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Sample records for endovascular aortic repair

  1. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive factors for cerebrovascular accidents after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscalco, Giovanni; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Tozzi, Matteo; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Carrafiello, Giampaolo; Sala, Andrea; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-12-01

    Cerebrovascular accidents are devastating and worrisome complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. The aim of this study was to determine cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Between January 2001 and June 2008, 76 patients treated with thoracic endovascular aortic repair were prospectively enrolled. The study cohort included 61 men; mean age was 65.4 +/- 16.8 years. All patients underwent a specific neurologic assessment on an hourly basis postoperatively to detect neurologic deficits. Cerebrovascular accidents were diagnosed on the basis of physical examination, tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging, or autopsy. Cerebrovascular accidents occurred in 8 (10.5%) patients, including 4 transient ischemic attack and 4 major strokes. Four cases were observed within the first 24-hours. Multivariable analysis revealed that anatomic incompleteness of the Willis circle (odds ratio [OR] 17.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10 to 140.66), as well as the presence of coronary artery disease (OR 6.86, 95 CI% 1.18 to 40.05), were independently associated with postoperative cerebrovascular accident development. Overall hospital mortality was 9.2%, with no significant difference for patients hit by cerebrovascular accidents (25.0% vs 7.3%, p = 0.102). Preexisting coronary artery disease, reflecting a severe diseased aorta and anomalies of Willis circle are independent cerebrovascular accident predictors after thoracic endovascular aortic repair procedures. A careful evaluation of the arch vessels and cerebral vascularization should be mandatory for patients suitable for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

  4. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Kasahara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion.

  5. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Sharath Chandra Vikram; Jayarajasingam, Rubaraj; Cottam, Rachel; Palfreyman, Simon J; Michaels, Jonathan A; Thomas, Steven M

    2014-01-23

    An abnormal dilatation of the abdominal aorta is referred to as an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Due to the risk of rupture, surgical repair is offered electively to individuals with aneurysms greater than 5.5 cm in size. Traditionally, conventional open surgical repair (OSR) was considered the first choice approach. However, over the past two decades endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has gained popularity as a treatment option. This article intends to review the role of EVAR in the management of elective AAA. To assess the effectiveness of EVAR versus conventional OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery, and EVAR versus best medical care in those considered unfit for surgery. This was determined by the effect on short, intermediate and long-term mortality, endograft related complications, re-intervention rates and major complications. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (January 2013) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12). The TSC also searched trial databases for details of ongoing or unpublished studies. Prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing EVAR with OSR in individuals with AAA considered fit for surgery. and comparing EVAR with best medical care in individuals considered unfit for surgery. We excluded studies with inadequate data or using an inadequate randomisation technique. Three reviewers independently evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and extracted data using pro forma designed by the Cochrane PVD Group. We assessed the quality of trials using The Cochrane Collaboration's 'Risk of bias' tool. We entered collected data in to Review Manager (version 5.2.3) for analysis. Where direct comparisons could be made, we determined odds ratios (OR). We tested studies for heterogeneity and, when present, we used a random-effects model; otherwise we used a fixed-effect model. We tabulated

  6. Open Versus Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firwana, Belal; Ferwana, Mazen; Hasan, Rim

    2014-01-01

    We performed an analysis to assess the need for conducting additional randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing open and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Trial sequential analysis (TSA) is a statistical methodology that can calculate the required inform...

  7. Preoperative Evaluation and Endovascular Procedure of Intraoperative Aneurysm Rupture During Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Bin-Shan, E-mail: binszha2013@163.com; Zhu, Hua-Gang, E-mail: huagzhu@yeah.net; Ye, Yu-Sheng, E-mail: yeyusheng@aliyun.com; Li, Yong-Sheng, E-mail: 872868848@qq.com; Zhang, Zhi-Gong, E-mail: zzgedward@sina.com; Xie, Wen-Tao, E-mail: 345344347@qq.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery (China)

    2017-03-15

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are now routinely repaired with endovascular repair if anatomically feasible because of advantages in safety and recovery. However, intraoperative aneurysm rupture is a severe complication which may have an adverse effect on the outcome of treatment. Comprehensive preoperative assessment and considerate treatment are keys to success of endovascular aneurysm repair, especially during unexpected circumstances. Few cases have reported on intraoperative aortic rupture, which were successfully managed by endovascular treatment. Here, we present a rare case of an intraoperative aneurysm rupture during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm with narrow neck and angulated aorta arch (coarctation-associated aneurysm), which was successfully treated using double access route approach and iliac limbs of infrarenal devices.Level of EvidenceLevel 5.

  8. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease.

  9. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) in Proximal (Type A) Aortic Dissection: Ready for a Broader Application?

    OpenAIRE

    Nienaber, Christoph A.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Clough, Rachel E.; Aboukoura, Mohamed; Mancuso, Enrico; Yeh, James S.M.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Cheshire, Nick; Rosendahl, Ulrich Peter; Quarto, Cesare; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveThoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has demonstrated encouraging results and is gaining increasing acceptance as a treatment option for aortic aneurysms and dissections. Yet, its role in managing proximal aortic pathologies is unknown - this is important because in proximal (Stanford type A) aortic dissections, 10-30% are not accepted for surgery, and 30-50% are technically amenable for TEVAR. We describe our case series of type A aortic dissections treated using TEVAR.Method...

  10. Outcomes of endovascular aortic repair in the modern era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Jacob; Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring outcomes following endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is critical. Although evidence from randomized controlled trials has solidified the role of EVAR, the analysis of outcomes and "real-world" data has uncovered limitations, improved the selection of appropriate patients, and underscored...... the importance of instructions for use. Subsequent studies demonstrated the learning curve of EVAR and gradual improvement of outcomes over time. Outcomes analyses will continue to play an important role, particularly as technological growth of endovascular therapy has enabled treatment of more complex aneurysm...... pathologies and patients. The important analyses are herein reviewed, following the development of EVAR in the treatment of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) to ruptured AAAs, and finally to complex aneurysms, including thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms and mycotic aneurysms. This includes an overview...

  11. Aorto-enteric Fistula 15 Years After Uncomplicated Endovascular Aortic Repair with Unforeseen Onset of Endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadhim, M M K; Rasmussen, J B G; Eiberg, J P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aorto-enteric fistula after endovascular aortic repair is an exceedingly rare but serious condition. Report A rare case of a fistula between the excluded aortic sac and the transverse colon 15 years after endovascular aortic repair is described. Onset was endocarditis without...... such as endocarditis, which in this case probably occurred as metastatic sepsis from endograft infection....

  12. Preoperative methylprednisolone enhances recovery after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Kehlet, Henrik; Vogt, Katja

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid on the inflammatory response and recovery after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). BACKGROUND: The postimplantation syndrome after EVAR may delay recovery due to the release of proinflammatory mediators....... Glucocorticoids may reduce postoperative inflammatory responses and enhance recovery, but with limited information on EVAR. METHODS: A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 153 patients undergoing elective EVAR between November 2009 and January 2013. Patients received 30 mg.......001) and fulfillment of discharge criteria was shorter [2 days (IQR = 2-4 days) vs 3 days (IQR = 3-4 days)] (P factor receptor were also reduced (P

  13. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H.J. Ultee (Klaas); R. Hurks (Rob); D.B. Buck (Dominique B.); G.S. Dasilva (George S.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion

  14. The impact of endovascular repair on specialties performing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, Klaas H J; Hurks, Rob; Buck, Dominique B.; Dasilva, George S.; Soden, Peter A.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Verhagen, Hence J M; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has been performed by various surgical specialties for many years. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may be a disruptive technology, having an impact on which specialties care for patients with AAA. Therefore, we examined the proportion of AAA

  15. Nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan; Chen Rumei; Xiao Zhanqiang; Qi Youfei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the main points of nursing cooperation in endovascular aneurysm repair treatment for aortic dissection. Methods: Preoperative psychological care and the other preparations were carefully conducted. During the operation, the patient's body was correctly placed. Active cooperation with the performance of angiography and close observation during heparinization were carried out. The proper delivery of catheter and stent to the operator was carefully done. Close observation for the patient's vital signs, the renal function and the changes of limb blood supply were made. Results: Under close cooperation of' the operators, nurses, anesthesiologists and technicians, the surgery was successfully accomplished in 35 patients. The monitoring of vital signs during the entire performance of operation was well executed. No surgical instruments delivery error's or surgery failure due to unsuitable cooperation occurred. Conclusion: Perfect preoperative preparation, strict nursing cooperation and team cooperation are the key points to ensure a successful endovascular aneurysm repair for aortic dissection. (authors)

  16. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  17. Development of stroke-induced quadriplegia after endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoudi, Abdullah S; Merdad, Anas A; Makhdoom, Ahmed Q; Jamjoom, Reda A

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular repair of blunt aortic injury is now a first-line approach in management. This can warrant coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA), which could lead to posterior strokes. In this case report, we present a severe complication of endovascular repair of a traumatic aortic aneurysm. A 53-year-old man presented with blunt aortic injury, endovascular repair was carried out where the left subclavian artery was covered. The intervention had a 100% technical success. Twelve hours later, he was discovered to have quadriplegia, a CT scan showed a large left cerebellar infarction extending to the medulla oblongata and proximal spinal cord. Strokes complicate 3% of thoracic endovascular aortic repairs, 80% of those strokes occur in patients who had their LSA`s covered. Most patients however, tolerate the coverage. Although our patient had a dominant right vertebral artery, and lacked risks for these strokes, he developed an extensive stroke that left him quadriplegic.

  18. Retrograde ascending aortic dissection during or after thoracic aortic stent graft placement: insight from the European registry on endovascular aortic repair complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Thompson, Matt; Rousseau, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Single-center reports have identified retrograde ascending aortic dissection (rAAD) as a potentially lethal complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). METHODS AND RESULTS: Between 1995 and 2008, 28 centers participating in the European Registry on Endovascular Aortic...

  19. Perioperative management of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haofu; Wang Yuwei; Li Jun; Zhao Zonggang; Qi Sen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical experience of perioperative management in performing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: EVAR was performed in 22 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Before treatment the functions of main organs were evaluated and certain measures were adopted in order to protect them. Useful parameters, including the length, diameter, angle and configuration of the proximal and distal aneurysmal neck, the relationship of the aneurysm to aortic branches, the distance from the lowest renal artery to the bifurcation of abdominal aorta, and the quality of access vessels (such as diameter, tortuosity and calcification degree) were determined and assessed with CTA. According to the parameters thus obtained, the suitable stent-graft with ideal diameter and length was selected, and the optimal surgery pattern was employed. Local anesthesia was employed in 20 patients, among them the local anesthesia had to be changed to general anesthesia in one. Epidural anesthesia was carried out in one patient through the surgically-reconstructed iliac artery access,and general anesthesia was employed in one patient who had Stanford type A aortic dissection. The lowest renal artery must be accurately localized before deployment of stent-graft was started. At least one patent internal iliac artery should be reserved when bilateral internal iliac arteries needed to be covered, to be covered by stages or to be reconstructed. After stent-graft placement, angiography must be performed to find out if there was any endoleak and, if any, to determine the type of endoleak and to deal with it properly. Two cases had proximal type I endoleak, so balloon dilation was employed in one and cuff implantation in another one. Distal type I endoleak occurred in one case, but, unfortunately, the iliac artery ruptured when balloon dilation was employed, therefore the patient had to receive vascular repair

  20. Morphological risk factors of stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bischoff, Moritz S; Jobst, Bertram; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Hinz, Ulf; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Böckler, Dittmar

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to identify independent factors correlating to an increased risk of perioperative stroke during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective maintained TEVAR database, medical records, and imaging studies of 300 patients (205 men; median age of all, 66 years, range 21-89), who underwent TEVAR between March 1997 and February 2011, were reviewed. Preoperative CT data sets were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with focus on the atheroma burden in the aortic arch (grade I, normal, to grade V, ulcerated or pedunculated atheroma). Aortic arch geometry (arch types I-III) was documented. Further parameters included in the univariate analysis were age, gender, urgency of repair, duration of procedure, adenosine-induced cardiac arrest or rapid pacing, proximal landing zone, left subclavian artery (LSA) coverage, and number of stent grafts. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the independent correlations of potential risk factors. Atherosclerotic aneurysm was the most common pathology (44%). One hundred and fifty-four of our patients (51%) were treated under urgent or emergent conditions. Seventeen percent of all patients had significant arch atheroma (grade IV or V), and 43% had a steep type III aortic arch. The perioperative stroke was 4% (12 patients; median age, 73 years, range 31-78). Two strokes were lethal (0.7%). All strokes were classified as embolic based on imaging characteristics. In eight patients, strokes were located in the left cerebral hemisphere (seven of them in the anterior and one in the posterior circulation). Four stroke patients (one in the left posterior circulation) underwent LSA coverage without revascularization. Three stroke patients had severe arch atheroma grade V. Five patients suffering stroke were recognized to have a type III aortic arch. Strokes were equally distributed between zones 0-2 vs. 3-4 (n = 6 each, 5 vs. 3.3%). The highest incidence was found in zone 1 (11

  1. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Interventions: After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. Outcomes: The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. Lessons: TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size. PMID:29703033

  2. A geometric reappraisal of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair according to aortic arch types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrocco-Trischitta, Massimiliano M.; de Beaufort, Hector W.; Secchi, Francesco; van Bakel, Theodorus M.; Ranucci, Marco; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Moll, Frans L.; Trimarchi, Santi

    Objective: This study assessed whether the additional use of the aortic arch classification in type I, II, and III may complement Ishimaru's aortic arch map and provide valuable information on the geometry and suitability of proximal landing zones for thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods:

  3. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rakesh P., E-mail: rpatel9@nhs.net [Northwick Park Hospital, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom); Katsargyris, Athanasios, E-mail: kthanassos@yahoo.com; Verhoeven, Eric L. G., E-mail: Eric.Verhoeven@klinikum-nuernberg.de [Klinikum Nuernberg, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany); Adam, Donald J., E-mail: donald.adam@tiscali.co.uk [Heartlands Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Hardman, John A., E-mail: johnhardman@doctors.org.uk [Royal United Hospital Bath, Department of Vascular Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  4. Geometric Deformations of the Thoracic Aorta and Supra-Aortic Arch Branch Vessels Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Hirotsu, Kelsey; Zhu, David; Lee, Jason T; Dake, Michael D; Fleischmann, Dominik; Cheng, Christopher P

    2018-04-01

    To utilize 3-D modeling techniques to better characterize geometric deformations of the supra-aortic arch branch vessels and descending thoracic aorta after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients underwent endovascular repair of either type B aortic dissection (n = 10) or thoracic aortic aneurysm (n = 8). Computed tomography angiography was obtained pre- and postprocedure, and 3-D geometric models of the aorta and supra-aortic branch vessels were constructed. Branch angle of the supra-aortic branch vessels and curvature metrics of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and stented thoracic aortic lumen were calculated both at pre- and postintervention. The left common carotid artery branch angle was lower than the left subclavian artery angles preintervention ( P Supra-aortic branch vessel angulation remains relatively static when proximal landing zones are distal to the left common carotid artery.

  5. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, I-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang; Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  6. Factors Affecting Optimal Aortic Remodeling After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Type B (IIIb) Aortic Dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Chen, Po-Lin; Huang, Chun-Yang [National Yang Ming University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine (China); Weng, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Wei-Yuan; Shih, Chun-Che, E-mail: ccshih@vghtpe.gov.tw [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine (China)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with entire aortic remodeling after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with type B dissection.Materials and MethodsThe patients with type B (IIIb) dissections who underwent TEVAR from 2006 to 2013 with minimum of 2 years of follow-up computed tomography data were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the status of false lumen remodeling of entire aorta, patients were divided into three groups: complete regression, total thrombosis, and inadequate regression with patent abdominal false lumen.ResultsA total of 90 patients (72 males, 18 females; mean age 56.6 ± 16.4 years) were included and divided into the complete regression (n = 22), total thrombosis (n = 18), and inadequate regression (n = 50) groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that dissection extension to iliac arteries, increased preoperative number of dissection tear over abdominal aorta, and decreased preoperative abdominal aorta bifurcation true lumen ratio, as compared between the inadequate and complete regression groups, were associated with a persistent false lumen (odds ratio = 33.33, 2.304, and 0.021; all, p ≤ 0.012). Comparison of 6, 12, and 24 months postoperative data revealed no significant differences at any level, suggesting that the true lumen area ratio might not change after 6 months postoperatively.ConclusionsIncreased preoperative numbers of dissection tear around the abdominal visceral branches, dissection extension to the iliac arteries, and decreased preoperative true lumen area ratio of abdominal aorta are predictive of entire aortic remodeling after TEVAR in patients with type B dissection.Level of EvidenceIII.

  7. Outcomes of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Andres; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie; Durgin, Jonathan; Aiello, Francesco A; Doucet, Danielle; Steppacher, Robert; Messina, Louis M

    2017-09-01

    More than 80% of infrarenal aortic aneurysms are treated by endovascular repair. However, adoption of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair for complex aortic aneurysms has been limited, despite high morbidity and mortality associated with open repair. There are few published reports of consecutive outcomes, inclusive of all fenestrated and branched endovascular repairs, starting from the inception of a complex aortic aneurysm program. Therefore, we examined a single center's consecutive experience of fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. This is a single-center, prospective, observational cohort study evaluating 30-day and 1-year outcomes in all consecutive patients who underwent fenestrated and branched endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms (definition: requiring one or more fenestrations or branches). Data were collected prospectively through an Institutional Review Board-approved registry and a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption clinical trial (G130210). We performed 100 consecutive complex endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs (November 2010 to March 2016) using 58 (58%) commercially manufactured custom-made devices and 42 (42%) physician-modified devices to treat 4 (4%) common iliac, 42 (42%) juxtarenal, 18 (18%) pararenal, and 36 (36%) thoracoabdominal aneurysms (type I, n = 1; type II, n = 4; type III, n = 12; type IV, n = 18; arch, n = 1). The repairs included 309 fenestrations, branches, and scallops (average of 3.1 branch arteries/case). All patients had 30-day follow-up for 30-day event rates: three (3%) deaths; six (6%) target artery occlusions; five (5%) progressions to dialysis; eight (8%) access complications; one (1%) paraparesis; one (1%) bowel ischemia; and no instances of myocardial infarction, paralysis, or stroke. Of 10 type I or type III endoleaks, 8 resolved (7 with secondary intervention, 1 without intervention). Mean follow-up time was 563 days (interquartile range

  8. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair using physician-modified endovascular grafts versus company-manufactured devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossabhoy, Shernaz S; Simons, Jessica P; Flahive, Julie M; Aiello, Francesco A; Sheth, Parth; Arous, Edward J; Messina, Louis M; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-12-07

    Fenestrated endografts are customized, patient-specific endovascular devices with potential to reduce morbidity and mortality of complex aortic aneurysm repair. With approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, our center began performing fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair through a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption (IDE #G130210), using both physician-modified endografts (PMEGs) and company-manufactured devices (CMDs). Because these techniques are associated with specific advantages and disadvantages, we sought to investigate differences in outcomes between PMEG and CMD cases. A single-institution retrospective review of all fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repairs was performed. The cohort was analyzed by device type (PMEG or CMD) after matching of cases on the basis of (1) number of target vessels intended for treatment, (2) extent of aneurysm, (3) aneurysm diameter, (4) device configuration, and (5) date of operation. Outcomes of ruptures, common iliac artery aneurysms, and aortic arch aneurysms were excluded. Demographics, operative details, perioperative complications, length of stay, and reinterventions were compared. For patients with >1 year of follow-up time, survival, type I or type III endoleak rate, target artery patency, and reintervention rate were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Between November 30, 2010, and July 30, 2016, 82 patients were identified and matched. The cohort included 41 PMEG and 41 CMD patients who underwent repair of 38 juxtarenal (PMEG, 17; CMD, 21; P = .38), 14 pararenal (PMEG, 6; CMD, 8; P = .56), and 30 thoracoabdominal type I to type IV (PMEG, 18; CMD, 12; P = .17) aneurysms. There were significant differences in presentation requiring urgent aneurysm repair (PMEG, 9; CMD, 0; P = .002), total fluoroscopy time (PMEG, 76 minutes; CMD, 61 minutes; P = .02), volume of contrast material used (PMEG, 88 mL; CMD, 70 mL; P = .02), in-operating room to out-of-operating room time

  9. Radiation Exposure in Endovascular Infra-Renal Aortic Aneurysm Repair and Factors that Influence It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The endovascular repair of aortic abdominal aneurysms exposes the patients and surgical team to ionizing radiation with risk of direct tissue damage and induction of gene mutation. This study aims to describe our standard of radiation exposure in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and the factors that influence it. Methods: Retrospective analysis of a prospective database of patients with abdominal infra-renal aortic aneurysms submitted to endovascular repair. This study evaluated the radiation doses (dose area product (DAP, fluoroscopy durations and their relationships to the patients, aneurysms, and stent-graft characteristics. Results: This study included 127 patients with a mean age of 73 years. The mean DAP was 4.8 mGy.m2, and the fluoroscopy time was 21.8 minutes. Aortic bilateral iliac aneurysms, higher body mass index, aneurysms with diameters larger than 60 mm, necks with diameters larger than 28 mm, common iliac arteries with diameters larger than 20 mm, and neck angulations superior to 50 degrees were associated with an increased radiation dose. The number of anatomic risk factors present was associated with increased radiation exposure and fluoroscopy time, regardless of the anatomical risk factors. Conclusion: The radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is significant (mean DAP 4.8 mGy.m2 with potential hazards to the surgical team and the patients. The anatomical characteristics of the aneurysm, patient characteristics, and the procedure's technical difficulty were all related to increased radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair procedures. Approximately 40% of radiation exposure can be explained by body mass index, neck angulation, aneurysm diameter, neck diameter, and aneurysm type.

  10. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  11. Statin use is associated with reduced all-cause mortality after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Visser, P.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.; Harris, P.L.; Blankensteijn, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that preoperative statin therapy reduces all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing major noncardiac vascular surgery. In this report, we investigated the influence of statin use on early and late outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

  12. Outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walschot, L.H.B.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the frequencies of complications and risk factors for complications following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR). METHODS: Thirty-nine articles published between October 1995 and October 1999 in English, German, French, or Dutch were identified in

  13. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  14. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. Copyright 2010 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar, E-mail: kamranm@mir.wustl.edu; Fowler, Kathryn J., E-mail: fowlerk@mir.wustl.edu; Mellnick, Vincent M., E-mail: mellnickv@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Sicard, Gregorio A., E-mail: sicard@wudosis.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery (United States); Narra, Vamsi R., E-mail: narrav@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR.

  16. Extra-Thoracic Supra-aortic Bypass Surgery Is Safe in Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Arterial Occlusive Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombert, Alexander; van Issum, Lea; Barbati, Mohammad E; Grommes, Jochen; Keszei, Andras; Kotelis, Drosos; Jalaie, Houman; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael J; Kalder, Johannes

    2018-04-20

    The safety and feasibility of supra-aortic debranching as part of endovascular aortic surgery or as a treatment option for arterial occlusive disease (AOD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of this surgery. This single centre, retrospective study included 107 patients (mean age 69.2 years, 38.4% women) who underwent supra-aortic bypass surgery (carotid-subclavian bypass, carotid-carotid bypass, and carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass) because of thoracic or thoraco-abdominal endovascular aortic repair (57%; 61/107) or as AOD treatment (42.9%; 46/107) between January 2006 and January 2015. Mortality, morbidity with a focus on neurological complications, and patency rate were assessed. Twenty-six of 107 (14.2%) of the debranching patients were treated under emergency conditions because of acute type B dissection or symptomatic aneurysm. Follow up, conducted by imaging interpretation and telephone interviews, continued till March 2017 (mean 42.1, 0-125, months). The in hospital mortality rate was 10.2% (11/107), all of these cases from the debranching group and related to emergency procedures (p supra-aortic bypass surgery involves low complication rates and high mid-term bypass patency rates. It is a safe and feasible treatment option in the form of debranching in combination with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and in AOD. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta.

  18. A case of acute ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorios Voulalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic ischemia is a recognized complication of either open or endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. The clinical difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, the severity of this complication and the patient's poor physiological status may lead to a fatal outcome. We presented a case of ischemic colitis in a patient with patent hypogastric arteries that occurred after an endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair as well as a review of the available literature. The patient's preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative data were recorded. A thorough search through the Google data and Medline to review similar cases or any analyses that referred to ischemic colitis after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair was conducted. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our department for an elective endovascular repair of an 8 cm in diameter abdominal aortic aneurysm. A Zenith bifurcation graft was implanted. The whole procedure was uneventful and the final angiogram showed an accurate deployment of the endograft without endoleaks and patency of both hypogastric arteries. During the 1st postoperative day, the patient developed symptoms of acute abdomen in combination with metabolic acidosis and oliguria. He underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed necrosis of the sigmoid. A Hartmann's procedure was performed; the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where he deceased after 24 h. Postoperative ischemic colitis has been described after open abdominal aneurysm repair. The description of this complication has been reported since the early phase of endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair development with a current incidence of 1.5%–3.0%. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to ischemic colitis in spite of the presence of patent hypogastric arteries include atheroembolization, shock, vasopressive drugs and inferior mesenteric artery occlusion.

  19. Intensive Care Management of Thoracic Aortic Surgical Patients, Including Thoracic and Infradiaphragmatic Endovascular Repair (EVAR/TEVAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sheela Pai

    2015-12-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic disease can present for open or endovascular repair. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a minimally invasive option for a multitude of aortic pathology, including dissections, aneurysms, traumatic injuries, and ulcers. Postoperative management of these patients depends on the extent of procedure, whether it was open or endovascular, and, finally, on the preoperative comorbidities present. While procedural success has catapulted TEVAR to popularity, midterm results have been mixed. Additionally, periprocedural complications such as paraplegia and renal failure remain a significant morbidity in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Endovascular Retrieval of Entrapped Elephant Trunk Graft During Complex Hybrid Aortic Arch Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damodharan, Karthikeyan, E-mail: drdkarthik@hotmail.com [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Chao, Victor T. T., E-mail: victor.chao.t.t@singhealth.com.sg [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Singapore); Tay, Kiang Hiong, E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@singhealth.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-12-15

    Entrapment of the elephant trunk graft within the false lumen is a rare complication of surgical repair of an aortic dissection. This is normally retrieved by emergent open surgery. We describe a technique of endovascular retrieval of the dislodged graft, during hybrid aortic arch repair. The elephant trunk was cannulated through and through from a femoral access and the free end of the wire was snared and retrieved from a brachial access. The wire was externalised from both accesses and was used to reposition the graft into the true lumen using a body flossing technique.

  1. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Single Center Experience in 122 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yun Young; Song, Jang Hyeon; Kim, Yong Tae; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Ho Kyun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2013-01-01

    To analyze a single center experience of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Results of 122 patients who underwent EVAR were analyzed, retrospectively. Sex, age, aneurysmal morphology, hostile neck anatomy, preprocedural and postprocedural sac-diameter, technical and clinical success, postprocedural complication and need of additional procedure were analyzed. A total of 111 male and 11 female patients were included. Morphology of the aneurysms was as follows: fusiform (n = 108), saccular (n = 3) and ruptured type (n = 11). Sixty-four patients had hostile neck anatomy. The preprocedural mean sac-diameter was 52.4 mm. Postprocedural sac-diameter was decreased or stable in 110 patients (90.2%) and increased in 8 patients (6.6%). Technical success rate was 100% and clinical success rate was 86.1%. Fifty-one patients showed endoleak (41.8%) and 15 patients (12.3%) underwent secondary intervention due to type I endoleak (n = 4), type II endoleak (n = 4) and stent-graft thrombosis (n = 7). EVAR is a safe and effective therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and it has high technical success and clinical success rate, and low complication rate.

  2. Endovascular repair of early rupture of Dacron aortic graft--two case reports.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, Sherif

    2005-01-01

    Complications after open aortic surgery pose a challenge both to the vascular surgeon and the patient because of aging population, widespread use of cardiac revascularization, and improved survival after aortic surgery. The perioperative mortality rate for redo elective aortic surgery ranges from 5% to 29% and increases to 70-100% in emergency situation. Endovascular treatment of the postaortic open surgery (PAOS) patient has fewer complications and a lower mortality rate in comparison with redo open surgical repair. Two cases of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were managed with the conventional open surgical repair. Subsequently, spiral contrast computer tomography scans showed reperfusion of the AAA sac remnant mimicking a type III endoleak. These graft-related complications presented as vascular emergencies, and in both cases endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedure was performed successfully by aortouniiliac (AUI) stent graft and femorofemoral crossover bypass. These 2 patients add further merit to the cases reported in the English literature. This highlights the crucial importance of endovascular grafts in the management of such complex vascular problems.

  3. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  4. Comparison of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woong Chol; Ko, Young-Guk; Shin, Eak Kyun; Park, Chul-Hyun; Choi, Donghoon; Youn, Young Nam; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-15

    To compare the outcomes of hybrid endovascular and open surgical repair for proximal aortic arch diseases. A total of 55 consecutive patients with aortic arch aneurysm or aortic dissection involving any of zone 0 to 1 (39 male, age 63.4 ± 14.3 years) underwent a hybrid endovascular repair (n=35) or open surgical repair (n=20) from 2006 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Perioperative and late outcomes were compared. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, except age and EuroSCORE II, which were higher in the hybrid group. Perioperative mortality or stroke was not significantly different between the two groups, however, tended to be lower in the hybrid repair group than in the open repair group (11.4% vs. 30.0%, p=0.144). Incidences of other morbidities did not differ. During follow-up, over-all survival was similar between the hybrid and the open repair was similar (87.3% vs. 79.7% at 1 year and 83.8% vs. 72.4% at 3 years; p=0.319). However, reintervention-free survival was significantly lower for hybrid repair compared with open repair (83.8% vs. 100% at 1 year and 65.7% vs. 100% at 3 years; p=0.022). Hybrid repair of proximal aortic disease showed comparable perioperative and late outcomes compared with open surgical repair despite a higher reintervention rate during follow-up. Therefore, hybrid repair may be considered as an acceptable treatment alternative to surgery especially in patients at high surgical risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Can an accessory renal artery be safely covered during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair?

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniou, George A.; Karkos, Christos D.; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Georgiadis, George S.

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether coverage of an accessory renal artery (ARA) in patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of renal impairment. Altogether, 106 papers were located using the reported searches, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, patient group studied, rel...

  6. A multidetector tomography protocol for follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Moraes Bastos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to improve the use of 64-channel multidetector computed tomography using lower doses of ionizing radiation during follow-up procedures in a series of patients with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. METHODS: Thirty patients receiving 5 to 29 months of follow-up after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed using a 64-channel multidetector computed tomography device by an exam that included pre-and postcontrast with both arterial and venous phases. Leak presence and type were classified based on the exam phase. RESULTS: Endoleaks were identified in 8/30 of cases; the endoleaks in 3/8 of these cases were not visible in the arterial phases of the exams. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that multidetector computed tomography with pre-contrast and venous phases should be a part of the ongoing follow-up of patients undergoing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The arterial phase can be excluded when the aneurism is stable or regresses. These findings permit a lower radiation dose without jeopardizing the correct diagnosis of an endoleak.

  7. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-04-01

    To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size.

  8. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  9. Contemporary economic and clinical evaluations of endovascular repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silingardi, Roberto; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Giovanni; Chester, Johanna; Marcheselli, Luigi; Brunetti, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess clinical and contemporary costs associated with elective endovascular repair of intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA) into the mid-term follow-up. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained clinical database including 29 consecutive patients from July 2005 to December 2009 treated with elective endovascular repair (TEVAR) or TEVAR and surgical infrarenal repair (hybrid) of intact DTAA was performed. Mean age was 74.5 years old (±7.1). Primary clinical endpoints include mortality and major morbidity. Additionally a comprehensive economic appraisal of individual in-hospital and follow-up costs was executed. Economic endpoints include in-hospital and follow-up costs and patient discharge status. Elective endovascular and open repairs' clinical and economical outcomes in contemporary literature were assessed for comparison according to PRISMA standards. Immediate mortality was 6.9% (1/24 TEVAR and 1/5 hybrid). Three respiratory complications were recorded (11%; 2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid). Renal and cardiac complication rates were 7.4% (1 TEVAR, 1 hybrid) and 3.7% (1 TEVAR) respectively. Routine discharge home was achieved for 85% of patients (95.7% TEVAR, 25% hybrid). Three endoleaks were treated throughout the follow-up (2 TEVAR, 1 hybrid; mean 30.4 mo, ±19.9) rendering an 11% (3/27) reintervention rate. Average immediate cost was €21,976.87 for elective endovascular repair and €33,783.21 for elective endovascular hybrid repair. Additional reintervention and routine follow-up costs augmented immediate costs by 12.4%. This study supports satisfying immediate clinical outcomes for TEVAR and TEVAR+surgical infrarenal procedures. Although limited by a small population size and difficulties in economic comparisons, this study presents the real world social and economic cost scenario for both elective TEVAR and TEVAR hybrid treatment of DTAA of both the in-hospital and at mid term follow-up periods.

  10. The effect of endograft device on patient outcomes in endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Objective Endovascular aneurysm repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is being increasingly applied as the intervention of choice. The purpose of this study was to determine whether survival and reintervention rates after ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm vary between endograft devices. Methods This cohort study identified all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms performed at The Ottawa Hospital from January 1999 to May 2015. Data collected included patient demographics, stability index at presentation, adherence to device instructions for use, endoleaks, reinterventions, and mortality. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare outcomes between groups. Mortality outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and multivariate Cox regression modeling. Results One thousand sixty endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed using nine unique devices. Ninety-six ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms were performed using three devices: Cook Zenith ( n = 46), Medtronic Endurant ( n = 33), and Medtronic Talent ( n = 17). The percent of patients presented in unstable or extremis condition was 30.2, which did not differ between devices. Overall 30-day mortality was 18.8%, and was not statistically different between devices ( p = 0.16), although Medtronic Talent had markedly higher mortality (35.3%) than Cook Zenith (15.2%) and Medtronic Endurant (15.2%). AUI configuration was associated with increased 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.02). Long-term mortality and graft-related reintervention rates at 30 days and 5 years were similar between devices. Instructions for use adherence was similar across devices, but differed between the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and elective endovascular aneurysm repair cohorts (47.7% vs. 79.0%, p 30 days post-endovascular aneurysm repair ( p = 0.01). Type 1 endoleak rates differed significantly across devices (Cook Zenith 0.0%, Medtronic Endurant 18.2%, Medtronic Talent 17.6%, p = 0

  11. Hybrid Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Preservation of Pelvic Perfusion with External to Internal Iliac Artery Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansukhani, Neel A; Havelka, George E; Helenowski, Irene B; Rodriguez, Heron E; Hoel, Andrew W; Eskandari, Mark K

    2017-07-01

    Diminished pelvic arterial flow as a result of intentional coverage/embolization of internal iliac arteries (IIA) during isolated endovascular common iliac artery aneurysm (CIAA) repair or endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) may result in symptomatic pelvic ischemia. Although generally well tolerated, in severe cases, pelvic ischemia may manifest as recalcitrant buttock claudication, vasculogenic impotence, or perineal, vesicle, rectal, and/or spinal cord ischemia. Branched graft technology has recently become available; however, many patients are not candidates for endovascular repair with these devices. Therefore, techniques to preserve pelvic arterial flow are needed. We reviewed our outcomes of isolated endovascular CIAA repair or EVAR in conjunction with unilateral external-internal iliac artery bypass. Single-center, retrospective review of 10 consecutive patients who underwent hybrid endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) or CIAA repair with concomitant external-internal iliac artery bypass between 2006 and 2015. Demographics, index procedural details, postoperative symptoms, hospital length of stay (LOS), follow-up imaging, and bypass patency were recorded. The cohort of 10 patients was all men with a mean age of 71 years (range: 56-84). Hybrid repair consisted of contralateral IIA coil embolization followed by EVAR with external iliac artery-internal iliac artery (EIA-IIA) bypass. All EIA-IIA bypasses were performed via a standard lower quadrant retroperitoneal approach with a prosthetic bypass graft. Technical success was 100%, and there were no perioperative deaths. One patient developed transient paraplegia, 1 patient had buttock claudication on the side of his hypogastric embolization contralateral to his iliac bypass, and 1 developed postoperative impotence. 20% of patients sustained long-term complications (buttock claudication and postoperative impotence). Mean LOS was 2.8 days (range: 1-9 days). Postoperative imaging

  12. Comparison of Total Arch and Partial Arch Transposition During Hybrid Endovascular Repair for Aortic Arch Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W C; Ko, Y-G; Oh, P C; Shin, E K; Park, C-H; Choi, D; Youn, Y N; Lee, D Y

    2016-08-01

    Total arch transposition (TAT) during hybrid endovascular repair for aortic arch disease is believed to allow a better landing zone, but also to be associated with higher peri-operative mortality than partial arch transposition (PAT). Information on this issue is limited. This study was a retrospective analysis. All 53 consecutive patients with aortic arch disease (41 males, mean age 65.0 years) who underwent hybrid endovascular repair with TAT (zone 0, n=20) or PAT (zone 1 or 2, n=33) from 2008 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The peri-operative and late outcomes of these two groups were compared. Baseline characteristics, including EuroSCORE II results, were similar in the two groups. After procedures, peri-operative mortalities and stroke rates were similar in the two groups (5.0% vs. 9.1%, p=1.000, and 10.0% vs. 6.1%, p=.627). Interestingly, all four strokes occurred in patients with a type III aortic arch irrespective of transposition type. Primary success rates (80.0% vs. 69.7%, p=.527) and type I endoleak incidences (20.0% vs. 27.3%, p=.744) were not significantly different. During follow up (mean duration 36.9 months), overall survival (89.7% vs. 87.4% at 1 year and 89.7% vs. 79.3% at 3 years; p=.375) and re-intervention free survival rates (78.6% vs. 92.0% at 1 year; 72.0% vs. 62.2% at 3 years, p=.872) were similar in the two groups. Morbidity and mortality were high within the first year of hybrid endovascular therapy for aortic arch disease, implying that candidates for hybrid procedures need to be selected carefully. Hybrid endovascular repair with TAT was found to have peri-operative mortality, stroke, and long-term survival rates comparable with PAT, so hybrid endovascular repair may be considered, irrespective of type of arch reconstruction, when clinically indicated. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intentional left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair for traumatic aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Cameron L; Dubose, Joseph J; Miller, Charles C; Perlick, Alexa P; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is widely used for treatment of traumatic aortic injury (TAI). Stent graft coverage of the left subclavian artery (LSA) may be required in up to 40% of patients. We evaluated the long-term effects of intentional LSA coverage (LSAC) on symptoms and return to normal activity in TAI patients compared with a similarly treated group whose LSA was uncovered (LSAU). Patients were identified from a prospective institutional trauma registry between September 2005 and July 2012. TAI was confirmed using computed tomography angiography. The electronic medical records, angiograms, and computed tomography angiograms were reviewed in a retrospective fashion. In-person or telephone interviews were conducted using the SF-12v2 (Quality Metrics, Lincoln, RI) to assess quality of life. An additional questionnaire was used to assess specific LSA symptoms and the ability to return to normal activities. Data were analyzed by Spearman rank correlation and multiple linear and logistic regression analysis with appropriate transformations using SAS software (SAS Institute, Cary, NC). During the study period, 82 patients (57 men; mean age 40.5 ± 20 years, mean Injury Severity Score, 34 ± 10.0) underwent TEVAR for treatment of TAI. Among them, LSAC was used in 32 (39.5%) and LSAU in 50. A group of the LSAU patients (n = 22) served as matched controls in the analysis. We found no statistically significant difference in SF-12v2 physical health scores (ρ = -0.08; P = .62) between LSAC and LSAU patients. LSAC patients had slightly better mental health scores (ρ = 0.62; P = .037) than LSAU patients. LSAC patients did not have an increased likelihood of experiencing pain (ρ = -0.0056; P = .97), numbness (ρ = -0.12; P = .45), paresthesia (ρ = -0.11; P = .48), fatigue (ρ = -0.066; P = .69), or cramping (ρ = -0.12; P = .45). We found no difference between groups in the ability to return to activities. The mean follow-up time was 3.35 years. Six LSAC

  14. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) procedures: counterbalancing the benefits with the costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Giannoukas, Athanasios D; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2010-05-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) is associated with lower 30-day mortality rates compared with open repair. Despite that, there are no significant differences in mortality rates between the two procedures at 2 years. On the other hand, EVAR is associated with considerably higher costs compared with open repair. The lack of significant long-term differences between the two procedures together with the substantially higher cost of EVAR may question the appropriateness of EVAR as an alternative to open surgical repair in patients fit for surgery. With several thousands of AAA procedures performed worldwide, the employment of EVAR for the management of all AAAs irrespective of the patient's surgical risk may hold implications for several national health economies. The lower perioperative mortality and morbidity rates associated with EVAR should thus be counterbalanced against the considerable costs of these procedures.

  15. Successful Aortic Banding for Type IA Endoleak Due to Neck Dilatation after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashima, Yasushi; Tamai, Koichi; Shirasugi, Takehiro; Sato, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo; Kobinata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-25

    A 69-year-old man with a type IA endoleak that developed approximately 21 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) of a 46 mm diameter aneurysm was referred to our department. He had impaired renal function, Parkinson's disease, and previous cerebral infarction. Computed tomography angiography showed a type IA endoleak with neck dilatation and that the aneurysm had grown to 60 mm in diameter. We decided to perform aortic banding. The type IA endoleak disappeared after banding and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. Aortic banding may be effective for type IA endoleak after EVAR and less invasive for high-risk patients in particular.

  16. Zone zero thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A proposed modification to the classification of landing zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Eric E; Idrees, Jay J; Johnston, Douglas R; Eagleton, Matthew J; Desai, Milind Y; Svensson, Lars G

    2018-04-01

    Endovascular stent-grafting provides an alternative treatment option for high-risk patients with ascending aortic disease. The feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated before. We assess the updated experience with ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair and propose a modification of the landing zone classification based on the outcomes. From 2006 to 2016, 39 patients deemed very high risk for open replacement underwent endovascular repair of ascending aorta for acute type A dissection (12, 31%), intramural hematoma (2, 5%), pseudoaneurysm (22, 56%), and chronic dissection suture line entry tear (3, 8%). Ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair was performed in 36 patients. In 3 patients with pseudoaneurysm, occluder devices were used. Computed tomography imaging analysis was performed, and the extent of aortic pathology was designated by segmental proximity to the left ventricle. Segmental anatomy of the proximal aorta was designed as zone 0A from the annulus to the distal margin of highest coronary, 0B extends from above the coronary to the distal margin of right pulmonary artery, and 0C extends from the right pulmonary artery border to the innominate artery. Multivariable time to event Cox regression analysis was performed to predict mortality, and long-term survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Operative mortality was 13%; all 5 deaths occurred after emergency ascending thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type A dissection. Other complications included stroke in 4 patients (10%), myocardial infarction in 2 patients (5%), tracheostomy in 2 patients (5%), and dialysis in 2 patients (5%). In patients with acute type A dissection, the ascending pathology extended into zone 0A in 10 (71%) and 0B in 4 (29%). Among those with pseudoaneurysm, the location of the defect was in 0B in 11 (50%), 0C in 10 (45%), and 0A in 1. Among the patients with chronic dissection, the defect was located in 0C in all 3 (100%). After multivariable

  17. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio; Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  18. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  19. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, U.; Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M.; Sebastian, M.; Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L.

    2009-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  20. CT appearance of complications related to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR): a pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, U. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Tay, K.H.; Tan, B.S.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Sebastian, M. [Singapore General Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Singapore (Singapore); Sin, K.; Chua, Y.L. [National Heart Centre, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-05-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a recognized treatment for various diseases involving the thoracic aorta. Patients treated with TEVAR require lifelong surveillance for potential complications, with CT being highly utilized in most centres. Endoleak is the most common complication and can be detected using CT. However, other complications such as stent strut perforations and end organ ischemia can also be detected on CT. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of post-TEVAR complications encountered in our institution and to highlight their significance. (orig.)

  1. Survival affects decision making for fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jocelyn M; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Parodi, F Ezequiel; Kuramochi, Yuki; Brier, Corey; Blackstone, Eugene; Eagleton, Matthew J

    2018-03-01

    Repair options for complex abdominal and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAAs) are evolving with increased experience and availability of less invasive endovascular techniques. Identifying risk factors for mortality after fenestrated and branched endovascular aortic repair (F/B-EVAR) could improve patient selection and facilitate decision making regarding who may benefit from prophylactic F/B-EVAR. We evaluated 1091 patients in a prospective investigational device exemption trial who underwent F/B-EVAR from August 2001 to June 2015 for complex aortic aneurysms (CAAs). Multivariable analysis of risk factors for death was performed using a nonproportional hazards model and a nonparametric analysis using random survival forest technology. Operative mortality after F/B-EVAR was low (3.7%), with high CAA-related survival at 30 day and 5 years (96.8% and 94.0%, respectively). All-cause 5-year survival, however, was 46.2% and older age, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, renal disease, anemia, and coagulation disorders were risk factors. Risk was highest for those undergoing type I/II TAAA repairs and those with larger aneurysms. Patients with multiple comorbidities and those undergoing type I or II TAAA repair are at greatest risk of mortality; however, in this high-risk population, F/B-EVAR offers greater survival compared with that reported for the natural history of untreated aneurysms. Operative and early mortality is lower than the best-reported open repair outcomes, even in this high-risk population, suggesting a potential benefit in extending the use of F/B-EVAR to low-to-average risk CAA patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Outcomes of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Chang, Guangqi; Yin, Henghui; Yao, Chen; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Shenming

    2015-11-01

    To summarize the experience of endovascular repairing aortic arch disease hybrid with supra-arch debranching procedures. It was a retrospective study. From January 2002 to December 2014, 42 high risk patients with aortic arch disease were treated by supra-arch debranching hybrid with subsequent endovascular repair in the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University. There were 39 male and 3 female patients with a mean age of (53±13) years (ranging from 34 to 80 years). Of the 42 patients, 7 were thoracic aortic aneurysm, 20 were Stanford type B aortic dissection and 15 were Stanford type A aortic dissection. After the supra-aortic debranching technique, simultaneous (n=16) or staged (n=26, mean interval (7±3) days) endovascular repair were performed. Fisher exact test was used to compare the in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching and non-ascending aorta based debranching. Technical success rate was 81.0% (34/42). The overall 30-day complication rate was 31.0% (13/42), including 3 cerebral stroke (7.1%), 8 endoleak (19.0%, including 6 type I endoleak and 2 type II endoleak), 1 circulatory failure, 1 aorto-tracheal fistula. The 30-day mortality was 9.5% (4/42), 2 died of cerebral stroke, 1 died of circulatory failure, 1 died of aorto-tracheal fistula. The in-hospital mortality of ascending aorta based debranching group was obviously higher than that of the non-ascending aorta based debranching group (4/16 vs. 0, P=0.02). The median time of follow-up was 64.8 (2 to 156.9) months. CT scanning was performed at 1, 3 months after surgery and annually thereafter. The overall survival rate was 76.6%. During the follow-up period, there was 4 deaths, and 2 of them were aortic artery related (5.3%). There were 4 de novo complications during the follow-up period, 1 stroke attributed to bypass occlusion was cured by medical treatment, 2 pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated with open surgery, 1 stent-graft induced new distal entry tear was

  3. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverberg, Daniel; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft

  5. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, Daniel, E-mail: silverberg-d@msn.com; Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe [The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, The Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  6. The imaging assessment and specific endograft design for the endovascular repair of ascending aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-07-01

    (10.4%, 22 (45.9%, 13 (27.1%, six (12.5%, and two (4.2% patients, respectively. Conclusion: In this selected number of Chinese patients, the suitability of endovascular repair has been demonstrated based on the CT imaging. Shorter, larger, and bare spring-free conical endografts were preferred in the ascending aortic pathology. Keywords: type A dissection, endovascular, endograft, design

  7. Endovascular treatment of type II endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm: Case report of squeeze technique to reach the aneurysmal sac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Song, Seung Hwan; Lee, Chung Won; Chung, Sung Woon [Pusan National University Hospital, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Type II endoleaks are common after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Various strategies are introduced to manage type II endoleaks, such as the use of coils, plugs, or liquid embolic agents (histoacryl, thrombin, onyx, etc.) through a transarterial approach or a direct puncture of the aneurysmal sac. We herein report a case of a type II endoleak caused by reverse blood flow through intercostal artery after TEVAR which was successfully treated with n-butyl cyanoacrylate (histoacryl)-lipiodol mixture by a squeeze technique to reach the aneurismal sac using a microcatheter.

  8. [Midterm results of thoracic aortic dissection endovascular repair in conjunctions with the location of Adamkiewicz artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ying-bin; Li, Jian; Su, Yong-hui; Ma, Jie-fei; Guan, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Bai-meng

    2012-10-23

    To evaluate the effects of using longer xenografts in conjunctions with the location of Adamkiewicz artery (AKA) on midterm outcomes of endovascular treatment for thoracic aortic dissection. From March 2005 to September 2011, 217 patients with type B dissection were recruited. There were 143 males and 74 females with a mean age of 65 ± 11 years. Among them, 43 patients were from Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University while another 174 patients from Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University. They were divided into 2 groups according to whether AKA was identified or not pre-operatively. Endovascular repairs were performed for all patients. Distal landing levels of xenografts were recorded. The thrombosis of false lumen and the complications of spinal cord injury and endoleak were analyzed. AKA was detected in 121 (55.8%) patients (group A) but not in 96 (44.2%) patients (group B). According to the levels of AKA, the patients of group A obtained the stabilization of affected thoracic aorta over a longer distance. And the ratio of patients with distal landing levels at T8-T10 was significantly higher than in group B (59.5% vs 12.5%, χ² = 49.85, P < 0.01). Also, during the follow-up period of 7.3 months, the ratio of patients with total thrombosis of false lumen in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (32.1% vs 19.1%, χ² = 4.34, P < 0.05). During the endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection, selecting a longer device may provide a better structural stability of affected aorta and promote false lumen thrombosis.

  9. Endovascular repair or medical treatment of acute type B aortic dissection? A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemelli-Steingruber, I. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria)], E-mail: andreas.chemelli@i-med.ac.at; Strasak, A. [Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Hugl, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Hiemetzberger, R. [Department of Cardiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria); Jaschke, W.; Glodny, B.; Czermak, B.V. [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University (Austria)

    2010-01-15

    Introduction: The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the outcome of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to that of medical therapy in patients with acute type B aortic dissection (TBD). Materials and methods: From July 1996 to April 2008, 88 patients presenting with acute TBD underwent either TEVAR (group A, n = 38) or medical therapy (group B, n = 50). Indications for TEVAR were intractable pain, aortic branch compromise resulting in end-organ ischemia, rapid aortic dilatation and rupture. Follow-up was performed postinterventionally, at 3, 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter and included clinical examinations and computed tomography (CT), as well as aortic diameter measurements and assessment of thrombosis. Results: Mean follow-up was 33 months in group A and 36 months in group B. The overall mortality rate was 23.7% in group A and 24% in group B, where 4 patients died of late aortic rupture. In group A, complications included 9 endoleaks and 4 retrograde type A dissections, 3 patients were converted to open surgery and 2 needed secondary intervention. None of the patients developed paraplegia. In group B, 4 patients were converted to open surgery and 2 to TEVAR. The maximal aortic diameter increased in both groups. Regarding the extent of thrombosis, our analyses showed slightly better overall results after TEVAR, but they also showed a tendency towards approximation between the two groups during follow-up. Conclusion: TEVAR is a feasible treatment option in acute TBD. However, several serious complications may occur during and after TEVAR and it should therefore be reserved to patients with life-threatening symptoms.

  10. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  11. The repair of a type Ia endoleak following thoracic endovascular aortic repair using a stented elephant trunk procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Rui-Dong; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Chen, Lei; Li, Cheng-Nan; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Type Ia endoleaks are not uncommon complications that occur after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Because aortic arch vessels prevent extension of the landing zone, it is very difficult to manipulate a type Ia endoleak using an extension cuff or stent-graft, especially when the aortic arch is involved. Here, we retrospectively review our experience of surgical treatment of type Ia endoleak after TEVAR using a stented elephant trunk procedure. From July 2010 to August 2016, we treated 17 patients diagnosed with a type Ia endoleak following TEVAR using stented elephant trunk procedure. The mean age of our patients was 52 ± 8 years. The mean interval between TEVAR and the open surgical repair was 38 ± 43 months. All cases of type Ia endoleak (100%) were repaired successfully. There were no in-hospital deaths. One case required reintubation and continuous renal replacement therapy due to renal failure; this patient recovered smoothly before discharge. One other patient suffered a stroke and renal failure and did not fully recover following discharge, or follow-up. During follow-up, there were 3 deaths. Acceptable results were obtained using a stented elephant trunk procedure in patients with a type Ia endoleak after TEVAR. This technique allowed us to repair the proximal aortic arch lesions, surgically correct the type Ia endoleak, and promote false lumen thrombosis in the distal aorta. Implantation of a stented elephant trunk, with or without a concomitant aortic arch procedure, is an alternative approach for this type of lesion. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  13. Aortopulmonary Fistula Presenting without an Endoleak after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Sica

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the case of a 60-year-old man, a smoker with a history of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. After computed tomography (CT for an episode of hemoptysis, the patient underwent elective thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR because of a degenerative aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta. The area of perianeurysmal pulmonary atelectasis reported on the CT scan was not considered. Three months later, he developed an aortopulmonary fistula without endoleaks. Although TEVAR is a relatively safe procedure, no detail should be overlooked in the preoperative evaluation in order to avoid life-threatening complications. Further, the effectiveness and modality of prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis and/or preoperative respiratory physiotherapy should be assessed in such cases.

  14. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length 30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy

  15. Periprocedural and long-term outcomes of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in cardiology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoor, Abhijeet; Patel, Kiritkumar C; Halabi, Abdul R; Todorov, Mina; Senthilvadivel, Prashanth; Choksi, Nishit; Phan, Thanh; LaLonde, Thomas; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; DeGregorio, Michele

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has recently been made a class I indication in the treatment of AAA. In comparison to the conventional open surgical treatment, endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is associated with equivalent long-term morbidity and mortality rates. Vascular surgeons perform majority of EVAR. There are no reports for the long-term results of this intervention performed by interventional cardiologists. We present one of the first reports of periprocedural and long-term outcomes of EVAR performed by interventional cardiologists. Retrospective chart review on patients with attempted EVAR between September 2005 and January 2011 was performed. Included cases were all consecutive patients who had attempted EVAR by interventional cardiologists. During the study period EVAR was attempted in 170 patients, with 27% being women. The mean age was 74 years (range 52-93). The endovascular graft placement was successful in 96% (163/170) of patients. Procedure failures were more common in women (6 of 46 vs 1 of 124, P = 0.003). The 30-day mortality was 1.8 % (3 of 170). In patients with successful EVAR the mean follow-up was 30 months and mean length of hospital stay was 3.5 ± 3.2 days. Major periprocedural complications were noted in 9% patients (15 of 167). During follow-up, six patients (3.5%) required re-intervention and additional 16 patients died with no aneurysm related deaths. EVAR primarily performed by interventional cardiologists demonstrates high periprocedural and long-term success rates. A higher EVAR failure rate has been observed in women. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Outcome after open surgery repair in endovascular-suitable patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzien, Felix; Matia, Ivan; Wiltberger, Georg; Hau, Hans-Michael; Freitas, Bruno; Moche, Michael; Schmelzle, Moritz; Jonas, Sven; Fellmer, Peter T

    2013-11-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been suggested in several studies to be superior to open surgery repair (OSR) for the treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAAs), but this finding might be affected by selection bias based on aneurysm morphology and patient characteristics. We tested rAAA anatomy according to EVAR suitability in patients undergoing OSR to assess the impact on mortality. This retrospective analysis reports on 83 patients with rAAAs treated between November 2002 and July 2013. Pre-operative computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated based on EVAR suitability and were determined by blinded independent reviewers. CT scans were lacking due to acquisition in an external institution with no availability (n = 9) or solely ultrasound evaluations (n = 8). In addition patient characteristics and outcomes were assessed. All patients who underwent OSR and who had available preoperative CT scans were included in the study (n = 66). In summary, 42 % of the patients (28/66; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 30.5 - 54.4) were considered eligible for EVAR according to pre-operative CT scans and 58 % of the patients (38/66; 95 % CI, 45.6 - 69.5) were categorized as unsuitable for endovascular repair. Patients suitable for EVAR had a significantly lower prevalence of in-hospital deaths (25 % [7/28]; 95 % CI, 9 - 41) in contrast to patients unsuitable for EVAR (53 % [20/38]; 95 % CI, 36.8 - 68.5; p = 0.02). EVAR-suitable patients had a highly significant mortality reduction undergoing OSR. Thus, the present study proposes that EVAR suitability is a positive predictor for survival after open repair of rAAA.

  17. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair complicated by spondylodiscitis and iliaco-enteral fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, Heleen D; van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Pierie, Maurice E N; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2008-06-01

    Infections of abdominal aortic endografts are rare. There are no reports on the association with spondylodiscitis. We report a case of a 74-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and subsequently femorofemoral bypass placement due to occlusion of the right limb of the endograft. Six months later, he presented with rectal bleeding, weight loss, back pain, and low abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed extensive abscess formation with air in and around the endograft and psoas muscles, in continuity with destructive spondylodiscitis L3-4. There was a small bowel loop in close proximity to the occluded right leg of the endograft, which was filled with air bubbles. An axillofemoral bypass was created followed by a laparotomy. Intra-operatively, an iliaco-enteral fistula was found. The small bowel defect was sutured, the endograft completely removed, and the infrarenal aorta and both common iliac arteries were closed. Necrotic fragments of the former L3-4 disk were removed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seven months postoperatively, the patient had recovered well. Iliaco-enteric fistula and spondylodiscitis are rare complications of aortic aneurysm repair. This is the first report of spondylodiscitis after EVAR.

  18. Application of rapid artificial cardiac pacing in thoracic endovascular aortic repair in aged patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jun Chen,1,* Wenhui Huang,2,* Songyuan Luo,2,* Dahao Yang,1 Zhengrong Xu,1 Jianfang Luo21Department of Angiocardiopathy, Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen City, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To compare the safety, efficacy, and impact on stent graft positioning between rapid artificial cardiac pacing (RACP, induced hypotension and sodium nitroprusside (SNP induced hypotension during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR for Stanford B aortic dissection.Methods: One hundred and sixty-eight patients, who were diagnosed with Stanford B aortic dissection and who underwent selective TEVAR in Guangdong General Hospital and the People's Hospital of Baoan District, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China, were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided into a RACP group (n=77 and a SNP group (n=91. During localization and deployment of the stent graft, hypotension was induced by RACP or intravenous SNP, according to randomization. Hemodynamics, landing precision (deviation from planned placement site, duration of procedure, renal function, neurocognitive function, and incidence of endoleaks and paraplegia/hemiplegia were compared. Except for methods of inducing hypotension, TEVAR was performed according to the same protocol in each group.Results: RACP was successfully performed in all patients assigned to the RACP group. Compared with the SNP group, blood pressure was significantly lower (43±5 versus 81±6 mmHg, P=0.003 and the restoration time of blood pressure and the operation duration were significantly shorter (7±2 versus 451±87 seconds, P<0.001; 87±15 versus 106±18 minutes, P<0.001, respectively in the RACP group. Stent graft localization/deployment was more precise in the RACP

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J. [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia); Bradshaw, Barbara [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); Golledge, Jonathan [James Cook University, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Townsville, Queensland (Australia); The Townsville Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Douglas (Australia); University of Queensland, School of Medicine and Centre for Clinical Research, Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm calcification and thrombus volume are not associated with outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Divyajeet; Velu, Ramesh; Tosenovsky, Patrik; Quigley, Francis; Wisniowski, Brendan; Walker, Philip J.; Bradshaw, Barbara; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Aortic calcification and thrombus have been postulated to worsen outcome following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). The purpose of this study was to assess the association of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) calcification and thrombus volume with outcome following EVAR using a reproducible, quantifiable computed tomography (CT) assessment protocol. Patients with elective EVAR performed between January 2002 and 2012 at the Townsville Hospital, Mater Private Hospital (Townsville) and Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) were included if preoperative CTAs were available for analysis. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were measured using a semiautomated workstation protocol. Outcomes were assessed in terms of clinical failure, endoleak (type I, type II) and reintervention. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Median follow-up was 1.7 years and the interquartile range 1.0-3.8 years. One hundred thirty-four patients undergoing elective EVAR were included in the study. Rates of primary clinical success and freedom from reintervention were 82.8 % and 88.9 % at the 24-month follow-up. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with clinical failure, type I endoleak, type II endoleak or reintervention. AAA calcification and thrombus volume were not associated with poorer outcome after EVAR in this study. (orig.)

  1. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A prospective clinical, economic, and quality-of-life analysis comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), open repair, and best medical treatment in high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms suitable for EVAR: the Irish patient trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hynes, Niamh

    2007-12-01

    To report the results of a trial comparing endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair (OR) and best medical therapy (BMT) involving high-risk patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) suitable for EVAR.

  3. Embolization by micro navigation for treatment of persistent type 2 Endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lorenção de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:Endovascular repair has become established as a safe and effective method for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. One major complication of this treatment is leakage, or endoleaks, of which type 2 leaks are the most common.Objective:To conduct a brief review of the literature and evaluate the safety and effectiveness of embolization by micronavigation for treatment of type 2 endoleaks.Method:A review of medical records from patients who underwent endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms identified 5 patients with persistent type 2 endoleaks. These patients were submitted to embolization by micronavigation.Results:In all cases, angiographic success was achieved and control CT scans showed absence of type 2 leaks and aneurysm sacs that had reduced in size after the procedure.Conclusion:Treatment of type 2 endoleaks using embolization by micronavigation is an effective and safe method and should be considered as a treatment option for this complication after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  4. Pros and Cons of 3D Image Fusion in Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudeketting, Seline R; Heinen, Stefan G H; Ünlü, Çağdaş; van den Heuvel, Daniel A F; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; van Strijen, Marco J; Sailer, Anna M

    2017-08-01

    To systematically review and meta-analyze the added value of 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion technology in endovascular aortic repair for its potential to reduce contrast media volume, radiation dose, procedure time, and fluoroscopy time. Electronic databases were systematically searched for studies published between January 2010 and March 2016 that included a control group describing 3D fusion imaging in endovascular aortic procedures. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included studies and extracted data on iodinated contrast volume, radiation dose, procedure time, and fluoroscopy time. The contrast use for standard and complex endovascular aortic repairs (fenestrated, branched, and chimney) were pooled using a random-effects model; outcomes are reported as the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven studies, 5 retrospective and 2 prospective, involving 921 patients were selected for analysis. The methodological quality of the studies was moderate (median 17, range 15-18). The use of fusion imaging led to an estimated mean reduction in iodinated contrast of 40.1 mL (95% CI 16.4 to 63.7, p=0.002) for standard procedures and a mean 70.7 mL (95% CI 44.8 to 96.6, p<0.001) for complex repairs. Secondary outcome measures were not pooled because of potential bias in nonrandomized data, but radiation doses, procedure times, and fluoroscopy times were lower, although not always significantly, in the fusion group in 6 of the 7 studies. Compared with the control group, 3D fusion imaging is associated with a significant reduction in the volume of contrast employed for standard and complex endovascular aortic procedures, which can be particularly important in patients with renal failure. Radiation doses, procedure times, and fluoroscopy times were reduced when 3D fusion was used.

  5. Strategy of endovascular versus open repair for patients with clinical diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: the IMPROVE RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulug, Pinar; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Sweeting, Michael J; Gomes, Manuel; Thompson, Matthew T; Thompson, Simon G; Grieve, Richard J; Ashleigh, Raymond; Greenhalgh, Roger M; Powell, Janet T

    2018-05-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common vascular emergency. The mortality from emergency endovascular repair may be much lower than the 40-50% reported for open surgery. To assess whether or not a strategy of endovascular repair compared with open repair reduces 30-day and mid-term mortality (including costs and cost-effectiveness) among patients with a suspected ruptured AAA. Randomised controlled trial, with computer-generated telephone randomisation of participants in a 1 : 1 ratio, using variable block size, stratified by centre and without blinding. Vascular centres in the UK ( n  = 29) and Canada ( n  = 1) between 2009 and 2013. A total of 613 eligible participants (480 men) with a ruptured aneurysm, clinically diagnosed at the trial centre. A total of 316 participants were randomised to the endovascular strategy group (immediate computerised tomography followed by endovascular repair if anatomically suitable or, if not suitable, open repair) and 297 were randomised to the open repair group (computerised tomography optional). The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality, with 30-day reinterventions, costs and disposal as early secondary outcome measures. Later outcome measures included 1- and 3-year mortality, reinterventions, quality of life (QoL) and cost-effectiveness. The 30-day mortality was 35.4% in the endovascular strategy group and 37.4% in the open repair group [odds ratio (OR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.28; p  = 0.62, and, after adjustment for age, sex and Hardman index, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.33]. The endovascular strategy appeared to be more effective in women than in men (interaction test p  = 0.02). More discharges in the endovascular strategy group (94%) than in the open repair group (77%) were directly to home ( p  open repair group, respectively (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53 to 1.00; p  = 0.053), with a stronger benefit for the endovascular strategy in the subgroup of 502 participants

  6. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  7. The Preclose Technique in Percutaneous Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A.; Prince, Ethan A.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Murphy, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To establish the efficacy and safety of the preclose technique in total percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR).MethodsA systematic literature search of Medline database was conducted for series on PEVAR published between January 1999 and January 2012.ResultsThirty-six articles comprising 2,257 patients and 3,606 arterial accesses were included. Anatomical criteria used to exclude patients from undergoing PEVAR were not uniform across all series. The technical success rate was 94 % per arterial access. Failure was unilateral in the majority (93 %) of the 133 failed PEVAR cases. The groin complication rate in PEVAR was 3.6 %; a minority (1.6 %) of these groin complications required open surgery. The groin complication rate in failed PEVAR cases converted to groin cutdown was 6.1 %. A significantly higher technical success rate was achieved when arterial access was performed via ultrasound guidance. Technical failure rate was significantly higher with larger sheath size (≥20F). Conclusion. The preclose technique in PEVAR has a high technical success rate and a low groin complication rate. Technical success tends to increase with ultrasound-guided arterial access and decrease with larger access. When failure occurs, it is unilateral in the majority of cases, and conversion to surgical cutdown does not appear to increase the operative risk.

  8. Fate of patients with spinal cord ischemia complicating thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSart, Kenneth; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Hong, Michael; Hess, Philip J; Beaver, Thomas M; Huber, Thomas S; Beck, Adam W

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a potentially devastating complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) that can result in varying degrees of short-term and permanent disability. This study was undertaken to describe the clinical outcomes, long-term functional impact, and influence on survival of SCI after TEVAR. A retrospective review of all TEVAR patients at the University of Florida from 2000 to 2011 was performed to identify individuals experiencing SCI, defined by any new lower extremity neurologic deficit not attributable to another cause. SCI was dichotomized into immediate or delayed onset, with immediate onset defined as SCI noted upon awakening from anesthesia, and delayed characterized as a period of normal function, followed by development of neurologic injury. Ambulatory status was determined using database query, record review, and phone interviews with patients and/or family. Mortality was estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 607 TEVARs were performed for various indications, with 57 patients (9.4%) noted to have postoperative SCI (4.3% permanent). SCI patients were more likely to be older (63.9 ± 15.6 vs 70.5 ± 11.2 years; P = .002) and have a number of comorbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular disease (P impact on postdischarge FI or long-term mortality. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair of Acute Occlusion of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Intra-Aneurysmal Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Yasuhiko; Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Nakai, Masanao; Goto, Shinnosuke; Miyano, Yuta; Tsuchiya, Hirokazu; Yamazaki, Fumio

    2015-11-01

    To report a rare case of acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occlusion successfully treated by endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). An 89-year-old man complained of severe back pain and weakness in the bilateral lower extremities. Although there were neither acute ischemic signs on the brain computed tomography (CT) nor critical leg ischemia, the patient presented progressing weakness in the bilateral lower extremities and decreased sensation in the perianal and saddle area. Contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated an infrarenal AAA, the formation of an ulcer-like lesion in the aneurysmal wall, and the complete occlusion of distal AAA because of the caudal extension of intramural hematoma. Both common iliac arteries were patent because of the development of collateral vessels. The neurologic symptoms were considered to be caused by the occlusion of lumbar radicular arteries. EVAR seemed anatomically feasible, if the occlusion could be crossed by guidewires from both side of the common femoral artery. Wires easily traversed the occlusion, and the stent graft could be smoothly unwrapped and opened. The patient could recover decent iliac arterial flow. The neurovascular deficits recovered within 4 days after the procedure. Although our experience may not be reproduced in all case of AAA occlusion, EVAR warrants consideration to reduce the high mortality rate associated with the classical treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of aorto-esophageal fistula secondary after thoracic endovascular aortic repair: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kaname; Koike, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Seiichi; Komazawa, Daisuke; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-10-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare and lethal entity, and the difficulty of making diagnosis of AEF is well-known. As promising results in the short-term effectiveness of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) promote its usage, the occurrence of AEF after TEVAR (post-TEVAR AEF) increases as one of the major complications. Therefore, we provide a review concerning the management strategy of post-TEVAR AEF. Although its representative symptom was reported as the triad of mid-thoracic pain and sentinel hematemesis followed by massive hematemesis, the symptom-free interval between sentinel hemorrhage and massive exsanguination is unpredictable. However, the physiological condition represents a surgical contraindication. Accordingly, early diagnosis is important, but either CT or esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy rarely depicts a typical image. The formation of post-TEVAR AEF might be associated with the infection of micro-organisms, which is uncontrollable with anti-biotic administration. The current first-line strategy is combination therapy as follows, (1) to control bleeding by TEVAR in the urgent phase, and (2) radical debridement and aortic/esophageal re-construction in the semi-urgent phase. In view of the high mortality and morbidity rate, it is proposed that the choice in treatment strategies might be affected by patient`s condition, size of the wall defects and the etiology of AEF. Practically, we should keep in mind the importance of making an early diagnosis and, once a suspicious symptom has occurred in a patient with a history of TEVAR, the existence of post-TEVAR AEF should be suspected. A prospective registry together with more developed technologies will be needed to establish a future strategy.

  11. Innovative postmarket device evaluation using a quality registry to monitor thoracic endovascular aortic repair in the treatment of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adam W; Lombardi, Joseph V; Abel, Dorothy B; Morales, J Pablo; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Wang, Grace; Azizzadeh, Ali; Kern, John; Fillinger, Mark; White, Rodney; Cronenwett, Jack L; Cambria, Richard P

    2017-05-01

    United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-mandated postapproval studies have long been a mainstay of the continued evaluation of high-risk medical devices after initial marketing approval; however, these studies often present challenges related to patient/physician recruitment and retention. Retrospective single-center studies also do not fully represent the spectrum of real-world performance nor are they likely to have a sufficiently large enough sample size to detect important signals. In recent years, The FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health has been promoting the development and use of patient registries to advance infrastructure and methodologies for medical device investigation. The FDA 2012 document, "Strengthening the National System for Medical Device Post-market Surveillance," highlighted registries as a core foundational infrastructure when linked to other complementary data sources, including embedded unique device identification. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) thoracic endovascular aortic repair for type B aortic dissection project is an innovative method of using quality improvement registries to meet the needs of device evaluation after market approval. Here we report the organization and background of this project and highlight the innovation facilitated by collaboration of physicians, the FDA, and device manufacturers. This effort used an existing national network of VQI participants to capture patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for acute type B aortic dissection within a registry that aligns with standard practice and existing quality efforts. The VQI captures detailed patient, device, and procedural data for consecutive eligible cases under the auspices of a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). Patients were divided into a 5-year follow-up group (200 acute; 200 chronic dissections) and a 1-year follow-up group (100 acute; 100 chronic). The 5-year cohort required additional imaging details, and the 1-year

  12. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  13. Volumetric analysis demonstrates that true and false lumen remodeling persists for 12 months after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Young Suh, PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man underwent an elephant trunk procedure followed by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR. Computed tomography angiography-based models were built to quantify volume of the whole aorta and true and false lumens preoperatively, before TEVAR, after TEVAR, and at follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months. With TEVAR, descending aortic true lumen volume increased by 54%, then increased additionally by 60% during 12 months. The descending aortic false lumen volume regressed continuously for 12 months following TEVAR, with the most rapid rate from 6 to 12 months at 16 cm3/month. TEVAR immediately increased true lumen volume and continued to remodel the true and false lumens throughout the following 12 months.

  14. Use of Suture-Mediated Closure Device in Percutaneous Direct Carotid Puncture During Chimney-Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Gabriel; Quek, Lawrence Hwee Han; Tan, Glenn Leong Wei; Pua, Uei

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundInsertion of a carotid chimney graft during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (Ch-TEVAR) is a recognized technique to extend the proximal landing zone into the aortic arch in the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Conventional technique requires surgical exposure of the carotid artery for insertion of the carotid chimney graft.MethodologyWe describe our experience in the use of a suture-mediated closure device in percutaneous Ch-TEVAR in four patients.ResultsSuccessful hemostasis was achieved in all four patients. No complications related to the carotid puncture were recorded.ConclusionWe conclude that using suture-mediated closure device for carotid closure appears feasible and deserves further studies as a potential alternative to conventional surgical approach.

  15. Use of Suture-Mediated Closure Device in Percutaneous Direct Carotid Puncture During Chimney-Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Gabriel, E-mail: dr.changabriel@gmail.com; Quek, Lawrence Hwee Han, E-mail: lawrence-quek@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Tan, Glenn Leong Wei, E-mail: glenn-tan@ttsh.com.sg [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of General Surgery (Singapore); Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2016-07-15

    BackgroundInsertion of a carotid chimney graft during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (Ch-TEVAR) is a recognized technique to extend the proximal landing zone into the aortic arch in the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Conventional technique requires surgical exposure of the carotid artery for insertion of the carotid chimney graft.MethodologyWe describe our experience in the use of a suture-mediated closure device in percutaneous Ch-TEVAR in four patients.ResultsSuccessful hemostasis was achieved in all four patients. No complications related to the carotid puncture were recorded.ConclusionWe conclude that using suture-mediated closure device for carotid closure appears feasible and deserves further studies as a potential alternative to conventional surgical approach.

  16. Trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: impact of endovascular repair and implications for future care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian D; Azefor, Nchang; Huang, Chun-Chih; Ricotta, John J

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to determine national trends in treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), with specific emphasis on open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and its impact on mortality and complications. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) from 2005 to 2009 were queried to identify patients older than 59 years with RAAA. Three groups were studied: nonoperative (NO), EVAR, and OSR. Chi-square analysis was used to determine the relationship between treatment type and patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and hospital type. The impact of EVAR compared with OSR on mortality and overall complications was examined using logistic regression analysis. We identified 21,206 patients with RAAA from 2005 to 2009, of which 16,558 (78.1%) underwent operative repair and 21.8% received no operative treatment. In the operative group, 12,761 (77.1%) underwent OSR and 3,796 (22.9%) underwent EVAR. Endovascular aneurysm repair was more common in teaching hospitals (29.1% vs 15.2%, p < .0001) and in urban versus rural settings. Nonoperative approach was twice as common in rural versus urban hospitals. Reduced mortality was seen in patients transferred from another institutions (31.2% vs 39.4%, p = 0.014). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a benefit of EVAR on both complication rate (OR = 0.492; CI, 0.380-0.636) and mortality (OR=0.535; CI, 0.395-0.724). Endovascular aneurysm repair use is increasing for RAAA and is more common in urban teaching hospitals while NO therapy is more common in rural hospitals. Endovascular aneurysm repair is associated with reduced mortality and complications across all age groups. Efforts to reduce mortality from RAAA should concentrate on reducing NO and OSR in patients who are suitable for EVAR. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Aortic Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathy B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta is a leading cause of death, following major blunt trauma, and endovascular repair has evolved as a viable alternative to open repair. This report highlights the role of transesophageal echocardiography as a valuable imaging tool for locating the exact position of the lesion, guiding placement of the endograft, detecting leaks around it and supplementing information derived from angiography during endograft deployment.

  18. Laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turley, Ryan S; Benrashid, Ehsan; Cox, Mitchell W; Mureebe, Leila; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2017-02-01

    Subset analyses from small case series suggest patients requiring laparotomy during endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (REVAR) have worse survival than those undergoing REVAR without laparotomy. Most concomitant laparotomies are performed for abdominal compartment syndrome. This study used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to determine whether the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with increased mortality. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant user files based on Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill) and International Classification of Diseases-9 Edition coding. Patient and procedure-related characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categoric variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. A backward-stepwise multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify patient- and procedure-related factors associated with increased death after REVAR. We identified 1241 patients who underwent REVAR, and 91 (7.3%) required concomitant laparotomy. The 30-day mortality was 60% in the laparotomy group and 21% in the standard REVAR group (P < .001). The major complication rate was also higher in the laparotomy group (88% vs 63%; P < .001). Multivariable analysis showed laparotomy was strongly associated with 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 3.62-9.62; P < .001). Laparotomy during REVAR is a commonly used technique for the management of elevated intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome development. The results of this study strongly confirm findings from smaller studies that the need for laparotomy during REVAR is associated with significantly worse 30-day survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Mid-term outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with carbon dioxide-guided angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yuriko; Morikage, Noriyasu; Matsuno, Yutaro; Nakamura, Tamami; Samura, Makoto; Ueda, Koshiro; Harada, Takasuke; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Suehiro, Kotaro; Ito, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kensuke; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2018-05-14

    Although iodinated contrast (IC) agents are commonly used in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), perioperative use in patients with renal dysfunction or IC allergies is avoided. Carbon dioxide (CO 2 )-guided angiography is a promising alternative. We aimed to evaluate short-term and mid-term outcomes of EVAR using CO 2 -guided angiography. Three hundred and eighty-one patients who underwent EVAR from January 2012 to September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and divided into an IC-EVAR group (n=351) and CO 2 -EVAR group (n=30). Subjects in the CO 2 -EVAR group had severe renal dysfunction (n=27) and IC allergy (n=4). Intraoperative, postoperative, and follow-up variables were compared. Compared to the IC-EVAR group, preoperative serum creatinine level was significantly higher (2.0 vs. 0.92 mg/dL, P < .0001) and mean IC dose significantly lower (18 vs. 55 mL P < .0001) in the CO 2 -EVAR group. The fluoroscopy time, operative time, number of stent grafts placed, and technical success rates of the groups were similar; no type I and/or type III endoleaks were detected on completion angiography. There was no acute kidney injury and one case of intestinal necrosis in the CO 2 -EVAR group, potentially due to cholesterol embolism. Postoperative endoleak, enlargement of aneurysms, survival, freedom from secondary intervention, and renal function change up to 3 months postoperatively were similar between groups. CO 2 -EVAR is technically feasible and exhibits prominent renal protection. However, consideration of the aortic lumen status remains an important challenge. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye Doo; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Seung Jin; Yim, Nam Yeol; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Jung, Sang Young; Chang, Nam Kyu; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes and find the prognostic factors of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with hostile neck anatomy of the abdominal aorta. This study was performed on 100 patients with abdominal aneurysm who were treated with EVAR between March 2006 and December 2010. We divided the patients into two groups: good neck anatomy (GNA), and hostile neck anatomy (HNA) and then compared the primary success rate and the incidence rate of complications with EVAR between the two groups. Our aim was to determine the factors related to the complications of EVAR among HNA types. There were no significant differences of primary success rate and incidence rate of complications between the two groups. Among the types of HNA, the short neck angle [odd ratio (OR), 4.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21-18.70; p = 0.023] and large neck angle (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 0.15-11.85; p = 0.031) showed a low primary success rate. The short neck angle (OR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.18-12.29; p = 0.002) and large neck angle (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 0.14-19.07; p = 0.032) showed a high incidence rate of early type 1 complication. In the case of the large neck angle (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 0.96-20.80; p = 0.047), the large neck thrombus (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 0.24-7.12; p = 0.035) and large neck calcification (OR, 2.50; 95% CI, 0.08-18.37; p 0.043) showed a high incidence rate of complications within a year. The results suggest that patients with hostile neck anatomy can be treated with EVAR successfully, although there was a higher incidence of complications in patients with a short neck length, severe neck angulation, circumferential thrombosis, and calcified proximal neck.

  1. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  2. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  3. The Burden of Hard Atherosclerotic Plaques Does Not Promote Endoleak Development After Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Risk Stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To objectify the influence of the atherosclerotic burden in the proximal landing zone on the development of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) or thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) using objective aortic calcium scoring (ACS). Materials and Methods: This retrospective observation study included 267 patients who received an aortic endograft between 1997 and 2010 and for whom preoperative computed tomography (CT) was available to perform ACS using the CT-based V600 method. The mean follow-up period was 2 ± 2.3 years. Results: Type I endoleaks persisted in 45 patients (16.9%), type II in 34 (12.7%), type III in 8 (3%), and type IV or V in 3 patients, respectively (1.1% each). ACS in patients with type I endoleaks was not increased: 0.029 ± 0.061 ml compared with 0.075 ± 0.1349 ml in the rest of the patients, (p > 0.05; Whitney–Mann U-Test). There were significantly better results for the indication “traumatic aortic rupture” than for the other indications (p < 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, age was an independent risk factor for the development of type I endoleaks in the thoracic aorta (Wald 9.5; p = 0.002), whereas ACS score was an independent protective factor (Wald 6.9; p = 0.009). In the abdominal aorta, neither age nor ACS influenced the development of endoleaks. Conclusion: Contrary to previous assumptions, TEVAR and EVAR can be carried out without increasing the risk of an endoleak of any type, even if there is a high atherosclerotic “hard-plaque” burden of the aorta. The results are significantly better for traumatic aortic.

  4. Retrograde Ascending Dissection After Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Combined With the Chimney Technique and Successful Open Repair Using the Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Koji; Tokui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Bun; Inoue, Ryosai; Inagaki, Masahiro; Maze, Yasumi; Kato, Noriyuki

    2018-01-01

    The chimney technique can be combined with thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to both obtain an appropriate landing zone and maintain blood flow of the arch vessels. However, surgical repair becomes more complicated if retrograde type A aortic dissection occurs after TEVAR with the chimney technique. We herein report a case involving a 73-year-old woman who developed a retrograde ascending dissection 3 months after TEVAR for acute type B aortic dissection. To ensure an adequate proximal sealing distance, the proximal edge of the stent graft was located at the zone 2 level and an additional bare stent was placed at the left subclavian artery (the chimney technique) at the time of TEVAR. Enhanced computed tomography revealed an aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Surgical aortic repair using the frozen elephant trunk technique was urgently performed. The patient survived without stroke, paraplegia, renal failure, or other major complications. Retrograde ascending dissection can occur after TEVAR combined with the chimney technique. The frozen elephant trunk technique is useful for surgical repair in such complicated cases.

  5. Case report and review of the literature total endovascular repair of acute ascending aortic rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, John C; Limmer, Karl K; Perricone, Anthony; Bandyk, Dennis; Kansal, Nikhil

    2013-07-01

    Thoracic aortic endografting has been successfully implemented to treat aneurysmal disease of the distal aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Although there are reports of ascending aortic endovascular interventions, the total endovascular repair of a ruptured ascending aorta secondary to a Type A dissection has not been described. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a ruptured ascending aortic aneurysm secondary to degeneration of a Stanford type A aortic dissection. His surgical history was significant for orthotropic heart transplant 19 years prior. The dissection, aneurysm, and rupture occurred in the native aorta distal to the ascending aortic suture line. At presentation, he was hemodynamically unstable with a right hemothorax. We placed 3 Medtronic Talent Thoracic Stent Graft devices (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) across the suture line in the ascending aorta, excluding the rupture. The patient survived and has been followed to 25 months.

  6. Percutaneous Transabdominal Approach for the Treatment of Endoleaks after Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Yun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, University of Yonsei, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong Hoon; Shim, Won Heum [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transabdominal treatment of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair. Between 2000 and 2007, six patients with type I (n = 4) or II (n = 2) endoleaks were treated by the percutaneous transabdominal approach using embolization with N-butyl cyanoacrylate with or without coils. Five patients underwent a single session and one patient had two sessions of embolization. The median time between aneurysm repair and endoleak treatment was 25.5 months (range: 0-84 months). Follow-up CT images were evaluated for changes in the size and shape of the aneurysm sac and presence or resolution of endoleaks. The median follow-up after endoleak treatment was 16.4 months (range: 0-37 months). Technical success was achieved in all six patients. Clinical success was achieved in four patients with complete resolution of the endoleak confirmed by follow-up CT. Clinical failure was observed in two patients. One eventually underwent surgical conversion, and the other was lost to follow-up. There were no procedure-related complications. The percutaneous transabdominal approach for the treatment of type I or II endoleaks, after endovascular aneurysm repair, is an alternative method when conventional endovascular methods have failed.

  7. Delayed endovascular aortic repair is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality in patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaccio, Christina L; Dumas, Ryan P; Huang, Yanlan; Yang, Wei; Wang, Grace J; Holena, Daniel N

    2018-02-13

    The traditional approach to stable blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) endorsed by the Society for Vascular Surgery is early (<24 hours) thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Recently, some studies have shown improved mortality in stable BTAI patients repaired in a delayed manner (≥24 hours). However, the indications for use of delayed TEVAR for BTAI are not well characterized, and its overall impact on the patient's survival remains poorly understood. We sought to determine whether delayed TEVAR is associated with a decrease in mortality compared with early TEVAR in this population. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with BTAI (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code 901.0) who underwent TEVAR (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision procedure code 39.73) from 2009 to 2013 using the National Sample Program data set. Missing physiologic data were imputed using chained multiple imputation. Patients were parsed into groups based on the timing of TEVAR (early, <24 hours, vs delayed, ≥24 hours). The χ 2 , Mann-Whitney, and Fisher exact tests were used to compare baseline characteristics and outcomes of interest between groups. Multivariable logistic regression for mortality was performed that included all variables significant at P ≤ .2 in univariate analyses. A total of 2045 adult patients with BTAI were identified, of whom 534 (26%) underwent TEVAR. Patients with missing data on TEVAR timing were excluded (n = 27), leaving a total of 507 patients for analysis (75% male; 69% white; median age, 40 years [interquartile range, 27-56 years]; median Injury Severity Score [ISS], 34 [interquartile range, 26-41]). Of these, 378 patients underwent early TEVAR and 129 underwent delayed TEVAR. The two groups were similar with regard to age, sex, race, ISS, and presenting physiology. Mortality was 11.9% in the early TEVAR group vs 5.4% in the delayed group, with the early group

  8. Surgical treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair in type A aortic dissection in a pregnant patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Doerthe; Probst, Chris; Mellert, Friedrich; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    We report an acute aortic dissection type Stanford A extending down to both iliac arteries affecting a 32-year-old woman suspected to have Marfan syndrome during week 37 of pregnancy. In a multidisciplinary approach, and emergency Cesarean section was performed followed by an abdominal hysterectomy and a valve-sparing aortic root replacement using a reimplantation technique. The aorta was replaced up to the hemi arch. Because of the high suspicion of visceral ischemia as confirmed ex juvantibus, an endovascular stent graft was implanted. Molecular testing revealed a frameshift mutation and confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Both the patient and her healthy child underwent an uneventful recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingruber, I.E.; Neuhauser, B.; Seiler, R.; Greiner, A.; Chemelli, A.; Kopf, H.; Walch, C.; Waldenberger, P.; Jaschke, W.; Czermak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions

  10. Technical and clinical success of infrarenal endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A 10-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingruber, I.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: iris.steingruber@uibk.ac.at; Neuhauser, B. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Seiler, R. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Greiner, A. [Department of Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Chemelli, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kopf, H. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walch, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Waldenberger, P. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jaschke, W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Czermak, B. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    Objective: The aim of our retrospective study was to review our single-center experience with aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) repair retrospectively. Material and methods: From 1995 to 2005, 70 consecutive patients affected by AAA were treated by endovascular stent-graft repair. Mean follow-up was 23.9 months. Follow-up investigations were performed at 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Five different stent-graft designs were compared to each other. Primary technical success (PTS), assisted primary technical success (APTS), primary clinical success (PCS) and secondary clinical success (SCS) were evaluated. Results: All over PTS was achieved in 94.3%, APTS in 97.1%, PCS in 61.4%, APCS in 64.3% and SCS in 70%. There were 3 type I endoleaks, 25 type II endoleaks, 4 type III endoleaks, 8 limb problems, 5 conversions to open surgery, 10 aneurysm sac expansions and 14 device migrations. Patients with newer generation devices showed better results than patients with first generation prosthesis. In addition results were better for grafts with suprarenal fixation (versus infrarenal fixation) and grafts with barbs and hooks (versus grafts without barbs and hooks). Patients with bad anatomic preconditions showed a higher complication rate. Conclusion: Contrary to first generation products, new stent-graft designs show acceptable technical and clinical results in endovascular AAA aneurysm repair. However, this therapy still should be reserved only for patients with significant comorbities and suitable anatomic conditions.

  11. Reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure allowing thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a chronic ascending aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Canaud, MD, PhD

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman was admitted with a large chronic dissecting ascending aortic aneurysm starting 5 mm distal to the ostia of the left coronary artery and ending immediately proximal to the innominate artery. A reverse extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching procedure was performed. During the same operative time, through a transapical approach, a thoracic stent graft was deployed with the proximal landing zone just distal to the coronary ostia and the distal landing zone excluding the origin of the left common carotid artery. The postoperative course was uneventful. Computed tomography at 12 months documented patent extra-anatomic aortic arch debranching and no evidence of endoleak. Keywords: Ascending aorta, Thoracic aorta, Aortic dissection, Stent graft

  12. Retrograde type A dissection following hybrid supra-aortic endovascular surgery in high-risk patients unfit for conventional open repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Hon C; Chan, Yiu C; Qing, Kai X; Cheng, Stephen W

    2018-04-01

    Hybrid procedures with combined open extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses and endovascular surgery are less invasive for patients with complex aortic arch pathology. The aim of this paper is to report patients who developed retrograde type A aortic dissection following initially successful hybrid endovascular treatment. Retrospective review of prospectively collected computerized departmental database. All patients with supra-aortic hybrid endovascular surgery and post-procedure retrograde type A dissection were identified. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, perioperative parameters, procedural details and post-operative complications were collected. From May 2005 to July 2014, 163 patients underwent thoracic aortic endovascular procedures at our institution. From the 46 patients who had supra-aortic hybrid endovascular repair, six patients (6/46, 13% of all supra-aortic hybrid cases, 3 males) developed retrograde type A aortic dissection. All were elective cases, with 3 chronic dissecting aneurysms and 3 atherosclerotic aneurysms. All had one-stage hybrid procedures: 2 patients had carotid-carotid bypass grafts, one had carotid-carotid-left subclavian bypass graft, and 3 had bypass grafts from ascending aorta to innominate artery and left carotid artery. Five patients had Cook Zenith thoracic stent-grafts (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN, USA), and one had Medtronic Valiant stent-grafts (Medtronic Vascular Inc, Santa Rosa, CA, USA). The retrograde type A dissection occurred with sudden symptoms at day 5, 6, 10, 20, 105 and 128, respectively. There were 3 immediate fatalities and 2 patients treated conservatively deemed unfit for reintervention (one died of pneumonia at 9 months, and one remained alive at 7 months post-complication). One patient underwent successful emergency open surgery and survived. Supra-aortic hybrid procedures in treating aortic arch pathology may be at risk of developing retrograde type A dissection. This post-operative complication

  13. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC

  14. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ziheng, E-mail: wuziheng303@hotmail.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Xu, Liang, E-mail: maxalive@163.com [Zhejiang University, Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine (China); Qu, Lefeng, E-mail: qulefeng@gmail.com [The Second Military Medical University, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Changzheng Hospital (China); Raithel, Dieter, E-mail: dieter.raithel@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de [Nuremberg Southern Hospital, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  15. Sex differences in 30-day and 5-year outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in the EUROSTAR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grootenboer, Nathalie; Hunink, M G Myriam; Hendriks, Johanna M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair.......The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sex on 30-day and long-term outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair....

  16. Anatomical Features and Early Outcomes of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm from a Korean Multicenter Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Park, Ki Hyuk; Min, Seung-Kee; Chang, Jeong-Hwan; Huh, Seung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Won, Jehwan; Byun, Seung Jae; Park, Sang Jun; Jang, Lee Chan; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2015-09-01

    To introduce a nation-based endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) registry in South Korea and to analyze the anatomical features and early clinical outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in patients who underwent EVAR. The Korean EVAR registry (KER) was a template-based online registry developed and established in 2009. The KER recruited 389 patients who underwent EVAR from 13 medical centers in South Korea from January 2010 to June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed the anatomic features and 30-day clinical outcomes. Initial deployment without open conversion was achieved in all cases and procedure-related 30-day mortality rate was 1.9%. Anatomic features showed the following variables: proximal aortic neck angle 48.8±25.7° (mean±standard deviation), vertical neck length 35.0±17.2 mm, aneurysmal sac diameter 57.2±14.2 mm, common iliac artery (CIA) involvement in 218 (56.3%) patients, and median right CIA length 34.9 mm. Two hundred and nineteen (56.3%) patients showed neck calcification, 98 patients (25.2%) had neck thrombus, and the inferior mesenteric arteries of 91 patients (23.4%) were occluded. Anatomical features of AAA in patients from the KER were characterized as having angulated proximal neck, tortuous iliac artery, and a higher rate of CIA involvement. Long-term follow-up and ongoing studies are required.

  17. Correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Galvagni Silveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish a correlation between intrasac pressure measurements of a pressure sensor and an angiographic catheter placed in the same aneurysm sac before and after its exclusion by an endoprosthesis. METHODS: Patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and received an EndoSureTM wireless pressure sensor implant between March 19 and December 11, 2004 were enrolled in the study. Simultaneous readings of systolic, diastolic, mean, and pulse pressure within the aneurysm sac were obtained from the catheter and the sensor, both before and after sac exclusion by the endoprosthesis (Readings 1 and 2, respectively. Intrasac pressure measurements were compared using Pearson's correlation and Student's t test. Statistical significance was set at p0.05, mean (p>0.05, and pulse (p0.05 by the sensor. CONCLUSION: The excellent agreement between intrasac pressure readings recorded by the catheter and the sensor justifies use of the latter for detection of post-exclusion abdominal aortic aneurysm pressurization.

  18. Mid-term cost-effectiveness analysis of open and endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, K E; Shak, J; Ambler, G K; Tang, T Y; Hayes, P D; Boyle, J R

    2014-02-01

    Emergency endovascular repair (EVAR) for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) may have lower operative mortality rates than open surgical repair. Concerns remain that the early survival benefit after EVAR for rAAA may be offset by late reinterventions. The aim of this study was to compare reintervention rates and cost-effectiveness of EVAR and open repair for rAAA. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients with rAAA undergoing EVAR or open repair over 6 years. A health economic model developed for the cost-effectiveness of elective EVAR was used in the emergency setting. Sixty-two patients (mean age 77·9 years) underwent EVAR and 85 (mean age 75·9 years) had open repair of rAAA. Median follow-up was 42 and 39 months respectively. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality rates after EVAR and open repair (18 and 26 per cent respectively; P = 0·243). Reintervention rates were also similar (32 and 31 per cent; P = 0·701). The mean cost per patient was €26,725 for EVAR and €30,297 for open repair, and the cost per life-year gained was €7906 and €9933 respectively (P = 0·561). Open repair had greater initial costs: longer procedural times (217 versus 178·5 min; P < 0·001) and intensive care stay (5·0 versus 1·0 days; P = 0·015). Conversely, EVAR had greater reintervention (€156,939 versus €35,335; P = 0·001) and surveillance (P < 0·001) costs. There was no significant difference in reintervention rates after EVAR or open repair for rAAA. EVAR was as cost-effective at mid-term follow-up. The increased procedural costs of open repair are not outweighed by greater surveillance and reintervention costs after EVAR. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Association of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and spinal cord ischemia in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair: A Vascular Quality Initiative® analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Pedro Gr; Woo, Karen; Beck, Adam W; Scali, Salvatore T; Weaver, Fred A

    2017-12-01

    Objectives Investigate the impact of left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization on spinal cord ischemia development in patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods The Vascular Quality Initiative thoracic endovascular aortic repair module (April 2011-July 2014) was analyzed. Patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage were divided into two groups according to revascularization status. The association between left subclavian artery revascularization with the primary outcome of spinal cord ischemia and the secondary outcome of stroke was assessed with multivariable analysis adjusting for between-group baseline differences. Results The left subclavian artery was covered in 508 (24.6%) of the 2063 thoracic endovascular aortic repairs performed. Among patients with left subclavian artery coverage, 58.9% underwent revascularization. Spinal cord ischemia incidence was 12.1% in the group without revascularization compared to 8.5% in the group undergoing left subclavian artery revascularization (odds ratio (95%CI): 1.48(0.82-2.68), P = 0.189). Multivariable analysis adjustment identified an independent association between left subclavian artery coverage without revascularization and the incidence of spinal cord ischemia (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 2.29(1.03-5.14), P = 0.043). Although the incidence of stroke was also higher for the group with a covered and nonrevascularized left subclavian artery (12.1% versus 8.5%), this difference was not statistically significant after multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio (95%CI): 1.55(0.74-3.26), P = 0.244). Conclusion For patients undergoing left subclavian artery coverage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, the addition of a revascularization procedure was associated with a significantly lower incidence of spinal cord ischemia.

  20. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumueller, Stephan; Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh; Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 ± 7.5 years, range 51–88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  1. Editor's Choice - Late Open Surgical Conversion after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Vinay; Nagpal, Sudhir; Jetty, Prasad

    2018-02-01

    Late open surgical conversion following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) may occur more frequently after performing EVAR in anatomy outside the instructions for use (IFU). This study reviews predictors and outcomes of late open surgical conversion for failed EVAR. This retrospective cohort study reviewed all EVARs performed at the Ottawa Hospital between January 1999 and May 2015. Open surgical conversions >1 month post EVAR were identified. Variables analysed included indication for conversion, pre-intervention AAA anatomy, endovascular device and configuration, operative technique, re-interventions, complications, and death. Of 1060 consecutive EVARs performed, 16 required late open surgical conversion. Endografts implanted were Medtronic Talent (n = 8, 50.0%), Medtronic Endurant (n = 3, 18.8%), Cook Zenith (n = 4, 25.0%), and Terumo Anaconda (n = 1, 6.2%). Eleven grafts were bifurcated (68.8%), five were aorto-uni-iliac (31.2%). The median time to open surgical conversion was 3.1 (IQR 1.0-5.2) years. There was no significant difference in pre-EVAR rupture status (1.4% elective, 2.1% ruptured, p = .54). Indications for conversion included: Type 1 endoleak with sac expansion (n = 4, 25.0%), Type 2 endoleak with expansion (n = 2, 12.5%), migration (n = 3, 18.8%), sac expansion without endoleak (n = 2, 12.5%), graft infection (n = 3, 18.8%), rupture (n = 2, 12.5%). Nine patients (56.2%) underwent stent graft explantation with in situ surgical graft reconstruction, seven had endograft preserving open surgical intervention. The 30 day mortality was 18.8% (n = 3, all of whom having had endograft preservation). Ten patients (62.5%) suffered major in hospital complications. One patient (6.5%) required post-conversion major surgical re-intervention. IFU adherence during initial EVAR was 43.8%, versus 79.0% (p Open surgical conversion following EVAR results in significant morbidity and mortality. IFU adherence of EVARs later requiring open surgical

  2. Comparative clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of endovascular strategy v open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: three year results of the IMPROVE randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    Objective  To assess the three year clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of a strategy of endovascular repair (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) versus open repair for patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Design  Randomised controlled trial. Setting  30 vascular centres (29 in UK, one in Canada), 2009-16. Participants  613 eligible patients (480 men) with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm, of whom 502 underwent emergency repair for rupture. Interventions  316 patients were randomised to an endovascular strategy (275 with confirmed rupture) and 297 to open repair (261 with confirmed rupture). Main outcome measures  Mortality, with reinterventions after aneurysm repair, quality of life, and hospital costs to three years as secondary measures. Results  The maximum follow-up for mortality was 7.1 years, with two patients in each group lost to follow-up by three years. After similar mortality by 90 days, in the mid-term (three months to three years) there were fewer deaths in the endovascular than the open repair group (hazard ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.36 to 0.90), leading to lower mortality at three years (48% v 56%), but by seven years mortality was about 60% in each group (hazard ratio 0.92, 0.75 to 1.13). Results for the 502 patients with repaired ruptures were more pronounced: three year mortality was lower in the endovascular strategy group (42% v 54%; odds ratio 0.62, 0.43 to 0.88), but after seven years there was no clear difference between the groups (hazard ratio 0.86, 0.68 to 1.08). Reintervention rates up to three years were not significantly different between the randomised groups (hazard ratio 1.02, 0.79 to 1.32); the initial rapid rate of reinterventions was followed by a much slower mid-term reintervention rate in both groups. The early higher average quality of life in the endovascular strategy versus open repair group, coupled with the lower mortality at three years, led to a

  3. Spinal arterial anatomy and risk factors for lower extremity weakness following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair with branched stent-grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catherine K; Chuter, Timothy A M; Reilly, Linda M; Ota, Maile K; Furtado, Andre; Bucci, Monica; Wintermark, Max; Hiramoto, Jade S

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate spinal arterial anatomy and identify risk factors for lower extremity weakness (LEW) following endovascular thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair. A retrospective review was conducted of 37 patients (27 men; mean age 74.8+/-7.1 years, range 58-86) undergoing endovascular TAAA repair with branched stent-grafts at a single academic institution from July 2005 to December 2007. Data were collected on preoperative comorbidities, duration of operation, blood loss, type of anesthesia, extent of aortic coverage, blood pressure, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and drainage, and postoperative development of LEW. Pre- and postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomographic angiograms (CTA) in a 26-patient subset were analyzed to evaluate the number of patent intercostal and lumbar arteries before and after repair. All patients were neurologically intact at the end of the operation. Seven (19%) patients developed LEW postoperatively: 6 perioperatively and 1 after discharge. LEW was associated with postoperative hypotension, internal iliac artery (IIA) occlusion, and fewer patent segmental arteries on preoperative CTA. Lowest mean systolic blood pressure was segmental arteries in patients with or without LEW. Endovascular TAAA repair inevitably occludes direct inflow to lumbar and intercostal arteries. The distal segments of these arteries to the spine, however, are seen to remain patent through collaterals. Measures to preserve collateral pathways and increase perfusion pressure may help prevent or treat LEW.

  4. Meta-analysis of individual-patient data from EVAR-1, DREAM, OVER and ACE trials comparing outcomes of endovascular or open repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm over 5 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, J. T.; Sweeting, M. J.; Ulug, P.; Blankensteijn, J. D.; Lederle, F. A.; Becquemin, J.-P.; Greenhalgh, R. M.; Beard, J. D.; Buxton, M. J.; Brown, L. C.; Harris, P. L.; Rose, J. D. G.; Russell, I. T.; Sculpher, M. J.; Thompson, S. G.; Lilford, R. J.; Bell, P. R. F.; Whitaker, S. C.; Poole-Wilson, The Late P. A.; Ruckley, C. V.; Campbell, W. B.; Dean, M. R. E.; Ruttley, M. S. T.; Coles, E. C.; Halliday, A.; Gibbs, S. J.; Epstein, D.; Hannon, R. J.; Johnston, L.; Bradbury, A. W.; Henderson, M. J.; Parvin, S. D.; Shepherd, D. F. C.; Mitchell, A. W.; Edwards, P. R.; Abbott, G. T.; Higman, D. J.; Vohra, A.; Ashley, S.; Robottom, C.; Wyatt, M. G.; Byrne, D.; Edwards, R.; Leiberman, D. P.; McCarter, D. H.; Taylor, P. R.; Reidy, J. F.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Clason, A. E.; Leen, G. L. S.; Wilson, N. V.; Downes, M.; Walker, S. R.; Lavelle, J. M.; Gough, M. J.; McPherson, S.; Scott, D. J. A.; Kessell, D. O.; Naylor, R.; Sayers, R.; Fishwick, N. G.; Gould, D. A.; Walker, M. G.; Chalmers, N. C.; Garnham, A.; Collins, M. A.; Gaines, P. A.; Ashour, M. Y.; Uberoi, R.; Braithwaite, B.; Davies, J. N.; Travis, S.; Hamilton, G.; Platts, A.; Shandall, A.; Sullivan, B. A.; Sobeh, M.; Matson, M.; Fox, A. D.; Orme, R.; Yusef, W.; Doyle, T.; Horrocks, M.; Hardman, J.; Blair, P. H. B.; Ellis, P. K.; Morris, G.; Odurny, A.; Vohra, R.; Duddy, M.; Thompson, M.; Loosemore, T. M. L.; Belli, A. M.; Morgan, R.; Adiseshiah, M.; Brookes, J. A. S.; McCollum, C. N.; Ashleigh, R.; Aukett, M.; Baker, S.; Barbe, E.; Batson, N.; Bell, J.; Blundell, J.; Boardley, D.; Boyes, S.; Brown, O.; Bryce, J.; Carmichael, M.; Chance, T.; Coleman, J.; Cosgrove, C.; Curran, G.; Dennison, T.; Devine, C.; Dewhirst, N.; Errington, B.; Farrell, H.; Fisher, C.; Fulford, P.; Gough, M.; Graham, C.; Hooper, R.; Horne, G.; Horrocks, L.; Hughes, B.; Hutchings, T.; Ireland, M.; Judge, C.; Kelly, L.; Kemp, J.; Kite, A.; Kivela, M.; Lapworth, M.; Lee, C.; Linekar, L.; Mahmood, A.; March, L.; Martin, J.; Matharu, N.; McGuigen, K.; Morris-Vincent, P.; Murray, S.; Murtagh, A.; Owen, G.; Ramoutar, V.; Rippin, C.; Rowley, J.; Sinclair, J.; Spencer, S.; Taylor, V.; Tomlinson, C.; Ward, S.; Wealleans, V.; West, J.; White, K.; Williams, J.; Wilson, L.; Grobbee, D. E.; Bak, A. A. A.; Buth, J.; Pattynama, P. M.; Verhoeven, E. L. G.; van Voorthuisen, A. E.; Balm, R.; Cuypers, P. W. M.; Prinssen, M.; van Sambeek, M. R. H. M.; Baas, A. F.; Hunink, M. G.; van Engelshoven, J. M.; Jacobs, M. J. H. M.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.; van Bockel, J. H.; Reekers, J.; Tielbeek, X.; Wisselink, W.; Boekema, N.; Heuveling, L. M.; Sikking, I.; de Bruin, J. L.; Tielbeek, A. V.; Pattynama, P.; Prins, T.; van der Ham, A. C.; van der Velden, J. J. I. M.; van Sterkenburg, S. M. M.; ten Haken, G. B.; Bruijninckx, C. M. A.; van Overhagen, H.; Tutein Nolthenius, R. P.; Hendriksz, T. R.; Teijink, J. A. W.; Odink, H. F.; de Smet, A. A. E. A.; Vroegindeweij, D.; van Loenhout, R. M. M.; Rutten, M. J.; Hamming, J. F.; Lampmann, L. E. H.; Bender, M. H. M.; Pasmans, H.; Vahl, A. C.; de Vries, C.; Mackaay, A. J. C.; van Dortmont, L. M. C.; van der Vliet, A. J.; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Boomsma, J. H. B.; van Dop, H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, J. C. A.; de Rooij, T. P. W.; Smits, T. M.; Yilmaz, E. N.; van den Berg, F. G.; Visser, M. J. T.; van der Linden, E.; Schurink, G. W. H.; de Haan, M.; Smeets, H. J.; Stabel, P.; van Elst, F.; Poniewierski, J.; Vermassen, F. E. G.; Freischlag, J. A.; Kohler, T. R.; Latts, E.; Matsumura, J.; Padberg, F. T.; Kyriakides, T. C.; Swanson, K. M.; Guarino, P.; Peduzzi, P.; Antonelli, M.; Cushing, C.; Davis, E.; Durant, L.; Joyner, S.; Kossack, The Late A.; LeGwin, Mary; McBride, V.; O'Connor, T.; Poulton, J.; Stratton, The Late S.; Zellner, S.; Snodgrass, A. J.; Thornton, J.; Haakenson, C. M.; Stroupe, K. T.; Jonk, Y.; Hallett, J. W.; Hertzer, N.; Towne, J.; Katz, D. A.; Karrison, T.; Matts, J. P.; Marottoli, R.; Kasl, S.; Mehta, R.; Feldman, R.; Farrell, W.; Allore, H.; Perry, E.; Niederman, J.; Randall, F.; Zeman, M.; Beckwith, The Late D.; O'Leary, T. J.; Huang, G. D.; Bader, M.; Ketteler, E. R.; Kingsley, D. D.; Marek, J. M.; Massen, R. J.; Matteson, B. D.; Pitcher, J. D.; Langsfeld, M.; Corson, J. D.; Goff, J. M.; Kasirajan, K.; Paap, C.; Robertson, D. C.; Salam, A.; Veeraswamy, R.; Milner, R.; Guidot, J.; Lal, B. K.; Busuttil, S. J.; Lilly, M. P.; Braganza, M.; Ellis, K.; Patterson, M. A.; Jordan, W. D.; Whitley, D.; Taylor, S.; Passman, M.; Kerns, D.; Inman, C.; Poirier, J.; Ebaugh, J.; Raffetto, J.; Chew, D.; Lathi, S.; Owens, C.; Hickson, K.; Dosluoglu, H. H.; Eschberger, K.; Kibbe, M. R.; Baraniewski, H. M.; Endo, M.; Busman, A.; Meadows, W.; Evans, M.; Giglia, J. S.; El Sayed, H.; Reed, A. B.; Ruf, M.; Ross, S.; Jean-Claude, J. M.; Pinault, G.; Kang, P.; White, N.; Eiseman, M.; Jones, The Late R.; Timaran, C. H.; Modrall, J. G.; Welborn, M. B.; Lopez, J.; Nguyen, T.; Chacko, J. K. Y.; Granke, K.; Vouyouka, A. G.; Olgren, E.; Chand, P.; Allende, B.; Ranella, M.; Yales, C.; Whitehill, T. A.; Krupski, The Late W. C.; Nehler, M. R.; Johnson, S. P.; Jones, D. N.; Strecker, P.; Bhola, M. A.; Shortell, C. K.; Gray, J. L.; Lawson, J. H.; McCann, R.; Sebastian, M. W.; Kistler Tetterton, J.; Blackwell, C.; Prinzo, P. A.; Lee, N.; Cerveira, J. J.; Zickler, R. W.; Hauck, K. A.; Berceli, S. A.; Lee, W. A.; Ozaki, C. K.; Nelson, P. R.; Irwin, A. S.; Baum, R.; Aulivola, B.; Rodriguez, H.; Littooy, F. N.; Greisler, H.; O'Sullivan, M. T.; Kougias, P.; Lin, P. H.; Bush, R. L.; Guinn, G.; Bechara, C.; Cagiannos, C.; Pisimisis, G.; Barshes, N.; Pillack, S.; Guillory, B.; Cikrit, D.; Lalka, S. G.; Lemmon, G.; Nachreiner, R.; Rusomaroff, M.; O'Brien, E.; Cullen, J. J.; Hoballah, J.; Sharp, W. J.; McCandless, J. L.; Beach, V.; Minion, D.; Schwarcz, T. H.; Kimbrough, J.; Ashe, L.; Rockich, A.; Warner-Carpenter, J.; Moursi, M.; Eidt, J. F.; Brock, S.; Bianchi, C.; Bishop, V.; Gordon, I. L.; Fujitani, R.; Kubaska, S. M.; Behdad, M.; Azadegan, R.; Ma Agas, C.; Zalecki, K.; Hoch, J. R.; Carr, S. C.; Acher, C.; Schwarze, M.; Tefera, G.; Mell, M.; Dunlap, B.; Rieder, J.; Stuart, J. M.; Weiman, D. S.; Abul-Khoudoud, O.; Garrett, H. E.; Walsh, S. M.; Wilson, K. L.; Seabrook, G. R.; Cambria, R. A.; Brown, K. R.; Lewis, B. D.; Framberg, S.; Kallio, C.; Barke, R. A.; Santilli, S. M.; d'Audiffret, A. C.; Oberle, N.; Proebstle, C.; Johnson, L. L.; Jacobowitz, G. R.; Cayne, N.; Rockman, C.; Adelman, M.; Gagne, P.; Nalbandian, M.; Caropolo, L. J.; Pipinos, I. I.; Johanning, J.; Lynch, T.; DeSpiegelaere, H.; Purviance, G.; Zhou, W.; Dalman, R.; Lee, J. T.; Safadi, B.; Coogan, S. M.; Wren, S. M.; Bahmani, D. D.; Maples, D.; Thunen, S.; Golden, M. A.; Mitchell, M. E.; Fairman, R.; Reinhardt, S.; Wilson, M. A.; Tzeng, E.; Muluk, S.; Peterson, N. M.; Foster, M.; Edwards, J.; Moneta, G. L.; Landry, G.; Taylor, L.; Yeager, R.; Cannady, E.; Treiman, G.; Hatton-Ward, S.; Salabsky, The Late B.; Kansal, N.; Owens, E.; Estes, M.; Forbes, B. A.; Sobotta, C.; Rapp, J. H.; Reilly, L. M.; Perez, S. L.; Yan, K.; Sarkar, R.; Dwyer, S. S.; Perez, S.; Chong, K.; Hatsukami, T. S.; Glickerman, D. G.; Sobel, M.; Burdick, T. S.; Pedersen, K.; Cleary, P.; Back, M.; Bandyk, D.; Johnson, B.; Shames, M.; Reinhard, R. L.; Thomas, S. C.; Hunter, G. C.; Leon, L. R.; Westerband, A.; Guerra, R. J.; Riveros, M.; Mills, J. L.; Hughes, J. D.; Escalante, A. M.; Psalms, S. B.; Day, N. N.; Macsata, R.; Sidawy, A.; Weiswasser, J.; Arora, S.; Jasper, B. J.; Dardik, A.; Gahtan, V.; Muhs, B. E.; Sumpio, B. E.; Gusberg, R. J.; Spector, M.; Pollak, J.; Aruny, J.; Kelly, E. L.; Wong, J.; Vasilas, P.; Joncas, C.; Gelabert, H. A.; DeVirgillio, C.; Rigberg, D. A.; Cole, L.; Marzelle, J.; Sapoval, M.; Favre, J.-P.; Watelet, J.; Lermusiaux, P.; Lepage, E.; Hemery, F.; Dolbeau, G.; Hawajry, N.; Cunin, P.; Harris, P.; Stockx, L.; Chatellier, G.; Mialhe, C.; Fiessinger, J.-N.; Pagny, L.; Kobeiter, H.; Boissier, C.; Lacroix, P.; Ledru, F.; Pinot, J.-J.; Deux, J.-F.; Tzvetkov, B.; Duvaldestin, P.; Jourdain, C.; DAVID, V.; Enouf, D.; Ady, N.; Krimi, A.; Boudjema, N.; Jousset, Y.; Enon, B.; Blin, V.; Picquet, J.; L'Hoste, P.; Thouveny, F.; Borie, H.; Kowarski, S.; Pernes, J.-M.; Auguste, M.; Desgranges, P.; Allaire, E.; Meaulle, P.-Y.; Chaix, D.; Juliae, P.; Fabiani, J. N.; Chevalier, P.; Combes, M.; Seguin, A.; Belhomme, D.; Baque, J.; Pellerin, O.; Favre, J. P.; Barral, X.; Veyret, C.; Peillon, C.; Plissonier, D.; Thomas, P.; Clavier, E.; Martinez, R.; Bleuet, F.; C, Dupreix; Verhoye, J. P.; Langanay, T.; Heautot, J. F.; Koussa, M.; Haulon, S.; Halna, P.; Destrieux, L.; Lions, C.; Wiloteaux, S.; Beregi, J. P.; Bergeron, P.; Patra, P.; Costargent, A.; Chaillou, P.; D'Alicourt, A.; Goueffic, Y.; Cheysson, E.; Parrot, A.; Garance, P.; Demon, A.; Tyazi, A.; Pillet, J.-C.; Lescalie, F.; Tilly, G.; Steinmetz, E.; Favier, C.; Brenot, R.; Krause, D.; Cercueil, J. P.; Vahdat, O.; Sauer, M.; Soula, P.; Querian, A.; Garcia, O.; Levade, M.; Colombier, D.; Cardon, J.-M.; Joyeux, A.; Borrelly, P.; Dogas, G.; Magnan, P.-É; Branchereau, A.; Bartoli, J.-M.; Hassen-Khodja, R.; Batt, M.; Planchard, P.-F.; Bouillanne, P.-J.; Haudebourg, P.; Bayne, J.; Gouny, P.; Badra, A.; Braesco, J.; Nonent, M.; Lucas, A.; Cardon, A.; Kerdiles, Y.; Rolland, Y.; Kassab, M.; Brillu, C.; Goubault, F.; Tailboux, L.; Darrieux, H.; Briand, O.; Maillard, J.-C.; Varty, K.; Cousins, C.

    2017-01-01

    The erosion of the early mortality advantage of elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) compared with open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm remains without a satisfactory explanation. An individual-patient data meta-analysis of four multicentre randomized trials of EVAR versus open repair

  5. Perioperative risk factors for hospital readmission after elective endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu; Gabra, Fady; Fujitani, Roy M

    2018-04-02

    Elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is generally well tolerated. However, the incidence of hospital readmission after EVAR and the risk factors and reasons for it are not well studied. This study sought to determine the incidence, to characterize the indications, and to identify perioperative patient-centered risk factors for hospital readmission within 30 days after elective EVAR. All patients who underwent EVAR electively in 2012 to 2013 were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Targeted Vascular database (n = 3886). Preoperative demographics, operation-specific variables, and postoperative outcomes were compared between those who were readmitted within 30 days of the index operation and those who were not. Multivariate logistic regression was then used to determine independent predictors of hospital readmission. The unadjusted 30-day readmission rate after EVAR was 8.2%. Of all readmissions, 55% were for reasons related to the procedure. Median time to readmission was 12 days. Significant preoperative risk factors associated with readmission were female sex, preoperative steroid use, congestive heart failure, and dialysis dependence (P readmission, including myocardial infarction and deep venous thrombosis (P readmission were surgical site infection (odds ratio, 10.24; 95% confidence interval, 5.31-19.75; P readmissions remain a costly problem after vascular surgery and are associated with 30-day mortality after elective EVAR. Whereas female sex and certain irreversible medical comorbidities are nonmodifiable, focusing on medical optimization and identifying those perioperative variables that can affect the need for post-EVAR interventions will be an important step in decreasing hospital readmission. Copyright © 2018 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aortic dissection. Basic aspects and endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, Nicolas I; Alviar, Carlos I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long-term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes have facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular Stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention, as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular Stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the theoretically high risk of complications should render the surgeon extremely cautious especially with young patients. Conceptually, the endo luminal treatment in the acute phase seems to be the solution and will probably become a preferred therapy while technical refinement is under way. Worldwide experience is growing and with this a better understanding of the indications and limitations of this innovative therapy will be

  7. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters 18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs ≥18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% ± 3% and 84% ± 9% for the <18-mm and ≥18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  8. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  9. Long-term decline in renal function is more significant after endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Adas, Ziad; Shepard, Alexander D; Nypaver, Timothy J; Weaver, Mitchell R; Maatman, Thomas; Yessayan, Lenar T; Balraj, Praveen; Kabbani, Loay S

    2018-03-20

    It is not clear whether endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) results in an increase in renal insufficiency during the long term compared with open repair (OR). We reviewed our experience with AAA repair to determine whether there was a significant difference in postoperative and long-term renal outcomes between OR and EVAR. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of all patients who underwent AAA repair between January 1993 and July 2013 at a tertiary referral hospital. Demographics, comorbidities, preoperative and postoperative laboratory values, morbidity, and mortality were collected. Patients with ruptured AAAs, preoperative hemodialysis, juxtarenal or suprarenal aneurysm origin, and no follow-up laboratory values were excluded. Preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and yearly serum creatinine values were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated on the basis of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. Acute kidney injury (AKI) was classified using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Change in GFR was defined as preoperative GFR minus the GFR at each follow-up interval. Comparison was made between EVAR and OR groups using multivariate logistics for categorical data and linear regression for continuous variables. During the study period, 763 infrarenal AAA repairs were performed at our institution; 675 repairs fit the inclusion criteria (317 ORs and 358 EVARs). Mean age was 73.9 years. Seventy-nine percent were male, 78% were hypertensive, 18% were diabetic, and 31% had preoperative renal dysfunction defined as GFR below 60 mL/min. Using a multivariate logistic model to control for all variables, OR was found to have a 1.6 times greater chance for development of immediate postoperative AKI compared with EVAR (P = .038). Hypertension and aneurysm size were independent risk factors for development of AKI (P = .012 and .022, respectively). Using a linear

  10. Lower extremity weakness is associated with elevated blood and cerebrospinal fluid glucose levels following multibranched endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Jade S; Fernandez, Charlene; Gasper, Warren; Vartanian, Shant; Reilly, Linda; Chuter, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with worsened clinical outcomes after central nervous system injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between lower extremity weakness (LEW) and the glucose levels of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients undergoing multibranched endovascular aneurysm repair (MBEVAR) of thoracoabdominal and pararenal aortic aneurysms. Blood and CSF samples were collected preoperatively, immediately after aneurysm repair, and on postoperative day 1 in 21 patients undergoing MBEVAR. Data on demographics, operative repair, complications, and outcomes were collected prospectively. There were 21 patients who underwent successful MBEVAR. Two patients had pre-existing paraplegia from prior open aortic surgery and were excluded from the current analysis. The mean age was 73 ± 8 years, and 15 of 19 (79%) were men. In the postoperative period, 7 of 19 (37%) patients developed LEW. This was temporary in 5 of 19 (26%) patients and permanent in 2 of 19 (11%) patients. The LEW group was older than the non-LEW group (77 ± 6 vs 70 ± 9 years, respectively; P = .10), had a lower preoperative glomerular filtration rate (58.6 ± 18.5 vs 71.4 ± 23.5 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ; P = .24), and was more likely to be taking a statin (100% vs 67%, respectively; P = .13), but these did not reach statistical significance. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, lung disease, or peripheral artery disease between the LEW and non-LEW groups. There was also no difference in operative time, blood loss, contrast material volume, or fluoroscopy times between the two groups. Preoperative blood and CSF glucose levels were similar in those with and without LEW. During the postoperative period, glucose values in the blood and CSF were significantly higher in those patients who developed LEW compared with those who did not develop LEW. In all patients with LEW, the elevation

  11. Low mortality rates after endovascular aortic repair expand use to high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turner, Megan C; Leraas, Harold J; Gilmore, Brian F; Nag, Uttara; Turley, Ryan S; Shortell, Cynthia K; Mureebe, Leila

    2018-02-01

    The 2010 endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) trial 2 (EVAR 2) reported that patients with comorbidity profiles rendering them unfit for open aneurysm repair who underwent EVAR did not experience a survival advantage compared with those who did not undergo intervention. These patients experienced a 30-day mortality of 7.3%, whereas reports from similar cohorts reported far lower mortality rates. The primary objective of our study was to compare the incidence of 30-day mortality in low- and high-risk patients undergoing EVAR in a contemporary data set, using patient risk stratification criteria from EVAR 2. Secondarily, we sought to identify risk factors associated with a disproportionate contribution to 30-day mortality risk. Data were obtained from the 2005 to 2013 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Participant Use Data Files (N = 24,813). Patients were included in the high-risk cohort with the presence of renal, respiratory, or cardiac preoperative criteria alone or in combination. Renal impairment criteria were defined as dialysis and creatinine concentration >2.26 mg/dL. Respiratory impairment criteria included history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and preoperative ventilator support. Cardiac impairment criteria included history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, angina, and prior coronary intervention. Patient and procedural characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes were compared using Pearson χ 2 tests for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables. Among 24,813 patients undergoing EVAR, 12,043 (48%) patients were characterized as high risk (at least one impairment criterion); 12,770 (52%) patients were stratified as low risk. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.9% in the high-risk cohort compared with the 7.3% reported by EVAR 2, and it was higher in the high-risk cohort compared with the low-risk cohort (1.9% vs 0.9%; P < .001). Whereas the

  12. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-01-01

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting

  13. Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 thoracic endovascular aortic repair: effect of bird-beak configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Tomoaki; Kuratani, Toru; Shimamura, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Tomohiko; Kin, Keiwa; Masada, Kenta; Shijo, Takayuki; Torikai, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-10-01

    Type 1a endoleak is one of the most severe complications after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), because it carries the risk of aortic rupture. The association between bird-beak configuration and Type 1a endoleak remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to analyse the predictors of Type 1a endoleak following Zone 1 and Zone 2 TEVAR, with a particular focus on the effect of bird-beak configuration. From April 2008 to July 2015, 105 patients (mean age 68.6 years) who underwent Zone 1 and 2 landing TEVAR were enrolled, with a mean follow-up period of 4.3 years. The patients were categorized into 2 groups, according to the presence (Group B, n = 32) or the absence (Group N, n = 73) of bird-beak configuration on the first postoperative multidetector computed tomography. The Kaplan-Meier event-free rate curve showed that Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak progression occurred less frequently in Group N than in Group B. Five-year freedom from Type 1a endoleak rates were 79.7% and 100% for Groups B and N, respectively (P = 0.007). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that dissecting aortic aneurysm (odds ratio 3.72, 95% confidence interval 1.30-11.0; P = 0.014) and shorter radius of inner curvature (odds ratio 1.09, 95% confidence interval 0.85-0.99; P = 0.025) were significant risk factors for bird-beak configuration. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression showed that Z-type stent graft (hazard ratio 2.69, 95% confidence interval 1.11-6.51; P = 0.030) was a significant risk factor for bird-beak progression. Appropriate stent grafts need to be chosen carefully to prevent Type 1a endoleak and bird-beak configuration after landing Zone 1 and 2 TEVAR. Patients with bird-beak configuration on early postoperative multidetector computed tomography require closer follow-up to screen for Type 1a endoleak. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  14. Retrograde type A dissection: a serious complication due to thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair for Stanford type B aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Zhai Shuiting; Li Tianxiao; Shi Shuaitao; Zhang Kewei; Li Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to discuss the possible causes and prevention of retrograde type A dissection occurred after thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair (TEVAR) for symptomatic type B dissection. Methods: During the period from January 2005 to January 2011, TEVAR was carried out in 189 patients (157 males and 32 females) with symptomatic type B dissection. The average age of the patients was (51.2±13.5) years, ranged from 26 to 78 years. A follow-up lasting for 3-63 months (mean 32 months) was conducted in 135 patients (71.43%). Fifty-four patients lost in touch with the authors (28.57%). The occurrence of retrograde type A dissection after TEVAR was calculated and the possible causes were analyzed. Results: After TEVAR retrograde type A dissection occurred in two patients (1.48%), and both were males. One patient developed retrograde type A dissection in perioperative period, and the patient refused to have surgery. Conservative treatment was employed for over three years and be was still alive so far. The other patient developed retrograde type A dissection one month after TEVAR, and emergency surgery was performed. The patient was followed up for three months and he was still alive. Conclusion: The retrograde type A dissection occurred after TEVAR may be closely related to the stent-graft device, to the interventional manipulations and to the vascular disorders. Close attention should be paid to the direct damage produced by the stent-graft device to the vascular wall. (authors)

  15. Complete ten-year follow-up after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Survival and causes of death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Nolz, Richard; Teufelsbauer, Harald; Kretschmer, Georg; Prusa, Alexander M.; Funovics, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Schoder, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the hazard and causes of death after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms during a complete ten year follow-up. Methods: This is a retrospective clinical study of 130 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR between 1995 and 1998. One-hundred twenty-one patients (93.1%) were treated with first-generation stentgrafts and nine patients (6.9%) received second-generation devices. All patients completed a follow-up of at least 10 years, unless death occurred before then. Time and causes of death were provided by the Austrian central register of deaths. Results: The median follow-up was 7.6 years, and the 130 patients had 968.5 person-years of follow-up. The ten-year mortality rate was 62.3%. Cardiovascular events were the most frequent causes of death, with a 3.9 incidence rate per 100 person-years. Cancer death and death due to other causes occurred in 2.1 and 1.8 cases per 100 person-years, respectively. Lethal late aneurysm rupture happened in 4.6% (n = 6), which corresponds to an annual incidence rate of 0.6 per 100 person-years. All of those patients had been treated with first-generation devices. Conclusions: Cardiovascular events were the most frequent cause of death after EVAR, followed by malignancy and other diseases. The risk of dying from secondary rupture was clearly lower than that of death due to other reasons during ten years after EVAR, even in patients with first-generation stentgrafts.

  16. Predictors of outcome after elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and external validation of a risk prediction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniowski, Brendan; Barnes, Mary; Jenkins, Jason; Boyne, Nicholas; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) has been associated with lower operative mortality and morbidity than open surgery but comparable long-term mortality and higher delayed complication and reintervention rates. Attention has therefore been directed to identifying preoperative and operative variables that influence outcomes after EVAR. Risk-prediction models, such as the EVAR Risk Assessment (ERA) model, have also been developed to help surgeons plan EVAR procedures. The aims of this study were (1) to describe outcomes of elective EVAR at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), (2) to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR, and (3) to externally validate the ERA model. All elective EVAR procedures at the RBWH before July 1, 2009, were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed to determine the outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify preoperative and operative variables predictive of outcomes after EVAR. Binomial logistic regression analyses were used to externally validate the ERA model. Before July 1, 2009, 197 patients (172 men), who were a mean age of 72.8 years, underwent elective EVAR at the RBWH. Operative mortality was 1.0%. Survival was 81.1% at 3 years and 63.2% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis showed predictors of survival were age (P = .0126), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P = .0180), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = .0348) at 3 years and age (P = .0103), ASA score (P = .0006), renal failure (P = .0048), and serum creatinine (P = .0022) at 5 years. Aortic branch vessel score was predictive of initial (30-day) type II endoleak (P = .0015). AAA tortuosity was predictive of midterm type I endoleak (P = .0251). Female sex was associated with lower rates of initial clinical success (P = .0406). The ERA model fitted RBWH data well for early death (C statistic = .906), 3-year survival (C statistic = .735), 5-year

  17. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Prakash; Hughes, John; Patel, Ashish S.; Donati, Tommaso; Sallam, Morad; Patel, Sanjay D.; Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan; Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities

  18. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Prakash, E-mail: prakash.2.saha@kcl.ac.uk; Hughes, John, E-mail: johnhughes387@rocketmail.com; Patel, Ashish S., E-mail: ashish.s.patel@kcl.ac.uk; Donati, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso.donati@gstt.nhs.uk; Sallam, Morad, E-mail: morad.sallam@gstt.nhs.uk; Patel, Sanjay D., E-mail: sanjay.patel@gstt.nhs.uk; Bell, Rachel E. [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Katsanos, Konstantinos, E-mail: katsanos@med.upatras.gr [King’s Health Partners, Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Modarai, Bijan, E-mail: bijan.modarai@kcl.ac.uk; Zayed, Hany A., E-mail: hany.zayed@gstt.nhs.uk [King’s Health Partners, Department of Vascular Surgery, Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  19. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); CHRU-Nancy, Hopitaux de BRABOIS, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre (France); Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin [CHU-Rouen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Rouen (France); Bravetti, Stephanie [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); Coscas, Raphael [Hopital Ambroise Pare, APHP, Chirurgie Vasculaire, Boulogne-Billancourt (France); Haulon, Stephan [CHU-Lille, Department of Vascular Surgery, Lille (France); Mandry, Damien [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Department of Radiology, Nancy (France); INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Alsac, Jean-Marc [grid.414093.b, APHP, HEGP, Department of Vascular Surgery, Paris (France); Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Vascular Surgery, Nancy (France); Goueffic, Yann [CHU-Nantes, Department of Vascular Surgery, Nantes (France); Morel, Olivier [CHU-Besancon, Department of Nuclear Medecine, Besancon (France); Roch, Veronique [CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, Nuclear Medecine and Nancyclotep Platform, Nancy (France); Micard, Emilien [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Lamiral, Zohra [INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France); Michel, Jean-Baptiste [INSERM, Bichat, UMR 698, Paris (France); Rossignol, Patrick [INSERM, University of Lorraine, UMR 1116, Nancy (France); INSERM, CHRU-Nancy, Universite de Lorraine, CIC-1433, FCRIN INI-CRCT, Nancy (France)

    2018-04-15

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an {sup 18}F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  20. Low baseline and subsequent higher aortic abdominal aneurysm FDG uptake are associated with poor sac shrinkage post endovascular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Pierre-Yves; Plissonnier, Didier; Rouer, Martin; Bravetti, Stephanie; Coscas, Raphael; Haulon, Stephan; Mandry, Damien; Alsac, Jean-Marc; Malikov, Serguei; Settembre, Nicla; Goueffic, Yann; Morel, Olivier; Roch, Veronique; Micard, Emilien; Lamiral, Zohra; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Rossignol, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    The growth phases of medically treated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are frequently associated with an 18 F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) pattern involving low baseline and subsequent higher FDG uptake. However, the FDG-PET patterns associated with the endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of larger AAA are presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serial AAA FDG uptake measurements, obtained before EVAR and 1 and 6 months post-intervention and subsequent sac shrinkage at 6 months, a well-recognized indicator of successful repair. Thirty-three AAA patients referred for EVAR (maximal diameter: 55.4 ± 6.0 mm, total volume: 205.7 ± 63.0 mL) underwent FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) before EVAR and at 1 and 6 months thereafter, with the monitoring of AAA volume and of a maximal standardized FDG uptake [SUVmax] averaged between the axial slices encompassing the AAA. Sac shrinkage was highly variable and could be stratified into three terciles: a first tercile in which shrinkage was absent or very limited (0-29 mL) and a third tercile with pronounced shrinkage (56-165 mL). SUVmax values were relatively low at baseline in the 1st tercile (SUVmax: 1.69 ± 0.33), but markedly increased at 6 months (2.42 ± 0.69, p = 0.02 vs. baseline). These SUV max values were by contrast much higher at baseline in the 3rd tercile (SUVmax: 2.53 ± 0.83 p = 0.009 vs. 1st tercile) and stable at 6 months (2.49 ± 0.80), while intermediate results were documented in the 2nd tercile. Lastly, the amount of sac shrinkage, expressed in absolute values or in percentages of baseline AAA volumes, was positively correlated with baseline SUVmax (p = 0.001 for both). A low pre-EVAR FDG uptake and increased AAA FDG uptake at 6 months are associated with reduced sac shrinkage. This sequential FDG-PET pattern is similar to that already shown to accompany growth phases of medically treated AAA. (orig.)

  1. Transthoracic Echocardiography Provides Important Long-Term Prognostic Information in Selected Patients Undergoing Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Jamie M; Bahia, Sandeep S; Gravina, Angela; Di Fino, Sara; Thompson, Matthew M; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Holt, Peter J E; Sharma, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The value of performing transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as part of the clinical assessment of patients awaiting endovascular repair of the abdominal aorta is little evaluated. We aimed to estimate the prognostic importance of information derived from TTE on long-term all-cause mortality in a selected group of patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair. This was a retrospective cohort study of 273 consecutive patients selected for endovascular aneurysm repair. All patients included in the analysis underwent TTE before their procedure. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of TTE measures on all-cause mortality. Over a mean follow-up of 3.2±1.5 years, there were 78 deaths with a mean time to death of 1.28±1.16 years. A greater tubular ascending aorta (hazard ratio [HR] 5.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.77-11.33), presence of mitral regurgitation (HR 8.13, 95% CI 4.09-12.16), lower left ventricular ejection fraction (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.98), younger age (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95-0.99), and presence of diabetes mellitus (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.24-1.89) were predictors of all-cause mortality. Echocardiography provides important long-term prognostic information in patients undergoing endovascular aneurysm repair. These TTE indices were more important at predicting outcome than standard conventional risk factors in this patient group. A greater tubular ascending aorta, presence of mitral regurgitation, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, younger age, and diabetes mellitus were independently associated with long-term mortality. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Epidemiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms in a Chinese population during introduction of endovascular repair, 1994 to 2013: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Greta; Chan, Yiu Che; Chong, Ka Chun; Lee, Kam Pui; Cheung, Grace Chung-Yan; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and mortality during a period when endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced.Open repair surgery was the mainstay of treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but EVAR is increasingly utilized. Studies in the Western population have reported improved short-term or postoperative mortality and shorter length of hospital stay with EVAR. However, scant data are available in the Chinese population.We conducted a retrospective observational study using the database of the Hospital Authority, which provides public health care to most of the Hong Kong population. AAA patients admitted to public hospitals for intact repair or rupture from 1994 to 2013 were included in this study. We calculated the incidence of ruptured AAA, annual repair rates according to type of AAA and surgery, as well as death rates (operative and overall short-term). We calculated whether there were significant changes over time and compared short-term mortality between open surgery and EVAR.One thousand eight hundred eighty-five patients were admitted for intact repair and 1306 patients were admitted for AAA rupture, of whom 795 underwent rupture repair. Intact repair rates significantly increased in all age groups (7.3-37.8%, P short-term AAA-related deaths decreased by more than half (73% in 1994 to 24% in 2013, P Short-term mortality was significantly lower for EVAR than for open repair (17.2% vs 40.3%, P Short-term AAA-related deaths have declined likely due to decreased operative mortality and rupture deaths during the period of EVAR introduction and expansion.

  3. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brechtel, Klaus; Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  4. Influence of diabetes mellitus on the endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leurs, L.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Buth, J.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of diabetes mellitus on outcome after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Of 6017 patients enrolled in the EUROSTAR registry after undergoing endovascular AAA repair between May 1994 and December 2003, 731 (12%) had diabetes mellitus

  5. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, Robert; Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Wacław

    2011-01-01

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a—the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  6. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  7. 3D printing of an aortic aneurysm to facilitate decision making and device selection for endovascular aneurysm repair in complex neck anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Matthew D B S; Laycock, Stephen D; Brown, James R I; Jakeways, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    To describe rapid prototyping or 3-dimensional (3D) printing of aneurysms with complex neck anatomy to facilitate endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A 75-year-old man had a 6.6-cm infrarenal aortic aneurysm that appeared on computed tomographic angiography to have a sharp neck angulation of ~90°. However, although the computed tomography (CT) data were analyzed using centerline of flow, the true neck length and relations of the ostial origins were difficult to determine. No multidisciplinary consensus could be reached as to which stent-graft to use owing to these borderline features of the neck anatomy. Based on past experience with rapid prototyping technology, a decision was taken to print a model of the aneurysm to aid in visualization of the neck anatomy. The CT data were segmented, processed, and converted into a stereolithographic format representing the lumen as a 3D volume, from which a full-sized replica was printed within 24 hours. The model demonstrated that the neck was adequate for stent-graft repair using the Aorfix device. Rapid prototyping of aortic aneurysms is feasible and can aid decision making and device delivery. Further work is required to test the value of 3D replicas in planning procedures and their impact on procedure time, radiation dose, and procedure cost.

  8. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks ≥20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  9. Alginate oligosaccharide indirectly affects toll-like receptor signaling via the inhibition of microRNA-29b in aneurysm patients after endovascular aortic repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Yong Yang,1–4,* Zhenhuan Ma,1–4,* Guokai Yang,1–4 Jia Wan,1–4 Guojian Li,1–4 Lingjuan Du,1–4 Ping Lu1–4 1Department of Vascular Surgery, The Second People’s Hospital of Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 2Department of Vascular Surgery, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China; 3Department of Vascular Surgery, Vascular Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China; 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Abdominal Surgery Centre in Yunnan Province, Kunming, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR is often followed by aneurysm recurrence. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS has potential antitumor properties as a natural product while the related mechanisms remain unclear. Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling is associated with inflammatory activity of aneurysm and may be affected by miR-29b. Thus, inhibitory function of AOS on aneurysms was explored by measuring the important molecules in TLR4 signaling. After EVAR, a total of 248 aortic aneurysm patients were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups: AOS group (AG, oral administration 10-mg AOS daily and control group (CG, placebo daily. The size of residual aneurysms, aneurysm recurrence, and side effects were investigated. Aneurysm recurrence was determined by Kaplan–Meier analysis. After 2 years, eight and two patients died in the CG and AG, respectively. The sizes of residual aneurysms were significantly larger in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. The incidence of aneurysm recurrence was also significantly higher in the CG than in the AG (P<0.05. AOS treatment reduced the levels of miR-29b, TLR4, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B, interleukin 1 (IL-1 beta, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. Overexpression and silence of miR-29b increased and reduced the level of TLR4, phospho-p65 NF-kappa B, phospho-p38 MAPK, IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Spearman’s rank correlation

  10. Hemodynamic and Anatomic Predictors of Renovisceral Stent-Graft Occlusion Following Chimney Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Rosamaria; He, Yong; Laquian, Liza; Scali, Salvatore T; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger; Beck, Adam W; Berceli, Scott A

    2017-12-01

    To identify anatomic and hemodynamic changes associated with impending visceral chimney stent-graft occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with the chimney technique (chEVAR). A retrospective evaluation was performed of computed tomography scans from 41 patients who underwent juxtarenal chEVAR from 2008 to 2012 to identify stent-grafts demonstrating conformational changes following initial placement. Six subjects (mean age 74 years; 3 men) were selected for detailed reconstruction and computational hemodynamic analysis; 4 had at least 1 occluded chimney stent-graft. This subset of repairs was systematically analyzed to define the anatomic and hemodynamic impact of these changes and identify signature patterns associated with impending renovisceral stent-graft occlusion. Spatial and temporal analyses of cross-sectional area, centerline angle, intraluminal pressure, and wall shear stress (WSS) were performed within the superior mesenteric and renal artery chimney grafts used for repair. Conformational changes in the chimney stent-grafts and associated perturbations, in both local WSS and pressure, were responsible for the 5 occlusions in the 13 stented branches. Anatomic and hemodynamic signatures leading to occlusion were identified within 1 month postoperatively, with a lumen area 25 Pa/mm (p=0.03), and systolic WSS >45 Pa (p=0.03) associated with future chimney stent-graft occlusion. Chimney stent-grafts at increased risk for occlusion demonstrated anatomic and hemodynamic signatures within 1 month of juxtarenal chEVAR. Analysis of these parameters in the early postoperative period may be useful for identifying and remediating these high-risk stent-grafts.

  11. Risk models for mortality following elective open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choke, E; Lee, K; McCarthy, M; Nasim, A; Naylor, A R; Bown, M; Sayers, R

    2012-12-01

    To develop and validate an "in house" risk model for predicting perioperative mortality following elective AAA repair and to compare this with other models. Multivariate logistics regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for perioperative-day mortality from one tertiary institution's prospectively maintained database. Consecutive elective open (564) and endovascular (589) AAA repairs (2000-2010) were split randomly into development (810) and validation (343) data sets. The resultant model was compared to Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS), Modified Customised Probability Index (m-CPI), CPI, the Vascular Governance North West (VGNW) model and the Medicare model. Variables associated with perioperative mortality included: increasing age (P = 0.034), myocardial infarct within last 10 years (P = 0.0008), raised serum creatinine (P = 0.005) and open surgery (P = 0.0001). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicted probability of 30-day mortality in development and validation data sets were 0.79 and 0.82 respectively. AUCs for GAS, m-CPI and CPI were poor (0.63, 0.58 and 0.58 respectively), whilst VGNW and Medicare model were fair (0.73 and 0.79 respectively). In this study, an "in-house" developed and validated risk model has the most accurate discriminative value in predicting perioperative mortality after elective AAA repair. For purposes of comparative audit with case mix adjustments, national models such as the VGNW or Medicare models should be used. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Endovascular stent-graft management of thoracic aortic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dake, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The traditional standard therapy for descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is open operative repair with graft replacement of the diseased aortic segment. Despite important advances in surgical techniques, anesthetic management, and post-operative care over the last 30 years, the mortality and morbidity of surgery remains considerable, especially in patients at high risk for thoracotomy because of coexisting severe cardiopulmonary abnormalities or other medical diseases. The advent of endovascular stent-graft technology provides an alternative to open surgery for selected patients with TAA. The initial experience suggests that stent-graft therapy potentially may reduce the operative risk, hospital stay and procedural expenses of TAA repair. These potential benefits are especially attractive for patients at high risk for open TAA repair. Current results of endovascular TAA therapy document operative mortalities of between 0 and 4%, aneurysm thrombosis in 90 and 100% of cases, and paraplegia as a complication in 0 and 1.6% of patients. The early success of stent-graft repair of TAA has fostered the application of these devices for the management of a wide variety of thoracic aortic pathologies, including acute and chronic dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, traumatic injuries, and other diseases. The results of prospective controlled trials that compare the outcomes of stent-graft therapy with those of surgical treatment in patients with specific types of aortic disease are anxiously awaited before recommendations regarding the general use of these new devices can be made with confidence

  13. Endovascular abdominal aortic repair for AAA. Anatomical suitability and limitation in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Atsushi; Okita, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Since 2007, the EVAR (endovascular abdominal aortic repair) grafts, Zenith, Excluder and Powerlink had been commercially available in Japan. However, a small iliac artery, typical of Japanese population especially in women, was a limiting factor to indicate EVAR. We analyzed the suitability of EVAR in Japanese population according to the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft in the current study. From January 2006 to December 2007, 106 AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) patients (88 men, 18 women) with a mean age of 73 years were investigated in our institution by multi-slice CT scan in terms of suitability of EVAR, then we measured their abdominal aorta and iliac artery parameters as follows; proximal neck diameter (PND) and length (PNL), common iliac artery diameter (CIAD) and length (CIAL), suprarenal (SNA) and infrarenal neck angulation (INA), external iliac artery diameter (EIAD) and aortic length from the lowest renal artery to the aortic bifurcation (AOL). The inclusion criteria for Zenith AAA stent graft treatment were; PND: 18-28 mm, PNL more than 15 mm, unilateral CIAD less than 20 mm, CIAL at least 10 mm, SNA less than 45 degree and INA less than 60 degree, unilateral EIAD more than 7.5 mm. The indication of EVAR was 25.5% (27/106 patients), and was especially very low in women (5.6%) strictly according to the inclusion criteria of the Zenith AAA stent graft. The main reason of exclusion of EVAR was proximal short neck (40.5%), small iliac artery (30.4%) and infrarenal aortic neck angulation (29.1%). In our analysis, female AAA patients had small PNL and EIAD with angulated neck compared with male AAA ones. Anatomical suitability of EVAR in Japanese population strictly following by the inclusion criteria of Zenith AAA stent graft was low due to their characteristic differences from the European Union (EU) and the United States (US) patients, such as short proximal neck, steep neck angulation and small iliac artery, especially in women. More flexible

  14. Flow and wall shear stress characterization following endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersen, Johannes T.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H.; Ku, David N.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is

  15. Early inflammatory response following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: A comparison between endovascular procedure and conventional, open surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA represents a pathological enlargment of infrarenal portion of aorta for over 50% of its lumen. The only treatment of AAA is a surgical reconstruction of the affected segment. Until the late XX century, surgical reconstruction implied explicit, open repair (OR of AAA, which was accompanied by a significant morbidity and mortality of the treated patients. Development of endovascular repair of (EVAR AAA, especially in the last decade, offered another possibility of surgical reconstruction of AAA. The preliminary results of world studies show that complications of such a procedure, as well as morbidity and mortality of patients, are significantly lower than with OR of AAA. The aim of this paper was to present results of comparative clinical prospective study of early inflammatory response after reconstruction of AAA between endovascular and open, conventional surgical technique. Methods. A comparative clinical prospective study included 39 patients, electively operated on for AAA within the period of December 2008 - February 2010, divided into two groups. The group I counted 21 (54% of the patients, 58-87 years old (mean 74.3 years, who had been submited to EVAR by the use of excluder stent graft. The group II consisted of 18 (46% of the patients, 49-82 (mean 66.8 years, operated on using OR technique. All of the treated patients in both groups had AAA larager than 50 mm. The study did not include patients who have been treated as urgent cases, due to the rupture or with simptomatic AAA. Clinical, biochemical and inflamatory parameters in early postoperative period were analyzed, in direct postoperative course (number of leucocytes, thrombocytes, serum circulating levels of cytokine - interleukine (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10. Parameters were monitored on the zero, first, second, third and seventh postoperative days. The study was approved by the Ethics Commitee of the Military Medical Academy. Results

  16. Aortic aneurysm sac pressure measurements after endovascular repair using an implantable remote sensor: initial experience and short-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Hanno; Kaufman, John A.; Segall, Jocelyn A.; Liem, Timothy K.; Landry, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this single-center study was to report our initial experience with an implantable remote pressure sensor for aneurysm sac pressure measurement in patients post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) including short-term follow-up. A pressure sensor (EndoSure, Atlanta, GA) was implanted in 12 patients treated with different commercially available aortic endografts for EVAR. Pressure was read pre- and post-EVAR in the operating room. One-month follow-up (30 days ± 6 days) was performed including sac pressure readings and IV contrast CT scans. Variables were compared using the paired Student's t test. An intraprocedure type-I endoleak and a type-III endoleak were successfully treated resulting in decreasing sac pressures. In all patients, post-EVAR systolic sac pressure decreased by an average of 33% (P ≤ 0.005) compared to pre-EVAR measurements. One-month follow-up demonstrated a 47% decrease in systolic sac pressure (P ≤ 0.05). On follow-up CT scans, the average maximum aneurysm diameter pre-EVAR was 6.3 ± 1.6 cm and post-EVAR 6.0 ± 1.7 cm (P≤0.05). The diameter of the aneurysm sac was larger only in one patient with a type-III endoleak. Remote sac pressure measurement may provide important information in addition to imaging and may help to reduce the number of follow-up CT scans. (orig.)

  17. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudeck, O., E-mail: oliver.dudeck@med.ovgu.de [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Schnapauff, D. [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Herzog, L.; Löwenthal, D.; Bulla, K.; Bulla, B. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Halloul, Z.; Meyer, F. [University of Magdeburg, Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery (Germany); Pech, M. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany); Gebauer, B. [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ricke, J. [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to identify parameters on CT angiography (CTA) of type II endoleaks following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which can be used to predict the subsequent need for reinterventions.MethodsWe retrospectively identified 62 patients with type II endoleak who underwent early CTA in mean 3.7 ± 1.9 days after EVAR. On the basis of follow-up examinations (mean follow-up period 911 days; range, 373–1,987 days), patients were stratified into two groups: those who did (n = 18) and those who did not (n = 44) require reintervention. CTA characteristics, such as AAA, endoleak, as well as nidus dimensions, patency of the inferior mesenteric artery, number of aortic branch vessels, and the pattern of endoleak appearance, were recorded and correlated with the clinical outcome.ResultsUnivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve regression analyses revealed significant differences between the two groups for the endoleak volume (surveillance group: 1391.6 ± 1427.9 mm{sup 3}; reintervention group: 3227.7 ± 2693.8 mm{sup 3}; cutoff value of 2,386 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.002), the endoleak diameter (13.6 ± 4.3 mm compared with 25.9 ± 9.6 mm; cutoff value of 19 mm; p < 0.0001), the number of aortic branch vessels (2.9 ± 1.2 compared with 4.2 ± 1.4 vessels; p = 0.001), as well as a “complex type” endoleak pattern (13.6 %, n = 6 compared with 44.4 %, n = 8; p = 0.02).ConclusionsEarly CTA can predict the future need for reintervention in patients with type II endoleak. Therefore, treatment decision should be based not only on aneurysm enlargement alone but also on other imaging characteristics.

  18. Systolic Sac Pressure Index for the Prediction of Persistent Type II Endoleak for 12 Months After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikoma, Akira, E-mail: yfb04322@nifty.com; Nakai, Motoki, E-mail: momonga@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Morio, E-mail: morisato@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Sato, Hirotatsu, E-mail: kuppa1220@yahoo.co.jp; Minamiguchi, Hiroki, E-mail: hiromina4@hotmail.com; Sonomura, Tetsuo, E-mail: sonomura@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Departments of Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Yoshiharu, E-mail: nishim-y@wakayama-med.ac.jp; Okamura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: y-ok@wakayama-med.ac.jp [Wakayama Medical University, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between the systolic sac pressure index (SPI) and the presence of endoleaks 12 months after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR).Materials and MethodsWe performed a single-center prospective trial of consecutively treated patients. SPI (calculated as systolic sac pressure/systolic aortic pressure) was measured by catheterization immediately after EVAR. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography was scheduled 12 months after EVAR to detect possible endoleaks.ResultsData were available for 34 patients who underwent EVAR for an AAA. Persisting type II endoleak was found in 8 patients (endoleak-positive group) but not in the other 26 patients (endoleak-negative group). The mean ± standard deviation SPI was significantly greater in the endoleak-positive group than in the endoleak-negative group (0.692 ± 0.048 vs. 0.505 ± 0.081, respectively; P = .001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that an SPI of 0.638 was the optimum cutoff value for predicting a persistent endoleak at 12 months with high accuracy (0.971; 33/34), sensitivity (1.00), and specificity (0.962) values. The mean change in AAA diameter was −4.28 ± 5.03 mm and 2.22 ± 4.54 mm in patients with SPI of <0.638 or ≥0.638, respectively (P = .002).ConclusionPatients with an SPI of ≥0.638 immediately after EVAR were more likely to have a persistent type II endoleak at 12 months with an accuracy of 0.971, and showed increases in aneurysm sac diameter compared with patients with an SPI of <0.638.

  19. Endovascular management of an acquired aortobronchial fistula following aortic bypass for coarctation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Katie E

    2013-09-20

    Aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in the setting of aortic coarctation repair is very rare but uniformly fatal if untreated. Endovascular stenting of the descending aorta is now the first-choice approach for ABF presenting with haemoptysis and offers a less-invasive technique with improved outcomes, compared with open repair. We report a case of late ABF occurring following bypass for aortic coarctation. Management focused on two key manoeuvres: use of a covered endovascular stent to occlude the aortic bypass thus controlling the fistula and dilatation and stenting of native coarctation.

  20. Supra-aortic interventions for endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrási, Terézia B; Grossmann, Marius; Zenker, Dieter; Danner, Bernhard C; Schöndube, Friedrich A

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to analyze the outcomes of endovascular exclusion of the entire aortic arch (proximal landing in zone 0, distal landing in zone III or beyond, after Ishimaru) in which complete surgical debranching of the supra-aortic vessels (I), endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (chimney, fenestrated, or branched grafts) with partial surgical debranching (II), or total endovascular supra-aortic revascularization (III) was additionally performed. Publications describing endovascular repair of the aortic arch (2000-2016) were systematically searched and reviewed. From a total of 53 relevant studies including 1853 patients, only 1021 patients undergoing 35 different total aortic arch procedures were found eligible for further evaluation and included in group I, II, or III (429, 190, and 402 patients, respectively). Overall early mortality was higher in group I vs groups II and III (P = .001; 1 - β = 95.6%) but exceeded in group III (18.6%) and group II (14.0%) vs group I (8.0%; P = .044; 1 - β = 57.4%) for diseases involving zone 0. Mortality was higher in all subgroups treated for zone 0 disease compared with corresponding subgroups treated for zone I to zone III disease. The incidence of cerebral ischemic events was increased in groups I and II vs group III (7.5% and 11% vs 1.7%; P = .0001) and correlated with early mortality (R 2  = .20; P = .033). The incidence of type II endoleaks and endovascular reintervention was similar between groups and correlated with each other (R 2  = .37; P = .004). Type Ia endoleak occurred more often in groups II and III than in group I (7.1% and 12.1% vs 5.8%; P = .023) and correlated with midterm mortality (R 2  = .53; P = .005). Retrograde type A dissection was low in all groups, whereas aneurysm growth was higher in group III (2.6%, 4.2%, 10.7%; P = .002), correlating with midterm mortality (R 2  = .311; P = .009). Surgical revision slightly correlated with surgical complications (R 2  = .18; P = .044

  1. Is Conventional Open Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Feasible in Nonagenarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Kyokun; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Inoue, Yosuke; Omura, Atsushi; Seike, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2017-09-25

    Background : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm has been found to be beneficial in very elderly patients, some patients have contraindications to this procedure. For nonagenarians, the results of open repair remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of open vs. endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm in nonagenarian patients. Methods and Results : Fourteen patients undergoing open surgical repair and 24 undergoing endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm were evaluated. There was no significant difference in early mortality between the open and endovascular groups (0% vs. 4.1%, p=0.16). The open repair group required much longer hospital stays (26.4 vs. 10.6 days, respectively, p=0.003). Finally, 12 patients (86%) undergoing open repair vs. 21 (88%) undergoing endovascular repair returned home (p=0.49). During a mean follow-up period of 23.4±23.5 months, cumulative estimated 1- and 3-year survival rates were 90.0% and 48.0%, respectively in the open repair group and 90.6% and 54.9%, respectively in the endovascular repair group (p=0.51). Conclusion : Although endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm was superior in terms of recovery, the results of conventional open repair were acceptable even in nonagenarian patients. Open repair remains an alternative for patients with contraindications to endovascular repair.

  2. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  3. Surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair increases medical center contribution margin and physician reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Francesco; Durgin, Jonathan; Daniel, Vijaya; Messina, Louis; Doucet, Danielle; Simons, Jessica; Jenkins, James; Schanzer, Andres

    2017-10-01

    Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) allows endovascular treatment of thoracoabdominal and juxtarenal aneurysms previously outside the indications of use for standard devices. However, because of considerable device costs and increased procedure time, FEVAR is thought to result in financial losses for medical centers and physicians. We hypothesized that surgeon leadership in the coding, billing, and contractual negotiations for FEVAR procedures will increase medical center contribution margin (CM) and physician reimbursement. At the UMass Memorial Center for Complex Aortic Disease, a vascular surgeon with experience in medical finances is supported to manage the billing and coding of FEVAR procedures for medical center and physician reimbursement. A comprehensive financial analysis was performed for all FEVAR procedures (2011-2015), independent of insurance status, patient presentation, or type of device used. Medical center CM (actual reimbursement minus direct costs) was determined for each index FEVAR procedure and for all related subsequent procedures, inpatient or outpatient, 3 months before and 1 year subsequent to the index FEVAR procedure. Medical center CM for outpatient clinic visits, radiology examinations, vascular laboratory studies, and cardiology and pulmonary evaluations related to FEVAR were also determined. Surgeon reimbursement for index FEVAR procedure, related adjunct procedures, and assistant surgeon reimbursement were also calculated. All financial analyses were performed and adjudicated by the UMass Department of Finance. The index hospitalization for 63 FEVAR procedures incurred $2,776,726 of direct costs and generated $3,027,887 in reimbursement, resulting in a positive CM of $251,160. Subsequent related hospital procedures (n = 26) generated a CM of $144,473. Outpatient clinic visits, radiologic examinations, and vascular laboratory studies generated an additional CM of $96,888. Direct cost analysis revealed that grafts

  4. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  5. Source of errors and accuracy of a two-dimensional/three-dimensional fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Douane, Frédéric; Therasse, Eric; Lessard, Simon; Elkouri, Stephane; Gilbert, Patrick; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Pfister, Marcus; Blair, Jean François; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and source of errors using a two-dimensional (2D)/three-dimensional (3D) fusion road map for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm. A rigid 2D/3D road map was tested in 16 patients undergoing EVAR. After 3D/3D manual registration of preoperative multidetector computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, abdominal aortic aneurysm outlines were overlaid on live fluoroscopy/digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Patient motion was evaluated using bone landmarks. The misregistration of renal and internal iliac arteries were estimated by 3 readers along head-feet and right-left coordinates (z-axis and x-axis, respectively) before and after bone and DSA corrections centered on the lowest renal artery. Iliac deformation was evaluated by comparing centerlines before and during intervention. A score of clinical added value was estimated as high (z-axis 5 mm). Interobserver reproducibility was calculated by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The lowest renal artery misregistration was estimated at x-axis = 10.6 mm ± 11.1 and z-axis = 7.4 mm ± 5.3 before correction and at x-axis = 3.5 mm ± 2.5 and z-axis = 4.6 mm ± 3.7 after bone correction (P = .08), and at 0 after DSA correction (P artery was estimated at x-axis = 2.4 mm ± 2.0 and z-axis = 2.2 mm ± 2.0. Score of clinical added value was low (n = 11), good (n= 0), and high (n= 5) before correction and low (n = 5), good (n = 4), and high (n = 7) after bone correction. Interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient for misregistration measurements was estimated at 0.99. Patient motion before stent graft delivery was estimated at x-axis = 8 mm ± 5.8 and z-axis = 3.0 mm ± 2.7. The internal iliac artery misregistration measurements were estimated at x-axis = 6.1 mm ± 3.5 and z-axis = 5.6 mm ± 4.0, and iliac centerline deformation was estimated at 38.3 mm ± 15.6. Rigid registration is feasible and fairly accurate. Only a partial reduction of vascular

  6. Unusual rapid evolution of type B aortic dissection in a marfan patient following heart transplantation: successful endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, L; Russo, V; Grigioni, F; Arpesella, G; Rocchi, G; Di Bartolomeo, R; Fattori, R

    2006-10-01

    A patient with Marfan syndrome with previous Bentall operation for mitral and tricuspid valve repair, required orthotopic cardiac transplantation for end stage cardiomyopathy. Postoperatively he suffered type-B aortic dissection, despite normal aortic diameters. Following sudden increase of aortic diameters, two years later, he underwent successful stent graft implantation. In patients with Marfan syndrome, post transplantation morbidity is high, with a 40% incidence of thoracic aortic dissection. This case highlights the potential of endovascular approach for treating post-transplantation aortic dissection.

  7. Systematic review of recent evidence for the safety and efficacy of elective endovascular repair in the management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, D; Michaels, J A; Jones, L; Ayiku, L

    2005-08-01

    Conventional management of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is by open repair and is associated with a mortality rate of 2-6 per cent. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an alternative technique first introduced in 1991. A systematic review was undertaken of the evidence for the safety and efficacy of elective EVAR in the management of asymptomatic infrarenal AAA. Thirteen electronic bibliographical databases were searched, covering biomedical, health-related, science and social science literature. Outcomes were assessed with respect to efficacy (successful deployment, technical success, conversion rates and secondary intervention rates) and safety (30-day mortality rate, procedure morbidity rates and technical issues-endoleaks, graft thrombosis, stenosis and migration). Of 606 reports identified, 61 met the inclusion criteria (three randomized and 15 non-randomized controlled trials, and 43 uncontrolled studies). There were 29 059 participants in total; 19,804 underwent EVAR. Deployment was successful in 97.6 per cent of cases. Technical success (complete aneurysm exclusion) was 81.9 per cent at discharge and 88.8 per cent at 30 days. Secondary intervention to treat endoleak or maintain graft patency was required in 16.2 per cent of patients. Mean stay in the intensive care unit and mean hospital stay were significantly shorter following EVAR. The 30-day mortality rate for EVAR was 1.6 per cent (randomized controlled trials) and 2.0 per cent in nonrandomized trials and case series. Technical complications comprised stent migration (4.0 per cent), graft limb thrombosis (3.9 per cent), endoleak (type I, 6.8 per cent; type II, 10.3 per cent; type III, 4.2 per cent) and access artery injury (4.8 per cent). EVAR is technically effective and safe, with lower short-term morbidity and mortality rates than open surgery. However, there is a need for extended follow-up as the long-term success of EVAR in preventing aneurysm-related deaths is not yet known.

  8. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe; Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  9. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  10. Salvage of bilateral renal artery occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair with open splenorenal bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jessula, MDCM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report renal salvage maneuvers after accidental bilateral renal artery coverage during endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 79-year-old man with an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated coverage of the renal arteries. Several revascularization techniques were attempted, including endograft repositioning and endovascular stenting through the femoral and brachial approach. The patient eventually underwent open splenorenal bypass with a Y Gore-Tex graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz. After 3 months, computed tomography showed no evidence of endoleak and patent renal arteries. Renal function was well maintained, and the patient did not require dialysis.

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Various Aortic Pathologies: Review of the Latest Data and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koji; Ohki, Takao; Kanaoka, Yuji

    2018-06-01

    The technologies and innovations applicable to endovascular treatment for complex aortic pathologies have progressed rapidly over the last two decades. Although the initial outcomes of an endovascular aortic repair have been excellent, as long-term data became available, complications including endoleaks, endograft migration, and endograft infection have become apparent and are of concern. Previously, the indication for endovascular therapy was restricted to descending thoracic aortic aneurysms and abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, its indication has expanded along with the improvement of techniques and devices, and currently, it has become possible to treat pararenal aortic aneurysms and Crawford type 4 thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) using the off-the-shelf devices. Additionally, custom-made devices allow for the treatment of arch or more extensive TAAAs. Endovascular treatment is applied not only to aneurysms but also to acute/chronic dissections. However, long-term outcomes are still unclear. This article provides an overview of available devices and the results of endovascular treatment for various aortic pathologies.

  12. Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections due to blunt force trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bjurlin, Marc A

    2012-02-01

    Endovascular stent graft treatment of acute thoracic aortic transections is an encouraging minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. Between 2006 and 2008, 16 patients with acute thoracic aortic transections underwent evaluation at our institution. Seven patients who were treated with an endovascular stent graft were reviewed. The mean Glasgow Coma Score was 13.0, probability of survival was .89, and median injury severity score was 32. The mean number of intensive care unit days was 7.7, mean number of ventilator support days was 5.4, and hospital length of stay was 10 days. Mean blood loss was 285 mL, and operative time was 143 minutes. Overall mortality was 14%. Procedure complications were a bleeding arteriotomy site and an endoleak. Endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic transections appears to demonstrate superior results with respect to mortality, blood loss, operative time, paraplegia, and procedure-related complications when compared with open surgical repair literature.

  13. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Domenico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment

  14. The β-d-Endoglucuronidase Heparanase Is a Danger Molecule That Drives Systemic Inflammation and Correlates with Clinical Course after Open and Endovascular Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Lessons Learnt from Mice and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Martin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is a highly lethal disorder requiring open or endovascular TAAA repair, both of which are rare, but extensive and complex surgical procedures associated with a significant systemic inflammatory response and high post-operative morbidity and mortality. Heparanase is a β-d-endoglucuronidase that remodels the endothelial glycocalyx by degrading heparan sulfate in many diseases/conditions associated with systemic inflammation including sepsis, trauma, and major surgery. We hypothesized that (a perioperative serum levels of heparanase and heparan sulfate are associated with the clinical course after open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b induce a systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction in mice. Using a reverse-translational approach, we assessed (a the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-1 preoperatively as well as 6 and 72 h after intensive care unit (ICU admission in patients undergoing open or endovascular TAAA repair and (b laboratory and clinical parameters and 90-day survival, and (c the systemic inflammatory response and renal injury/dysfunction induced by heparanase and heparan sulfate in mice. When compared to preoperative values, the serum levels of heparanase, heparan sulfate, and syndecan-1 significantly transiently increased within 6 h of ICU admission and returned to normal within 72 h after ICU admission. The kinetics of any observed changes in heparanase, heparan sulfate, or syndecan-1 levels, however, did not differ between open and endovascular TAAA-repair. Postoperative heparanase levels positively correlated with noradrenalin dose at 12 h after ICU admission and showed a high predictive value of vasopressor requirements within the first 24 h. Postoperative heparan sulfate showed a strong positive correlation with interleukin-6 levels day 0, 1, and 2 post-ICU admission and a strong negative correlation with

  15. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Sealing (EVARS): A Useful Adjunct in Treating Challenging Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Gareth J., E-mail: garethjamesharrison@yahoo.co.uk; Antoniou, George A., E-mail: antoniou.ga@hotmail.com; Torella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.torella@rlbuht.nhs.uk; McWilliams, Richard G., E-mail: richard.mcwilliams@rlbuht.nhs.uk; Fisher, Robert K., E-mail: robert.fisher@rlbuht.nhs.uk [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool Vascular and Endovascular Service (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    An 81-year-old male with previous open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair presented with asymptomatic large pseudoaneurysms at both ends of an open surgical tube graft. Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) in combination with the iliac limbs of a standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) successfully excluded both pseudoaneurysms from circulation. We describe the combination of elements of EVAS and EVAR and have termed this endovascular aneurysm repair and sealing (EVARS). EVARS has the advantage of harnessing the benefits of endobag sealing in aortic necks unsuitable for standard EVAR whilst providing the security of accurate stent placement within short common iliac arteries. In conclusion, EVAS may be combined with standard endovascular iliac limbs and is a possible treatment option for pseudoaneurysm following open aneurysm repair.

  16. Hybrid aortic repair with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castro-Madrazo, José Antonio; Rivas-Domínguez, Margarita; Fernández-Prendes, Carlota; Zanabili Al-Sibbai, Amer; Llaneza-Coto, José Manuel; Alonso-Pérez, Manuel

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is a life threatening condition. Hybrid repair has been described for the treatment of complex aortic pathology such as thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) and type A and B dissections, although open and total endovascular repair are also possible. Open surgery is still associated with substantial perioperative morbi-mortality rates, thus less invasive techniques such as endovascular repair and hybrid procedures can achieve good results in centers with experience. We present the case of a patient with a chronic type B dissection and TAAA degeneration that was treated in a single stage hybrid procedure with antegrade supra-aortic and renovisceral debranching from the ascending aorta and TEVAR. At three-year follow up, the patient is free of intervention-related complications.

  17. Collected world and single center experience with endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, F.J.; Lachat, M.; Mayer, D.; Malina, M.; Holst, J.; Mehta, M.; Verhoeven, E.L.; Larzon, T.; Gennai, S.; Coppi, G.; Lipsitz, E.C.; Gargiulo, N.J.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Buth, J.; Lee, W.A.; Biasiol, G.; Deleo, G.; Kasirajan, K.; Moore, R.; Soong, C.V.; Cayne, N.S.; Farber, M.A.; Raithel, D.; Greenberg, R.K.; Sambeek, M.R. van; Brunkwall, J.S.; Rockman, C.B.; Hinchliffe, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. OBJECTIVE: To clarify these we examined a

  18. Collected World and Single Center Experience With Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veith, Frank J.; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter; Malina, Martin; Holst, Jan; Mehta, Manish; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Larzon, Thomas; Gennai, Stefano; Coppi, Gioacchino; Lipsitz, Evan C.; Gargiulo, Nicholas J.; van der Vliet, J. Adam; Blankensteijn, Jan; Buth, Jacob; Lee, W. Anthony; Biasi, Giorgio; Deleo, Gaetano; Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Moore, Randy; Soong, Chee V.; Cayne, Neal S.; Farber, Mark A.; Raithel, Dieter; Greenberg, Roy K.; van Sambeek, Marc R. H. M.; Brunkwall, Jan S.; Rockman, Caron B.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Case and single center reports have documented the feasibility and suggested the effectiveness of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAAs), but the role and value of such treatment remain controversial. Objective: To clarify these we examined a

  19. Endovascular stenting of a chronic ruptured type B thoracic aortic dissection, a second chance: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Ali; Khan, Sumaira L; Whitaker, Simon C; Macsweeney, Shane T

    2008-02-07

    We aim to highlight the need for awareness of late complications of endovascular thoracic aortic stenting and the need for close follow-up of patients treated by this method. We report the first case in the English literature of an endovascular repair of a previously stented, ruptured chronic Stanford type B thoracic aortic dissection re-presenting with a type III endoleak of the original repair. Endovascular thoracic stenting is now a widely accepted technique for the treatment of thoracic aortic dissection and its complications. Long term follow up is necessary to ensure that late complications are identified and treated appropriately. In this case of type III endoleak, although technically challenging, endovascular repair was feasible and effective.

  20. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, Clare L.; Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 ± 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 ± 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  1. Endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Shan; Zhang, Xiquan; Chen, Zhong; Zhu, Wei; Pan, Xiaolin [Dept. of nterventional Vascular, The 148th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Zibo (China); Dong, Peng; Sun, Yequan [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Weifang Medical University, Weifang (China); Qi, Deming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Qilu Medical University, Zibo (China)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of endovascular repair for blunt popliteal arterial injuries. A retrospective analysis of seven patients with clinical suspicion of popliteal arterial injuries that were confirmed by arteriography was performed from September 2009 to July 2014. Clinical data included demographics, mechanism of injury, type of injury, location of injury, concomitant injuries, time of endovascular procedures, time interval from trauma to blood flow restoration, instrument utilized, and follow-up. All patients were male (mean age of 35.9 ± 10.3 years). The type of lesion involved intimal injury (n = 1), partial transection (n = 2), complete transection (n = 2), arteriovenous fistula (n = 1), and pseudoaneurysm (n = 1). All patients underwent endovascular repair of blunt popliteal arterial injuries. Technical success rate was 100%. Intimal injury was treated with a bare-metal stent. Pseudoaneurysm and popliteal artery transections were treated with bare-metal stents. Arteriovenous fistula was treated with bare-metal stent and coils. No perioperative death and procedure-related complication occurred. The average follow-up was 20.9 ± 2.3 months (range 18–24 months). One patient underwent intra-arterial thrombolysis due to stent thrombosis at 18 months after the procedure. All limbs were salvaged. Stent migration, deformation, or fracture was not found during the follow-up. Endovascular repair seems to be a viable approach for patients with blunt popliteal arterial injuries, especially on an emergency basis. Endovascular repair may be effective in the short-term. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair.

  2. High risk endovascular aneurysm repair: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Samanthi

    2017-10-01

    Mr AB is a 66-year old gentleman who presented for elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) following a routine screening scan identifying a 5.5cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). He had a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with FEV1/FVC ratio of 48% on pre-assessment. He was hypertensive with a history of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), which has remained asymptomatic following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) eight years prior to this presentation. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  3. Unplanned return to operating room after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) is associated with increased risk of hospital readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Faisal; Ferranti, Katelynn; Lehman, Erik B

    2018-04-01

    Objectives Hospital readmissions after surgical operations are considered serious events. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) consider surgical readmissions as preventable and hold hospitals responsible for them. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) has become the first line modality of treatment for suitable patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The purpose of this study is to retrospectively review the factors associated with hospital readmission after EVAR. Methods The 2013 EVAR targeted American College of Surgeons (ACS-NSQIP) database and generalized 2013 general and vascular surgery ACS-NSQIP participant use files were used for this study. Patient, diagnosis, and procedure characteristics of patients undergoing EVAR surgery were assessed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent risk factors for hospital readmission within 30 days after surgery. Results A total of 2277 patients (81% males, 19% females) underwent EVAR operations in the year 2013. Indications for operations included: asymptomatic large diameter (79%), symptomatic (5.7%), rupture without hypotension (4.3%), and rupture with hypotension (2.8%). Among these patients, 178 (7.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days after surgery. About 53% of all readmissions were within two weeks after the discharge. Risk factors, associated with readmission included: body mass index (per 5-units, OR 1.23, CI 1.06-1.42, p readmission for patients with presence of all these seven factors was 99.9%. Conclusions Readmission after EVAR is a serious occurrence. Various factors predispose a patient at a high risk for readmission. Unplanned return to operating room after EVAR is associated with a 11-fold increase in hospital readmission.

  4. Human Thiel-Embalmed Cadaveric Aortic Model with Perfusion for Endovascular Intervention Training and Medical Device Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Helen; Cox, Ben F; Robertson, James; Duncan, Robyn; Matthew, Shona; Bhat, Raj; Barclay, Avril; Anwar, J; Wilkinson, Tracey; Melzer, Andreas; Houston, J Graeme

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate human Thiel-embalmed cadavers with the addition of extracorporeal driven ante-grade pulsatile flow in the aorta as a model for simulation training in interventional techniques and endovascular device testing. Three human cadavers embalmed according to the method of Thiel were selected. Extracorporeal pulsatile ante-grade flow of 2.5 L per min was delivered directly into the aorta of the cadavers via a surgically placed connection. During perfusion, aortic pressure and temperature were recorded and optimized for physiologically similar parameters. Pre- and post-procedure CT imaging was conducted to plan and follow up thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair as it would be in a clinical scenario. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) and endovascular abdominal repair (EVAR) procedures were conducted in simulation of a clinical case, under fluoroscopic guidance with a multidisciplinary team present. The Thiel cadaveric aortic perfusion model provided pulsatile ante-grade flow, with pressure and temperature, sufficient to conduct a realistic simulation of TEVAR and EVAR procedures. Fluoroscopic imaging provided guidance during the intervention. Pre- and post-procedure CT imaging facilitated planning and follow-up evaluation of the procedure. The human Thiel-embalmed cadavers with the addition of extracorporeal flow within the aorta offer an anatomically appropriate, physiologically similar robust model to simulate aortic endovascular procedures, with potential applications in interventional radiology training and medical device testing as a pre-clinical model.

  5. Computed tomography-based anatomic characterization of proximal aortic dissection with consideration for endovascular candidacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Michael C; Greenberg, Roy K; Morales, Jose P; Martin, Zenia; Lu, Qingsheng; Dowdall, Joseph F; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2011-04-01

    Proximal aortic dissections are life-threatening conditions that require immediate surgical intervention to avert an untreated mortality rate that approaches 50% at 48 hours. Advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques have permitted increased characterization of aortic dissection that are necessary to assess the design and applicability of new treatment paradigms. All patients presenting during a 2-year period with acute proximal aortic dissections who underwent CT scanning were reviewed in an effort to establish a detailed assessment of their aortic anatomy. Imaging studies were assessed in an effort to document the location of the primary proximal fenestration, the proximal and distal extent of the dissection, and numerous morphologic measurements pertaining to the aortic valve, root, and ascending aorta to determine the potential for an endovascular exclusion of the ascending aorta. During the study period, 162 patients presented with proximal aortic dissections. Digital high-resolution preoperative CT imaging was performed on 76 patients, and 59 scans (77%) were of adequate quality to allow assessment of anatomic suitability for treatment with an endograft. In all cases, the dissection plane was detectable, yet the primary intimal fenestration was identified in only 41% of the studies. Scans showed 24 patients (32%) appeared to be anatomically amenable to such a repair (absence of valvular involvement, appropriate length and diameter of proximal sealing regions, lack of need to occlude coronary vasculature). Of the 42 scans that were determined not to be favorable for endovascular repair, the most common exclusion finding was the absence of a proximal landing zone (n = 15; 36%). Appropriately protocoled CT imaging provides detailed anatomic information about the aortic root and ascending aorta, allowing the assessment of which dissections have proximal fenestrations that may be amenable to an endovascular repair. Copyright © 2011 Society for

  6. Evolution of the Proximal Sealing Rings of the Anaconda Stent-Graft After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenrades, Maaike A.; Klein, Almar; Leferink, Anne M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To provide insight into the evolution of the saddle-shaped proximal sealing rings of the Anaconda stent-graft after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: Eighteen abdominal aortic aneurysm patients were consecutively enrolled in a single-center, prospective, observational cohort

  7. Prevention of paraplegia after endovascular exclusion for stanford B thoracic aortic dissection aneurism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Rui; Jing Zaiping; Bao Junmin; Zhao Zhiqing; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Lu Qingsheng; Huang Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prophylactic measures of paraplegia and paralysis after endovascular graft exclusion (EVE) for Stanford B thoracic aortic dissections (TAD). Methods: The records of 116 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular TAD repair from 1998 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Steroids were administrated postoperatively in high risk patients likely to be candidates for paraplegia or paralysis. Results: No paraplegia or paralysis occurred postoperatively in all cases, including the patient undergone selective spinal artery angiography (SSAA). Conclusions: Transluminal repair can avoid spinal cord ischemia due to aortic cross-clamping, there is still a risk of spinal cord injury caused by occlusion of intercostal arteries under the cover of endograft. A combination of the prophylactic measures, including SSAA and steroids, have been able to reduce the risk of paraplegia and paralysis. A graft-stent of appropriate length is the key point of this procedure

  8. Validation of the Simbionix PROcedure Rehearsal Studio sizing module : A comparison of software for endovascular aneurysm repair sizing and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velu, Juliëtte F.; Groot Jebbink, Erik; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Geelkerken, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    An important determinant of successful endovascular aortic aneurysm repair is proper sizing of the dimensions of the aortic-iliac vessels. The goal of the present study was to determine the concurrent validity, a method for comparison of test scores, for EVAR sizing and planning of the recently

  9. Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection%腔内修复术治疗原发性逆撕型Stanford A型主动脉夹层

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海卫; 孙磊; 李德闽; 景华; 许飚; 王常田; 张雷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the short-and mid-term results on endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with an entry tear in distal aortic arch or descending aorta.Methods Between December 2009 and December 2014,21 male patients of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with a mean age of (52 ± 9) years received endovascular repair in Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery,Jinling Hospital.Among the 21 cases,17 patients were presented as ascending aortic intramural hematoma,4 patients as active blood flow in false lumen and partial thrombosis,8 patients as ulcer on descending aorta combined intramural hematoma in descending aorta,and 13 patients as typical dissection changes.All patients received cndovascular stent-graft repair successfully,with 15 cases in acute phase and 6 cases in chronic phase.Results Cone stent was implanted in 13 cases,while straight stent in 8 cases,including 1 case of left common carotid-left subclavian artery bypass surgery and 1 case of restrictive bare-metal stent implantation.No perioperative stroke,paraplegia,stent fracture or displacement,limbs or abdominal organ ischemia or other severe complications occured,except for tracheotomy in 2 patients.Active blood flow in ascending aorta or aortic arch disappeared,and intramural hematoma started being absorbed on CT angiography images before discharge.All patients were alive during follow-up (6 to 72 months),and intramural hematoma in ascending aorta and aortic arch was absorbed thoroughly.Type Ⅰ endoleak and ulcer expansion were found in 1 patient,and type Ⅳ endoleak in distal stent was found in another one patient.Secondary ascending aortic dissection was found in 1 case two years later,which was cured by hybrid procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass.Conclusion Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection was safe and effective,which correlated with favorable short-and mid-term results.%目的 探讨腔内修复

  10. Potential Long-Term Complications of Endovascular Stent Grafting for Blunt Thoracic Aortic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E. Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI is a rare, but lethal, consequence of rapid deceleration events. Most victims of BTAI die at the scene of the accident. Of those who arrive to the hospital alive, expedient aortic intervention significantly improves survival. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR has been accepted as the standard of care for BTAI at many centers, primarily due to the convincing evidence of lower mortality and morbidity in comparison to open surgery. However, less attention has been given to potential long-term complications of TEVAR for BTAI. This paper focuses on these complications, which include progressive aortic expansion with aging, inadequate stent graft characteristics, device durability concerns, long-term radiation exposure concerns from follow-up computed tomography scans, and the potential for (Victims of Modern Imaging Technology VOMIT.

  11. Outcomes after open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in patients with friendly versus hostile aortoiliac anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, S. C.; Reimerink, J. J.; Vahl, A. C.; Wisselink, W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.; Balm, R.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), anatomic suitability for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) depends on aortic neck and iliac artery characteristics. If the aortoiliac anatomy is unsuitable for EVAR ("hostile anatomy"), open repair (OR) is the next option. We

  12. Correção endovascular de aneurisma de aorta abdominal e artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em paciente com hemofilia C grave Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and left common iliac artery in a patient with severe hemophilia C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Quilici Belczak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A deficiência do fator XI, também conhecida como hemofilia C, é uma doença hematológica hereditária rara, que se manifesta clinicamente com hemorragia persistente após cirurgias, traumas, menorragias e extrações dentárias. Neste artigo, relatou-se a correção endovascular de um paciente com aneurisma de aorta e de artéria ilíaca comum esquerda em um paciente portador de deficiência major do fator XI (atividade do fator XI inferior a 20%. O procedimento foi realizado com sucesso, com o manuseio do distúrbio da coagulação por meio da infusão de plasma fresco no pré-operatório imediato e no pós-operatório, e controle laboratorial da coagulação do paciente.Factor XI deficiency, also known as hemophilia C, is a rare hereditary blood disease that manifests with persistent bleeding after surgery, trauma, menorrhagia, and dental extractions. This article reports an endovascular repair of a patient diagnosed with an aortic and left common iliac aneurysm, with severe factor XI deficiency (factor XI activity below 20%. The procedure was successfully performed with management of the coagulation disorder by preoperative and postoperative infusion of plasma and laboratory control of the coagulation.

  13. Identifying patients with AAA with the highest risk following endovascular repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadili, Ali; Turnbull, Robert; Hervas-Malo, Marilou; Ghosh, Sunita; Chyczij, Harold

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that endovascular repair of arterial disease results in reduced perioperative morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. The rates of complications and need for reinterventions, however, have been found to be higher than that in open repair. The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of endograft complications and mortality in patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair; specifically, our aim was to identify a subset of patients with AAA whose risk of periprocedure mortality was so high that they should not be offered endovascular repair. We undertook a prospective review of patients with AAA receiving endovascular therapy at a single institution. Collected variables included age, gender, date of procedure, indication for procedure, size of aneurysm (where applicable), type of endograft used, presence of rupture, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, major medical comorbidities, type of anesthesia (general, epidural, or local), length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and length of hospital stay. These factors were correlated with the study outcomes (overall mortality, graft complications, morbidity, and reintervention) using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 199 patients underwent endovascular AAA repair during the study period. The ICU stay, again, was significantly correlated with the primary outcomes (death and graft complications). In addition, length of hospital stay greater than 3 days, also emerged as a statistically significant predictor of graft complications in this subgroup (P = .024). Survival analysis for patients with AAA revealed that age over 85 years and ICU stay were predictive of decreased survival. Statistical analysis for other subgroups of patients (inflammatory AAA or dissection) was not performed due to the small numbers in these subgroups. Patients with AAA greater than 85 years of age are at a greater risk of mortality

  14. Contemporary Management of Type B Aortic Dissection in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Tadros, Rami O; McKinsey, James; Chander, Rajiv; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common catastrophic pathologies affecting the aorta. Anatomic classification is based on the origin of entry tear and its extension. Type A dissections originate in the ascending aorta, whereas the entry tear in Type B dissections starts distal to the left subclavian artery. The patients with aortic dissection who manifest complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal degeneration, and intractable pain are classified as complicated AD. Risk factors for developing aortic dissection include age, male gender, and aortic wall structural abnormalities. The most common presenting symptom of acute aortic dissection is pain. Malperfusion occurs as a result of end-organ ischemia due to involvement of aortic branches from the dissecting process. This can happen in various locations causing mesenteric ischemia (mesenteric vessels), stroke (aortic arch vessels), renal failure (renal arteries), spinal ischemia, and limb ischemia (iliac or subclavian arteries). Aneurysmal degeneration is the most common complication of patients with chronic Type B dissection who are managed with medical therapy. Management of Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) remains controversial. Many groups recommend conservative therapy for newly diagnosed TBAD and reserve surgical management for patients who develop complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal dilatation, and refractory pain. The mainstay of medical therapy includes antihypertensive medication to reduced ΔP/ ΔT by lowering blood pressure and heart rate. With the continued success of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), this procedure has been extended to treat TBAD in selected patients. The outcomes of TEVAR are promising, with early mortality rates from 10% to 20%. With promising results from these series, some groups recommend early TEVAR in uncomplicated TBAD to prevent future adverse events. The goals of endovascular treatment of TBAD are to cover the entry tear

  15. Early experience with transfemoral endovascular aneurysm management (TEAM) in the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balm, R.; Eikelboom, B. C.; May, J.; Bell, P. R.; Swedenborg, J.; Collin, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the early experience with transfemoral endovascular aortic aneurysm management using the Endovascular Grafting System. DESIGN: Multi-centre prospective evaluation of the implantation procedure and early results (median follow-up 153 days). SETTING: Department of Surgery,

  16. Fatal late multiple emboli after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Sandermann, Jes; Bruun-Petersen, J

    1998-01-01

    The short term experience of endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) seems promising but long term randomised data are lacking. Consequently, cases treated by endovascular procedures need to be closely followed for potential risks and benefits....

  17. Late type III endoleak after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and previous infrarenal stent graft implantation - a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyński, Jerzy; Macioch, Waldemar; Chudziński, Witold; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-09-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) effectively improved the results of thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. TEVAR is a less invasive procedure that can be performed under local anesthesia with shorter hospital stay. The perioperative morbidity and mortality rates are lower for endovascular than open repair, but the rate of secondary interventions is higher for TEVAR. We report a case of an elderly man with synchronous abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. A type III dangerous endoleak was recognized 3 years after TEVAR. It was successfully repaired during an endovascular procedure. There were no new endoleaks after 12 months of follow-up. TEVAR may be the only option of treatment for risky and elderly patients. However, postoperative monitoring is necessary to exclude different types of endoleaks. Most of them undergo effective endovascular repair.

  18. Outcomes of endovascular management of acute thoracic aortic emergencies in an academic level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Angela B; Branco, Bernardino C; Goshima, Kay R; Hughes, John D; Mills, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    Thoracic aortic emergencies account for 10% of thoracic-related admissions in the United States and remain associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Open repair has declined owing to the emergence of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), but data on emergency TEVAR use for acute aortic pathology remain limited. We therefore reviewed our experience. We retrospectively evaluated emergency descending thoracic aortic endovascular interventions performed at a single academic level 1 trauma center between January 2005 and August 2013 including all cases of traumatic aortic injury, ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer, aortoenteric fistula, and acute complicated type B dissection. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were extracted. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for death. During the study period, 51 patients underwent TEVAR; 22 cases (43.1%) were performed emergently (11 patients [50.0%] traumatic aortic injury; 4 [18.2%] ruptured descending thoracic aneurysm; 4 [18.2%] complicated type B dissection; 2 [9.1%] penetrating aortic ulcer; and 1 [4.5%] aortoenteric fistula). Overall, 72.7% (n = 16) were male with a mean age of 54.8 ± 15.9 years. Nineteen patients (86.4%) required only a single TEVAR procedure, whereas 2 (9.1%) required additional endovascular therapy, and 1 (4.5%) open thoracotomy. Four traumatic aortic injury patients required exploratory laparotomy for concomitant intra-abdominal injuries. During a mean hospital length of stay of 18.9 days (range, 1 to 76 days), 3 patients (13.6%) developed major complications. In-hospital mortality was 27.2%, consisting of 6 deaths from traumatic brain injury (1); exsanguination in the operating room before repair could be achieved (2); bowel ischemia (1) and multisystem organ failure (1); and family withdrawal of care (1). A stepwise logistic regression model identified 24-hour packed red blood cell requirements ≥4

  19. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  20. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm due to brucellosis: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Qi; Liu, Han; Sun, Siqiao; Sun, Xiwei; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhongying; Cheng, Zhihua

    2017-06-02

    Arterial damage is a known complication of brucellosis, but the occurrence of a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis has not been previously reported. A 65-year-old Chinese man presented with a pseudoaneurysm in the descending segment of the thoracic aorta that caused symptoms of chest pain and intermittent fever. He was diagnosed with a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to brucellosis based on a positive brucella serology test (standard-tube agglutination test) and imaging examination (computed tomography angiography). Anti-brucellosis treatment and covered stent graft implantation were attempted to eliminate the brucellosis and pseudoaneurysm, respectively, and were ultimately successful, with no symptoms after 6 months of follow-up. Endovascular repair may be effective and safe for treating a thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm resulting from brucellosis.

  1. Endovascular treatment of type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome: mid-term outcomes and aortic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid-Lidt, Guering; Gaspar, Jorge; Meléndez-Ramírez, Gabriela; Cervantes S, Jorge; González-Pacheco, Hector; Dámas de Los Santos, Félix; Meave-González, Aloha; Ramírez Marroquín, Samuel

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the mid-term outcomes, and the aortic remodeling in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients with type B dissection that were treated with endovascular repair. MFS is a relative contraindication to thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Mid-term aortic outcomes data in MFS after TEVAR are limited, and the occurrence of late events remains unclear. Of 89 patients that underwent TEVAR between September 2002 and February 2011, 10 patients with mid-term follow-up fulfilled the Ghent criteria for MFS and complicated type B dissection. High risk for open surgery was documented in 90%. The mean age was 35.1 ± 9.4 years and all patients presented with acute aortic syndrome complicating a chronic type B dissection (DeBakey type IIIb). Five patients underwent a Bentall surgical procedure previous to endovascular repair, and in four patients initial TEVAR was followed by surgery of the ascending aorta. Treatment was limited to endovascular repair in only one patient. In-hospital mortality was 10%. At a mean follow-up of 59.6 ± 38.9 months, the cumulated mortality was of 20% and late mortality 11.1%. The rate of secondary endoleak was 44.4%, and late reintervention of 33.3%. Survival freedom from cardiovascular death at 8 years was 80.0%, and positive remodeling was documented in 37.5% of patients. Our results suggest that TEVAR is feasible, safe, and associated with a high reintervention rate and reduced rate of positive aortic remodeling in patients with Marfan syndrome. Survival at 8 years was comparable to contemporary series of open repair. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Retrograde Embolization of the Left Vertebral Artery in a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Treatment of Aortic Thoracic Rupture: Technical Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia Nielsen, L.; Baldi, S.; Zander, T.; Arnaiz, L.; Llorens, R.; Zerolo, I.; Maynar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Endoleak is a frequent complication after endovascular repair of aortic rupture. We describe the case of a female patient with traumatic aortic injury, treated with endograft, who developed a type II endoleak through the left subclavian and vertebral arteries. Both arteries originated independently from the aortic arch, and were managed with coil embolization of each vessel. We also report our experience with treating the left vertebral artery by placing a microcatheter through the right vertebral one.

  3. Endograft Collapse After Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandorski, Dirk; Brueck, Martin; Guenther, Hans-Ulrich; Manke, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Endovascular treatment is an established therapy for thoracic aortic disease. Collapse of the endograft is a potentially fatal complication. We reviewed 16 patients with a thoracic endograft between 2001 and 2006. Medical records of the treated patients were studied. Data collected include age, gender, diagnosis, indication for endoluminal treatment, type of endograft, and time of follow up. All patients (n = 16; mean age, 61 years; range, 21-82 years) underwent computed tomography (CT) for location of the lesion and planning of the intervention. Time of follow-up with CT scan ranged from 1 to 61 months. Indications for endovascular treatment were degenerative aneurysm (n = 7; 44%), aortic dissection (n = 2; 12%), perforated aortic ulcer (n = 4; 25%), and traumatic aortic injury (n = 3; 19%). Three patients suffered from a collapse of the endograft (one patient distal, two patients proximal) between 3 and 8 days after endovascular treatment. These patients were younger (mean age, 37 ± 25 years vs. 67 ± 16 years; P 0.05]; distal, 45 ± 23.5% vs. 38 ± 21.7% [P > 0.05]). Proximal collapse was corrected by placing a bare stent. In conclusion, risk factors for stent-graft collapse are a small lumen of the aorta and a small radius of the aortic arch curvature (young patients), as well as oversizing, which is an important risk factor and is described for different types of endografts and protheses (Gore TAG and Cook Zenith). Dilatation of the collapsed stent-graft is not sufficient. Following therapy implantation of a second stent or surgery is necessary in patients with a proximal endograft collapse. Distal endograft collapse can possibly be treated conservatively under close follow-up.

  4. Hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root and thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Guido; Mazzaccaro, Daniela; Romagnoni, Claudia; Contino, Monica; Antona, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the hybrid endovascular treatment of an aortic root dilatation and a thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a high-risk patient with Marfan syndrome. A 50-year-old male, in hemodialysis for polycystic kidney and polycystic liver, was referred to our department for aortic root dilatation of 5 cm and a 6.3-cm thoracoabdominal aneurysm . He already underwent surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm 10 years ago, complicated by pseudoaneurysm of the proximal anastomosis that had been treated in another center, with an endoprosthesis. The patient underwent aortic root replacement, aortic valve sparing operation, and rerouting of the superior mesenteric artery and celiac trunk to the ascending aorta. The thoracoabdominal aneurysm was excluded with an endoprosthesis few days after the surgical step. The 12-month computed tomography scan confirmed the complete exclusion of the thoracoabdominal aneurysm.

  5. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up imaging: the assessment and treatment of common postoperative complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Shaida, N.; Thakor, A.S.; Winterbottom, A.; Cousins, C.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a well-established procedure, which has long-term mortality rates similar to that of open repair. It has the additional benefit of being less invasive, making it the favoured method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms in elderly and high-risk patients with multiple co-morbidities. The main disadvantage of EVAR is the higher rate of re-intervention, due to device-related complications, including endoleaks, limb occlusion, stent migration, kinking, and infection. As a result lifelong surveillance is required. In order to avoid missing these complications, intricate knowledge of stent graft design, good-quality diagnostic ultrasound skills, multiplanar reformatting of CT images, and reproducible investigations are important. Most of these complications can be treated via an endovascular approach using cuff extensions, uncovered stents, coils, and liquid embolic agents. Open surgery is reserved for complex complications, where an endovascular approach is not feasible. - Highlights: • Comprehensive pictorial review of EVAR related complications. • Importance of life-long EVAR surveillance, to prevent aortic rupture or lower limb ischaemia. • Identification and management of endoleaks, rupture, migration, kink/infolding, occlusion and infection

  6. Endovascular Exclusion of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Patients with Concomitant Abdominal Malignancy: Early Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, You Ri; Chang, Nam Kyu [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyo Hyun; Oh, Hyun Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Nam Yeol [Armed Forces Yangju Hospital, Yangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for the treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing curative surgical treatment for concomitant abdominal malignancy. The study included 12 patients with abdominal neoplasia and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which was treated by surgery and stent EVAR. The neoplasm consisted of the gastric, colorectal, pancreas, prostate, and gall bladder. The follow up period was 3-21 months (mean 11.8 months). All medical records and imaging analyses were reviewed by CTA and/or color Doppler US, retrospectively. Successful endoluminal repair was accomplished in all twelve patients. The mean interval time between EVAR and surgery was 58.6 days. Small amounts of type 2 endoleaks were detected in two patients (17%). One patient developed adult respiratory distress syndrome after Whipple's operation 20 days after surgery, which led to hopeless discharge. No procedure-related mortality, morbidity, or graft-related infection was noted. Exclusion of AAA in patients with accompanying malignancy show with a relatively low procedure morbidity and mortality. Hence, endoluminal AAA repair in patients with synchronous neoplasia may allow greater flexibility in the management of an offending malignancy

  7. Endovascular Exclusion of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Patients with Concomitant Abdominal Malignancy: Early Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, You Ri; Chang, Nam Kyu; Shin, Hyo Hyun; Oh, Hyun Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chung, Sang Young; Yim, Nam Yeol

    2010-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for the treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in patients undergoing curative surgical treatment for concomitant abdominal malignancy. The study included 12 patients with abdominal neoplasia and an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which was treated by surgery and stent EVAR. The neoplasm consisted of the gastric, colorectal, pancreas, prostate, and gall bladder. The follow up period was 3-21 months (mean 11.8 months). All medical records and imaging analyses were reviewed by CTA and/or color Doppler US, retrospectively. Successful endoluminal repair was accomplished in all twelve patients. The mean interval time between EVAR and surgery was 58.6 days. Small amounts of type 2 endoleaks were detected in two patients (17%). One patient developed adult respiratory distress syndrome after Whipple's operation 20 days after surgery, which led to hopeless discharge. No procedure-related mortality, morbidity, or graft-related infection was noted. Exclusion of AAA in patients with accompanying malignancy show with a relatively low procedure morbidity and mortality. Hence, endoluminal AAA repair in patients with synchronous neoplasia may allow greater flexibility in the management of an offending malignancy

  8. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommertz, G; Sigala, F; Langer, S; Koeppel, T A; Mess, W H; Schurink, G W H; Jacobs, M J

    2008-02-01

    patients with Marfan syndrome. In this series, a surgical protocol with cerebrospinal fluid drainage, distal aortic and selective organ perfusion and monitoring motor evoked potentials resulted in low morbidity and absent mortality. These outcomes of open surgery should be considered when discussing endovascular aneurysm repair in Marfan patients.

  9. Endovascular Repair of an Actively Hemorrhaging Stab Wound Injury to the Abdominal Aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Qasim; Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic injury of the abdominal aorta is rare and potentially lethal (Yeh et al., J Vasc Surg 42(5):1007-1009, 2005; Chicos et al., Chirurgia (Bucur) 102(2):237-240, 2007) as it can result in major retroperitoneal hemorrhage, requiring an urgent open surgery. In case of concomitant bowel injury or other conditions of hostile abdomen, endovascular repair can be an alternative treatment. This case report deals with a 50-year-old man presenting at the emergency ward with three stab wounds: two in the abdomen and one in the chest. During explorative laparotomy, liver laceration and bowel perforation were repaired. One day later, abdominal CT-scan revealed an additional retroperitoneal hematoma associated with an aortic pseudoaneurysm, located anteriorly 3 cm above the aortic bifurcation. Because of the risk of graft infection, an endovascular repair of the aortic injury using a Gore excluder stent-graft was performed. Radiological and clinical follow-up revealed a gradual shrinkage of the pseudo-aneurysm and no sign of graft infection at two years' follow-up.

  10. Endovascular Therapy of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Mid- and Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubin, Klaus; Sodeck, Gottfried H.; Teufelsbauer, H.; Nowatschka, Bernd; Kretschmer, Georg; Lammer, Johannes; Schoder, Maria

    2008-01-01

    As an alternative to open aneurysm repair, emergency endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) has emerged as a promising technique for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) within the last decade. The aim of this retrospective study is to present early and late outcomes of patients treated with EVAR for rAAA. Twenty-two patients (5 women, 17 men; mean age, 74 years) underwent EVAR for rAAA between November 2000 and April 2006. Diagnostic multislice computed tomography angiography was performed prior to stent-graft repair to evaluate anatomical characteristics and for follow-up examinations. Periprocedural patient characteristics and technical settings were evaluated. Mortality rates, hospital stay, and early and late complications, within a mean follow-up time of 744 ± 480 days, were also assessed. Eight of 22 patients were hemodynamically unstable at admission. Stent-graft insertion was successful in all patients. The total early complication rate was 54%, resulting in a 30-day mortality rate of 23%. The median intensive care unit stay was 2 days (range, 2-48 days), and the median hospital stay was 16 days (range, 9-210 days). During the follow-up period, three patients suffered from stent-graft-related complications. The overall mortality rate in our study group was 36%. EVAR is an acceptable, minimally invasive treatment option in patients with acute rAAA, independent of the patient's general condition. Short- and long-term outcomes are definitely comparable to those with open surgical repair procedures

  11. Vascular Rupture Caused by a Molding Balloon during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Young; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Young Wook; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been accepted as an alternative to traditional open surgery in selected patients. Despite the minimally invasiveness of this treatment, several complications may occur during or after EVAR. Complications include endoleak, aortic dissection, distal embolism, or iatrogenic injury to the access artery. However, there are few reports on the vascular rupture caused by a molding balloon during EVAR. We report two cases of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms complicated by procedure-related aortic or iliac artery rupture by the molding balloon during EVAR. In our cases, we observed suddenly abrupt increase of the diameter of the endograft during balloon inflation, because we inflated the balloon rapidly. In conclusion, careful attention must be paid during inflation of the molding balloon to prevent vascular rupture.

  12. Causes and Implications of Readmission after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, David Yu; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Kind, Amy J.H.; Havlena, Jeffrey A.; Mell, Matthew W.; Nelson, Matthew T.; Smith, Maureen A.; Kent, K. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency, causes, predictors, and consequences of 30-day readmission after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Summary Background Data CMS will soon reduce total Medicare reimbursements for hospitals with higher-than-predicted 30-day readmission rates after vascular surgical procedures including AAA repair. However, causes and factors leading to readmission in this population have never before been systematically analyzed. Methods We analyzed elective AAA repairs over a two-year period from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse, a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Results 2481 patients underwent AAA repair – 1502 endovascular (EVAR) and 979 open. 30-day readmission rates were equivalent for EVAR (13.3%) and open repair (12.8%). While wound complication was the most common reason for readmission after both procedures, the relative frequency of other causes differed – e.g., bowel obstruction was common following open repair and graft complication after EVAR. In multivariate analyses, preoperative comorbidities had a modest effect on readmission; however, postoperative factors including serious complications leading to prolonged length of stay and discharge destination other than home had a profound influence on the probability of readmission. The one-year mortality in readmitted patients was 23.4% versus 4.5% in those not readmitted (preadmission is common after AAA repair. Adjusting for comorbidities, postoperative events predict readmission, suggesting that proactively preventing, detecting, and managing postoperative complications may provide an approach to decreasing readmissions, with the potential to reduce cost and possibly enhance long-term survival. PMID:22964736

  13. Late graft explants in endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, Eric J; Steenberge, Sean P; Lyden, Sean P; Eagleton, Matthew J; Srivastava, Sunita D; Sarac, Timur P; Kelso, Rebecca L; Clair, Daniel G

    2014-04-01

    With more than a decade of use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), we expect to see a rise in the number of failing endografts. We review a single-center experience with EVAR explants to identify patterns of presentation and understand operative outcomes that may alter clinical management. A retrospective analysis of EVARs requiring late explants, >1 month after implant, was performed. Patient demographics, type of graft, duration of implant, reason for removal, operative technique, length of stay, complications, and in-hospital and late mortality were reviewed. During 1999 to 2012, 100 patients (91% men) required EVAR explant, of which 61 were placed at another institution. The average age was 75 years (range, 50-93 years). The median length of time since implantation was 41 months (range, 1-144 months). Explanted grafts included 25 AneuRx (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn), 25 Excluder (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz), 17 Zenith (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), 15 Talent (Medtronic), 10 Ancure (Guidant, Indianapolis, Ind), 4 Powerlink (Endologix, Irvine, Calif), 1 Endurant (Medtronic), 1 Quantum LP (Cordis, Miami Lakes, Fla), 1 Aorta Uni Iliac Rupture Graft (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind), and 1 homemade tube graft. Overall 30-day mortality was 17%, with an elective case mortality of 9.9%, nonelective case mortality of 37%, and 56% mortality for ruptures. Endoleak was the most common indication for explant, with one or more endoleaks present in 82% (type I, 40%; II, 30%; III, 22%; endotension, 6%; multiple, 16%). Other reasons for explant included infection (13%), acute thrombosis (4%), and claudication (1%). In the first 12 months, 23 patients required explants, with type I endoleak (48%) and infection (35%) the most frequent indication. Conversely, 22 patients required explants after 5 years, with type I (36%) and type III (32%) endoleak responsible for most indications. The rate of EVAR late explants has increased during the past decade at our

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising

  15. Dynamics of the aorta and its sidebranches : implications for endovascular treatment of aortic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhs, B.E.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to critically evaluate the clinical results of emerging aortic endovascular therapies and then to utilize dynamic imaging modalities [EKG gated dynamic computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)] to understand the

  16. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy.

  17. Transluminal endovascular stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Yun; Chang, Byung Chul; Shim, Won Heum; Cho, Seung Yun; Chung, Nam Sik; Kwon, Hyuk Moon; Lee, Young Joon; Lee, Jong Tae

    1995-01-01

    The standard treatment for aortic aneurysms is surgical replacement with a prosthetic graft. Currently there is great interest in endoluminal intervention for treatment of aortic aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of endoluminally placed Stent-graft for the treatment of aortic aneurysms. Transluminal endovascular Stent-graft placements were attempted in 9 patients with infra-renal aortic aneurysms(n 6), thoracic aortic aneurysm(n = 1), and aortic dissection(n = 2). The endovascular Stent-grafts were custom-designed for each patient and were constructed of self-expandable modified Gianturco Stents covered with polytetrafluroethylene. The Stent-grafts were introduced through a 16-18 French sheath and expanded to 17-30 mm in diameter. The endovascular therapy was performed using a common femoral artery cutdown with local anesthesia. The endovascular Stent-graft deployment was achieved in 7 of 9 patients. Two cases failed deployment of the Stent-graft due to iliac artery stenosis and tortousity. There were complete thrombosis of the thoracic and infra-renal aortic aneurysm surround the Stent-graft in 3 patients, and persistent leak with partial thrombosis in 2. Two patients with aortic dissection were successfully treated by obliteration of entry tears. There were no major complication associated with Stent-graft placement. These preliminary results show that transluminal endovascular Stent-grafts offer great promise and good results. Further investigation is needed to establish its long-term safety and efficacy

  18. Endovascular Repair of Traumatic Rupture of the Thoracic Aorta: Single-Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saratzis, Nikolaos A.; Saratzis, Athanasios N.; Melas, Nikolaos; Ginis, Georgios; Lioupis, Athanasios; Lykopoulos, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, John; Dimitrios, Kiskinis

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. Traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta secondary to blunt chest trauma is a life-threatening emergency and a common cause of death, usually following violent collisions. The objective of this retrospective report was to evaluate the efficacy of endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions with a single commercially available stent-graft. Methods. Nine men (mean age 29.5 years) were admitted to our institution between January 2003 and January 2006 due to blunt aortic trauma following violent motor vehicle collisions. Plain chest radiography, spiral computed tomography, aortography, and transesophageal echocardiography were used for diagnostic purposes in all cases. All patients were diagnosed with contained extramural thoracic aortic hematomas, secondary to aortic disruption. One patient was also diagnosed with a traumatic thoracic aortic dissection, secondary to blunt trauma. All subjects were poor surgical candidates, due to major injuries such as multiple bone fractures, abdominal hematomas, and pulmonary contusions. All repairs were performed using the EndoFit (LeMaitre Vascular) stent-graft. Results. Complete exclusion of the traumatic aortic disruption and pseudoaneurysm was achieved and verified at intraoperative arteriography and on CT scans, within 10 days of the repair in all patients. In 1 case the deployment of a second cuff was necessary due to a secondary endoleak. In 2 cases the left subclavian artery was occluded to achieve adequate graft fixation. No procedure-related deaths have occurred and no cardiac or peripheral vascular complications were observed within the 12 months (range 8-16 months) follow-up. Conclusions. This is the first time the EndoFit graft has been utilized in the treatment of thoracic aortic disruptions secondary to chest trauma. The repair of such pathologies is technically feasible and early follow-up results are promising

  19. Endovascular approach to treat ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with previous CABG and very high surgical risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Alexandre C; Saadi, Eduardo K; Zago, Alcides J

    2011-10-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta is an uncommon pathology and a challenge in high-risk patients who undergo conventional surgery because of high operative morbidity and mortality. Endovascular exclusion of an aortic pseudoaneurysm using an endoprosthesis is a less invasive approach, but few such cases have been reported. Moreover, the use of this approach poses unique therapeutic challenges because there is no specific endoprosthesis for ascending aortic repair, particularly to treat patients with previous coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). We describe the case of a 74-year-old patient who had undergone CABG and later presented with an iatrogenic ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm that occurred during an angiography. This patient was at very high risk for surgical treatment and, therefore, an endovascular approach was adopted: percutaneous coronary intervention for the left main coronary artery, left anterior descending and left circumflex native coronary arteries followed by endovascular endoprosthesis deployment in the ascending aorta to exclude the pseudoaneurysm. Both procedures were successfully performed, and the patient was discharged without complications 4 days later. At 5 months' clinical follow-up, his clinical condition was good and he had no complications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Acute Symptomatic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Endovascular Stent Graft Associated Type II Endoleak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Ka Leung Chan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR is popular because of its low invasiveness and feasibility for high-risk patients. Endoleak is common after EVAR and is characterized by blood flow within the aneurysm sac but outside the stent graft. Type II or collateral endoleak commonly results from retrograde filling of the aneurysm from collateral visceral vessels, lumbar, inferior mesenteric, accessory renal or sacral arteries. Collateral leaks are generally thought to be benign and over half of the early leaks will seal spontaneously. Sporadically, collateral endoleak could lead to aneurysm sac pressurization and place the patient at ongoing risk of rupture. Herein, we report an uncommon case of early post-stent graft placement symptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with type II endoleak.

  1. Retroperitoneal aortic hemorrhage caused by penetration of an endovascular stent-graft anchoring barb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Christopher P; Winterbottom, Andrew; Shaida, Nadeem; Boyle, Jonathan R

    2013-08-01

    To report a rare case of acute intraoperative retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to aortic penetration by the suprarenal anchoring barb on a stent-graft. A 75-year-old patient on dual antiplatelet therapy for coronary stents and low-molecular-weight heparin for atrial thrombus underwent elective endovascular repair of a 6.7-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A device with suprarenal fixation and metal anchoring barbs was implanted, and a molding balloon was used that at no time covered the proximal bare metal stents or barbs. In recovery, the patient became tachycardic and hypotensive. After resuscitation, imaging identified an anterior barb penetrating the aortic wall, causing the acute retroperitoneal hemorrhage. A decision to treat conservatively rather than resort to open surgery was difficult but ultimately influenced by the patients' high risk for open surgery. The patient was treated by aggressive reversal of heparin and platelet transfusion, and the bleed settled spontaneously. Major surgery and subsequent morbidity may be avoided by medical management of what would appear to be a surgical problem.

  2. Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies - State of the art. Part 1 - Aneurysms of abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, Carlos E; Calderon, Luis L; Gomez, German S; Castro, Pablo; Hurtado, Edgar F; Estrada, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies is actually an alternative to open surgery. It has proven to be safe, showing similar or better results to those achieved by surgery. In this article, treatment of aortic pathologies by means of endoprosthesis is presented, as well as its indications, contraindications and future treatment with this kind of devices

  3. Endovascular stent-graft exclusion of aortic dissection combined with renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiang; Jing Zaiping; Yuan Weijie; Bao Junmin; Zhao Zhiqing; Zhao Jun; Lu Qingsheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indications and peri-operative management of endovascular graft exclusion of aortic dissection combined with renal failure. Methods: Endovascular graft exclusion for Stanford B type thoracic aortic dissection had been preformed on 136 patients including two complicated with renal failure. Hemodialysis was preformed before operation with the fluid infusion controlled during the operation and bed-side hemodialysis after the operation for the latter. Results: All the 2 cases with renal failure complication were successfully carried out, and the peri-operative metabolism and circulation were kept on smoothly. Conclusions: Under good peri-operative management, patients having aortic dissection combined with renal failure could receive the endovascular graft exclusion of aortic dissection safely

  4. Life satisfaction in patients with and without spinal cord ischemia after advanced endovascular therapy for extensive aortic disease at mid-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Irma; Santén, Stefan; Jörgensen, Sophie; Acosta, Stefan

    2016-11-11

    Advanced endovascular aortic repair can be used to treat patients with extensive and complex aortic disease who are at risk of spinal cord ischaemia. The aim of this study was to compare whether life satisfaction differs between patients with and without spinal cord ischaemia at mid-term follow-up. Nested case-control study. Among patients undergoing advanced endovascular aortic repair between 2009 and 2012, 18 patients with spinal cord ischaemia and 33 without were interviewed at home. The Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11) and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) were used. LiSat-11 found that patients with spinal cord ischaemia were more dissatisfied with their activities of daily living than were patients without spinal cord ischaemia (p=0.012). Both groups had similar, very low, scores in the sexual life domain; median 2.0 (interquartile range (IQR) 1.5-3.0) and 3.0 (IQR 2.0-4.0), respectively. There was no difference in SWLS between the groups. This study cohort of patients who underwent advanced endovascular aortic repair was rather homo-genous in their rating of life satisfaction and there was little difference between mid-term survivors who had spinal cord ischaemia and those who did not.

  5. Carotid and coronary disease management prior to open and endovascular aortic surgery. What are the current guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J P

    2014-04-01

    Several bodies produce broadly concurring and updated guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of cardiovascular disease in both surgical and non-surgical patients. Recent developments include revised recommendations on preoperative stress testing, referral for possible coronary revascularization and medical management. It is recognized that non-invasive cardiac tests are relatively poor at predicting perioperative risk, and "prophylactic" coronary revascularization has a limited role. The planned aortic intervention (open or endovascular repair) also influences preoperative management. Patients presenting for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair should only be referred for cardiological testing if they have active symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD), known CAD and poor functional exercise capacity, or multiple risk factors for CAD. Coronary revascularization before AAA surgery should be limited to patients with established indications, so cardiac stress testing should only be performed if it would change management i.e. the patient is a candidate for and would benefit from coronary revascularization. When endovascular aortic repair is planned, it is reasonable to proceed to surgery without further cardiac stress testing or evaluation unless otherwise indicated. All non-emergency patients require medical optimization, but perioperative beta blockade benefits only certain patients. Some of the data informing recent guidelines have been questioned and some guidelines are being revised. Current guidelines do not specifically address the management of patients with known or suspected carotid artery disease who may require aortic surgery. For these patients, an individualized approach is required. This review considers recent guidelines. Algorithms for investigation and management based on their recommendations are included.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair, open repair, and conservative management of splenic artery aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, Wouter; Lavida, Anthi; Hunink, M. G Myriam; Moll, Frans L.; Geroulakos, George; Muhs, Bart E.; Sumpio, Bauer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Open repair (OPEN) and conservative management (CONS) have been the treatments of choice for splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs) for many years. Endovascular repair (EV) has been increasingly used with good short-term results. In this study, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of OPEN, EV, and

  7. Stent fractures in the Hemobahn/Viabahn stent graft after endovascular popliteal aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Vourliotakis, George; Bekkema, Foppe; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Prins, Ted R.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.

    Objective: During the last decade, endovascular repair of popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs) has become a valid alternative to open repair. This study analyzes the incidence and origin of stein graft fractures after endovascular repair, its impact on patency, and strategies to prevent fractures.

  8. Recognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis during and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingsheng; Jing Zaiping; Zhao Zhiqing; Bao Junmin; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Feng Rui; Huang Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the cognition and treatment of outflow tract stenosis in and after endovascular exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Methods: From Mar 1997 to Oct 2002, in 136 patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular exclusion, 8 patients had outflow tract stenosis during the operation, and 3 patients had outflow tract stenosis after operation. The stenosis of 5 patients occurred at the crotch of the graft-stent. PTA was done in 7 patients and stents were placed in stenotic segment in 2 patients. 2 patients were treated with crossover operation. Results: Following up 1 month to 2 years, all patients have no lower limbs ischemia. Conclusions: The diagnosis of outflow tract stenosis during and after abdominal endovascular exclusion for aortic aneurysm must be in time. The treatment should be according to the different causes of stenosis

  9. Anastomotic pseudoaneurysms after surgical reconstruction: Outcomes after endovascular repair of symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolz, Richard; Gschwendtner, Manfred; Jülg, Gregor; Plank, Christina; Beitzke, Dietrich; Teufelsbauer, Harald; Wibmer, Andreas; Kretschmer, Georg; Lammer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare perioperative and follow-up outcomes of symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients following endovascular repair of anastomotic pseudoaneurysms (APAs) of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 17 patients (two women), with a mean age of 66.2 years (range 30–83 years). Endovascular treatment was performed in ten symptomatic, and seven asymptomatic patients electively. Data included technical success, perioperative (within 30 days) mortality and morbidity, as well as stent graft-related complications, reinterventions, and survival in follow-up. Results: Bifurcated (n = 13), aortomonoiliac (n = 3) endoprosthesis and one aortic cuff were implanted with a primary technical success rate of 100%. The overall in-hospital mortality and morbidity rate was 11.8% and 35.3%. The mean survival was 36.5 (range 0–111) months. There was a clear trend toward a lower overall survival within hospital and at one and three years for symptomatic patients compared to asymptomatic patients. (47.7 (CI: 0–138.8) versus 52.6 (CI: 28.5–76.8) months (p = 0.274)). During follow-up, late stent graft related complications were observed in six patients (35.3%) necessitating eight endovascular reinterventions. Additional three patients with primary fistulas between the APA and the intestine were treated by late surgical revision. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy of APAs represents a considerable alternative to open surgical repair. Short proximal anchoring zones still pose a risk for endoleaks and unintentional overstenting of side branches with commercially available devices, but this might be overcome by use of fenestrated and branched stent grafts in elective cases.

  10. Type A dissection following endovascular repair of type B dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, R.; Zabicki, M.; Jemielity, M.; Buczkowski, P.; Urbanowicz, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: We present a patient, who was treated with thoracic stentgraft implantation, because of acute type B aortic dissection (according to Stanford classification). The endovascular procedure was performed without any complications. Case Report: The patient was discharged in the 3 rd postprocedural day and was transferred to another hospital for further recovery. Nine days after the procedure, the patient was readmitted in cardiogenic shock to the Cardiac Surgery Department. The patient was immediately operated on, after dissection of the ascending aorta and pericardial tamponade had been diagnosed in transthoracic echocardiography. Conclusions: Total replacement of the aortic arch and its ascending part was performed successfully. The surgery was carried out in deep hypothermia with temporary circulatory arrest. The patient was discharged from the Cardiac Surgery Unit 15 days after the surgery, and transferred to another unit for further recovery. (authors)

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  12. Changes in Renal Anatomy After Fenestrated Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, B; Lounes, Y; Amako, M; Fabre, D; Hertault, A; Sobocinski, J; Spear, R; Azzaoui, R; Mastracci, T M; Haulon, S

    2017-01-01

    To assess short- and long-term movement of renal arteries after fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (FEVAR). Consecutive patients who underwent FEVAR at one institution with a custom-made device designed with fenestrations for the superior mesenteric (SMA) and renal arteries, a millimetric computed tomography angiography (CTA), and a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were included. Angulation between renal artery trunk and aorta, clock position of the origin of the renal arteries, distance between renal arteries and SMA, and target vessel occlusion were retrospectively collected and compared between the pre-operative, post-operative (12 months) CTA. From October 2004 to January 2014, 100 patients met the inclusion criteria and 86% of imaging was available for accurate analysis. Median follow-up was 27.3 months (22.7-50.1). There were no renal occlusions. A significant change was found in the value of renal trunk angulation of both renal arteries on post-operative compared with pre-operative CTA (17° difference upward [7.5-29], p renal clock positions (7.5° of change equivalent to 15 min of renal ostial movement): significant anterior change was found between post-operative and pre-operative CTA (15 min [0-30], p = .03 on the left and 15 min [15-30], p renal and SMA ostia (difference of 1.65 mm [1-2.5], p = .63). The renal arteries demonstrate tolerance to permanent changes in angulation after FEVAR of approximately 17° upward trunk movement and of 15-30 min ostial movement without adverse consequences on patency after a median of more than 2 years' follow-up. The distance between the target vessels remained stable over time. These results may suggest accommodation to sizing errors and thus a compliance with off the shelf devices in favourable anatomies. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Endovascular Repair of Thoracoabdominal and Arch Aneurysms in Patients with Connective Tissue Disease Using Branched and Fenestrated Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Rachel E; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Van Calster, Katrien; Hertault, Adrien; Spear, Rafaëlle; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-10-01

    Prophylactic open surgery is the standard practice in patients with connective tissue and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) and aortic arch disease. Branched and fenestrated devices offer a less invasive alternative but there are concerns regarding the durability of the repair and the effect of the stent graft on the fragile aortic wall. The aim of this study is to evaluate mid-term outcomes of fenestrated and/or branched endografting in patients with connective tissue disease. All patients with connective tissue disease who underwent TAAA or arch aneurysm repair using a fenestrated and/or branched endograft in a single, high-volume center between 2004 and 2015 were included. Ruptured aneurysms and acute aortic dissections were excluded from this study, but not chronic aortic dissections. In total, 427 (403 pararenal and TAAAs, and 24 arch aneurysms) endovascular interventions were performed during the study period. Of these, 17 patients (4%) (16 TAAAs, 1 arch) had connective tissue disease. All patients were classified as unfit for open repair. The mean age was 51 ± 8 years. Thirteen patients with TAAA were treated with a fenestrated, 1 with a branched, and 2 with a combined fenestrated/branch device. A double inner branch device was used to treat the arch aneurysm. The technical success rate was 100% with no incidence of early mortality, spinal cord ischemia, stroke, or further dissection. Postoperative deterioration in renal function was seen in 3 patients (18.8%) and no hemodialysis was required. The mean follow-up was 3.4 years (0.3-7.4). Aneurysm sac shrinkage was seen in 35% of patients (6/17) and the sac diameter remained stable in 65% of patients (11/17). No sac or sealing zone enlargement was observed in any of the patients and there were no conversions to open repair. Reintervention was required in 1 patient at 2 years for bilateral renal artery occlusion (successful fibrinolysis). One type II endoleak (lumbar) is under surveillance and 1 type

  14. Contemporary Management Strategies for Chronic Type B Aortic Dissections: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamman, Arnoud V.; de Beaufort, Hector W. L.; van Bogerijen, Guido H W; Nauta, FJH; Heijmen, Robin H.; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Trimarchi, Santi

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the optimal management strategy for chronic type B aortic dissections (CBAD) is unknown. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the literature to compare results of open surgical repair (OSR), standard thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) or branched and fenestrated TEVAR

  15. Surgical repair for acute type A aortic dissection in octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed Ahmad, Ali; Papadopoulos, Nestoras; Detho, Faisal; Srndic, Edin; Risteski, Petar; Moritz, Anton; Zierer, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Despite limited data, the necessity for immediate surgical intervention in octogenarians with acute type A aortic dissection (AAD) has recently been questioned because the surgical risk may outweigh its potential benefits. At the same time, evolving stent graft technologies are pushing in the market for pathology within the ascending aorta, even for treatment of AAD. Against this background, we analyzed our institutional experience in this patient cohort during the last 8 years. Between October 2005 and October 2013, 39 patients aged older than 80 years (82 ± 2 years) underwent surgical repair for AAD, of which 29 patients (74%) were men. Owing to patient age and comorbidities, we aimed to limit the operation to supracoronary hemiarch replacement whenever possible. Clinical data were prospectively entered into our institutional database. Late follow-up was 3.6 ± 2.8 years and was 100% complete. Hemiarch replacement was performed in 32 patients (82%), and full arch replacement was necessary in the remaining 7. In 31 patients (79%), the aortic root could be glued and reconstructed or remained untouched. The remaining 8 patients (21%) underwent the bio-Bentall procedure. Mean ventilation time was 46 ± 23 hours, and the intensive care unit stay was 5 ± 9 days. We observed new postoperative permanent neurologic deficits in 2 patients (5%) and transient neurologic deficits in 3 (8%). The 30-day mortality was 26% (n = 10). Kaplan-Meier estimates for late survival were 46% ± 16% at 5 years. Given the guidelines regarding the predicted risk of death in patients with untreated AAD, current data suggest a survival benefit with immediate open surgical intervention even in octogenarians. Similarly to the early days of transcatheter-based aortic valve implantation, open surgical reference data are warranted to set the bar for upcoming endovascular treatment of AAD in octogenarians. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Persistent Intraluminal Pressure After Endovascular Stent Grafting for Type B Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, K-X; Chan, Y-C; Ting, A C W; Cheng, S W K

    2016-05-01

    Despite technically successful thoracic endovascular stent graft repair (TEVAR) in patients with Stanford Type B aortic dissection (TBAD), long-term follow up studies have shown that the false lumen may continue to dilate. The aim of this study was to analyze the possible mechanisms leading to such changes from a hemodynamic perspective. Twenty-eight ex vivo fresh porcine TBAD models (Mo A: 10; Model B: 12; Model C: 6) were established to simulate three clinical situations: Model A with patent false lumen (pre-TEVAR); Model B with distal re-entry only (post-TEVAR), and Model C with thrombus filling in the false lumen and a distal re-entry (chronic stage of post-TEVAR). Synchronous pressure waveforms were taken from both the true and the false lumen. True lumen and false lumen pressure differences were calculated for each model as four indices: systolic index (SI), diastolic index (DI), mean pressure index (MPI) and area under curve index (AUCI). These indices were compared between the three models. False lumen pressure and corresponding pressure-accumulating effects were significantly higher in Model A than in Model C: SI (99.9% vs. 189.4%; p area under curve (AUC) in Model C was merely lowered by 20% compared with its true lumen (67.5 mmHg vs. 85.2 mmHg). The false lumen pressure remained unchanged in the non-thrombosed segment with patent blood flow after the primary entry tear sealed. Intraluminal pressure reduction in the thrombosed false lumen was significant. However, nearly 80% of the pressure remained in the thrombosed false lumen. If this high intra-thrombus pressure persists, it may contribute to delayed aneurysmal formation after endovascular treatment. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mortality within the endovascular treatment in Stanford type B aortic dissections Mortalidade no tratamento endovascular nas dissecções aórticas tipo B

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    Alexandre Fioranelli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endovascular stent-graft repair of aortic dissections is a relatively new procedure, and although apparently less invasive, the efficacy and safety of this technique have not been fully established. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mortality in patients with complicated Stanford type B aortic dissections submitted to endovascular treatment. METHODS: Clinical, anatomical, imaging and autopsy data of 23 patients with complicated type B aortic dissections were reviewed from November 2004 to October 2007. The main indications for transluminal thoracic stent-grafting included: persistent pain in spite of medical therapy, signs of distal limb ischemia, signs of aortic rupture, progression of aneurismal dilation of the descending aorta during follow-up (defined as a diameter > 50 mm and the diameter of descending thoracic aorta of 40mm or larger at the onset of aortic dissection. Data were analyzed statistically; all p-values were two-tailed and differences INTRODUÇÃO: O tratamento endovascular na dissecção de aorta é um procedimento relativamente novo e, embora aparentemente menos invasivo, a eficácia e a segurança dessa técnica não estão totalmente estabelecidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a mortalidade e complicações nos pacientes submetidos a tratamento endovascular na dissecção de aorta tipo B de Stanford. MÉTODOS: Foram revisados, a partir de novembro de 2004 a outubro de 2007, em estudo clínico, anatômico, de imagens e dados da autopsia de 23 pacientes com dissecção aórtica tipo B. As principais indicações para o procedimento foram: dor persistente apesar da terapia médica, sinais de isquemia distal do membro, sinais de ruptura da aorta, progressão da dilatação do aneurisma da aorta descendente, durante o seguimento (definida como um diâmetro > 5 cm e descendente da aorta torácica de 40 mm ou mais de diâmetro no início da dissecção aórtica. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente considerados erro alfa de 5%. As vari

  18. Open and endovascular aneurysm repair in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Emily L; Beck, Adam W

    2017-12-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative is a patient safety organization and a collection of procedure-based registries that can be utilized for quality improvement initiatives and clinical outcomes research. The Vascular Quality Initiative consists of voluntary participation by centers to collect data prospectively on all consecutive cases within specific registries which physicians and centers elect to participate. The data capture extends from preoperative demographics and risk factors (including indications for operation), through the perioperative period, to outcomes data at up to 1-year of follow-up. Additionally, longer-term follow-up can be achieved by matching with Medicare claims data, providing long-term longitudinal follow-up for a majority of patients within the Vascular Quality Initiative registries. We present the unique characteristics of the Vascular Quality Initiative registries and highlight important insights gained specific to open and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endovascular aortic graft infection resulting in retroperitoneal abscess: report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Di Somma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection is a rare complication of aortoiliac endovascular procedures, with an incidence inferior to 0.5%, and it may result in a retroperitoneal abscess potentially evolving to sepsis and gastrointestinal bleeding. In more than 50% of cases endovascular aortoiliac prosthetic grafts infection occur months or years after the procedure. The growing number of endovascular procedures, and as the actually midterm follow up in most cases, septic sequelae will no doubt continue to occur with increased frequency and may represent an emerging problem in the ED for the emergency physician. Endovascular graft infection begins with unspecific clinical manifestations. An high index of suspicion in any patient with an aortic stent graft presenting prolonged or recurrent fever and or abdominal or back pain and a low threshold for obtaining CT scan should increase the clinician’s ability to make a timely diagnosis in the ED setting.

  20. Perioperative nursing for patients receiving endovascular therapy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yanfen; Pan Wei; Zhang Hongpeng; Guo Wei; Liu Xiaoping; Wei Ren

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the nursing strategy and practical measures for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm during the perioperative period of endovascular intervention. Methods: Endovascular therapy was carried out in 34 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm,who were encountered in our department during the period of July 1997 to September 2008. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed and the nursing points were summarized. Results: The average hospitalization days of the 34 patients were (14 ± 5) days, the mortality rate within 30 days was 23.5% (8/34). No nursing-related complications occurred. Conclusion: A comprehensive understanding of the mechanism, development and clinical evolution of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is very important for nursing care. For nursing staff, well mastering the relevant nursing technique, carefully guarding against any nursing errors and lessening patient's suffering as far as possible, all these are the task of primary importance. (authors)

  1. Flow and wall shear stress characterization after endovascular aneurysm repair and endovascular aneurysm sealing in an infrarenal aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersen, Johannes T; Groot Jebbink, Erik; Versluis, Michel; Slump, Cornelis H; Ku, David N; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-12-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a modular endograft has become the preferred treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysms. A novel concept is endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), consisting of dual endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags. This dual-lumen configuration is different from a bifurcation with a tapered trajectory of the flow lumen into the two limbs and may induce unfavorable flow conditions. These include low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS), linked to atherosclerosis, and high shear rates that may result in thrombosis. An in vitro study was performed to assess the impact of EVAR and EVAS on flow patterns and WSS. Four abdominal aortic aneurysm phantoms were constructed, including three stented models, to study the influence of the flow divider on flow (Endurant [Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn], AFX [Endologix, Irvine, Calif], and Nellix [Endologix]). Experimental models were tested under physiologic resting conditions, and flow was visualized with laser particle imaging velocimetry, quantified by shear rate, WSS, and oscillatory shear index (OSI) in the suprarenal aorta, renal artery (RA), and common iliac artery. WSS and OSI were comparable for all models in the suprarenal aorta. The RA flow profile in the EVAR models was comparable to the control, but a region of lower WSS was observed on the caudal wall compared with the control. The EVAS model showed a stronger jet flow with a higher shear rate in some regions compared with the other models. Small regions of low WSS and high OSI were found near the distal end of all stents in the common iliac artery compared with the control. Maximum shear rates in each region of interest were well below the pathologic threshold for acute thrombosis. The different stent designs do not influence suprarenal flow. Lower WSS is observed in the caudal wall of the RA after EVAR and a higher shear rate after EVAS. All stented models have a small region of low WSS and high OSI near the distal outflow

  2. Endovascular treatment of false-aneurysm ten years after dacron patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta; Palumbo, Piergaspare; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Vietri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    False aneurysm degeneration is a known complication of patch aortoplasty for coarctation of the aortic isthmus. Open surgical treatment consists of prosthetic graft repair of the involved aorta, often requires circulatory arrest to achieve a safe proximal aortic control and perform proximal anastomosis, and finally is associated with substantial perioperative morbidity. Endografting of the diseased aorta is a valuable alternative to open repair, when feasible, with good short and long term results. We now report one more case of false aneurysm ten years after Dacron patch aortoplasty for isthmic coarctation in a 26-year-old woman, successfully treated by endovascular repair via the left common iliac artery, and a complete exclusion of the aneurysm at two year follow-up.

  3. Endovascular stent-graft placement for the treatment of acute onset and chronic aortic dissections of the descending aorta (Short-term follow-up)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, I; Jorgova, J.; Trendafilova, D.

    2004-01-01

    The leading cause of death for patients with surgically untreated thoracic aortic aneurysms is the rupture of the aneurysm. Almost one half of these patients are left to medical treatment assuming the risk of late rupture and aneurysm sac enlargement - the late surgical treatment of these patients is too risky and with poor results. On the other hand the emergent surgical treatment of these cases is related with relatively high mortality rate. Recently, thoracic aortic stent-grafting has emerged as a less traumatic alternative therapeutic modality for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections. The first case of stent implantation in a dissected descending aorta was performed in Bulgaria at 09.04.2003. Since then we implanted in 8 patients thoracic stent grafts, The mean age of the patients was 67.5 years. The primary success was 100%. One died on the second postoperative day by abdominal aorta rupture. No other complications were registered. The mean follow-up of 5 months proved to be uneventful and the control CT revealed efficacious sealing of the entry and false lumen thrombosis in all except one cases. We report our initial clinical experience of endovascular stent-graft repair for dissection of the descending aorta that is encouraging. These preliminary data suggest that endovascular stent-grafting is a viable treatment for acute onset and chronic aortic dissection type B

  4. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic ane...

  5. Disección de aorta: Aspectos básicos y manejo endovascular Aortic dissection: Basic aspects and endovascular management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás I Jaramillo

    2005-08-01

    , probablemente llegue a ser la terapia preferida, aunque la técnica todavía está en proceso de refinamiento. A nivel mundial la experiencia viene en crecimiento y hoy se entienden mejor las indicaciones y las limitaciones de esta terapia innovadora. En este artículo se hace una revisión general sobre el diagnóstico clínico y el manejo de la disección aórtica y sus variantes: el hematoma intramural y la úlcera aórtica aterosclerótica.Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes has facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the

  6. Short-term curative effect of endovascular stent-graft treatment for aortic diseases in China: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwen Wang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the short-term efficacy of endovascular treatment for aortic diseases by summarizing all available published data on endovascular stent-graft treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA, type A aortic dissection (type A AD and type B aortic dissection (type B AD in China. METHODS: We performed a systematic analysis of 935 published series on retrograde endovascular treatment for aortic diseases in China from January 1996 to November 2010. Based on the inclusion criteria, 159 studies, involving a total of 5531 patients, were included. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in procedural success among the studies (P>0.05. The rates of overall neurologic complications and stroke were significantly different in all two-group comparisons (P0.05. A significant difference was noted between the 30-day mortality rate of the type A AD patients and the AAA or type B AD patients (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Endovascular stent-graft is a feasible and safe treatment for aortic diseases, with high procedural success and low incidences of post-procedural complications and short-term mortality. Endovascular treatment for AAA and type B AD is more efficient than for type A AD and TAA.

  7. 3D printed abdominal aortic aneurysm phantom for image guided surgical planning with a patient specific fenestrated endovascular graft system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meess, Karen M.; Izzo, Richard L.; Dryjski, Maciej L.; Curl, Richard E.; Harris, Linda M.; Springer, Michael; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2017-03-01

    Following new trends in precision medicine, Juxatarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (JAAA) treatment has been enabled by using patient-specific fenestrated endovascular grafts. The X-ray guided procedure requires precise orientation of multiple modular endografts within the arteries confirmed via radiopaque markers. Patient-specific 3D printed phantoms could familiarize physicians with complex procedures and new devices in a risk-free simulation environment to avoid periprocedural complications and improve training. Using the Vascular Modeling Toolkit (VMTK), 3D Data from a CTA imaging of a patient scheduled for Fenestrated EndoVascular Aortic Repair (FEVAR) was segmented to isolate the aortic lumen, thrombus, and calcifications. A stereolithographic mesh (STL) was generated and then modified in Autodesk MeshMixer for fabrication via a Stratasys Eden 260 printer in a flexible photopolymer to simulate arterial compliance. Fluoroscopic guided simulation of the patient-specific FEVAR procedure was performed by interventionists using all demonstration endografts and accessory devices. Analysis compared treatment strategy between the planned procedure, the simulation procedure, and the patient procedure using a derived scoring scheme. Results: With training on the patient-specific 3D printed AAA phantom, the clinical team optimized their procedural strategy. Anatomical landmarks and all devices were visible under x-ray during the simulation mimicking the clinical environment. The actual patient procedure went without complications. Conclusions: With advances in 3D printing, fabrication of patient specific AAA phantoms is possible. Simulation with 3D printed phantoms shows potential to inform clinical interventional procedures in addition to CTA diagnostic imaging.

  8. "Elephant trunk" and endovascular stentgrafting : a hybrid approach to the treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Holubec, Tomás; Raupach, Jan; Dominik, Jan; Vojácek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid approach to elephant trunk technique for treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms combines a conventional surgical and endovascular therapy. Compared to surgery alone, there is a presumption that mortality and morbidity is reduced. We present a case report of a 42-year-old man with a giant aneurysm of the entire thoracic aorta, significant aortic and tricuspid regurgitation and ventricular septum defect. The patient underwent multiple consecutive operations and interventions having, am...

  9. Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies - State of the art. Part 2 - Pathologies of thoracic aorta and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uribe, Carlos E; Calderon, Luis L; Gomez, German S; Castro, Pablo; Hurtado, Edgar F; Estrada, Gilberto

    2007-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies is actually an alternative to open surgery. It has proven to be safe, showing similar or better results to those achieved by surgery. In this article, treatment of aortic pathologies by means of endoprosthesis is presented, as well as its indications, contraindications and future treatment with this kind of devices

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Symptomatic Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm by Chimney and Periscope Techniques for Total Visceral and Renal Artery Revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariati, Maurizio, E-mail: cariati.maurizio@sancarlo.mi.it [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Mingazzini, Pietro; Dallatana, Raffaello [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy); Rossi, Umberto G. [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Sciences (Italy); Settembrini, Alberto [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Santuari, Davide [San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery (Italy)

    2013-05-02

    Conventional endovascular therapy of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with involving visceral and renal arteries is limited by the absence of a landing zone for the aortic endograft. Solutions have been proposed to overcome the problem of no landing zone; however, most of them are not feasible in urgent and high-risk patients. We describe a case that was successfully treated by total endovascular technique with a two-by-two chimney-and-periscope approach in a patient with acute symptomatic type IV thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with supra-anastomotic aneurysm formation involving the renal and visceral arteries and a pseduaneurismatic sac localized in the left ileopsoas muscle.

  11. The influence of neck thrombus on clinical outcome and aneurysm morphology after endovascular aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M.V. Bastos Gonçalves (Frederico); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); K. Chinsakchai (Khamin); J.W. van Keulen (Jasper); M.T. Voûte (Michiel); H.J.A. Zandvoort (Herman); F.L. Moll (Frans); J.A. van Herwaarden (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: This study investigated the influence of significant aneurysm neck thrombus in clinical and morphologic outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods: The patient population was derived from a prospective EVAR database from two university institutions in The

  12. Importance of stent-graft design for aortic arch aneurysm repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysm of the aorta is currently treated by open surgical repair or endovascular repair. However, when the aneurysm occurs in regions between the aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, it can be a complex pathology to treat due to its intricate geometry. When complex aortic aneurysms are treated with the conventional procedures, some of the patients present with significant post-operative complications and high mortality rate. Consequently, a clinically driven hybrid innovation known as the frozen elephant trunk procedure was introduced to treat complex aortic aneurysms. Although this procedure significantly reduces mortality rate and operating time, it is still associated with complications such as endoleaks, spinal cord ischemia, renal failure and stroke. Some of these complications are consequences of a mismatch in the biomechanical behaviour of the stent-graft device and the aorta. Research on complex aneurysm repair tended to focus more on the surgical procedure than the stent-graft design. Current stent-graft devices are suitable for straight vessels. However, when used to treat aortic aneurysm with complex geometry, these devices are ineffective in restoring the normal biological and biomechanical function of the aorta. A stent-graft device with mechanical properties that are comparable with the aorta and aortic arch could possibly lead to fewer post-operative complications, thus, better outcome for patients with complex aneurysm conditions. This review highlights the influence stent-graft design has on the biomechanical properties of the aorta which in turn can contribute to complications of complex aneurysm repair. Design attributes critical for minimising postoperative biomechanical mismatch are also discussed.

  13. Aortic arch/elephant trunk procedure with Sienna(TM) graft and endovascular stenting of thoraco-abdominal aorta for treatment of complex chronic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Randolph H L; Baghai, Max; Yu, Simon C H; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2013-05-01

    Aneurismal dilatation of the remaining thoracic aorta after ascending aortic interposition grafting for type 'A' aortic dissection is not uncommon. For such complex cases, one treatment option is total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure with the Sienna(TM) collared graft (Vascutek, Inchinnan, UK) technique followed by a staged thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The video illustrates our technique in a 56-year-old man with an extensive aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic dissecting aneurysm. For the 'open' procedure femoral arterial and venous cannulation was used along with systemic cooling and circulatory arrest at 22 °C. Upon circulatory arrest, the aortic arch was incised and antegrade cerebral perfusion achieved via selective cannulation to the right brachiocephalic and left common carotid artery, keeping flow rates at 10-15 mL/kg/min and perfusion pressure at 50-60 mmHg. Arch replacement with an elephant trunk component was then performed and after completion of the distal aortic anastomosis antegrade perfusion via a side-arm in the graft was started and the operation completed using a variation of the 'sequential' clamping technique to maximize cerebral perfusion. The second endovascular stage was performed two weeks after discharge. Two covered stents were landing from the elephant trunk to the distal descending thoracic aorta, to secure the distal landing a bare stent of was placed to cover the aorta just distal to the origin of the celiac axis. The left subclavian artery was embolised with fibre coils. Post TEVAR angiogram showed no endoleak Although re-operative total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure and subsequent TEVAR remained a challenging procedure, we believe excellent surgical outcome can be achieved with carefully planned operative strategy.

  14. Risk factors and early outcomes of acute renal injury after thoracic aortic endograft repair for type B aortic dissection

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    Luo S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Songyuan Luo,* Huanyu Ding,* Jianfang Luo, Wei Li, Bing Ning, Yuan Liu, Wenhui Huang, Ling Xue, Ruixin Fan, Jiyan Chen Cardiology Department, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR has become an emerging treatment modality for acute type B aortic dissection (TBAD patients in recent years. The risk factors and impacts of acute kidney injury (AKI after percutaneous TEVAR, however, have not been widely established.Methods: We retrospectively studied the clinical records of 305 consecutive patients who admitted to our institution and had TEVAR for TBAD between December 2009 and June 2013. The patients were routinely monitored for their renal functions preoperatively until 7 days after TEVAR. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Guidelines (KDIGO criteria were used for AKI.Results: Of the total 305 consecutive patients, 84 (27.5% developed AKI after TEVAR, comprising 66 (21.6% patients in KDIGO stage 1, 6 (2.0% patients in stage 2 and 12 (3.9% patients in stage 3. From the logistic regression analysis, systolic blood pressure (SBP on admission >140 mmHg (odds ratio [OR], 2.288; 95% CI, 1.319–3.969 and supra-aortic branches graft bypass hybrid surgery (OR, 3.228; 95% CI, 1.526–6.831 were independent risk factors for AKI after TEVAR. Local anesthesia tended to be a protective factor (OR, 0.563; 95% CI, 0.316–1.001. The preoperative renal function, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or statin administration, volume of contrast agent, range of TBAD and false lumen involving renal artery were not associated with post-operation AKI. The in-hospital mortality and major adverse events were markedly increased with the occurrence of AKI (7.1% vs 0.9%, P=0

  15. Transient postoperative atrial fibrillation after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair increases mortality risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N.; Halandras, Pegge M.; Drescher, Max; Blackwell, Robert H.; Graunke, Dawn M.; Kliethermes, Stephanie; Kuo, Paul C.; Cho, Jae S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether new-onset transient postoperative atrial fibrillation (TPAF) affects mortality rates after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and to identify predictors for the development of TPAF. Methods Patients who underwent open aortic repair or endovascular aortic repair for a principal diagnosis AAA were retrospectively identified using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-State Inpatient Database (Florida) for 2007 to 2011 and monitored longitudinally for 1 year. Inpatient and 1-year mortality rates were compared between those with and without TPAF. TPAF was defined as new-onset atrial fibrillation that developed in the postoperative period and subsequently resolved in patients without a history of atrial fibrillation. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, gender, comorbidities, rupture status, and repair method, were used to assess 1-year survival. Predictive models were built with preoperative patient factors using Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision trees and externally validated on patients from California. Results A 3.7% incidence of TPAF was identified among 15,148 patients who underwent AAA repair. The overall mortality rate was 4.3%. The inpatient mortality rate was 12.3% in patients with TPAF vs 4.0% in those without TPAF. In the ruptured setting, the difference in mortality was similar between groups (33.7% vs 39.9%, P = .3). After controlling for age, gender, comorbid disease severity, urgency (ruptured vs nonruptured), and repair method, TPAF was associated with increased 1-year postoperative mortality (hazard ratio, 1.48; P predict an individual's probability of developing TPAF at the point of care. Conclusions The development of TPAF is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients undergoing repair of nonruptured AAA. Predictive modeling can be used to identify those patients at highest risk for developing TPAF and guide interventions to improve

  16. Aortic Branch Artery Pseudoaneurysms Associated with Intramural Hematoma: When and How to Do Endovascular Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G., E-mail: urossi76@hotmail.com; Seitun, Sara [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, IST, National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Italy); Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Giancarlo [IRCCS San Martino University Hospital, IST, National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Italy); Williams, David M. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-04-15

    To describe when and how to perform endovascular embolization of aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B intramural hematoma (IMH) involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) that increased significantly in size during follow-up. Sixty-one patients (39 men; mean {+-} standard deviation age 66.1 {+-} 11.2 years) with acute IMH undergoing at least two multidetector computed tomographic examinations during follow-up for 12 months or longer were enrolled. Overall, 48 patients (31 men, age 65.9 {+-} 11.5) had type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III). Among the 48 patients, 26 (54 %; 17 men, aged 64.3 {+-} 11.4 years) had 71 aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms. Overall, during a mean follow-up of 22.1 {+-} 9.5 months (range 12-42 months), 31 (44 %) pseudoaneurysms disappeared; 22 (31 %) decreased in size; two (3 %) remained stable; and 16 (22 %) increased in size. Among the 16 pseudoaneurysms with increasing size, five of these (three intercostal arteries, one combined intercostobronchial/intercostal arteries, one renal artery), present in five symptomatic patients, had a significant increase in size (thickness >10 mm; width and length >20 mm). These five patients underwent endovascular embolization with coils and/or Amplatzer Vascular Plug. In all patients, complete thrombosis and exclusion of aortic pseudoaneurysm and relief of back pain were achieved. Aortic branch artery pseudoaneurysms associated with type A and type B IMH involving the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta (DeBakey I and III) may be considered relatively benign lesions. However, a small number may grow in size or extend longitudinally with clinical symptoms during follow-up, and in these cases, endovascular embolization can be an effective and safe procedure.

  17. Tratamento endovascular de ruptura traumática da aorta torácica descendente Endovascular treatment of traumatic descending thoracic aortic rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Roberto Breda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Paciente do sexo feminino, 55 anos de idade, vítima de atropelamento, foi admitida em unidade de emergência, onde se realizou o diagnóstico clínico, radiológico e tomográfico de ruptura traumática da aorta torácica descendente. Diante do achado, a paciente foi encaminhada para tratamento endovascular com colocação de endoprótese auto-expansível (stent pela artéria femoral. O tratamento obteve sucesso, evidenciado pela exclusão da lesão localizada previamente no istmo aórtico. O tratamento endovascular tem sido indicado nas afecções de aorta torácica descendente com bons resultados iniciais. Na ruptura traumática de aorta, a terapêutica endovascular representa uma alternativa aceitável, especialmente devido aos riscos do tratamento operatório convencional.A 55-year-old, female patient who was run over by a motor vehicle was admitted at an emergency room. Clinical, radiological and tomographic diagnosis of traumatic descending aortic thoracic rupture was performed. The patient was referred for endovascular treatment with placement of a self-expandable stent through the femoral artery. Treatment was successful, with exclusion of the lesion previously located in the aortic isthmus. Endovascular treatment has been indicated in the treatment of descending thoracic aortic diseases, with good initial results. In case of traumatic aortic rupture, endovascular treatment is a feasible alternative, especially due to risks offered by the conventional surgical treatment.

  18. Contemporary strategies for repair of complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: real-world experiences and multilayer stents as an alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Robert Kolvenbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA present special challenges for repair due to their extent, their distinctive pathology, and the fact that they typically cross the ostia of one or more visceral branch vessels. Historically, the established treatment for TAAA was open surgical repair, with the first procedure reported in 1955. Endovascular repair of TAAA with fenestrated and/ or branched endografts, has been studied since the beginning of the current century as a means of mechanical aneurysm exclusion. More recently, flow modulator stents have been employed with the aim at reducing shear stress on aortic aneurysmal wall. In this review we present technical and main results of these techniques, based on literature review and personal experience.

  19. Aneurisma de la aorta abdominal: Tratamiento endovascular con una endoprótesis fenestrada Abdominal aortic aneurysm: Endovascular treatment with fenestrated endoprothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Rostagno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El tratamiento endovascular de los aneurismas de aorta abdominal es una alternativa a la cirugía abierta para pacientes de alto riesgo. Consiste en la exclusión del saco aneurismático mediante la interposición de una endoprótesis colocada por vía femoral. El tratamiento endovascular no puede ser utilizado en todos los pacientes. Una limitación frecuente la constituye el nacimiento de una arteria visceral desde el saco aneurismático. Para contrarrestar esta limitación recientemente se han desarrollado endoprótesis fenestradas que presentan orificios que se corresponden con el nacimiento de las arterias involucradas en el aneurisma evitando su oclusión, permitiendo de esta manera el tratamiento endovascular. En esta comunicación se presenta un caso de tratamiento endovascular de un aneurisma de aorta abdominal mediante la colocación de una endoprótesis fenestrada en un paciente cuya arteria renal izquierda nacía directamente del saco aneurismático.Endovascular treatment of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is consider an alternative to open surgery for high risk patients. Its goal is to exclude the aneurysm from the circulation by using an endoprothesis introduced from a femoral approach. Patients must be strictly selected to avoid possible complications. The most frequent limitation is related to anatomic contraindications such as visceral arteries involved in the aneurysm. Fenestrated endograft have been recently developed to allow endovascular treatment when anatomic features contraindicate classic endovascular procedures. Fenestrated endograft have holes that match with the origin of the visceral arteries maintaining its potency. In this paper we report the endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by using a fenestrated endoprothesis in a patient whose left renal artery is originated from the aneurysm.

  20. Trans-aortic repair of a sinus of valsalva aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Ieromonachos, Constantinos; Stavridis, George; Antoniou, Theofani A; Athanassopoulos, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V; Alivizatos, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Sinus of Valsalva aneurysms are rare and vary in their presentation and approach of surgical repair. We report on a case of isolated right sinus of Valsalva aneurysm that underwent successful excision and patch repair with individual sutures placed through the annulus of the aortic valve.

  1. Simultaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and resection of unexpected, associated abdominal malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Lorusso, Riccardo; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Vietri, Francesco

    2004-12-15

    The management of unexpected intra-abdominal malignancy, discovered at laparotomy for elective treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), is controversial. It is still unclear whether both conditions should be treated simultaneously or a staged approach is to be preferred. To contribute in improving treatment guidelines, we retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing laparotomy for elective AAA repair. From January 1994 to March 2003, 253 patients underwent elective, trans-peritoneal repair of an AAA. In four patients (1.6%), an associated, unexpected neoplasm was detected at abdominal exploration, consisting of one renal, one gastric, one ileal carcinoid, and one ascending colon tumor. All of them were treated at the same operation, after aortic repair and careful isolation of the prosthetic graft. The whole series' operative mortality was 3.6%. None of the patients simultaneously treated for AAA and tumor resection died in the postoperative period. No graft-related infections were observed. Simultaneous treatment of AAA and tumor did not prolong significantly the mean length of stay in the hospital, compared to standard treatment of AAA alone. Except for malignancies of organs requiring major surgical resections, simultaneous AAA repair and resection of an associated, unexpected abdominal neoplasm can be safely performed, in most of the patients, sparing the need for a second procedure. Endovascular grafting of the AAA can be a valuable tool in simplifying simultaneous treatment, or in staging the procedures with a very short delay.

  2. Combined Repair of Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, John N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.; Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Skouteli, Eleni Anna T.; Milonakis, Michael K.; Bastounis, Elias A.; Boulafendis, Dimitrios G.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta after the original inclusion/wrap technique of the Bentall procedure present a difficult surgical management problem and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Patients with Marfan syndrome frequently develop aneurysms and dissections that involve multiple aortic segments. We present the case of a Marfan patient who successfully underwent repair of a giant ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm and concomitant repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. An aggressive surgical strategy followed by life-long cardiovascular monitoring is warranted in order to prolong the survival of these patients. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:233–5) PMID:12959210

  3. [Classification and treatment of endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitton, M B; Schmiedt, W; Neufang, A; Düber, C; Thelen, M

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the classification of endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, thereby summarizing the most important problems of this endovascular technique. The correct classification of endoleaks is a prerequisite for interdisciplinary discussion. It is indispensable for professional reporting of the pathological findings and for the decision making as to the adequate treatment of endoleaks. Irrespective of the types of stent graft and property of the material, five endoleak types are defined in the literature: leakage at the anchor sites (type I); leakage due to collateral arteries (type II); defective stent grafts (type III); leakage due to porosity of the graft material (type IV); and endotension (type V). The causes of endoleaks are discussed and treatment options are reviewed for the diverse pathologic findings.

  4. Classification and treatment of endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Thelen, M.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dueber, C.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the classification of endoleaks after endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, thereby summarizing the most important problems of this endovascular technique. The correct classification of endoleaks is a prerequisite for interdisciplinary discussion. It is indispensable for professional reporting of the pathological findings and for the decision making as to the adequate treatment of endoleaks. Irrespective of the types of stent graft and property of the material, five endoleak types are defined in the literature: leakage at the anchor sites (type I); leakage due to collateral arteries (type II); defective stent grafts (type III); leakage due to porosity of the graft material (type IV); and endotension (type V). The causes of endoleaks are discussed and treatment options are reviewed for the diverse pathologic findings. (orig.)

  5. Endovascular repair of mycotic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta: diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas-two case reports with 1-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Ivan; Sarac, Momir; Tomic, Aleksandar; Bezmarevic, Mihailo

    2013-10-01

    A mycotic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta is a rare diagnosis with high mortality. We present two cases of endovascular reconstruction of mycotic descending thoracic aorta. Specific or nonspecific bacterial or other infectious agent in serial samples of blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and pleural puncture was not detected in the first case, but we found in sputum sample Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the second patient. We empirically began by administering broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics in the first case, with preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis and antituberculotic drugs therapy in the second case, and continued with the same medication for 4 months after endovascular repair. Control computed tomographic scans 6 months after reconstruction showed no endoleak in both patients. Repair of mycotic descending thoracic aortic aneurysms by endoluminal stent graft is reasonable alternative to open surgical intervention. A broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy has a high significance in the treatment of patients with mycotic aneurysm. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason A; Skrip, Laura; Sumpio, Bauer E; Cardella, Jonathan A; Indes, Jeffrey E; Sarac, Timur P; Dardik, Alan; Ochoa Chaar, Cassius I

    2017-03-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) with percutaneous femoral access (PEVAR) has several potential advantages. Morbidly obese (MO) patients present unique anatomical challenges and have not been specifically studied. This study examines the trends in the use of PEVAR and its surgical outcomes compared with open femoral cutdown (CEVAR) in MO patients. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program files for the years 2005 to 2013 were reviewed. The study included all MO patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥40 kg/m 2 ) undergoing EVAR. Patients were categorized as having CEVAR if they had any one of 11 selected Current Procedural Terminology (American Medical Association, Chicago, Ill) codes describing an open femoral procedure. The PEVAR group included any remaining patients who had only codes for EVAR and endovascular procedures. Linear correlation was used to evaluate temporal trends in the use of PEVAR among MO patients. Baseline comorbidities and surgical outcomes were compared between the PEVAR and CEVAR groups using χ 2 tests or t-tests. There were 833 MO patients (470 CEVAR and 363 PEVAR) constituting 3.0% of all patients undergoing EVAR. The use of PEVAR in MO patients significantly increased from 27.3% of total EVARs in the years 2005 to 2006 to 48.6% in 2013 (P = .039). The two groups had similar baseline characteristics, including age, BMI, comorbidities, and emergency procedures, except for history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (29.6% CEVAR vs 22.6% PEVAR; P = .024). PEVAR patients had shorter duration of anesthesia (244 vs 260 minutes; P = .048) and shorter total operation time (158 vs 174 minutes; P = .002). PEVAR patients had significantly decreased wound complications (5.5% vs 9.4%; P = .039). There was a trend towards PEVAR patients being more likely to be discharged home than to a facility (93.6% vs 87.8%; P = .060). There was no difference in any other complication or mortality. A subgroup

  7. The risk of endoleak following stent covering of the internal iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesparan, K.; Partridge, W.; Refson, J.; Abidia, A.; Aldin, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the risk of endoleak during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) involving the distal common iliac artery (CIA) when the internal iliac artery (IIA) is covered without prior coil embolization. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of 145 (125 men, 20 women) consecutive EVAR cases. Clinical notes and radiological images were reviewed, and data collected on patient demographics, aneurysm morphology, covering of the IIA with or without embolization, presence of endoleaks, and patient symptoms relating to IIA ischaemia. Results: A total of 29 IIAs (10%) were covered in a total of 25 patients. Seven IIAs (24%) were embolized before stent covering (Embolization group), and 22 IIAs (76%) were covered only without embolization (Cover group). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean size of the abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter or CIA diameter between each group. No endoleaks from IIA retrograde filling were found in either group. Conclusion: The results of the present study do not support the traditional view that coverage of the IIA without prior embolization carries a high risk of endoleak, with no endoleaks seen in all 22 cases. Large-scale trials are required. However, the advent of branched-stenting techniques and the emergence of their success in long-term follow-up may preclude the former. - Highlights: • No EVAR endoleaks due to retrograde filling of the internal iliac artery (IIA). • No increased risk of endoleak with stent coverage of the IIA without embolisation. • Current evidence does not support traditional views

  8. Selective Aortic Arch and Root Replacement in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, Fernando; Elsayed, Ramsey S; Cohen, Robbin G; Tatum, James M; Kumar, S Ram; Kazerouni, Kayvan; Mack, Wendy J; Barr, Mark L; Cunningham, Mark J; Hackmann, Amy E; Baker, Craig J; Starnes, Vaughn A; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal extent of repair for type A aortic dissection. Our approach is to replace the ascending aorta, and only replace the aortic root or arch when intimal tears are present in those areas. We examined intermediate outcomes with this approach to acute type A aortic dissection repair. Between March 2005 and October 2016, 195 patients underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection. Repair was categorized by site of proximal and distal anastomosis and extent of repair. Mean follow-up was 31.0 ± 30.9 months. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Multiple variable Cox proportional hazards modeling was utilized to identify factors associated with overall mortality. Overall survival was 85.1%, 83.9%, 79.1%, and 74.4% at 6, 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively. Eight patients required reintervention. The cumulative incidence of aortic reintervention at 1 year with death as a competing outcome was 3.95%. Multiple variable regression analysis identified factors such as age, preoperative renal failure, concomitant thoracic endograft, postoperative myocardial infarction and sepsis, and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as predictive of overall mortality. Neither proximal or distal extent of repair, nor need for reintervention affected overall survival (proximal: hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval: 0.75 to 3.51, p = 0.22; distal: hazard ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 2.97, p = 0.81; reintervention: hazard ratio 0.03, 95% confidence interval: 0.002 to 0.490, p < 0.01). A selective approach to root and arch repair in acute type A aortic dissection is safe. If aortic reintervention is needed, survival does not appear to be affected. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Value of fractional flow reserve measurement in endovascular therapy for patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangrui; Huang, Xiaoyong; Yong, Qiang; Wang, Guoqin; Huang, Lianjun

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the value of fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement on endovascular therapy for patients with renal artery stenosis. Clinical data of 12 patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury in Anzhen hospital hospitalized from May 2013 to February 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Renal artery angiography was performed and fractional flow reserve (FFR) was measured before Thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After operation, renal artery FFR was measured again, and renal artery stenting was performed in patients with FFR ≤ 0.90 or average pressure difference between proximal and distal of renal artery > 20 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and not applied for patients with FFR > 0.90.The patients were then subsequently followed up clinically. Kidney function were measured after 1 month, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography data were obtained at 1 and 3 months later, respectively. The FFR of 1 patient was 0.90, while the FFR of other patients were less than 0.90 before thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After the procedure,the angiography showed that the blood flow of renal artery in 8 patients were fluency, and the FFR index was over 0.90. There were 4 patients with FFR less than 0.90. After renal artery stenting, the FFR of these 4 patients were all above 0.90. Compared with pre-procedure, blood urea nitrogen ((8.84 ± 3.99) mmol/L vs. (5.18 ± 1.69) mmol/L, P = 0.011) and uric acid ((359.3 ± 77.3) µmol/L vs. (276.9 ± 108.3) µmol/L, P = 0.008) decreased significantly after 1 month, and there was no significant difference in serum creatinine (P = 0.760). Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography results showed that blood flow of renal artery were fluency after 1 month and 3 months. In patients with aortic dissection complicating renal blood flow injury, the FFR measurement is meaningful in evaluating the blood flow status of target organs and guide the endovascular revascularization.

  10. An anatomic risk model to screen post endovascular aneurysm repair patients for aneurysm sac enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Chien Yi M; Tadros, Rami O; Beckerman, William E; Han, Daniel K; Tardiff, Melissa L; Torres, Marielle R; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2017-09-01

    Follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) scans add considerable postimplantation costs to endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). By building a risk model, we hope to identify patients at low risk for aneurysm sac enlargement to minimize unnecessary CTAs. 895 consecutive patients who underwent EVAR for AAA were reviewed, of which 556 met inclusion criteria. A Probit model was created for aneurysm sac enlargement, with preoperative aneurysm morphology, patient demographics, and operative details as variables. Our final model included 287 patients and had a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 68.9%, and an accuracy of 70.4%. Ninety-nine (35%) of patients were assigned to the high-risk group, whereas 188 (65%) of patients were assigned to the low-risk group. Notably, regarding anatomic variables, our model reported that age, pulmonary comorbidities, aortic neck diameter, iliac artery length, and aneurysms were independent predictors of post-EVAR sac enlargement. With the exception of age, all statistically significant variables were qualitatively supported by prior literature. With regards to secondary outcomes, the high-risk group had significantly higher proportions of AAA-related deaths (5.1% versus 1.1%, P = 0.037) and Type 1 endoleaks (9.1% versus 3.2%, P = 0.033). Our model is a decent predictor of patients at low risk for post AAA EVAR aneurysm sac enlargement and associated complications. With additional validation and refinement, it could be applied to practices to cut down on the overall need for postimplantation CTA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound surveillance of endovascular aneurysm repair: a safe modality versus computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John T; Boros, Michael J; Combs, Kristin

    2007-11-01

    Routine ultrasound surveillance is adequate and safe for monitoring endovascular aneurysm repairs (EVARs). A retrospective chart review including 160 endograft patients was performed from August 2000 to September 2005. All ultrasound examinations (n = 359) were performed by a board-certified vascular surgery group's accredited laboratory. Registered vascular technologists utilized the same equipment consisting of Siemens Antares high-definition ultrasonography with tissue harmonics and color flow Doppler. An identical protocol was followed by each technologist: scan body and both limbs of the endograft and distal iliac vessels, measure anterior-posterior aneurysm sac size, and detect intrasac pulsatility and color flow. Statistical analysis utilized Pearson's correlation coefficient and the paired t-test. Forty-one endoleaks were discovered out of the 359 exams (11.4%). There were type I (7, 17%), type II (26, 63%), and combined type I with type II (8, 20%) endoleaks. Correlation with computed tomography (CT) was obtained in 35 of these cases. CT discovered three endoleaks that were not seen with ultrasound. However, these particular ultrasound exams were inadequate due to additional factors (bowel gas, body habitus, hernia), which prompted CT investigation and, hence, endoleak discovery. Of the 41 endoleaks found on ultrasound, only 14 were seen on CT. Specifically, 26 type II endoleaks were seen with ultrasound versus only nine during CT. Additional factors addressed included comparison between ultrasound and CT of residual aneurysm sac measurements and conditions limiting ultrasound examination. Although criticized in the past, color flow ultrasonography is a safe and effective modality for surveillance of aortic endografts. Utilizing ultrasound to analyze abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac dimensions and endoleak detection is statistically sound for screening AAA status post-EVAR.

  12. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  13. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M. B.; Herber, S.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dorweiler, B.; Dueber, C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the long-term outcome and efficacy of emergency treatment of acute aortic diseases with endovascular stent-grafts. Methods. From September 1995 to April 2007, 37 patients (21 men, 16 women; age 53.9 ± 19.2 years, range 18-85 years) with acute complications of diseases of the descending thoracic aorta were treated by endovascular stent-grafts: traumatic aortic ruptures (n = 9), aortobronchial fistulas due to penetrating ulcer or hematothorax (n = 6), acute type B dissections with aortic wall hematoma, penetration, or ischemia (n = 13), and symptomatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta (n = 9) with pain, penetration, or rupture. Diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Multiplanar reformations were used for measurement of the landing zones of the stent-grafts. Stent-grafts were inserted via femoral or iliac cut-down. Two procedures required aortofemoral bypass grafting prior to stent-grafting due to extensive arteriosclerotic stenosis of the iliac arteries. In this case the bypass graft was used for introduction of the stent-graft. Results. A total of 46 stent-grafts were implanted: Vanguard/Stentor (n = 4), Talent (n = 31), and Valiant (n = 11). Stent-graft extension was necessary in 7 cases. In 3 cases primary graft extension was done during the initial procedure (in 1 case due to distal migration of the graft during stent release, in 2 cases due to the total length of the aortic aneurysm). In 4 cases secondary graft extensions were performed-for new aortic ulcers at the proximal stent struts (after 5 days) and distal to the graft (after 8 months) and recurrent aortobronchial fistulas 5 months and 9 years after the initial procedure-resulting in a total of 41 endovascular procedures. The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3 of 37) and the overall follow-up was 29.9 ± 36.6 months (range 0-139 months). All patients with traumatic ruptures demonstrated an immediate sealing of bleeding. Patients with aortobronchial fistulas also demonstrated a

  14. Sequential Hybrid Repair of Aorta and Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Secondary to Chronic Aortic Dissection with Extensive Aneurysmal Degeneration in a Marfan Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Lizola, Rene; Torres-Machorro, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder associated with aortic dissection, aneurysmal degeneration and rupture. These cardiovascular complications represent the main cause of mortality, therefore repair is indicated. We present a 35-year-old woman who experienced acute onset of chest pain. Her imaging revealed a chronic DeBakey type I dissection with aortic root dilation and descending thoracic aneurysmal degeneration. She underwent a Bentall procedure and endovascular exclusion of the descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. She was closely followed and 2 years later a computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed the aneurysmal degeneration of the thoracoabominal aorta and bilateral iliac arteries. The patient underwent a composite reconstruction using multi-visceral branched and bifurcated Dacron grafts. At 5 years from her last surgery, a CTA revealed no new dissection or further aneurysmal degenerations. Aortic disease in Marfan patients is a complex clinical problem that may lead to secondary or tertiary aortic reconstructions; close follow-up is mandatory.

  15. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godfrey, Anthony D., E-mail: deangodfrey@yahoo.co.uk; Morbi, Abigail H. M., E-mail: a.morbi@soton.ac.uk; Nordon, Ian M., E-mail: ian.nordon@uhs.nhs.uk [University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Unit of Cardiac Vascular and Thoracic Surgery - CV& T, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR.

  16. Patient Compliance with Surveillance Following Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, Anthony D.; Morbi, Abigail H. M.; Nordon, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeIntegral to maintaining good outcomes post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a robust surveillance protocol. A significant proportion of patients fail to comply with surveillance, exposing themselves to complications. We examine EVAR surveillance in Wessex (UK), exploring factors that may predict poor compliance.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 179 consecutive elective EVAR cases [2008–2013] was performed. 167 patients were male, with the age range of 50–95. Surveillance was conducted centrally (tertiary referral trauma centre) and at four spoke units. Surveillance compliance and predictors of non-compliance including age, gender, co-morbid status, residential location and socioeconomic status were analysed for univariate significance.ResultsFifty patients (27.9 %) were non-compliant with surveillance; 14 (8.1 %) had no imaging post-EVAR. At 1 year, 56.1 % (of 123 patients) were compliant. At years 2 and 3, 41.5 and 41.2 % (of 65 and 34 patients, respectively) were compliant. Four years post-EVAR, only one of eight attended surveillance (12.5 %). There were no statistically significant differences in age (p = 0.77), co-morbid status or gender (p = 0.64). Distance to central unit (p = 0.67) and surveillance site (p = 0.56) was non-significant. While there was a trend towards compliance in upper-middle-class socioeconomic groups (ABC1 vs. C1C2D), correlating with >50 % of non-compliant patients living within <10 mile radius of the central unit, overall predictive value was not significant (p = 0.82).ConclusionsCompliance with surveillance post-EVAR is poor. No independent predictor of non-compliance has been confirmed, but socioeconomic status appears to be relevant. There is a worrying drop-off in attendance beyond the first year. This study highlights a problem that needs to be addressed urgently, if we are to maintain good outcomes post-EVAR

  17. Management of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Complications via Retrograde Catheterization Through the Distal Stent-Graft Landing Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xicheng; Sun, Yuan; Chen, Zhaolei; Jing, Yuanhu; Xu, Miao

    2017-08-01

    A retrograde technique through the gap between the distal stent landing zone and the iliac artery wall has been applied to treat type II endoleak after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). In this study, we tried to investigate its efficacy in the management of type III endoleak and intraoperative accidental events. We reported 2 complications of EVAR that were difficult to treat with conventional methods. One patient had a sustained type III endoleak after EVAR, and the right renal artery was accidentally sealed by a graft stent in the other patient during the operation. Both complications were managed by the retrograde technique from the distal stent landing zone. In the first case, the endoleak was easily embolized by the retrograde catheterization technique, and in the second case, a stent was implanted in the right renal artery using the retrograde technique to restore blood flow. In some EVAR cases, the technique of retrograde catheterization through the distal stent-graft landing zone is feasible, safe, and easy to perform.

  18. Mechanisms of recurrent aortic regurgitation after aortic valve repair: predictive value of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; Robert, Annie; Pasquet, Agnès; Gerber, Bernhard L; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraoperative echocardiographic features associated with recurrent severe aortic regurgitation (AR) after an aortic valve repair surgery. Surgical valve repair for AR has significant advantages over valve replacement, but little is known about the predictors and mechanisms of its failure. We blindly reviewed all clinical, pre-operative, intraoperative, and follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic data of 186 consecutive patients who underwent valve repair for AR during a 10-year period and in whom intraoperative and follow-up echo data were available. After a median follow-up duration of 18 months, 41 patients had recurrent 3+ AR, 23 patients presented with residual 1+ to 2+ AR, and 122 had no or trivial AR. In patients with recurrent 3+ AR, the cause of recurrent AR was the rupture of a pericardial patch in 3 patients, a residual cusp prolapse in 26 patients, a restrictive cusp motion in 9 patients, an aortic dissection in 2 patients, and an infective endocarditis in 1 patient. Pre-operatively, all 3 groups were similar for aortic root dimensions and prevalence of bicuspid valve (overall 37%). Patients with recurrent AR were more likely to display Marfan syndrome or type 3 dysfunction pre-operatively. At the opposite end, patients with continent AR repair at follow-up were more likely to have type 2 dysfunction pre-operatively. After cardiopulmonary bypass, a shorter coaptation length, the degree of cusp billowing, a lower level of coaptation (relative to the annulus), a larger diameter of the aortic annulus and the sino-tubular junction, the presence of a residual AR, and the width of its vena contracta were associated with the presence of AR at follow-up. Multivariate Cox analysis identified a shorter coaptation length (odds ratio [OR]: 0.8, p = 0.05), a coaptation occurring below the level of the aortic annulus (OR: 7.9, p < 0.01), a larger aortic annulus (OR: 1.2, p = 0.01), and residual aortic regurgitation

  19. Incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome after endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De La Motte, L; Vogt, K; Jensen, Leif Panduro

    2011-01-01

    : Sixty-six patients were included, 40 (60%) met the SIRS criteria within the first 5 postoperative days (95% of the 40 patients met the criteria within 3 days). We found no significant differences between the SIRS and the non-SIRS group in baseline characteristics or other data including volume...... in the groups (3% in the SIRS group vs. none in the non-SIRS group). CONCLUSION: The high incidence of SIRS after EVAR is unexpected considering the minimally invasive procedure. Further studies on the cause of this response and measures to attenuate the response seem appropriate....... during 2007, were retrospectively evaluated for SIRS within the first 5 postoperative days. The only exclusion-criteria were missing data. SIRS was assessed using the criteria defined by the American College of Chest Physicians and Society of Critical Care Medicine Consensus Conference Committee. RESULTS...

  20. Detecting endoleaks after endovascular AAA repair with a minimally invasive, implantable, telemetric pressure sensor: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Fabian; Pfeffer, Joachim-Georg; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Schlierf, Roland; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2007-01-01

    A feasibility study on a completely digital telemetric pressure sensor (TPS) to detect endoleaks was performed in an in vitro model of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). An endovascular-stented AAA silicone model with different types (I-III) and sizes (3-11 French) of endoleaks was created and pulsatile pressure was applied with physiological flow and pressure rates [mean intraaortic pressure (IAP): 95-130 mmHg] and different degrees of thrombosis of the aneurysm sac. Aneurysm sac pressure (ASP) was measured with the TPS and with wired pressure sensors (WPS) as a reference. Statistical analysis included paired t-test, Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plots. After opening an endoleak, the mean ASP increased significantly (P < 0.0001) from 15 to almost 95% of the mean IAP depending on endoleak type and size. ASP could be measured accurately with the TPS and the WPS. The telemetric and wired ASP increase showed a high Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) for a non-thrombosed (r 0.97) and a thrombosed (r = 0.96) aneurysm sac. In an in vitro silicone model, the newly designed telemetric pressure sensor was able to detect the occurrence of an endoleak in a non-invasive way and might be a valuable device for follow-up of endovascular AAA repair. (orig.)

  1. Influence of Iliac Stenotic Lesions on Blood Flow Patterns Near a Covered Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Bifurcation (CERAB) Stent Configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jebbink, Erik Groot; Engelhard, Stefan; Lajoinie, Guillaume; de Vries, Jean-Paul P.M.; Versluis, Michel; Reijnen, Michel M.P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of distal stenotic lesions on flow patterns near a covered endovascular reconstruction of the aortic bifurcation (CERAB) configuration used in the treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Method: Laser particle image velocimetry measurements were performed using

  2. Dynamic CE-MRA for endoleak classification after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, M.J. van der; Bakker, C.J.; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Bartels, L.W.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for classification of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-eight patients, between 2 days and 54 months after EVAR, were evaluated with CTA, MRI and dynamic

  3. Dynamic CE=MRA for endoleak classification after endovascular aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, MJ; Bakker, CJG; Blankensteijn, JD; Bartels, LW

    Aim. To evaluate the value of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA)for classification of endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and methods. Twenty-eight patients, between 2 days and 54 months after EVAR, were evaluated with CTA, MRI and dynamic

  4. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfi, S.; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997–2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18–90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0–61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  5. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfi, S., E-mail: shamim.lotfi@kcl.ac.uk; Clough, R. E.; Ali, T. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Salter, R. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Young, C. P. [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Cardiac Surgery (United Kingdom); Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P., E-mail: peter.taylor@gstt.nhs.uk [Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Trust, Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  6. Influence of Anatomic Angulations in Chimney and Fenestrated Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradu, Caroline; Bérard, Xavier; Midy, Dominique; Ducasse, Eric

    2017-08-01

    The lack of widespread availability of Fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (F-EVAR) encouraged alternative strategies. Hence, Chimney graft (CG)-EVAR spread when costs, manufacturing delays, or anatomy preclude F-EVAR. Our objective is to evaluate CG- and F-EVAR outcomes depending on the angulation of target renal arteries and hostility of iliac accesses in order to determine the potential impact of a choice made between both techniques on the basis of preoperative anatomic criteria. Consecutive patients treated by CG-EVAR or F-EVAR, from January 2010 to January 2015, were considered for inclusion. Anatomic parameters were defined by preoperative computed tomography angiography. A subgroup analysis was performed depending on renal arteries' angulation (cut-off: -30°) and iliac arteries' hostility (cut-off: diameter renal artery was shorter in the CG group (11.7 ± 6.2 mm vs. 14.1 ± 5.9 mm, P = 0.06). Longitudinal angulation of the right renal artery was not statistically different between both groups, while the left renal artery presented with a significantly more downward angulation in the CG group (-32.0 ± 15.3 vs. -19.0 ± 19.6, P = 0.003). There were significantly more grade 3 iliac tortuosity indexes for CG-EVAR (P = 0.03) with significantly smaller external iliac diameters (7.8 ± 1.7 vs. 8.8 ± 1.6 mm, P = 0.0009). There was 1 renal artery early occlusion in the renal artery angulation and diameter, iliac artery hostility, and aortic neck length among other parameters may help the surgeon make a decision toward the endovascular strategy that seems best suited for each specific patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endovascular graft exclusion in treating thoracic aortic dissection: a report of 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong; Zhuang Wenquan; Guo Wenbo; Li Heping; Zhong Lizhen; Huang Qiuping

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness and efficacy of endovascular graft exclusion (EVGE) in treating thoracic aortic dissection (TAD). Methods: Twenty-five cases of TAD, including 24 cases of Standford B and 1 case of A, were treated by EVGE. The clinical outcome and morphological changes of the lesions were analyzed during a 2-20 months' follow-up. Results: Procedures were technically successful in all 25 cases, while a total of 28 stent-grafts were deployed (3 cases with 2 stent-grafts in each). Complete disappearance of the false lumen or remarkable decrease of the endoleak was noted on the angiograms after stent placement. No severe procedure-related complication was observed, and thrombosis of the false lumen was noted during the follow-up. Conclusion: EVGE is effective and reliable in treating TAD, especially for patients with sub-acute or chronic courses

  8. Doses to patients and staff from endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms - Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerklund, E.G.; Widmark, A.; Gjoelberg, T.; Bay, D.; Joergensen, J.J.; Staxrud, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    Patient radiation doses received during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) can be significant and give rise to both deterministic and stochastic effects. Recording of dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time and number of exposures together with calculations of effective dose, were performed for 8 patients. In addition, the entrance surface dose was measured for 3 of the patients. Typically, DAPs of 340 Gycm 2 , fluoroscopy times of 30 minutes and 310 exposures were obtained together with maximum entrance surface doses of 1,8 Gy and effective doses of 50 mSv. Finger doses to the staff performing the procedure were in the order of a few hundred μSv. Conversion factors (effective dose/DAP) and (maximum entrance surface does/DAP) of 0,61·10 -2 Gy/Gycm 2 and 0,15 mSv/Gycm 2 were obtained, respectively. (author)

  9. Percutaneous endovascular stent-graft treatment of aortic aneurysms and dissections: new techniques and initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Dong Hoon; Kang, Sung Gwon; Lee, Kwang Hoon; Won, Jong Yun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Gwon [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Won, Je Whan [Aju University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and effectiveness of a newly designed percutaneously implanted separate stent-graft (SSG) for the treatment of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Using a percutaneous technique, SSG placement (in the descending thoracic aorta in 26 cases and infrarenal abdominal aorta in 24) was attempted in 50 patients with aortic aneurysms (n=27) or dissection (n=23). All SSGs were individually constructed using self-expandable nitinol stents and a Dacron graft, and were introduced through a 12 F sheath and expanded to a diameter of 20-34 mm. In all cases, vascular access was through the femoral artery. The clinical status of each patient was monitored, and postoperative CT was performed within one week of the procedure and at 3-6 month intervals afterwards. Endovascular stent-graft deployment was technically successful in 49 of 50 patients (98%). The one failure was due to torsion of the unsupported graft during deployment. Successful exclusion of aneurysms and the primary entry tears of dissections was achieved in all but three patients with aortic dissection. All patients in whom technical success was achieved showed complete thrombosis of the thoracic false lumen or aneurysmal sac, and the overall technique success rate was 92%. In addition, sixteen patients demonstrated complete resolution of the dissected thoracic false lumen (n=9) or aneurysmal sac (n=7). Immediate post-operative complications occurred at the femoral puncture site in one patient with an arteriovenous fistula, and in two, a new saccular aneurysm developed at the distal margin of the stent. No patients died, and there was no instance of paraplegia, stroke, side-branch occlusion or infection during the subsequent mean follow-up period of 9.4 (range, 2 to 26) months. In patients with aortic aneurysm and dissection, treatment with a separate percutaneously inserted stent-graft is technically feasible, safe, and effective.

  10. Dynamic Geometric Analysis of the Renal Arteries and Aorta following Complex Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Brant W; Suh, Ga-Young; Kim, John J; Lee, Jason T; Dalman, Ronald L; Cheng, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Aneurysm regression and target vessel patency during early and mid-term follow-up may be related to the effect of stent-graft configuration on the anatomy. We quantified geometry and remodeling of the renal arteries and aneurysm following fenestrated (F-) or snorkel/chimney (Sn-) endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Twenty-nine patients (mean age, 76.8 ± 7.8 years) treated with F- or Sn-EVAR underwent computed tomography angiography at preop, postop, and follow-up. Three-dimensional geometric models of the aorta and renal arteries were constructed. Renal branch angle was defined relative to the plane orthogonal to the aorta. End-stent angle was defined as the angulation between the stent and native distal artery. Aortic volumes were computed for the whole aorta, lumen, and their difference (excluded lumen). Renal patency, reintervention, early mortality, postoperative renal impairment, and endoleak were reviewed. From preop to postop, F-renal branches angled upward, Sn-renal branches angled downward (P renals exhibited increased end-stent angulation (12 ± 15°, P renals, whereas F-renals exhibited increased end-stent angulation (5 ± 10°, P renal stent patency was 94.1% and renal impairment occurred in 2 patients (6.7%). Although F- and Sn-EVAR resulted in significant, and opposite, changes to renal branch angle, only Sn-EVAR resulted in significant end-stent angulation increase. Longitudinal geometric analysis suggests that these anatomic alterations are primarily generated early as a consequence of the procedure itself and, although persistent, they show no evidence of continued significant change during the subsequent postoperative follow-up period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fitness plus American Society of Anesthesiologists grade improve outcome prediction after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boult, Margaret; Cowled, Prue; Barnes, Mary; Fitridge, Robert A

    2017-09-01

    Although the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade was established for statistical purposes, it is often used prognostically. However, older patients undergoing elective surgery are typically ASA III, which limits patient stratification. We look at the prognostic effect on early complications and survival of using ASA and self-reported physical fitness to stratify patients undergoing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Data were extracted from a trial database. All patients were assigned a fitness level (A (fit) or B (unfit)) based on their self-reported ability to walk briskly for 1 km or climb two flights of stairs. Fitness was used to stratify ASA III patients, with fitter patients assigned ASA IIIA and less fit patients ASA IIIB. Outcomes assessed included survival, reinterventions, endoleak, all early and late complications and early operative complications. A combined ASA/fitness scale (II, IIIA, IIIB and IV) correlated with 1- and 3-year survival (1-year P = 0.001, 3-year P = 0.001) and early and late complications (P = 0.001 and P = 0.05). On its own, ASA predicted early complications (P = 0.0004) and survival (1-year P = 0.01, 3-year P = 0.01). Fitness alone was predictive for survival (1-year P = 0.001, 3-year P = 0.001) and late complications (P = 0.009). This study shows that even a superficial assessment of fitness is reflected in surgical outcomes, with fitter ASA III patients showing survival patterns similar to ASA II patients. Physicians should be alert to differences in fitness between patients in the ASA III group, despite similarities based on preexisting severe systemic disease. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Endovascular aneurysm repair delivery redesign leads to quality improvement and cost reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Courtney J; Horvath, Alexander J; Powell, Richard J; Columbo, Jesse A; Walsh, Teri R; Goodney, Philip P; Walsh, Daniel B; Stone, David H

    2015-08-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is now a mainstay of therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysm, although it remains associated with significant expense. We performed a comprehensive analysis of EVAR delivery at an academic medical center to identify targets for quality improvement and cost reduction in light of impending health care reform. All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (N = 127). Procedures were included if they met standard commercial instructions for use guidelines, used a single manufacturer, and were billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group 238 (n = 49). By use of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) quality improvement methodology (define, measure, analyze, improve, control), targets for EVAR quality improvement were identified and high-yield changes were implemented. Procedure technical costs were calculated before and after process redesign. Perioperative services and clinic visits were identified as targets for quality improvement efforts and cost reduction. Mean technical costs before the intervention were $31,672, with endograft implants accounting for 52%. Pricing redesign in collaboration with hospital purchasing reduced mean EVAR technical costs to $28,607, a 10% reduction in overall cost, with endograft implants now accounting for 46%. Perioperative implementation of instrument tray redesign reduced instrument use by 32% (184 vs 132 instruments), saving $50,000 annually. Unnecessary clinic visits were reduced by 39% (1.6 vs 1.1 clinic visits per patient) through implementation of a preclinic imaging protocol. There was no difference in mean length of stay after the intervention. Comprehensive EVAR delivery redesign leads to cost reduction and waste elimination while preserving quality. Future efforts to achieve more competitive and transparent device pricing will make EVAR more cost neutral and enhance its financial sustainability for health care systems. Copyright © 2015 Society for

  13. Evaluation of Aneurysm Neck Angle Change After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Clinical Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Trong Binh; Moon, Mi Hyoung [Inha University Hospital, Endovascular Training Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Sun, E-mail: radjeon@inha.ac.kr [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kee Chun [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Keun-Myoung [Inha University School of Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the aneurysm neck angle changes and post-endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) complications.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed 72 cases of elective EVAR for abdominal aortic aneurysm among 109 consecutive cases from December 2005 to April 2014. Patients were divided into angulated and non-angulated groups. The angulated group was defined as neck angulation ≥60°. Neck angle was evaluated pre- and post-EVAR during short- (within 1 month), mid- (3–6 months), and long-term (>1 year) follow-up. Aneurysm sac diameter change, aneurysm neck morphology other than angulation, endoleaks, and other post-procedural complications were also documented.ResultsA total of 34 patients were enrolled in the angulated group. There were no statistical differences in age, sex, follow-up duration, and aneurysm neck profile between the two groups (p > 0.05). Both groups showed statistically significant and consistent decreases in angulation during the follow-up period (p < 0.01). The angulated group revealed 22.45 % more straightening than the non-angulated group. Recoil of the Endurant device occurred in the angulated group. No statistically significant intergroup differences were observed in any endoleaks, complications, or re-intervention rates (p > 0.05). Pre-EVAR angle was the only predictor for post-procedural angle change (p < 0.001).ConclusionEVAR is applicable for patients with highly angulated aneurysm neck and provides consistent neck straightening over long-term follow-up. Recoil was evident in the angulated group using the Endurant device.

  14. Contemporary results of surgical repair of recurrent aortic arch obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mery, Carlos M; Khan, Muhammad S; Guzmán-Pruneda, Francisco A; Verm, Raymond; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Watrin, Carmen H; Adachi, Iki; Heinle, Jeffrey S; McKenzie, E Dean; Fraser, Charles D

    2014-07-01

    There is a paucity of data on the current outcomes of surgical intervention for recurrent aortic arch obstruction (RAAO) after initial aortic arch repair in children. The goal of this study is to report the long-term results in these patients. All patients undergoing surgical intervention for RAAO at Texas Children's Hospital from 1995 to 2012 were included. The cohort was divided into four groups based on initial procedure: (1) simple coarctation repair, (2) Norwood procedure, (3) complex congenital heart disease, and (4) interrupted aortic arch. A total of 48 patients age 9 months (range, 22 days to 36 years) underwent 49 procedures for RAAO. All patients had an anatomic repair consisting of either patch aortoplasty (n=27, 55%), aortic arch advancement (n=8, 16%), sliding arch aortoplasty (n=6, 12%), placement of an interposition graft (n=2, 17%), reconstruction with donor allograft (n=4, 8%), extended end-to-end anastomosis (n=1, 2%), or redo Norwood-type reconstruction (n=1, 2%). Most procedures (n=46, 94%) were performed through a median sternotomy using cardiopulmonary bypass. At a median follow-up of 6.1 years (range, 9 days to 17 years), only 2 patients required surgical or catheter-based intervention for RAAO. Hypertension was present in 10% of patients at last follow-up. There were no neurologic or renal complications. There was 1 perioperative death after an aortic arch advancement in group 1. Four other patients have died during follow-up, none of the deaths related to RAAO. Anatomic repair of RAAO is a safe procedure associated with low morbidity and mortality, and low long-term reintervention rates. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of Reintervention After Endovascular Repair of Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, Hany A.; Attia, Rizwan; Modarai, Bijan; Clough, Rachel E.; Bell, Rachel E.; Carrell, Tom; Sabharwal, Tarun; Reidy, John; Taylor, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors predicting the need for reintervention after endovascular repair of isolated iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA). We reviewed prospectively collected database records of all patients who underwent endovascular repair of IIAA between 1999 and 2008. Detailed assessment of the aneurysms was performed using computed tomography angiography (CTA). Follow-up protocol included CTA at 3 months. If this showed no complication, then annual duplex scan was arranged. Multivariate analysis and analysis of patient survival and freedom from reintervention were performed using Kaplan–Meier life tables. Forty IIAAs (median diameter 44 mm) in 38 patients were treated (all men; median age 75 years), and median follow-up was 27 months. Endovascular repair of IIAA was required in 14 of 40 aneurysms (35%). The rate of type I endoleak was significantly higher with proximal landing zone (PLZ) diameter >30 mm in the aorta or >24 mm in the common iliac artery or distal landing zone (DLZ) diameter >24 mm (P = 0.03, 0.03, and 0.0014, respectively). Reintervention rate (RR) increased significantly with increased diameter or decreased length of PLZ; increased DLZ diameter; and endovascular IIAA repair (P = 0.005, 0.005, 0.02, and 0.02 respectively); however, RR was not significantly affected by length of PLZ or DLZ. Freedom-from-reintervention was 97, 93, and 86% at 12, 24, and 108 months. There was no in-hospital or aneurysm-related mortality. Endovascular IIAA repair is a safe treatment option. Proper patient selection is essential to decrease the RR.

  17. Anatomic changes of target vessels after fenestrated and branched aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalder, J; Keschenau, P; Tamm, M; Jalaie, H; Jacobs, M J; Greiner, A

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomic changes of the stented target vessels after endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. Between July 2011 and December 2013, 53 aortic aneurysms were treated in our department with fenestrated and branched stent-graft devices. Forty-two of these patients were pre- and postoperatively scanned with a high resolution computer tomography (CT) (Cook Zenith® fenestrated or branched, Australia Pty. Ltd., Brisbane, Australia: N.=19; AnacondaTM fenestrated, Vascutek, Glasgow, Scotland, UK: N.=23). The other 11 out of the 53 patients did not receive a CT scan, because of a pre-existing renal failure. In the CT scans we retrospectively evaluated the anatomic vessel deviation at the origin of the target vessel and the vessel shift distal to the stent. For the first measurement the CT scans were loaded into OsiriX MD®, and the pre- and postoperative angles of the target vessels were measured and subtracted. For matching, the CT-scans were normalized at vertebral body lumbar 2. The second measured angle was the maximal measured angle distal to the target vessel stent-graft. Altogether, 113 target vessels were stented (celiac trunk [CT] 15, superior mesenteric arteries [SMA] 26, renal arteries [RA] 72), with 97 balloon-expandable PTFE stents: 90 Atrium V12 (Maquet Getinge group, Hudson, NH, USA), 7 BeGrafts (Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany) and 16 self-expandable fluency PTFE stents (Bard, Karlsruhe, Germany). The mean anatomic deviation at the target vessel origin was 28±17.3 and the mean vessel shift distal to the stent was 36.3±18.8. There were no significant differences between the main device and the target vessel stent types. Fenestrated and branched stent-graft solutions for aortic aneurysm repair induce changes of the target vessel anatomy. We did not observe significant differences between the several devices.

  18. The Role of Learning in Health Technology Assessments: An Empirical Assessment of Endovascular Aneurysm Repairs in German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varabyova, Yauheniya; Blankart, Carl Rudolf; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2017-02-01

    Changes in performance due to learning may dynamically influence the results of a technology evaluation through the change in effectiveness and costs. In this study, we estimate the effect of learning using the example of two minimally invasive treatments of abdominal aortic aneurysms: endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (fEVAR). The analysis is based on the administrative data of over 40,000 patients admitted with unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to more than 500 different hospitals over the years 2006 to 2013. We examine two patient outcomes, namely, in-hospital mortality and length of stay using hierarchical regression models with random effects at the hospital level. The estimated models control for patient and hospital characteristics and take learning interdependency between EVAR and fEVAR into account. In case of EVAR, we observe a significant decrease both in the in-hospital mortality and length of stay with experience accumulated at the hospital level; however, the learning curve for fEVAR in both outcomes is effectively flat. To foster the consideration of learning in health technology assessments of medical devices, a general framework for estimating learning effects is derived from the analysis. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Dual-energy CT for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair: usefulness of colored iodine overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenti, Giorgio; Mazziotti, Silvio; Lamberto, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Caloggero, Simona; Racchiusa, Sergio; Mileto, Achille; Scribano, Emanuele

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the value of dual-source dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We also calculated the potential dose reduction by using a dual-energy CT single-phase protocol. From November 2007 to November 2009, 74 patients underwent CT angiography 2-7 days after endovascular repair during single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy venous phases. By using dual-energy software, the iodine overlay was superimposed on venous phase images with different percentages ranging between 0 (virtual unenhanced images) and 50-75% to show the iodine in an orange color. Two blinded readers evaluated the data for diagnosis of endoleaks during standard unenhanced and venous phase images (session 1, standard of reference) and virtual unenhanced and venous phase images with colored iodine overlay images (session 2). We compared the effective dose radiation of a single-energy biphasic protocol with that of a single-phase dual-energy protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was calculated. The mean dual-energy effective dose was 7.27 mSv. By using a dual-energy single-phase protocol, we obtained a mean dose reduction of 28% with respect to a single-energy biphasic protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was: 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% negative predictive value, and 100% positive predictive value. Statistically significant differences in the level of confidence for endoleak detection between the two sessions were found by reviewers for scores 3-5. Dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay is a useful diagnostic tool in endoleak detection. The use of a dual-energy single-phase study protocol will lower radiation exposure to patients.

  20. Endovascular therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm: results of a mid-term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Schweitzer, H.; Herber, S.; Thelen, M.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dueber, C.

    2003-01-01

    Prospective study to evaluate clinical results and complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm treatment in a mid-term follow-up. Materials and methods: A total of 122 patients (9 females, 113 males, average age 70.0±7,9 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated with stent grafts (53 Vanguard or Stentor endografts, 69 Talent endografts). Group I consisted of 40 patients who had all aortic tributaries of the aneurysm sac occluded prior to endovalscular grafting, either spontaneously by parietal thrombosis or by selective coil embolization of the respective ostia preserving collateral circulation distal to the vessel occlusion. Group II consisted of 82 patients and included all cases without or with incomplete coil embolization with at least one patent vessel. Stent grafting was performed in general anesthesia in the first 21 patients, followed by peridural anesthesia in 15 cases, and local anesthesia with conscious sedation in 86 cases. The results were evaluated with Spiral-CT, MRI and radiographs of the endovascular graft, with follow-up examinations obtained at 3, 6, 12 months, and every year - Implantation was successfully completed in all cases without primary conversion surgery, laparotomy or any significant complication. Mean follow-up was 29±21 months (maximum 82 months). The 30-day mortality was 0,8% due to a myocardial infarction 3 days after discharge from the hospital. A total of 47 re-interventions were performed in 29 patients (23.8%), with 35 re-interventions in 18 cases with Vanguard or Stentor endografts and 12 re-interventions in 11 patients with Talent endografts. 23 percutaneous re-interventions included distal graft extension (n=11), Wallstent for kinking and limb stenosis (n=3), and secondary coil embolization of collateral vessels (n=9). 24 surgical re-interventions included proximal graft extension (n=6), new endovascular grafts (n=3), surgical clipping of lumbar and mesenteric artery branches for type-II endoleaks

  1. “ELEPHANT TRUNK” AND ENDOVASCULAR STENTGRAFTING – A HYBRID APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF EXTENSIVE THORACIC AORTIC ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Holubec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid approach to elephant trunk technique for treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms combines a conventional surgical and endovascular therapy. Compared to surgery alone, there is a presumption that mortality and morbidity is reduced. We present a case report of a 42-year-old man with a giant aneurysm of the entire thoracic aorta, significant aortic and tricuspid regurgitation and ventricular septum defect. The patient underwent multiple consecutive operations and interventions having, among others, finally replaced the entire thoracic aorta with the use of the hybrid elephant trunk technique.

  2. Quality Improvement Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of Endoleaks following Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.; Cil, B.; Munneke, G.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-01-01

    Major concerns after aortic aneurysm repair are caused by the presence of endoleaks, which are defined as persistent perigraft flow within the aortic aneurysm sac. Diagnosis of endoleaks can be performed with various imaging modalities, and indications for treatment are based on further subclassifications. Early detection and correct classification of endoleaks are crucial for planning patient management. The vast majority of endoleaks can be treated successfully by interventional means. Guidelines for Imaging Detection and Treatment of endoleaks are described in this article.

  3. Elective visceral hybrid repair of type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the classification given by Crawford et al. type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA is dilatation of the aorta from the level of the rib 6 to the separation of the aorta below the renal arteries, capturing all the visceral branch of aorta. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA is a procedure developed in recent years in the world, which involves a combination of conventional, open and endovascular aortic reconstruction surgery at the level of separation of the left subclavian artery to the level of visceral branches of aorta. Case report. We presented a 75-years-old man, with elective visceral hybrid reconstruction of type III TAAA. Computerized scanning (CT angiography of the patient showed type III TAAA with the maximum transverse diameter of aneurysm of 92 mm. Aneurysm started at the level of the sixth rib, and the end of the aneurysm was 1 cm distal to the level of renal arteries. Aneurysm compressed the esophagus, causing the patient difficulty in swallowing act, especially solid food, and frequent back pain. From the other comorbidity, the patient had been treated for a long time, due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension. In general endotracheal anesthesia with epidural analgesia, the patient underwent visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA, which combines classic, open vascular surgery and endovascular procedures. Classic vascular surgery is visceral reconstruction using by-pass procedure from the distal, normal aorta to all visceral branches: celiac trunk, superior mesenteric artery and both renal arteries, with ligature of all arteries very close to the aorta. After that, by synchronous endovascular technique a complete aneurysmal exclusion of thoracoabdominal aneurysm with thoracic stent-graft was performed. The postoperative course was conducted properly and the patient left the Clinic for Vascular Surgery on postoperative day 21. Control CT, performed 3 months after the surgery

  4. Abnormalities of aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility predispose to hypertension after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donazzan, Luca; Crepaz, Robert; Stuefer, Josef; Stellin, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Systemic hypertension (HT) is a major long-term complication even after successful repair of aortic coarctation (CoA), and many factors are involved in this pathophysiology. To investigate the role of abnormalities in the aortic arch shape, central aortic flow dynamics, and distensibility in developing HT after successful repair of CoA. We selected a group of 26 normotensive patients (mean age 16.9±7.3 years, range 9-32 years) with anatomically successful repair of CoA among 140 patients regularly followed after repair of CoA and analyzed their last clinical and echocardiographic data. Bicycle exercise test and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were also obtained. Mean age at surgical repair was 3.2±3.9 years (range 10 days-15 years); 12 patients underwent surgical correction during the first year of life. Repair of CoA was performed by end-to-end anastomosis (TT) in 23 patients (extended TT in 6 patients with arch hypoplasia), patch aortoplasty in 2, and subcalvian flap aortoplasty in 1. The postsurgical follow-up was 13.8±7.2 years (range 3.5-29.4 years). The shape of the aortic arch was defined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on this global geometry (normal-gothic-crenel), ratio of the height-transverse diameter (A/T), percentage of residual stenosis, and growth index of the transverse arch segments. Flow mapping by phase-contrast imaging in the ascending and descending aorta was performed in order to measure the systolic waveforms and central aortic distensibility. Twenty normal age-matched patients submitted to the same MRI protocol were used as controls. Six patients were found to have a gothic and 20 a normal aortic arch shape. Patients with gothic aortic arch shape had an increased A/T ratio (0.80±0.07 vs 0.58±0.05, P135 mm Hg on ABPM were higher in the gothic than in the normal arch group. There was a correlation between nocturnal SBP, 24 hours pulse pressure on ABPM in the whole group, and different MRI variables (A/T, distensibility of

  5. Comparison of three contemporary risk scores for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S W; Hickey, G L; Carlson, E D; McCollum, C N

    2014-07-01

    A number of contemporary risk prediction models for mortality following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have been developed. Before a model is used either in clinical practice or to risk-adjust surgical outcome data it is important that its performance is assessed in external validation studies. The British Aneurysm Repair (BAR) score, Medicare, and Vascular Governance North West (VGNW) models were validated using an independent prospectively collected sample of multicentre clinical audit data. Consecutive, data on 1,124 patients undergoing elective AAA repair at 17 hospitals in the north-west of England and Wales between April 2011 and March 2013 were analysed. The outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Model calibration (observed to expected ratio with chi-square test, calibration plots, calibration intercept and slope) and discrimination (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]) were assessed in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. The mean age of the population was 74.4 years (SD 7.7); 193 (17.2%) patients were women and the majority of patients (759, 67.5%) underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. All three models demonstrated good calibration in the overall cohort and procedural subgroups. Overall discrimination was excellent for the BAR score (AUC 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-0.89), and acceptable for the Medicare and VGNW models, with AUCs of 0.78 (95% CI 0.70-0.86) and 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.84) respectively. Only the BAR score demonstrated good discrimination in procedural subgroups. All three models demonstrated good calibration and discrimination for the prediction of in-hospital mortality following elective AAA repair and are potentially useful. The BAR score has a number of advantages, which include being developed on the most contemporaneous data, excellent overall discrimination, and good performance in procedural subgroups. Regular model validations and recalibration will be essential. Copyright

  6. Should intentional endovascular stent-graft coverage of the left subclavian artery be preceded by prophylactic revascularisation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigang, Ernst; Parker, Jack A T C; Czerny, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional open aortic replacement but it requires suitable proximal and distal landing zones for stent-graft anchoring. Many aortic pathologies affect in the immediate proximity of the left subcla...

  7. Open Abdomen Therapy with Vacuum and Mesh Mediated Fascial Traction After Aortic Repair: an International Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Stefan; Seternes, Arne; Venermo, Maarit; Vikatmaa, Leena; Sörelius, Karl; Wanhainen, Anders; Svensson, Mats; Djavani, Khatereh; Björck, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Open abdomen therapy may be necessary to prevent or treat abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The aim of the study was to analyse the primary delayed fascial closure (PDFC) rate and complications after open abdomen therapy with vacuum and mesh mediated fascial traction (VACM) after aortic repair and to compare outcomes between those treated with open abdomen after primary versus secondary operation. This was a retrospective cohort, multicentre study in Sweden, Finland, and Norway, including consecutive patients treated with open abdomen and VACM after aortic repair at six vascular centres in 2006-2015. The primary endpoint was PDFC rate. Among 191 patients, 155 were men. The median age was 71 years (IQR 66-76). Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) occurred in 69.1%. Endovascular/hybrid and open repairs were performed in 49 and 142 patients, respectively. The indications for open abdomen were inability to close the abdomen (62%) at primary operation and ACS (80%) at secondary operation. Duration of open abdomen was 11 days (IQR 7-16) in 157 patients alive at open abdomen termination. The PDFC rate was 91.8%. Open abdomen initiated at primary (N=103), compared with secondary operation (N=88), was associated with less severe initial open abdomen status (p=.006), less intestinal ischaemia (p=.002), shorter duration of open abdomen (p=.007), and less renal replacement therapy (RRT, popen abdomen initiated at primary versus secondary operation. VACM was associated with a high PDFC rate after prolonged open abdomen therapy following aortic repair. Patient outcomes seemed better when open abdomen was initiated at primary, compared with secondary operation but a selection effect is possible. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Open fenestration of the distal landing zone via a subxyphoid incision for subsequent endovascular repair of a dissecting thoracic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Renske; de Bruin, Jorg L; Wisselink, Willem

    2013-02-01

    To describe a novel hybrid technique to address two challenges in endovascular repair of chronic dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm (dTAA): obtaining an adequate seal of the stent-graft in a half-moon-shaped fibrotic aortic lumen and preserving flow into the distal true and false lumens. The technique is demonstrated in a 52-year-old man who presented with progressive asymptomatic dilatation of the thoracic aorta 9 years after undergoing a Bentall procedure for a Stanford type A dissection followed by arch replacement and elephant trunk construction. Imaging at this admission showed a 6.8-cm dissecting aneurysm extending distally to ∼4 cm above the celiac trunk; the dissection included both common iliac arteries. The patient refused a thoracotomy, so a hybrid procedure was devised to resect the intimal flap via a median subxyphoid incision and transperitoneal approach through the lesser sac. Two overlapping Zenith TX-2 stent-grafts were deployed into the elephant trunk, terminating just above the surgically created "flow divider" at the level of the celiac trunk. Imaging showed adequate sealing at both ends of the stent-graft and a type II endoleak that persisted into follow-up, but the aneurysm diameter decreased to 6.4 cm, and there was unobstructed flow into the visceral, renal, and iliac arteries. In this case of chronic dTAA, open surgical removal of a segment of the dissection flap via a subxyphoid incision provided a distal landing zone for subsequent endoluminal repair, with exclusion of the aneurysm and preservation of antegrade flow in both true and false lumens.

  9. Endovascular Repair of a Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta Secondary to Translumbar Aortography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, Naheed; Nunzio, Mario De; Pollock, John G

    2006-01-01

    This report describes an incidental finding of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta on a computed tomography (CT) renal angiogram during investigation of chronic renal failure in a 73-year-old man. The patient had undergone a translumbar aortogram 20 years previously. An increase in the size of the aneurysm by 7 mm over 6 months prompted treatment and the aneurysm underwent successful endovascular repair with a custom-made stent-graft

  10. New paradigms in the management of acute type B aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Rosario; Secco, Gioel Gabrio; Fattori, Rossella

    2015-11-01

    Type B aortic dissection is a relatively uncommon and multifaceted disease, whose management is ongoing debated. Its wide range of clinical presentations and anatomical features hamper the early identification and medical management. In the past few years, the introduction of endovascular techniques opened new paradigms in comprehension and management of aortic diseases. Aim of this review is to discuss contemporary therapeutic approaches of acute type B aortic dissections highlighting the growing role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in focusing its complex physiopathology. Prompt medical therapy followed by endovascular repair should be considered as the gold standard in complicated acute type B aortic dissection. Moreover, recent findings also suggest a potential benefit in case of uncomplicated cases. Management of acute type B aortic dissection is progressively shifting into endovascular approach. However, further studies are warranted to define the optimal treatment strategy in each subset of patients and anatomical features.

  11. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Is Imaging Surveillance Robust, and Does It Influence Long-term Mortality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waduud, Mohammed Abdul, E-mail: m.a.waduud@doctors.org.uk [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Choong, Wen Ling, E-mail: wenlingchoong@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moirasim9@gmail.com; Williams, Claire, E-mail: c.williams.3@research.gla.ac.uk [University of Glasgow, Institute of Health and Wellbeing Glasgow (United Kingdom); Yadavali, Reddi, E-mail: reddi.yadavali@nhs.net [Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Lim, Shueh, E-mail: s.lim.06@aberdeen.ac.uk [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Buchanan, Fraser, E-mail: f.buchanan.11@aberdeen.ac.uk [University of Aberdeen, The School of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Bhat, Raj, E-mail: raj.bhat@nhs.net [Ninewells Hospital, NHS Tayside, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Ramanathan, Krishnappan, E-mail: k.ramanathan@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, School of Medicine (United Kingdom); Ingram, Susan, E-mail: susan.ingram@luht.scot.nhs.uk; Cormack, Laura, E-mail: lgcormack@googlemail.com [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, NHS Lothian, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Moss, Jonathan G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeEndovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is the dominant treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, as a result of uncertainty regarding long-term durability, an ongoing imaging surveillance program is required. The aim of the study was to assess EVAR surveillance in Scotland and its effect on all-cause and aneurysm-related mortality.MethodsA retrospective analysis of all EVAR procedures carried out in the four main Scottish vascular units. The primary outcome measure was the implementation of post-EVAR imaging surveillance across Scotland. Patients were identified locally and then categorized as having complete, incomplete, or no surveillance. Secondary outcome measures were all-cause mortality and aneurysm-related mortality. Cause of death was obtained from death certificates.ResultsData were available for 569 patients from the years 2001 to 2012. All centers had data for a minimum of 5 contiguous years. Surveillance ranged from 1.66 to 4.55 years (median 3.03 years). Overall, 53 % had complete imaging surveillance, 43 % incomplete, and 4 % none. For the whole cohort, all-cause 5-year mortality was 33.5 % (95 % confidence interval 28.0–38.6) and aneurysm-related mortality was 4.5 % (.8–7.3). All-cause mortality in patients with complete, incomplete, and no imaging was 49.9 % (39.2–58.6), 19.1 % (12.6–25.2), and 47.2 % (17.7–66.2), respectively. Aneurysm-related mortality was 3.7 % (1.8–7.4), 4.4 % (2.2–8.9), and 9.5 % (2.5–33.0), respectively. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in patients with complete compared to incomplete imaging surveillance (p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in aneurysm-related mortality (p = 0.2).ConclusionOnly half of EVAR patients underwent complete long-term imaging surveillance. However, incomplete imaging could not be linked to any increase in mortality. Further work is required to establish the role and deliverability of EVAR imaging surveillance.

  12. Endovascular aneurysm repair simulation can lead to decreased fluoroscopy time and accurately delineate the proximal seal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ann H; Kendrick, Daniel E; Moorehead, Pamela A; Nagavalli, Anil; Miller, Claire P; Liu, Nathaniel T; Wang, John C; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2016-07-01

    The use of simulators for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is not widespread. We examined whether simulation could improve procedural variables, including operative time and optimizing proximal seal. For the latter, we compared suprarenal vs infrarenal fixation endografts, right femoral vs left femoral main body access, and increasing angulation of the proximal aortic neck. Computed tomography angiography was obtained from 18 patients who underwent EVAR at a single institution. Patient cases were uploaded to the ANGIO Mentor endovascular simulator (Simbionix, Cleveland, Ohio) allowing for three-dimensional reconstruction and adapted for simulation with suprarenal fixation (Endurant II; Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minn) and infrarenal fixation (C3; W. L. Gore & Associates Inc, Newark, Del) deployment systems. Three EVAR novices and three experienced surgeons performed 18 cases from each side with each device in randomized order (n = 72 simulations/participant). The cases were stratified into three groups according to the degree of infrarenal angulation: 0° to 20°, 21° to 40°, and 41° to 66°. Statistical analysis used paired t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Mean fluoroscopy time for participants decreased by 48.6% (P time decreased by 33.8% (P zone coverage in highly angulated aortic necks was significantly decreased. The infrarenal device resulted in mean aortic neck zone coverage of 91.9%, 89.4%, and 75.4% (P zone coverage. The side of femoral access for the main body did not influence proximal seal zone coverage regardless of infrarenal angulation. Simulation of EVAR leads to decreased fluoroscopy times for novice and experienced operators. Side of femoral access did not affect precision of proximal endograft landing. The angulated aortic neck leads to decreased proximal seal zone coverage regardless of infrarenal or suprarenal fixation devices. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Midterm results of endovascular stent graft treatment for descending aortic aneurysms including high-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gussmann, Andreas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Methods: 21 patients (17 men, 4 women; mean age 66.1 years, range 29-90 years with 15 true aneurysms, and 6 type B-dissections were treated by implantation of a TalentTM Endoluminal Stentgraft System from February 2000 to July 2003. In 3 cases it was necessary to overstent the left subclavian artery, in 1 case to overstent the left common carotid. Results: 2 patients (9.5% died during the first 30 days (1 myocardial infarction, 1 pneumonia. Two patients (9.5% suffered from cerebral ischemia and needed revascularisation. No paraplegia, no stroke occurred. One endoleak required additional stenting. No patient needed conversion. Follow-up, average 25.4 months (range 0-39, was 100% complete. During this another two patients died of myocardial infarction i.e. 9.5% (the above mentioned endoleak, but no late migration were detected in the remaining patients. In all cases the graft lumen stayed patent. Conclusions: Treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with an endovascular approach has acceptable mortality and morbidity-rates even in high risk patients. Procedural overstenting of the subclavian artery requires subclavian revascularisation in a minority of cases.

  14. Covered stents for endovascular repair of iatrogenic injuries of iliac and femoral arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufner, Sebastian, E-mail: kufners@dhm.mhn.de [Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Cassese, Salvatore; Groha, Philipp; Byrne, Robert A. [Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Schunkert, Heribert; Kastrati, Adnan [Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich (Germany); Ott, Ilka; Fusaro, Massimiliano [Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Background: The growing number of complex endovascular procedures is expected to increase the risk of iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries. A strategy of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with covered stent (CS) may represent a valuable alternative to open surgery. However, systematic evaluations of CS in this setting represent a scientific gap. In the present study, we investigate the procedural and clinical outcomes associated with PTA and CS implantation to repair iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries. Methods: All patients undergoing PTA with CS for endovascular repair of iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries between August 2010 and July 2013 at our Institution were retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint was the technical success. Secondary endpoints were in-hospital mortality and cumulative death, target lesion revascularization (TLR), amputation and major stroke at 12-month follow-up. Results: During the period of observation, a total of 30 patients underwent PTA with either self-expandable (43.3%) or balloon-expandable CS (56.7%) for iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries. Injuries consisted of perforation/rupture (76.7%), arteriovenous fistula (16.7%) and pseudoaneurysm (6.7%) of iliac–femoral arteries. Technical success was achieved in all cases. Median follow-up was 409 days [210–907]. The incidence of in-hospital mortality was 10.0%. At 12-month follow-up, the incidence of death, TLR, amputation and major stroke was 20.0%, 17.0%, 3.3% and 6.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The use of covered stents for endovascular repair of iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries shows a high technical success and may be alternative to surgery. Further studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these preliminary findings. - Highlights: • The growing number of complex endovascular procedures is expected to increase the risk of iatrogenic injuries of peripheral arteries. • Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with

  15. Endovascular management of lap belt-related abdominal aortic injury in a 9-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Konstantinos O; Karkos, Christos D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T

    2015-02-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic trauma is a rare occurrence in children with only a few patients having been reported in the literature. Most such cases have been described in the context of lap belt injuries. We report a 9-year-old boy who suffered lap belt trauma to the abdomen during a high-speed road traffic accident resulting to the well-recognized pattern of blunt abdominal injury, that is, the triad of intestinal perforation, fractures of the lumbar spine, and abdominal aortic injury. The latter presented with lower limb ischemia due to dissection of the infrarenal aorta and right common iliac artery. Revascularization was achieved by endovascular means using 2 self-expanding stents in the infrarenal aorta and the right common iliac artery. This case is one of the few reports of lap belt-related acute traumatic abdominal aortic dissection in a young child and highlights the feasibility of endovascular management in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Repair-oriented classification of aortic insufficiency: impact on surgical techniques and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodhwani, Munir; de Kerchove, Laurent; Glineur, David; Poncelet, Alain; Rubay, Jean; Astarci, Parla; Verhelst, Robert; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gébrine

    2009-02-01

    Valve repair for aortic insufficiency requires a tailored surgical approach determined by the leaflet and aortic disease. Over the past decade, we have developed a functional classification of AI, which guides repair strategy and can predict outcome. In this study, we analyze our experience with a systematic approach to aortic valve repair. From 1996 to 2007, 264 patients underwent elective aortic valve repair for aortic insufficiency (mean age - 54 +/- 16 years; 79% male). AV was tricuspid in 171 patients bicuspid in 90 and quadricuspid in 3. One hundred fifty three patients had type I dysfunction (aortic dilatation), 134 had type II (cusp prolapse), and 40 had type III (restrictive). Thirty six percent (96/264) of the patients had more than one identified mechanism. In-hospital mortality was 1.1% (3/264). Six patients experienced early repair failure; 3 underwent re-repair. Functional classification predicted the necessary repair techniques in 82-100% of patients, with adjunctive techniques being employed in up to 35% of patients. Mid-term follow up (median [interquartile range]: 47 [29-73] months) revealed a late mortality rate of 4.2% (11/261, 10 cardiac). Five year overall survival was 95 +/- 3%. Ten patients underwent aortic valve reoperation (1 re-repair). Freedoms from recurrent Al (>2+) and from AV reoperation at 5 years was 88 +/- 3% and 92 +/- 4% respectively and patients with type I (82 +/- 9%; 93 +/- 5%) or II (95 +/- 5%; 94 +/- 6%) had better outcomes compared to type III (76 +/- 17%; 84 +/- 13%). Aortic valve repair is an acceptable therapeutic option for patients with aortic insufficiency. This functional classification allows a systematic approach to the repair of Al and can help to predict the surgical techniques required as well as the durability of repair. Restrictive cusp motion (type III), due to fibrosis or calcification, is an important predictor for recurrent Al following AV repair.

  17. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis

  18. Atheroembolization and potential air embolization during aortic declamping in open repair of a pararenal aortic aneurysm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregelid, Einar Børre; Lilleng, Peer Kåre

    2016-01-01

    When ischemic events ascribable to microembolization occur during open repair of proximal abdominal aortic aneurysms, a likely origin of atheroembolism is not always found. A 78-year old man with enlargement of the entire aorta underwent open repair for a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm using supraceliac aortic clamping for 20min. Then the graft was clamped, the supraceliac clamp was removed, and the distal and right renal anastomoses were also completed. The patient was stable throughout the operation with only transient drop in blood pressure on reperfusion. Postoperatively the patient developed ischemia, attributable to microembolization, in legs, small intestine, gall bladder and kidneys. He underwent fasciotomy, small bowel and gall bladder resections. Intestinal absorptive function did not recover adequately and he died after 4 months. Microscopic examination of hundreds of intestinal, juxtaintestinal mesenteric, and gall bladder arteries showed a few ones containing cholesterol emboli. It is unsure whether a few occluded small arteries out of several hundred could have caused the ischemic injury alone. There had been only moderate backbleeding from aortic branches above the proximal anastomosis while it was sutured. Inadvertently, remaining air in the graft, aorta, and aortic branches may have been whipped into the pulsating blood, resulting in air microbubbles, when the aortic clamp was removed. Although both atheromatous particles and air microbubbles are well-known causes of iatrogenic microembolization, the importance of air microembolization in open repair of pararenal aortic aneurysms is not known and need to be studied. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Stenting for infantile adult aortic coarctation with successful conception of zygomatic twins at 4 years' post-intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waters, Peadar S

    2013-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is a congenital defect which rarely presents in adulthood but results in significant morbidity and mortality. Endovascular techniques present novel therapeutic options for managing this anomaly with comparable results to traditional open surgical repair.

  20. Early- and Mid-term Results of the Chimney Technique in the Repair of Aortic Arch Pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Junjie; Jiao, Yuanyong, E-mail: wishlucky@163.com, E-mail: johemail@163.com; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of General Surgery (China)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeTo examine the safety, feasibility, and mid-term efficacy of the chimney technique for aortic arch pathologies.MethodsFrom February 2011 to December 2014, a total of 35 patients (30 men; mean age 54.3 ± 14.1 years) with aortic arch pathologies underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair combined with chimney stents. The indication was a proximal landing zone <1.5 cm. Follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly thereafter.ResultsA total of 36 chimney stents were deployed (innominate artery, n = 1; left common carotid artery, n = 9; right subclavian artery, n = 1; left subclavian artery, n = 25). The technical success rate was 94.3 % (33/35). Immediate type Ia endoleaks (ELIa) were observed in two patients (8.6 %, 2/35). Twenty-five patients were successfully followed-up for a median period of 29.3 months (range, 6–48 months). One patient died due to aortic dissection aneurysm rupture at 36 months (mortality rate of 4 %, 1/25). Three late ELIa were observed and no reinterventions were performed. The overall incidence of ELIa was 20 % (5/25). During follow-up, the patency rate for chimney stents was 92 % (23/25).ConclusionOur limited experience demonstrates that the chimney technique is a viable and relatively safe treatment for patients with challenging thoracic aortic pathologies at least in the mid-term follow-up period.

  1. Early- and Mid-term Results of the Chimney Technique in the Repair of Aortic Arch Pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Junjie; Jiao, Yuanyong; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Hongyu; Ma, Hao

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo examine the safety, feasibility, and mid-term efficacy of the chimney technique for aortic arch pathologies.MethodsFrom February 2011 to December 2014, a total of 35 patients (30 men; mean age 54.3 ± 14.1 years) with aortic arch pathologies underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair combined with chimney stents. The indication was a proximal landing zone <1.5 cm. Follow-up was performed at 3, 6, and 12 months and then yearly thereafter.ResultsA total of 36 chimney stents were deployed (innominate artery, n = 1; left common carotid artery, n = 9; right subclavian artery, n = 1; left subclavian artery, n = 25). The technical success rate was 94.3 % (33/35). Immediate type Ia endoleaks (ELIa) were observed in two patients (8.6 %, 2/35). Twenty-five patients were successfully followed-up for a median period of 29.3 months (range, 6–48 months). One patient died due to aortic dissection aneurysm rupture at 36 months (mortality rate of 4 %, 1/25). Three late ELIa were observed and no reinterventions were performed. The overall incidence of ELIa was 20 % (5/25). During follow-up, the patency rate for chimney stents was 92 % (23/25).ConclusionOur limited experience demonstrates that the chimney technique is a viable and relatively safe treatment for patients with challenging thoracic aortic pathologies at least in the mid-term follow-up period.

  2. Regional Differences in Case Mix and Peri-operative Outcome After Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Vascunet Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, K; Venermo, M; Beiles, B; Menyhei, G; Altreuther, M; Loftus, I; Björck, M

    2015-06-01

    National differences exist in the outcome of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. The role of case mix variation was assessed based on an international vascular registry collaboration. All elective AAA repairs with aneurysm size data in the Vascunet database in the period 2005-09 were included. AAA size and peri-operative outcome (crude and age adjusted mortality) were analysed overall and in risk cohorts, as well as per country. Glasgow Aneurysm Score (GAS) was calculated as risk score, and patients were stratified in three equal sized risk cohorts based on GAS. Predictors of peri-operative mortality were analysed with multiple regression. Missing data were handled with multiple imputation. Patients from Australia, Finland, Hungary, Norway, Sweden and the UK (n = 5,895) were analysed; mean age was 72.7 years and 54% had endovascular repair (EVAR). There were significant variations in GAS (lowest = Finland [75.7], highest = UK [79.4], p for comparison of all regions 82. Of those with a GAS >82, 8.4% of men and 20.8% of women had an AAA case selection for elective AAA repair, including variations in AAA size and patient risk profile. These differences partly explain the variations in peri-operative mortality. Further audit is warranted to assess the underlying reasons for the regional variation in case-mix. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Select early type IA endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair will resolve without secondary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Corey, Michael R; Deery, Sarah E; Tsougranis, Gregory; Maruthi, Rohit; Clouse, W Darrin; Cambria, Richard P; Conrad, Mark F

    2018-01-01

    Although it is traditionally considered ominous, the natural history of early proximal attachment site endoleaks (IA) after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is not well known. Our aim was to identify risk factors for persistent type IA endoleaks and to determine their effect on long-term outcomes after EVAR. All patients who underwent infrarenal EVAR at a single institution between 1998 and 2015 were identified. Preoperative axial imaging and intraoperative arteriograms were reviewed, and those patients with a type IA endoleak were further studied. Aneurysm features were characterized by two reviewers and were studied for predictors of persistent endoleaks at the conclusion of the case. Patient records and the Social Security Death Index were used to record 1-year and overall survival. We identified 1484 EVARs, 122 (8%) of which were complicated by a type IA endoleak on arteriography after graft deployment, with a median follow-up of 4 years. The majority of patients underwent additional ballooning of the proximal site (52 [43%]) or placement of an aortic cuff (47 [39%]); 30 patients (25%) received a Palmaz stent, and four patients were treated with coils or anchors. At case end, only 43 (35%) of the type IA endoleaks remained; at 1 month, only 16 endoleaks persisted (13%), and only six persisted at 1 year (6%). In multivariable analysis, the only independent predictor of persistence of type IA endoleak at the conclusion of the case was the presence of extensive neck calcifications (odds ratio [OR], 9.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-67.9; P = .02). Thirteen patients (11%) underwent reintervention for type IA endoleaks, with a time frame ranging from 3 days postoperatively to 11 years. There were three patients (2.4%) who experienced aneurysm rupture. Postoperative type IA endoleak was associated with lower survival at 1 year (79% vs 91%; relative risk, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4; P = .02), but it did not affect long-term survival (log-rank, P = .45

  4. Low rate of reoperations after acute type A aortic dissection repair from The Nordic Consortium Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Emily; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Ahlsson, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Bakey classification nor the extent of proximal or distal repair predicted freedom from a later reoperation. The only independent risk factor associated with a later proximal reoperation was a history of connective tissue disease. CONCLUSIONS: Type A aortic dissection repair in low- to medium-volume centers......OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationship between the extent of primary aortic repair and the incidence of reoperations after surgery for type A aortic dissection. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 1159 patients treated for type A aortic dissection at eight Nordic low- to medium......-sized cardiothoracic centers from 2005 to 2014. Data were gathered from patient records and national registries. Patients were separately divided into 3 groups according to the distal anastomoses technique (ascending aorta [n = 791], hemiarch [n = 247], and total arch [n = 66]), and into 2 groups for proximal repair...

  5. Contemporary spinal cord protection during thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic surgery and endovascular aortic repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etz, Christian D; Weigang, Ernst; Hartert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    devastating complication. The aim of this position paper is to provide physicians with broad information regarding spinal cord blood supply, to share strategies for shortening intraprocedural spinal cord ischaemia and to increase spinal cord tolerance to transitory ischaemia through detection of ischaemia...... publications available in the PubMed database, which are cohort studies, experimental research reports, case reports, reviews, short series and meta-analyses. Individual chapters of this position paper were assigned and after delivery harmonized by Christian D. Etz, Ernst Weigang and Martin Czerny....... Consequently, further writing assignments were distributed within the group and delivered in August 2014. The final version was submitted to the EJCTS for review in September 2014....

  6. Decision-making in follow-up after endovascular aneurysm repair based on diameter and volume measurements : a blinded comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinssen, M; Verhoeven, ELG; Verhagen, HJM; Blankensteijn, JD

    Objective: to assess whether volume, in addition to diameter, measurements facilitate decision-making after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Material/Methods: patients (n = 82) with an immediately post-EVAR, and at least one follow-up (3-60 months), computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) were

  7. Investigation of reference levels and radiation dose associated with abdominal EVAR (endovascular aneurysm repair) procedures across several European Centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuthill, E.; Rainford, L. [University College Dublin, Diagnostic Imaging, School of Medicine, Dublin (Ireland); O' Hora, L.; O' Donohoe, M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Panci, S. [San Giovanni di Dio Hospital, Florence (Italy); Gilligan, P.; Fox, E. [Mater Private Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Campion, D. [Mauriziano-Umberto Hospital, Turin (Italy); Trenti, R. [Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Catania, D. [AITRI, Association of Italian Interventional Radiographers, Milan (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is considered the treatment of choice for abdominal aortic aneurysms with suitable anatomy. In order to improve radiation safety, European Directive (2013/59) requires member states to implement diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in radio-diagnostic and interventional procedures. This study aimed to determine local DRLs for EVAR across five European centres and identify an interim European DRL, which currently remains unestablished. Retrospective data was collected for 180 standard EVARs performed between January 2014 and July 2015 from five specialist centres in Ireland (n=2) and Italy (n=3). Data capture included: air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), total air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), fluoroscopic time (FT), number of acquisitions, frame rate of acquisition, type of acquisition, patient height, weight, and gender. The mean values for each site A, B, C, D, and E were: P{sub KA}s of 4343 ± 994 μGym{sup 2}, 18,200 ± 2141 μGym{sup 2}, 11,423 ± 1390 μGym{sup 2}, 7796 ± 704 μGym{sup 2}, 31,897 ± 5798 μGym{sup 2}; FTs of 816 ± 92 s, 950 ± 150 s, 708 ± 70 s, 972 ± 61 s, 827 ± 118 s; and number of acquisitions of 6.72 ± 0.56, 10.38 ± 1.54, 4.74 ± 0.19, 5.64 ± 0.36, 7.28 ± 0.65, respectively. The overall pooled 75th percentile P{sub KA} was 15,849 μGym{sup 2}. Local reference levels were identified. The pooled data has been used to establish an interim European DRL for EVAR procedures. (orig.)

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with acromegaly and aortic root dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Van Praet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic regurgitation and dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are severe complications of acromegaly. The current trend for management of an aortic root aneurysm is valve-sparing root replacement as well as restoring the diameter of the aortic sinotubular junction (STJ and annulus. Our case report supports the recommendation that in patients with acromegaly, severe aortic root involvement may indicate the need for surgery.

  9. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root dilatation in adult patients after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Cristina; Pinho, Teresa; Lebreiro, Ana; Silva Cardoso, José; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2013-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is an important tool after tetralogy of Fallot repair, of which aortic root dilatation is a recognized complication. In this study we aimed to assess its prevalence and potential predictors. We consecutively assessed adult patients by transthoracic echocardiography after tetralogy of Fallot repair, and divided them into two groups based on the maximum internal aortic diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva in parasternal long-axis view: group 1 with aortic root dilatation (≥38 mm) and group 2 without dilatation (de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Tratamiento endovascular de las patologías de aorta -Estado del arte-: Parte 1 - Aneurismas de aorta abdominal Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies -State of the art-: Part 1 - Aneurysms of abdominal aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E Uribe

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, el tratamiento endovascular de las patologías de aorta es una alternativa a la cirugía abierta. Éste ha demostrado ser seguro ya que arroja resultados iguales o superiores que el grupo quirúrgico. En este artículo se presenta el estado actual del tratamiento con endoprótesis de las patologías de aorta, así como las indicaciones, las contraindicaciones y el futuro del tratamiento con este tipo de dispositivos.Endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies is actually an alternative to open surgery. It has proven to be safe, showing similar or better results to those achieved by surgery. In this article, treatment of aortic pathologies by means of endoprosthesis is presented, as well as its indications, contraindications and future treatment with this kind of devices.

  11. Assessment of value of spiral CT in preoperative evaluation of endovascular graft exclusion for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Zaiping; Zhao Jun; Zhu Wenjiang; Xiao Yi

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The assess the value of spiral CT (SCT) in preoperative evaluation of endovascular graft exclusion (EVGE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: 41 case with AAA received SCT scanning. Two and three dimensional images were reconstructed, utilizing the shaded surface display (SSD), maximum-intensity Projection (MIP) and multiplanar reformation (MPR). Information were obtained regarding the size and features of AAA, length and diameters of aneurysm's neck, status of the branches of aorta, etc. Results: Nine patients had spinal CT study prior EVGE procedure and the grafts selected according to the parameters obtained by SCT matched perfectly to the needs of deployment. Conclusion: CTA provides high quality images. It is a high-speed and non-invasive method which can provide three-dimensional images of AAA and its main branches and all the parameters needed in EVGE

  12. Tratamento endovascular de aneurismas da aorta em pacientes com doença de Behçet: relato de dois casos Endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms in patients with Behcet's disease: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Quilici Belczak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Behçet, uma vasculite sistêmica de causa desconhecida, pode ser causa de doença aneurismática da aorta em alguns portadores dessa patologia. Nós apresentamos nossa experiência com dois casos de aneurismas aórticos em pacientes com doença de Behçet submetidos à terapêutica endovascular, descrevendo seus respectivos seguimentos. A terapêutica atual, a patofisiologia e os critérios diagnósticos vigentes foram revisados. Concluímos que a técnica endovascular é uma excelente opção terapêutica para certos pacientes com doença de Behçet e que esta deve ser acompanhada de tratamento imunossupressivo adequado.Behcet's disease, a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, may be the cause of aortic aneurysmal diseases in some patients. We report our experience with two Behcet's disease patients who presented with aortic aneurysms and were submitted to endovascular therapy, and describe their respective follow-ups. Current pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment approaches were reviewed. Our experience suggests that the endovascular approach, combined with adequate immunosuppressive treatment, is an excellent therapeutic option for some patients with Behcet's disease suffering from aneurysms.

  13. Expression in Whole Blood Samples of miRNA-191 and miRNA-455-3p in Patients with AAA and Their Relationship to Clinical Outcomes after Endovascular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Emanuel Junio Ramos; Braga, Andre Felipe Farias; Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti Da Cunha; Ribeiro, Mauricio Serra; Piccinato, Carlos Eli; Joviliano, Edwaldo Edner

    2018-03-05

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and evaluate the expression response of miRNA-191 and miRNA-455-3p endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) based in whole blood samples. This report describes a prospective study of a single center of 30 patients with AAA who underwent endovascular repair. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The differential expression of the miRNAs was performed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method, after extraction of the RNA from the blood samples at the 2 moments. In addition, bioinformatic tools were used to determine pathophysiological pathways related to AAA. The miR-191 and miR-455-3p were overexpressed preoperatively. After 6 months postoperatively, miR-191 (median 0.98, IQR 0.5-2.1, P AAA showed no significant differences in the expression of miR-191 and miR-455-3p. Exclusion of the aneurysmal sac after endovascular treatment induces a decrease in the expression of the studied miRNAs in whole blood samples, which suggests a possible use of them as biomarkers of therapeutic success. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aortic root repair for thoracic aorta false aneurysm following Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Jones, Steve; Sivananthan, U M; McGoldrick, J P

    2008-08-01

    The Bentall procedure for aortic root replacement in Marfan's syndrome is safe and durable. We describe successful repair of periprosthetic valvular leak, 12 years following Bentall repair with composite graft. The aim of this report is to analyse and evaluate technical factors leading to this unusual occurrence.

  15. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  16. Early results after implantation of a new geometric annuloplasty ring for aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitelli, Domenico; Nöbauer, Christian; Rankin, J Scott; Badiu, Catalin C; Krane, Markus; Crooke, Philip S; Cohn, William E; Opitz, Anke; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve repair is associated with fewer long-term valve-related complications as compared with valve replacement, and repair is being performed increasingly. A current problem is the lack of a geometric annuloplasty ring to facilitate reconstruction. This paper describes the first clinical application of such a device designed to permanently restore physiologic annular size and geometry during aortic valve repair. Based on mathematical studies of human cadaver valves, as well as computed tomography angiographic analyses of awake patients with normal valves, a three-dimensional annuloplasty ring has been developed, consisting of low-profile, one-piece titanium construction and Dacron cloth covering. The ring design incorporates 2:3 elliptical base geometry and 10-degree outwardly flaring subcommissural posts. Appropriately sized rings were implanted in 5 patients with severe aortic insufficiency due to annular dilation and anatomic leaflet defects. The rings restored annular geometry and facilitated leaflet repairs in all patients. Each recovered excellent valve function with minimal residual leak. All patients convalesced uneventfully, were discharged within 7 days after surgery, and continue with stable valve function as long as 6 months after implantation. Initial clinical application of a geometric aortic annuloplasty ring was associated with excellent device performance and perhaps better repairs. Further clinical series and patient follow-up should identify potential benefits of the device, including improved applicability and stability of aortic valve repair. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early-Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography and PET Angiography for Endoleak Detection After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Robert; Gühne, Falk; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2017-06-01

    To propose a positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) protocol including early-dynamic and late-phase acquisitions to evaluate graft patency and aneurysm diameter, detect endoleaks, and rule out graft or vessel wall inflammation after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in one examination without intravenous contrast medium. Early-dynamic PET/CT of the endovascular prosthesis is performed for 180 seconds immediately after intravenous injection of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose. Data are reconstructed in variable time frames (time periods after tracer injection) to visualize the arterial anatomy and are displayed as PET angiography or fused with CT images. Images are evaluated in view of vascular abnormalities, graft configuration, and tracer accumulation in the aneurysm sac. Whole-body PET/CT is performed 90 to 120 minutes after tracer injection. This protocol for early-dynamic PET/CT and PET angiography has the potential to evaluate vascular diseases, including the diagnosis of complications after endovascular procedures.

  18. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Using a Reverse Chimney Technique in a Patient With Marfan Syndrome and Contained Ruptured Chronic Type B Dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, Dominik; Kalender, Guenay; Heuschmid, Martin; Syha, Roland; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Brechtel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We report endovascular thoracic and abdominal aneurysm repair (EVAR) with reverse chimney technique in a patient with contained ruptured type B dissection. EVAR seems feasible as a bailout option in Marfan patients with acute life-threatening disease.

  19. The role of annular dimension and annuloplasty in tricuspid aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Boodhwani, Munir; Astarci, Parla; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-02-01

    Valve sparing reimplantation can improve the durability of bicuspid aortic valve repair compared with subcommissural annuloplasty, especially in patients with a large basal ring. This study analyses the effect of basal ring size and annuloplasty on valve repair in the setting of a tricuspid aortic valve. From 1995 to 2013, 382 patients underwent elective tricuspid aortic valve repair. We included only those undergoing subcommissural annuloplasty, valve sparing reimplantation or no annuloplasty and in whom intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography images were available for retrospective pre- and post-repair basal ring measurements (n = 323, subcommissural annuloplasty: 146, valve sparing reimplantation: 154, no annuloplasty: 23). In a subgroup of patients with available echocardiographic images, basal ring was retrospectively measured at the latest follow-up or prior to reoperation. subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation were compared after matching for degree of aortic regurgitation and root size. All three groups differed significantly for most of preoperative characteristics. Hospital mortality was 0.9%. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. At 8 years, overall survival was 80 ± 5%. Freedom from reoperation and freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ were 92 ± 5% and 71 ± 8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, predictors of aortic regurgitation >1+ were left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (P = 0.003), cusp repair (P = 0.006), body surface area (P = 0.01) and subcommissural annuloplasty (P = 0.05). In subcommissural annuloplasty, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was lower for patients with basal ring ≥28 mm compared with patients with basal ring 1+ was independent of basal ring size (P = 0.38). In matched comparison between subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation, freedom from aortic regurgitation >1+ was not significantly different (P = 0.06), but in patients with basal ring ≥28 mm, valve sparing

  20. Endovascular repair of an aorto-iliac aneurysm succeeded by kidney transplantation Tratamento endovascular de aneurisma aorto-ilíaco sucedido por transplante renal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bellini Dalio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of aorto-iliac aneurysm in a patient with chronic renal failure requiring dialysis who were treated with an endovascular stent graft and, later on, submitted to kidney transplantation. A 53-year-old male with renal failure requiring dialysis presented with an asymptomatic abdominal aorto-iliac aneurysm measuring 5.0cm of diameter. He was treated with endovascular repair technique, being used an endoprosthesis Excluder®. After four months, he was successfully submitted to kidney transplantation (dead donor, with anastomosis of the graft renal artery in the external iliac artery distal to the endoprosthesis. The magnetic resonance imaging, carried out 30 days after the procedure, showed a good positioning of the endoprosthesis and adequate perfusion of the renal graft. In the follow-up, the patient presented improvement of nitrogenous waste, good positioning of the endoprosthesis without migration or endoleak. The endovascular repair of aorto-iliac aneurysm in a patient with end-stage renal failure under hemodialysis treatment showed to be feasible, safe and efficient, as it did not prevent the success of the posterior kidney transplantation.Apresentamos o caso de aneurisma aortoilíaco em um paciente com insuficiência renal crônica dialítica tratado com uma endoprótese vascular, sendo, após, submetido a transplante renal. Um homem de 53 anos com insuficiência renal dialítica apresentava um aneurisma abdominal aortoilíaco assintomático com 5,0cm de diâmetro. Foi tratado com técnica endovascular com uma endoprótese Excluderâ. Após quatro meses, foi submetido a transplante renal (doador cadáver com sucesso, com anastomose da artéria renal do enxerto na artéria ilíaca externa distal à endoprótese. A ressonância magnética 30 dias após o procedimento mostrou a endoprótese bem posicionada e o enxerto renal bem perfundido. No seguimento, o paciente evoluiu com melhora das escórias nitrogenadas, bom

  1. Is there a prospect for hybrid aortic arch surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Mohamad; Harky, Amer; Bilal, Haris

    2018-05-16

    The surge of endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm in current modern aortic surgery practice has been the key for surgical management of elective cases of thoracic aortic aneurysms. This has paved way for the combined hybrid approach to be amongst the armamentarium for the management of aortic arch disease. The pivotal understanding of the aortic arch natural history coupled with device technology advancement allowed surgeons insight into delivery of hybrid surgery with acceptable morbidity and mortality results. This review article provides current insights into hybrid technique of aortic arch aneurysm repair and the evidences behind its applicability to arch surgery. It is aimed to highlight the challenges encountered for this innovative approach and correlate its challenges to those that are met by the conventional open aortic arch repair.

  2. Ex vivo repair of renal artery aneurysm associated with surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dušan M.

    2004-01-01

    shorter arteries was implanted into the long artery, and another one into PTFE graft. After 30 minutes of explanation, autotransplantation of the kidney into the right iliac fossa was performed. The right renal vein was implanted into the inferior vein cava, and PTFE graft into the right limb of Dacron graft. Immediately following the completion of both anastomoses, large volume of urine was evident. Finally, ureteneocystostomy was performed with previous insertion of double "J" catheter. In the immediate postoperative period, renal function was restored to normal, while postoperative angiography revealed all patent grafts. DISCUSSION The most common causes of renal artery aneurysms are arteriosclerosis, as in our case, and fibro-muscular dysplasia. Very often, renal artery aneurysms are asymptomatic and discovered only during angiography in patients with aneurysmal and occlusive aortic disease. Other cases include: arterial hypertension, groin pain and acute or chronic renal failure. Due to relatively small number of evaluated cases, the risk of aneurysmal rupture is not known. According to some authors, the overall rupture rate of renal artery aneurysm is 5%, however, the rupture risk becomes higher in young pregnant woman. Several standard surgical procedures are available for the repair of renal artery aneurysms. These include saphenous vein angioplasty, bypass grafting, as well as ex vivo reconstruction with reimplantation or autotransplantation. Furthermore, interventional embolization therapy, as well as endovascular treatment with ePTFE covered stent, or autologous vein-coverage stent graft, have been also reported to be successful. CONCLUSION The major indications for surgical treatment of renal artery aneurysms are to eliminate the source of thromboembolism which leads to fixed renal hypertension and kidney failure, as well as prevention of aneurysmal rupture.

  3. Acute Aortic Arch Perforation During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Bicuspid Aortic Stenosis and a Gothic Aortic Arch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan-Iturbe, Oscar; Sawaya, Fadi J; Bieliauskas, Gintautas; Chow, Danny H F; De Backer, Ole; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has evolved from a novel technology to an established therapy for high/intermediate-risk patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS). Although TAVR is used to treat bicuspid severe AS, the large randomized trials typically excluded bicuspid AS because of its unique anatomic features. This case report describes an acute aortic perforation during delivery of a transcatheter heart valve to treat a severe bicuspid AS with a "gothic aortic arch"; more careful evaluation of the preprocedural multislice computed tomographic scan would have unveiled a sharply angulated aortic arch. This life-threatening complication was successfully treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  5. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Nandipati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy‐like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints.

  6. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Zakkar; Mustafa Zakkar; Vito Domanico Bruno; Alexandru Ciprian Visan; Stephanie Curtis; Gianni Angelini; Emmanuel Lansac; Serban Stoica

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population...

  7. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Association with Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Endovascular Era: Vigilance Remains Critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Bozeman

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  8. Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm From Late Type II Endoleak Treated by Transarterial Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunasekaran, Senthil; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Endoleak is the most common complication after endovascular aneurysm repair. The most common type of endoleak, a type II endoleak, typically follows a benign course and is only treated when associated with increasing aneurysm size. In this case report, we describe a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm due to a late, type II endoleak occurring 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair that was successfully treated by transarterial embolization.

  9. Three-year-old child with middle aortic syndrome treated by endovascular stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszura, Tomasz; Goreczny, Sebastian; Dryzek, Pawel; Niwald, Marek

    2013-04-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is an extremely rare anomaly and represents both a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, particularly in young children. A case of a 3.5 year-old child with MAS and arterial hypertension is reported, where owing to the patient's young age and the length of the hypoplastic aortic segment, surgical correction with end-to-end anastomosis was not feasible. Instead of palliative bypass grafting between the thoracic and abdominal aorta, successful percutaneous balloon angioplasty and stenting of the lesion was performed with the assistance of three-dimensional rotational angiography.

  10. One Year Outcomes of 101 BeGraft Stent Grafts used as Bridging Stents in Fenestrated Endovascular Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Rafaelle; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Hertault, Adrien; Delloye, Matthieu; Azzauiu, Richard; Fabre, Dominique; Haulon, Stéphan

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of the second generation BeGraft balloon expandable covered stent Graft System (Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany) implanted as bridging stent grafts during fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (FEVAR) of complex aneurysms. This was a single centre prospective study including all consecutive patients treated by FEVAR performed with second generation BeGraft stent grafts as bridging stents. Demographics of patients, diameter and length of the bridging stent grafts, technical success, re-interventions, occlusions, post-operative events, and imaging (Cone Beam CT and/or CT scan, and contrast enhanced ultrasound) were prospectively collected in an electronic database. Duplex ultrasound was performed before discharge and at 6 month follow-up. At 1 year, patients were evaluated clinically and by imaging (CT and ultrasound). Between November 2015 and September 2016, 39 consecutive patients (one woman) were treated with custom made fenestrated endografts (2-5 fenestrations) for complex aneurysms or type 1 endoleak after EVAR, using a variety of bridging stents including the BeGraft. All 101 BeGraft stent grafts were successfully delivered and deployed. There was no in hospital mortality. Early fenestration patency rate was 99% (96/97); the sole target vessel post-operative occlusion was secondary to a dissection of the renal artery distal to the stent. Complementary stenting was unsuccessful in recovering renal artery patency; bilateral renal stent occlusion was observed in the same patient on a CT scan performed 2 months after the procedure. He required post-operative dialysis. No additional renal impairment was observed. During follow-up (median 13 months [11-15]), all fenestrations stented with BeGraft stent grafts remained patent (95/97, 98%). One type 1b endoleak was detected and treated (2.6%). BeGraft stent grafts used as bridging stents during FEVAR are associated with favourable outcomes at 1 year follow-up. Long-term follow-up is

  11. Endovascular Treatment of Occlusive Lesions in the Aortic Bifurcation with Kissing Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimme, F.A.B.; Spithoven, J.H.; Zeebregts, C.J.A.; Scharn, D.M.; Reijnen, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the clinical outcomes of polytetrafluoroethylene covered balloon expandable stents (CBESs) in occlusive lesions of the aortic bifurcation in a kissing stent configuration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 69 consecutive patients (29 men, 40 women) who underwent kissing

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Occlusive Lesions in the Aortic Bifurcation with Kissing Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimme, Frederike A. B.; Spithoven, J. Hans; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Scharn, Dirk M.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes of polytetrafluoroethylene covered balloon expandable stents (CBESs) in occlusive lesions of the aortic bifurcation in a kissing stent configuration. Materials and Methods: The study included 69 consecutive patients (29 men, 40 women) who underwent kissing

  13. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Diniz Affonso da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods: From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results: Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95% at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97% and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97% at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions: Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results.

  14. Is Internal Iliac Artery Embolization Essential Prior to Endovascular Repair of Aortoiliac Aneurysms?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharwani, N.; Raja, J.; Choke, E.; Belli, A. M.; Thompson, M. M.; Morgan, R. A.; Munneke, G.

    2008-01-01

    Patients who undergo endovascular repair of aorto-iliac aneurysms (EVAR) require internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization (IIAE) to prevent type II endoleaks after extending the endografts into the external iliac artery. However, IIAE may not be possible in some patients due to technical factors or adverse anatomy. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively whether patients with aorto-iliac aneurysms who fail IIAE have an increase in type II endoleak after EVAR compared with similar patients who undergo successful embolization. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 148 patients who underwent EVAR from December 1997 to June 2005. Sixty-one patients had aorto-iliac aneurysms which required IIAE before EVAR. Fifty patients had successful IIAE and 11 patients had unsuccessful IIAE prior to EVAR. The clinical and imaging follow-up was reviewed before and after EVAR. The endoleak rate of the embolized group was compared with that of the group in whom embolization failed. After a mean follow-up of 19.7 months in the study group and 25 months in the control group, there were no statistically significant differences in outcome measures between the two groups. Specifically, there were no type II endoleaks related to the IIA in patients where IIAE had failed. We conclude that failure to embolize the IIA prior to EVAR should not necessarily preclude patients from treatment. In patients where there is difficulty in achieving coil embolization, it is recommended that EVAR should proceed, as clinical sequelae are unlikely

  15. Stepwise Total Aortic Repairs With Fenestrated Endografts in a Patient With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Kenichi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Honda, Masanori; Inoue, Shinya; Takaki, Hidenobu; Hayashi, Kanako; Kaneyama, Hiroaki

    2017-07-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare connective tissue disorder (CTD) caused by mutations in the gene encoding transforming growth factor-β receptors Ⅰ and Ⅱ. Patients with LDS manifest spontaneous aneurysms and dissections of the aorta and peripheral artery. We report a successful treatment with a hybrid endovascular repair for a rapidly expanding thoracoabdominal aneurysm in a 41-year-old woman affected by LDS. To overcome the difficulties of anatomical and surgical repair, we applied an original strategy using surgeon-modified fenestrated endografts. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Durability of Aortic Valve Cusp Repair With and Without Annular Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Ahmad; Idrees, Jay J; Johnston, Douglas R; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Roselli, Eric E; Soltesz, Edward G; Gillinov, A Marc; Griffin, Brian; Grimm, Richard; Hammer, Donald F; Pettersson, Gösta B; Blackstone, Eugene H; Sabik, Joseph F; Svensson, Lars G

    2018-03-01

    To determine the value of aortic valve repair rather than replacement for valve dysfunction, we assessed late outcomes of various repair techniques in the contemporary era. From January 2001 to January 2011, aortic valve repair was planned in 1,124 patients. Techniques involved commissural figure-of-8 suspension sutures (n = 63 [6.2%]), cusp repair with commissuroplasty (n = 481 [48%]), debridement (n = 174 [17%]), free-margin plication (n = 271 [27%]) or resection (n = 75) or both, or annulus repair with resuspension (n = 230 [23%]), root reimplantation (n = 252 [25%]), or remodeling (n = 35 [3.5%]). Planned repair was aborted for replacement in 115 patients (10%); risk factors included greater severity of aortic regurgitation (AR; p = 0.0002) and valve calcification (p < 0.0001). In-hospital outcomes for the remaining 1,009 patients included death (12 [1.2%]), stroke (13 [1.3%]), and reoperation for valve dysfunction (14 [1.4%]). Freedom from aortic valve reoperation at 1, 5, and 10 years was 97%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. Figure-of-8 suspension sutures, valve resuspension, and root repair and replacement were least likely to require reoperation; cusp repair with commissural sutures, plication, and commissuroplasty was most likely (p < 0.05). Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 96%, 92%, and 83%. Immediate postoperative AR grade was none-mild (94%), moderate (5%), and severe (1%). At 10 years after repair, AR grade was none (20%), mild (33%), moderate (26%), and severe (21%). Patients undergoing root procedures were less likely to have higher-grade postoperative AR (p < 0.0001). Valve repair is effective and durable for treating aortic valve dysfunction. Greater severity of AR preoperatively is associated with higher likelihood of repair failure. Commissural figure-of-8 suspension sutures and repair with annular support have the best long-term durability. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen; Yu, Dong; Jie, Bing

    2014-01-01

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA

  18. Dutch experience with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft for short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Martijn L; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Pierie, Maurice; van Brussel, Jerome; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Lardenoye, Jan-Willem; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2014-08-01

    In the past decennium, the management of short-neck infrarenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair (FEVAR) has been shown to be successful, with good early and midterm results. Recently, a new fenestrated device, the fenestrated Anaconda (Vascutek, Renfrewshire, Scotland), was introduced. The aim of this study was to present the current Dutch experience with this device. A prospectively held database of patients treated with the fenestrated Anaconda endograft was analyzed. Decision to treat was based on current international guidelines. Indications for FEVAR included an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with unsuitable neck anatomy for EVAR. Planning was performed on computed tomography angiography images using a three-dimensional workstation. Between May 2011 and September 2013, 25 patients were treated in eight institutions for juxtarenal (n = 23) and short-neck AAA (n = 2). Median AAA size was 61 mm (59-68.5 mm). All procedures except one were performed with bifurcated devices. A total of 56 fenestrations were incorporated, and 53 (94.6%) were successfully cannulated and stented. One patient died of bowel ischemia caused by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. On completion angiography, three type I endoleaks and seven type II endoleaks were observed. At 1 month of follow-up, all endoleaks had spontaneously resolved. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-29 months). There were no aneurysm ruptures or aneurysm-related deaths and no reinterventions to date. Primary patency at 1 month of cannulated and stented target vessels was 96%. Initial and short-term results of FEVAR using the fenestrated Anaconda endograft are promising, with acceptable technical success and short-term complication rates. Growing experience and long-term results are needed to support these findings. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

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    Shin, Ji Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C. [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States); Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Surgery (United States); Matsumoto, Alan H., E-mail: ahm4d@virginia.edu [University of Virginia Health System, Division of Angiography, Interventional Radiology and Special Procedures, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  20. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C.; Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 ± 5.6 mm; range 1.5–25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 ± 9.7 mm; range 2.2–41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  1. Late complications in patients after repair of aortic coarctation: implications for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Joris W. J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Survival of patients with aortic coarctation has dramatically improved after surgical repair became available and the number of patients who were operated and reach adulthood is steadily increasing. However, life expectancy is still not as normal as in unaffected peers. Cardiovascular complications

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Nielsen, Henning Morris Bay; Secher, N H

    2016-01-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We i...

  3. International trends in patient selection for elective endovascular aneurysm repair: sicker patients with safer anatomy leading to improved 1-year survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitridge, Robert A; Boult, Margaret; Mackillop, Clare; De Loryn, Tania; Barnes, Mary; Cowled, Prue; Thompson, Matthew M; Holt, Peter J; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Sayers, Robert D; Choke, Edward; Boyle, Jonathan R; Forbes, Thomas L; Novick, Teresa V

    2015-02-01

    To review the trends in patient selection and early death rate for patients undergoing elective endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) in 3 countries. For this study, audit data from 4,163 patients who had undergone elective infrarenal EVAR were amalgamated. The data originated from Australia, Canada (Ontario), and England (London, Cambridge, and Leicester). Statistical analyses were undertaken to determine whether patient characteristics and early death rate varied between and within study groups and over time. The study design was retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively between 1999 and 2012. One-year survival improved over time (P = 0.0013). Canadian patients were sicker than those in Australia or England (P international comparison, several trends were noted including improved 1-year survival despite declining patient health (as measured by increasing ASA status). This may reflect greater knowledge regarding EVAR that centers from different countries have gained over the last decade and improved medical management of patients with aneurysmal disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  5. Extended aortic repair using frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Naomichi; Katayama, Akira; Kuraoka, Masatsugu; Katayama, Keijiro; Takahashi, Shinya; Takasaki, Taiichi; Sueda, Taijiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze midterm results of frozen elephant trunk technique for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection. Between February 1999 and August 2011 we performed arch replacement uisng frozen elephant trunk technique for acute aortic dissection in 8 patients with Marfan syndrome containing two complicated type B dissections and six type A dissections.Five patients compromised annulo-aortic ectasia who performed Bentall operation. No patients died in the initial operation. Fate of false lumen on the stent graft border was expressed by CT scan follow-up that were patent in 0, thrombosis in 5 and absorption in 3 patients. One patient who had new aortic dissection 8 years after initial surgery required the Crawford V operation. Ten-years-survival rate was 100% and ten years-event free rate was 67%. Frozen elephant trunk technique was feasible for Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection and might become alternative prophylactic treatment to the downstream aorta for acute aortic dissection.

  6. Long-term outcomes after immediate aortic repair for acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukube, Takuro; Haraguchi, Tomonori; Okada, Yasushi; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Kozawa, Shuichi; Ogawa, Kyoichi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The management of acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma remains controversial. We previously reported an excellent rate of recovery of consciousness provided aortic repair was performed within 5 hours of the onset of symptoms. This study evaluates the early and long-term outcomes using this approach. Between August 2003 and July 2013, of the 241 patients with acute type A aortic dissection brought to the Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital and Hyogo Emergency Medical Center, 30 (12.4%) presented with coma; Glasgow Coma Scale was less than 11 on arrival. Surgery was performed in 186 patients, including 27 (14.5%) who were comatose. Twenty-four comatose patients underwent successful aortic repair immediately (immediate group). Their mean age was 71.0 ± 11.1 years, Glasgow Coma Scale was 6.5 ± 2.4, and prevalence of carotid dissection was 79%. For brain protection, deep hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion was used, and postoperative induced hypothermia was performed. Neurologic evaluations were performed using the Glasgow Coma Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and modified Rankin Scale. In the immediate group, the time from the onset of symptoms to arrival in the operating theater was 222 ± 86 minutes. Hospital mortality was 12.5%. Full recovery of consciousness was achieved in 79% of patients in up to 30 days. Postoperative Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improved significantly when compared with the preoperative score (P coma were satisfactory. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Discrepancies in abdominal aortic aneurysm expressions and repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurks, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) disease is a growing healthcare burden. Besides theassociated cardiovascular comorbidities, the AAA itself poses a risk for the patient in two fashions. First, it could rupture, which is associated with high mortality and morbidity. This thesis focused on the second,

  8. Emergency endovascular management of peripheral artery aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillard Jonathan H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endovascular stenting has been successfully employed in the management of aortic aneurysms; however, its use in managing peripheral arterial conditions remains questionable. We review the utility of endovascular technique in the management of peripheral arterial conditions like aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms and arterio-venous fistulas in the emergency setting. Though long term data about graft patency rates is not yet available, the endovascular approach appears to be a useful minimally invasive technique in situations where open repair is either difficult or not feasible.

  9. Treatment strategy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, L

    2014-07-01

    Rupture is the most serious and lethal complication of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Despite all improvements during the past 50 years, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are still associated with very high mortality. Namely, including patients who die before reaching the hospital, the mortality rate due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is 90%. On the other hand, during the last twenty years, the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms significantly increased. One of the reasons is the fact that in majority of countries the general population is older nowadays. Due to this, the number of degenerative AAA is increasing. This is also the case for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Age must not be the reason of a treatment refusal. Optimal therapeutic option ought to be found. The following article is based on literature analysis including current guidelines but also on my Clinics significant experience. Furthermore, this article show cases options for vascular medicine in undeveloped countries that can not apply endovascular procedures at a sufficient level and to a sufficient extent. At this moment the following is evident. Thirty-day-mortality after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is significantly lower in high-volume hospitals. Due to different reasons all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are not suitable for EVAR. Open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm should be performed by experienced open vascular surgeons. This could also be said for the treatment of endovascular complications that require open surgical conversion. There is no ideal procedure for the treatment of AAA. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, its own limits and complications, as well as indications and contraindications. Future reductions in mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms will depend on implementation of population-based screening; on strategies to prevent postoperative organ injury and also on new medical technology

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Guo

    Full Text Available This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to determine the current evidence on risk factors for type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR.A systematic literature search was carried out for studies that evaluated the association of demographic, co-morbidity, and other patient-determined factors with the onset of type II endoleaks. Pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was updated.Among the 504 studies screened, 45 studies with a total of 36,588 participants were included in this review. The pooled prevalence of type II endoleaks after EVAR was 22% [95% confidence interval (CI, 19%-25%]. The main factors consistently associated with type II endoleaks included age [pooled odds ratio (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.31-0.43; P<0.001], smoking (pooled OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92; P<0.001, patent inferior mesenteric artery (pooled OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.06-3.71; P = 0.012, maximum aneurysm diameter (pooled OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.17-0.30; P<0.001, and number of patent lumbar arteries (pooled OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 2.81-3.33; P<0.001. Sex, diabetes, hypertension, anticoagulants, antiplatelet, hyperlipidemia, chronic renal insufficiency, types of graft material, and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD did not show any association with the onset of type II endoleaks.Clinicians can use the identified risk factors to detect and manage patients at risk of developing type II endoleaks after EVAR. However, further studies are needed to analyze a number of potential risk factors.

  11. The financial implications of endovascular aneurysm repair in the cost containment era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Horvath, Alexander J; Goodney, Philip P; Rzucidlo, Eva M; Nolan, Brian W; Walsh, Daniel B; Zwolak, Robert M; Powell, Richard J

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is associated with significant direct device costs. Such costs place EVAR at odds with efforts to constrain healthcare expenditures. This study examines the procedure-associated costs and operating margins associated with EVAR at a tertiary care academic medical center. All infrarenal EVARs performed from April 2011 to March 2012 were identified (n = 127). Among this cohort, 49 patients met standard commercial instruction for use guidelines, were treated using a single manufacturer device, and billed to Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) 238. Of these 49 patients, net technical operating margins (technical revenue minus technical cost) were calculated in conjunction with the hospital finance department. EVAR implant costs were determined for each procedure. DRG 238-associated costs and length of stay were benchmarked against other academic medical centers using University Health System Consortium 2012 data. Among the studied EVAR cohort (age 75, 82% male, mean length of stay, 1.7 days), mean technical costs totaled $31,672. Graft implants accounted for 52% of the allocated technical costs. Institutional overhead was 17% ($5495) of total technical costs. Net mean total technical EVAR-associated operating margins were -$4015 per procedure. Our institutional costs and length of stay, when benchmarked against comparable centers, remained in the lowest quartile nationally using University Health System Consortium costs for DRG 238. Stent graft price did not correlate with total EVAR market share. EVAR is currently associated with significant negative operating margins among Medicare beneficiaries. Currently, device costs account for over 50% of EVAR-associated technical costs and did not impact EVAR market share, reflecting an unawareness of cost differential among surgeons. These data indicate that EVAR must undergo dramatic care delivery redesign for this practice to remain sustainable. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular

  12. Endoscopic repair of an injured internal carotid artery utilizing femoral endovascular closure devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompaey, Jason; Bowers, Greg; Radhakrishnan, Jay; Panizza, Benedict; Solares, C Arturo

    2014-06-01

    Injury to the internal carotid artery is a feared complication of endoscopic endonasal surgery of the skull base. Such an event, although rare, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Even if bleeding is controlled, permanent neurological defects frequently persist. Many techniques have been developed to manage internal carotid artery rupture with varying degrees of success. The purpose of this study was to explore endoscopic management of arterial damage with endovascular closure devices used for a femoral arteriotomy. The ability to remotely suture a damaged artery permits the possible adaptation of this technology in managing endoscopic arterial complications. Technical note. After the creation of an endoscopic endonasal corridor in a cadaveric specimen, an arteriotomy was created at the cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery. The Angio-Seal, StarClose, and MynxGrip vascular closure devices were utilized under endoscopic guidance to repair the arteriotomy. Angiography was then done on a cadaver sutured with the StarClose. Both the Angio-Seal and StarClose were deployed quickly and appeared to provide sufficient closure of the arteriotomy. The Angio-Seal required the use of a guidewire and was longer to deploy when compared with the StarClose. The StarClose deployment was quick and facile. The MynxGrip also deployed without difficulty. The Angio-Seal and StarClose systems were both successfully deployed utilizing an endoscopic endonasal approach. The MynxGrip was the easiest to deploy and has the greatest potential to be of benefit in this application. Further studies with hemodynamic models are required to properly assess the appropriateness in this setting. NA. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. A simulator for training in endovascular aneurysm repair: The use of three dimensional printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, I O; De Luccia, N

    2017-08-01

    To develop an endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) simulation system using three dimensional (3D) printed aneurysms, and to evaluate the impact of patient specific training prior to EVAR on the surgical performance of vascular surgery residents in a university hospital in Brazil. This was a prospective, controlled, single centre study. During 2015, the aneurysms of patients undergoing elective EVAR at São Paulo University Medical School were 3D printed and used in training sessions with vascular surgery residents. The 3D printers Stratasys-Connex 350, Formlabs-Form1+, and Makerbot were tested. Ten residents were enrolled in the control group (five residents and 30 patients in 2014) or the training group (five residents and 25 patients in 2015). The control group performed the surgery under the supervision of a senior vascular surgeon (routine procedure, without simulator training). The training group practised the surgery in a patient specific simulator prior to the routine procedure. Objective parameters were analysed, and a subjective questionnaire addressing training utility and realism was answered. Patient specific training reduced fluoroscopy time by 30% (mean 48 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] 40-58 vs. 33 min, 95% CI 26-42 [p training useful and realistic, and reported that it increased their self confidence. The 3D printers Form1+ (using flexible resin) and Makerbot (using silicone) provided the best performance based on simulator quality and cost. An EVAR simulation system using 3D printed aneurysms was feasible. The best results were obtained with the 3D printers Form1+ (using flexible resin) and Makerbot (using silicone). Patient specific training prior to EVAR at a university hospital in Brazil improved residents' surgical performance (based on fluoroscopy time, surgery time, and volume of contrast used) and increased their self confidence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid Two-stage Versus One-stage Surgical Repair of Interrupted Aortic Arch with Ventricular Septal Defect in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Lin Lee

    2008-11-01

    Conclusion: The outcome of rapid two-stage repair is comparable to that of one-stage repair. Rapid two-stage repair has the advantages of significantly shorter cardiopulmonary bypass duration and AXC time, and avoids deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. LVOTO remains an unresolved issue, and postoperative aortic arch restenosis can be dilated effectively by percutaneous balloon angioplasty.

  15. Endovascular repair of arterial iliac vessel wall lesions with a self-expandable nitinol stent graft system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Mensel

    Full Text Available To assess the therapeutic outcome after endovascular repair of iliac arterial lesions (IALs using a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft system.Between July 2006 and March 2013, 16 patients (13 males, mean age: 68 years with a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft. A total of 19 lesions were treated: nine true aneurysms, two anastomotic aneurysms, two dissections, one arteriovenous fistula, two type 1B endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair, one pseudoaneurysm, and two perforations after angioplasty. Pre-, intra-, and postinterventional imaging studies and the medical records were analyzed for technical and clinical success and postinterventional complications.The primary technical and clinical success rate was 81.3% (13/16 patients and 75.0% (12/16, respectively. Two patients had technical failure due to persistent type 1A endoleak and another patient due to acute stent graft thrombosis. One patient showed severe stent graft kinking on the first postinterventional day. In two patients, a second intervention was performed. The secondary technical and clinical success rate was 87.5% (14/16 and 93.8% (15/16. The minor complication rate was 6.3% (patient with painful hematoma at the access site. The major complication rate was 6.3% (patient with ipsilateral deep vein thrombosis. During median follow-up of 22.4 months, an infection of the aneurysm sac in one patient and a stent graft thrombosis in another patient were observed.Endovascular repair of various IALs with a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft is safe and effective.

  16. Chronic Contained Rupture of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: From Diagnosis to Endovascular Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandini, Roberto; Chiocchi, Marcello; Maresca, Luciano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Messina, Massimo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    A male patient, 69 years old, presented with fever, leucocytosis, and persistent low back pain; he also had an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), as previously diagnosed by Doppler UltraSound (US), and was admitted to our hospital. On multislice computed tomography (msCT), a large abdominal mass having no definite border and involving the aorta and both of the psoas muscles was seen. This mass involved the forth-lumbar vertebra with lysis, thus simulating AAA rupture into a paraspinal collection; it was initially considered a paraspinal abscess. After magnetic resonance imaging examination and culture of the fluid aspirated from the mass, no infective organisms were found; therefore, a diagnosisof chronically contained AAA rupture was made, and an aortic endoprosthesis was subsequently implanted. The patient was discharged with decreased lumbar pain. At 12-month follow-up, no evidence of leakage was observed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of endoprosthesis implantation in a patient, who was a poor candidate for surgical intervention due to renal failure, leucocytosis and high fever, having a chronically contained AAA ruptured simulatingspodilodiscitis abscess. Appropriate diagnosis and therapy resolved potentially crippling pathology and avoided surgical graft-related complications.

  17. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  18. Radial force measurement of endovascular stents: Influence of stent design and diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsubara, Yutaka; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsuda, Daisuke; Okadome, Jun; Morisaki, Koichi; Inoue, Kentarou; Tanaka, Shinichi; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Angioplasty and endovascular stent placement is used in case to rescue the coverage of main branches to supply blood to brain from aortic arch in thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This study assessed mechanical properties, especially differences in radial force, of different endovascular and thoracic stents. We analyzed the radial force of three stent models (Epic, E-Luminexx and SMART) stents using radial force-tester method in single or overlapping conditions. We also analyzed radial force in three thoracic stents using Mylar film testing method: conformable Gore-TAG, Relay, and Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft. Overlapping SMART stents had greater radial force than overlapping Epic or Luminexx stents (P stents was greater than that of all three endovascular stents (P stents, site of deployment, and layer characteristics. In clinical settings, an understanding of the mechanical characteristics, including radial force, is important in choosing a stent for each patient. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Open Repair of Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms With Biological Grafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinola, Ivika; Sörelius, Karl; Wyss, Thomas R

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm requires surgery and antimicrobial therapy. Since prosthetic reconstructions carry a considerable risk of reinfection, biological grafts are noteworthy alternatives. The current study evaluated the durability, infection resistance......, and midterm outcome of biological grafts in treatment of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients treated with biological graft in 6 countries between 2006 and 2016 were included. Primary outcome measures were 30- and 90-day survival, treatment-related mortality, and reinfection...... rate. Secondary outcome measures were overall mortality and graft patency. Fifty-six patients (46 males) with median age of 69 years (range 35-85) were included. Sixteen patients were immunocompromised (29%), 24 (43%) had concomitant infection, and 12 (21%) presented with rupture. Bacterial culture...

  20. Chimney-Graft as a Bail-Out Procedure for Endovascular Treatment of an Inflammatory Juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fratesi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory and juxtarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (j-iAAA represents a technical challenge for open repair (OR due to the peculiar anatomy, extensive perianeurysmal fibrosis, and dense adhesion to the surrounding tissues. A 68-year-old man with an 11 cm asymptomatic j-iAAA was successfully treated with elective EVAR and chimney-graft (ch-EVAR without postprocedural complications. Target vessel patency and normal renal function are present at 24-month follow-up. The treatment of j-iAAA can be technically challenging. ch-EVAR is a feasible and safe bail-out method for elective j-iAAA with challenging anatomy.

  1. Endovascular repair as a sole treatment in multiple aneurysms in patient with SLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineva, S.; Al-Amin, M.; Demetriou, S.; Tsetis, D.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Most aneurysms are local manifestations of systemic disease. For patients over 65 years the incidence of aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (AAA) is approximately 5-6% in men and 1-2 % for women. The presence of both the AAA and aneurysms in other location is even rarer, and this percentage is likely increase further in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). What you will learn: We present a rare clinical case of endovascular treatment of multifocal aneurysm including post catheterization pseudoaneurysm. The patient is a 73 years old woman with a history of SLE and age-related comorbidity. Originally an endovascular treatment of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta and right common iliac artery was used. Two years later a successfully endovascular treatment of aneurysm of the right renal artery was conducted, which however is complicated by the formation of a pseudoaneurysm in access through the left femoral artery. The late one is again treated endovascular by placement of a covered stent after failure of percutaneous injection of 1000 UI thrombin. Discussion: Adult patients with a long history of SLE are unsuitable candidates for surgical treatment of aneurysmal disease, especially in its multifocal form. In our case we have taken multistep successful endovascular procedures, including technically hard placing of the stent at the site of the right renal aneurysms, and post catheterization pseudoaneurysm. Conclusion: Multifocal aneurysmal vascular changes due to macroangiopathia in SLE can be treated alone by endovascular means in multi-stages procedures

  2. The Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Statistically Corrected Operative Risk Evaluation (AAA SCORE) for predicting mortality after open and endovascular interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Graeme K; Gohel, Manjit S; Mitchell, David C; Loftus, Ian M; Boyle, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Accurate adjustment of surgical outcome data for risk is vital in an era of surgeon-level reporting. Current risk prediction models for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair are suboptimal. We aimed to develop a reliable risk model for in-hospital mortality after intervention for AAA, using rigorous contemporary statistical techniques to handle missing data. Using data collected during a 15-month period in the United Kingdom National Vascular Database, we applied multiple imputation methodology together with stepwise model selection to generate preoperative and perioperative models of in-hospital mortality after AAA repair, using two thirds of the available data. Model performance was then assessed on the remaining third of the data by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and compared with existing risk prediction models. Model calibration was assessed by Hosmer-Lemeshow analysis. A total of 8088 AAA repair operations were recorded in the National Vascular Database during the study period, of which 5870 (72.6%) were elective procedures. Both preoperative and perioperative models showed excellent discrimination, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of .89 and .92, respectively. This was significantly better than any of the existing models (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for best comparator model, .84 and .88; P AAA repair. These models were carefully developed with rigorous statistical methodology and significantly outperform existing methods for both elective cases and overall AAA mortality. These models will be invaluable for both preoperative patient counseling and accurate risk adjustment of published outcome data. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aneurysm pulsatility after endovascular exclusion: an experimental study using human aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Amin Orra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure the pulsatility of human aneurysms before and after complete exclusion with an endograft. METHOD: Five aortic aneurysms obtained during necropsy were submitted to pulsatile perfusion before and after implantation of a bifurcated endograft. The specimens were contained in a closed chamber filled with saline solution. A vertical tube attached to the chamber was used to measure volume dislocation in each systole. Mural thrombus was kept intact, and the space around the device was filled with human blood. After each experiment, the aneurysm was opened to check for the correct positioning and attachment of the device. RESULTS: The level of the saline column oscillated during pulsation in each case, with respective amplitudes of 17, 16, 13, 7, and 25 cm before the endograft insertion. After the insertion, the amplitudes dropped to 13, 12, 9, 3.5, and 23 cm, respectively. The differences were not significant. During the post-experimental examination, all devices were found to be in position and well attached to the neck and iliacs. No endoleak was detected during perfusion or by visual inspection. CONCLUSION: Pulsation of an endograft is transmitted to the aneurysm wall even in the absence of endoleak, and should not be interpreted as procedural failure.

  4. Duplex ultrasound in aneurysm surveillance following endovascular aneurysm repair: a comparison with computed tomography aortography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, Brian J

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cumulative radiation dose, cost, and increased demand for computed tomography aortography (CTA) suggest that duplex ultrasonography (DU) may be an alternative to CTA-based surveillance. We compared CTA with DU during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up. METHODS: Patients undergoing EVAR had clinical and radiological follow-up data entered in a prospectively maintained database. For the purpose of this study, the gold standard test for endoleak detection was CTA, and an endoleak detected on DU alone was assumed to be a false positive result. DU interpretation was performed independently of CTA and vice versa. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-two patients underwent EVAR, of whom 117 attended for follow-up ranging from six months to nine years (mean, 32 months). Adequate aneurysm sac visualisation on DU was not possible in 1.7% of patients, predominantly due to obesity. Twenty-eight endoleaks were detected in 28 patients during follow-up. Of these, 24 were initially identified on DU (four false negative DU examinations), and eight had at least one negative CTA with a positive DU prior to diagnosis. Twenty-three endoleaks were type II in nature and three of these patients had increased sac size. There was one type I and four type III endoleaks. Two of these (both type III) had an increased sac size. Of 12 patients with increased aneurysm size of 5 mm or more at follow-up, five had an endoleak visible on DU, yet negative CTA and a further five had endoleak visualisation on both DU and CTA. Of six endoleaks which underwent re-intervention, all were initially picked up on DU. One of these endoleaks was never demonstrated on CTA and a further two had at least one negative CTA prior to endoleak confirmation. Positive predictive value for DU was 45% and negative predictive value 94%. Specificity of DU for endoleak detection was 67% when compared with CTA, because of the large number of false positive DU results. Sensitivity for DU was 86%, with all

  5. Angular (Gothic) aortic arch leads to enhanced systolic wave reflection, central aortic stiffness, and increased left ventricular mass late after aortic coarctation repair: evaluation with magnetic resonance flow mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Phalla; Celermajer, David S; Raisky, Olivier; Jolivet, Odile; Buyens, Fanny; Herment, Alain; Sidi, Daniel; Bonnet, Damien; Mousseaux, Elie

    2008-01-01

    We sought to investigate the mechanism whereby a particular deformity of the aortic arch, an angulated Gothic shape, might lead to hypertension late after anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-five normotensive patients with anatomically successful repair of aortic coarctation and either a Gothic (angulated) or a Romanesque (smooth and rounded) arch were studied with magnetic resonance angiography and flow mapping in both the ascending and descending aortas. Systolic waveforms, central aortic stiffness, and pulse velocity were measured. We hypothesized that arch angulation would result in enhanced systolic wave reflection with loss of energy across the aortic arch, as well as increased central aortic stiffness. Twenty patients were found to have a Gothic, and 35 a Romanesque, arch. Patients with a Gothic arch showed markedly augmented systolic wave reflection (12 +/- 6 vs 5 +/- 0.3 mL, P Gothic arch (5.6 +/- 1.1 vs 4.1 +/- 1 m/s, P Gothic aortic arch is associated with increased systolic wave reflection, as well as increased central aortic stiffness and left ventricular mass index. These findings explain (at least in part) the association between this pattern of arch geometry and late hypertension at rest and on exercise in subjects after coarctation repair.

  6. Outcomes of Endovascular Aneurysm Repair using the Ovation Stent Graft System in Adverse Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Nicholas S; Moore, Aiden; Seriki, Dare; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2018-04-01

    The aim was the evaluation of mid-term efficacy and safety outcome measures for the Ovation (Endologix, Santa Rosa, CA, USA) stent graft system in the management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (iAAA) with adverse anatomy. A retrospective observational study of all patients undergoing elective iAAA repair was carried out from 2012 to 2017 using Ovation Prime or iX stent grafts with a minimum of 3 months follow-up at a single UK vascular centre. Post-operative surveillance involved computed tomography scans at 3 months and 1 year, with duplex ultrasound yearly thereafter. Outcome measures were established with retrospective analysis of pre- and post-operative imaging, and included peri-operative mortality, major adverse events, limb complications, aneurysm diameter change, and endoleak rates. All patients were within Ovation instructions for use (IFU), and assessment was made to determine whether aneurysms had anatomical features considered adverse for other commonly used stent graft platforms. Ovation stent grafts were implanted in 52 patients (79% male, mean age 75.7 years) with a mean aneurysm diameter of 62.5 mm (range 55-107 mm). There was 100% technical deployment success. The 30 day mortality was 0% and there was no aneurysm related mortality during follow-up (median 24 months, range 3-48 months). There were no type I or III endoleaks, but 19% developed type II endoleaks with one patient requiring re-intervention. No iliac limb occlusions were identified but one case required relining for limb kinking. All 52 cases were within the IFU for Ovation but only 12% met the IFU criteria for the Cook and Medtronic devices. The mid-term experience with Ovation demonstrates safe, durable treatment of iAAAs, including those with unfavourable anatomy, frequently off IFU for other commonly used devices. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation by MRA of aortic dilation late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, W Aaron; Cook, Stephen C; Daniels, Curt J

    2013-09-10

    This study evaluated predictors for aortic dilation (AD) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). AD is common in patients with rTOF and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. There are no guidelines for evaluation of AD for rTOF patients. All adults with rTOF who previously underwent MRA had retrospective aortic measurements at the sinuses of Valsalva (SoV) and ascending aorta (AsAo). Rate of change in diameter was determined in patients with multiple MRAs. Chart review identified risk factors for AD. Univariate and multivariate analyses tested predictors of AD. Of the 87 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 12 (14%) had AD. At baseline, mean diameter was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm and 3.1 ± 0.6 cm at the SoV and AsAo, respectively. The AsAo was larger than the SoV in 17%. Predictors of AD included male gender, age, right aortic arch, pregnancy, older age at complete repair, smoking, and systemic hypertension. Serial studies were available in 55 patients; the rate of growth was slow: 0.4 ± 0.9 mm/year (SoV) and 0.1 ± 0.8mm/year (AsAo). AD is common in rTOF at the SoV and AsAo. Transthoracic echocardiography, which does not always image the AsAo as well as MRA, may not image AD in rTOF in cases in which the AsAo is dilated. Although several risk factors correlate with AD in rTOF, the rate of aortic growth is slow, suggesting that rTOF patients may not require frequent aortic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aortic root replacement in 372 Marfan patients: evolution of operative repair over 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duke E; Alejo, Diane E; Patel, Nishant D; Nwakanma, Lois U; Weiss, Eric S; Vricella, Luca A; Dietz, Harry C; Spevak, Philip J; Williams, Jason A; Bethea, Brian T; Fitton, Torin P; Gott, Vincent L

    2009-05-01

    We reviewed the evolution of practice and late results of aortic root replacement (ARR) in Marfan syndrome patients at our institution. A retrospective clinical review of Marfan patients undergoing ARR at our institution was performed. Follow-up data were obtained from hospital and office records and from telephone contact with patients or their physicians. Between September 1976 and September 2006, 372 Marfan syndrome patients underwent ARR: 269 had a Bentall composite graft, 85 had valve-sparing ARR, 16 had ARR with homografts, and 2 had ARR with porcine xenografts. In the first 24 years of the study, 85% received a Bentall graft; during the last 8 years, 61% had a valve-sparing procedure. There was no operative or hospital mortality among the 327 patients who underwent elective repair; there were 2 deaths among the 45 patients (4.4%) who underwent emergent or urgent operative repair. There were 74 late deaths (70 Bentalls, 2 homograft, and 2 valve-sparing ARRs). The most frequent causes of late death were dissection or rupture of the residual aorta (10 of 74) and arrhythmia (9 of 74). Of the 85 patients who had a valve-sparing procedure, 40 had a David II remodeling operation; there was 1 late death in this group, and 5 patients required late aortic valve replacement for aortic insufficiency. A David I reimplantation procedure using the De Paulis Valsalva graft has been used exclusively since May 2002. All 44 patients in this last group have 0 to 1+ aortic insufficiency. Prophylactic surgical replacement of the ascending aorta in patients with Marfan syndrome has low operative risk and can prevent aortic catastrophe in most patients. Valve-sparing procedures, particularly using the reimplantation technique with the Valsalva graft, show promise but have not yet proven as durable as the Bentall.

  9. Contemporary results of aortic valve repair for congenital disease: lessons for management and staged strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnat, Mathieu; Asfour, Boulos; Arenz, Claudia; Suchowerskyj, Philipp; Bierbach, Benjamin; Schindler, Ehrenfried; Schneider, Martin; Hraska, Victor

    2017-09-01

    Any aortic valve (AoV) operation in children (repair, Ross or mechanical replacement) is a palliation and reinterventions are frequent. AoV repair is a temporary solution primarily aimed at allowing the patient to grow to an age when more definitive solutions are available. We retrospectively analysed AoV repair effectiveness across the whole age spectrum of children, excluding neonates and AoV disease secondary to congenital heart disease. From 2003 to 2015, 193 consecutive patients were included. The mean age was 9.2 ± 6.9 years (22% disease. The procedures performed were commissurotomy shaving (n = 74; 38%), leaflet replacement (n = 78; 40%), leaflet extension (n = 21; 11%) and neocommissure creation (n = 21; 11%). Post-repair geometry was tricuspid in 137 (71%) patients. The 10-year survival rate was 97.1%. Freedom from reoperation and replacement at 7 years was, respectively, 57% (95% confidence interval, 47-66) and 68% (95% confidence interval, 59-76). In multivariate analysis, balloon dilatation before 6 months, the absence of a developed commissure, a non-tricuspid post-repair geometry and cross-clamp duration were predictors for reoperation and replacement. After a mean follow-up period of 5.1 ± 3.0 years, 145 (75%) patients had a preserved native valve, with undisturbed valve function (peak gradient <40 mmHg, regurgitation ≤mild) in 113 (58%). Aortic valve repair in children is safe and effective in delaying the timing for more definitive solution. Surgical strategy should be individualized according to the age of the patient. Avoidance of early balloon dilatation and aiming for a tricuspid post-repair arrangement may improve outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Endovascular repair of multiple infrageniculate aneurysms in a patient with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenick, Natalie; Cho, Jae S; Abu Hamad, Ghassan; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2011-09-01

    Patients with vascular type Ehler-Danlos syndrome can develop aneurysms in unusual locations. We describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who developed metachronous tibial artery aneurysms that were sequentially treated with endovascular means. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparison of Percutaneous femoral access in Endovascular Repair versus Open femoral access (PiERO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P; Saleem, Ben R; Ott, Alewijn; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; de Kempenaer, Ties D van Andringa; Pierie, Maurice E N; Bottema, Jan T; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2015-09-14

    Access for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) is obtained through surgical cutdown or percutaneously. The only devices suitable for percutaneous closure of the 20 French arteriotomies of the common femoral artery (CFA) are the Prostar(™) and Proglide(™) devices (Abbott Vascular). Positive effects of these devices seem to consist of a lower infection rate, and shorter operation time and hospital stay. This conclusion was published in previous reports comparing techniques in patients in two different groups (cohort or randomized). Access techniques were never compared in one and the same patient; this research simplifies comparison because patient characteristics will be similar in both groups. Percutaneous access of the CFA is compared to surgical cutdown in a single patient; in EVAR surgery, access is necessary in both groins in each patient. Randomization is performed on the introduction site of the larger main device of the endoprosthesis. The contralateral device of the endoprosthesis is smaller. When we use this type of randomization, both groups will contain a similar number of main and contralateral devices. Preoperative nose cultures and perineal cultures are obtained, to compare colonization with postoperative wound cultures (in case of a surgical site infection). Furthermore, patient comfort will be considered, using VAS-scores (Visual analog scale). Punch biopsies of the groin will be harvested to retrospectively compare skin of patients who suffered a surgical site infection (SSI) to patients who did not have an SSI. The PiERO trial is a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial designed to show the consequences of using percutaneous access in EVAR surgery and focuses on the occurrence of surgical site infections. NTR4257 10 November 2013, NL44578.042.13.

  12. Initial clinical experience with a sac-anchoring endoprosthesis for aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donayre, Carlos E; Zarins, Christopher K; Krievins, Dainis K; Holden, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Calderas, Carlos; Velez, Jaime; White, Rodney A

    2011-03-01

    All current aortic endografts depend on proximal and distal fixation to prevent migration. However, migration and rupture can occur, particularly in patients with aortic necks that are short or angulated, or both. We present our initial clinical experience with a new sac-anchoring endoprosthesis designed to anchor and seal the device within the aneurysm sac. The initial worldwide experience using a new endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic aneurysms (Nellix Endovascular, Palo Alto, Calif) was reviewed. The endoprosthesis consists of dual balloon-expandable endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags designed to obliterate the aneurysm sac and maintain endograft position. Clinical results and follow-up contrast computed tomography (CT) scans at 30 days and 6 and 12 months were reviewed. The endograft was successfully deployed in 21 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms measuring 5.7 ± 0.7 cm (range, 4.3-7.4 cm). Two patients with common iliac aneurysms were treated with sac-anchoring extenders that maintained patency of the internal iliac artery. Infusion of 71 ± 37 mL of polymer (range, 19-158 mL) into the aortic endobags resulted in complete aneurysm exclusion in all patients. Mean implant time was 76 ± 35 minutes, with 33 ± 17 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 180 ± 81 mL of contrast; estimated blood loss was 174 ± 116 mL. One patient died during the postoperative period (30-day mortality, 4.8%), and one died at 10 months from non-device-related causes. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 3.1 months and a median of 6.3 months, there were no late aneurysm- or device-related adverse events and no secondary procedures. CT imaging studies at 6 months and 1 year revealed no increase in aneurysm size, no device migration, and no new endoleaks. One patient had a limited proximal type I endoleak at 30 days that resolved at 60 days and remained sealed. One patient has an ongoing distal type I endoleak near the iliac bifurcation, with no change in aneurysm

  13. Valve-sparing aortic root repair in acute type A dissection: how many sinuses have to be repaired for curative surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Paul P; Hijazi, Husam; Dinstak, Witold; Diegeler, Anno

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate operative and long-term results of valve-sparing aortic root surgery in acute type A dissection. The repair consisted of selective replacement of all dissected and pathological sinuses. Forty-six patients (mean age 62 ± 14; range 29-88 years, 3 with Marfan syndrome), operated on between August 2001 and July 2011 due to acute type A aortic dissection, underwent valve-sparing root repair, resulting in a valve preservation rate of 56% in acute aortic dissection surgery involving the aortic root. Insufficiency grades of 0/1+, 2+, 3+ and 4+ were presented in 16, 17, 12 and 1 patients, respectively. Root repair with resection of the whole of the pathological aortic wall without the use of any glue was performed in all patients. Replacement of 1, 2 or 3 sinuses of Valsalva was performed in 29, 12 and 5 patients, respectively. Concomitant cusp repair was necessary in 7 patients. All perioperative data were collected prospectively and an intention-to-treat analysis was performed. A total of 6 patients (median age 76, range 63-81 years) died, on average 10 months (range 0.9-44) after surgery resulting in an overall survival of 87% at the mean follow-up of 54 ± 37, range 0.9-132 months. The linearized death rate was 2.9%/year, and the actuarial survival rate at 8 years was 85.5 ± 5.6%. No death was related to the aortic valve or aortic root. There were no valve-related events and no patient required reoperation on the proximal aorta/aortic valve during the follow-up. At the last echocardiography (47.8 ± 35.6 months after surgery), 33 patients showed no and 13 patients slight (1+) aortic insufficiency. Curative repair with replacement of all pathological sinuses of Valsalva leads to an excellent long-term outcome. Selected sinus repair is a simple and effective method of curative, valve-sparing root repair in acute aortic dissection because replacement of all sinuses is seldom necessary.

  14. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zakkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  15. Surgery for Young Adults With Aortic Valve Disease not Amenable to Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Bruno, Vito Domanico; Visan, Alexandru Ciprian; Curtis, Stephanie; Angelini, Gianni; Lansac, Emmanuel; Stoica, Serban

    2018-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the gold standard for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis or mixed pathology that is not amenable to repair according to currently available guidelines. Such a simplified approach may be suitable for many patients, but it is far from ideal for young adults considering emerging evidence demonstrating that conventional valve replacement in this cohort of patients is associated with inferior long-term survival when compared to the general population. Moreover; the utilisation of mechanical and bioprosthetic valves can significantly impact on quality and is linked to increased rates of morbidities. Other available options such as stentless valve, homografts, valve reconstruction and Ross operation can be an appealing alternative to conventional valve replacement. Young patients should be fully informed about all the options available - shared decision making is now part of modern informed consent. This can be achieved when referring physicians have a better understanding of the short and long term outcomes associated with every intervention, in terms of survival and quality of life. This review presents up to date evidence for available surgical options for young adults with aortic stenosis and mixed disease not amenable to repair.

  16. Successful surgical repair of acute type A aortic dissection without the use of blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexopoulou, N; Attia, R Q; Bapat, V N

    2013-10-01

    We report successful surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection in a Jehovah's Witness without the use of any blood products. An interposition graft replacement of the ascending aorta was carried out. This was under right axillo-atrial cardiopulmonary bypass with antegrade cerebral perfusion via right a subclavian and left carotid cannula for 24 minutes at 28°C. Body temperature was kept at 32°C throughout. Autologous transfusion was deployed using cell salvage and a preoperative haemodilution technique. The patient was given tranexamic acid, desmopressin, recombinant factor VIIa, folic acid and epoetin alfa. Patients who object to transfusion represent a significant challenge, especially those who are at a high risk of coagulopathy associated with inherent aortic dissection leading to perturbed haemodynamics, cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. Type A aortic dissection repair is possible in patients refusing the use of blood products with blood salvage techniques and synthetic products that can limit the risk of bleeding. Minimal hypothermia is vital to preserve platelet function and avoid coagulopathy. Thus, a combination of normothermic/minimal hypothermia and antegrade cerebral protection with a blood conservation strategy can be deployed for a successful surgical outcome in aortic dissection without transfusion.

  17. Surgical repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis in children with williams syndrome: a 30-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Tyson A; d'Udekem, Yves; Brizard, Christian P; Wheaton, Gavin; Weintraub, Robert G; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2015-04-01

    Williams syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) in childhood. We reviewed outcomes of children with Williams syndrome who underwent repair of SVAS during a 30-year period at a single institution. Between 1982 and 2012, 28 patients with Williams syndrome were operated on for SVAS. Mean age at operation was 5.2 years (range, 3 months to 13 years), and mean weight at operation was 18.6 kg (range, 4.1 to 72.4 kg). Associated cardiac lesions in 11 patients (39.3%) were repaired at the time of the SVAS repair. The most common associated cardiac lesion was main pulmonary artery stenosis (8 of 28 [28%]). A 3-patch repair was performed in 10 patients, a Doty repair in 17, and a McGoon repair in 1 (3.6%). There were no early deaths. Follow-up was 96% complete (27 of 28). Overall mean follow-up was 11.2 years (range, 1 month to 27.3 years). Mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 1 month to 14.3 years) for the 3-patch repair patients and 14.7 years (range, 6 weeks to 27 years) for the Doty repair patients. Of the 17 Doty patients, there were 4 (24%) late deaths, occurring at 6 weeks, 3.5 years, 4 years, and 16 years after the initial operation. There were no late deaths in the 3-patch repair patients. Overall survival was 86% at 5, 10, and 15 years after repair. Survival was 82% at 5, 10 and 15 years for the Doty repair patients. Overall, 6 of 27 patients (22%) patients required late reoperation at a mean of 11.2 years (range, 3.6 to 23 years). No 3-patch repair patients required reoperation. Overall freedom from reoperation was 91% at 5 years and 73% at 10 and 15 years. Freedom from reoperation for the Doty repair patients was 93% at 5 years and 71% at 10 and 15 years. Surgical repair of SVAS in children Williams syndrome has excellent early results. However, significant late mortality and morbidity warrants close follow-up. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  18. Patient and Aneurysm Characteristics Predicting Prolonged Length of Stay After Elective Open AAA Repair in the Endovascular Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas-Berumen, Sergio; Rojas-Miguez, Florencia A; Farber, Alik; Komshian, Sevan; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Siracuse, Jeffrey J

    2018-01-01

    Open aortic aneurysm repair (AAA) repair can be resource intensive and associated with a prolonged length of stay (LOS). We sought to examine patient and aneurysm predictors of prolonged LOS to better identify those at risk in the preoperative setting. Patient data were obtained from the targeted AAA American College of Surgery National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2012 to 2014 of patients undergoing open AAA repair. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of prolonged postoperative LOS defined as greater than 10 days (75th percentile). There were 1172 open AAA repairs identified. The majority (54%) of patients were older than 70 years and male (74%). Surgical approach was transperitoneal (70.9%) and retroperitoneal (29.1%). Aneurysms were 51.4% infrarenal, 33% juxtarenal, 5.7% pararenal, 7.4% suprarenal, and 2.5% type IV thoracoabdominal. Mean and median LOS were 9.1 ± 7.4 and 7 (0-72) days, respectively. Independently associated with extended LOS factors were visceral revascularization (odds ratio [OR]: 5.32, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.77-10.22, P AAA repair. Prospective identification of high-risk patients may allow physicians and hospitals to engage in multidisciplinary collaborations preoperatively to try to improve LOS in this resource-intensive population.

  19. Directional tip control technique for optimal stent graft alignment in angulated proximal aortic landing zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Takayama, MD, PhD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Angulated anatomy in the aorta, such as tortuous infrarenal aortic necks or steep aortic arches, is a significant challenge for endovascular aortic repair because it often causes inadequate sealing and fixation, which may lead to treatment failure. We have developed a technique using off-the-shelf equipment to precisely control the deployment of stent grafts in challenging landing zones. The key of this technique is to create a through-and-through wire between two access sites and to use a guiding device over the wire. This technique is best used with stent grafts without nose cones. We present an endovascular aneurysm repair case and a thoracic endovascular aortic repair case with challenging proximal landing zones treated by this technique. In both cases, technical success was attained, and follow-up imaging demonstrated well-aligned stent grafts. Our directional tip control technique is easy and effective. It can be a good technical solution for endovascular aortic treatment in angulated anatomy.

  20. Clinical applications of robotic technology in vascular and endovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, George A; Riga, Celia V; Mayer, Erik K; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Bicknell, Colin D

    2011-02-01

    Emerging robotic technologies are increasingly being used by surgical disciplines to facilitate and improve performance of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted intervention has recently been introduced into the field of vascular surgery to potentially enhance laparoscopic vascular and endovascular capabilities. The objective of this study was to review the current status of clinical robotic applications in vascular surgery. A systematic literature search was performed in order to identify all published clinical studies related to robotic implementation in vascular intervention. Web-based search engines were searched using the keywords "surgical robotics," "robotic surgery," "robotics," "computer assisted surgery," and "vascular surgery" or "endovascular" for articles published between January 1990 and November 2009. An evaluation and critical overview of these studies is reported. In addition, an analysis and discussion of supporting evidence for robotic computer-enhanced telemanipulation systems in relation to their applications in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery was undertaken. Seventeen articles reporting on clinical applications of robotics in laparoscopic vascular and endovascular surgery were detected. They were either case reports or retrospective patient series and prospective studies reporting laparoscopic vascular and endovascular treatments for patients using robotic technology. Minimal comparative clinical evidence to evaluate the advantages of robot-assisted vascular procedures was identified. Robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic procedures have been reported by several studies with satisfactory results. Furthermore, the use of robotic technology as a sole modality for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and expansion of its applications to splenic and renal artery aneurysm reconstruction have been described. Robotically steerable endovascular catheter systems have potential advantages over conventional catheterization systems

  1. Is Decellularized Porcine Small Intestine Sub-mucosa Patch Suitable for Aortic Arch Repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Antonio F.; Smith, Paul; Bezuska, Laurynas; Mimic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: We reviewed our experience with decellularized porcine small intestine sub-mucosa (DPSIS) patch, recently introduced for congenital heart defects. Materials and Methods: Between 10/2011 and 04/2016 a DPSIS patch was used in 51 patients, median age 1.1 months (5 days to 14.5 years), for aortic arch reconstruction (45/51 = 88.2%) or aortic coarctation repair (6/51 = 11.8%). All medical records were retrospectively reviewed, with primary endpoints interventional procedure (balloon dilatation) or surgery (DPSIS patch replacement) due to patch-related complications. Results: In a median follow-up time of 1.5 ± 1.1 years (0.6–2.3years) in 13/51 patients (25.5%) a re-intervention, percutaneous interventional procedure (5/51 = 9.8%) or re-operation (8/51 = 15.7%) was required because of obstruction in the correspondence of the DPSIS patch used to enlarge the aortic arch/isthmus, with median max velocity flow at Doppler interrogation of 4.0 ± 0.51 m/s. Two patients required surgery after failed interventional cardiology. The mean interval between DPSIS patch implantation and re-intervention (percutaneous procedure or re-operation) was 6 months (1–17 months). While there were 3 hospital deaths (3/51 = 5.9%) not related to the patch implantation, no early or late mortality occurred for the subsequent procedure required for DPSIS patch interventional cardiology or surgery. The median max velocity flow at Doppler interrogation through the aortic arch/isthmus for the patients who did not require interventional procedure or surgery was 1.7 ± 0.57 m/s. Conclusions: High incidence of re-interventions with DPSIS patch for aortic arch and/or coarctation forced us to use alternative materials (homografts and decellularized gluteraldehyde preserved bovine pericardial matrix). PMID:29900163

  2. Impact of surgeon and hospital experience on outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Andrew J; Connolly, Peter H; Schneider, Darren B; Sedrakyan, Art

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on the outcomes of open surgical repair (OSR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of intact and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in New York State. New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System data were used to identify patients undergoing AAA repair from 2000 to 2011. Characteristics of the provider and hospital were determined by linkage to the New York Office of Professions and National Provider Identification databases. Distinct hierarchical logistic regression models for EVAR and OSR for intact and ruptured AAAs were created to adjust for the patient's comorbidities and to evaluate the impact of the surgeon's and hospital's experience on outcomes. The provider's years since medical school graduation as well as annual volume of the facility and provider are examined in tertiles. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are presented. A total of 18,842 patients underwent AAA repair by a vascular surgeon. For intact AAAs (n = 17,118), 26.2% of patients underwent OSR and 73.8% underwent EVAR. For ruptured AAAs (n = 1724), 63.9% underwent OSR and 36.1% underwent EVAR. After intact AAA repair, OSR adjusted outcomes were significantly influenced by the surgeon's annual volume but not by the facility's volume or the surgeon's age. The lowest volume providers (1-4 OSRs) had higher in-hospital mortality rates than high-volume (>11 OSRs) surgeons (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.17]). Low-volume providers also had higher odds of major complications (1.23 [1-1.51]). For patients with intact AAA undergoing EVAR, mortality was higher at low-volume facilities (2.6 [1.3-5.3] and 2.7 [1.5-4.8] for 27 OSRs for ruptured AAA) centers (1.56 [1.02-2.39]), whereas low-volume physicians (<4 OSRs for ruptured AAA) had higher odds of major complications (1.58 [1.04-2.41]). In the case of EVAR for rupture, there were no characteristics of

  3. Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm: Is It a Real Emergency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Mafalda; Prunella, Roberto; Gerardi, Pasquale; Lillo, Antonio; De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Notarstefano, Stefano; Impedovo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm is a rare but life-threatening condition that occurs due to penetrating or blunt trauma. Clinical manifestations are variable, and the time interval from the initial trauma to diagnosis is variable. A prompt diagnosis and an aggressive management approach are required to avoid catastrophic complications. Possible treatment options are open surgical repair, endovascular repair, pseudoanerysmal sac thrombosis induction through direct thrombin injection, and coil embolization. Here, we present the case of a 75-year-old man affected by an infrarenal abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm presenting with abdominal and lumbar pain for 3 days, who was successfully treated with an endograft. PMID:29515707

  4. Endovascular repair of renal artery aneurysm with the multilayer stent – a short report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Flis

    2012-10-01

    in the main left renal artery involving all three major branches of the renal artery. Via a percutaneous femoral approach a multilayer stent was deployed without complications. Blood flow inside the sac was immediately and significantly reduced. All the renal branches remained patent. Conclusion: New multilayer fluid modulating stent concept appears to be a very useful and attractive alternative to surgery or other endovascular techniques for those RAA involving or very close to major branch vessels, especially in patients with very high risk of loosing the only viable kidney, as in our case.

  5. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  6. Effect of Pregnancy on Ventricular and Aortic Dimensions in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauldwell, Matthew; Quail, Michael A; Smith, Gillian S; Heng, Ee Ling; Ghonim, Sarah; Uebing, Anselm; Swan, Lorna; Li, Wei; Patel, Roshni R; Pennell, Dudley J; Steer, Philip J; Johnson, Mark R; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V

    2017-07-23

    The aim was to assess whether cardiovascular adaptation to pregnancy in women with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) adversely affects hemodynamic stability, in particular with respect to right ventricular (RV) dilatation, pulmonary regurgitation, or aortic root dilatation. This was a retrospective cohort study of women with repaired TOF with paired cardiovascular magnetic resonance scans before and after their first pregnancy (baseline RV end systolic volume index 49 mL/m 2 and RV end diastolic volume index 118 mL/m 2 ) matched with a comparison group of nulliparous women with TOF. Cases were matched for age at baseline cardiovascular magnetic resonance scan, time between follow-up of cardiovascular magnetic resonance scans, QRS duration, RV ejection fraction, and indexed RV end systolic and diastolic volume at baseline. Effect of pregnancy and time on parameters was assessed using mixed-effects modelling. Nineteen women with repaired TOF who had completed their first pregnancy were identified and matched with 38 nulliparous women. We observed no deleterious effects of pregnancy on RV volumes, aortic dimensions, or exercise data. There was an effect of pregnancy observed in both left ventricular end diastolic volume and left ventricular stroke volume, consistent with a sustained small increase in left ventricular stroke volume attributed to pregnancy (53-55 mL/m 2 ). Women with repaired TOF and with mild-to-moderate RV dilatation considering pregnancy can be reassured that pregnancy is unlikely to cause deterioration in their cardiovascular status. We recommend that women are routinely assessed and followed up before and after pregnancy and that prepregnancy counseling is tailored to their individual clinical status. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  7. Provider volume and outcomes for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower extremity revascularization procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Shane D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Intuitively, vascular procedures performed by high-volume vascular subspecialists working at high-volume institutions should be associated with improved patient outcome. Although a large number of studies assess the relationship between volume and outcome, a single contemporary compilation of such studies is lacking. METHODS: A review of the English language literature was performed incorporating searches of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (elective and emergent), carotid endarterectomy, and arterial lower limb procedures for any volume outcome relationship. Studies were included if they involved a patient cohort from 1980 onwards, were community or population based, and assessed health outcomes (mortality and morbidity) as a dependent variable and volume as an independent variable. RESULTS: We identified 74 relevant studies, and 54 were included. All showed either an inverse relationship of variable magnitude between provider volume and mortality, or no volume-outcome effect. The reduction in the risk-adjusted mortality rate (RAMR) for high-volume providers was 3% to 11% for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, 2.5 to 5% for emergent AAA repair, 0.7% to 4.7% carotid endarterectomy, and 0.3% to 0.9% for lower limb arterial bypass procedures. Subspeciality training also conferred a considerable morbidity and mortality benefit for emergent AAA repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb arterial procedures. CONCLUSION: High-volume providers have significantly better outcomes for vascular procedures both in the elective and emergent setting. Subspeciality training also has a considerable impact. These data provide further evidence for the specialization of vascular services, whereby vascular procedures should generally be preformed by high-volume, speciality trained providers.

  8. Endovascular surgery in Marfan syndrome: CON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchoukos, Nicholas T

    2017-11-01

    The frequency of endovascular stent grafting procedures to treat various conditions of the thoracic aorta has increased dramatically over the past three decades. Stent grafting has been applied on a limited basis in patients with Marfan syndrome and other connective tissue disorders, despite recommendations from current guidelines and expert consensus statements against its use in this setting. A review of publications reporting outcomes after stent grafting of the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with acute or chronic aortic dissection indicates that these procedures can be accomplished with rates of early mortality, stroke and spinal cord ischemic injury that are comparable to those observed in patients who do not have Marfan syndrome. However, the rates of primary treatment failure (principally endoleak), secondary treatment failure, need for open repair and late death among the Marfan patients are substantially higher than those observed in patients without this condition. In addition, the rates of retrograde aortic dissection and development of stent-graft induced new entry (SINE), are also greater among patients with Marfan syndrome. All of these findings argue strongly against the routine use of endovascular grafts in Marfan patients with type B or residual type A dissection. Few data are available to assess the role of endografting in Marfan patients with aneurysmal disease, but the progressive aortic dilatation noted in these patients argues strongly against its use in this setting as well. At present, the available data indicate that there is no justification for elective stent grafting in Marfan patients with aortic dissection or aneurysm. The only reasonable indications for primary aortic stent grafting are in the setting of acute aortic dissection or rupture, where the intervention is considered life-saving and rarely, considering the relatively young age of these patients, where the risk of open operation is considered to be prohibitive.

  9. Severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with adverse outcomes in patients undergoing elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David H; Goodney, Philip P; Kalish, Jeffrey; Schanzer, Andres; Indes, Jeffrey; Walsh, Daniel B; Cronenwett, Jack L; Nolan, Brian W

    2013-06-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been implicated as a risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture, its effect on surgical repair is less defined. Consequently, variation in practice persists regarding patient selection and surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of COPD on patients undergoing AAA repair. We reviewed a prospective regional registry of 3455 patients undergoing elective open AAA repair (OAR) and endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) from 23 centers in the Vascular Study Group of New England from 2003 to 2011. COPD was categorized as none, medical (medically treated but not oxygen [O2]-dependent), and O2-dependent. End points included in-hospital death, pulmonary complications, major postoperative adverse events (MAEs), extubation in the operating room, and 5-year survival. Survival was determined using life-table analysis based on the Social Security Death Index. Predictors of in-hospital and long-term mortality were determined by multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analysis. During the study interval, 2043 patients underwent EVAR and 1412 patients underwent OAR with a nearly equal prevalence of COPD (35% EVAR vs 36% OAR). O2-dependent COPD (4%) was associated with significantly increased in-hospital mortality, pulmonary complications, and MAE and was also associated with significantly decreased extubation in the operating room among patients undergoing both EVAR and OAR. Five-year survival was significantly diminished among all patients undergoing AAA repair with COPD (none, 78%; medical, 72%; O2-dependent, 42%; P < .001). By multivariate analysis, O2-dependent COPD was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval, 1.0-4.0; P = .04) and diminished 5-year survival (hazard ratio, 3.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.1; P < .001). Patients with O2-dependent COPD undergoing AAA repair suffer increased pulmonary

  10. Multidirectional flow analysis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in aneurysm development following repair of aortic coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalder Aurelien F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aneurysm formation is a life-threatening complication after operative therapy in coarctation. The identification of patients at risk for the development of such secondary pathologies is of high interest and requires a detailed understanding of the link between vascular malformation and altered hemodynamics. The routine morphometric follow-up by magnetic resonance angiography is a well-established technique. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR towards motion offers the possibility to additionally investigate hemodynamic consequences of morphological changes of the aorta. We demonstrate two cases of aneurysm formation 13 and 35 years after coarctation surgery based on a Waldhausen repair with a subclavian patch and a Vosschulte repair with a Dacron patch, respectively. Comprehensive flow visualization by cardiovascular MR (CMR was performed using a flow-sensitive, 3-dimensional, and 3-directional time-resolved gradient echo sequence at 3T. Subsequent analysis included the calculation of a phase contrast MR angiography and color-coded streamline and particle trace 3D visualization. Additional quantitative evaluation provided regional physiological information on blood flow and derived vessel wall parameters such as wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index. The results highlight the individual 3D blood-flow patterns associated with the different vascular pathologies following repair of aortic coarctation. In addition to known factors predisposing for aneurysm formation after surgical repair of coarctation these findings indicate the importance of flow sensitive CMR to follow up hemodynamic changes with respect to the development of vascular disease.

  11. The Infant with Aortic Arch Hypoplasia and Small Left Heart Structures: Echocardiographic Indices of Mitral and Aortic Hypoplasia Predicting Successful Biventricular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymale, Jennifer M; Frommelt, Peter C; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Tweddell, James S; Shillingford, Amanda J

    2017-08-01

    In infants with aortic arch hypoplasia and small left-sided cardiac structures, successful biventricular repair is dependent on the adequacy of the left-sided structures. Defining accurate thresholds of echocardiographic indices predictive of successful biventricular repair is paramount to achieving optimal outcomes. We sought to identify pre-operative echocardiographic indices of left heart size that predict intervention-free survival in infants with small left heart structures undergoing primary aortic arch repair to establish biventricular circulation (BVC). Infants ≤2 months undergoing aortic arch repair from 1999 to 2010 with aortic and/or mitral valve hypoplasia, (Z-score ≤-2) were included. Pre-operative and follow-up echocardiograms were reviewed. Primary outcome was successful biventricular circulation (BVC), defined as freedom from death, transplant, or single ventricular conversion at 1 year. Need for catheter based or surgical re-intervention (RI), valve annular growth, and significant late aortic or mitral valve obstruction were additional outcomes. Fifty one of 73 subjects (79%) had successful BVC and were free of RI at 1 year. Seven subjects failed BVC; four of those died. The overall 1 year survival for the cohort was 95%. Fifteen subjects underwent a RI but maintained BVC. In univariate analysis, larger transverse aorta (p = 0.006) and aortic valve (p = 0.02) predicted successful BVC without RI. In CART analysis, the combination of mitral valve (MV) to tricuspid valve (TV) ratio ≤0.66 with an aortic valve (AV) annulus Z-score ≤-3 had the greatest power to predict BVC failure (sensitivity 71%, specificity 94%). In those with successful BVC, the combination of both AV and MV Z-score ≤-2.5 increased the odds of RI (OR 3.8; CI 1.3-11.4). Follow-up of non-RI subjects revealed improvement in AV and MV Z-score (median AV annulus changed over time from -2.34 to 0.04 (p indices. In this complex population, 1 year survival is high, but

  12. Endovascular treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysm and dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, I.; Stankov, Z.; Stefanov, St.; Stoyanov, Hr.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The aim is to give up to date information about modern endovascular treatment of aortic pathology Dissection and aneurysms of the aorta are life threatening condition requiring in most of the cases prompt surgical or endovascular treatment because of the poor natural evolution. Purpose: to assess the immediate and 1-year outcome of endovascular treatment in broad spectrum of acute and subacute aortic syndrome during the last 3 years (November 2012 - August 2015) in City Clinic (Sofia, Bulgaria). We performed endovascular treatment of 47 patients (43 men, 4 women) at average age 54 y. with dissection (24) and aneurysms (23) of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta (in 5 emergent treatment was performed for aortic rupture). All patients were treated with minimal surgical femoral approach. In 4 (9%) of them initial carotid to carotid bypass was performed in order to provide a sufficient landing zone for the endograft implantation.the last 9 patients (19%) were treated without general anesthesia with either deep sedation or epidural anesthesia. Results: In all patients successful endograft implantation was achieved. Additional stent-graft or open cell stent was implanted in 4 cases in order to centralize the flow in the compressed true lumen. In 5 cases additional vascular plug or large coil was delivered in the left subclavian arteryostium in order to interrupt retrograde aneurysm or false lumen filling. Complications: 30 days mortality-2.2%, neurologic disorders (4.4%). one year survival- 45 (90.5%). 3 and 6 mo control CT scan showed no migration of the graft in 100%, full false lumen isolation in 19 out of 24 dissections (80%) and aneurysm free of expansion in 20 out of 23 (86%), patent carotid bay-pass graft in 4 of 4 (100%). This one center study showed excellent immediate and 1 year clinical and device results from endovascular repair of potentially fatal disease. Endovascular treatment is a method of choice for broad spectrum of aortic pathology

  13. Immediate endovascular treatment of an aortoiliac aneurysm ruptured into the inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Reinhard; Weidenhagen, Rolf; Hoffmann, Ralf; Waggershauser, Tobias; Meimarakis, Georgios; Andrassy, Joachim; Clevert, Dirk; Czerner, Stephan; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2006-07-01

    An aortocaval fistula is a severe complication of an aortoiliac aneurysm, usually associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality during open operative repair. We describe the successful endovascular treatment of a symptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm ruptured into the inferior vena cava with secondary interventional coiling of a persistent type II endoleak because of retrograde perfusion of the inferior mesenteric artery. Endovascular exclusion of ruptured abdominal aneurysms seems to be a valuable treatment option for selected patients even with complicated vascular conditions like an aortocaval fistula.

  14. Influence of endoleaks on aneurysm volume and hemodynamics after endovascular aneurysm repair

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    Pitton, M.B.; Welter, B.; Schmenger, P.; Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Neufang, A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the aneurysm volume and the intra-aneurysmatic pressure and maximal pressure pulse (dp/dtmax) in completely excluded aneurysms and cases with endoleaks. Materials and Methods: In 36 mongrel dogs, experimental autologous aneurysms were treated with stent-grafts. All aortic side branches were ligated in 18 cases (group I) but were preserved in group II (n=18). Aneurysm volumes were calculated from CT scans before and after intervention, and from follow-up CT scans at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months. Finally, for hemodynamic measurements, manometer-tipped catheters were introduced into the excluded aneurysm sac (group I and II), selectively in endoleaks (group II), and intraluminally for aortic reference measurement. Systemic hypertension was induced by volume load and pharmacologic stress. Pressure curves and dp/dt were simultaneously recorded and the ratios of aneurysm pressure to systemic reference pressure calculated. Results: At follow-up, type-II, endoleaks were excluded in all cases of group I by selective angiography. In contrast, endoleaks were evident in all cases of group II. Volumetric analysis of the aneurysms showed a benefit for group I with an improved aneurysm shrinkage: ΔVolume +0.08%, -1.62% and -9.76% at 1 week, 6 weeks and 6 months follow-up (median, group I), compared to +1.43%, +0.67%, and -4.04% (group II), p [de

  15. Hybrid repair of a very late, post-aortic coarctation surgery thoracic aneurysm: a case report

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    Tilea Ioan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Local aneurysms after surgical repair of coarctation of the aorta occur mainly in patients surgically treated by Dacron patch plasty during adulthood. The management of these patients is always problematic, with frequent complications and increased mortality rates. Percutaneous stent-graft implantation avoids the need for surgical reintervention. Case presentation We report a case involving the hybrid treatment by stent-graft implantation and transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery of an aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta that occurred in a 64-year-old Caucasian man, operated on almost 40 years earlier with a Dacron patch plasty for aortic coarctation. Our patient presented to our facility for evaluation with back pain and shortness of breath after minimal physical effort. A physical examination revealed stony dullness to percussion of the left posterior thorax, with no other abnormalities. The results of chest radiography, followed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography and aortography, led to a diagnosis of giant aortic thoracic aneurysm. Successful treatment of the aneurysm was achieved by percutaneous stent-graft implantation combined with transposition of the left subclavian artery to the left common carotid artery. His post-procedural recovery was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, computed tomography showed complete thrombosis of the excluded aneurysm, without any clinical signs of left lower limb ischemia or new onset neurological abnormalities. Conclusions Our patient’s case illustrates the clinical outcomes of surgical interventions for aortic coarctation. However, the very late appearance of a local aneurysm is rather unusual. Management of such cases is always difficult. The decision-making should be multidisciplinary. A hybrid approach was considered the best solution for our patient.

  16. Is tube repair of aortic aneurysm followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, J L; Fialkov, J; Ameli, F M; St Louis, E L

    1990-10-01

    To address the concern that tube repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm might be followed by aneurysmal change in the common iliac arteries, 23 patients who had undergone the operation were re-examined 3 to 5 years later. Although 9 had had minimal ectasia of these arteries preoperatively, in none of the 23 was there symptomatic or radiologic evidence of aneurysmal change on follow-up. Measurements of the maximum intraluminal diameters were made by computed tomography; they indicated no significant differences between the preoperative and follow-up sizes of the common iliac arteries. The variation in time to follow-up also showed no significant correlation with change in artery diameter.

  17. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring for surgical hip repair in two patients with severe aortic stenosis

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    María Mercedes López

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Aortic stenosis increases perioperative morbidity and mortality, perioperative invasive monitoring is advised for patients with an aortic valve area 30 mm Hg and it is important to avoid hypotension and arrhythmias. We report the anaesthetic management with continuous spinal anaesthesia and minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring of two patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical hip repair. CASE REPORT: Two women with severe aortic stenosis were scheduled for hip fracture repair. Continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring was used for anaesthetic management of both. Surgery was performed successfully after two consecutive doses of 2 mg of isobaric bupivacaine 0.5% in one of them and four consecutive doses in the other. Haemodynamic conditions remained stable throughout the intervention. Vital signs and haemodynamic parameters remained stable throughout the two interventions. CONCLUSION: Our report illustrates the use of continuous spinal anaesthesia with minimally invasive haemodynamic monitoring as a valid alternative to general or epidural anaesthesia in two patients with severe aortic stenosis who are undergoing lower limb surgery. However, controlled clinical trials would be required to establish that this technique is safe and effective in these type or patients.

  18. Impact of Discordant Views in the Management of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Peter; Sailer, Anna-Margaretha; Baiocchi, Michael; Goldstone, Andrew B; Schaffer, Justin M; Trojan, Jeff; Fleischmann, Dominik; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig; Dake, Michael D; Woo, Y Joseph; Lee, Jason T; Fischbein, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair has a lower perceived risk than open surgical repair and has become an increasingly popular alternative. Whether general consensus exists regarding candidacy for either operation among open and endovascular specialists is unknown. A retrospective review of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysm at our institution between January 2005 and October 2015 was performed, excluding trauma and dissection. Two cardiac surgeons, 2 cardiovascular surgeons, 1 vascular surgeon, and 1 interventional radiologist gave their preference for open vs endovascular repair. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the kappa coefficient. k-means clustering agnostically grouped various patterns of agreement. The mean rating was predicted using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression. Negative binomial regression predicted the discrepancy between our panel of raters and the historical operation. Generalized estimating equation modeling was then used to evaluate the association between the extent of discrepancy and the adverse perioperative outcome. There were 77 patients with preoperative imaging studies. Pairwise interobserver agreement was only fair (median weighted kappa 0.270 [interquartile range 0.211-0.404]). Increasing age and proximal neck length predicted an increasing preference for thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our panel; larger proximal neck diameter predicted a general preference for open surgical repair. Increasing proximal neck diameter predicted a larger discrepancy between our panel and the historical operation. Greater discrepancy was associated with adverse outcome. Substantial disagreement existed among our panel, and an exploratory analysis of the effect of increasing discrepancy demonstrated an association with adverse perioperative outcome. An investigation of the effect of a thoracic aortic team with open and endovascular specialists is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  19. The Impact of Deep Versus Moderate Hypothermia on Postoperative Kidney Function After Elective Aortic Hemiarch Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, George J; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Bavaria, Joseph E; Sultan, Ibrahim; Siki, Mary; Naidu, Suveeksha; Milewski, Rita K; Williams, Matthew L; Hargrove, W Clark; Desai, Nimesh D; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2016-10-01

    There remains concern that moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest (MHCA) with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) may provide suboptimal distal organ protection compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). We compared postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in in patients who underwent elective hemiarch repair with either DHCA/RCP or MHCA/ACP. This was a retrospective review of all patients undergoing elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease between 2009 and 2014. Patients were stratified according to the use of DHCA/RCP versus MHCA/ACP. The primary outcome was the occurrence of AKI at 48 hours, as defined by the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage (RIFLE ) criteria. A multivariable logistic regression identified risk factors for AKI. One hundred eighteen patients who underwent ACP and 471 patients who underwent RCP were included. The mean lowest temperature was 26.4°C in patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 17.5°C in patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Baseline demographics were similar except that patients who underwent DHCA/RCP were more likely to have peripheral arterial disease or bicuspid aortic valves. Cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were shorter in the MHCA/ACP group. AKI occurred in 19 (16.2%) patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 67 (14.3%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Four (0.8%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP required postoperative dialysis. In-hospital mortality tended to increase with increasing RIFLE classification (RIFLE class-0 (No AKI) = 0.41%; Risk = 1.35%, and Injury = 10.0%; p = 0.09). On multivariable analysis, the lowest temperature and cerebral perfusion strategy were not significant predictors of AKI. Lower baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), lower preoperative ejection fraction, and longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time were independently associated with higher AKI. We applied the sensitive RIFLE criteria to examine AKI in

  20. Visceral hybrid reconstruction of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm after open repair of type a aortic dissection by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique: A case report

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    Marjanović Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of chronic type B dissection and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA remaining after the emergency reconstruction of the ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch for acute type A dissection represents one of the major surgical challenges. Complications of chronic type B dissection are aneurysmal formation and rupture of an aortic aneurysm with a high mortality rate. We presented a case of visceral hybrid reconstruction of TAAA secondary to chronic dissection type B after the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique due to acute type A aortic dissection in a high-risk patient. Case report. A 62 year-old woman was admitted to our institution for reconstruction of Crawford type I TAAA secondary to chronic dissection. The patient had had an acute type A aortic dissection 3 years before and undergone reconstruction by the Bentall procedure with the elephant trunk technique with valve replacement. On admission the patient had coronary artery disease (myocardial infarction, two times in the past 3 years, congestive heart disease with ejection fraction of 25% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. On computed tomography (CT of the aorta TAAA was revealed with a maximum diameter of 93 mm in the descending thoracic aorta secondary to chronic dissection. All the visceral arteries originated from the true lumen with exception of the celiac artery (CA, and the end of chronic dissection was below the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. The patient was operated on using surgical visceral reconstruction of the SMA, CA and the right renal artery (RRA as the first procedure. Postoperative course was without complications. Endovascular TAAA reconstruction was performed as the second procedure one month later, when the elephant trunk was used as the proximal landing zone for the endograft, and distal landing zone was the level of origin of the RRA. Postoperatively, the patient had no neurological deficit and

  1. Duodenal Obstruction after Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report

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    Chun-Yao Lin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal tract complications after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair are well known. The reported frequency ranges from 6.6% to 21%. However, the incidence of duodenal obstruction following AAA has probably been underestimated. This report concerns a 78-year-old male who was admitted for elective repair of an infrarenal AAA. On the ninth postoperative day, the patient presented with large quantities of bile-stained vomitus despite passing flatus per rectum. Metoclopramide and ranitidine were given under the initial impression of paralytic ileus. However, the upper gastrointestinal obstruction persisted, and on day 12, computerized tomography (CT revealed marked distension of the gastric tube and duodenum, down to the level of the third portion, with abrupt change of caliber at the point of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA. SMA syndrome was diagnosed. After nasogastric tube aspiration, parenteral nutrition, and 11 days of conservative treatment, abdominal CT and upper gastrointestinal series showed no apparent duodenal obstruction. The patient was discharged on the 29th postoperative day; follow-up abdominal CT 4 months later was unremarkable.

  2. Endovascular repair of an innominate artery pseudoaneurysm using the Valiant Mona LSA branched graft device

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    Josh A. Sibille, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman involved in a motor vehicle collision presented with a traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the innominate artery origin in addition to multiple concomitant injuries. She was classified as a high-risk candidate for open repair. An experimental thoracic branched graft device was used for coverage of the injury with the addition of a right carotid-to-left carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass. Follow-up imaging showed resolution of the pseudoaneurysm and patency of her bypass grafts. This is the first described use of the Mona LSA Branch Thoracic Stent Graft System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn in the innominate artery.

  3. A Rare Entity: Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury in a Patient with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiten Mohanbhai; Banerjee, Shubhabrata; Bulsara, Shahzad; Sahu, Tapish; Sheorain, Virender K; Grover, Tarun; Parakh, Rajiv

    2017-05-01

    Aberrant right subclavian artery is an uncommon entity incidence ranging from 0.5 to 2.5%. Management of thoracic aortic injury in the presence of such anomalies can be a challenge. We present here a case of traumatic aortic injury, which was incidentally found to have an asymptomatic aberrant right subclavian artery. The patient was managed by an endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury with an endograft and a right carotid to subclavian artery bypass as a hybrid procedure. A 40-year male patient was brought to the emergency in shock with an alleged history of road traffic accident an hour back. After initial resuscitation as per advance trauma life support protocol, imaging revealed thoracic aortic injury with aberrant right subclavian artery with multiple rib and bilateral humerus fracture. After primary stabilization of arm fractures, the patient was shifted to a hybrid operation room. As the aortic injury was within 10 mm of the origin of both subclavian arteries, it was decided to cover the origin of both subclavian arteries and land the endograft distal to the left carotid artery origin. Since there was a right dominant vertebral artery on imaging, right carotid to right subclavian artery bypass was done with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft to prevent posterior circulatory stroke along with thoracic endovascular aortic repair to seal the thoracic aortic injury. After endovascular repair of thoracic aortic injury, left subclavian artery perfusion was maintained through left vertebral artery; and hence, revascularization of left subclavian artery was deferred. After management of all fractures, the patient was discharged 3 weeks after the date of admission without any complications. At 6 months follow-up, patient was stable and images showed patent bypass graft and sealed aortic injury. In a trauma setting with multiple injuries, hybrid procedure with a thoracic endograft is associated with low mortality and morbidity; hence, it is the treatment

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Augmenting the Preclose Technique with a Collagen-Based Closure Device for Percutaneous Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rafiuddin, E-mail: rafiuddin.patel@ouh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Juszczak, Maciej T. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Bratby, Mark J. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Sideso, Ediri [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Anthony, Susan; Tapping, Charles R. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Handa, Ashok; Darby, Christopher R.; Perkins, Jeremy [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom); Uberoi, Raman [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo report our experience of selectively augmenting the preclose technique for percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR) with an Angio-Seal device as a haemostatic adjunct in cases of significant bleeding after tensioning the sutures of the suture-mediated closure devices.Materials and MethodsProspectively collected data for p-EVAR patients at our institute were analysed. Outcomes included technical success and access site complications. A logistic regression model was used to analyse the effects of sheath size, CFA features and stent graft type on primary failure of the preclose technique necessitating augmentation and also on the development of complications.Resultsp-EVAR was attempted via 122 CFA access sites with a median sheath size of 18-French (range 12- to 28-French). Primary success of the preclose technique was 75.4 % (92/122). Angio-Seal augmentation was utilised as an adjunct to the preclose technique in 20.5 % (25/122). The overall p-EVAR success rate was 95.1 % (116/122). There was a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.0093) between depth of CFA and primary failure of preclose technique. CFA diameter, calcification, type of stent graft and sheath size did not have significant effects on primary preclose technique failure. Overall 4.9 % (6/122) required surgical conversion but otherwise there were no major complications.ConclusionAugmentation with an Angio-Seal device is a safe and effective adjunct to increase the success rate of the preclose technique in p-EVAR.

  5. Early experience with the multilayer aneurysm repair stent in the endovascular treatment of trans/infragenicular popliteal artery aneurysms: a mixed bag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Tejal; Chaudhuri, Arindam

    2013-06-01

    To present a preliminary experience using a multilayer flow-modulating stent for trans/infragenicular popliteal endovascular aneurysm repair. Five men (mean age 76 years, range 62-86) with 6 popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs) measuring 22 to 39 mm in diameter (mean 30) underwent endovascular repair using the Cardiatis Multilayer Aneurysm Repair System (MARS) between June and August 2011. Radiological assessments post procedure using duplex ultrasonography and biplanar knee radiographs (additional contrast studies as necessary) sought evidence of aneurysm exclusion, graft patency, and preservation of branches and runoff vessels. Technical success was achieved in each case. There was one symptomatic stent occlusion requiring thrombectomy at 4 days, with reocclusion, and one leak via the stent struts into the sac with no branch outflow identified. Two further symptomatic stent occlusions were identified within a 6-week follow-up period, totaling 3 occlusions among the 6 devices deployed. No firm conclusion can be reached on the efficacy of the MARS in PAAs due to the inherent limitations of this small series, although a 50% thrombosis rate is a poor outcome. The risk of early thrombosis in flow-modulating stents deployed in the popliteal artery exists, as it does with earlier generation stent-grafts. Larger prospective trials and the influence of more aggressive antithrombotic/anticoagulant therapy should be considered to enable accurate evaluation of this device in popliteal artery aneurysms.

  6. Dilatation of the ascending aorta is associated with presence of aortic regurgitation in patients after repair of tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovas, Karen Gomes; Keedy, Alexander; Naeger, David M.; Kallianos, Kimberly; Foster, Elyse; Liu, Jing; Saloner, David; Hope, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between aortic morphology and elasticity with aortic regurgitation in surgically corrected of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients. We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients with surgically corrected TOF and 27 healthy controls who underwent cardiac MRI evaluation. Velocity-encoded cine MRI was used to quantify degree of aortic regurgitation (AR) in TOF patients. Ascending aorta diameters were measured at standard levels on MRA images. Aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) was quantified with MRI. Morphological and functional MRI variables were compared between groups of TOF patients with and without clinically relevant AR and controls. The association between aortic morphology and elasticity with the presence of AR was evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. The majority of TOF patients had only trace AR. Nine TOF patients (12 %) had an AR fraction higher than 15 %. Indexed aorta diameter at the sinotubular junction (p = 0.007), at the RPA level (p = 0.006), and low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (p = 0.015) showed the strongest associations with the presence of at least mild AR, which persisted after controlling for age and gender. Increased ascending aorta dimension is associated with AR in patients after repair of TOF. LVEF was also low in the group of patients with relevant AR compared to those without, suggesting even mild to moderate AR may contribute to LV dysfunction in these patients. Enlarged ascending aorta may be an indication for precise quantification of regurgitant fraction with MRI, since symptomatic patients may need aortic valve repair when moderate regurgitation is present. PMID:27240599

  7. Endovascular Repair of a Perforation of the Vena Caval Wall Caused by the Retrieval of a Gunther Tulip Filter After Long-Term Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-01-01

    Symptomatic penetration of the inferior vena cava (IVC) wall reportedly occurs in 0.3% of patients in whom a filter has been implanted, and it causes injury to the adjacent structures (Bogue et al. in Pediatr Radiol 39(10):1110–1113, 1; Brzezinski et al. in Burns 32(5):640–643, 2). We succeeded in the endovascular repair of perforation of the IVC wall occurring during the retrieval of a penetrated Gunther tulip vena cava filter (Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) after long-term implantation.

  8. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  9. Repair of aortic arch aneurysm under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow: A case report

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    Md. Rezwanul Hoque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aortic arch surgery is the challenging and most difficult surgery among the cardiovascular operations. Cerebral and spinal complications are the most feared and common complications of aortic arch surgery. With best available techniques for cerebral and spinal protection, anesthetic management and good post-operative care; aortic arch surgery is considerably safer nowadays and satisfactory results can be achieved in most patients. Also, selecting the sites for arterial cannulation to maintain whole body circulation, during isolation of the aortic arch to operate on it, need proper anatomical description of the extent of the aneurysm. This is also achievable by the availability of the imaging techniques like Computed Tomog­raphy (CT with or without contrast, CT Angiography (CTA and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. We are reporting a case of aneurysm of aortic arch in a young adult, who had undergone repair under cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermia with low flow and had normal convalescence without any cerebral or spinal complications.

  10. Polar orientation of renal grafts within the proximal seal zone affects risk of early type IA endoleaks after chimney endovascular aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Ullery, Brant W; Itoga, Nathan; Lee, Jason T

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the polar orientation of renal chimney grafts within the proximal seal zone and to determine whether graft orientation is associated with early type IA endoleak or renal graft compression after chimney endovascular aneurysm repair (ch-EVAR). Patients who underwent ch-EVAR with at least one renal chimney graft from 2009 to 2015 were included in this analysis. Centerline three-dimensional reconstructions were used to analyze postoperative computed tomography scans. The 12-o'clock polar position was set at the takeoff of the superior mesenteric artery. Relative polar positions of chimney grafts were recorded at the level of the renal artery ostium, at the mid-seal zone, and at the proximal edge of the graft fabric. Early type IA endoleaks were defined as evidence of a perigraft flow channel within the proximal seal zone. There were 62 consecutive patients who underwent ch-EVAR (35 double renal, 27 single renal) for juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms with a mean follow-up of 31.2 months; 18 (29%) early type IA "gutter" endoleaks were identified. During follow-up, the majority of these (n = 13; 72%) resolved without intervention, whereas two patients required reintervention (3.3%). Estimated renal graft patency was 88.9% at 60 months. Left renal chimney grafts were most commonly at the 3-o'clock position (51.1%) at the ostium, traversing posteriorly to the 5- to 7-o'clock positions (55.5%) at the fabric edge. Right renal chimney grafts started most commonly at the 9-o'clock position (n = 17; 33.3%) and tended to traverse both anteriorly (11 to 1 o'clock; 39.2%) and posteriorly (5 to 7 o'clock; 29.4%) at the fabric edge. In the polar plane, the majority of renal chimney grafts (n = 83; 85.6%) traversed 90 degrees were independently associated with early type IA endoleaks (odds ratio, 11.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-64.8) even after controlling for other device and anatomic variables. Polar orientation of the chimney

  11. Comparison of long-term clinical outcome between patients with chronic versus acute type B aortic dissection treated by implantation of a stent graft: a single-center report

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    Chen SL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Shao-Liang Chen, Jian-Cheng Zhu, Xiao-Bo Li, Fei Ye, Jun-Jie Zhang, Zhi-Zhong Liu, Nai-Liang Tian, Song Lin, Cheng-Yu Lv Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China Background: Stent grafting for treatment of type B aortic dissection has been extensively used. However, the difference in the long-term clinical outcome between patients with chronic versus acute type B aortic dissection remains unknown. This study aimed to analyze the difference in long-term clinical outcome after endovascular repair for patients with chronic (93% complete false-lumen thrombosis. Untreated tear and type I endoleak were predictors of clinical events during follow-up. Conclusion: Comparable long-term clinical results were achieved in patients with chronic or acute type B aortic dissection after implantation of a stent graft. Keywords: