using in deep space because of a long time operation without refueling and possibility in downsizing due to higher power density. We selected the fast reactor system of about 18 MWth compared with other type of reactors, such as PWR and high temperature gas reactor (Honma, 2006). With regard to a power generation system, we examined about efficiency of Stirling engine compared with a gas-turbine engine. Theoretical efficiency of Stirling engine is much higher than that of gas-turbine engine. Therefore, we selected Stirling engine and we have started the model test of a Stirling engine. Total power generation at International Space Station (ISS) that has been built since 1998 is about 110kWe. We estimated that about 5 times as much electricity as that of ISS is enough to explore or developed the space. In that case, 2.5MWe will be generated by the system, number of crews will be about 10 and 2MW will be used to electric propulsion. (author)

  19. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  20. Report on application results of the nuclear reactor in Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. April 1994 - March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is on researching action state, application state, management state, and others of 1994 fiscal year at the Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Rikkyo University. The experimental reactor has been used for the studies such as application of neutron radioactivity analysis to multi fields, application of fission and alpha track method to age determination and metallurgy, hot atom chemistry, neutron radiation effect on semiconductors and others, nuclear data measurement, organism, materials and products using neutron radiography, and development and application to inspection of radiation detectors such as neutron detector. This report was a report shown as a shape of research results of actions of the researchers. And, another report of colaborate research results using the Rikkyo University reactor was also published from the Atomic Energy Center, the University of Tokyo begun since April, 1974. (G.K.)

  1. Licensing of nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Recommendations are presented for the licensing of nuclear reactor operators in units licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all physical persons designated by the Operating Organization of the nuclear reactor or reactors to execute any of the following functional activities: a) to manipulate the controls of a definite reactor b) to direct the authorized activities of the reactor operators licesed according to the present recommendations. (F.E.) [pt

  2. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, M.L.

    1960-01-01

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author) [fr

  3. Nuclear reactor containment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the volume of a containment shell and decrease the size of a containment equipment for BWR type reactors by connecting the containment shell and a suppression pool with slanted vent tubes to thereby shorten the vent tubes. Constitution: A pressure vessel containing a reactor core is installed at the center of a building and a containment vessel for the nuclear reactor that contains the pressure vessel forms a cabin. To a building situated below the containment shell, is provided a suppression chamber in which cooling water is charged to form a suppression pool. The suppression pool is communicated with vent tubes that pass through the partition wall of the containment vessel. The vent tubes are slanted and their lower openings are immersed in coolants. Therefore, if accident is resulted and fluid at high temperature and high pressure is jetted from the pressure vessel, the jetting fluid is injected and condensated in the cooling water. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Takenori.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a nuclear reactor container in which heat is removed from a container by external water injection. Heat is removed from the container by immersing the lower portion of the container into water and scattering spary water from above. Thus, the container can be cooled by the spray water falling down along the outer wall of the container to condensate and cool vapors filled in the container upon occurrence of accidents. Further, since the inside of the container can be cooled also during usual operation, it can also serve as a dry well cooler. Accordingly, heat is removed from the reactor container upon occurrence of accidents by the automatic operation of a spray device corresponding to the change of the internal temperature and the pressure in the reactor container. Further, since all of these devices are disposed out of container, maintenance is also facilitated. (I.S.)

  5. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  6. Nuclear reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a nuclear reactor core and a fuel storage area while the fuel assembies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. The system comprises an in-vessel fuel transfer machine located inside the reactor vessel and an ex-vessel fuel transfer machine located in a fuel storage tank. The in-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises two independently rotatable frames with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed on the lower rotatable frame. The ex-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises one frame with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed thereon. The pivotable apparatuses are capable of being aligned with each other to transfer a fuel assembly between the reactor vessel and fuel storage tank while the fuel assembly remains completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. 9 claims, 7 figures

  7. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment adapted to retain and cool core debris in the unlikely event of a core meltdown and subsequent breach in the reactor vessel. The reactor vessel is seated in a cavity which has a thick metal sidewall that is integral with a thick metal basemat at the bottom of the cavity. The basemat extends beyond the perimeter of the cavity sidewall. Underneath the basemat is a porous bed with water pipes and steam pipes running into it. Water is introduced into the bed and converted into steam which is vented to the atmosphere. A plurality of metal pilings in the form of H-beams extend from the metal base plate downwardly and outwardly into the earth.

  8. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  9. Study of nuclear reactions involving heavy nuclei and intermediate- and high-energy protons and an application in nuclear reactor physics (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuoka, Paula Fernanda Toledo

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, intermediate- and high-energy nuclear reactions involving heavy nuclei and protons were studied with the Monte Carlo CRISP (Rio - Ilheus - Sao Paulo Collaboration) model. The most relevant nuclear processes studied were intranuclear cascade and fission-evaporation competition. Preliminary studies showed fair agreement between CRISP model calculation and experimental data of multiplicity of evaporated neutrons (E 20 MeV) were emitted mostly in the intranuclear cascade stage, while evaporation presented larger neutron multiplicity. Fission cross section of 209 mb and spallation cross section of 1788 mb were calculated { both in agreement with experimental data. The fission process resulted in a symmetric mass distribution. Another Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used for radiation transport in order to understand the role of a spallation neutron source in a ADS (Accelerator Driven System) nuclear reactor. Initially, a PWR reactor was simulated to study the isotopic compositions in spent nuclear fuel. As a rst attempt, a spallation neutron source was adapted to an industrial size nuclear reactor. The results showed no evidence of incineration of transuranic elements and modifications were suggested. (author)

  10. Advanced nuclear reactors and their simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, Anton; Boshevski, Tome

    2003-01-01

    Population growth, economy development and improvement life standard impact on continually energy needs as well as electricity. Fossil fuels have limited reserves, instability market prices and destroying environmental impacts. The hydro energy capacities highly depend on geographic and climate conditions. The nuclear fission is significant factor for covering electricity needs in this century. Reasonable capital costs, low fuel and operating expenses, environmental acceptable are some of the facts that makes the nuclear energy an attractive option especially for the developing countries. The simulators for nuclear reactors are an additional software tool in order to understand, study research and analyze the processes in nuclear reactors. (Original)

  11. Zero energy reactor 'RB'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, D; Takac, S; Markovic, H; Raisic, N; Zdravkovic, Z; Radanovic, Lj [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1959-03-15

    In 1958 the zero energy reactor RB was built with the purpose of enabling critical experiments with various reactor systems to be carried out. The first core assembly built in this reactor consists of heavy water as moderator and natural uranium metal as fuel. In order to be able to obtain very accurate results when measuring the main characteristics of the assembly the reactor was built as a completely bare system. (author)

  12. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  13. Shields for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The patent concerns shields for nuclear reactors. The roof shield comprises a normally fixed radial outer portion, a radial inner portion rotatable about a vertical axis, and a connection between the inner and outer portions. In the event of hypothecal core disruption conditions, a cantilever system on the inner wall allows the upward movement of the inner wall, in order to prevent loss of containment. (UK)

  14. Compact nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juric, S.I.

    1975-01-01

    A compact nuclear reactor of the pressurized-water variety is described which has two separate parts separably engageable for ease of inspection, maintenance and repair. One of the parts is a pressure vessel having an active core and the other of the parts is a closure adapted on its lower surface with an integral steam generator. An integral pump, external pressurizer and control rods are provided which communicate with the active core when engaged to form a total unit. (U.S.)

  15. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described which has an equal number of fuel sub-assemblies and sensing instruments. Each instrument senses temperature and rate of coolant flow of a coolant derived from a group of three sub-assemblies so that an abnormal value for one sub-assembly will be indicated on three instruments thereby providing for redundancy of up to two of the three instruments. The abnormal value may be a precurser to unstable boiling of coolant

  16. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  17. Nuclear power reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Risoe National Laboratory was established more than twenty years ago with research and development of nuclear reactor technology as its main objective. The Laboratory has by now accumulated many years of experience in a number of areas vital to nuclear reactor technology. The work and experience of, and services offered by the Laboratory within the following fields are described: Health physics site supervision; Treatment of low and medium level radioactive waste; Core performance evaluation; Transient analysis; Accident analysis; Fuel management; Fuel element design, fabrication and performance evaluation; Non-destructive testing of nuclear fuel; Theoretical and experimental structural analysis; Reliability analysis; Site evaluation. Environmental risk and hazard calculation; Review and analysis of safety documentation. Risoe has already given much assistance to the authorities, utilities and industries in such fields, carrying out work on both light and heavy water reactors. The Laboratory now offers its services to others as a consultant, in education and training of staff, in planning, in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and for the development and specification of fabrication techniques. (author)

  18. Five MW Nuclear Heating Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dafang; Dong Duo; Su Qingshan

    1997-01-01

    The 5 MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR-5) developed and designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has been operated for four winter seasons since 1989. During the time of commissioning and operation a number of experiments including self-stability, self-regulation, and simulation of ATWS etc. were carried out. Some operating experiences such as water chemistry, radiation protection and environmental impacts and so on were also obtained at the same time. All of these results demonstrate the design of the NHR-5 is successful. (author). 9 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs

  19. Five MW Nuclear Heating Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dafang, Zhang; Duo, Dong; Qingshan, Su [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsingua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1997-09-01

    The 5 MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR-5) developed and designed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has been operated for four winter seasons since 1989. During the time of commissioning and operation a number of experiments including self-stability, self-regulation, and simulation of ATWS etc. were carried out. Some operating experiences such as water chemistry, radiation protection and environmental impacts and so on were also obtained at the same time. All of these results demonstrate the design of the NHR-5 is successful. (author). 9 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs.

  20. The modular pebble bed nuclear reactor - the preferred new sustainable energy source for electricity, hydrogen and potable water production?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a joint project of Massachusetts Institute of technology, Nu-Tec Inc. and Proto Power. The elegant simplicity of graphite moderated pebble bed reactor is the basis for the 'generation four' nuclear power plants. High Temperature Gas Cooled (HTGC) nuclear power plant have the potential to become the preferred base load sustainable energy source for the new millennium. The great attraction of these helium cooled 'Generation Four' nuclear plant can be summarised as follows: Factory assembly line production; Modularity and ease of delivery to site; High temperature Brayton Cycle ideally suited for cogeneration of electricity, potable water and hydrogen; Capital and operating costs competitive with hydrocarbon plant; Design is inherently meltdown proof and proliferation resistant

  1. The high flux reactor Petten, A multi-purpose research and test facility for the future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, H.; Duijves, K.; Conrad, R.; Markgraf, J.F.W.; May, R.; Moss, R.L.; Sordon, G.; Tartaglia, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    The High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten, is owned by the European Commission (EC) and managed by the Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the EC. Its operation has been entrusted since 1962 to the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN). The HFR is one of the most powerful multi-purpose research and test reactors in the world. Together with the ECN hot cells at Petten, it has provided since three decades an integral and full complement of irradiation and examination services as required by current and future research and development for nuclear energy, industry and research organizations. Since 1963, the HFR has recognized record of consistent, reliable and high availability of more than 250 days of operation per year. The HFR has 20 in-core and 12 poolside irradiation positions, plus 12 beam tubes. With a variety of dedicated irradiation devices, and with its long-standing experience in executing small and large irradiation projects, the HFR is particularly suited for fuel, materials and components testing for all reactor lines, including thermonuclear fusion reactors. In addition, processing with neutrons and gamma rays, neutron-based research and inspection services are employed by industry and research, such as activation analysis, boron neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron diffraction. Moreover, in recent years, HFRs' mission has been broadened within the area of radioisotopes production, where, within a few years, the HFR has attained the European leadership in production volume

  2. Nuclear Energy Data 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants declined in 2012 as a result of operational issues at some facilities and suspended operation at all but two reactors in Japan. Nuclear safety was further strengthened in 2012 following safety reviews prompted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix pursued initiatives to increase nuclear generating capacity. In Turkey, plans were finalised for the construction of the first four reactors for commercial electricity production. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Statlinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link [fr

  3. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Several issues concerning nuclear energy in France during 1996 are presented: permission of a demand for installing underground laboratories in three sites (Marcoule, Bure and Chapelle-Baton); a report assessing the capacity of Superphenix plant to operate as a research tool; the project of merging between Framatome and Gec-Alsthom companies; the revision of a general report on nuclear energy in France; the issue of military plutonium management

  4. Prospective opportunities for using the innovative nuclear reactors in Armenian energy sector long-term programme development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, A.

    2003-01-01

    gases such as CO 2 CO, SO 2 and NOx, which are responsible for acid rain and global warming, some 35% of the present electricity generation is based on fossil fuels (natural gas), giving emission of 1 267 213 tons of CO 2 , 3355 tons of NOx, 960 tons of CO; and 9 tons of SO 2 . Although, some radioactive materials are released to the environment during normal operation of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the amounts released are very small and strictly kept within the permissible limits. So, we can say that the option with combined cycle scenario, from this point of view, is not as preferable as that with the nuclear scenario. Taking into consideration also a social aspect, we can see that in case of realization of an option of energy sector development with the nuclear scenario, it is expected that more than 10.000 workers will be employed in the construction process. Considerable part of industry and transport infrastructure of the country will be involved. For the country that suffers a transition period, such huge construction may be a locomotive for the whole economy. The implementation of nuclear option would also make it possible to include the costs of decommissioning of the old units of the ANPP into the tariff on the electricity generated by the new nuclear unit. Thus, the analysis performed has shown that the sustainable energy long-term development in Armenia can be achieved provided that the nuclear scenario will be implemented as the preferable, in view of all aspects, of the two above-mentioned scenarios considered. This may be ensured in case of utilization of innovative nuclear reactors with high-level operational safety and economic indicators. (author)

  5. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6 : nuclear waste management & reactor safety report 2009/2010 ; material science for nuclear waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D. (Editors)

    2011-01-01

    This is the first issue of a new series of bi-annual reports intended to provide an overview of research activities for the safe management of nuclear waste in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety devision in Jülich. The report gives a thematic overview of the research in 2009 and 2010 by short papers of five to eight pages. Some papers are discussing the work within different projects with intensive overlap, such as ...

  6. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This booklet appeared in a series on technical history. It tries to communicate some of the scientific, technical and social stresses, which have been connected with the application of nuclear energy since its discovery. The individual sections are concerned with the following subjects: the search for the 'smallest particles'; the atomic nucleus; nuclear fission; the 'Manhattan Project'; the time after this - from the euphoria of the 1950's via disillusionment and change of opinion to the state of nuclear energy at the start of the 1980's. The booklet contains many details and is generously illustrated. (HSCH) [de

  7. Improvements in streaking nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    In this type of reactor atomic nuclei are stripped of their electron shells by heating to form a very high temperature plasma which is passed at high speed through a chamber in which they are forced into contact with a 'wall' formed by a unidirectional stream of photons from continuous laser beams. In this way it should be possible to brush off from the surface of the nuclei protons and neutrons, with release of their binding energy. The energy thus produced can be subjected to much more gentle control than with a fission or fusion reactor. Furthermore, if this concept can be successfully applied to elements of high atomic number which are normally regarded as stable and unfissionable, a vast new source of nuclear energy release will have been made available. It also seems possible that an atomic nucleus might be spun sufficiently in such a reactor to disintegrate it completely into nucleons by simple centrifugal action, with great release of binding energy. The reactor described has a central body with radial ducts through which the nuclei are passed, and a number of lasers are provided whose beams are arranged so that the nuclei are discharged at the cross-over point of two or more laser beams which form a corner at the junction of two or more photon walls. (U.K.)

  8. Nuclear reactor cavity streaming shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, R.J.; Stephen, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    The upper portion of a nuclear reactor vessel supported in a concrete reactor cavity has a structure mounted below the top of the vessel between the outer vessel wall and the reactor cavity wall which contains hydrogenous material which will attenuate radiation streaming upward between vessel and the reactor cavity wall while preventing pressure buildup during a loss of coolant accident

  9. Gasification with nuclear reactor heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisbrodt, I.A.

    1977-01-01

    The energy-political ultimate aims for the introduction of nuclear coal gasification and the present state of technology concerning the HTR reactor, concerning gasification and heat exchanging components are outlined. Presented on the plans a) for hydro-gasification of lignite and for steam gasification of pit coal for the production of synthetic natural gas, and b) for the introduction of a nuclear heat system. The safety and environmental problems to be expected are portrayed. The main points of development, the planned prototype plant and the schedule of the project Pototype plant Nuclear Process heat (PNP) are specified. In a market and economic viability study of nuclear coal gasification, the application potential of SNG, the possible construction programme for the FRG, as well as costs and rentability of SNG production are estimated. (GG) [de

  10. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, J.

    1990-01-01

    This set of questions is based on an inquiry from the years 1987 to 1989. About 250 people af all age groups - primarily, however, young people between 16 and 25 years of age - were asked to state the questions they considered particularly important on the subject of nuclear energy. The survey was carried out without handicaps according to the brain-storming principle. Although the results cannot claim to be representative, they certainly reflect the areas of interest of many citizens and also their expectations, hopes and fears in connection with nuclear energy. The greater part of the questions were aimed at three topic areas: The security of nuclear power-stations, the effects of radioactivity on people and the problem of waste disposal. The book centres around these sets of questions. The introduction gives a general survey of the significance of nuclear energy as a whole. After this follow questions to do with the function of nuclear power stations, for the problems of security and waste disposal - which are dealt with in the following chapters - are easier to explain and to understand if a few physical and technical basics are understood. In the final section of the book there are questions on the so-called rejection debate and on the possibility of replacing nuclear energy with other energy forms. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Change in plan for installation of nuclear reactor in No.1 atomic powered vessel of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (change in purpose of use and in method for nuclear reactor installation and spent fuel disposal) (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report, compiled by the Nuclear Safety Commission to be submitted to the Prime Minister, deals with studies concerning some changes in the plan for the installation of a nuclear reactor in the No.1 atomic powered vessel to be constructed under the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (changes in the purpose of its use and in the methods for the nuclear reactor installation and spent fuel disposal). The conclusions of and procedures for the examination and evaluation are presented and then detailes of the studies are described. The study on the location requirements for the incidental land facilities at Sekinehama covers various conditions concerning the location, geology, earthquakes, meteorology, hydrology and social environment. The study on the safety design of the nuclear reactor facilities deals with the reactor, fuel handling facilities and other auxiliary facilities, as well as various land facilities to be constructed at Sekinehama including the reactor facilities and other facilities for fuel handling, waste disposal and protection and management of radioactive rays. Evaluation of possible radiation emission is shown and the accident analysis is also addressed. (Nogami, K.)

  12. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): study on opportunities and challenges of large-scale nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshev, M.; Subbotin, S.

    2006-01-01

    Existing scenarios for global energy use project that demand will at least double over the next 50 years. Electricity demand is projected to grow even faster. These scenarios suggest that the use of all available generating options, including nuclear energy, will inevitably be required to meet those demands. If nuclear energy is to play a meaningful role in the global energy supply in the foreseeable future, innovative approaches will be required to address concerns about economic competitiveness, environment, safety, waste management, potential proliferation risks and necessary infrastructure. In the event of a renaissance of nuclear energy, adequate infrastructure development will become crucial for Member States considering the future use of nuclear power. The IAEA should be ready to provide assistance in this area. A special resolution was adopted by the General Conference in September 2005 on 'Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications: Approaches to Supporting Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development'. Previously, in 2000, taking into account future energy scenarios and the needs of Member States, the IAEA General Conference had adopted a resolution initiating the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Based on scenarios for the next fifty years, INPRO identified requirements for different aspects of future nuclear energy systems, such as economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and infrastructure and developed a methodology to assess innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles. Using this assessment tool, the need for innovations in nuclear technology can be defined, which can be achieved through research, development and demonstration (RD and D). INPRO developed these requirements during its first stage, Phase 1A, which lasted from 2001 to mid-2003. In the second stage, Phase 1B (first part), INPRO organized 14 case studies (8 by

  13. Nuclear Energy Data - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants remained steady in 2013 despite the progressive shutdown of all reactors in Japan leading up to September and the permanent closure of six reactors in the OECD area. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for increasing nuclear generating capacity, and progress was made in the development of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, with Finland expected to have the first such facility in operation in the early 2020's. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'StatLinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  14. Nuclear Energy Data - 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants increased slightly in 2015, by 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. Two new units were connected to the grid in 2015, in Russia and Korea; two reactors returned to operation in Japan under the new regulatory regime; and seven reactors were officially shut down - five in Japan, one in Germany and one in the United Kingdom. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects progressing in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Stat Links'. For each Stat Link, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  15. Nuclear reactor for release of nuclear energy, without a chain reaction using the simultaneous implosion of three, or more, atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1976-01-01

    A modified form of what is known as a 'streaking nuclear reactor' is described. In this type of reactor it is proposed to obtain release of nuclear energy from atomic nuclei by stripping such nuclei of their electron clouds or shells, to form a high temperature plasma, and breaking nucleons off the surface of the nuclei. In the apparatus described it is proposed to break up nuclei by causing three or more nuclei to collide with each other at very high velocity. Streams of nuclei, stripped of their electron clouds are directed into a reactor vessel to a focal point or implosion center along three or more ducts, equi-angularly spaced around the implosion center in the same plane, the arrangement being such as to permit mutual simultaneous collision of three or more of the nuclei. The importance of achieving a release of nuclear energy in this manner is that it may be able to use any chemical element that can be converted to a plasma, but it is most likely to be successful with elements of high atomic number, such as Pb or Bi. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With simple and accessible explanations, this book presents the physical principles, the history and industrial developments of nuclear energy. More than 25 years after the Chernobyl accidents and few months only after the Fukushima one, it discusses the pros and cons of this energy source with its assets and its risks. (J.S.)

  17. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  18. Proposal for the small high temperature gas cooled reactor (application of nuclear energy in the changing and emerging energy markets)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remond R Pahladsingh

    2005-01-01

    With the peaking of the oil-production (2006) on the global energy-markets, already predicted by M.K. Hubbert in 1970 and the limited possibilities to use coal as an alternative, the world has come in a critical situation. Exponential growth in global population and the demand of energy (IEA) have created a unique, but known, problem in the present time. The difference with the past is the period in which the changes will take place is not centuries or decades but most likely a few years. There is no alternative for oil to anticipate on the coming energy-crisis. The coal-industry has been demolished in Europe and America, under the pressure of the environmental lobby, and the nuclear industry is in very bad shape. Large scale nuclear plants can only be built in strong power grids; the present power grids are exposed to de-investment and less maintenance in liberalized and de-regulated economies. Furthermore the Digital Society is placing additional requirements on reliability and quality of our electric power systems. Life extension programs in the nuclear industry have shown that the present industry is robust, safety standards are high but at the same time no breakthrough technology has come to the market. The manpower in the nuclear industry is ageing. There are no real indications of growth in the large scale nuclear industry. The present industry is heavily relaying on the present grid concepts that have shown many difficulties in recent past and the increased failures in power-grids will create constraints to excel the option of nuclear energy in the electric power industry This paper is a request to the nuclear industry to come with a revival program, easy to implement nuclear technology and to help the world to solve the huge energy-problems that present and future generations are facing in the world. The proposal in the paper is a request to bring nuclear energy back in our society (Yes in my backyard-YIMBY) so that the many fruitful uses of nuclear energy

  19. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. A submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review by Atomic Energy Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This submission comments on the evolution of the Canadian nuclear program, the management of safety, and the reactor design, analysis, operation and research programs that contribute to the safety of the CANDU reactor and provide assurance of safety to the regulatory agency and to the public. The CANDU reactor system has been designed and developed with close cooperation between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), utilities, manufacturers, and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The AECB has the responsibility, on behalf of the public, for establishing acceptable standards with respect to public risk and for establishing through independent review that these standards are satisfied. The plant designer has responsibility for defining how those standards will be met. The plant operator has responsibility for operating within the framework of those standards. The Canadian approach to safety design is based on the philosophy of defence in depth. Defence in depth is achieved through a high level of equipment quality, system redundancy and fail-safe design; regulating and process systems designed to maintain all process systems within acceptable operating parameters; and, independent safety systems to shut down the reactor, provide long-term cooling, and contain potential release of radioactivity in the event of an accident. The resulting design meets regulatory requirements not only in Canada but also in other countries. Probabilistic safety and risk evaluations show that the CANDU design offers a level of safety and least as good as other commercially available reactor designs

  20. Nuclear Energy Data - 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, fuel cycle capacities and requirements, and projections to 2035, where available. Country reports summarise energy policies, updates of the status in nuclear energy programs and fuel cycle developments. In 2016, nuclear power continued to supply significant amounts of low-carbon baseload electricity, despite strong competition from low-cost fossil fuels and subsidised renewable energy sources. Three new units were connected to the grid in 2016, in Korea, Russia and the United States. In Japan, an additional three reactors returned to operation in 2016, bringing the total to five under the new regulatory regime. Three reactors were officially shut down in 2016 - one in Japan, one in Russia and one in the United States. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects making progress in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports

  1. Proceedings of the international conference on the fiftieth anniversary of the Fermi reactor and on peaceful applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Ph.

    1992-01-01

    This premiere conference is organized by the alumni of graduate engineers from the University of Liege - AILg - and held in Liege at the Palais des Congres from Wednesday 14th to Friday 16th October 1992. In conjunction with the 175th anniversary of the foundation of the University of Liege and the creation of of the Internal European Market at the end of 1992, this conference celebrates the 50th anniversary of the construction of the first nuclear reactor by Enrico Fermi in Chicago in 1942. This official European celebration is co-organized by the European Nuclear Society and the Belgian Nuclear Society. The goal of the conference is to provide a complete and objective evaluation to the widest possible audience of the state-of-the-art and the prospects of nuclear energy. Invited lectures will be presented by national, European and international experts. The Conference will appeal to experts in the nuclear industry and to a general audience interested in receiving a concise and illuminating expose on the following topics: 1) electricity generation and the environment 2) safeguards issues 3) safety issues 4) nuclear fuel cycle

  2. Nuclear reactor trip system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Each parameter of the processes of a nuclear reactor and components operatively associated with it is monitored by a set of four like sensors. A trip system normally operates on a ''two out four'' configuration; i.e., to trip the reactor it is necessary that at least two sensors of a set sense an off-normal parameter. This assumes that all sensors are in normal operating condition. However, when a sensor is in test or is subject to maintenance or is defective or disabled, the ''two out of four''configuration would be reduced to a ''one out of three'' configuration because the affected sensor is taken out of service. This would expose the system to the possibility that a single sensor failure, which may be spurious, will cause a trip of the reactor. To prevent this, it is necessary that the affected sensor be bypassed. If only one sensor is bypassed, the system operates on a ''two out of three'' configuration. With two sensors bypassed, the sensing of an off-normal parameter by a third sensor trips the reactor. The by-pass circuit also disables the circuit coupling the by-passed sensor to the trip circuit. (author)

  3. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  4. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  5. Water cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling water intake collector for a nuclear reactor. It includes multiple sub-collectors extending out in a generally parallel manner to each other, each one having a first end and a second one separated along their length, and multiple water outlets for connecting each one to a corresponding pressure tube of the reactor. A first end tube and a second one connect the sub-collector tubes together to their first and second ends respectively. It also includes multiple collector tubes extending transversely by crossing over the sub-collector tubes and separated from each other in the direction of these tubes. Each collector tubes has a water intake for connecting to a water pump and multiple connecting tubes separated over its length and connecting each one to the corresponding sub-collector [fr

  6. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  7. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Rika; Kawabe, Ryuhei.

    1989-01-01

    A venturi scrubber is connected to a nuclear reactor container. Gases containing radioactive aerosols in the container are introduced into the venturi scrubber in the form of a high speed stream under the pressure of the container. The radioactive aerosols are captured by inertia collision due to the velocity difference between the high speed gas stream and water droplets. In the case of the present invention, since the high pressure of the reactor container generated upon accident is utilized, compressor, etc. is no more required, thereby enabling to reduce the size of the aerosol removing device. Further, since no external power is used, the radioactive aerosols can be removed with no starting failure upon accidents. (T.M.)

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  9. Hydrogen energy based on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    A concept to produce hydrogen of an energy carrier using nuclear energy was proposed since 1970s, and a number of process based on thermochemical method has been investigated after petroleum shock. As this method is used high temperature based on nuclear reactors, these researches are mainly carried out as a part of application of high temperature reactors, which has been carried out at an aim of the high temperature reactor application in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. On October, 2000, the 'First International Conference for Information Exchange on Hydrogen Production based on Nuclear Energy' was held by auspice of OECD/NEA, where hydrogen energy at energy view in the 21st Century, technology on hydrogen production using nuclear energy, and so on, were published. This commentary was summarized surveys and researches on hydrogen production using nuclear energy carried out by the Nuclear Hydrogen Research Group established on January, 2001 for one year. They contains, views on energy and hydrogen/nuclear energy, hydrogen production using nuclear energy and already finished researches, methods of hydrogen production using nuclear energy and their present conditions, concepts on production plants of nuclear hydrogen, resources on nuclear hydrogen production and effect on global environment, requests from market and acceptability of society, and its future process. (G.K.)

  10. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  11. Fast reactors in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazachkovskii, O

    1981-02-01

    The possible applications are discussed of fast reactor nuclear power plants. Basic differences are explained in fast and thermal reactors, mainly with a view to nuclear fuel utilization. Discussed in more detail are the problems of nuclear fuel reproduction and the nost important technical problems of fast reactors. Flow charts are shown of heat transfer for fast reactors BN-350 (loop design) and BN-600 (integral coolant circuit design). Main specifications are given for demonstration and power fast reactors in operation, under construction and in project-stage.

  12. The church and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.O.

    1978-03-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: foreword (explaining that report is a synopsis of the Hearing on Nuclear Energy arranged by the World Council of Churches, held in Sigtune, Sweden, June 24 to 29, 1975); humanity's energy needs); alternative sources of energy (nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, non-nuclear processes; some generalisations (concerning the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear energy to various sections of the world); what risks are acceptable (radiation hazards, reactor safety, radioactive wastes, misuse of Pu, safeguarding); nuclear weapons; nuclear energy - a challenge to the Churches; social and ethical issues; certain conclusions; postscript -the American move. (U.K.)

  13. IMPACT OF ENERGY GROUP STRUCTURE ON NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores; H. Hiruta

    2011-06-01

    A target accuracy assessment study using both a fine and a broad energy structure has shown that less stringent nuclear data accuracy requirements are needed for the latter energy structure. However, even though a reduction is observed, still the requirements will be very difficult to be met unless integral experiments are also used to reduce nuclear data uncertainties. Target accuracy assessment is the inverse problem of the uncertainty evaluation. To establish priorities and target accuracies on data uncertainty reduction, a formal approach can be adopted by defining target accuracy on design parameters and finding out required accuracy on data in order to meet them. In fact, the unknown uncertainty data requirements can be obtained by solving a minimization problem where the sensitivity coefficients in conjunction with the constraints on the integral parameters provide the needed quantities for finding the solutions.

  14. Subchannel analysis in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, H.; Aritomi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains 10 informative papers, presented at the International Seminar on Subchannel Analysis 1992 (ISSCA '92), organized by the Institute of Applied Energy, in collaboration with Atomic Energy Society of Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Kansai Electric Power Company, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and held at the TIS-Green Forum, Tokyo, Japan, 30 October 1992. The seminar ISSCA '92 was intended to review the current state-of-the-arts of the method being applied to advanced nuclear reactors including Advanced BWRs, Advanced PWRs and LMRs, and to identify the problems to be solved, improvements to be made, and the needs of R and Ds that were required from the new fuel bundles design. The critical review was to focus on the performances of currently available subchannel analysis codes with regard to heat transfer and fluid flows in various types of nuclear reactor bundles under both steady-state and transient operating conditions, CHF, boiling transition (BT) or dryout behaviors and post BT. The behaviors of physical modeling and numerical methods in these extreme conditions were discussed and the methods critically evaluated in comparison with experiments. (author) (J.P.N.)

  15. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, Armand.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons and conditions of utilizing nuclear power in developing countries are examined jointly with the present status and future uses already evaluated by some organizations. Some consequences are deduced in the human, financial scientific and technological fields, with provisional suggestions for preparing the nuclear industry development in these countries. As a conclusion trends are given to show how the industrialized countries having gained a long scientific and technological experience in nuclear energy can afford their assistance in this field, to developing countries [fr

  16. Nuclear reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention is concerned with a quick-closing valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear reactor plant. The quick-closing valve serves as isolating valve and as safety valve permitting depressurization in case of an accident. For normal operation a tube-shaped gate valve is provided as valve disc, enclosing an auxiliary valve disc to be used in case of accidents and which is opened at increased pressure to provide a smaller flow cross-section. The design features are described in detail. (RW) [de

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-10-16

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value.

  19. Nuclear reactor control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an assembly for providing global power control in a nuclear reactor having the core split into two halves. It comprises a disk assembly formed from at least two disks each machined with an identical surface hole pattern such that rotation of one disk relative to the other causes the hole pattern to open or close, the disk assembly being positioned substantially at the longitudinal center of and coaxial with the core halves; and means for rotating at least one of the disks relative to the other

  20. Nuclear reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wampole, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of manitenance and inspections it is proposed for a nuclear reactor facility with a primary circuit containing liquid metal to provide a thermally insulated chamber, within which are placed a number of components of the primary circuit, as e.g. valves, recirculation pump, heat exchangers. The isolated placement permit controlled preheating on one hand, but prevents undesirable heating of adjacent load-bearing elements on the other. The chamber is provided with heating devices and, on the outside, with cooling devices; it is of advantage to fill it with an inert gas. (UWI) 891 HP [de

  1. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  2. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  3. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12. ENFIR), the 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  4. Perspectives for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.-M.; Abderrahim, H.A.; Dekeyser, J.; Meskens, G.

    1998-09-01

    In Belgium, approximately 60 percent of the produced electricity is generated by nuclear power. At present, nuclear power production tends to stagnate in Europe and North America but is still growing in Asia. The document gives an overview of the present status and the future energy demand with emphasis on electric power. Different evaluation criteria including factors hindering and factors promoting the expansion of nuclear power as well as requirements of new nuclear power plants are discussed. The extension of the lifetime of existing facilities as well as fuel supply are taken into consideration. A comparative assesment of nuclear power with other energy sources is made. The report concludes with estimating the contribution and the role of nuclear power in future energy demand as well as with an overview of future reactors and research and development programmes

  5. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1989-01-01

    Aerosol filters considered so far for nuclear reactor containers in conventional BWR type nuclear power plants make the facility larger and involve a risk of clogging. In view of the above, in the present invention, the diameter of a flow channel of gases entering from a bent pipe to a suppression pool is made smaller thereby decreasing the diameter of gas bubbles in the supperssional pool. Since this reduces the force of surface tension, the diameter of resulted gas bubbles is made remarkably smaller as compared with the case where the gases are released from the lower end of the bent pipe. Since the absorption velocity of bubble-entrained aerosols into water is in proportion to the square of the bubble diameter, the absorption efficiency can be increased remarkably by reducing the diameter of the gas bubbles. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the efficiency of eliminating radioactivity of released gases. (K.M.)

  6. Present Status of Nuclear Energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, SI (2013), s. 89-94 ISSN 0375-8842. [European Nuclear Forum. Praha, 12.05.2013-13.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear energy * nuclear reactors * electricity production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  7. Nuclear energy in the Eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, N.L.

    1981-01-01

    The article gives a summarizing prognosis on possible developments in the utilization of nuclear energy during the next 10 years. The main concerns are the uranium supply, nuclear reactor industry, the breeding reactor, the fuel cycle, and the public opinion. (UA) [de

  8. Dossier nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The present Dutch government compiled the title document to enable the future Dutch government to declare its opinion on the nuclear energy problemacy. The most important questions which occupy the Dutch society are discussed: safe application and risks of nuclear energy, radioactive wastes and other environmental aspects, and the possible danger of misusing nuclear technology. In chapter two attention is paid to the policy, as formulated by the Dutch government, with regard to risks of nuclear power plants. Next the technical safety regulations that have to be met are dealt with. A brief overview is given of the state of the art of commercially available nuclear reactors, as well as reactors under development. The nuclear waste problem is the subject of chapter three. Attention is paid to the Dutch policy that has been formulated and is executed, the OPLA-program, in which the underground storage of radioactive wastes is studied, the research on the conversion of long-lived radioactive isotopes to short-lived radioactive isotopes, and planned research programs. In chapter four, other environmental effects of the use of nuclear power are taken into consideration, focusing on the nuclear fuel cycle. International obligations and agreements to guarantee the peaceful use of nuclear energy (non-proliferation) are mentioned and discussed in chapter four. In chapter six the necessity to carry out surveys to determine public support for the use of nuclear energy is outlined. In the appendices nuclear energy reports in the period 1986-present are listed. Also the subject of uranium supplies is discussed and a brief overview of the use of nuclear energy in several other countries is given. 2 tabs., 5 annexes, 63 refs

  9. Preservation of the first research nuclear reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This book describes preservation of the first research nuclear reactor in Korea and necessity of building memorial hall, sale of the Institute of Atomic Energy Research in Seoul and dismantlement of the first and the second nuclear reactor, preservation of the first research nuclear reactor and activity about memorial hall of the atomic energy reactor, assignment and leaving the report, and the list of related data.

  10. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  11. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, A.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor metal pressure vessel is surrounded by a concrete wall forming an annular space around the vessel. Thermal insulation is in this space and surrounds the vessel, and a coolant-conductive layer is also in this space surrounding the thermal insulation, coolant forced through this layer reducing the thermal stress on the concrete wall. The coolant-conductive layer is formed by concrete blocks laid together and having coolant passages, these blocks being small enough individually to permit them to be cast from concrete at the reactor installation, the thermal insulation being formed by much larger sheet-metal clad concrete segments. Mortar is injected between the interfaces of the coolant-conductive layer and concrete wall and the interfaces between the fluid-conductive layer and the insulation, a layer of slippery sheet material being interposed between the insulation and the mortar. When the pressure vessel is thermally expanded by reactor operation, the annular space between it and the concrete wall is completely filled by these components so that zero-excursion rupture safeguard is provided for the vessel. 4 claims, 1 figure

  12. Nuclear reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Nobuaki.

    1991-01-01

    The secondary container in a nuclear reactor building is made of a transparent structure having a shielding performance such as lead glass, by which the inside of the secondary container can be seen without undergoing radiation exposure. In addition, an operator transportation facility capable of carrying about 5 to 10 operators at one time is disposed, and the side of the facility on the secondary container is constituted with a transparent material such as glass, to provide a structure capable of observing the inside of the secondary container. The ventilation and air conditioning in the operator's transportation facility is in communication with the atmosphere of a not-controlled area. Accordingly, operators at the outside of the reactor building can reach the operator's transportation facility without taking and procedures for entering the controlled area and without undergoing radiation exposure. The inside of the secondary container in the reactor building can be seen from various directions through the transparent structure having the shielding performance. (N.H.)

  13. Reactors physics. Bases of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diop, Ch.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of nuclear reactor physics is to quantify the relevant macroscopic data for the characterization of the neutronic state of a reactor core and to evaluate the effects of radiations (neutrons and gamma radiations) on organic matter and on inorganic materials. This first article presents the bases of nuclear physics in the context of nuclear reactors: 1 - reactor physics and nuclear physics; 2 - atomic nucleus - basic definitions: nucleus constituents, dimensions and mass of the atomic nucleus, mass defect, binding energy and stability of the nucleus, strong interaction, nuclear momentums of nucleons and nucleus; 3 - nucleus stability and radioactivity: equation of evolution with time - radioactive decay law; alpha decay, stability limit of spontaneous fission, beta decay, electronic capture, gamma emission, internal conversion, radioactivity, two-body problem and notion of radioactive equilibrium. (J.S.)

  14. Lessons Learned from Nuclear Energy System Assessments (NESA) Using the INPRO Methodology. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of a resolution of the IAEA General Conference in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by resolutions of IAEA General Conferences and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to meeting the energy needs of the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can consider jointly the international and national actions required for achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. INPRO is proceeding in steps. In its first step, referred to as Phase 1, 2001 to 2006, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria together with an assessment method, which taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology an INPRO Manual was developed; it is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics, infrastructure, waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment, safety of reactors, and safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Based on a decision of the 9 INPRO steering committee in July 2006, INPRO has entered into Phase 2. This phase has three main directions of activity: methodology improvement, infrastructure/institutional aspects and collaborative projects. As of March 2009, INPRO had 28 members: Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United States of America and the European Commission. This IAEA-TECDOC is part of

  15. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  16. Nuclear reactor power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The redundant signals from the sensor assemblies measuring the process parameters of a nuclear reactor power supply are transmitted each in its turn to a protection system which operates to actuate the protection apparatus for signals indicating off-process conditions. Each sensor assembly includes a number of like sensors measuring the same parameters. The sets of process signals derived from the sensor assemblies are each in its turn transmitted from the protection system to the control system which impresses control signals on the reactor or its components to counteract the tendency for conditions to drift off-normal status requiring operation of the protection system. A parameter signal selector is interposed between the protection system and the control system. This selector prevents a parameter signal of a set of signals, which differs from the other parameters signals of the set by more than twice the allowable variation of the sensors which produce the set, from passing to the control system. The selectors include a pair of signal selection units, one unit sending selected process signals to primary control channels and the other sending selected process signals to back-up control channels. Test signals are periodically impressed by a test unit on a selected pair of a selected unit and control channels. When test signals are so impressed the selected control channel is disabled from transmitting control signals to the reactor and/or its associated components. This arrangement eliminates the possibility that a single component failure which may be spurious will cause an inadvertent trip of the reactor during test

  17. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, Thomas E.; Sanders, Thomas L.; Eagan, Robert J.; Baker, Arnold B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  18. Radiological controls and worker and public health and safety: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tew, J.L.; Miles, M.E.; Knuth, D.; Boyd, R.

    1981-02-01

    DOE has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors were reviewed by the Committee. This report was prepared to provide a measure of how the radiological control and environmental practices at the 13 individual DOE reactor facilities measure up to (1) the recommendations contained in the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island, (2) the requirements and guidelines contained, and (3) the requirements of the applicable Title and Part of the Code of Federal Regulations

  19. French nuclear energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.; Bertel, E.

    1980-11-01

    The French energy policy is supported by a lucid view of the situation of our country and the constraints linked to the international context. This statement implies, the definition of a French policy or energy production essentially based on national resources, uranium, and especially for long term, technical know how which allows using plutonium in breeder reactors. This policy implies an effort in R and D, and industrial development of nuclear field, both in reactor construction and at all levels of fuel cycle. This coherent scientific and financial effort has been pursued since the beginning of years 60, and has placed France among the first nuclear countries in the world. Now this effort enables the mastership of a strong nuclear industry capable to assure the energy future of the country [fr

  20. Nuclear reaction data and nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paver, N [University of Trieste (Italy); Herman, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Gandini, A [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-15

    These two volumes contain the lecture notes of the workshop 'Nuclear Reaction Data and Nuclear Reactors: Physics, Design and Safety', which was held at the Abdus Salam ICTP in the Spring of 2000. The workshop consisted of five weeks of lecture courses followed by practical computer exercises on nuclear data treatment and design of nuclear power systems. The spectrum of topics is wide enough to timely cover the state-of-the-art and the perspectives of this broad field. The first two weeks were devoted to nuclear reaction models and nuclear data evaluation. Nuclear data processing for applications to reactor calculations was the subject of the third week. On the last two weeks reactor physics and on-going projects in nuclear power generation, waste disposal and safety were presented.

  1. Assessment of Nuclear Energy Systems Based on a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle with Fast Reactors. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A Joint Study was started in 2005 and completed in 2007 within the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine participated in this study. The objectives were to assess a nuclear energy system based on a closed fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) regarding its sustainability, determine milestones for the nuclear energy system deployment, and establish frameworks for, and areas of, collaborative R and D work. The assessment was carried out in accordance with the requirements of INPRO methodology and guiding documents of the Joint Study developed and approved by the participating parties (Canada and Ukraine participated in the discussions during the Joint Study, but did not contribute to the assessments themselves). The Joint Study was implemented in steps. In its first step, nominated experts, during the course of extensive discussions, analyzed the country/region/world context data; discussed national and global scenarios of introduction of the CNFC-FR systems; identified technologies suitable for the INS; and arrived at a broad definition of a common CNFC-FR system. In the second step, the participants of the study examined characteristics of CNFC-FR systems for compliance with criteria of sustainability developed in the INPRO methodology in the area of economics, safety, environment, waste management, proliferation resistance, and infrastructure. The results of the study were submitted to and endorsed by the INPRO Steering Committee in meetings held in Vienna 2005 - 2007. The authors of the Joint Study report highly appreciate the valuable comments provided by delegates of the INPRO Steering Committee meetings as well as the advice and assistance of the other experts. Due to the length of the Joint Study report, a summary of the results was produced, which is the content of this publication. The full text of the Joint Study

  2. Assessment of Nuclear Energy Systems based on a Closed Nuclear Fuel Cycle with Fast Reactors. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-09-01

    A Joint Study was started in 2005 and completed in 2007 within the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Canada, China, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine participated in this study. The objectives were to assess a nuclear energy system based on a closed fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) regarding its sustainability, determine milestones for the nuclear energy system deployment, and establish frameworks for, and areas of, collaborative R and D work. The assessment was carried out in accordance with requirements of INPRO methodology and guiding documents of the Joint Study developed and approved by the participating parties (Canada and Ukraine participated in the discussions during the Joint Study but did not contribute to the assessments themselves). The Joint Study was implemented in steps. In its first step, nominated experts in course of extensive discussions analyzed the country/region/world context data, discussed national and global scenarios of introduction of the INS CNFC-FR, identified technologies suitable for the INS, and arrived at a broad definition of a common INS CNFC-FR. In the second step, the participants of the study examined characteristics of INS CNFC-FR for compliance with criteria of sustainability developed in the INPRO methodology in the domain of economics, safety, environment, waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection and infrastructure. The results of the study were submitted to and endorsed by the INPRO Steering Committee meetings held in Vienna 2005-2007. The authors of the report highly appreciate the valuable comments provided by delegates of INPRO Steering Committee meetings as well as the advice and assistance of the other experts. Due to the length of the Joint Study report a summary of the results was produced, which was published as a hard copy. The full text of the Joint Study report is available on the CD

  3. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  4. Development of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeham, John [Secretary of State for Energy, London (UK)

    1991-06-01

    The Government's views on the development of nuclear energy are outlined. In this country, we continue to see some important advantages in maintaining nuclear power generation. It increases diversity, and so helps to maintain security of energy supply. It does not produce greenhouse gases or contribute to acid rain. But it is equally clear that nuclear costs must be brought under control whilst at the same time maintaining the high standards of safety and environmental protection which we have come to expect in the UK. The three main elements which the nuclear industry must address in the future are summarized. First the costs of nuclear generation must be reduced. Secondly, once the feasibility and costings of PWRs have been established consideration must be given to the choices for the future energy policy and thirdly new reactor designs should be standardized so the benefits of replication can be realised. (author).

  5. Storage of non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    In 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established a program at the Hanford Site for management of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) until final disposition. Currently, the DOE-owned SNF Program is developing and implementing plans to assure existing storage, achieve interim storage, and prepare DOE-owned SNF for final disposition. Program requirements for management of the SNF are delineated in the DOE-owned SNF Program Plan.(DOE 1995a) and the DOE Spent Fuel Program's Requirements Document (DOE 1994a). Major program requirements are driven by the following: commitments established in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (DOE 1995b); corrective action plans for resolving vulnerabilities identified in the DOE Spent Fuel Working Group's Report on Health, Safety, and Environmental Vulnerabilities for Reactor Irradiated Nuclear Materials (DOE 1993); the settlement agreement between the US Department of Navy, the US Department of Energy, and the State of Idaho on the record of decision (ROD) from the DOE Programmatic SNF Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement (DOE Programmatic SNF EIS) (Idaho, 1995)

  6. Albedo boundary conditions for global calculations of thermal nuclear reactors with the model of discrete ordinates to two energy groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Carlos Eduardo de Araujo

    2011-01-01

    As neutron fission events do not take place in the non-multiplying regions of nuclear reactors, e.g., moderator, reflector, and structural core, these regions do not generate power and the computational efficiency of nuclear reactor global calculations can hence be improved by eliminating the explicit numerical calculations within the non-multiplying regions around the active domain. Discussed here is the computational efficiency of approximate discrete ordinates (SN) albedo boundary conditions for two-energy group eigenvalue problems in X, Y geometry. Albedo, the Latin word for w hiteness , was originally defined as the fraction of incident light reflected diffusely by a surface. This Latin word has remained the usual scientific term in astronomy and in this dissertation this concept is extended for the reflection of neutrons. The non-standard SN albedo substitutes approximately the reflector region around the active domain, as we neglect the transverse leakage terms within the non-multiplying reflector. Should the problem have no transverse leakage terms, i.e., one dimensional slab geometry, then the offered albedo boundary conditions are exact. By computational efficiency we mean analyzing the accuracy of the numerical results versus the CPU execution time of each run for a given model problem. Numerical results to two 1/4 symmetric test problems are shown to illustrate this efficiency analysis. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Since the seventies, economic incentives have led the utilities to drive a permanent evolution of the light water reactor (LWR). The evolution deals with the reactor designs as well as the way to operate them in a more flexible manner. It is for instance related to the fuel technologies and management. On the one hand, the technologies are in continuous evolution, such as the fuel pellets (MOX, Gd fuel, or Cr doped fuels..) as well as advanced cladding materials (M5 TM , MDA or ZIRLO). On the other hand, the fuel management is also subject to continuous evolution in particular in terms of increasing the level of burn-up, the reactor (core) power, the enrichment, as well as the duration of reactor cycles. For instance, in a few years in France, the burn-up has raised beyond the value of 39 GWj/t, initially authorized up to 52 GWj/t for the UO 2 fuel. In the near future, utilities foreseen to reach fuel burn-up of 60 GWj/t for MOX fuel and 70 GWj/t for UO 2 fuel. Furthermore, the future reactor of fourth generation will use new fuels of advanced conception. Furthermore with the objective of improving the safety margins, methods and calculation tools used by the utilities in the elaboration of their safety demonstrations submitted to the Safety Authority, are in movement. The margin evaluation methodologies often consist of a calculation chain of best-estimate multi-field simulations (e.g. various codes being coupled to simulate in a realistic way the evolution of the thermohydraulic, neutronic and mechanic state of the reactor). The statistical methods are more and more sophisticated and the computer codes are integrating ever-complex physical models (e.g. three-dimensional at fine scale). Following this evolution, the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), whose one of the roles is to examine the safety records and to rend a technical expertise, considers the necessity of reevaluating the safety issues for advanced

  8. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D. (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  9. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Neumeier, S.; Bosbach, D.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m 3 ) of high level waste and about 300.000 m 3 of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear graphite

  10. Institute of Energy and Climate Research IEK-6. Nuclear waste management and reactor safety report 2009/2010. Material science for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkenberg, M; Neumeier, S; Bosbach, D [eds.

    2011-07-01

    Due to the use of nuclear energy about 17.000 t (27.000 m{sup 3}) of high level waste and about 300.000 m{sup 3} of low and intermediated level waste will have accumulated in Germany until 2022. Research in the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-6), Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Division focuses on fundamental and applied aspects of the safe management of nuclear waste - in particular the nuclear aspects. In principle, our research in Forschungszentrum Juelich is looking at the material science/solid state aspects of nuclear waste management. It is organized in several research areas: The long-term safety of nuclear waste disposal is a key issue when it comes to the final disposal of high level nuclear waste in a deep geological formation. We are contributing to the scientific basis for the safety case of a nuclear waste repository in Germany. In Juelich we are focusing on a fundamental understanding of near field processes within a waste repository system. The main research topics are spent fuel corrosion and the retention of radionuclides by secondary phases. In addition, innovative waste management strategies are investigated to facilitate a qualified decision on the best strategy for Germany. New ceramic waste forms for disposal in a deep geological formation are studied as well as the partitioning of long-lived actinides. These research areas are supported by our structure research group, which is using experimental and computational approaches to examine actinide containing compounds. Complementary to these basic science oriented activities, IEK-6 also works on rather applied aspects. The development of non-destructive methods for the characterisation of nuclear waste packages has a long tradition in Juelich. Current activities focus on improving the segmented gamma scanning technique and the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis. Furthermore, the waste treatment group is developing concepts for the safe management of nuclear

  11. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.) [de

  12. Nuclear energy outlook 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With the launch today of its first Nuclear Energy Outlook, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) makes an important contribution to ongoing discussions of nuclear energy's potential role in the energy mixes of its member countries. As world energy demand continues to grow unabated, many countries face serious concerns about the security of energy supplies, rising energy prices and climate change stemming from fossil fuel consumption. In his presentation, the NEA Director-General Luis Echavarri is emphasizing the role that nuclear power could play in delivering cost-competitive and stable supplies of energy, while also helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In one Outlook scenario, existing nuclear power technologies could provide almost four times the current supply of nuclear-generated electricity by 2050. Under this scenario, 1400 reactors of the size commonly in use today would be in operation by 2050. But in order to accomplish such an expansion, securing political and societal support for the choice of nuclear energy is vital. An ongoing relationship between policy makers, the nuclear industry and society to develop knowledge building and public involvement will become increasingly important, the publication notes. Moreover, governments have a clear responsibility to maintain continued effective safety regulation, advance efforts to develop radioactive waste disposal solutions and uphold and reinforce the international non-proliferation regime. The authors find that the security of energy from nuclear power is more reliable than that for oil or gas. Additionally, uranium's high energy density means that transport is less vulnerable to disruption, and storing a large energy reserve is easier than for fossil fuels. One tonne of uranium produces the same energy as 10 000 to 16 000 tonnes of oil using current technology. Ongoing technological developments are likely to improve that performance even more. Until the middle of the century the dominant reactor

  13. Nuclear reactors for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Kamble, M.T.; Dulera, I.V.

    2013-01-01

    For the sustainable development of nuclear power plants with enhanced safety features, economic competitiveness, proliferation resistance and physical protection, several advanced reactor developments have been initiated world-wide. The major advanced reactor initiatives and the proposed advanced reactor concepts have been briefly reviewed along with their advantages and challenges. Various advanced reactor designs being pursued in India have also been briefly described in the paper. (author)

  14. Comparison of fuel cycles characteristics for nuclear energy systems based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagramanyan, V.S.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, Eh.N.; Puzakov, A.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Authors determine the characteristics of the fuel cycle (FC) based on stationary nuclear power system based on WWER-TOI and BN-1200 reactors with fuel of different composition. Characteristics of reactor systems with partial or complete spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and recycling of plutonium are compared to those of the reference system consisting only of WWER-TOI with uranium oxide fuel, operating in an open FC [ru

  15. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Shirazi, A.; Daneshvar, Sh.; Aghanajafi, C.; Jahanfarnia, Gh.; Rahgoshay, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the O ppenheim Electrical Network m ethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  16. Nuclear reactor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Masaya; Makihara, Yoshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the heat transfer performance, as well as reducing and simplifying the structure while preventing the intrusion of primary coolants to utilization systems. Constitution: Heat transfer from the primary coolant circuit to the utilization circuits is conducted by means of heat pipe type heat exchangers. The heat exchanger comprises a tightly closed vessel divided by a partition wall, through which a plurality of heat pipes are passed. The primary coolants receiving the heat from the nuclear reactor enter the first chamber of the heat exchanger to heat the evaporating portion of the heat pipes. The heated flow of steams in the heat pipes transfer to the condensating portion in the second chamber to conduct heat exchange with the utilization system. In this way, since secondary coolant circuits are saved, the heat transfer performance can be improved significantly and the risk of failure can be reduced. (Kamimura, M,)

  17. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear reactor safety rod release apparatus comprises a ring which carries detents normally positioned in an annular recess in outer side of the rod, the ring being held against the lower end of a drive shaft by magnetic force exerted by a solenoid carried by the drive shaft. When the solenoid is de-energized, the detent-carrying ring drops until the detents contact a cam surface associated with the lower end of the drive shaft, at which point the detents are cammed out of the recess in the safety rod to release the rod from the drive shaft. In preferred embodiments of the invention, an additional latch is provided to release a lower portion of a safety rod under conditions that may interfere with movement of the entire rod

  18. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  20. Clean energy : nuclear energy world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-10-15

    This book explains the nuclear engineering to kids with easy way. There are explanations of birth of nuclear energy such as discover of nuclear and application of modern technology of nuclear energy, principles and structure of nuclear power plant, fuel, nuclear waste management, use of radiation for medical treatment, food supplies, industry, utilization of neutron. It indicates the future of nuclear energy as integral nuclear energy and nuclear fusion energy.

  1. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioiri, Akio.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a vent tube communication port is disposed to a pressure suppression pool at a position higher than the pool water therein for communication with an upper dry well, and the upper end opening of a dry well communication pipe is disposed at a position higher than the communication port. When condensate return pipeline is ruptured in the upper dry well, water in a water source pool is injected to the pressure vessel and partially discharged out of the ruptured port and a depressurization valve connected to the pressure vessel to the inside of the upper dry well. The discharged water stays in the upper dry well and, when the water level reaches the height of the vent tube communication port, it flows into the pressure suppression pool. Even in a state that the entire amount of water in the water source pool is supplied, since water does not reach the upper opening port of the dry well communication pipe, water does not flow into a lower dry well. Accordingly, the motor of a control rod drives disposed in the lower dry well can be prevented from submerging. The reactor core can be cooled more reliably, to improve the reliability of the pressure suppression function. (N.H.)

  2. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  3. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyar, O.M.; West, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device is described for controlling a safety control rod within the core of a nuclear reactor, the reactor controlled by a reactor control system, the device comprising: a safety control rod drive shaft and an electromagnetic clutch co-axial with the drive shaft operatively connected to the safety control rod for driving and positioning the safety control rod within or without the reactor core during reactor operation, the safety rod being oriented in a substantially vertical position to allow the rod to fall into the reactor core under the influence of gravity during shutdown of the reactor; the safety control rod drive shaft further operatively connected to a hydraulic pump such that operation of the drive shaft simultaneously drives and positions the safety control rod and operates the hydraulic pump such that a hydraulic fluid is forced into an accumulator, filling the accumulator with oil for the storage and supply of primary potential energy for safety control rod insertion such that the release of potential energy in the accumulator causes hydraulic fluid to flow through the hydraulic pump, converting the hydraulic pump to a hydraulic motor having speed and power capable of full length insertion and high speed driving of the safety control rod into the reactor core; a solenoid valve interposed between the hydraulic pump and the accumulator, said solenoid valve being a normally open valve, actuated to close when the safety control rod is out of the reactor during reactor operation; and further wherein said solenoid opens in response to a signal from the reactor control system calling for shutdown of the reactor and rapid insertion of the safety control rod into the reactor core, such that the opening of the solenoid releases the potential energy in the accumulator to place the safety control rod in a safe shutdown position

  4. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    2 1/2 years ago a consultation group was formed to help the Section for Social Questions of the Council of Churches in the Netherlands, to answer questions in the area of nuclear energy. During this time the character of the questions has changed considerably. In the beginning people spoke of fear and anxiety over the plans for the application of this new technical development but later this fear and anxiety turned to protest and opposition. This brochure has been produced to enlighten people and try and answer their alarm, by exploring the many facets of the problems. Some of these problems are already being deeply discussed by the public, others play no role in the forming of public opinion. The points of view of the churches over nuclear energy are not expressed, the brochure endeavours to express that nuclear energy problems are a concern for the churches. Technical and economic information and the most important social questions are discussed. (C.F.)

  5. Energy, electricity and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.; Naudet, G.

    2008-01-01

    After an introduction recalling what energy is, the first part of this book presents the present day energy production and consumption and details more particularly the electricity 'vector' which is an almost perfect form of energy despite the fact that it is not a primary energy source: it must be generated from another energy source and no large scale storage of this energy is possible. The second part of the book is devoted to nuclear energy principles and to the related technologies. Content: 1 - What does energy mean?: the occurrence of the energy concept, the classical notion of energy, energy notion in modern physics, energy transformations, energy conservation, irreversibility of energy transformations, data and units used in the energy domain; 2 - energy production and consumption: energy systems, energy counting, reserves and potentialities of energy resources, production of primary energies, transport and storage of primary energies, energy consumption, energy saving, energy markets and prices, energy indicators; 3 - electric power: specificity of electricity and the electric system, power networks, power generation, electricity storage, power consumption and demand, power generation economics, electricity prices and market; 4 - physical principles of nuclear energy: nuclei structure and binding energy, radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear reactions used in energy generation, basics of fission reactors physics; 5 - nuclear techniques: historical overview, main reactor types used today, perspectives; 6 - fuel cycle: general considerations, uranium mining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, back-end of the cycle, plutonium recycle in water cooled reactors; 7 - health and environmental aspects of nuclear energy: effects on ionizing radiations, basics of radiation protection, environmental impacts of nuclear energy, the nuclear wastes problem, specific risks; 8 - conclusion; 9 - appendixes (units, physics constants etc..)

  6. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Dr. Buhl feels that nuclear-energy issues are too complex to be understood as single topics, and can only be understood in relationship to broader issues. In fact, goals and risks associated with all energy options must be seen as interrelated with other broad issues, and it should be understood that there are presently no clearcut criteria to ensure that the best decisions are made. The technical community is responsible for helping the public to understand the basic incompatibility of hard and soft technologies and that there is no risk-free energy source. Four principles are outlined for assessing the risks of various energy technologies: (1) take a holistic view; (2) compare the risk with the unit energy output; (3) compare the risk with those of everyday activities; and (4) identify unusual risks associated with a particular option. Dr. Buhl refers to the study conducted by Dr. Inhaber of Canada who used this approach and concluded that nuclear power and natural gas have the lowest overall risk

  8. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Takeo; Ochiai, Kanehiro; Niino, Tsuyoshi; Kodama, Toyokazu; Hirako, Shizuka.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain structures suitable to a container structures for nuclear power plants used in those districts where earthquakes occur frequently, in which no local stresses are caused to the fundamental base portions and the workability for the fundamental structures is improved. Constitution: Basic stabilizers are attached to a nuclear reactor container (PCV) and a basic concrete recess for receiving a basic stabilizer is disposed in basic concretes. A top stabilizer is joined and fixed to a top stabilizer receiving plate at the inside of an outer shielding wall. On the other hand, a PCV top recess for conducting the load of PCV to the top stabilizer is attached to the top of the PCV. By disposing stabilizer structures allowing miner displacements at the two points, that is, the top and the lowermost portion of the PCV, no local stress concentrations can be generated to the extension on the axial direction of components due to the inner pressure of the PCV and to the horizontal load applied to the upper portion of the PCV upon earthquakes. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Complete automation of nuclear reactors control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1955-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactor for energy production induces the installation of automatic control systems which need to be safe enough and can adapt to the industrial scale of energy production. These automatic control systems have to insure the constancy of power level and adjust the power produced to the energy demand. Two functioning modes are considered: nuclear plant connected up to other electric production systems as hydraulic or thermic plants or nuclear plants functioning on an independent network. For nuclear plants connected up with other production plants, xenon poisoning and operating cost lead to keep working at maximum power the nuclear reactors. Thus, the power modulation control system will not be considered and only start-up control, safety control, and control systems will be automated. For nuclear power plants working on an independent network, the power modulation control system is needed to economize fuel. It described the automated control system for reactors functioning with constant power: a power measurement system constituted of an ionization chamber and a direct-current amplifier will control the steadfastness of the power produced. For reactors functioning with variable power, the automated power control system will allow to change the power and maintain it steady with all the necessary safety and will control that working conditions under P max and R max (maximum power and maximum reactivity). The effects of temperature and xenon poisoning will also be discussed. Safety systems will be added to stop completely the functioning of the reactor if P max is reached. (M.P.)

  10. Safety of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety is the major public issue to be resolved or accommodated if nuclear power is to have a future. Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) of accidental releases of low-level radiation, the spread and activity of radiation in populated areas, and the impacts on public health from exposure evolved from the earlier Rasmussen Reactor Safety Study. Applications of the PRA technique have identified design peculiarities in specific reactors, thus increasing reactor safety and establishing a quide for evaluating reactor regulations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and reactor vendors must share with utilities the responsibility for reactor safety in the US and for providing reasonable assurance to the public. This entails persuasive public education and information that with safety a top priority, changes now being made in light water reactor hardware and operations will be adequate. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  11. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Volpi, L.

    2003-01-01

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy. 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques. 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination. And 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  12. Desalination of seawater with nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisan, S.; Volpi, L.

    2001-01-01

    About 40 % of the world population is concerned with water scarcity. This article reviews the different techniques of desalination: distillation (MED and MSF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis (ED). The use of nuclear energy rests on several arguments: 1) it is economically efficient compared to fossil energy; 2) nuclear reactors provide heat covering a broad range of temperature, which allows the implementation of all the desalination techniques; 3) the heat normally lost at the heat sink could be used for desalination; and 4) nuclear is respectful of the environment. The feedback experience concerning nuclear desalination is estimated to about 100 reactor-years, it is sufficient to allow the understanding of all the physical and technological processes involved. In Japan, 8 PWR-type reactors are coupled to MED, MSF, and RO desalination techniques, the water produced is used locally mainly for feeding steam generators. (A.C.)

  13. Arkansas Tech University TRIGA nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankoorikal, J.; Culp, R.; Hamm, J.; Elliott, D.; Hodgson, L.; Apple, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the TRIGA nuclear reactor (ATUTR) proposed for construction on the campus of Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, Arkansas. The reactor will be part of the Center for Energy Studies located at Arkansas Tech University. The reactor has a steady state power level of 250 kW and can be pulsed with a maximum reactivity insertion of $2.0. Experience gained in dismantling and transporting some of the components from Michigan State University, and the storage of these components will be presented. The reactor will be used for education, training, and research. (author)

  14. Evaluation of two processes of hydrogen production starting from energy generated by high temperature nuclear reactors; Evaluacion de dos procesos de produccion de hidrogeno a partir de energia generada por reactores nucleares de alta temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J., E-mail: jvalle@upmh.edu.mx [Universidad Politecnica Metropolitana de Hidalgo, Boulevard Acceso a Tolcayuca 1009, Ex-Hacienda San Javier, 43860 Tolcayuca, Hidalgo (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In this work an evaluation to two processes of hydrogen production using energy generated starting from high temperature nuclear reactors (HTGR's) was realized. The evaluated processes are the electrolysis of high temperature and the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur. The electrolysis of high temperature, contrary to the conventional electrolysis, allows reaching efficiencies of up to 60% because when increasing the temperature of the water, giving thermal energy, diminishes the electric power demand required to separate the molecule of the water. However, to obtain these efficiencies is necessary to have water vapor overheated to more than 850 grades C, temperatures that can be reached by the HTGR. On the other hand the thermo-chemistry cycle Iodine-Sulfur, developed by General Atomics in the 1970 decade, requires two thermal levels basically, the great of them to 850 grades C for decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and another minor to 360 grades C approximately for decomposition of H I, a high temperature nuclear reactor can give the thermal energy required for the process whose products would be only hydrogen and oxygen. In this work these two processes are described, complete models are developed and analyzed thermodynamically that allow to couple each hydrogen generation process to a reactor HTGR that will be implemented later on for their dynamic simulation. The obtained results are presented in form of comparative data table of each process, and with them the obtained net efficiencies. (author)

  15. Design of an organic simplified nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvan, Koroush [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Forrest, Eric [Primary Standards Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  16. Design of an Organic Simplified Nuclear Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Shirvan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous advanced reactor concepts have been proposed to replace light water reactors ever since their establishment as the dominant technology for nuclear energy production. While most designs seek to improve cost competitiveness and safety, the implausibility of doing so with affordable materials or existing nuclear fuel infrastructure reduces the possibility of near-term deployment, especially in developing countries. The organic nuclear concept, first explored in the 1950s, offers an attractive alternative to advanced reactor designs being considered. The advent of high temperature fluids, along with advances in hydrocracking and reforming technologies driven by the oil and gas industries, make the organic concept even more viable today. We present a simple, cost-effective, and safe small modular nuclear reactor for offshore underwater deployment. The core is moderated by graphite, zirconium hydride, and organic fluid while cooled by the organic fluid. The organic coolant enables operation near atmospheric pressure and use of plain carbon steel for the reactor tank and primary coolant piping system. The core is designed to mitigate the coolant degradation seen in early organic reactors. Overall, the design provides a power density of 40 kW/L, while reducing the reactor hull size by 40% compared with a pressurized water reactor while significantly reducing capital plant costs.

  17. Modification of Japanese first nuclear ship reactor for a regional energy supply system using gadolinia as a burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kotaro; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Tsuji, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    In our laboratory, a small regional energy supply system which uses a small nuclear reactor has been studied for a long time. This system could supply not only heat but also electricity. Heat could be used for hot-water supply, a heating system of a house, melting snow and so on. In this point, this system seems to be useful for the places like northern part of Japan where it snows in winter. This reactor is based on Nuclear Ship Mutsu which was developed as the first nuclear ship of Japan about 40 years ago. It has several advantages for a small reactor. For example, its moderator temperature coefficient is always to be deeply negative because boric acid solution is not used in moderator and coolant. This can lead to a self-controlled operation without control rod maneuvering for load change. But some modifications have been performed in order to satisfy requirements such as (1) longer core life without refueling and reshuffling, (2) reactivity adjustment for load change without control rods or soluble boron, (3) simpler operations for load changes and (4) ultimate safety with sufficient passive capability. In our previous study, we confirmed the core based on Mutsu core had longer core life (about 10 years) using high uranium enrichment fuel (more than 5wt%) and current 17x17 fuel assemblies. We also confirmed excess reactivity during the cycle could be suppressed using combination of erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) and gadolinium oxide (Gd 2 O 3 ) as burnable poisons. Er 2 O 3 has advantages such that criticality safety can be kept even if uranium enrichment is more than 5wt% and burnup characteristics of the core can be gradual. But at this time there are 2 problems to apply for the core using Er 2 O 3 in Japan. First problem is that more than 5wt% enrichment fuel is not yet accepted in Japan. Second problem is that there are no experiences of using Er 2 O 3 in commercial reactors in Japan. Considering these problems, we have to modify the design of the core, using

  18. Generation 4 - nuclear reactors and an approach to secure public acceptance and access to energy for everyone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahladsingh, R.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to bring the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and a few interesting Light Water Passive nuclear reactor designs under your attention. The PBMR is under further development in South Africa and Asia. The philosophy behind the PBMR concept has been to develop a nuclear reactor which is so safe that it could be called inherently safe. Its concept is so completely different, see figure 2, that it can easily pass strictest safety regulations. Consequently it is a good Generation IV candidate. Good promotion of the gas-turbine direct cycle PBMR design is a main task to the nuclear technology and industry and could be the challenge that the young generation needs to consider a career in nuclear technology. (authors)

  19. Is nuclear energy acceptable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear hazards are assessed as being unique only in the sense of their unfamiliarity, with future development of nuclear energy dependent on overcoming public fears. Economics is clearly in favor of properly operated nuclear energy facilities for long-term power generation. Risks arise over the potential for human error to permit improper operation and for an industry shutdown because of a reactor accident. Attempts to ascertain accident probabilities have revealed that emergency core cooling systems and containment are not simply parallel, but operate in series and provide more safety than was thought. Insurance liability, resting on the small probability of very costly damage, is felt to be best placed on the utility with the government providing ultimate protection in the event of a potentially bankrupting accident. Problems of nuclear waste handling and low-level release are felt to be solvable with present technology. Proliferation is felt to be a political problem that is incidental to power plants. Public concern is blamed on possible diversion of materials for weapons, unfamiliarity with radiation, and the demand for meticulous handling of materials and operations. Burner reactors are projected to phase out and be replaced by breeder reactors that are operated in physical isolation under strict security by a professional cadre aware of its responsibility. A restructuring of the nuclear industry is called for so that the generation of power can be insulated from the distribution and marketing functions. (13 references)

  20. Prospect of increases the efficiency of nuclear energy production in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin; Belikov, Svyatoslav; Novikov, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Values of quality factor and pass-band for acoustic model of reactor core of reactor unit with WWER - 1000 are defined at single-phase and biphasic conditions of the coolant. The settlement-theoretical substantiation of conditions of growth of vibrations of internals and fuel assembly within a pass-band limits. Results of calculation and measurements have suitable coincidence. The technique of forecasting is developed and results of forecasting of vibration acoustical resonances of fuel assemblies with coolant in stationary and transitive operating modes of reactor unit with WWER - 1000 are worked out. (author)

  1. Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Activities at the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Ian

    2013-01-01

    • NEA is organizing significant activities are ongoing to preserve fast reactor information: – Integral experiments supporting fast reactors; – Often “use it, or lose it”; – Difficult to preserve everything, critical information is identified; – Organisation is a large but important task; – Electronic databases needed to manage the data. • Authoritative Handbooks and state of the art reports: – These tend to be the documents that last. • OECD/NEA will continue to support member countries in fast reactor knowledge preservation: – forum for exchange of information; – collaborative activities

  2. Environmentalists for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, B.

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels such as coal oil, and gas, massively pollute the Earth atmosphere (CO, CO 2 , SOX, NOX...), provoking acid rains and changing the global climate by increasing the greenhouse effect, while nuclear energy does not participate in these pollutions and presents well-founded environmental benefits. Renewable energies (solar, wind) not being able to deliver the amount of energy required by populations in developing and developed countries, nuclear energy is in fact the only clean and safe energy available to protect the planet during the 21 century. The first half of the book, titled The Atomic Paradox, describes in layman language the risks of nuclear power, its environmental impact, quality and safety standards, waste management, why a power reactor is not a bomb, energy alternatives, nuclear weapons, and other major global and environmental problems. In each case the major conclusions are framed for greater emphasis. Although examples are taken from the French nuclear power program, the conclusions are equally valid elsewhere. The second half of the book is titled Information on Nuclear Energy and the Environment and briefly provides a historical survey, an explanation of the different types of radiation, radioactivity, dose effects of radiation, Chernobyl, medical uses of radiation, accident precautions, as well as a glossary of terms and abbreviations and a bibliography. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Both the light water reactor and the Canadian heavy water reactor systems produce electricity cheaply and efficiently. They produce some fissionable byproducts, which can be recycled to extend energy sources many-fold. Besides the production of electrical power, the nuclear industry produces various radioistopes used for treatment of cancer, in diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine, in ionization smoke detectors, and as radioactive tracers with various technological applications including the study of the mechanisms of life. The increment in environmental radiation levels resulting from operation of nuclear power reactors represents a very small fraction of the radiation levels to which we are all exposed from natural sources, and of the average radiation exposures resulting from diagnostic procedures in the healing arts. The total health hazard of the complete nuclear power cycle is generally agreed to be smaller than the hazards associated with the generation of an equal amount of electricity from most other currently available sources of energy. The hazards from energy production in terms of shortened life expectancy are much smaller in all cases than the resulting increase in health and life expectancy. (auth)

  4. Nuclear energy - a professional assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: the role of the Watt Committee in nuclear energy; supply and demand, and economics of nuclear power; technical means (types of reactor; fuel cycle; nuclear energy for applications other than large-scale electricity generation); availability of resources (nuclear fuel; British industrial capacity; manpower requirements for a British nuclear power programme); environment (environmental issues; disposal of radioactive wastes); balance of risk and advantage in the peaceful use of nuclear energy (proliferation; safety and risk; benefits; public acceptability, awareness, education); summary and general comments.

  5. Nuclear energy - a professional assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The report falls under the headings: the role of the Watt Committee in nuclear energy; supply and demand, and economics of nuclear power; technical means (types of reactor; fuel cycle; nuclear energy for applications other than large-scale electricity generation); availability of resources (nuclear fuel; British industrial capacity; manpower requirements for a British nuclear power programme); environment (environmental issues; disposal of radioactive wastes); balance of risk and advantage in the peaceful use of nuclear energy (proliferation; safety and risk; benefits; public acceptability, awareness, education); summary and general comments. (U.K.)

  6. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  7. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The purchase by Korea of a second CANDU reactor, to be known as Wolsong-2, was announced at the end of 1990. The sale will mean 7,000 direct and indirect jobs in Canada. CANDU has about 6% of the world's reactor market and is in third place. The CANDU consistently leads all other reactor types in performance

  8. Nuclear energy and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baisong

    1996-01-01

    The information tells us that since the first chain reaction discovery about 50 years ago up to now, there are more than 400 commercial nuclear power plants connected to electricity supply net works. The electricity supplied by nuclear power plants has exceeded 2000 TWH, which represents almost 17% of the total electricity generated in the world and this proportion is still increasing. The accumulated operating experience of nuclear power plants reach more than 6000 reactor-year. Quite high average life time energy availability factors demonstrate the good reliability of nuclear power plants. The present status of the electricity development in the world shows that nuclear power has become an imperative and exclusively realistic alternative energy source. All of these information demonstrate that nuclear power as a safe, clean and less cost power source has already been widely accepted in the world. In Asia and Pacific region, the fast development of economy provides a vast possibility for the development of nuclear power. In China, shortage of electricity has become the 'bottle neck' which retards the economic development nowadays. China has already drawn up the plan for the development of nuclear power. The information is of great significance to promote the development of nuclear power. It could be said that without information, nuclear power could not be smoothly introduced in any country or region. (J.P.N.)

  9. Nuclear energy of hope and dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    This book describes nuclear energy as hopeful and helpful energy for our life. It includes a lot of introductions of carbon energy, green energy, an atomic reactor for generation of electricity and research, a nuclear fuel cycle, radiation in life, radiation measurement, a radioisotope, the principle of utilization of radiation, utilization for clinical medicine, nuclear energy and economy, international cooperation of nuclear energy and control of nuclear energy.

  10. Nuclear reactor kinetics and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewins, J.

    1978-01-01

    A consistent, integrated account of modern developments in the study of nuclear reactor kinetics and the problem of their efficient and safe control. It aims to prepare the student for advanced study and research or practical work in the field. Special features include treatments of noise theory, reliability theory and safety related studies. It covers all aspects of the operation and control of nuclear reactors, power and research and is complete in providing physical data methods of calculation and solution including questions of equipment reliability. The work uses illustrations of the main types of reactors in use in the UK, USA and Europe. Each chapter contains problems and worked examples suitable for course work and study. The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introductory review; neutron and precursor equations; elementary solutions at low power; linear reactor process dynamics with feedback; power reactor control systems; fluctuations and reactor noise; safety and reliability; nonlinear systems (safety and control); analogue computing. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Izzo, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a vertically oriented bottom entry control rod from a nuclear reactor: a frame including an elongated central spine of cruciform cross section connected between an upper support member and a lower support member both of cruciform shape having four laterally extending arms. The arms are in alignment with the arms of the lower support member and each aligned upper and lower support members has a sheath extending between; absorber plates of neutron absorber material, different from the material of the frame, one of the absorber plates is positioned within a sheath beneath each of the arms; attachment means suspends the absorber plates from the arms of the upper support member within a sheath; elongated absorber members positioned within a sheath between each of the suspended absorber plates and an arm of the lower support member; and joint means between the upper ends of the absorber members and the lower ends of the suspended absorber plates for minimizing gaps; the sheath means encloses the suspended absorber plates and the absorber members extending between aligned arms of the upper and lower support members and secured

  12. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tooru; Murase, Michio; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Hidaka, Masataka; Sumita, Isao; Tominaga, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor container, a chamber in communication with a wet well of a pressure suppression chamber is disposed and situated to such a position that the temperature is lower than a chamber containing pool water upon occurrence of loss of coolant accident. In addition, the inner surface of the pressure suppression chamber is constituted with steel walls in contact with pool water, and an outer circumferential pool is disposed at the outer circumferential surface thereof. Further, a circulation channel is disposed, and a water intake port is disposed at a position higher than an exit to the pool water, and a water discharge port is opened in the pool water at a position lower than the exit to the pool water. With such a constitution, the allowable temperature of the pressure suppression pool water can be elevated to a saturated steam temperature corresponding to the resistant pressure of the container, so that the temperature difference between the pressure suppression pool and the outer side thereof is increased by so much, to improve thermal radiation performance. Accordingly, it can be utilized as a pressure suppression means for a plant of greater power. Further, thermal conduction efficiency from the pool water region of the pressure suppression chamber to the outer circumferential pool water is improved, or thermal radiation area is enlarged due to the circulation channel, to improve the heat radiation performance. (N.H.)

  13. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  14. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  15. Control rod drive of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuchkov, I.I.; Gorjunov, V.S.; Zaitsev, B.I.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear reactors and, more particularly, to a drive of a control rod of a nuclear reactor and allows power control, excess reactivity compensation, and emergency shut-down of a reactor. (author)

  16. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Standards Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1980-01-01

    The policy with respect to the development and use of standards in the Department of Energy (DOE) programs concerned with maintaining and developing the nuclear option for the civilian sector (both in the form of the currently used light water reactors and for advanced concepts including the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), is embodied in a Nuclear Standards Policy, issued in 1978, whose perspectives and philosophy are discussed

  17. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; Futuro nuclear: refletindo para construir. Anais do 5. Encontro nacional de aplicacoes nucleares; 8. Congresso geral de energia nuclear; 12. Encontro nacional de fisica de reatores e termo-hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12. ENFIR), the 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed.

  19. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; Futuro nuclear: refletindo para construir. Anais do 12. Encontro nacional de fisica de reatores e termo-hidraulica; 8. Congresso geral de energia nuclear; 5. Encontro nacional de aplicacoes nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12 ENFIR), 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed.

  20. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  1. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Moody, K.J.; Bradley, K.S.; Lorenzana, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  2. Transmutation of nuclear waste in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, K.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Pilate, S.; Wehmann, U.K.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this joint study of ECN, Belgonucleaire, and Siemens is to investigate possibilities for transmutation of nuclear waste in regular nuclear reactors or in special transmutation devices. Studies of possibilities included the limits and technological development steps which would be needed. Burning plutonium in fast reactors, gas-cooled high-temperature reactors and light water reactors (LWR) have been considered. For minor actinides the transmutation rate mainly depends on the content of the minor actinides in the reactor and to a much less degree on the fact whether one uses a homogeneous system (with the actinides mixed into the fuel) or a heterogeneous system. If one wishes to stabilise the amount of actinides from the present LWRs, about 20% of all nuclear power would have to be generated in special burner reactors. It turned out that reactor transmutation of fission products would require considerable recycling efforts and that the time needed for a substantial transmutation would be rather long for the presently available levels of the neutron flux. If one would like to design burner systems which can serve more light water reactors, a large effort would be needed and other burners (possibly driven by accelerators) should be considered. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekener, H.

    1997-01-01

    It examines the technical, scientific and legal issues relating to the peaceful use of atomic energy in Turkey. The first fifteen chapters give a general overview of the atom and radioactivity; the chapters which follow this section are more technical and deal with the causes of nuclear accidents in reactors.A number of chapters cover legal issues, for example the conditions and procedures involved in the insurance market and the risks linked to operation of a nuclear power plant.The following subjects are examined in relation to nuclear insurance: risks during construction; fire during operation of the plants and other causes of accidents; risks due to the transport of radioactive materials and waste etc. The final chapters reproduce the principle legislative texts in force in Turkey in the field of nuclear energy, and also certain regulations which establish competent regulatory bodies

  4. Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 98, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Jencic, I.; Zagar, T.

    1998-01-01

    Regional Meeting for Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 63 articles from Slovenia, sorounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: Research Reactors, Nuclear Methods, Reactor Physics, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment, Severe Accidents, NPP Operation and Nuclear Waste disposal

  5. Technical assessment: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, R.S.

    1981-02-01

    Inherent in the design of DOE reactors under review are many features which provide significant protection against the likelihood of TMI-type accidents. In addition, other features in the design or operating characteristics would tend to limit or reduce the consequences of the accident. Some of these features were discussed earlier in this report. However, some of the events included within the TMI accident sequence contain technical implications for the DOE reactors. These implications were reviewed by this Assessment Team, and the results of this review are reported in this and the following sections of this report. It is also important to reemphasize that as a result of this review, no major TMI-related safety issues have been identified that would indicate that these DOE reactors cannot be operated in a safe manner. Rather, the findings of this report, by nature, generally reemphasize and support ongoing DOE efforts and identify areas for additional improvements

  6. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, W. G.; Merrill, M. H.; Holland, J. W.; Fisher, C. R.; Allen, D. T.

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic reactor designs for a variety of space power applications spanning the range from 5 kWe to 3 MWe are described. In all of these reactors, nuclear heat is converted directly to electrical energy in thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). A circulating reactor coolant carries heat from the core of TFEs directly to a heat rejection radiator system. The recent design of a thermionic reactor to meet the SP-100 requirements is emphasized. Design studies of reactors at other power levels show that the same TFE can be used over a broad range in power, and that design modifications can extend the range to many megawatts. The design of the SP-100 TFE is similar to that of TFEs operated successfully in test reactors, but with design improvements to extend the operating lifetime to seven years.

  7. Nuclear reactors: physics and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G

    2005-07-01

    In the form of a tutorial addressed to non-specialists, the article provides an introduction to nuclear reactor technology and more specifically to Light Water Reactors (LWR); it also shows where materials and chemistry problems are encountered in reactor technology. The basics of reactor physics are reviewed, as well as the various strategies in reactor design and the corresponding choices of materials (fuel, coolant, structural materials, etc.). A brief description of the various types of commercial power reactors follows. The design of LWRs is discussed in greater detail; the properties of light water as coolant and moderator are put in perspective. The physicochemical and metallurgical properties of the materials impose thermal limits that determine the performance and the maximum power a reactor can deliver. (author)

  8. Nuclear Power Reactor simulator - based training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, S.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    nuclear power stations will continue playing a major role as an energy source for electric generation and heat production in the world. in this paper, a nuclear power reactor simulator- based training program will be presented . this program is designed to aid in training of the reactor operators about the principles of operation of the plant. also it could help the researchers and the designers to analyze and to estimate the performance of the nuclear reactors and facilitate further studies for selection of the proper controller and its optimization process as it is difficult and time consuming to do all experiments in the real nuclear environment.this program is written in MATLAB code as MATLAB software provides sophisticated tools comparable to those in other software such as visual basic for the creation of graphical user interface (GUI). moreover MATLAB is available for all major operating systems. the used SIMULINK reactor model for the nuclear reactor can be used to model different types by adopting appropriate parameters. the model of each component of the reactor is based on physical laws rather than the use of look up tables or curve fitting.this simulation based training program will improve acquisition and retention knowledge also trainee will learn faster and will have better attitude

  9. Small reactors and the 'second nuclear era'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions of the nuclear industry's demise are premature and distort both history and politics. The industry is reemerging in a form commensurate with the priorities of those people and nations controlling the global forces of production. The current lull in plant orders is due primarily to the world recession and to factors related specifically to reactor size. Traditional economies of scale for nuclear plants have been greatly exaggerated. Reactor vendors and governments in Great Britain, France, West Germany, Japan, the United States, Sweden, Canada, and the Soviet Union are developing small reactors for both domestic applications and export to the Third World. The prefabricated, factory-assembled plants under 500 MWe may alleviate many of the existing socioeconomic constraints on nuclear manufacturing, construction, and operation. In the industrialized world, small reactors could furnish a qualitatively new energy option for utilities. But developing nations hold the largest potential market for small reactors due to the modest size of their electrical systems. These units could double or triple the market potential for nuclear power in this century. Small reactors will both qualitatively and quantitatively change the nature of nuclear technology transfers, offering unique advantages and problems vis-a-vis conventional arrangements. (author)

  10. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammers, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a sodium-cooled nuclear reactor, whose reactor tank contains the primary circuit, shielding surrounding the reactor core and a primary/secondary heat exchanger, particularly a fast breeder reactor on the module principle. In order to achieve this module principle it is proposed to have electromagnetic circulating pumps outside the reactor tank, where the heat exchanger is accomodated in an annular case above the pumps. This case has several openings at the top end to the space above the reactor core, some smaller openings in the middle to the same space and is connected at the bottom to an annular space between the tank wall and the reactor core. As a favoured variant, it is proposed that the annular electromagnetic pumps should be arranged concentrically to the reactor tank, where there is an annual duct on the inside of the reactor tank. In this way the sodium-cooled nuclear reactor is made suitable as a module with a large number of such elements. (orig.) [de

  11. Nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, S.; Kharazyan, V.

    2000-01-01

    This summary represents an overview of the energy situation in Armenia and, in particular, the nuclear energy development during the last period of time. the energy sector of Armenia is one of the most developed economy branches of the country. The main sources of energy are oil products, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydropower, and coal. In the period of 1985-1988 the consumption of these energy resources varied between 12-13 million tons per year of oil equivalent. Imported energy sources accounted for 96% of the consumption. During the period 1993-1995 the consumption dropped to 3 million tons per year. Electricity in Armenia is produced by three thermal, one nuclear, and two major hydroelectric cascades together with a number small hydro units. The total installed capacity is 3558 MW. Nuclear energy in Armenia began its development during the late 1960's. Since the republic was not rich in natural reserves of primary energy sources and the only domestic source of energy was hydro resource, it was decided to build a nuclear power plant in Armenia. The Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) Unit 1 was commissioned in 1996 and Unit 2 in 1980. The design of the ANPP was developed in 1968-1969 and was based on the project of Units 3 and 4 of the Novovoronezh NPP. Both units of the plant are equipped with reactors WWER-440 (V -270) type, which are also in use in some power stations in Russian Federation, Bulgaria, and Slovakia. Currently in Armenia, 36% of the total electricity production is nuclear power electricity. (authors)

  12. Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Chavez-Mercado; Jaime B. Morales-Sandoval; Benjamin E. Zayas-Perez

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (NREAL) is a sophisticated computer system with state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology for analysis of light water reactors. Multiple application software tools can be activated to carry out different analyses and studies such as nuclear fuel reload evaluation, safety operation margin measurement, transient and severe accident analysis, nuclear reactor instability, operator training, normal and emergency procedures optimization, and human factors engineering studies. An advanced graphic interface, driven through touch-sensitive screens, provides the means to interact with specialized software and nuclear codes. The interface allows the visualization and control of all observable variables in a nuclear power plant (NPP), as well as a selected set of nonobservable or not directly controllable variables from conventional control panels

  13. Effects of Water Radiolysis in Water Cooled Reactors - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. M. Pimblott

    2000-10-01

    OAK B188 Quarterly Progress Report on NERI Proposal No.99-0010 for the Development of an Experiment and Calculation Based Model to Describe the Effects of Radiation on Non-standard Aqueous Systems Like Those Encountered in the Advanced Light Water Reactor

  14. Radioactive nuclides in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1982-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also chemical subject materials. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry was considered for students of the school in the previous report (JAERI-M 9827), where the first part of the plan, ''Fundamentals of Reactor Chemistry'', was reviewed. This report is a review of the second part of the plan containing fission products chemistry, actinoids elements chemistry and activated reactor materials chemistry. (author)

  15. Random processes in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, M M R

    1974-01-01

    Random Processes in Nuclear Reactors describes the problems that a nuclear engineer may meet which involve random fluctuations and sets out in detail how they may be interpreted in terms of various models of the reactor system. Chapters set out to discuss topics on the origins of random processes and sources; the general technique to zero-power problems and bring out the basic effect of fission, and fluctuations in the lifetime of neutrons, on the measured response; the interpretation of power reactor noise; and associated problems connected with mechanical, hydraulic and thermal noise sources

  16. Multi-objective technico-economic optimization of energy conversion systems: hydrogen and electricity cogeneration from Generation IV nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in environmental considerations, such as the control of greenhouse emissions, and with the decrease in the fossil energy resources, hydrogen is currently considered as a promising energy vector. One of the main technological challenges of a future hydrogen economy is its large scale production without fossil fuel emissions. Under this context, nuclear energy is particularly adapted for hydrogen massive production by thermochemical cycles or high temperature electrolysis. One of the selected nuclear systems is the Very High Temperature Reactor (950 C/1200 C), cooled with helium, and dedicated to hydrogen production or to hydrogen electricity cogeneration. The main objective of this investigation, within the framework of a collaboration between CEA, French Atomic Agency (Cadarache) and LGC (Toulouse), consists in defining a technico-economic optimization methodology of electricity-hydrogen cogeneration systems, in order to identify and propose promising development strategies. Among the massive production processes of hydrogen, the thermochemical cycle Iodine-Sulphur has been considered. Taking into account the diversity of the used energies (i.e., heat and electricity) on the one hand and of the produced energies (hydrogen and electricity) on the other hand of the studied cogeneration system, an exergetic approach has been developed due to its ability to consider various energy forms on the same thermodynamical basis. The CYCLOP software tool (CEA) is used for the thermodynamic modelling of these systems. The economic criterion, calculated using the SEMER software tool (CEA), is based on the minimization of the total production site cost over its lifespan i.e., investment, operating costs and nuclear fuel cost. Capital investment involves the development of cost functions adapted to specific technologies and their specific operating conditions. The resulting optimization problems consist in maximizing the energy production, while minimizing the

  17. Nuclear data for nuclear reactor analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlstein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A discussion of nuclear data is presented emphasizing to what extent data are known and to what accuracy. The principal data of interest is that for neutron cross-sections. The changing status of data, evaluated nuclear data files and data validation and improvement are described. Although the discussion relates to nuclear data for reactor analysis may of the results also apply to fusion, accelerator, shielding, biomedical, space and defense studies. (U.K.)

  18. Current Abstracts Nuclear Reactors and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, J.D.; Hicks, S.C. [eds.

    1993-01-01

    This publication Nuclear Reactors and Technology (NRT) announces on a monthly basis the current worldwide information available from the open literature on nuclear reactors and technology, including all aspects of power reactors, components and accessories, fuel elements, control systems, and materials. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past month. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in NRT and other citations to information on nuclear reactors back to 1948 are available for online searching and retrieval on the Energy Science and Technology Database and Nuclear Science Abstracts (NSA) database. Current information, added daily to the Energy Science and Technology Database, is available to DOE and its contractors through the DOE Integrated Technical Information System. Customized profiles can be developed to provide current information to meet each user`s needs.

  19. Japan: Sendai, first reactor to restart. Sendai restart: how does it work? Japan: restart will be 'progressive'. 2015: which role for nuclear energy in Japan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc, Boris; Jouette, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    A set of articles addresses the restart of nuclear plants in Japan. The first one presents the Sendai nuclear plant, evokes the commitment of the Japanese nuclear safety authority (the NRA) at each step of the restart process, the agreement of local populations, the loading of the nuclear fuel, a successful crisis exercise, and the benefits expected from this restart. The second article addresses the restart process with its administrative aspects, the implication of local authorities, its technical aspects, and investments made to improve nuclear safety. The third article proposes an interview of the nuclear expert of the French embassy in Tokyo. He outlines that the restart of nuclear plants will be progressive, comments how Sendai restart has been commented in the Japanese press, evokes how this restart is part of the Japanese Prime Minister's policy, evokes the role and challenges of nuclear energy in Japan for the years to come, and the role France may play. The last article discusses the role of nuclear energy in Japan in 2015: importance of the old 3E policy (Energy, Environment, Economy) which is put into question again by the Fukushima accident, creation of a new nuclear safety authority as a first step before restarting nuclear reactors

  20. Energies and media nr 26. Conditions for the nuclear sector. Nuclear reactors for developing countries? Fast reactors: why not to make a fuss about sodium. Depleted uranium: a godsend, not a waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    After a brief article of the actuality in the nuclear sector (commissioning of new reactors in the USA, investments allowed in the UK for the construction of nuclear reactors, boost on the Chinese program, perspectives in South Africa), this issue proposes a discussion of the problems raised by providing nuclear reactors to developing countries (problems of safety and security, risk of proliferation, important issues on expertise development and personnel training, international controls, regulations and cooperation). Other topics are briefly addressed: the risk associated with the use of sodium in fast neutron reactors, the use and interest of depleted uranium as a resource

  1. Technique of nuclear reactors controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.

    1953-12-01

    This report deal about 'Techniques of control of the nuclear reactors' in the goal to achieve the control of natural uranium reactors and especially the one of Saclay. This work is mainly about the measurement into nuclear parameters and go further in the measurement of thermodynamic variables,etc... putting in relief the new features required on behalf of the detectors because of their use in the thermal neutrons flux. In the domain of nuclear measurement, we indicate the realizations and the results obtained with thermal neutron detectors and for the measurement of ionizations currents. We also treat the technical problem of the start-up of a reactor and of the reactivity measurement. We give the necessary details for the comprehension of all essential diagrams and plans put on, in particular, for the reactor of Saclay. (author) [fr

  2. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  3. Nuclear reactor strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, H.; Srinivasan, T.N.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to a linear programming model considered by Hafele and Manne ('Strategies for a Transition from Fossil to Nuclear Fuels'. 11ASA Research Report RR-74-7) in which the sum of discounted costs of meeting demand for electrical and non-electrical energy over a horizon of 75 years divided into 25 periods of 3 years is minimised subject to constraints, inter alia, on the total availability of fossil fuel and low cost ($15/lb) natural uranium. The sensitivity of the Hafele-Manne results are explored with respect to changes in some crucial parameters and assumptions namely; variation in discount rate, variation in current costs of operation of HTRB, variation in costs and availability of natural uranium, market penetration constraints, changing capital costs, price responsive demands, petroleum prices, and minimisation of PETG consumption with constraints on the sum of discounted costs. (U.K.)

  4. The safety R and D for GEN-IV reactors in the European nuclear energy technology platform strategic research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, G.

    2009-01-01

    In the fall 2007 EC launched the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE-TP). The SNE-TP governing board set-up three working groups (WG): 1) Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) WG, in charge of drafting road-maps to support research, development and demonstration for current and future NPPs; 2) Deployment Strategy (DS) WG, in charge of defining the research road-map implementation and 3) Education, Training and Knowledge management (ETKM) WG, which was aimed at issuing proposal to reinforce European education and attract young in the nuclear field. The SRA WG was mandated to prepare the SRA vision document based on the preliminary road-map sketched in the document published by the Commission earlier in 2007. The SRA WG was originally organized in 5 sub-groups covering specific topics (1) GEN II and III, III+, including Advanced LWR, 2) Advanced Fuel Cycle for waste minimization and resource optimization; 3) GEN IV Fast Systems (SFR, LFR, GFR, ADS); 4) GEN IV (V) HTR and non-electricity-production applications; 5) New Nuclear Large Research Infrastructures) and 5 other sub-groups dealing with more generic cross-cutting research activities applicable to many specific topics, namely: 1) Structural material research; 2) modeling, simulation and methods, including physical data and tools and means for qualification and validation; 3) Reactor Safety, including severe accidents and human factor; 4) Advanced Driver and Minor Actinide Fuels: science and properties; 5) Pre-normative Research, Codes and Standards.The present paper is mainly aimed at summarizing the content of the SRA Safety sub-chapter focusing on GEN-IV aspects

  5. I wonder nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Cheol

    2009-04-15

    This book consists seven chapters, which are powerful nuclear energy, principle of nuclear fission, nuclear energy in our daily life, is nuclear energy safe?, what is radiation?, radiation spread in pur daily life and radiation like a spy. It adds nuclear energy story through quiz. This book with pictures is for kids to explain nuclear energy easily.

  6. Quality assurance: an independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankhouser, W.L.; Bass, W. Jr.; Langston, M.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report presents the assessments of QA programs at eight DOE reactor sites as performed by three members of the NFPQT Support Team. A summation of assessments is presented. That summation includes discussion of findings and recommendations for follow-on actions. The detailed record of contractor-by-contractor reviews is provided. A discussion of the approach in performing the QA assessments is presented, and the basis and limitations of the assessments are discussed

  7. World nuclear energy paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, T.J.; Hansen, U.; Jaek, W.; Beckurts, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    In examing the world nuclear energy paths, the following assumptions were adopted: the world economy will grow somewhat more slowly than in the past, leading to reductions in electricity demand growth rates; national and international political impediments to the deployment of nuclear power will gradually disappear over the next few years; further development of nuclear power will proceed steadily, without serious interruption but with realistic lead times for the introduction of advanced technologies. Given these assumptions, this paper attempts a study of possible world nuclear energy developments, disaggregated on a regional and national basis. The scenario technique was used and a few alternative fuel-cycle scenarios were developed. Each is an internally consistent model of technically and economically feasible paths to the further development of nuclear power in an aggregate of individual countries and regions of the world. The main purpose of this modeling exercise was to gain some insight into the probable international locations of reactors and other nuclear facilities, the future requirements for uranium and for fuel-cycle services, and the problems of spent-fuel storage and waste management. The study also presents an assessment of the role that nuclear power might actually play in meeting future world energy demand

  8. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  9. Fundamentals of Nuclear Reactor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, E E

    2008-01-01

    This new streamlined text offers a one-semester treatment of the essentials of how the fission nuclear reactor works, the various approaches to the design of reactors, and their safe and efficient operation. The book includes numerous worked-out examples and end-of-chapter questions to help reinforce the knowledge presented. This textbook offers an engineering-oriented introduction to nuclear physics, with a particular focus on how those physics are put to work in the service of generating nuclear-based power, particularly the importance of neutron reactions and neutron behavior. Engin

  10. Department of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The activities of Department was engaged in the selected topics in nuclear fission reactor science and engineering. Present and future industry competitiveness, economic prosperity and living standards within the world are strongly dependent on maintaining the availability of energy at reasonable prices and with security of supply. Also, protection of man and the environment from the harmful effects of all uses of energy is an important element of the quality of life especially in Europe. It is unrealistic to assume that the technology for renewable (hydro, wind, solar and biomass) available within a 20-30 year perspective could provide the production capacity to replace present use of nuclear power and at the same time substantially reduce the use of fossil fuels, especially when considering that energy demand in industrialized countries can be expected to continue to increase even within a framework of overall energy conservation and continued improvement of efficiency in energy usage. In the area of nuclear fission, we continue support to maintain and develop the competence needed to ensure the safety of existing and future reactors and other nuclear installations. In addition support is given to explore the potential for improving present fission technology from a sustainable development point of view. The focus on advanced modelling of improved reactor and fuel cycle concepts, including supporting experimental research, with a view to improving the utilisation of the inherent energy content of uranium and other nuclear fuels, whilst at the same time reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste produced. A common scientific understanding of the frequently used concept of ''reasonable assurance of safety'' for the long-term, post-closure phase of repositories for spent fuel and high-level waste developed in order to ensure reasonably equivalent legal interpretations in environmental impact assessment and licensing procedures. Also, research is

  11. Nuclear energy policy in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishlock, David.

    1978-01-01

    The history of nuclear energy development in Britain is outlined. Presently three major strategic decisions remain undecided. One is the choice of a thermal reactor type for the steady expansion of nuclear electricity capacity until the end of this century. Another is the reprocessing of spent oxide fuel which at present offers Britain its most promising foreign market. The third one is the future of fast breeders after the successfull demonstration of the 250 MWe prototype reactor at Dounreay [fr

  12. Nuclear reactors with auxiliary boiler circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, B.V.; Cook, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor has a main circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating one or more main energy converting units, such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulatory system for the gaseous coolant incorporating at least one steam generating boiler arranged to be heated by the coolant after its passage through the reactor core to provide steam for driving an auxiliary steam turbine, such an arrangement providing a simplified start-up procedure also providing emergency duties associated with long term heat removal on reactor shut down

  13. A nuclear reactor for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.; Fenton, N.

    1989-07-01

    Global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years. In the northern hemisphere, many countries consume in excess of 25 percent of their primary energy supply for building heating. Satisfying this need, within the constraints now being acknowledged for sustainable global development, provides an important opportunity for district heating. Fuel-use flexibility, energy and resource conservation, and reduced atmospheric pollution from acid gases and greenhouse gases, are important features offered by district heating systems. Among the major fuel options, only hydro-electricity and nuclear heat completely avoid emissions of combustion gases. To fill the need for an economical nuclear heat source, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has designed a 10 MW plant that is suitable as a heat source within a network or as the main supply to large individual users. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees C, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on AECL's successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype for the commercial unit is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba. With capital costs of $7 million (Canadian), unit energy costs are projected to be $0.02/kWh for a 10 MW unit operating in a heating grid over a 30-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees C, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  14. Is nuclear energy ethically justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuend, H.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear technology brings the chance to provide an essential long term contribution to the energy supply of the world population and to use the raw materials uranium and thorium which have no other use. The use of nuclear energy is ethically justifiable providing certain simple fundamental rules for the design of nuclear facilities are observed. Such rules were clearly violated before the reactor accident at Chernobyl. They are, however, observed in our existing nuclear power plants. Compared with other energy systems nuclear energy has, with the exception of natural gas, the lowest risk. The consideration of the ethical justification of nuclear energy must also include the question of withdrawal. A withdrawal would have considerable social consequences for the industrial nations as well as for the developing countries. The problem of spreading alarm (and concern) by the opponents of nuclear energy should also be included in the ethical justification. 8 refs., 2 figs

  15. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of a nuclear power plant for electric propulsion of spacecrafts have been on going for several years. An attractive concept which has evolved from these studies and which has been described in previous publications, is a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor that provides 3 MW of thermal energy to out-of-core thermionic converters. The primary motivation for using heat pipes is to provide redundancy in the core cooling system that is not available in gas or liquid-metal cooled reactors. Detailed investigation of the consequences of heat pipe failures has resulted in modifications to the basic reactor design and has led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO 2 and molybdenum sheets that span the entire diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for the two reactors

  16. Multimedia on nuclear reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, Javier; Puig, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    The paper present an example of measures that have been found to be effective in the development of innovative educational and training technology. A multimedia course on nuclear reactor physics is presented. This material has been used for courses at master level at the universities; training for engineers at nuclear power plant as modular 2 weeks course; and training operators of nuclear power plant. The multimedia has about 785 slides and the text is in English, Spanish and French. (authors)

  17. Energy from nuclear fission()

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripani, M.

    2015-08-01

    The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  18. THERMOS, district central heating nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patarin, L.

    1981-02-01

    In order to expand the penetration of uranium in the national energy balance sheet, the C.E.A. has been studying nuclear reactors for several years now, that are capable of providing heat at favourable economic conditions. In this paper the THERMOS model is introduced. After showing the attraction of direct town heating by nuclear energy, the author describes the THERMOS project, defines the potential market, notably in France, and applies the lay-out study to the Grenoble Nuclear Study Centre site with district communal heating in mind. The economic aspects of the scheme are briefly mentioned [fr

  19. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  20. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, K.

    1982-01-01

    In order to make a real contribution to the nuclear energy debate (is nuclear energy the limitless solution to man's energy problems or the path to man's destruction) people must be aware of the facts. The Science Reference Library (SRL) has a collection of the primary sources of information on nuclear energy - especially journals. This guideline aims to draw attention to the up-to-date literature on nuclear energy and its technology, freely available for consultation in the main Holborn reading room. After explanations of where to look for particular types of information and the SRL classification, the booklet gives lists and brief notes on the sources held. These are abstracting and indexing periodicals and periodicals. Reports, conference proceedings, patents, bibliographies, directories, year-books and buyer's guides are covered very briefly but not listed. Nuclear reactor data and organisations are also listed with brief details of each. (U.K.)

  1. Proceedings of the INAC 2007 International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy and energetic challenges for 21st. century. 15. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 and 2005, INAC 2007 has been held with the 15th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XV ENFIR) and the 8th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VIII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2007 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2007 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VIII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology, environmental sciences always highlighting the social, economical and environmental improvements generated by nuclear techniques. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions

  2. Proceedings of the INAC 2007 International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy and energetic challenges for 21st. century. 15. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 and 2005, INAC 2007 has been held with the 15th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XV ENFIR) and the 8th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VIII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2007 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2007 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VIII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology, environmental sciences always highlighting the social, economical and environmental improvements generated by nuclear techniques. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions.

  3. Vision of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A study about the perspectives of nuclear energy, in Japan, for the next 40 years is shown. The present tendencies are analyzed as well as the importance that the subject adquires for the economy and the industry. At the same time, the parameters of the governmental, private and foreign participation are established in the frame of the technological development. The aim fixed for the year 2030 can be divided into; 1: from 1986 to 2010-development of the technology of nuclear fuel cycle already stablished and in process of maturity. The LWR technology will reach a very advanced stage. The fast breeder reactors (FBRs) will become commercially available, and the nuclear fuel cycle will reach its maturity in Japan; 2: from 2011 to 2030-commercial use of the FBRS and further advance in the nuclear fuel cycle. (M.E.L.) [es

  4. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  5. On the energy gain enhancement of DT+D3He fuel configuration in nuclear fusion reactor driven by heavy ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khoshbinfar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that advanced fuels be employed in the second generation of nuclear fusion reactors. Theoretical calculations show that in such a fuel, a high plasma temperature about 100 keV is a requisite for reaction rate improvement of nuclear fusion. However, creating such a temporal condition requires a more powerful driver than we have today. Here, introducing an optimal fuel configuration consisting of DT and D-3He layers, suitable for inertial fusion reactors and driven by heavy ion beams, the optimal energy gain conditions have been simulated and derived for 1.3 MJ system. It was found that, in this new fuel configuration, the ideal energy gain, is 22 percent more comparing with energy gain in corresponding single DT fuel layer. Moreover, the inner DT fuel layer contributed as an ignition trigger, while the outer D3He fuel acts as particle and radiation shielding as well as fuel layer.

  6. Nuclear energy, environmental protection and international conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke-Glueckert, P.

    1975-01-01

    Some general and some critical remarks on: nuclear energy as an image for politics; nuclear energy as a model for research planning; nuclear controversy; the principle of precaution in nuclear and radiation protection law; reactor safety on probation; advantages and economy of nuclear energy; communication difficulties; the special role of nuclear energy; the need for European site planning; supervision of fissionable materials; the world's energy household in danger; global structure politics and nuclear energy; nuclear energy with a capacity for social innovations. (HP/LN) [de

  7. Method for operating nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Urata, Megumu; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: In order to judge the fuel failures, if any, without opening a reactor container for BWR type reactors, a method has been described for measuring the difference between the temperature dependent iodine spike value and the pressure dependent iodine spike value in the pressure vessel. Method: After the scram of a nuclear reactor, steam generated by decay heat is condensed in a remaining heat exchanger and cooling water is returned through a recycling pipe line to a reactor core. At the same time, a control rod drive system pump is operated, the reactor core is filled with the cooling water. Then, the coolant is taken from the recycling pipe line to cool the reactor core. After applying the temperature fluctuation, the cooling water is sampled at a predetermined time interval at a sampling point to determine the changes with time in the radioactive concentration of iodine. When the radioactivity of iodine in the cooling water is lowered sufficiently by a reactor purifying system, the nuclear reactor vessel is depressurized. After applying pressure fluctuation, iodine spike value is determined. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Guidelines for nuclear reactor equipments safety-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The safety analysis in approving the applications for nuclear reactor constructions (or alterations) is performed by the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety in accordance with various guidelines prescribed by the Atomic Energy Commission. In addition, the above Committee set forth its own regulations for the safety analysis on common problems among various types of nuclear reactors. This book has collected and edited those guidelines and regulations. It has two parts: Part I includes the guidelines issued to date by the Atomic Energy Commission: and Part II - regulations of the Committee. Part I has collected 8 categories of guidelines which relate to following matters: nuclear reactor sites analysis guidelines and standards for their applications; standard exposure dose of plutonium; nuclear ship operation guidelines; safety design analysis guidelines for light-water type, electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments; safety evaluation guidelines for emergency reactor core cooling system of light-water type power reactors; guidelines for exposure dose target values around light-water type electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments, and guidelines for evaluation of above target values; and meteorological guidelines for the safety analysis of electricity generating nuclear reactor equipments. Part II includes regulations of the Committee concerning - the fuel assembly used in boiling-water type and in pressurized-water type reactors; techniques of reactor core heat designs, etc. in boiling-water reactors; and others

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Shungo; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1990-01-01

    In a fuel assembly, if the entire fuels comprise mixed oxide fuels, reactivity change in cold temperature-power operation is increased to worsen the reactor shutdown margin. The reactor shutdown margin has been improved by increasing the burnable poison concentration thereby reducing the reactivity of the fuel assembly. However, since unburnt poisons are present at the completion of the reactor operation, the reactivity can not be utilized effectively to bring about economical disadvantage. In view of the above, the reactivity change between lower temperature-power operations is reduced by providing a non-boiling range with more than 9.1% of cross sectional area at the inside of a channel at the central portion of the fuel assembly. As a result, the amount of the unburnt burnable poisons is decreased, the economy of fuel assembly is improved and the reactor shutdown margin can be increase. (N.H.)

  10. Nuclear reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihashi, Ishi; Honma, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring device of the present invention comprises a reactor core/reactor system data measuring and controlling device, a radioactivity concentration calculation device for activated coolants for calculating a radioactivity concentration of activated coolants in a main steam and reactor water by using an appropriate physical model, a radioactivity concentration correlation and comparison device for activated coolants for comparing correlationship with a radiation dose and an abnormality alarm device. Since radioactivity of activated primary coolants is monitored at each of positions in the reactor system and occurrence of leakage and the amount thereof from a primary circuit to a secondary circuit is monitored if the reactor has secondary circuit, integrity of the reactor system can be ensured and an abnormality can be detected rapidly. Further, radioactivity concentration of activated primary circuit coolants, represented by 16 N or 15 C, is always monitored at each of positions of PWR primary circuits. When a heat transfer pipe is ruptured in a steam generator, leakage of primary circuit coolants is detected rapidly, as well as the amount of the leakage can be informed. (N.H.)

  11. The energy yield of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ph.B.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, a comparison is made between the energy produced in a nuclear cycle in a light-water reactor without recycling of plutonium or uranium on the one hand and the energy stored into the system to realize this energy production on the other. Only empirical data are used, which means that some energy costs are omitted because no empirical data were available (e.g. energy needed to waste processing and waste disposal). The following steps are taken into account: production and processing of ores, conversion and enrichment of fuels, construction and shutdown of the reactor itself. (Auth.)

  12. Nuclear Energy in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.

    2003-01-01

    The new energy approach towards nuclear, due to the growing political support at the beginning of this century, is the result of a complexity of economical, social, political and technological factors. The history of peaceful use of nuclear energy in Romania goes back 45 years. Considering the strategic importance of the energy sector in developing the national economy on sustainable basis, the sector evolution should be outlined through prognosis and strategies on different horizons of time, so that the development perspectives and the energy supply to be correctly estimated. This necessity is emphasized in the Governmental Program of the present administration, which takes into consideration Romanian Economic Strategy on medium term and also The Government Action Plan on 2000-2004, agreed with the European Commission. In order to implement the Governmental Program, the Ministry of Industries and Resources elaborates the National Energy Strategy. The Government Action Plan draw up the conclusion that Unit 2 from Cernavoda NPP must be finalized. This solution fits the least-cost energy development planning and answers to environment requirements. Romania became a Member State of the Agency in 1957. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s its technical co-operation program with the Agency covered mainly research in nuclear physics and some medical and other applications of radiation and isotopes. Since 1976, when the Romanian nuclear power program was embarking to use CANDU-type reactors, the Agency has supported mainly the activities related to the Cernavoda NPP. In the framework of the Romanian accession process to the European structures, CNCAN co-operates with European Commission for transposition of the communautaire acquis in the field of nuclear activities. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974. They were remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes started in 1989 until 1996

  13. US Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University program in robotics for advanced reactors: Program plan, FY 1987-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.C.; Gonzalez, R.C.; Tulenko, J.S.; Tesar, D.; Wehe, D.K.

    1987-07-01

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of an advanced robotic system capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. This goal will be achieved through a team effort among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Combustion Engineering, Martin Marietta Baltimore Aerospace, Odetics, Remotec, and Telerobotics International. Each of the universities and ORNL have ongoing activities and corresponding facilities in areas of R and D related to robotics. This program is designed to take full advantage of these existing resources at the participating institutions

  14. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  15. New generation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwaszczewski, S.

    2000-01-01

    The development trends of the construction of nuclear reactors has been performed on the background of worldwide electricity demand for now and predicted for future. The social acceptance, political and economical circumstances has been also taken into account. Seems to Electric Power Research Institute (US) and other national authorities the advanced light water reactors have the best features and chances for further development and commercial applications in future

  16. Nuclear reactor core safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    The danger of a steam explosion from a nuclear reactor core melt-down can be greatly reduced by adding a gasifying agent to the fuel that releases a large amount of gas at a predetermined pre-melt-down temperature that ruptures the bottom end of the fuel rod and blows the finely divided fuel into a residual coolant bath at the bottom of the reactor. This residual bath should be equipped with a secondary cooling loop

  17. Nuclear reactor apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.E.; Bonnet, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor and its containment, instead of being supported on a solid concrete pad, are supported on a truss formed of upper and lower reinforced horizontal plates and vertical walls integrated into a rigid structure. The plates and walls from chambers within which the auxiliary components of the reactor, such as valves, pumping equipment and various tanks, are disposed. Certain of the chambers are also access passages for personnel, pipe chases, valve chambers and the like. In particular the truss includes an annular chamber. This chamber is lined and sealed by a corrosion-resistant liner and contains coolant and serves as a refueling cooling storage tank. This tank is directly below the primary-coolant conductor loops which extend from the reactor above the upper plate. The upper plate includes a sump connected to the tank through which coolant flows into the tank in the event of the occurrence of a loss-of-coolant accident. The truss extends beyond the containment and has chambers in the extending annulus. Pumps for circulating the coolant between the refueling coolant storage tank and the reactor are provided in certain of these chambers. The pumps are connected to the reactor by relatively short coolant conductors. Access to these pumps is readily afforded through hatches in the extending annulus

  18. BWR type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain reactor core characteristics with less changes in the excess reactivity due to fuel burnup even when the operation period varies. Constitution: In a BWR type reactor where fuel assemblies containing fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons are arranged, the fuel assemblies are grouped into first fuel assemblies and second fuel assemblies. Then, the number of fuel rods incorporated with burnable poisons within the first fuel assemblies is made greater than that of the second fuel rods, while the concentration of the burnable poisons in the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the first fuel assemblies is made lower than that of the fuel rods incorporated with the burnable poisons in the second fuel assemblies. In the BWR type reactor constituted in this way, the reactor core characteristics can be improved by changing the ratio between the first fuel assemblies and the second fuel assemblies charged to the reactor core, thereby decreasing the changes in the burnup of the excess reactivity. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Fluidized bed nuclear reactor as a IV generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    2002-01-01

    The object of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is seen that FBNR generally meets the goals of providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production; minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment; increase the assurance that it is a very unattractive and least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials; excel in safety and reliability; have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; eliminate the need for offsite emergency response; have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects. The other advantages of the proposed design are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (author)

  20. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  1. The control of emissions from nuclear power reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Neil, B.C.J.; Chatterjee, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU pressurised heavy water design. These are located in the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Most of the nuclear generating capacity is in the province of Ontario which has 16 commissioned reactors with a total capacity of 11,500 MWe. There are four reactors under construction with an additional capacity of 3400 MWe. Nuclear power currently accounts for approximately 50% of the electrical power generation of Ontario. Regulation of the reactors is a Federal Government responsibility administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) which licenses the reactors and sets occupational and public dose limits

  2. Proceedings of the INAC 2005: International nuclear atlantic conference. Nuclear energy reducing global warming; 14. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 7. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Following the success of INAC 2002 which was inaugurated in Rio de Janeiro, INAC 2005 has been held with the 14th Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics (XIV ENFIR) and the 7th Meeting on Nuclear Applications (VII ENAN). A key goal of these joint meetings is to bring together scientists to exchange the latest research and development (R and D) information in nuclear science and technology. In the INAC 2005 technical program, plenary sessions, such as round table discussions and keynote lectures, has held to present to the general public the recent advances of peaceful nuclear energy usage, reducing the global warming. Besides, INAC 2005 has offered a poster technical session on Management Systems for Nuclear Organizations. The XIV ENFIR has covered all aspects of interdisciplinary R and D related to nuclear reactors, and the VII ENAN has offered a forum for discussion on nuclear applications in industry, geology, agriculture, medicine, biology and environmental sciences. Both ENFIR and ENAN have also organized oral and poster technical sessions

  3. 10 CFR 73.58 - Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements for nuclear power reactors. (a) Each operating nuclear power reactor licensee with a license... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors. 73.58 Section 73.58 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF...

  4. Advanced Small-Safe Long-Life Lead Cooled Reactor Cores for Future Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyeong; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    One of the reasons for use of the lead or lead-bismuth alloy coolants is the high boiling temperature that avoids the possibility of coolant voiding. Also, these coolants are compatible with air, steam, and water. Therefore, intermediate coolant loop is not required as in the sodium cooled reactors 3. Lead is considered to be more attractive coolant than lead-bismuth alloy because of its higher availability, lower price, and much lower amount of polonium activity by factor of 104 relatively to lead. On the other hand, lead has higher melting temperature of 601K than that of lead-bismuth (398K), which narrows the operating temperature range and also leads to the possibility of freezing and blockage in fresh cores. Neutronically, the lead and lead-bismuth have very similar characteristics to each other. The lead-alloy coolants have lower moderating power and higher scattering without increasing moderation for neutrons below 0.5MeV, which reduces the leakage of the neutrons through the core and provides an excellent reflecting capability for neutrons. Due to the above features of lead or lead-alloy coolants, there have been lots of studies on the small lead cooled core designs. In this paper, small-safe long-life lead cooled reactor cores having high discharge burnup are designed and neutronically analyzed.. The cores considered in this work rates 110MWt (36.7MWe). In this work, the long-life with high discharge burnup was achieved by using thorium or depleted uranium blanket loaded in the central region of the core. Also, we considered a reference core having no blanket for the comparison. This paper provides the detailed neutronic analyses for these small long-life cores and the detailed analyses of the reactivity coefficients and the composition changes in blankets. The results of the core design and analyses show that our small long-life cores can be operated without refueling over their long-lives longer than 45EFPYs (Effective Full Power Year). In this work

  5. Nuclear energy. Risk or advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy is controversial. But what's all about really in the controversy? It's about more than safty or electricity prices. Nuclear energy is not only a technical or political question, but also a moral, a human. The discussion enter various rational and irrational arguments, beside straightforward arguments various misleading and mendacious exist. The present publication is comprehensively dedicated to the thema of nuclear energy - its pro and contra - and considers its risks and advantages. Thereby the sources of energy, the processes in the nuclear reactor, and the risk potentials (Harrisburg, Chernobyl, Fukushima) are illustratively and reproducibly presented. Extensively the text explains the forms of the radiation, its doses, and the tolerance of it. Also to the theme waste and final disposal an explaining chapter is dedicated and the question for the exit from nuclear energy elucidated. Finally the author appoints with the question ''How considers mankind nuclear energy world-wide'' the international comparison.

  6. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincic, A.

    2009-01-01

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  8. Space nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  9. Nuclear reactors theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudan, G.; Nigon, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    After principles of chain reaction and criticality notion, a descriptive model of neutrons behaviour is exposed from a local point of view (this model is called four factors model). One justifies the use of middle values for the calculation of the distribution in space of reactor, quantities representing heterogeneous middle from a local point of view (fuel, moderator, can or clad, and so on ...) by substitution of an equivalent homogeneous middle. Time dependence, dynamical behaviour of reactor are studied. Long term effects of evolution of constituents elements of heart under irradiation, and ways to balance this evolution are in the last paragraph. 18 refs., 26 figs

  10. EPR (European Pressurized water Reactor) The advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which provides a steady supply of electricity at low cost, has its rightful place in the energy mix of the 21. century, which puts the emphasis on sustainable development. The EPR is the only 3. generation reactor under construction today. It is an evolutionary reactor that represents a new generation of pressurized water reactors with no break in the technology used for the most recent models. The EPR was developed by Framatome and Siemens, whose nuclear activities were combined in January 2001 to form Framatome ANP, a subsidiary of AREVA and Siemens. EDF and the major German electricity companies played an active part in the project. The safety authorities of the two countries joined forces to bring their respective safety standards into line and draw up joint design rules for the new reactor. The project had three objectives: meet the requirements of European utilities, comply with the safety standards laid down by the French safety authority for future pressurized water reactors, in concert with its German counterpart, and make nuclear energy even more competitive than energy generated using fossil fuels. The EPR can guarantee a safe, inexpensive electricity supply, without adding to the greenhouse effect. It meets the requirements of the safety authorities and lives up to the expectations of electricity utilities. This document presents the main characteristics of the EPR, and in particular the additional measures to prevent the occurrence of events likely to damage the core, the leak-tight containment, the measures to reduce the exposure of operating and maintenance personnel, the solutions for an even greater protection of the environment. The foreseen development of the EPR in France and abroad (Finland, China, the United States) is summarized

  11. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This brochure is intended as a contribution to a better and more general understanding of one of the most urgent problems of present society. Emphasis is laid on three issues that are always raised in the nuclear debate: 1) Fuel cycle, 2) environmental effects of nuclear power plants, 3) waste disposal problems. (GL) [de

  12. Applications of nuclear energy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, J.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts and international frames of generation IV nuclear reactors. A review of use of nuclear energy for non electric applications especially in areas such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, district heating and other industrial applications. (Author)

  13. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddley, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  14. Improvements in or relating to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, A.V.; Batjukov, V.I.; Fadeev, A.I.; Shapkin, A.F.; Shikhiyan, T.G.; Ordynsky, G.V.; Drachev, V.P.; Pogodin, E.N.

    1980-01-01

    A refuelling installation for nuclear reactor complexes is described for recharging the reactor vessels of such complexes with new fuel assemblies and for removing spent fuel assemblies from the reactor vessel. (U.K.)

  15. Environmental concerns in regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Glaucia R.T.; Durazzo, Michelangelo; Carvalho, Elita F.U.; Riella, Humberto G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the main programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel -CCN- is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt % 235 U), to supply its IEA-R1 research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts.This study aims to implant the Sustainability Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to CCN

  16. Environmental concerns regarding a materials test reactor fuel fabrication facility at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. R. T.; Durazzo, M.; Carvalho, E. F. U.; Riella, H. G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the industrial activities success, front to a more and more informed and demanding society and to a more and more competitive market demands an environmental administration policy which doesn't limit itself to assist the legislation but anticipate and prevent, in a responsible way, possible damages to the environment. One of the maim programs of the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research of the national Commission of Nuclear Energy located in Brazil, through the Center of Nuclear Fuel - CCN - is to manufacture MTR-type fuel elements using low-enrichment uranium (20 wt% 2 35U), to supply its IEA-RI research reactor. Integrated in this program, this work aims at well developing and assuring a methodology to implant an environment, health and safety policy, foreseeing its management with the use of detailed data reports and through the adoption of new tools for improving the management, in order to fulfil the applicable legislation and accomplish all the environmental, operational and works aspects. The applied methodology for the effluents management comprises different aspects, including the specific environmental legislation of a country, main available effluents treatment techniques, process flow analyses from raw materials and intakes to products, generated effluents, residuals and emissions. Data collections were accomplished for points gathering and tests characterization, classification and compatibility of the generated effluents and their eventual environmental impacts. This study aims to implant the Sustainable Concept in order to guarantee access to financial resources, allowing cost reduction, maximizing long-term profits, preventing and reducing environmental accident risks and stimulating both the attraction and the keeping of a motivated manpower. Work on this project has already started and, even though many technical actions have not still ended, the results have being extremely valuable. These results can already give to CCN

  17. Nuclear instrumentation for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Carlos G.; Pita, Antonio; Verrastro, Claudio A.; Maino, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear instrumentation for research reactors in Argentina was developed in 70'. A gradual modernization of all the nuclear instrumentation is planned. It includes start-up and power range instrumentation, as well as field monitors, clamp, scram and rod movement control logic. The new instrumentation is linked to a computer network, based on real time operating system for data acquisition, display and logging. This paper describes the modules and whole system aspects. (author). 2 refs

  18. Cryogenics in nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmadurai, G.

    1982-01-01

    The cryogenic technology has significantly contributed to the development of several proven techniques for use in the nuclear power industry. A noteworthy feature is the unique role of cryogenics in minimising the release of radioactive and some chemical pollutants to the environment during the operation of various plants associated with this industry. The salient technological features of several cryogenic processes relevant to the nuclear reactor technology are discussed. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy and the renewable energies namely: solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy and biomass are complementary. They are not polluting and they are expected to develop in the future to replace the fossil fuels

  20. Terrestrial Energy bets on molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial Energy is a Canadian enterprise, founded in 2013, for marketing the integral molten salt reactor (IMSR). A first prototype (called MSRE and with an energy output of 8 MW) was designed and operated between 1965 and 1969 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. IMSR is a small, modular reactor with a thermal energy output of 400 MW. According to Terrestrial Energy the technology of conventional power reactors is too complicated and too expensive. On the contrary IMSR's technology appears to be simple, easy to operate and affordable. With a staff of 30 people Terrestrial Energy appears to be a start-up in the nuclear sector. A process of pre-licensing will be launched in 2016 with the Canadian nuclear safety authority. (A.C.)

  1. Nuclear power plant with several reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishanin, E I; Ilyunin, V G; Kuznetsov, I A; Murogov, V M; Shmelev, A N

    1972-05-10

    A design of a nuclear power plant suggested involves several reactors consequently transmitting heat to a gaseous coolant in the joint thermodynamical circuit. In order to increase the power and the rate of fuel reproduction the low temperature section of the thermodynamical circuit involves a fast nuclear reactor, whereas a thermal nuclear reactor is employed in the high temperature section of the circuit for intermediate heating and for over-heating of the working body. Between the fast nuclear and the thermal nuclear reactors there is a turbine providing for the necessary ratio between pressures in the reactors. Each reactor may employ its own coolant.

  2. Daddy, What's a Nuclear Reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, Dennis W.

    2008-01-01

    No matter what we think of the nuclear industry, it is part of mankind's heritage. The decommissioning process is slowly making facilities associated with this industry disappear and not enough is being done to preserve the information for future generations. This paper provides some food for thought and provides a possible way forward. Industrial archaeology is an ever expanding branch of archaeology that is dedicated to preserving, interpreting and documenting our industrial past and heritage. Normally it begins with analyzing an old building or ruins and trying to determine what was done, how it was done and what changes might have occurred during its operation. We have a unique opportunity to document all of these issues and provide them before the nuclear facility disappears. Entombment is an acceptable decommissioning strategy; however we would have to change our concept of entombment. It is proposed that a number of nuclear facilities be entombed or preserved for future generations to appreciate. This would include a number of different types of facilities such as different types of nuclear power and research reactors, a reprocessing plant, part of an enrichment plant and a fuel manufacturing plant. One of the main issues that would require resolution would be that of maintaining information of the location of the buried facility and the information about its operation and structure, and passing this information on to future generations. This can be done, but a system would have to be established prior to burial of the facility so that no information would be lost. In general, our current set of requirements and laws may need to be re-examined and modified to take into account these new situations. As an alternative, and to compliment the above proposal, it is recommended that a study and documentation of the nuclear industry be considered as part of twentieth century industrial archaeology. This study should not only include the power and fuel cycle

  3. Health requirements for nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The health prerequisites established for the qualification of nuclear reactor operators according to CNEN-NE-1.01 Guidelines Licensing of nuclear reactor operators, CNEN-12/79 Resolution, are described. (M.A.) [pt

  4. Set of rules SOR 2 licensing of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    This is the set of rules promulgated by the Israel Atomic Energy Commission pursuant to the Supervision of Supplies and Services Law 5718-1957, Order regarding Supervision of Nuclear Reactors (1974) Chapter 3: Permits, to provide for the Licensing of Nuclear Reactors. (B.G.)

  5. Use of nuclear reactors for seawater desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) status report on desalination, including nuclear desalination, was issued nearly 2 decades ago. The impending water crisis in many parts of the world, and especially in the Middle East, makes it appropriate to provide an updated report as a basis for consideration of future activities. This report provides a state-of-the-art review of desalination and pertinent nuclear reactor technology. Information is included on fresh water needs and costs, environmental risks associated with alternatives for water production, and data regarding the technical and economic characteristics of immediately available desalination systems, as well as compatible nuclear technology. 68 refs, 60 figs, 11 tabs

  6. Neutron noise in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaquiere, A.; Pachowska, R.

    1961-06-01

    The power of a nuclear reactor, in the operating conditions, presents fluctuations due to various causes. This random behaviour can be included in the study of 'noises'. Among other sources of noise, we analyse hereafter the fluctuations due: a) to the discontinuous emissions of neutrons from an independent source; b) to the multiplication of neutrons inside the reactor. The method which we present makes use of the analogies between the rules governing a nuclear reactor in operation and a number of radio-electrical systems, in particular the feed-back loops. The reactor can be characterized by its 'passing band' and is described as a system submitted to a sequence of random pulses. In non linear operating condition, the effect of neutron noise is defined by means of a non-linear functional, this theory is thus related to previous works the references of which are given at the end of the present report. This leads us in particular in the case of nuclear reactors to some results given by A. Blaquiere in the case of radio-electrical loops. (author) [fr

  7. Nuclear reactors and disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Estrada Oyuela, M.E.; Garcia Moritan, R.

    1987-01-01

    From a brief analysis of the perspectives of nuclear weapons arsenals reduction, a rational use of the energetic potential of the ogives and the authentic destruction of its warlike power is proposed. The fissionable material conversion contained in the nuclear fuel ogives for peaceful uses should be part of the disarmament agreements. This paper pretends to give an approximate idea on the resources re assignation implicancies. (Author)

  8. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear calculation of the thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Naohiro

    1998-01-01

    Even if for a reactor using thorium (and 233-U), its nuclear design calculation procedure is similar to the case using conventional 235-U, 238-U and plutonium. As nuclear composition varies with time on operation of nuclear reactor, calculation of its mean cross section should be conducted in details. At that time, one-group cross section obtained by integration over a whole of energy range is used for small member group. And, as the nuclear data for a base of its calculation is already prepared by JENDL3.2 and nuclear data library derived from it, the nuclear calculation of a nuclear reactor using thorium has no problem. From such a veiwpoint, IAEA has organized a coordinated research program of 'Potential of Th-based Fuel Cycles to Constrain Pu and to reduce Long-term Waste Toxicities' since 1996. All nations entering this program were regulated so as to institute by selecting a nuclear fuel cycle thinking better by each nation and to examine what cycle is expected by comparing their results. For a promise to conduct such neutral comparison, a comparison of bench mark calculations aiming at PWR was conducted to protect that the obtained results became different because of different calculation method and cross section adopted by each nation. Therefore, it was promoted by entrance of China, Germany, India, Israel, Japan, Korea, Russia and USA. The SWAT system developed by Tohoku University is used for its calculation code, by using which calculated results on the bench mark calculation at the fist and second stages and the nuclear reactor were reported. (G.K.)

  10. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  11. Nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Ishibashi, Yoko; Mochida, Takaaki; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Yamanaka, Akihiro.

    1995-01-01

    A reactor core is radially divided into an inner region, an outer region and an outermost region. As a fuel, three kinds of fuels, namely, a high enrichment degree fuel at 3.4%, a middle enrichment degree fuel at 2.3% and a low enrichment degree at 1.1% of a fuel average enrichment degree of fission product are used. Each of the fuels is bisected to upper and lower portions at an axial center thereof. The difference of average enrichment degrees between upper and lower portions is 0.1% for the high enrichment degree fuel, 0.3% for the middle enrichment degree fuel and 0.2% for the low enrichment degree fuel. In addition, the composition of fuels in each of radial regions comprises 100% of the low enrichment degree fuels in the outermost region, 91% of the higher enrichment degree fuels and 9% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the outer region, and 34% of the high enrichment degree fuels and 30% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the inner region. With such a constitution, fuel economy can be improved while maintaining the thermal margin in an initially loaded reactor core of a BWR type reactor. (I.N.)

  12. Nuclear reactor recyclation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Yukio; Chuma, Kazuto

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the unevenness for the coolant flow rate even when abnormality occurs to one of recycling pumps. Constitution: A plurality of jet pumps disposed at an interval around the reactor core are divided circumferentially into two sets, and a pipeway is disposed to the outside of each pair including recycling pumps corresponding to each of the sets. The pipeway is connected to the recycling inlet of the jet pump by way of a manifold. The discharge portion of the recycling pumps of the loop pipeway are connected with each other by way of communication pipes, and a normally closed valve is disposed to the communication pipe and the normally closed valve of the communication pipe is opened upon detecting abnormality for one of the recycling pumps. Thus, if either one of the pair of recycling pumps shows abnormal state, coolants flows from the other of pipeway to the outside of the loop pipeway and coolants are supplied from all the jet pumps to the reactor core portion and, accordingly, the not-uniform flow rate can be prevented to eliminate undesired effect on the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  14. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is described, wherein coolant is arranged to be flowed upwardly through a fuel assembly and having one or more baffles located above the coolant exit of the fuel assembly, the baffles being arranged so as to convert the upwardly directed motion of liquid metal coolant leaving the fuel assembly into a substantially horizontal motion. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor safety protection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Fumiyasu; Noguchi, Atomi; Matsumiya, Shoichi; Furusato, Ken-ichiro; Arita, Setsuo.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention extremely reduces a probability of causing unnecessary scram of a nuclear reactor. That is, four control devices receive signals from each of four sensors and output four trip signals respectively in a quardruplicated control device. Each of the trip signals and each of trip signals via a delay circuit are inputted to a logical sum element. The output of the logical sum circuit is inputted to a decision of majority circuit. The decision of majority circuit controls a scram pilot valve which conducts scram of the reactor by way of a solenoid coils. With such procedures, even if surge noises of a short pulse width are mixed to the sensor signals and short trip signals are outputted, there is no worry that the scram pilot valve is actuated. Accordingly, factors of lowering nuclear plant operation efficiency due to erroneous reactor scram can be reduced. (I.S.)

  16. Surveillance of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, J.

    1983-01-01

    Surveillance of nuclear power reactors is now a necessity imposed by such regulatory documents as USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.133. In addition to regulatory requirements, however, nuclear reactor surveillance offers plant operators significant economic advantages insofar as a single day's outage is very costly. The economic worth of a reactor surveillance system can be stated in terms of the improved plant availability provided through its capability to detect incidents before they occur and cause serious damage. Furthermore, the TMI accident has demonstrated the need for monitoring certain components to provide operators with clear information on their functional status. In response to the above considerations, Framatome has developed a line of products which includes: pressure vessel leakage detection systems, loose part detection systems, component vibration monitoring systems, and, crack detection and monitoring systems. Some of the surveillance systems developed by Framatome are described in this paper

  17. A prehistory of nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary progress of the LWR plants in the last half-century was reviewed in series. As a prehistory of nuclear energy development, this first lecture presented (1) discovery of nuclear energy and development of the atomic bomb and (2) development of the reactor system using nuclear energy for making electricity and for naval propulsion. The first nuclear reactor to produce electricity was the small Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-1) in Idaho, in the USA, which started up in December 1951. The Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) for naval use was developed under Hyman Rickover in the USA. The Mark I prototype naval reactor started up in March 1953 in Idaho, and the first nuclear-powered submarine, NS Nautilus, with the Mark II reactor was put into service in January 1955. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Nuclear energy: obstacles and promises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy has distinctive merits (sustainable resources, low costs, no greenhouse gases) but its development must overcome serious hurdles (fear of accidents, radio-phobia, waste management). The large unit size of present-day reactors is compatible only with large electrical grids, and involves a high capital cost. Taking into account these different factors, the paper outlines how nuclear energy may contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases, and which are the most promising developments. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotter, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    The recent, terrifying threat of a major calamity at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island power plant near Harrisburg reverberated across practically the whole of the civilised world. An almost incredible sequence of human and mechanical failures at this installation had stopped just short of disaster and had brought the unthinkable perilously close to happening. The accident had sprayed radioactive waste into the air and had led to the large scale evacuation of people from the endangered area, disrupted hundreds of thousands of lives and caused a crippling setback to the nuclear industry. In this article the author discusses the impact the Harrisburg incident has had on the nuclear industry

  20. Nuclear energy - some aspects; Energia nuclear - alguns aspectos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-15

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy.

  1. Desalination and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeijn, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    The techniques for fresh water production from seawater have matured and capacities have increased considerably over the past decades. It is feasible to combine seawater desalination with the generation of electricity since power stations can provide energy and low grade heat during off peak periods for the purpose of fresh water production. A dual purpose installation, combining a seawater desalination facility with a light water reactor power generation station promises interesting possibilities. The case in South Africa, where nuclear power stations are most economically sited far from the inland coal fields, is discussed. 1 ill

  2. The failure diagnoses of nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Huanxing.

    1986-01-01

    The earlier period failure diagnoses can raise the safety and efficiency of nuclear reactors. This paper first describes the process abnormality monitoring of core barrel vibration in PWR, inherent noise sources in BWR, sodium boiling in LMFBR and nuclear reactor stability. And then, describes the plant failure diagnoses of primary coolant pumps, loose parts in nuclear reactors, coolant leakage and relief valve location

  3. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  4. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC's program results

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmonier, Pierre; Mesnage, Bernard; Nervi, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    This invention refers to fuel assemblies for a liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor. Each assembly is composed of a hollow vertical casing, of regular polygonal section, containing a bundle of clad pins filled with a fissile or fertile substance. The casing is open at its upper end and has a cylindrical foot at its lower end for positioning the assembly in a housing provided in the horizontal diagrid, on which the core assembly rests. A set of flat bars located on the external surface of the casing enables it to be correctly orientated in its housing among the other core assemblies [fr

  6. Spatial and energy distributions of skyshine neutron and gamma radiation from nuclear reactors on the ground-air boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Y.; Netecha, M.E.; Vasiliev, A.P.; Avaev, V.N.; Vasiliev, G.A. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zelensky, D.I.; Istomin, Y.L.; Cherepnin, Y.S. [Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Semipalatinsk-21 (Kazakhstan); Nomura, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    A set of measurements on skyshine radiation was conducted at two special research reactors. A broad range of detectors was used in the measurements to record neutron and gamma radiations. Dosimetric and radiometric field measurements of the neutrons and gamma quanta of the radiation scattered in the air were performed at distances of 50 to 1000 m from the reactor during different weather conditions. The neutron spectra in the energy range of 1 eV to 10 MeV and the gamma quanta spectra in the range of 0.1-10 MeV were measured. (author)

  7. A three-dimensional methodology for the assessment of neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition in graphite components of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.O.; Robinson, A.T.; Allen, D.A.; Picton, D.J.; Thornton, D.A. [TCS, Serco, Rutherford House, Olympus Park, Quedgeley, Gloucester, Gloucestershire GL2 4NF (United Kingdom); Shaw, S.E. [EDF Energy, Barnet Way, Barnwood, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a three-dimensional methodology for the assessment of neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition (or nuclear heating) throughout the graphite cores of the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors. Advances in the development of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCBEND have enabled the efficient production of detailed fully three-dimensional models that utilise three-dimensional source distributions obtained from Core Follow data supplied by the reactor physics code PANTHER. The calculational approach can be simplified to reduce both the requisite number of intensive radiation transport calculations, as well as the quantity of data output. These simplifications have been qualified by comparison with explicit calculations and they have been shown not to introduce significant systematic uncertainties. Simple calculational approaches are described that allow users of the data to address the effects on neutron damage and nuclear energy deposition predictions of the feedback resulting from the mutual dependencies of graphite weight loss and nuclear energy deposition. (authors)

  8. Nuclear reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; McGonigal, G.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to the instrumentation of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. In order to ensure the safe operation of such reactors it is necessary to constantly monitor the coolant flowing through the fuel assemblies for temperature and rate of flow, requiring a large number of sensors. An improved and simplified arrangement is claimed in which the fuel assemblies feed a fraction of coolant to three instrument units arranged to sense the temperature and rate of flow of samples of coolant. Each instrument unit comprises a sleeve housing a sensing unit and has a number of inlet ducts arranged for receiving coolant from a fuel assembly together with a single outlet. The sensing unit has three thermocouple hot junctions connected in series, the hot junctions and inlet ducts being arranged in pairs. Electromagnetic windings around an inductive core are arranged to sense variation in flow of liquid metal by flux distortion. Fission product sensing means may also be provided. Full constructional details are given. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Tank type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Kesahiro; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Takahashi, Kazuo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the seismic proofness and the radiation shielding of LMFBR type reactors by providing the reactor with a structure reduced in the size and the weight, excellent in satisfactory heat insulating property and having radioactive material capturing performance. Constitution: Two sheets of ceramic plate members (for instance, mullite, steatite, beryllium ceramics or the like) which can be fabricated into plate-like shape and have high heat insulating property are overlapped with each other, between which magnetic heat-insulating material with magnetizing magnetic ceramics (for example, Lisub(0.5)Fesub(2.5)O 4 , Ni-Fe 2 O 4 , Fe-Fe 2 O 4 ) are sandwiched and the whole assembly is covered with metal coating material (for example, stainless steels). The inside of the coating material is evacuated or filled with an inert gas with low heat-conductivity (argon) at a pressure less than 1 kg/cm 2 abs, considering that the temperature goes higher and the inner pressure increases upon operation. In this way, the size of the laminated structure can be reduced to about 1/7 of the conventional case. The magnetic heat insulating materials can capture the magnetic impurities in sodium. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Nuclear energy: the European way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The dossier published in this issue deals with the present and future situation of nuclear energy in Europe. What could be the trends of the nuclear development in the Europe of tomorrows. That global question is answered by pointing out the different data related to the present state of european nuclear programmes. Such an overview is followed by a serie of articles dealing with definite items: the actions implemented by the European Communities Commission: the electricity market and EDF policy in the field of european electric grids; the trends of nuclear cycle industry and the perfecting of the future european nuclear reactor

  12. The experimental nuclear reactor: AQUILON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Y.; Koechlin, J.C.; Moreau, J.M.

    1958-01-01

    'Aquilon' is an experimental reactor specially designed for the neutronic study of heterogeneous multiplying media with solid fuel and liquid moderator. Since this study is in general incompatible with energy production, the power of the reactor has been limited to a minimum so as to be able to obtain a simple and compact structure, easy access, good handling and great flexibility of operation and utilisation. (author) [fr

  13. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  14. Economic analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, P.S.; Parker, M.B.; Omberg, R.P.

    1979-05-01

    The report presents several methods for estimating the power costs of nuclear reactors. When based on a consistent set of economic assumptions, total power costs may be useful in comparing reactor alternatives. The principal items contributing to the total power costs of a nuclear power plant are: (1) capital costs, (2) fuel cycle costs, (3) operation and maintenance costs, and (4) income taxes and fixed charges. There is a large variation in capital costs and fuel expenses among different reactor types. For example, the standard once-through LWR has relatively low capital costs; however, the fuel costs may be very high if U 3 O 8 is expensive. In contrast, the FBR has relatively high capital costs but low fuel expenses. Thus, the distribution of expenses varies significantly between these two reactors. In order to compare power costs, expenses and revenues associated with each reactor may be spread over the lifetime of the plant. A single annual cost, often called a levelized cost, may be obtained by the methods described. Levelized power costs may then be used as a basis for economic comparisons. The paper discusses each of the power cost components. An exact expression for total levelized power costs is derived. Approximate techniques of estimating power costs will be presented

  15. Nuclear energy. Selective bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    This bibliography gathers articles and books from the French National Library about civil nuclear energy, its related risks, and its perspectives of evolution: general overview (figures, legal framework, actors and markets, policies); what price for nuclear energy (environmental and health risks, financing, non-proliferation policy); future of nuclear energy in energy policies (nuclear energy versus other energies, nuclear phase-out); web sites selection

  16. A nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1974-01-01

    Between the steel pressure vessel of the pressurized water power reactor and the biological shield a gap is found which enables inspections as well as cooling by air or gas. Within the gap, fins are equally distributed around the circumference of the pressure vessel summing parallel to each other and to the longitudinal axis of the vessel or being inclined. The fins cross the gap for about 9/10. Each fin consists of a sectional bar supported with its foot on a girder. The girder has got a rectangular steel section of two sectional iron parts. Between one of the parts and a plate anchored in the biological shield a ceramic body is inserted as a heat insulation. A further heat insulation of aluminium foils connects the fins with each other and divides the gap into two concentric subspaces which can be streamed through by a gas having different temperatures. (DG) [de

  17. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Michio; Fujii, Tadashi; Susuki, Akira.

    1994-01-01

    A wet well space above a pressure suppression pool is divided into a first wet well on the side in contact with the pressure suppression pool and a second wet well on the side not in contact with the pool. Cooling water is contained in the second wet well and it is in communication with the first wet well by pipelines. Since steams flown into the second well are condensed in the cooling water, they continuously transfer from the first wet well to the second wet well, thereby capable of eliminating the effects of incondensible gases in the first wet well. With such procedures, the effect of the incondensible gases can be eliminated even without cooling from the outside of the reactor. Heat accumulation can be increased in a container of any material, so that thermal load on cooling circuits for removing after-heat can be mitigated. (T.M.)

  18. Nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F

    1974-07-11

    The core of the fast neutron reactor consisting, among other components, of fuel elements enriched in plutonium is divided into modules. Each module contains a bundle of four or six elongated components (fuel elements and control rods). In the arrangement with four components, one is kept rigid while the other three are elastically yielding inclined towards the center and lean against the rigid component. In the modules with six pieces, each component is elastically yielding inclined towards a central cavity. In this way, they form a circular arc. A control rod may be placed in the cavity. In order to counteract a relative lateral movement, the outer surfaces of the components which have hexagonal cross-sections have interlocking bearing cushions. The bearing cushions consist of keyway-type ribs or grooves with the wedges or ribs gripping in the grooves of the neighbouring components. In addition, the ribs have oblique entering surfaces.

  19. Fears caused by nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As after the Fukushima accident, fears with respect to nuclear energy may appear again, this very positive document outlines the differences between a nuclear bomb and a nuclear reactor, outlines the natural character of radioactivity and its benefits when used with low dose, outlines the fact that radioactivity although invisible can be easily and well measured. It comments the accident and recalls that TEPCO did not take the fact that ten meter high waves could happen as in Indonesia in 2004. It discusses the loss of confidence in scientists, in nuclear authorities. It addresses the issue of nuclear wastes, evokes the discovery of a natural underground nuclear reactor in Gabon, outlines properties of waste vitrification, discusses the case of high level wastes, of minor actinides, and of storage reversibility. It outlines the safety of installations containing plutonium, of plutonium transportation

  20. Nuclear reactor fuelling machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peberdy, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The refuelling machine described comprises a rotatable support structure having a guide tube attached to it by a parellel linkage mechanism, whereby the guide tube can be displaced sideways from the support structure. A gripper unit is housed within the guide tube for gripping the end of a fuel assembly or other reactor component and has means for maintenance in the engaging condition during travel of the unit along the guide tube, except for a small portion of the travel at one end of the guide tube, where the inner surface of the guide tube is shaped so as to maintain the gripper unit in a disengaging condition. The gripper unit has a rotatable head, means for moving it linearly within the guide tube so that a component carried by the unit can be housed in the guide tube, and means for rotating the head of the unit through 180 0 relative to its body, to effect rotation of a component carried by the unit. The means for rotating the head of the gripper unit comprises ring and pinion gearing, operable through a series of rotatable shafts interconnected by universal couplings. The reason for provision for 180 0 rotation is that due to the variation in the neutron flux across the reactor core the side of a fuel assembly towards the outside of the core will be subjected to a lower neutron flux and therefore will grow less than the side of the fuel assembly towards the inside of the core. This can lead to bowing and possible jamming of the fuel assemblies. Full constructional details are given. See also BP 1112384. (U.K.)