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Sample records for endosperm gene floa

  1. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  2. Temporal patterns of gene expression in developing maize endosperm identified through transcriptome sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guosheng; Wang, Dongfang; Yang, Ruolin; Logan, Kyle; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Shanshan; Skaggs, Megan I.; Lloyd, Alan; Burnett, William J.; Laurie, John D.; Hunter, Brenda G.; Dannenhoffer, Joanne M.; Larkins, Brian A.; Drews, Gary N; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    In flowering plants, double fertilization gives rise to an embryo and the endosperm, an absorptive storage structure that supports embryogenesis and seedling germination. In cereal grains, endosperm comprises a large proportion of the mature seed, contains large amounts of carbohydrates and proteins, and is an important source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the genes expressed in the early developing endosperm in maize. We also show...

  3. ZmDof3, a maize endosperm-specific Dof protein gene, regulates starch accumulation and aleurone development in maize endosperm.

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    Qi, Xin; Li, Shixue; Zhu, Yaxi; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the function of Dof transcription factors during kernel development in maize, we first identified Dof genes in the maize genome. We found that ZmDof3 was exclusively expressed in the endosperm of maize kernel and had the features of a Dof transcription factor. Suppression of ZmDof3 resulted in a defective kernel phenotype with reduced starch content and a partially patchy aleurone layer. The expression levels of starch synthesis-related genes and aleurone differentiation-associated genes were down-regulated in ZmDof3 knockdown kernels, indicating that ZmDof3 plays an important role in maize endosperm development. The maize endosperm, occupying a large proportion of the kernel, plays an important role in seed development and germination. Current knowledge regarding the regulation of endosperm development is limited. Dof proteins, a family of plant-specific transcription factors, play critical roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, an endosperm-specific Dof protein gene, ZmDof3, was identified in maize through genome-wide screening. Suppression of ZmDof3 resulted in a defective kernel phenotype. The endosperm of ZmDof3 knockdown kernels was loosely packed with irregular starch granules observed by electronic microscope. Through genome-wide expression profiling, we found that down-regulated genes were enriched in GO terms related to carbohydrate metabolism. Moreover, ZmDof3 could bind to the Dof core element in the promoter of starch biosynthesis genes Du1 and Su2 in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the aleurone at local position in mature ZmDof3 knockdown kernels varied from one to three layers, which consisted of smaller and irregular cells. Further analyses showed that knockdown of ZmDof3 reduced the expression of Nkd1, which is involved in aleurone cell differentiation, and that ZmDof3 could bind to the Dof core element in the Nkd1 promoter. Our study reveals that ZmDof3 functions in maize endosperm development as a positive regulator in

  4. The Bsister MADS gene FST determines ovule patterning and development of the zygotic embryo and endosperm.

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    Dong Sun Lee

    Full Text Available Many homeotic MADS-box genes have been identified as controllers of the floral transition and floral development. However, information regarding Bsister (Bs-function genes in monocots is still limited. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a Bs-group MADS-box gene FEMALE-STERILE (FST, whose frame-shift mutation (fst results in abnormal ovules and the complete abortion of zygotic embryos and endosperms in rice. Anatomical analysis showed that the defective development in the fst mutant exclusively occurred in sporophytic tissues including integuments, fertilized proembryos and endosperms. Analyses of the spatio-temporal expression pattern revealed that the prominent FST gene products accumulated in the inner integument, nucellar cell of the micropylar side, apical and base of the proembryos and free endosperm nuclei. Microarray and gene ontology analysis unraveled substantial changes in the expression level of many genes in the fst mutant ovules and seeds, with a subset of genes involved in several developmental and hormonal pathways appearing to be down-regulated. Using both forward and reverse genetics approaches, we demonstrated that rice FST plays indispensable roles and multiple functions during ovule and early seed development. These findings support a novel function for the Bs-group MADS-box genes in plants.

  5. Correlation-maximizing surrogate gene space for visual mining of gene expression patterns in developing barley endosperm tissue

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    Usadel Björn

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micro- and macroarray technologies help acquire thousands of gene expression patterns covering important biological processes during plant ontogeny. Particularly, faithful visualization methods are beneficial for revealing interesting gene expression patterns and functional relationships of coexpressed genes. Such screening helps to gain deeper insights into regulatory behavior and cellular responses, as will be discussed for expression data of developing barley endosperm tissue. For that purpose, high-throughput multidimensional scaling (HiT-MDS, a recent method for similarity-preserving data embedding, is substantially refined and used for (a assessing the quality and reliability of centroid gene expression patterns, and for (b derivation of functional relationships of coexpressed genes of endosperm tissue during barley grain development (0–26 days after flowering. Results Temporal expression profiles of 4824 genes at 14 time points are faithfully embedded into two-dimensional displays. Thereby, similar shapes of coexpressed genes get closely grouped by a correlation-based similarity measure. As a main result, by using power transformation of correlation terms, a characteristic cloud of points with bipolar sandglass shape is obtained that is inherently connected to expression patterns of pre-storage, intermediate and storage phase of endosperm development. Conclusion The new HiT-MDS-2 method helps to create global views of expression patterns and to validate centroids obtained from clustering programs. Furthermore, functional gene annotation for developing endosperm barley tissue is successfully mapped to the visualization, making easy localization of major centroids of enriched functional categories possible.

  6. Antisense suppression of LOX3 gene expression in rice endosperm enhances seed longevity.

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    Xu, Huibin; Wei, Yidong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Lian, Ling; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Chen, Qiushi; Lin, Zhongping; Wang, Zonghua; Xie, Huaan; Zhang, Jianfu

    2015-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a major role in seed longevity and viability. In rice grains, lipid peroxidation is catalyzed by the enzyme lipoxygenase 3 (LOX3). Previous reports showed that grain from the rice variety DawDam in which the LOX3 gene was deleted had less stale flavour after grain storage than normal rice. The molecular mechanism by which LOX3 expression is regulated during endosperm development remains unclear. In this study, we expressed a LOX3 antisense construct in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants to down-regulate LOX3 expression in rice endosperm. The transgenic plants exhibited a marked decrease in LOX mRNA levels, normal phenotypes and a normal life cycle. We showed that LOX3 activity and its ability to produce 9-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (9-HPOD) from linoleic acid were significantly lower in transgenic seeds than in wild-type seeds by measuring the ultraviolet absorption of 9-HPOD at 234 nm and by high-performance liquid chromatography. The suppression of LOX3 expression in rice endosperm increased grain storability. The germination rate of TS-91 (antisense LOX3 transgenic line) was much higher than the WT (29% higher after artificial ageing for 21 days, and 40% higher after natural ageing for 12 months). To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that decreased LOX3 expression can preserve rice grain quality during storage with no impact on grain yield, suggesting potential applications in agricultural production. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A novel highly differentially expressed gene in wheat endosperm associated with bread quality

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    Furtado, A.; Bundock, P. C.; Banks, P. M.; Fox, G.; Yin, X.; Henry, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression in developing wheat seeds was used to identify a gene, wheat bread making (wbm), with highly differential expression (~1000 fold) in the starchy endosperm of genotypes varying in bread making quality. Several alleles differing in the 5’-upstream region (promoter) of this gene were identified, with one present only in genotypes with high levels of wbm expression. RNA-Seq analysis revealed low or no wbm expression in most genotypes but high expression (0.2-0.4% of total gene expression) in genotypes that had good bread loaf volume. The wbm gene is predicted to encode a mature protein of 48 amino acids (including four cysteine residues) not previously identified in association with wheat quality, possibly because of its small size and low frequency in the wheat gene pool. Genotypes with high wbm expression all had good bread making quality but not always good physical dough qualities. The predicted protein was sulphur rich suggesting the possibility of a contribution to bread loaf volume by supporting the crossing linking of proteins in gluten. Improved understanding of the molecular basis of differences in bread making quality may allow more rapid development of high performing genotypes with acceptable end-use properties and facilitate increased wheat production. PMID:26011437

  8. Temperature Stress at Grain Filling Stage Mediates Expression of Three Isoform Genes Encoding Starch Branching Enzymes in Rice Endosperm

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    Ke-su WEI

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An early-maturity indica rice variety Zhefu 49, whose grain quality and starch structure are sensitive to environmental temperature, was subjected to different temperatures (32°C for high temperature and 22°C for optimum temperature at the grain filling stage in plant growth chambers, and the different expressions of three isoform genes (SBEI, SBEIII and SBEIV encoding starch branching enzyme (SBE in the endosperms were studied by the real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR method. Effects of high temperature on the SBE expression in developing rice endosperms were isoform-dependent. High temperature significantly down-regulated the expressions of SBEI and SBEIII, while up-regulated the expression of SBEIV. Compared with SBEIV and SBEIII, the expression of SBEI gene in Zhefu 49 rice endosperms was more sensitive to temperature variation at the grain filling stage. This study indicates that changes in weather/climate conditions especially temperature stress influence rice grain formation and its quality as evidenced by isoform expression.

  9. Pyrophosphate-dependent fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase induction and attenuation of Hsp gene expression during endosperm modification in quality protein maize.

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    Guo, Xiaomei; Ronhovde, Kyla; Yuan, Lingling; Yao, Bo; Soundararajan, Madhavan P; Elthon, Thomas; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R

    2012-02-01

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard-endosperm version of the high-lysine opaque2 (o2) maize (Zea mays) mutant, but the genes involved in modification of the soft o2 endosperm are largely unknown. Pyrophosphate-dependent fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFP) catalyzes the ATP-independent conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate in glycolysis. We found a large increase in transcript and protein levels of the α-regulatory subunit of PFP (PFPα) in QPM endosperm. In vitro enzyme assays showed a significant increase in forward PFP activity in developing endosperm extracts of QPM relative to the wild type and o2. An expressed retrogene version of PFPα of unknown function that was not up-regulated in QPM was also identified. The elevated expression levels of a number of ATP-requiring heat shock proteins (Hsps) in o2 endosperm are ameliorated in QPM. PFPα is also coinduced with Hsps in maize roots in response to heat, cold, and the unfolded protein response stresses. We propose that reduced ATP availability resulting from the generalized Hsp response in addition to the reduction of pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase activity in o2 endosperm is compensated in part by increased PFP activity in QPM.

  10. Effect of suppression of arabinoxylan synthetic genes in wheat endosperm on chain length of arabinoxylan and extract viscosity.

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    Freeman, Jackie; Lovegrove, Alison; Wilkinson, Mark David; Saulnier, Luc; Shewry, Peter Robert; Mitchell, Rowan Andrew Craig

    2016-01-01

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is the dominant component within wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) endosperm cell walls, accounting for 70% of the polysaccharide. The viscosity of aqueous extracts from wheat grain is a key trait influencing the processing for various end uses, and this is largely determined by the properties of endosperm AX. We have previously shown dramatic effects on endosperm AX in transgenic wheat by down-regulating either TaGT43_2 or TaGT47_2 genes (orthologues to IRX9 and IRX10 in Arabidopsis, respectively) implicated in AX chain extension and the TaXAT1 gene responsible for monosubstitution by 3-linked arabinose. Here, we use these transgenic lines to investigate the relationship between amounts of AX in soluble and insoluble fractions, the chain-length distribution of these measured by intrinsic viscosity and the overall effect on extract viscosity. In transgenic lines expressing either the TaGT43_2 or TaGT47_2 RNAi transgenes, the intrinsic viscosities of water-extractable (WE-AX) and of a water-insoluble alkaline-extracted fraction (AE-AX) were decreased by between 10% and 50% compared to control lines. In TaXAT1 RNAi lines, there was a 15% decrease in intrinsic viscosity of WE-AX but no consistent effect on that of AE-AX. All transgenic lines showed decreases in extract viscosity with larger effects in TaGT43_2 and TaGT47_2 RNAi lines (by up to sixfold) than in TaXAT1 RNAi lines (by twofold). These effects were explained by the decreases in amount and chain length of WE-AX, with decreases in amount having the greater influence. Extract viscosity from wheat grain can therefore be greatly decreased by suppression of single gene targets. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization of the fertilization independent endosperm ( FIE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproduction of angiosperm plants initiates from two fertilization events: an egg fusing with a sperm to form an embryo and a second sperm fusing with the central cell to generate an endosperm. The tryptophan-aspartate (WD) domain polycomb protein encoded by fertilization independent endosperm (FIE) gene, has been ...

  12. Control of Paternally Expressed Imprinted UPWARD CURLY LEAF1, a Gene Encoding an F-Box Protein That Regulates CURLY LEAF Polycomb Protein, in the Arabidopsis Endosperm.

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    Cheol Woong Jeong

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting, an epigenetic process in mammals and flowering plants, refers to the differential expression of alleles of the same genes in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. In Arabidopsis, imprinting occurs primarily in the endosperm, which nourishes the developing embryo. Recent high-throughput sequencing analyses revealed that more than 200 loci are imprinted in Arabidopsis; however, only a few of these imprinted genes and their imprinting mechanisms have been examined in detail. Whereas most imprinted loci characterized to date are maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs, PHERES1 (PHE1 and ADMETOS (ADM are paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs. Here, we report that UPWARD CURLY LEAF1 (UCL1, a gene encoding an E3 ligase that degrades the CURLY LEAF (CLF polycomb protein, is a PEG. After fertilization, paternally inherited UCL1 is expressed in the endosperm, but not in the embryo. The expression pattern of a β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene driven by the UCL1 promoter suggests that the imprinting control region (ICR of UCL1 is adjacent to a transposable element in the UCL1 5'-upstream region. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 silences the maternal UCL1 allele in the central cell prior to fertilization and in the endosperm after fertilization. The UCL1 imprinting pattern was not affected in paternal PRC2 mutants. We found unexpectedly that the maternal UCL1 allele is reactivated in the endosperm of Arabidopsis lines with mutations in cytosine DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1 or the DNA glycosylase DEMETER (DME, which antagonistically regulate CpG methylation of DNA. By contrast, maternal UCL1 silencing was not altered in mutants with defects in non-CpG methylation. Thus, silencing of the maternal UCL1 allele is regulated by both MET1 and DME as well as by PRC2, suggesting that divergent mechanisms for the regulation of PEGs evolved in Arabidopsis.

  13. Regulation of FA and TAG biosynthesis pathway genes in endosperms and embryos of high and low oil content genotypes of Jatropha curcas L.

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    Sood, Archit; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2015-09-01

    The rising demand for biofuels has raised concerns about selecting alternate and promising renewable energy crops which do not compete with food supply. Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.), a non-edible energy crop of the family euphorbiaceae, has the potential of providing biodiesel feedstock due to the presence of high proportion of unsaturated fatty acids (75%) in seed oil which is mainly accumulated in endosperm and embryo. The molecular basis of seed oil biosynthesis machinery has been studied in J. curcas, however, what genetic differences contribute to differential oil biosynthesis and accumulation in genotypes varying for oil content is poorly understood. We investigated expression profile of 18 FA and TAG biosynthetic pathway genes in different developmental stages of embryo and endosperm from high (42%) and low (30%) oil content genotypes grown at two geographical locations. Most of the genes showed relatively higher expression in endosperms of high oil content genotype, whereas no significant difference was observed in endosperms versus embryos of low oil content genotype. The promoter regions of key genes from FA and TAG biosynthetic pathways as well as other genes implicated in oil accumulation were analyzed for regulatory elements and transcription factors specific to oil or lipid accumulation in plants such as Dof, CBF (LEC1), SORLIP, GATA and Skn-1_motif etc. Identification of key genes from oil biosynthesis and regulatory elements specific to oil deposition will be useful not only in dissecting the molecular basis of high oil content but also improving seed oil content through transgenic or molecular breeding approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular analysis of endo-β-mannanase genes upon seed imbibition suggest a cross-talk between radicle and micropylar endosperm during germination of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; del Carmen Rodríguez-Gacio, María; Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Carbonero, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    The endo-β-mannanase (MAN) family is represented in the Arabidopsis genome by eight members, all with canonical signal peptides and only half of them being expressed in germinating seeds. The transcripts of these genes were localized in the radicle and micropylar endosperm (ME) before radicle protrusion and this expression disappears as soon as the endosperm is broken by the emerging radicle tip. However, only three of these MAN genes, AtMAN5, AtMAN7 and especially AtMAN6 influence the germination time (t50) as assessed by the analysis of the corresponding knock-out lines. The data suggest a possible interaction between embryo and ME regarding the role of MAN during the Arabidopsis germination process. PMID:21301215

  15. Development of marker-free transgenic Jatropha curcas producing curcin-deficient seeds through endosperm-specific RNAi-mediated gene silencing.

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    Gu, Keyu; Tian, Dongsheng; Mao, Huizhu; Wu, Lifang; Yin, Zhongchao

    2015-10-08

    Jatropha curcas L. is a potential biofuel plant and its seed oil is suitable for biodiesel production. Despite this promising application, jatropha seeds contain two major toxic components, namely phorbol esters and curcins. These compounds would reduce commercial value of seed cake and raise safety and environment concerns on jatropha plantation and processing. Curcins are Type I ribosome inactivating proteins. Several curcin genes have been identified in the jatropha genome. Among which, the Curcin 1 (C1) gene is identified to be specifically expressed in endosperm, whereas the Curcin 2A (C2A) is mainly expressed in young leaves. A marker-free RNAi construct carrying a β-estradiol-regulated Cre/loxP system and a C1 promoter-driven RNAi cassette for C1 gene was made and used to generate marker-free transgenic RNAi plants to specifically silence the C1 gene in the endosperm of J. curcas. Plants of transgenic line L1, derived from T0-1, carry two copies of marker-free RNAi cassette, whereas plants of L35, derived from T0-35, harbored one copy of marker-free RNAi cassette and three copies of closely linked and yet truncated Hpt genes. The C1 protein content in endosperm of L1 and L35 seeds was greatly reduced or undetectable, while the C2A proteins in young leaves of T0-1 and T0-35 plants were unaffected. In addition, the C1 mRNA transcripts were undetectable in the endosperm of T3 seeds of L1 and L35. The results demonstrated that the expression of the C1 gene was specifically down-regulated or silenced by the double-stranded RNA-mediated RNA interference generated from the RNAi cassette. The C1 promoter-driven RNAi cassette for the C1 gene in transgenic plants was functional and heritable. Both C1 transcripts and C1 proteins were greatly down-regulated or silenced in the endosperm of transgenic J. curcas. The marker-free transgenic plants and curcin-deficient seeds developed in this study provided a solution for the toxicity of curcins in jatropha seeds and

  16. Impaired auxin biosynthesis in the defective endosperm18 mutant is due to mutational loss of expression in the ZmYuc1 gene encoding endosperm-specific YUCCA1 protein in maize.

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    A seed-specific maize mutant, defective endosperm18 (de18), accumulates approximately 40% less dry mass and 10- to 15- fold less auxin (IAA) as compared to the De18; however, a causal basis of these changes is not known. Cellular analyses here showed that the de18 developing endosperm had lower tota...

  17. Overexpression of the rice carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 gene in Golden Rice endosperm suggests apocarotenoids as substrates in planta.

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    Ilg, Andrea; Yu, Qiuju; Schaub, Patrick; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-08-01

    Carotenoids are converted by carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases that catalyze oxidative cleavage reactions leading to apocarotenoids. However, apocarotenoids can also be further truncated by some members of this enzyme family. The plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 1 (CCD1) subfamily is known to degrade both carotenoids and apocarotenoids in vitro, leading to different volatile compounds. In this study, we investigated the impact of the rice CCD1 (OsCCD1) on the pigmentation of Golden Rice 2 (GR2), a genetically modified rice variety accumulating carotenoids in the endosperm. For this purpose, the corresponding cDNA was introduced into the rice genome under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter in sense and anti-sense orientations. Despite high expression levels of OsCCD1 in sense plants, pigment analysis revealed carotenoid levels and patterns comparable to those of GR2, pleading against carotenoids as substrates in rice endosperm. In support, similar carotenoid contents were determined in anti-sense plants. To check whether OsCCD1 overexpressed in GR2 endosperm is active, in vitro assays were performed with apocarotenoid substrates. HPLC analysis confirmed the cleavage activity of introduced OsCCD1. Our data indicate that apocarotenoids rather than carotenoids are the substrates of OsCCD1 in planta.

  18. The compressive strength of wheat endosperm: Analysis of endosperm 'bricks'.

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    The material properties of wheat grain endosperm are central to its processing and end-use quality. The preparation of geometrically-defined endosperm specimens free of bran, germ, and pigment strand can facilitate the objective study of endosperm material properties. This study was conducted to c...

  19. Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Chuanxin; Mutisya, J.; Rosenquist, S.; Baguma, Y.; Jansson, C.

    2009-01-15

    Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIB genes, encoding, respectively, starch branching enzyme (SBE) I, IIA and IIB, in the developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were studied. Full-length genomic and cDNA clones for sorghum was cloned and the SBEIIA cDNA was used together with gene-specific probes for sorghum SBEIIB and SBEI. In contrast to sorghum SBEIIB, which was expressed primarily in endosperm and embryo, SBEIIA was expressed also in vegetative tissues. All three genes shared a similar temporal expression profile during endosperm development, with a maximum activity at 15-24 days after pollination. This is different from barley and maize where SBEI gene activity showed a significantly later onset compared to that of SBEIIA and SBEIIB. Expression of the three SBE genes in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle.

  20. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Ehlers, Katrin; Bhide, Amey S; Tekleyohans, Dawit G; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Becker, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  1. Development of endosperm transfer cells in barley

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    Johannes eThiel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Endosperm transfer cells (ETCs are positioned at the intersection of maternal and filial tissues in seeds of cereals and represent a bottleneck for apoplasmic transport of assimilates into the endosperm. Endosperm cellularization starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the highly specialized ETCs. During differentiation barley ETCs develop characteristic flange-like wall ingrowths to facilitate effective nutrient transfer. A comprehensive morphological analysis depicted distinct developmental time points in establishment of transfer cell morphology and revealed intracellular changes possibly associated with cell wall metabolism. Embedded inside the grain, ETCs are barely accessible by manual preparation. To get tissue-specific information about ETC specification and differentiation, laser microdissection(LM-based methods were used for transcript and metabolite profiling. Transcriptome analysis of ETCs at different developmental stages by microarrays indicated activated gene expression programs related to control of cell proliferation and cell shape, cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism reflecting the morphological changes during early ETC development. Transporter genes reveal distinct expression patterns suggesting a switch from active to passive modes of nutrient uptake with the onset of grain filling. Tissue-specific RNA-seq of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial stage until functionality in nutrient transfer identified a high number of novel transcripts putatively involved in ETC differentiation. An essential role for two-component signaling (TCS pathways in transfer cell development of barley emerged from this analysis. Correlative data provide evidence for ABA and ethylene influences on ETC differentiation and hint at a crosstalk between hormone signal transduction and TCS phosphorelays. Collectively, the data expose a comprehensive view on ETC development, associated pathways and identified candidate genes for

  2. Genomic DNA Methylation Analyses Reveal the Distinct Profiles in Castor Bean Seeds with Persistent Endosperms1

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    Yang, Tianquan; Dong, Xue; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of genomic DNA methylation in seeds have been restricted to a few model plants. The endosperm genomic DNA hypomethylation has been identified in angiosperm, but it is difficult to dissect the mechanism of how this hypomethylation is established and maintained because endosperm is ephemeral and disappears with seed development in most dicots. Castor bean (Ricinus communis), unlike Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), endosperm is persistent throughout seed development, providing an excellent model in which to dissect the mechanism of endosperm genomic hypomethylation in dicots. We characterized the DNA methylation-related genes encoding DNA methyltransferases and demethylases and analyzed their expression profiles in different tissues. We examined genomic methylation including CG, CHG, and CHH contexts in endosperm and embryo tissues using bisulfite sequencing and revealed that the CHH methylation extent in endosperm and embryo was, unexpectedly, substantially higher than in previously studied plants, irrespective of the CHH percentage in their genomes. In particular, we found that the endosperm exhibited a global reduction in CG and CHG methylation extents relative to the embryo, markedly switching global gene expression. However, CHH methylation occurring in endosperm did not exhibit a significant reduction. Combining with the expression of 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mapped within transposable element (TE) regions and genes involved in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, we demonstrate that the 24-nucleotide siRNAs played a critical role in maintaining CHH methylation and repressing the activation of TEs in persistent endosperm development. This study discovered a novel genomic DNA methylation pattern and proposes the potential mechanism occurring in dicot seeds with persistent endosperm. PMID:27208275

  3. Characterization of the imprinting and expression patterns of ZAG2 in maize endosperm and embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chaoxian; Wang, Jiuguang; Mei, Xiupeng; Deng, Xiaojing; Yu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaoli; Wang, Guoqiang; Liu, Zhizhai; Cai, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    ZAG2 has been identified as a maternally expressed imprinted gene in maize endosperm. Our study revealed that paternally inherited ZAG2 alleles were imprinted in maize endosperm and embryo at 14 days after pollination (DAP), and consistently imprinted in endosperm at 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, and 28 DAP in reciprocal crosses between B73 and Mo17. ZAG2 alleles were also imprinted in reciprocal crosses between Zheng 58 and Chang 7-2 and between Huang C and 178. ZAG2 alleles exhibited diff...

  4. Widespread Contamination of Arabidopsis Embryo and Endosperm Transcriptome Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Michael A; Nodine, Michael D

    2017-04-01

    A major goal of global gene expression profiling in plant seeds has been to investigate the parental contributions to the transcriptomes of early embryos and endosperm. However, consistency between independent studies has been poor, leading to considerable debate. We have developed a statistical tool that reveals the presence of substantial RNA contamination from maternal tissues in nearly all published Arabidopsis thaliana endosperm and early embryo transcriptomes generated in these studies. We demonstrate that maternal RNA contamination explains the poor reproducibility of these transcriptomic data sets. Furthermore, we found that RNA contamination from maternal tissues has been repeatedly misinterpreted as epigenetic phenomena, which has resulted in inaccurate conclusions regarding the parental contributions to both the endosperm and early embryo transcriptomes. After accounting for maternal RNA contamination, no published genome-wide data set supports the concept of delayed paternal genome activation in plant embryos. Moreover, our analysis suggests that maternal and paternal genomic imprinting are equally rare events in Arabidopsis endosperm. Our publicly available software (https://github.com/Gregor-Mendel-Institute/tissue-enrichment-test) can help the community assess the level of contamination in transcriptome data sets generated from both seed and non-seed tissues. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell wall invertase as a regulator in determining sequential development of endosperm and embryo through glucose signaling early in seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Liao, Shengjin; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Seed development depends on coordination among embryo, endosperm and seed coat. Endosperm undergoes nuclear division soon after fertilization, whereas embryo remains quiescent for a while. Such a developmental sequence is of great importance for proper seed development. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Recent results on the cellular domain- and stage-specific expression of invertase genes in cotton and Arabidopsis revealed that cell wall invertase may positively and specifically regulate nuclear division of endosperm after fertilization, thereby playing a role in determining the sequential development of endosperm and embryo, probably through glucose signaling.

  6. Near infrared spectra indicate specific mutant endosperm genes and reveal a new mechanism for substituting starch with (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Møller, B.; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    Near Infrared Reflectance spectroscopy was tested as a screening method to characterise high lysine mutants from a barley collection by classification through Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Mean spectra of the samples within each cluster identified gene-specific patterns in the 2270-2360 nm ...... the phenotype by chemometric classification of a spectral library, representing the digitised phenome from a barley gene bank....

  7. Proteomic Comparison of Basal Endosperm in Maize miniature1 Mutant and its Wild-type Mn1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia eSilva-Sanchez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing endosperm in maize seed is a major site for biosynthesis and storage of starch and proteins, and of immense economic importance for its role in food, feed and biofuel production. The basal part of endosperm performs a major role in solute, water and nutrition acquisition from mother plant to sustain these functions. The miniature1 (mn1 mutation is a loss-of-function mutation of the Mn1-encoded cell wall invertase that is entirely expressed in the basal endosperm and is essential for many of the metabolic and signaling functions associated with metabolically released hexose sugars in developing endosperm. Here we report a comparative proteomic study between Mn1 and mn1 basal endosperm to better understand basis of pleiotropic effects on many diverse traits in the mutant. Specifically, we used iTRAQ based quantitative proteomics combined with Gene Ontology and bioinformatics to understand functional basis of the proteomic information. A total of 2518 proteins were identified from soluble and cell wall associated protein fractions; of these 131 proteins were observed to be differentially expressed in the two genotypes. The main functional groups of proteins that were significantly different were those involved in the carbohydrate metabolic and catabolic process, and cell homeostasis. The study constitutes the first proteomic analysis of basal endosperm cell layers in relation to endosperm growth and development in maize.

  8. Replication of DNA during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of [6-H-3]-thymidine into DNA of developing barley end sperm was examined by autoradiography of cross sections of seeds and DNA analysis. The majority of nuclear divisions took place in the very young endosperm, but as late as 25 days after anthesis there was evidence for DNA re...

  9. Sugary Endosperm is Modulated by Starch Branching Enzyme IIa in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjoo; Choi, Min-Seon; Lee, Gileung; Jang, Su; Yoon, Mi-Ra; Kim, Backki; Piao, Rihua; Woo, Mi-Ok; Chin, Joong Hyoun; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2017-12-01

    Starch biosynthesis is one of the most important pathways that determine both grain quality and yield in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Sugary endosperm, sugary-1 (sug-1), is a mutant trait for starch biosynthesis. Rice plants carrying sug-1 produce grains that accumulate water-soluble carbohydrates instead of starch, even after maturity. Although this trait enhances the diversity of grain quality, sugary endosperm rice has hardly been commercialized due to the severely wrinkled grains and subsequent problems in milling. This study was conducted to identify the genes responsible for the sug-h phenotype through a map-based cloning technology. We induced a mild sugary mutant, sugary-h (sug-h) through the chemical mutagenesis on the Korean japonica cultivar Hwacheong. Grains of the sug-h mutant were translucent and amber-colored, and the endosperm appeared less wrinkled than sug-1, whereas the soluble sugar content was fairly high. These characteristics confer greater marketability to the sug-h mutant. Genetic analyses indicated that the sug-h mutant phenotype was controlled by a complementary interaction of two recessive genes, Isoamylase1 (OsISA1), which was reported previously, and Starch branching enzyme IIa (OsBEIIa), which was newly identified in this study. Complementation tests indicated that OsBEIIa regulated the properties of sugary endosperm. Complementary interactions between the starch biosynthesis genes OsISA1 and OsBEIIa determine the mild sugary endosperm mutant, sugary-h, in rice. Our finding may facilitate the breeding of sugaryendosperm rice for commercial benefit.

  10. Widespread Contamination of Arabidopsis Embryo and Endosperm Transcriptome Data Sets[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A major goal of global gene expression profiling in plant seeds has been to investigate the parental contributions to the transcriptomes of early embryos and endosperm. However, consistency between independent studies has been poor, leading to considerable debate. We have developed a statistical tool that reveals the presence of substantial RNA contamination from maternal tissues in nearly all published Arabidopsis thaliana endosperm and early embryo transcriptomes generated in these studies. We demonstrate that maternal RNA contamination explains the poor reproducibility of these transcriptomic data sets. Furthermore, we found that RNA contamination from maternal tissues has been repeatedly misinterpreted as epigenetic phenomena, which has resulted in inaccurate conclusions regarding the parental contributions to both the endosperm and early embryo transcriptomes. After accounting for maternal RNA contamination, no published genome-wide data set supports the concept of delayed paternal genome activation in plant embryos. Moreover, our analysis suggests that maternal and paternal genomic imprinting are equally rare events in Arabidopsis endosperm. Our publicly available software (https://github.com/Gregor-Mendel-Institute/tissue-enrichment-test) can help the community assess the level of contamination in transcriptome data sets generated from both seed and non-seed tissues. PMID:28314828

  11. The Dynamics of Transcript Abundance during Cellularization of Developing Barley Endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runxuan; Tucker, Matthew R; Burton, Rachel A; Shirley, Neil J; Little, Alan; Morris, Jenny; Milne, Linda; Houston, Kelly; Hedley, Pete E; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-03-01

    Within the cereal grain, the endosperm and its nutrient reserves are critical for successful germination and in the context of grain utilization. The identification of molecular determinants of early endosperm development, particularly regulators of cell division and cell wall deposition, would help predict end-use properties such as yield, quality, and nutritional value. Custom microarray data have been generated using RNA isolated from developing barley grain endosperm 3 d to 8 d after pollination (DAP). Comparisons of transcript abundance over time revealed 47 gene expression modules that can be clustered into 10 broad groups. Superimposing these modules upon cytological data allowed patterns of transcript abundance to be linked with key stages of early grain development. Here, attention was focused on how the datasets could be mined to explore and define the processes of cell wall biosynthesis, remodeling, and degradation. Using a combination of spatial molecular network and gene ontology enrichment analyses, it is shown that genes involved in cell wall metabolism are found in multiple modules, but cluster into two main groups that exhibit peak expression at 3 DAP to 4 DAP and 5 DAP to 8 DAP. The presence of transcription factor genes in these modules allowed candidate genes for the control of wall metabolism during early barley grain development to be identified. The data are publicly available through a dedicated web interface (https://ics.hutton.ac.uk/barseed/), where they can be used to interrogate co- and differential expression for any other genes, groups of genes, or transcription factors expressed during early endosperm development. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. A chemometric evaluation of the underlying physical and chemical patterns that support near infrared spectroscopy of barley seeds as a tool for explorative classification of endosperm genes and gene combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Susanne; Søndergaard, Ib; Møller, Birthe

    2005-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopic (NIR; 1100-2500 nm), chemical and genetic data were combined to study the pleiotropic secondary effects of mutant genes on milled samples in a barley seed model. NIR and chemical data were both effective in classifying gene and gene combinations by Principal Component...... revealing pleiotropic gene effects in expression timing that supporting the gene classification. To verify that NIR spectroscopy data represents a physio-chemical fingerprint of the barley seed, physical and chemical spectral components were partially separated by Multiple Scatter Correction...... and their genetic classification ability verified. Wavelength bands with known water binding and (I -> 3, 1 -> 4)-beta-glucan assignments were successfully predicted by partial least squares regression giving insight into how NIR-data works in classification. Highly reproducible gene-specific, covariate...

  13. The compressive strength of wheat endosperm: Comparison of endosperm 'bricks' to the single kernel characterization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The three major classes of endosperm texture (“grain hardness”) of soft and hard common, and durum wheat represent and define one of the leading determinants of the milling and end-use quality of wheat. Although these three genetic classes are directly related to the Hardness locus and puroindoline ...

  14. Lignification of developing maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm transfer cells and starchy endosperm cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sara; Monjardino, Paulo; Mendonça, Duarte; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Fernandes, Rui; Sampaio, Paula; Salema, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells in maize have extensive cell wall ingrowths that play a key role in kernel development. Although the incorporation of lignin would support this process, its presence in these structures has not been reported in previous studies. We used potassium permanganate staining combined with transmission electron microscopy – energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry as well as acriflavine staining combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine whether the most basal endosperm transfer cells (MBETCs) contain lignified cell walls, using starchy endosperm cells for comparison. We investigated the lignin content of ultrathin sections of MBETCs treated with hydrogen peroxide. The lignin content of transfer and starchy cell walls was also determined by the acetyl bromide method. Finally, the relationship between cell wall lignification and MBETC growth/flange ingrowth orientation was evaluated. MBETC walls and ingrowths contained lignin throughout the period of cell growth we monitored. The same was true of the starchy cells, but those underwent an even more extensive growth period than the transfer cells. Both the reticulate and flange ingrowths were also lignified early in development. The significance of the lignification of maize endosperm cell walls is discussed in terms of its impact on cell growth and flange ingrowth orientation. PMID:24688487

  15. Application of two bicistronic systems involving 2A and IRES sequences to the biosynthesis of carotenoids in rice endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sun-Hwa; Liang, Ying Shi; Jung, Harin; Ahn, Mi-Jeong; Suh, Seok-Cheol; Kweon, Soon-Jong; Kim, Dong-Hern; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2010-10-01

    Coordination of multiple transgenes is essential for metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathways. Here, we report the utilization of two bicistronic systems involving the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus and the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) sequence from the crucifer-infecting tobamovirus to the biosynthesis of carotenoids in rice endosperm. Two carotenoid biosynthetic genes, phytoene synthase (Psy) from Capsicum and carotene desaturase (CrtI) from Pantoea, were linked via either the synthetic 2A sequence that was optimized for rice codons or the IRES sequence under control of the rice globulin promoter, generating PAC (Psy-2A-CrtI) and PIC (Psy-IRES-CrtI) constructs, respectively. The transgenic endosperm of PAC rice had a more intense golden color than did PIC rice, demonstrating that 2A was more efficient than IRES in coordinating gene expression. The 2A and IRES constructs were equally effective in driving transgene transcription. However, immunoblot analysis of CRTI, a protein encoded by the downstream open reading frame of the bicistronic constructs, revealed that 2A was ninefold more effective than IRES in driving translation. The PAC endosperms accumulated an average of 1.3 μg/g of total carotenoids, which was ninefold higher than was observed for PIC endosperms. In particular, accumulation of β-carotene was much higher in PAC endosperms than in PIC endosperms. Collectively, these results demonstrate that both 2A and IRES systems can coordinate the expression of two biosynthetic genes, with the 2A system exhibiting greater efficiency. Thus, the 2A expression system described herein is an effective new tool for multigene stacking in crop biotechnology. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Phytosiderophores determine thresholds for iron and zinc accumulation in biofortified rice endosperm while inhibiting the accumulation of cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakar, Raviraj; Alvarez Fernandez, Ana; Díaz-Benito, Pablo; Abadia, Javier; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2017-10-13

    Nicotianamine (NA) and 2'-deoxymugenic acid (DMA) are metal-chelating ligands that promote the accumulation of metals in rice endosperm, but it is unclear how these phytosiderophores regulate the levels of different metals and limit their accumulation. In this study, transgenic rice plants producing high levels of NA and DMA accumulated up to 4-fold more iron (Fe) and 2-fold more zinc (Zn) in the endosperm compared with wild-type plants. The distribution of Fe and Zn in vegetative tissues suggested that both metals are sequestered as a buffering mechanism to avoid overloading the seeds. The buffering mechanism involves the modulation of genes encoding metal transporters in the roots and aboveground vegetative tissues. As well as accumulating more Fe and Zn, the endosperm of the transgenic plants accumulated less cadmium (Cd), suggesting that higher levels of Fe and Zn competitively inhibit Cd accumulation. Our data show that although there is a strict upper limit for Fe (~22.5 µg g-1 dry weight) and Zn (~84 µg g-1 dry weight) accumulation in the endosperm, the careful selection of strategies to increase endosperm loading with essential minerals can also limit the accumulation of toxic metals such as Cd, thus further increasing the nutritional value of rice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Production of cecropin A antimicrobial peptide in rice seed endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cecropin A is a natural antimicrobial peptide that exhibits rapid, potent and long-lasting lytic activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens, thus having great biotechnological potential. Here, we report a system for producing bioactive cecropin A in rice seeds. Results Transgenic rice plants expressing a codon-optimized synthetic cecropin A gene drived by an endosperm-specific promoter, either the glutelin B1 or glutelin B4 promoter, were generated. The signal peptide sequence from either the glutelin B1 or the glutelin B4 were N-terminally fused to the coding sequence of the cecropin A. We also studied whether the presence of the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal at the C-terminal has an effect on cecropin A subcellular localization and accumulation. The transgenic rice plants showed stable transgene integration and inheritance. We show that cecropin A accumulates in protein storage bodies in the rice endosperm, particularly in type II protein bodies, supporting that the glutelin N-terminal signal peptides play a crucial role in directing the cecropin A to this organelle, independently of being tagged with the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The production of cecropin A in transgenic rice seeds did not affect seed viability or seedling growth. Furthermore, transgenic cecropin A seeds exhibited resistance to infection by fungal and bacterial pathogens (Fusarium verticillioides and Dickeya dadantii, respectively) indicating that the in planta-produced cecropin A is biologically active. Conclusions Rice seeds can sustain bioactive cecropin A production and accumulation in protein bodies. The system might benefit the production of this antimicrobial agent for subsequent applications in crop protection and food preservation. PMID:24755305

  18. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  19. High Temperature-Induced Expression of Rice α-Amylases in Developing Endosperm Produces Chalky Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Nakata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global warming impairs grain filling in rice and reduces starch accumulation in the endosperm, leading to chalky-appearing grains, which damages their market value. We found previously that high temperature-induced expression of starch-lytic α-amylases during ripening is crucial for grain chalkiness. Because the rice genome carries at least eight functional α-amylase genes, identification of the α-amylase(s that contribute most strongly to the production of chalky grains could accelerate efficient breeding. To identify α-amylase genes responsible for the production of chalky grains, we characterized the histological expression pattern of eight α-amylase genes and the influences of their overexpression on grain appearance and carbohydrate components through a series of experiments with transgenic rice plants. The promoter activity of most α-amylase genes was elevated to various extents at high temperature. Among them, the expression of Amy1A and Amy3C was induced in the internal, especially basal to dorsal, region of developing endosperm, whereas that of Amy3D was confined near the ventral aleurone. These regions coincided with the site of occurrence of chalkiness, which was in clear contrast to conventionally known expression patterns of the enzyme in the scutellum and aleurone during seed germination. Furthermore, overexpression of α-amylase genes, except for Amy3E, in developing endosperm produced various degrees of chalky grains without heat exposure, whereas that of Amy3E yielded normal translucent grains, as was the case in the vector control, even though Amy3E-overexpressing grains contained enhanced α-amylase activities. The weight of the chalky grains was decreased due to reduced amounts of starch, and microscopic observation of the chalky part of these grains revealed that their endosperm consisted of loosely packed round starch granules that had numerous pits on their surface, confirming the hydrolysis of the starch reserve by

  20. A Novel Factor FLOURY ENDOSPERM2 Is Involved in Regulation of Rice Grain Size and Starch Quality[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Kao-Chih; Kusano, Hiroaki; Koizumi, Kazuyoshi; Yamakawa, Hiromoto; Hakata, Makoto; Imamura, Tomohiro; Fukuda, Masato; Naito, Natsuka; Tsurumaki, Yumi; Yaeshima, Mitsuhiro; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Kudoh, Mari; Itoh, Eiko; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Yazaki, Junshi; Ando, Tsuyu; Yano, Masahiro; Aoyama, Takashi; Sasaki, Tadamasa; Satoh, Hikaru; Shimada, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm accumulates a massive amount of storage starch and storage proteins during seed development. However, little is known about the regulatory system involved in the production of storage substances. The rice flo2 mutation resulted in reduced grain size and starch quality. Map-based cloning identified FLOURY ENDOSPERM2 (FLO2), a member of a novel gene family conserved in plants, as the gene responsible for the rice flo2 mutation. FLO2 harbors a tetratricopeptide repeat motif, considered to mediate a protein–protein interactions. FLO2 was abundantly expressed in developing seeds coincident with production of storage starch and protein, as well as in leaves, while abundant expression of its homologs was observed only in leaves. The flo2 mutation decreased expression of genes involved in production of storage starch and storage proteins in the endosperm. Differences between cultivars in their responsiveness of FLO2 expression during high-temperature stress indicated that FLO2 may be involved in heat tolerance during seed development. Overexpression of FLO2 enlarged the size of grains significantly. These results suggest that FLO2 plays a pivotal regulatory role in rice grain size and starch quality by affecting storage substance accumulation in the endosperm. PMID:20889913

  1. 454 Transcriptome sequencing suggests a role for two-component signalling in cellularization and differentiation of barley endosperm transfer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Thiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell specification and differentiation in the endosperm of cereals starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the endosperm transfer cells (ETCs. Besides the importance in assimilate transfer, ETCs are proposed to play an essential role in the regulation of endosperm differentiation by affecting development of proximate endosperm tissues. We attempted to identify signalling elements involved in early endosperm differentiation by using a combination of laser-assisted microdissection and 454 transcriptome sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 454 sequencing of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial state until functionality in transfer processes captured a high proportion of novel transcripts which are not available in existing barley EST databases. Intriguingly, the ETC-transcriptome showed a high abundance of elements of the two-component signalling (TCS system suggesting an outstanding role in ETC differentiation. All components and subfamilies of the TCS, including distinct kinds of membrane-bound receptors, have been identified to be expressed in ETCs. The TCS system represents an ancient signal transduction system firstly discovered in bacteria and has previously been shown to be co-opted by eukaryotes, like fungi and plants, whereas in animals and humans this signalling route does not exist. Transcript profiling of TCS elements by qRT-PCR suggested pivotal roles for specific phosphorelays activated in a coordinated time flow during ETC cellularization and differentiation. ETC-specificity of transcriptionally activated TCS phosphorelays was assessed for early differentiation and cellularization contrasting to an extension of expression to other grain tissues at the beginning of ETC maturation. Features of candidate genes of distinct phosphorelays and transcriptional activation of genes putatively implicated in hormone signalling pathways hint at a crosstalk of hormonal influences, putatively ABA and ethylene, and

  2. Golden Rice: introducing the beta-carotene biosynthesis pathway into rice endosperm by genetic engineering to defeat vitamin A deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim; Ye, Xudong; Lucca, Paola; Schaub, Patrick; Welsch, Ralf; Potrykus, Ingo

    2002-03-01

    To obtain a functioning provitamin A (beta-carotene) biosynthetic pathway in rice endosperm, we introduced in a single, combined transformation effort the cDNA coding for phytoene synthase (psy) and lycopene beta-cyclase (beta-lcy) both from Narcissus pseudonarcissus and both under the control of the endosperm-specific glutelin promoter together with a bacterial phytoene desaturase (crtI, from Erwinia uredovora under constitutive 35S promoter control). This combination covers the requirements for beta-carotene synthesis and, as hoped, yellow beta-carotene-bearing rice endosperm was obtained in the T(0)-generation. Additional experiments revealed that the presence of beta-lcy was not necessary, because psy and crtI alone were able to drive beta-carotene synthesis as well as the formation of further downstream xanthophylls. Plausible explanations for this finding are that these downstream enzymes are constitutively expressed in rice endosperm or are induced by the transformation, e.g., by enzymatically formed products. Results using N. pseudonarcissus as a model system led to the development of a hypothesis, our present working model, that trans-lycopene or a trans-lycopene derivative acts as an inductor in a kind of feedback mechanism stimulating endogenous carotenogenic genes. Various institutional arrangements for disseminating Golden Rice to research institutes in developing countries also are discussed.

  3. Additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time of rice down-regulates cellulose synthesis in seed endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Midorikawa

    Full Text Available The balance between carbon and nitrogen is a key determinant of seed storage components, and thus, is of great importance to rice and other seed-based food crops. To clarify the influence of the rhizosphere carbon/nitrogen balance during the maturation stage of several seed components, transcriptome analysis was performed on the seeds from rice plants that were provided additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time. As a result, it was assessed that genes associated with molecular processes such as photosynthesis, trehalose metabolism, carbon fixation, amino acid metabolism, and cell wall metabolism were differentially expressed. Moreover, cellulose and sucrose synthases, which are involved in cellulose synthesis, were down-regulated. Therefore, we compared cellulose content of mature seeds that were treated with additional nitrogen fertilization with those from control plants using calcofluor staining. In these experiments, cellulose content in endosperm from plants receiving additional nitrogen fertilization was less than that in control endosperm. Other starch synthesis-related genes such as starch synthase 1, starch phosphorylase 2, and branching enzyme 3 were also down-regulated, whereas some α-amylase and β-amylase genes were up-regulated. On the other hand, mRNA expression of amino acid biosynthesis-related molecules was up-regulated. Moreover, additional nitrogen fertilization caused accumulation of storage proteins and up-regulated Cys-poor prolamin mRNA expression. These data suggest that additional nitrogen fertilization at heading time changes the expression of some storage substance-related genes and reduces cellulose levels in endosperm.

  4. Proteomic and genetic analysis of wheat endosperm albumins and globulins using deletion lines of cultivar Chinese Spring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlino, Marielle; Bousbata, Sabrina; Svensson, Birte

    2012-01-01

    identified using mass spectrometry and data mining. Salt-soluble endosperm proteins from 67 CS deletion lines were also separated by 2DE (four gels per line). Image analysis of the 268 2DE gels as compared to the CS reference proteome allowed the detection of qualitative and quantitative variations...... in endosperm proteins due to chromosomal deletions. This differential analysis of spots allowed structural or regulatory genes, encoding 211 proteins, to be located on segments of the 21 wheat chromosomes. In addition, variance analysis of quantitative variations in spot volume showed that the expression....... Quantitative or qualitative variation in a total of 386 proteins was influenced by genes assigned to at least one chromosomal region, while 66 % of all stained proteins were not found to be influenced by chromosome bins. Proteomics of deletion lines can, therefore, be used to simultaneously analyse...

  5. EFFECT OF ENDOSPERM HARDNESS ON AN ETHANOL PROCESS USING A GRANULAR STARCH HYDROLYZING ENZYME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; W Liu, D B; Johnston, K D; Rausch, S J; Schmidt, M E; Tumbleson, V Singh

    2010-01-01

    Granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GSHE) can hydrolyze starch at low temperature (32°C). The dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process) has fewer unit operations and no changes in process conditions (pH 4.0 and 32°C) compared to the conventional process because it dispenses with the cooking and liquefaction step. In this study, the effects of endosperm hardness, protease, urea, and GSHE levels on GSH process were evaluated. Ground corn, soft endosperm, and hard endosperm were processed using two GSHE levels (0.1 and 0.4 mL per 100 g ground material) and four treatments of protease and urea addition. Soft and hard endosperm materials were obtained by grinding and sifting flaking grits from a dry milling pilot plant; classifications were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy. During 72 h of simultaneous granular starch hydrolysis and fermentation (GSHF), ethanol and glucose profiles were determined using HPLC. Soft endosperm resulted in higher final ethanol concentrations compared to ground corn or hard endosperm. Addition of urea increased final ethanol concentrations for soft and hard endosperm. Protease addition increased ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates for soft endosperm, hard endosperm, and ground corn. The effect of protease addition on ethanol concentrations and fermentation rates was most predominant for soft endosperm, less for hard endosperm, and least for ground corn. Samples (soft endosperm, hard endosperm, or corn) with protease resulted in higher (1.0% to 10.5% v/v) ethanol concentration compared to samples with urea. The GSH process with protease requires little or no urea addition. For fermentation of soft endosperm, GSHE dose can be reduced. Due to nutrients (lipids, minerals, and soluble proteins) present in corn that enhance yeast growth, ground corn fermented faster at the beginning than hard and soft endosperm.

  6. The Miniature-1 (Mn1) gene product, cell wall invertase-2 (INCW2), is associated with wall-in-growths (WIGs) is basal endosperm transfer cells (BETCs) in developing seeds of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell wall invertases (CWI) are ionically bound to the cell wall in plant cells. A major CWI, INCW2, encoded by the Mn1 gene, provides the gateway to sucrose metabolism in developing seeds as it is entirely and exclusively localized to the BETCs that juxtapose the pedicel. The loss of INCW2 protein ...

  7. The effects of calcium regulation of endosperm reserve protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of steep liquor calcium ion on sorghum endosperm reserve protein mobilization were evaluated using two improved Nigeria sorghum cultivars (ICSV 400 and KSV 8). The key protein modification factors evaluated were free amino nitrogen (FAN), total non protein nitrogen (TNPN) and soluble protein of cold water ...

  8. Imaging the ER and Endomembrane System in Cereal Endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibl, Verena; Peters, Jenny; Stöger, Eva; Arcalís, Elsa

    2018-01-01

    The cereal endosperm is a complex structure comprising distinct cell types, characterized by specialized organelles for the accumulation of storage proteins. Protein trafficking in these cells is complicated by the presence of several different storage organelles including protein bodies (PBs) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dynamic protein storage vacuoles (PSVs). In addition, trafficking may follow a number of different routes depending on developmental stage, showing that the endomembrane system is capable of massive reorganization. Thus, developmental sequences involve progressive changes of the endomembrane system of endosperm tissue and are characterized by a high structural plasticity and endosomal activity.Given the technical dexterity required to access endosperm tissue and study subcellular structures and (seed storage protein) SSP trafficking in cereal seeds, static images are the state of the art providing a bulk of information concerning the cellular composition of seed tissue. In view of the highly dynamic endomembrane system in cereal endosperm cells, it is reasonable to expect that live cell imaging will help to characterize the spatial and temporal changes of the system. The high resolution achieved with electron microscopy perfectly complements the live cell imaging.We therefore established an imaging platform for TEM as well as for live cell imaging. Here, we describe the preparation of different cereal seed tissues for live cell imaging concomitant with immunolocalization studies and ultrastructure.

  9. Induction and multiplication of callus from endosperm of Cycas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The usage of medicinal plants in traditional medication has gained the attraction from global and local markets, mainly to cure diseases or simply for health maintenance. Callus cultures were initiated from the endosperm of the medicinal plant Cycas revoluta, cultured on half-strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium ...

  10. An Endosperm-Associated Cuticle Is Required for Arabidopsis Seed Viability, Dormancy and Early Control of Germination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien De Giorgi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular layers and seeds are prominent plant adaptations to terrestrial life that appeared early and late during plant evolution, respectively. The cuticle is a waterproof film covering plant aerial organs preventing excessive water loss and protecting against biotic and abiotic stresses. Cutin, consisting of crosslinked fatty acid monomers, is the most abundant and studied cuticular component. Seeds are dry, metabolically inert structures promoting plant dispersal by keeping the plant embryo in an arrested protected state. In Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, the embryo is surrounded by a single cell endosperm layer itself surrounded by a seed coat layer, the testa. Whole genome analyses lead us to identify cutin biosynthesis genes as regulatory targets of the phytohormones gibberellins (GA and abscisic acid (ABA signaling pathways that control seed germination. Cutin-containing layers are present in seed coats of numerous species, including Arabidopsis, where they regulate permeability to outer compounds. However, the role of cutin in mature seed physiology and germination remains poorly understood. Here we identify in mature seeds a thick cuticular film covering the entire outer surface of the endosperm. This seed cuticle is defective in cutin-deficient bodyguard1 seeds, which is associated with alterations in endospermic permeability. Furthermore, mutants affected in cutin biosynthesis display low seed dormancy and viability levels, which correlates with higher levels of seed lipid oxidative stress. Upon seed imbibition cutin biosynthesis genes are essential to prevent endosperm cellular expansion and testa rupture in response to low GA synthesis. Taken together, our findings suggest that in the course of land plant evolution cuticular structures were co-opted to achieve key physiological seed properties.

  11. FRAKSINASI ENZIM LIPASE DARI ENDOSPERM KELAPA DENGAN METODE SALTING OUT (Lipase fractionation of Coconut Endosperm by Salting out Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Su'i

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This research learns about fractionation of lipases activity from coconut endosperm by using ammonium sulphate of 0–15%; 15-30 %, 30–45 %, 45–60 %, 60–75 % and 75–90 %. The results showed that the fractions of 0–15% ; 30–45 %, 45–60 % and 60–75 % have lipase activity. Meanwhile, the highest activity was fractions of 60-75%. fractions of 15-30% and 75-90%  have no lipase enzym activity. Molecule weigh of lipase enzyme was 72 kDa. Keywords: Lipases, endosperm, coconut, fractionation, ammonium sulphate   ABSTRAK Penelitian ini mempelajari fraksinasi enzim lipase dari endosperm kelapa menggunakan ammonium sulfat. fraksinasi dilakukan dengan variasi konsentrasi ammonium sulfat 0–15% ; 15-30%; 30–45 %, 45–60 %, 60–75 % dan 75–90 %. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa enzim lipase terdapat pada fraksi 0–15% ; 30–45 %, 45–60 % dan fraksi 60–75 % dengan aktivitas enzim tertinggi pada fraksi 60-75%. Sedangkan fraksi 15-30% dan 75-90% tidak ada enzim lipase. Berat molekul enzim lipase pada semua fraksi 72 kDa. Kata kunci: Lipase, endosperm, fraksinasi, ammonium sulfat

  12. Improved Evidence-Based Genome-scale Metabolic Models for Maize Leaf, Embryo, and Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel eSeaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  13. Improved evidence-based genome-scale metabolic models for maize leaf, embryo, and endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Frelin, Océane; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes. PMID:25806041

  14. Improved evidence-based genome-scale metabolic models for maize leaf, embryo, and endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Bradbury, Louis M. T.; Frelin, Océane; Zarecki, Raphy; Ruppin, Eytan; Hanson, Andrew D.; Henry, Christopher S.

    2015-03-10

    There is a growing demand for genome-scale metabolic reconstructions for plants, fueled by the need to understand the metabolic basis of crop yield and by progress in genome and transcriptome sequencing. Methods are also required to enable the interpretation of plant transcriptome data to study how cellular metabolic activity varies under different growth conditions or even within different organs, tissues, and developmental stages. Such methods depend extensively on the accuracy with which genes have been mapped to the biochemical reactions in the plant metabolic pathways. Errors in these mappings lead to metabolic reconstructions with an inflated number of reactions and possible generation of unreliable metabolic phenotype predictions. Here we introduce a new evidence-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of maize, with significant improvements in the quality of the gene-reaction associations included within our model. We also present a new approach for applying our model to predict active metabolic genes based on transcriptome data. This method includes a minimal set of reactions associated with low expression genes to enable activity of a maximum number of reactions associated with high expression genes. We apply this method to construct an organ-specific model for the maize leaf, and tissue specific models for maize embryo and endosperm cells. We validate our models using fluxomics data for the endosperm and embryo, demonstrating an improved capacity of our models to fit the available fluxomics data. All models are publicly available via the DOE Systems Biology Knowledgebase and PlantSEED, and our new method is generally applicable for analysis transcript profiles from any plant, paving the way for further in silico studies with a wide variety of plant genomes.

  15. Differential Synthesis in Vitro of Barley Aleurone and Starchy Endosperm Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundy, John; Hejgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Annette

    1986-01-01

    RNAs from isolated endosperm and aleurone tissues (developing and mature grain) and from cultured (germinating) aleurone layers treated with abscisic acid (ABA) and GA(3). B and C hordein polypeptides and the salt-soluble proteins beta-amylase, protein Z, protein C, the chymotrypsin inhibitors (CI-1 and 2......, expression of genes encoding ASI, PSI, protein C, and PAPI is tissue and stage-specific during seed development. Only ASI, CI-1, and PAPI were synthesized in significant amounts with mRNA from cultured aleurone layers. The levels of synthesis of PAPI and CI-1 were independent of hormone treatment......To widen the selection of proteins for gene expression studies in barley seeds, experiments were performed to identify proteins whose synthesis is differentially regulated in developing and germinating seed tissues. The in vitro synthesis of nine distinct barley proteins was compared using m...

  16. Construction and evaluation of a maize (Zea mays) chimaeric promoter with activity in kernel endosperm and embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Colin T; Scott, M Paul

    2009-03-01

    Chimaeric promoters contain DNA sequences from different promoters. Chimaeric promoters are developed to increase the level of recombinant protein expression, to precisely control transgene activity or to combat homology-based gene silencing. Sets of chimaeric promoters, each containing different lengths of DNA from maize (Zea mays) 27zn (27 kDa gamma-zein) endosperm-specific promoter and the Glb1 (Globulin-1) embryo-specific promoter were created and tested in a transient expression assay of GFP (green fluorescent protein). Promoter fragments with the highest activity were combined to create the chimaeric promoter A27znGlb1. In the context of the chimaeric promoter, the selected Glb1 promoter fragment was necessary and sufficient to activate expression in embryo tissue and was functionally equivalent to the native Glb1 promoter. Similarly, the selected 27zn promoter fragment in the chimaeric promoter was necessary and sufficient to activate expression in endosperm tissue and was functionally equivalent to the native 27zn promoter. Maize transgenic plants containing the A27znGlb1 chimaeric promoter fused to GFP were produced to characterize this promoter in vivo. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to determine that the promoter was active in the embryo, endosperm, pericarp and immature leaf tissues. GFP activity in plants containing the chimaeric promoter was not significantly different in endosperm than the activity of GFP fused to the full-length 27zn promoter, nor was it different in embryo from the activity of GFP fused to the full-length Glb1 promoter. Transgene copy numbers were shown to be between 4 and 12 copies in different events.

  17. Starch Biosynthesis in the Developing Endosperms of Grasses and Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Tetlow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The starch-rich endosperms of the Poaceae, which includes wild grasses and their domesticated descendents the cereals, have provided humankind and their livestock with the bulk of their daily calories since the dawn of civilization up to the present day. There are currently unprecedented pressures on global food supplies, largely resulting from population growth, loss of agricultural land that is linked to increased urbanization, and climate change. Since cereal yields essentially underpin world food and feed supply, it is critical that we understand the biological factors contributing to crop yields. In particular, it is important to understand the biochemical pathway that is involved in starch biosynthesis, since this pathway is the major yield determinant in the seeds of six out of the top seven crops grown worldwide. This review outlines the critical stages of growth and development of the endosperm tissue in the Poaceae, including discussion of carbon provision to the growing sink tissue. The main body of the review presents a current view of our understanding of storage starch biosynthesis, which occurs inside the amyloplasts of developing endosperms.

  18. Lipid partitioning in maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm highlights relationships among starch lipids, amylose, and vitreousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayral, Mathieu; Bakan, Bénédicte; Dalgalarrondo, Michele; Elmorjani, Khalil; Delluc, Caroline; Brunet, Sylvie; Linossier, Laurent; Morel, Marie-Hélène; Marion, Didier

    2015-04-08

    Content and composition of maize endosperm lipids and their partition in the floury and vitreous regions were determined for a set of inbred lines. Neutral lipids, i.e., triglycerides and free fatty acids, accounted for more than 80% of endosperm lipids and are almost 2 times higher in the floury than in the vitreous regions. The composition of endosperm lipids, including their fatty acid unsaturation levels, as well as their distribution may be related to metabolic specificities of the floury and vitreous regions in carbon and nitrogen storage and to the management of stress responses during endosperm cell development. Remarkably, the highest contents of starch lipids were observed systematically within the vitreous endosperm. These high amounts of starch lipids were mainly due to lysophosphatidylcholine and were tightly linked to the highest amylose content. Consequently, the formation of amylose-lysophosphatidylcholine complexes has to be considered as an outstanding mechanism affecting endosperm vitreousness.

  19. Distinct cell wall architectures in seed endosperms in representatives of the Brassicaceae and Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Dekkers, Bas J W; Steinbrecher, Tina; Walsh, Cherie T; Bacic, Antony; Bentsink, Leónie; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Knox, J Paul

    2012-11-01

    In some species, a crucial role has been demonstrated for the seed endosperm during germination. The endosperm has been shown to integrate environmental cues with hormonal networks that underpin dormancy and seed germination, a process that involves the action of cell wall remodeling enzymes (CWREs). Here, we examine the cell wall architectures of the endosperms of two related Brassicaceae, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the close relative Lepidium (Lepidium sativum), and that of the Solanaceous species, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The Brassicaceae species have a similar cell wall architecture that is rich in pectic homogalacturonan, arabinan, and xyloglucan. Distinctive features of the tobacco endosperm that are absent in the Brassicaceae representatives are major tissue asymmetries in cell wall structural components that reflect the future site of radicle emergence and abundant heteromannan. Cell wall architecture of the micropylar endosperm of tobacco seeds has structural components similar to those seen in Arabidopsis and Lepidium endosperms. In situ and biomechanical analyses were used to study changes in endosperms during seed germination and suggest a role for mannan degradation in tobacco. In the case of the Brassicaceae representatives, the structurally homogeneous cell walls of the endosperm can be acted on by spatially regulated CWRE expression. Genetic manipulations of cell wall components present in the Arabidopsis seed endosperm demonstrate the impact of cell wall architectural changes on germination kinetics.

  20. Bottlenecks in carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation in rice endosperm are influenced by the precursor-product balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chao; Capell, Teresa; Berman, Judit; Medina, Vicente; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2016-01-01

    The profile of secondary metabolites in plants reflects the balance of biosynthesis, degradation and storage, including the availability of precursors and products that affect the metabolic equilibrium. We investigated the impact of the precursor-product balance on the carotenoid pathway in the endosperm of intact rice plants because this tissue does not normally accumulate carotenoids, allowing us to control each component of the pathway. We generated transgenic plants expressing the maize phytoene synthase gene (ZmPSY1) and the bacterial phytoene desaturase gene (PaCRTI), which are sufficient to produce β-carotene in the presence of endogenous lycopene β-cyclase. We combined this mini-pathway with the Arabidopsis thaliana genes AtDXS (encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, which supplies metabolic precursors) or AtOR (the ORANGE gene, which promotes the formation of a metabolic sink). Analysis of the resulting transgenic plants suggested that the supply of isoprenoid precursors from the MEP pathway is one of the key factors limiting carotenoid accumulation in the endosperm and that the overexpression of AtOR increased the accumulation of carotenoids in part by up-regulating a series of endogenous carotenogenic genes. The identification of metabolic bottlenecks in the pathway will help to refine strategies for the creation of engineered plants with specific carotenoid profiles. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Isolating Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) B1 Hordein Gene Promoter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... region of B1 hordein gene was isolated from the genomic DNA of Walfajre and Alger barley by polymerase chain reaction. ..... also named an endosperm box and is the binding site of endosperm-specific nuclear .... and common structural features of the complete phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene family ...

  2. In vitro biochemical characterization of all barley endosperm starch synthases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Ruzanski, Christian

    2016-01-01

    define the mode of action of each SS class in unprecedented detail; we analyze their substrate selection, temperature dependence and stability, substrate affinity and temporal abundance during barley development. Our results are at variance with some generally accepted ideas about starch biosynthesis....... Here we provide a detailed biochemical study of the activity of all five classes of SSs in barley endosperm. Each enzyme was produced recombinantly in E. coli and the properties and modes of action in vitro were studied in isolation from other SSs and other substrate modifying activities. Our results...

  3. The significance of genic balance to endosperm development in interspecific crosses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnston, S.A.; Nijs, den A.P.M.; Peloquin, S.J.; Jr, R.E.H.

    1980-01-01

    The endosperm has played a significant role in the evolution of angiosperms because of its physiological and genetic relationships to the embryo. One manifestation of this evolutionary role is its abnormal development in interploidy crosses. It is now established that the endosperm develops

  4. Effect of nitrogen fertilizer on distribution of starch granules in different regions of wheat endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study provided visual evidence of a nitrogen effect on starch granules (SGs in wheat endosperm. Winter wheat (Titicum aestivum L. cultivar Xumai 30 was cultured under no nitrogen (control and 240 kg ha− 1 of nitrogen applied at the booting stage. The number, morphology, and size of A- and B-type SGs in subaleurone of dorsal endosperm (SDE, center of dorsal endosperm (CDE, modified aleurone (MA, subaleurone of ventral endosperm (SVE, and center of ventral endosperm (CVE were observed under light and electron microscopes. (1 The distribution of SGs in SDE was similar to that in SVE, the distributions of SGs in CDE and CVE were similar, but the distribution of SGs in MA was different from those in the other four endosperm regions. The number of SGs in the five endosperm regions was in the order SDE > CDE > SVE > CVE > MA. (2 Nitrogen increased the number of A- and B-type SGs in SDE and SVE. Nitrogen also increased the number of B-type SGs but decreased the number of A-type SGs in CDE and CVE. Nitrogen decreased the numbers of A-type and B-type SGs in MA. The results suggest that increased N fertilizer application mainly increased the numbers of small SGs and decreased the numbers of large SGs, but that the results varied in different regions of the wheat endosperm.

  5. Ascorbic acid synthesis and metabolism in maize are subject to complex and genotype-dependent feedback regulation during endosperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja, Georgina; Farré, Gemma; Bassie, Ludovic; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2013-10-01

    L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an antioxidant and electron donor whose metabolism in plants is under strict feedback control. The factors that influence L-ascorbic acid accumulation in staple crops are only partially understood. One way to gain insight into the regulation of L-ascorbic acid metabolism is to investigate the endogenous pathways in various genetic backgrounds and characterize their interactions with transgenes encoding relevant enzymes. In an initial step, we investigated the developmental profile of L-ascorbic acid accumulation in the endosperm of three diverse maize genotypes and a transgenic line expressing rice dehydroascorbate reductase, which enhances L-ascorbic acid recycling. We determined the transcript levels of all the key genes in the L-ascorbic acid metabolic pathways as well as the specific levels of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbate. L-ascorbic acid levels were high 20 days after pollination and declined thereafter. We found significant genotype-dependent variations in the transcript levels of some genes, with particular complexity in the ascorbic acid recycling pathway. Our data will help to elucidate the complex mechanisms underlying the regulation of L-ascorbic acid metabolism in plants, particularly the impact of genetic background on the strict regulation of ascorbic acid metabolism in endosperm cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. An analysis of expressed sequence tags of developing castor endosperm using a full-length cDNA library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallis James G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castor seeds are a major source for ricinoleate, an important industrial raw material. Genomics studies of castor plant will provide critical information for understanding seed metabolism, for effectively engineering ricinoleate production in transgenic oilseeds, or for genetically improving castor plants by eliminating toxic and allergic proteins in seeds. Results Full-length cDNAs are useful resources in annotating genes and in providing functional analysis of genes and their products. We constructed a full-length cDNA library from developing castor endosperm, and obtained 4,720 ESTs from 5'-ends of the cDNA clones representing 1,908 unique sequences. The most abundant transcripts are genes encoding storage proteins, ricin, agglutinin and oleosins. Several other sequences are also very numerous, including two acidic triacylglycerol lipases, and the oleate hydroxylase (FAH12 gene that is responsible for ricinoleate biosynthesis. The role(s of the lipases in developing castor seeds are not clear, and co-expressing of a lipase and the FAH12 did not result in significant changes in hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Only one oleate desaturase (FAD2 gene was identified in our cDNA sequences. Sequence and functional analyses of the castor FAD2 were carried out since it had not been characterized previously. Overexpression of castor FAD2 in a FAH12-expressing Arabidopsis line resulted in decreased accumulation of hydroxy fatty acids in transgenic seeds. Conclusion Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation of FAD2 and FAH12 genes maybe one of the mechanisms that contribute to a high level of ricinoleate accumulation in castor endosperm. The full-length cDNA library will be used to search for additional genes that affect ricinoleate accumulation in seed oils. Our EST sequences will also be useful to annotate the castor genome, which whole sequence is being generated by shotgun sequencing at

  7. Comparison of starch granule development and physicochemical properties of starches in wheat pericarp and endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xurun; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Heng; Xiong, Fei; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (i) to characterize structural development of starch granule in pericarp and endosperm during wheat caryopsis growth; (ii) to compare physicochemical properties of starches in pericarp and endosperm; (iii) to further discover the relationships between pericarp starches and endosperm starches. Wheat pericarp and endosperm at different development stages were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Structural properties of starches were determined using X-ray power diffraction and (13) C solid nuclear magnetic resonance. Pericarp starch granules (PSG) accumulated in amyloplasts and chloroplasts, and showed a typical accumulation peak at 5 days after fertilization (DAF), and then gradually decomposed during 5-22 DAF. PSG in the abdominal region showed a higher rate of decomposition compared to the dorsal region of pericarp. Endosperm starch granules (ESG) accumulated in amyloplasts, and occurred in endosperm cells at 5 DAF, then rapidly enriched the endosperm cells until 22 DAF. Compared with ESG, PSG were compound granules of irregular shape and small size distribution. The results also suggested lower amylose content and V-type single-helix content and higher proportions of double helices for PSG compared to ESG. Based on the structural development of PSG and ESG, we speculated that the saccharides resulting from decomposition of PSG, on one hand, enabled the pericarp to survive before maturity of wheat caryopsis and, on the other hand, provided extra nutrition for the growth of ESG. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Endosperm formation in aposporous Crataegus (Rosaceae, Spiraeoideae, tribe Pyreae): parallels to Ranunculaceae and Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talent, Nadia; Dickinson, Timothy A

    2007-01-01

    Apomixis in Crataegus is primarily aposporous and requires pollination. The embryo sac is of the Polygonum type. A combination of meiotically unreduced embryo sacs with apparently reduced pollen would violate the usual requirement for a 2 : 1 ratio of maternal to paternal contributions to the endosperm. We therefore investigated the origin of endosperm in seeds of sexual diploids and apomictic polyploids of the sister genera Crataegus and Mespilus. Flow-cytometric DNA measurements from embryo and endosperm in mature seeds were converted to ploidy levels using leaf-tissue information. The diploids had triploid endosperm. In c. 60% of seed from polyploids, one sperm apparently contributes to the endosperm, while 25% or more may involve two sperm. Additional results suggest that trinucleate central cells also occur. Fertilization of meiotically unreduced eggs is indicated. The ratio of maternal to paternal contributions to the endosperm in these apomictic Crataegus is not constrained to 2 : 1. They thus resemble some Sorbus (Pyreae) and very distantly related Ranunculus (Ranunculaceae). It is suggested that Paspalum (Poaceae) may have similarly flexible endosperm ploidy levels.

  9. Microtubule-Associated Protein SBgLR Facilitates Storage Protein Deposition and Its Expression Leads to Lysine Content Increase in Transgenic Maize Endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Li, Shixue; Yue, Jing; Xiao, Wenhan; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2015-12-12

    Maize (Zea mays) seed is deficient in protein and lysine content. Many studies have been made to improve the nutritional quality of maize seeds. Previously, we reported the role of a natural lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR in increasing protein and lysine content. However, how the SBgLR improves lysine and protein content remains unclear. Here, the reasons and possible mechanism for SBgLR in protein and lysine improvement have been analyzed and discussed. Through seed-specific expression of SBgLR, we obtained transgenic maize with the simultaneously increased lysine and protein contents. High-protein and high-lysine characters were stably inherited across generations. The expression of SBgLR in maize kernels increased the accumulation of both zeins and non-zein proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the number of protein bodies (PBs) was increased obviously in SBgLR transgenic immature endosperms with the morphology and structure of PBs unchanged. The proteinaceous matrix was more abundant in transgenic mature endosperms under scanning electron microscopy. The stabilities of zein and lysine-rich non-zein genes were also increased in transgenic endosperms. Finally, the potential application of SBgLR in maize nutrient improvement was evaluated. This study shows that a cytoskeleton-associated protein has potential applicable value in crop nutrient improving, and provided a feasible strategy for improvement of maize grain quality.

  10. Microtubule-Associated Protein SBgLR Facilitates Storage Protein Deposition and Its Expression Leads to Lysine Content Increase in Transgenic Maize Endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maize (Zea mays seed is deficient in protein and lysine content. Many studies have been made to improve the nutritional quality of maize seeds. Previously, we reported the role of a natural lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR in increasing protein and lysine content. However, how the SBgLR improves lysine and protein content remains unclear. Here, the reasons and possible mechanism for SBgLR in protein and lysine improvement have been analyzed and discussed. Through seed-specific expression of SBgLR, we obtained transgenic maize with the simultaneously increased lysine and protein contents. High-protein and high-lysine characters were stably inherited across generations. The expression of SBgLR in maize kernels increased the accumulation of both zeins and non-zein proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the number of protein bodies (PBs was increased obviously in SBgLR transgenic immature endosperms with the morphology and structure of PBs unchanged. The proteinaceous matrix was more abundant in transgenic mature endosperms under scanning electron microscopy. The stabilities of zein and lysine-rich non-zein genes were also increased in transgenic endosperms. Finally, the potential application of SBgLR in maize nutrient improvement was evaluated. This study shows that a cytoskeleton-associated protein has potential applicable value in crop nutrient improving, and provided a feasible strategy for improvement of maize grain quality.

  11. Molecular Genetic Traits Influencing Maize Endosperm Development and Value: Closeout Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER20242

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian A. Larkins

    2012-09-12

    Development of the endosperm in cereal grasses entails different phases characterized by cell division, endoreduplication, accumulation of storage metabolites and cell death, which need to be carried out in an orderly fashion. While correct regulation of the cell cycle plays an essential role in endosperm development, the key regulatory factors and how the cell cycle interfaces with other pathways in this developmental context are largely unknown. We investigated the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-retinoblastoma pathway and how it controls the cell cycle and coordinates it with other processes during maize endosperm development. Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) proteins may be inactivated through CDK-mediated phosphorylation, but the identity of the responsible kinase in maize is unknown. We have previously shown that down-regulation of CDKA;1 severely inhibits the endoreduplication cell cycle and suggested that CDK may be an up-stream regulator of the retinoblastoma pathway. We discovered two types of maize RBR genes, RBR1 and RBR3, which differ in terms of structure, regulation and function. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that these genes may be distinctive features of the Poaceae. We found that RBR3 plays a positive rather than a negative role in DNA replication, cell transformation, and the expression of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM)2-7 family of DNA replication factors. These features are a paradigm shift in RBR gene function and appear to be unique within the RBR gene family. They suggest the existence in maize and related cereal crops of specific RBR/E2F-dependent pathways impinging on the cell cycle and development. RBR1 was down-regulated in transgenic endosperm using RNAi approaches. This resulted in the de-repression of a number of down-stream E2F targets, including RBR3, the MCM2-7 gene family, DNA methyltransferase (MET)1, CDKB;1, and the recently identified RBR4 gene. It also increased endosperm ploidy levels, stimulated the production of a larger

  12. Improving zinc accumulation in cereal endosperm using HvMTP1, a transition metal transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menguer, Paloma K; Vincent, Thomas; Miller, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    ) vacuolar Zn transporter HvMTP1 was expressed under the control of the endosperm-specific D-hordein promoter. Transformed plants exhibited no significant change in growth but had higher total grain Zn concentration, as measured by ICP-OES, compared to parental controls. Compared with Zn, transformants had...... smaller increases in concentrations of Cu and Mn but not Fe. Staining grain cross sections with the Zn-specific stain DTZ revealed a significant enhancement of Zn accumulation in the endosperm of two of three transformed lines, a result confirmed by ICP-OES in the endosperm of dissected grain. Synchrotron...

  13. Analysis of grain characters in temperate grasses reveals distinctive patterns of endosperm organization associated with grain shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Philip; Kourmpetli, Sofia; Sharples, Donna; Harris, Robert G; Drea, Sinéad

    2012-10-01

    Members of the core pooids represent the most important crops in temperate zones including wheat, barley, and oats. Their importance as crops is largely due to the grain, particularly the storage capabilities of the endosperm. In this study, a comprehensive survey of grain morphology and endosperm organization in representatives of wild and cultivated species throughout the core pooids was performed. As sister to the core pooid tribes Poeae, Aveneae, Triticeae, and Bromeae within the Pooideae subfamily, Brachypodium provides a taxonomically relevant reference point. Using macroscopic, histological, and molecular analyses distinct patterns of grain tissue organization in these species, focusing on the peripheral and modified aleurone, are described. The results indicate that aleurone organization is correlated with conventional grain quality characters such as grain shape and starch content. In addition to morphological and organizational variation, expression patterns of candidate gene markers underpinning this variation were examined. Features commonly associated with grains are largely defined by analyses on lineages within the Triticeae and knowledge of grain structure may be skewed as a result of the focus on wheat and barley. Specifically, the data suggest that the modified aleurone is largely restricted to species in the Triticeae tribe.

  14. Functional and structural characterization of plastidic starch phosphorylase during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Ruzanski, Christian; Krucewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The production of starch is essential for human nutrition and represents a major metabolic flux in the biosphere. The biosynthesis of starch in storage organs like barley endosperm operates via two main pathways using different substrates: starch synthases use ADP-glucose to produce amylose...... (HvPho1) for starch biosynthesis in barley endosperm, we analyzed HvPho1 protein production and enzyme activity levels throughout barley endosperm development and characterized structure-function relationships of HvPho1. The molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of starch granule biosynthesis......, that is, the enzymes and substrates involved in the initial transition from simple sugars to polysaccharides, remain unclear. We found that HvPho1 is present as an active protein at the onset of barley endosperm development. Notably, purified recombinant protein can catalyze the de novo production of α-1...

  15. Ribonucleic acids of wheat grain and its endosperm during development and ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Weidner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The work present quantitative changes and synthesis od: RNA fractions in wheat grain and endosperm during development and ripening. It was found that share of rRNA in total RNA decreases during development both, in the endosperm and in grain. Rapid drop of rRNA content in total RNA takes place in the endosperm since 31st day after blooming, and in grain - since 45th day after blooming. Absolute amount of rRNA, as calculated per 100 grains or endosperms, increases in the first half of grain formation period, and then decreases till the end of development. As a result of degradation of ribosomal RNA in endosperm, low-molecule fraction – 4 S, significantly increased at final stage of development. Decrease of rRNA fraction at final stage of development is not accompanied by an increase of absolute amount of 4 S RNA fraction. Incorporation of 3H-,uriidine into grain and endosperm RNA is highest at the begining of development. Further on it gradually decreases till the end of development. Synthesis of RNA in grain takes place throughout the whole development. Contrary to this, no incorporation of precursor into rRNA was noted during waxy and full ripeness of wheat grain.

  16. Induction of a ricinosomal-protease and programmed cell death in tomato endosperm by gibberellic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobacher, Christopher P; Senatore, Adriano; Holley, Christine; Greenwood, John S

    2013-03-01

    Several examples of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants utilize ricinosomes, organelles that appear prior to cell death and store inactive KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinases. Upon cell death, the contents of ricinosomes are released into the cell corpse where the proteinases are activated and proceed to degrade any remaining protein for use in adjacent cells or, in the case of nutritive seed tissues, by the growing seedling. Ricinosomes containing pro-SlCysEP have been observed in anther tissues prior to PCD and ricinosome-like structures have been observed in imbibed seeds within endosperm cells of tomato. The present study confirms that the structures in tomato endosperm cells contain pro-SlCysEP making them bona fide ricinosomes. The relative abundance of pro- versus mature SlCysEP is suggested to be a useful indicator of the degree of PCD that has occurred in tomato endosperm, and is supported by biochemical and structural data. This diagnostic tool is used to demonstrate that a sub-region of the micropylar endosperm surrounding the emerged radical is relatively long-lived and may serve to prevent loss of mobilized reserves from the lateral endosperm. We also demonstrate that GA-induced reserve mobilization, SlCysEP accumulation and processing, and PCD in tomato endosperm are antagonized by ABA.

  17. Metabolic engineering of astaxanthin biosynthesis in maize endosperm and characterization of a prototype high oil hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Gemma; Perez-Fons, Laura; Decourcelle, Mathilde; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Hem, Sonia; Zhu, Changfu; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Fraser, Paul D; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Maize was genetically engineered for the biosynthesis of the high value carotenoid astaxanthin in the kernel endosperm. Introduction of a β-carotene hydroxylase and a β-carotene ketolase into a white maize genetic background extended the carotenoid pathway to astaxanthin. Simultaneously, phytoene synthase, the controlling enzyme of carotenogenesis, was over-expressed for enhanced carotenoid production and lycopene ε-cyclase was knocked-down to direct more precursors into the β-branch of the extended ketocarotenoid pathway which ends with astaxanthin. This astaxanthin-accumulating transgenic line was crossed into a high oil- maize genotype in order to increase the storage capacity for lipophilic astaxanthin. The high oil astaxanthin hybrid was compared to its astaxanthin producing parent. We report an in depth metabolomic and proteomic analysis which revealed major up- or down- regulation of genes involved in primary metabolism. Specifically, amino acid biosynthesis and the citric acid cycle which compete with the synthesis or utilization of pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, the precursors for carotenogenesis, were down-regulated. Nevertheless, principal component analysis demonstrated that this compositional change is within the range of the two wild type parents used to generate the high oil producing astaxanthin hybrid.

  18. Rice endosperm produces an underglycosylated and potent form of the HIV-neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvaka, Evangelia; Twyman, Richard M; Murad, Andre Melro; Melnik, Stanislav; Teh, Audrey Yi-Hui; Arcalis, Elsa; Altmann, Friedrich; Stoger, Eva; Rech, Elibio; Ma, Julian K C; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Protein microbicides against HIV can help to prevent infection but they are required in large, repetitive doses. This makes current fermenter-based production systems prohibitively expensive. Plants are advantageous as production platforms because they offer a safe, economical and scalable alternative, and cereals such as rice are particularly attractive because they could allow pharmaceutical proteins to be produced economically and on a large scale in developing countries. Pharmaceutical proteins can also be stored as unprocessed seed, circumventing the need for a cold chain. Here, we report the development of transgenic rice plants expressing the HIV-neutralizing antibody 2G12 in the endosperm. Surprisingly for an antibody expressed in plants, the heavy chain was predominantly aglycosylated. Nevertheless, the heavy and light chains assembled into functional antibodies with more potent HIV-neutralizing activity than other plant-derived forms of 2G12 bearing typical high-mannose or plant complex-type glycans. Immunolocalization experiments showed that the assembled antibody accumulated predominantly in protein storage vacuoles but also induced the formation of novel, spherical storage compartments surrounded by ribosomes indicating that they originated from the endoplasmic reticulum. The comparison of wild-type and transgenic plants at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels indicated that endogenous genes related to starch biosynthesis were down-regulated in the endosperm of the transgenic plants, whereas genes encoding prolamin and glutaredoxin-C8 were up-regulated. Our data provide insight into factors that affect the functional efficacy of neutralizing antibodies in plants and the impact of recombinant proteins on endogenous gene expression. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. In Vitro Biochemical Characterization of All Barley Endosperm Starch Synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Cuesta-Seijo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Starch is the main storage polysaccharide in cereals and the major source of calories in the human diet. It is synthesized by a panel of enzymes including five classes of starch synthases (SSs. While the overall starch synthase (SS reaction is known, the functional differences between the five SS classes are poorly understood. Much of our knowledge comes from analyzing mutant plants with altered SS activities, but the resulting data are often difficult to interpret as a result of pleitropic effects, competition between enzymes, overlaps in enzyme activity and disruption of multi-enzyme complexes. Here we provide a detailed biochemical study of the activity of all five classes of SSs in barley endosperm. Each enzyme was produced recombinantly in E. coli and the properties and modes of action in vitro were studied in isolation from other SSs and other substrate modifying activities. Our results define the mode of action of each SS class in unprecedented detail; we analyze their substrate selection, temperature dependence and stability, substrate affinity and temporal abundance during barley development. Our results are at variance with some generally accepted ideas about starch biosynthesis and might lead to the reinterpretation of results obtained in planta. In particular, they indicate that granule bound SS is capable of processive action even in the absence of a starch matrix, that SSI has no elongation limit, and that SSIV, believed to be critical for the initiation of starch granules, has maltoligosaccharides and not polysaccharides as its preferred substrates.

  20. Distribution of soluble amino acids in maize endosperm mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toro Alejandro Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For human nutrition the main source of vegetable proteins are cereal and legume seeds. The content of total soluble amino acids in mature endosperm of wild-type, opaque and floury maize (Zea mays L. mutants were determined by HPLC. The total absolute concentration of soluble amino acids among the mutants varied depending on the mutant. The o11 and o13 mutants exhibited the highest average content, whereas o10, fl3 and fl1 exhibited the lowest average content. In general, the mutants exhibited similar concentrations of total soluble amino acids when compared to the wild-type lines, with the clear exception of mutants o11 and fl1, with the o11 mutant exhibiting a higher concentration of total soluble amino acids when compared to its wild-type counterpart W22 and the fl1 mutant a lower concentration when compared to its wild-type counterpart Oh43. For methionine, the mutants o2 and o11 and wild-type Oh43 exhibited the highest concentrations of this amino acid. Significant differences were not observed between mutants for other amino acids such as lysine and threonine. The high lysine concentrations obtained originally for these mutants may be due to the amino acids incorporated into storage proteins, but not those present in the soluble form.

  1. Effect of salicylhydroxamic acid on endosperm strength and embryo growth of Lactuca sativa L. cv Waldmann's Green seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, C. A.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) stimulated germination of photosensitive lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv Waldmann's Green) seeds in darkness. To determine whether SHAM acts on the embryo or the endosperm, we investigated separately effects of SHAM on growth potential of isolated embryos as well as on endosperm strength. Embryo growth potential was quantified by incubating decoated embryos in various concentrations of osmoticum and measuring subsequent radicle elongation. Growth potential of embryos isolated from seeds pretreated with 4 millimolar SHAM was equal to that of untreated controls. Rupture strength of endosperm tissue excised from seeds pretreated with SHAM was 33% less than that of controls in the micropylar region. To determine if the embryo must be in contact with the endosperm of SHAM to weaken the endosperm, some endosperms were incubated with SHAM only after dissection from seeds. Rupture strength of SHAM-treated, isolated endosperms in the micropylar region was 25% less than that of untreated controls. There was no difference in rupture strength in the cotyledonary region of endosperm isolated from seeds treated with SHAM in buffer or buffer alone. SHAM therefore stimulates germination not by enhancing embryo growth potential, but by weakening the micropylar region of the endosperm enclosing the embryo.

  2. Bioengineered 'golden' indica rice cultivars with beta-carotene metabolism in the endosperm with hygromycin and mannose selection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Karabi; Baisakh, Niranjan; Oliva, Norman; Torrizo, Lina; Abrigo, Editha; Tan, Jing; Rai, Mayank; Rehana, Sayda; Al-Babili, Salim; Beyer, Peter; Potrykus, Ingo; Datta, Swapan K

    2003-03-01

    Vitamin-A deficiency (VAD) is a major malnutrition problem in South Asia, where indica rice is the staple food. Indica-type rice varieties feed more than 2 billion people. Hence, we introduced a combination of transgenes using the biolistic system of transformation enabling biosynthesis of provitamin A in the endosperm of several indica rice cultivars adapted to diverse ecosystems of different countries. The rice seed-specific glutelin promoter (Gt-1 P) was used to drive the expression of phytoene synthase (psy), while lycopene beta-cyclase (lcy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI), fused to the transit peptide sequence of the pea-Rubisco small subunit, were driven by the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus promoter (CaMV35S P). Transgenic plants were recovered through selection with either CaMV35S P driven hph (hygromycin phosphotransferase) gene or cestrum yellow leaf curling virus promoter (CMP) driven pmi (phophomannose isomerase) gene. Molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated stable integration and expression of the transgenes. The yellow colour of the polished rice grain evidenced the carotenoid accumulation in the endosperm. The colour intensity correlated with the estimated carotenoid content by spectrophotometric and HPLC analysis. Carotenoid level in cooked polished seeds was comparable (with minor loss of xanthophylls) to that in non-cooked seeds of the same transgenic line. The variable segregation pattern in T1 selfing generation indicated single to multiple loci insertion of the transgenes in the genome. This is the first report of using nonantibiotic pmi driven by a novel promoter in generating transgenic indica rice for possible future use in human nutrition.

  3. Genotype-dependent efficiency of endosperm development in culture of selected cereals: histological and ultrastructural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popielarska-Konieczna, Marzena; Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Tuleja, Monika; Ślesak, Halina; Kapusta, Paweł; Marcińska, Izabela; Bohdanowicz, Jerzy

    2013-02-01

    The paper reports studies, including histological and ultrastructural analyses, of in vitro cell proliferation and development of immature endosperm tissue isolated from caryopses of Triticum aestivum, Triticum durum, and Triticosecale plants. Endosperm isolated at 7-10 days post-anthesis developed well on MS medium supplemented with auxins and/or cytokinins. The efficiency of endosperm response was highly genotype-dependent and best in two winter cultivars of hexaploid species. The pathways of development and proliferation were very similar among the selected species and cultivars. Histological and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that only the part of the endosperm not touching the medium surface continued growth and development, resulting in swelling. The central part of swollen regions was composed mainly of cells containing many large starch grains. The peripheric parts of developed endosperm consisted of highly vacuolated cells and small cells with dense cytoplasm. SEM showed that cells from the swollen region were covered partially with a membraneous structure. Transmission electron microscope studies of cells from the outer part of the developing region showed features typical for cell activity connected with lipid metabolism.

  4. Chloroplast-localized 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase is critical for maize endosperm starch accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielbauer, Gertraud; Li, Li; Römisch-Margl, Lilla; Do, Phuc Thi; Fouquet, Romain; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gierl, Alfons; Settles, A. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Plants have duplicate versions of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (oxPPP) enzymes with a subset localized to the chloroplast. The chloroplast oxPPP provides NADPH and pentose sugars for multiple metabolic pathways. This study identified two loss-of-function alleles of the Zea mays (maize) chloroplast-localized oxPPP enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). These mutations caused a rough endosperm seed phenotype with reduced embryo oil and endosperm starch. Genetic translocation experiments showed that pgd3 has separate, essential roles in both endosperm and embryo development. Endosperm metabolite profiling experiments indicated that pgd3 shifts redox-related metabolites and increases reducing sugars similar to starch-biosynthetis mutants. Heavy isotope-labelling experiments indicates that carbon flux into starch is altered in pgd3 mutants. Labelling experiments with a loss of cytosolic 6PGDH did not affect flux into starch. These results support the known role for plastid-localized oxPPP in oil synthesis and argue that amyloplast-localized oxPPP reactions are integral to endosperm starch accumulation in maize kernels. PMID:23530131

  5. The role of gibberellic acid in the hydrolysis of endosperm reserves in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, B M; Oaks, A

    1974-01-01

    Excised maize (Zea mays L.) endosperms incubated in buffer rapidly degrade their starch and protein reserves. These processes are not markedly stimulated by addition of gibberellic acid (GA3). However protease and α-amylase production are strongly inhibited by abscisic acid, and this inhibition can be overcome by exogenous GA3. Endosperms of a dwarf mutant maize (d 5), which is deficient in endogenous GA, produce only small amounts of protease and α-amylase. With these mutants oxogenous GA3 causes a 3-5fold stimulation in hydrolase production. Our interpretation of these results is that in many cases maize endosperms contain sufficient gibberellin to stimulate maximal hydrolase production and starch and protein breakdown.

  6. Invitro Synthesis of Barley Endosperm Proteins on Wild Type and Mutant Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Ingversen, J.

    1976-01-01

    Membrane bound and free polyribosomes were isolated from 20 day old barley endosperms. Sucrose gradient analysis revealed distinct polysomal peaks up to heptamers. The isolated polysomes were active in a cell-free protein synthesizing system employing wheat germ extract. SDS-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis showed that proteins with molecular weights ranging from 200,000 to 10,000 daltons were synthesized. A substantial part of the polypeptides coded for by the template associated with the membrane bound polysomes was identified as hordeins by their solubility in 55% isopropanol and by their co......-migration with native hordein on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Membrane bound endosperm polysomes from a barley mutant defective in hordein synthesis produced in the cell-free protein synthesizing system only a small amount of hordein. Conversely membrane bound polysomes from the endosperm of a mutant giving rise...

  7. Abscisic acid controls embryo growth potential and endosperm cap weakening during coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Rubi) seed germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da E.A.A.; Toorop, P.E.; Aelst, van A.C.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism and regulation of coffee seed germination were studied in Coffea arabica L. cv. Rubi. The coffee embryo grew inside the endosperm prior to radicle protrusion and abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited the increase in its pressure potential. There were two steps of endosperm cap weakening. An

  8. Modeling of the endosperm crush response profile of hard red spring wheat using a single kernel characterization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a wheat endosperm is crushed the force profile shows viscoelastic response and the modulus of elasticity is an important parameter that might have substantial influence on wheat milling. An experiment was performed to model endosperm crush response profile (ECRP) and to determine the modulus o...

  9. Dissection of two major components of the post-zygotic hybridization barrier in rice endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Furuumi, Hiroyasu; Ono, Akemi; Yamada, Toshihiro; Kurata, Nori; Kinoshita, Tetsu

    2013-12-01

    A post-zygotic hybridization barrier is often observed in the endosperm of seeds produced by interspecific or interploidy crosses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, for example, hybrid endosperm from both types of cross shows altered timing of cellularization and an altered rate of nuclear divisions. Therefore, it has been proposed that interspecific and interploidy crosses share common molecular mechanisms for establishment of an effective species barrier. However, these two types of hybridization barrier may be initiated by different intrinsic cues: the interspecific cross barrier arises after hybridization of genomes with differences in DNA sequences, while the interploidy cross barrier arises after hybridization of genomes with the same DNA sequences but differences in ploidy levels. In this study, we performed interploidy crosses to identify components of the post-hybridization barrier in the endosperm of rice. We performed an intra-cultivar cross of autotetraploid (4n) × diploid (2n) rice, and found precocious cellularization and a decreased rate of nuclear division in the syncytial endosperm. By contrast, seeds from the reciprocal cross showed delayed cellularization and an increased rate of nuclear division. This differential effect on nuclear division rates contrasts with the outcome of rice interspecific crosses, which were previously shown to have altered timing of cellularization without any change in nuclear division rates. Thus, we propose that the post-zygotic hybridization barrier in rice endosperm has two separable components, namely control of the timing of cellularization and control of the nuclear division rates in the syncytial stage of endosperm development. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Primer Dependent and Independent Forms of Soluble Starch Synthetase from Developing Barley Endosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreis, M.

    1980-01-01

    The activity of soluble starch synthetase (ADP-glucose: agr-1,4-glucan agr-4-glucosyltransferase) in the non-purified extract from 16 day-old Bomi barley endosperms (Hordeum vulgare L.) was low and the reaction was non-linear when plotted against protein concentration. Starch synthetase was purif...

  11. Disruption of endosperm development: an inbreeding effect in almond (Prunus dulcis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Encarnación; Martínez-García, Pedro J; Dicenta, Federico; Egea, José

    2010-06-01

    A homozygous self-compatible almond, originated from self-fertilization of a self-compatible genotype and producing a reasonable yield following open pollination, exhibited a very high fruit drop rate when self-pollinated. To investigate whether fruit dropping in this individual is related to an abnormal development of the embryo sac following self-fertilization, histological sections of ovaries from self and cross-pollinated flowers were observed by light microscopy. Additionally, the presence of pollen tubes in the ovary and fruit set were determined for both types of pollination. Despite pollen tubes reached the ovary after both pollinations, differences in embryo sac and endosperm development after fertilization were found. Thus, while for cross-fertilized ovules a pro-embryo and an endosperm with abundant nuclei were generally observed, most self-fertilized ovules remained in a previous developmental stage in which the embryo sac was not elongated and endosperm nuclei were absent. Although 30 days after pollination fruit set was similar for both pollination types, at 60 days it was significantly reduced for self-pollination. These results provide evidence that the high fruit drop in this genotype is the consequence of a disrupted development of the endosperm, what could be an expression of its high level of inbreeding.

  12. A pharmacological study ofArabidopsiscell fusion between the persistent synergid and endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Kazuki; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Berger, Frédéric; Kinoshita, Tetsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Daisuke

    2018-01-29

    Cell fusion is a pivotal process in fertilization and multinucleate cell formation. A plant cell is ubiquitously surrounded by a hard cell wall, and very few cell fusions have been observed except for gamete fusions. We recently reported that the fertilized central cell (the endosperm) absorbs the persistent synergid, a highly differentiated cell necessary for pollen tube attraction. The synergid-endosperm fusion (SE fusion) appears to eliminate the persistent synergid from fertilized ovule in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we analyzed the effects of various inhibitors on SE fusion in an in vitro culture system. Different from other cell fusions, neither disruption of actin polymerization nor protein secretion impaired SE fusion. However, transcriptional and translational inhibitors decreased the SE fusion success rate and also inhibited endosperm division. Failures of SE fusion and endosperm nuclear proliferation were also induced by roscovitine, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). These data indicate unique aspects of SE fusion such as independence of filamentous actin support and the importance of CDK-mediated mitotic control. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Influence of instrument rigidity and specimen geometry on calculations of compressive strength properties of wheat endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endosperm texture is one of the most important quality features in wheat that defines milling energy requirements and the suitability of flour or semolina for the various food products such as pan breads, crackers, cakes, and pastas. Rooted in low molecular weight proteins known as puroindolines a a...

  14. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Boiled Prosopis africana Seed Endosperm Macerated in Various Ethanol-water Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    James E. Obiegbuna; Peter I. Akubor; Ishiwu, Charles N.; Joel Ndife

    2013-01-01

    The processing of boiled Prosopis africana endosperm for better utilization using ethanol-water mixtures was explored. Prosopis africana seeds were boiled for 5 h to softness and the endosperm fraction separated from the kernel (cotyledon) and the hull. The endosperm was divided into five equal parts which were individually macerated in absolute (Abs) ethanol, 80, 60 and 40% ethanol in water prior to sun-drying (32±2°C, 3 days). The fifth sample, which served as control, was left untreated wi...

  15. Characterization of the endosperm starch and the pleiotropic effects of biosynthetic enzymes on their properties in novel mutant rice lines with high resistant starch and amylose content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuuki; Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Misato; Hosaka, Yuko; Fujita, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is beneficial to human health. In order to reduce the current prevalence of diabetes and obesity, several transgenic and mutant crops containing high RS content are being developed. RS content of steamed rice with starch-branching enzyme (BE)IIb-deficient mutant endosperms is considerably high. To understand the mechanisms of RS synthesis and to increase RS content, we developed novel mutant rice lines by introducing the gene encoding starch synthase (SS)IIa and/or granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS)I from an indica rice cultivar into a japonica rice-based BEIIb-deficient mutant line, be2b. Introduction of SSIIa from an indica rice cultivar produced higher levels of amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 11-18 than those in be2b; the extent of the change was slight due to the shortage of donor chains for SSIIa (DP 6-12) owing to BEIIb deficiency. The introduction of GBSSI from an indica rice cultivar significantly increased amylose content (by approximately 10%) in the endosperm starch. RS content of the new mutant lines was the same as or slightly higher than that of the be2b parent line. The relationship linking starch structure, RS content, and starch biosynthetic enzymes in the new mutant lines has also been discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of grain characters in temperate grasses reveals distinctive patterns of endosperm organization associated with grain shape

    OpenAIRE

    Hands, Philip; Kourmpetli, Sofia; Sharples, Donna; Harris, Robert G.; Drea, Sinéad

    2012-01-01

    Members of the core pooids represent the most important crops in temperate zones including wheat, barley, and oats. Their importance as crops is largely due to the grain, particularly the storage capabilities of the endosperm. In this study, a comprehensive survey of grain morphology and endosperm organization in representatives of wild and cultivated species throughout the core pooids was performed. As sister to the core pooid tribes Poeae, Aveneae, Triticeae, and Bromeae within the Pooideae...

  17. Mobilization of lipid reserves during germination of oat (Avena sativa L.), a cereal rich in endosperm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, Svetlana; Grimberg, Asa; Marttila, Salla; Stymne, Sten; Carlsson, Anders S

    2010-06-01

    Since the cereal endosperm is a dead tissue in the mature grain, beta-oxidation is not possible there. This raises the question about the use of the endosperm oil in cereal grains during germination. In this study, mobilization of lipids in different tissues of germinating oat grains was analysed using thin-layer and gas chromatography. The data imply that the oat endosperm oil [triacylglycerol (TAG)] is not a dead-end product as it was absorbed by the scutellum, either as free fatty acids (FFAs) released from TAG or as intact TAG immediately degraded to FFAs. These data were supported by light and transmission electron microscopy (LM and TEM) studies where close contact between endosperm lipid droplets and the scutellum was observed. The appearance of the fused oil in the oat endosperm changed into oil droplets during germination in areas close to the aleurone and the scutellar epithelium. However, according to the data obtained by TEM these oil droplets are unlikely to be oil bodies surrounded by oleosins. Accumulation of FFA pools in the embryo suggested further transport of FFAs from the scutellum. Noticeably high levels of TAG were also accumulated in the embryo but were not synthesized by re-esterification from imported FFAs. Comparison between two oat cultivars with different amounts of oil and starch in the endosperm suggests that an increased oil to starch ratio in oat grains does not significantly impact the germination process.

  18. Detection of dehydrin-like proteins in embryos and endosperm of mature Euterpe edulis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, V; Distéfano, A J; Carjuzaa, P; Láinez, V; Del Vas, M; Maldonado, S

    2007-01-01

    Euterpe edulis Martius, a tropical palm species characterized as highly recalcitrant, accumulated dehydrin proteins in both the endosperm and the embryo of the mature seed, as detected by Western blot analysis and immunogold electron microscopy. Three major bands at molecular masses of approximately 16, 18, and 24 kDa were identified in both samples analysed. Immunogold electron microscopy studies detected the presence of dehydrins in the embryo and endosperm. In both cases, dehydrins were immunolocalized in cytoplasm and chromatin. No labelling associated with either membranes or organelles was detected. It is known that dehydrins are produced as part of the developmental program of orthodox seeds and are also present in some recalcitrant seeds of temperate regions. The constitutive presence of dehydrins in embryos of extremely recalcitrant species of tropical origin has not been previously reported.

  19. Isolation and Translation of Hordein Messenger RNA from Wild Type and Mutant Endosperms in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Anders Bøving; Ingwersen, J.

    1978-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of four cDNA clones coding for the carboxy-terminal portion of at least two different B1 hordein polypeptides are presented. The open reading frame in the nucleotide sequence of the the largest clone (pc hor2-4, 720 nucleotides) translates into the 181 carboxy-terminal amino.......30 megadaltons. The 11S messenger RNA was translated in vitro into hordein precursor polypeptides which are 2–4 kilodaltons larger than the native hordein polypeptides. The endosperm cell of mutant No. 1508 contained twice as much RNA as the wild type endosperm cell but the same amount of polyadenylated 11S RNA....... The template activity of the latter was 10% of that found for the 11S hordein messenger RNA from the wild type and was limited to translation into one hordein precursor polypeptide....

  20. Non-reciprocal Interspecies Hybridization Barriers in the Capsella Genus Are Established in the Endosperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin A Rebernig

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transition to selfing in Capsella rubella accompanies its recent divergence from the ancestral outcrossing C. grandiflora species about 100,000 years ago. Whether the change in mating system was accompanied by the evolution of additional reproductive barriers that enforced species divergence remained unknown. Here, we show that C. rubella and C. grandiflora are reproductively separated by an endosperm-based, non-reciprocal postzygotic hybridization barrier. While hybridizations of C. rubella maternal plants with C. grandiflora pollen donors resulted in complete seed abortion caused by endosperm cellularization failure, the reciprocal hybridization resulted in the formation of small seeds with precociously cellularized endosperm. Strikingly, the transcriptomic response of both hybridizations mimicked respectively the response of paternal and maternal excess hybridizations in Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting unbalanced genome strength causes hybridization failure in both species. These results provide strong support for the theory that crosses between plants of different mating systems will be unbalanced, with the outcrosser behaving like a plant of increased ploidy, evoking a response that resembles an interploidy-type seed failure. Seed incompatilibity of C. rubella pollinated by C. grandiflora followed the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller model, involving negative genetic interaction of multiple paternal C. grandiflora loci with at least one maternal C. rubella locus. Given that both species only recently diverged, our data suggest that a fast evolving mechanism underlies the post-zygotic hybridization barrier(s separating both species.

  1. Deficiency of Starch Synthase IIIa and IVb Alters Starch Granule Morphology from Polyhedral to Spherical in Rice Endosperm1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyosawa, Yoshiko; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Matsushima, Ryo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Fukuda, Masako; Kumamaru, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Yozo; Kusano, Miyako; Saito, Kazuki; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Ai, Yongfeng; Fujita, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Starch granule morphology differs markedly among plant species. However, the mechanisms controlling starch granule morphology have not been elucidated. Rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm produces characteristic compound-type granules containing dozens of polyhedral starch granules within an amyloplast. Some other cereal species produce simple-type granules, in which only one starch granule is present per amyloplast. A double mutant rice deficient in the starch synthase (SS) genes SSIIIa and SSIVb (ss3a ss4b) produced spherical starch granules, whereas the parental single mutants produced polyhedral starch granules similar to the wild type. The ss3a ss4b amyloplasts contained compound-type starch granules during early developmental stages, and spherical granules were separated from each other during subsequent amyloplast development and seed dehydration. Analysis of glucan chain length distribution identified overlapping roles for SSIIIa and SSIVb in amylopectin chain synthesis, with a degree of polymerization of 42 or greater. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy of wild-type developing rice seeds revealed that the majority of SSIVb was localized between starch granules. Therefore, we propose that SSIIIa and SSIVb have crucial roles in determining starch granule morphology and in maintaining the amyloplast envelope structure. We present a model of spherical starch granule production. PMID:26747287

  2. Regulation of (1,3;1,4)-beta-D-glucan synthesis in developing endosperm of barley lys mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism behind altered content of (1,3:1,4)-beta-D-glucan was investigated in developing endosperm of barley lys3 and lys5 mutants. Both types of mutants are primarily affected in starch biosynthesis, and hence effects on (1,3;1,4)-beta-D-glucan are likely to be pleiotropic. The mutant...... alleles lys5f and lys5g exerted pronounced effects on the cell wall with increased level of (1,3;1,4)-beta-D-glucan content. The low-starch high-(1,3;1,4)-beta-D-glucan phenotype was most pronounced in lys5f. Among the Cellulose Synthase-Like (CSL) gene members belonging to the families CSLF and CSLH......, which all encode (1,3;1,4)-beta-D-glucan synthase proteins, CSLF6 was by far the highest expressed in the wild type, whereas both lys5f and lys5g exhibited a decreased level of CSLF6 transcript. Thus, the lys5 mutants have increased (1,3:1,4)-beta-D-glucan level in spite of lower transcript levels...

  3. Characterization and Ectopic Expression ofCoWRI1, an AP2/EREBP Domain-Containing Transcription Factor from Coconut (Cocos nuciferaL.) Endosperm, Changes the Seeds Oil Content in TransgenicArabidopsis thalianaand Rice (Oryza sativaL.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RuHao; Ye, Rongjian; Gao, Lingchao; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Rui; Mao, Ting; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    Coconut ( Cocos nucifera L.) is a key tropical crop and a member of the monocotyledonous family Arecaceae ( Palmaceae ). Few genes and related metabolic processes involved in coconut endosperm development have been investigated. In this study, a new member of the WRI1 gene family was isolated from coconut endosperm and was named CoWRI1 . Its transcriptional activities and interactions with the acetyl-CoA carboxylase ( BCCP2 ) promoter of CoWRI1 were confirmed by the yeast two-hybrid and yeast one-hybrid approaches, respectively. Functional characterization was carried out through seed-specific expression in Arabidopsis and endosperm-specific expression in rice. In transgenic Arabidopsis , high over-expressions of CoWRI1 in seven independent T2 lines were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. The relative mRNA accumulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in either fatty acid biosynthesis or triacylglycerols assembly (BCCP2, KASI, MAT, ENR, FATA, and GPDH) were also assayed in mature seeds. Furthermore, lipid and fatty acids C16:0 and C18:0 significantly increased. In two homozygous T2 transgenic rice lines (G5 and G2), different CoWRI1 expression levels were detected, but no CoWRI1 transcripts were detected in the wild type. Analyses of the seed oil content, starch content, and total protein content indicated that the two T2 transgenic lines showed a significant increase ( P oil content. The transgenic lines also showed a significant increase in starch content, whereas total protein content decreased significantly. Further analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed that palmitic acid (C16:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) increased significantly in the seeds of the transgenic rice lines, but oleic acid (C18:1) levels significantly declined.

  4. Characterization and Ectopic Expression of CoWRI1, an AP2/EREBP Domain-Containing Transcription Factor from Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) Endosperm, Changes the Seeds Oil Content in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RuHao; Ye, Rongjian; Gao, Lingchao; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Rui; Mao, Ting; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong; Lin, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is a key tropical crop and a member of the monocotyledonous family Arecaceae (Palmaceae). Few genes and related metabolic processes involved in coconut endosperm development have been investigated. In this study, a new member of the WRI1 gene family was isolated from coconut endosperm and was named CoWRI1. Its transcriptional activities and interactions with the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (BCCP2) promoter of CoWRI1 were confirmed by the yeast two-hybrid and yeast one-hybrid approaches, respectively. Functional characterization was carried out through seed-specific expression in Arabidopsis and endosperm-specific expression in rice. In transgenic Arabidopsis, high over-expressions of CoWRI1 in seven independent T2 lines were detected by quantitative real-time PCR. The relative mRNA accumulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in either fatty acid biosynthesis or triacylglycerols assembly (BCCP2, KASI, MAT, ENR, FATA, and GPDH) were also assayed in mature seeds. Furthermore, lipid and fatty acids C16:0 and C18:0 significantly increased. In two homozygous T2 transgenic rice lines (G5 and G2), different CoWRI1 expression levels were detected, but no CoWRI1 transcripts were detected in the wild type. Analyses of the seed oil content, starch content, and total protein content indicated that the two T2 transgenic lines showed a significant increase (P oil content. The transgenic lines also showed a significant increase in starch content, whereas total protein content decreased significantly. Further analysis of the fatty acid composition revealed that palmitic acid (C16:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3) increased significantly in the seeds of the transgenic rice lines, but oleic acid (C18:1) levels significantly declined. PMID:28179911

  5. Marker-free transgenic (MFT) near-isogenic introgression lines (NIILs) of 'golden' indica rice (cv. IR64) with accumulation of provitamin A in the endosperm tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisakh, Niranjan; Rehana, Sayda; Rai, Mayank; Oliva, Norman; Tan, Jing; Mackill, David J; Khush, Gurdev S; Datta, Karabi; Datta, Swapan K

    2006-07-01

    We have developed near-isogenic introgression lines (NIILs) of an elite indica rice cultivar (IR64) with the genes for beta-carotene biosynthesis from dihaploid (DH) derivatives of golden japonica rice (cv. T309). A careful analysis of the DH lines indicated the integration of the genes of interest [phytoene synthase (psy) and phytoene desaturase (crtI)] and the selectable marker gene (hygromycin phosphotransferase, hph) in two unlinked loci. During subsequent crossing, progenies could be obtained carrying only the locus with psy and crtI, which was segregated independently from the locus containing the hph gene during meiotic segregation. The NIILs (BC(2)F(2)) showed maximum similarity with the recurrent parent cultivar IR64. Further, progenies of two NIILs were devoid of any fragments beyond the left or right border, including the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) antibiotic resistance gene of the transformation vector. Spectrophotometric readings showed the accumulation of up to 1.06 microg total carotenoids, including beta-carotene, in 1 g of the endosperm. The accumulation of beta-carotene was also evident from the clearly visible yellow colour of the polished seeds.

  6. OsHrd3 is necessary for maintaining the quality of endoplasmic reticulum-derived protein bodies in rice endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Masaru; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of seed storage proteins (SSPs) are produced in the maturing endosperm of rice seeds. Rice SSPs are synthesized as secretory proteins on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and are transported and deposited into protein complexes called protein bodies (PB-I and PB-II). Due to the high production of SSPs, unfolded SSPs may be generated during this process. However, it was previously unclear how such unfolded proteins are selected among synthesized products and removed from the ER to maintain protein quality in the endosperm. Since Hrd3/SEL1L recognizes unfolded proteins in yeast and mammalian protein quality control systems, the role of OsHrd3 in protein quality control in rice endosperm was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that OsHrd3 interacts with components of the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase complex such as OsOS-9 and OsHrd1 in rice protoplasts. Endosperm-specific suppression of OsHrd3 in transgenic rice reduced the levels of polyubiquitinated proteins and resulted in unfolded protein responses (UPRs) in the endosperm, suggesting that OsHrd3-mediated polyubiquitination plays an important role in ER quality control. It was found that a cysteine-rich 13kDa prolamin, RM1, was polyubiquitinated in wild-type (WT) seeds but not in OsHrd3 knockdown (KD) seeds. RM1 formed aberrant aggregates that were deposited abnormally in OsHrd3 KD seeds, resulting in deformed PB-I. Therefore, the quality of protein bodies is maintained by polyubiquitination of unfolded SSPs through the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase system in rice endosperm. PMID:25977235

  7. The Arabidopsis general transcription factor TFIIB1 (AtTFIIB1) is required for pollen tube growth and endosperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing-Jing; Liang, Yan; Niu, Qian-Kun; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Ye, De

    2013-05-01

    Pollen tube growth and endosperm development are important for fertilization and seed formation. The genetic mechanism of the processes remains poorly understood. This study reports the functional characterization of AtTFIIB1 in pollen tube growth and endosperm development. AtTFIIB1 shares 86% and 44% similarity with AtTFIIB2 and AtTFIIB3/AtpBRP2, respectively. It is expressed in many tissues including vegetative nuclei and generative cells of pollen grains and pollen tubes, endosperm, and embryos. It is thus different from AtTFIIB2, whose expression is not found in the endosperm and vegetative nucleus of mature pollen, and AtTFIIB3/AtpBRP2, which is expressed mostly in male gametophytes and weakly in seeds. Mutations in AtTFIIB1 caused a drastic retardation of pollen tube growth and endosperm development, as well as impaired pollen tube guidance and reception, leading to disruption of fertilization and seed development. Expression of AtTFIIB2 driven by the AtTFIIB1 promoter could restore the defective pollen tube growth, guidance, and reception completely, but only partially recovered the seed development in attfiib1, whilst expression of AtTFIIB3/AtpBRP2 driven by the AtTFIIB1 promoter could rescue only the defective attfiib1 seeds. All these results suggest that AtTFIIB1 plays important roles in pollen tube growth, guidance, and reception as well as endosperm development and is partially functionally different from AtTFIIB2 and AtTFIIB3/AtpBRP2.

  8. Dataset on exogenous application of salicylic acid and methyljasmonate and the accumulation of caffeine in young leaf tissues and catabolically inactive endosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous exposure of coffee plants to 50 μM and 500 μM salicylic acid through liquid hydroponic medium or the exposure to volatile fumes of methyljasmonate was carried out to study the role of salicylic acid and methyljasmonate on the accumulation of caffeine and other methylxanthines like 7-methylxanthine, theobromine and theophylline. Transcript levels of the first, second and third N-methyltransferase involved in the core caffeine biosynthetic pathway namely, xanthosine methyltransferase (XMT, methylxanthine methyltransferase (MXMT and di-methylxanthine methyltransferase (DXMT was investigated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR for validating the reason behind the changes of caffeine biosynthetic potential under the influence of the two analogues of plant phytohormones. Maturing coffee fruits are known to be biologically inactive with respect to caffeine biosynthetic activity in the endosperms. To understand this, fruits were treated with different doses of salicylic acid in a time-course manner and the de-repression of tissue maturation-mediated knockdown of caffeine biosynthesis by exogenously applied salicylic acid was achieved. In our companion paper [1] it was shown that the repression of NMT genes during the dry weight accumulation phase of maturing endosperm could be relaxed by the exogenous application of salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. A probable model based on the work carried out therein and based on other literature [2–4] was proposed to describe that the crosstalk between salicylic acid or methyljasmonate and the ABA/ethylene pathway and might involve transcription factors downstream to the signaling cascade.

  9. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    Full Text Available The opaque-2 (o2 mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2 called "Quality Protein Maize" (QPM have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Endosperm Ontogeny of Jatropha curcas L. Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mohibullah; Soares, Emanoella L; Carvalho, Paulo C; Soares, Arlete A; Domont, Gilberto B; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Campos, Francisco A P

    2015-06-05

    Seeds of Jatropha curcas L. represent a potential source of raw material for the production of biodiesel. However, this use is hampered by the lack of basic information on the biosynthetic pathways associated with synthesis of toxic diterpenes, fatty acids, and triacylglycerols, as well as the pattern of deposition of storage proteins during seed development. In this study, we performed an in-depth proteome analysis of the endosperm isolated from five developmental stages which resulted in the identification of 1517, 1256, 1033, 752, and 307 proteins, respectively, summing up 1760 different proteins. Proteins with similar label free quantitation expression pattern were grouped into five clusters. The biological significance of these identifications is discussed with special focus on the analysis of seed storage proteins, proteins involved in the metabolism of fatty acids, carbohydrates, toxic components and proteolytic processing. Although several enzymes belonging to the biosynthesis of diterpenoid precursors were identified, we were unable to find any terpene synthase/cyclase, indicating that the synthesis of phorbol esters, the main toxic diterpenes, does not occur in seeds. The strategy used enabled us to provide a first in depth proteome analysis of the developing endosperm of this biodiesel plant, providing an important glimpse into the enzymatic machinery devoted to the production of C and N sources to sustain seed development.

  11. SSH Analysis of Endosperm Transcripts and Characterization of Heat Stress Regulated Expressed Sequence Tags in Bread Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Suneha; Kumar, Ranjeet R.; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Jyoti P.; Tiwari, Sachidanand; Kumar, Ashok; Smita, Shuchi; Mishra, Dwijesh C.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Grover, Monendra; Padaria, Jasdeep C.; Kala, Yugal K.; Singh, Gyanendra P.; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly; Rai, Raj D.

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major problems in agriculturally important cereal crops, especially wheat. Here, we have constructed a subtracted cDNA library from the endosperm of HS-treated (42°C for 2 h) wheat cv. HD2985 by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). We identified ~550 recombinant clones ranging from 200 to 500 bp with an average size of 300 bp. Sanger's sequencing was performed with 205 positive clones to generate the differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Most of the ESTs were observed to be localized on the long arm of chromosome 2A and associated with heat stress tolerance and metabolic pathways. Identified ESTs were BLAST search using Ensemble, TriFLD, and TIGR databases and the predicted CDS were translated and aligned with the protein sequences available in pfam and InterProScan 5 databases to predict the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). We observed eight different types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in the DEPs corresponds to the cloned ESTs-147 sites with phosphorylation, 21 sites with sumoylation, 237 with palmitoylation, 96 sites with S-nitrosylation, 3066 calpain cleavage sites, and 103 tyrosine nitration sites, predicted to sense the heat stress and regulate the expression of stress genes. Twelve DEPs were observed to have transmembrane helixes (TMH) in their structure, predicted to play the role of sensors of HS. Quantitative Real-Time PCR of randomly selected ESTs showed very high relative expression of HSP17 under HS; up-regulation was observed more in wheat cv. HD2985 (thermotolerant), as compared to HD2329 (thermosusceptible) during grain-filling. The abundance of transcripts was further validated through northern blot analysis. The ESTs and their corresponding DEPs can be used as molecular marker for screening or targeted precision breeding program. PTMs identified in the DEPs can be used to elucidate the thermotolerance mechanism of wheat—a novel step toward the development of

  12. SSH Analysis of Endosperm Transcripts and Characterization of Heat Stress Regulated Expressed Sequence Tags in Bread Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Suneha; Kumar, Ranjeet R; Dubey, Kavita; Singh, Jyoti P; Tiwari, Sachidanand; Kumar, Ashok; Smita, Shuchi; Mishra, Dwijesh C; Kumar, Sanjeev; Grover, Monendra; Padaria, Jasdeep C; Kala, Yugal K; Singh, Gyanendra P; Pathak, Himanshu; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Rai, Anil; Praveen, Shelly; Rai, Raj D

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major problems in agriculturally important cereal crops, especially wheat. Here, we have constructed a subtracted cDNA library from the endosperm of HS-treated (42°C for 2 h) wheat cv. HD2985 by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). We identified ~550 recombinant clones ranging from 200 to 500 bp with an average size of 300 bp. Sanger's sequencing was performed with 205 positive clones to generate the differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Most of the ESTs were observed to be localized on the long arm of chromosome 2A and associated with heat stress tolerance and metabolic pathways. Identified ESTs were BLAST search using Ensemble, TriFLD, and TIGR databases and the predicted CDS were translated and aligned with the protein sequences available in pfam and InterProScan 5 databases to predict the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). We observed eight different types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in the DEPs corresponds to the cloned ESTs-147 sites with phosphorylation, 21 sites with sumoylation, 237 with palmitoylation, 96 sites with S-nitrosylation, 3066 calpain cleavage sites, and 103 tyrosine nitration sites, predicted to sense the heat stress and regulate the expression of stress genes. Twelve DEPs were observed to have transmembrane helixes (TMH) in their structure, predicted to play the role of sensors of HS. Quantitative Real-Time PCR of randomly selected ESTs showed very high relative expression of HSP17 under HS; up-regulation was observed more in wheat cv. HD2985 (thermotolerant), as compared to HD2329 (thermosusceptible) during grain-filling. The abundance of transcripts was further validated through northern blot analysis. The ESTs and their corresponding DEPs can be used as molecular marker for screening or targeted precision breeding program. PTMs identified in the DEPs can be used to elucidate the thermotolerance mechanism of wheat-a novel step toward the development of "climate-smart" wheat.

  13. SSH analysis of endosperm transcripts and characterization of heat stress regulated expressed sequence tags in bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneha Goswami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress is one of the major problems in agriculturally important cereal crops, especially wheat. Here, we have constructed a subtracted cDNA library from the endosperm of HS-treated (42°C for 2 h wheat cv. HD2985 by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. We identified ~550 recombinant clones ranging from 200 to 500 bp with an average size of 300 bp. Sanger’s sequencing was performed with 205 positive clones to generate the differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Most of the ESTs were observed to be localized on the long arm of chromosome 2A and associated with heat stress tolerance and metabolic pathways. Identified ESTs were BLAST search using Ensemble, TriFLD and TIGR databases and the predicted CDS were translated and aligned with the protein sequences available in pfam and InterProScan 5 databases to predict the differentially expressed proteins (DEPs. We observed eight different types of post-translational modifications (PTMs in the DEPs corresponds to the cloned ESTs—147 sites with phosphorylation, 21 sites with sumoylation, 237 with palmitoylation, 96 sites with S-nitrosylation, 3066 calpain cleavage sites, and 103 tyrosine nitration sites, predicted to sense the heat stress and regulate the expression of stress genes. Twelve DEPs were observed to have transmembrane helixes (TMH in their structure, predicted to play the role of sensors of HS. Quantitative Real-Time PCR of randomly selected ESTs showed very high relative expression of HSP17 under HS; up-regulation was observed more in wheat cv. HD2985 (thermotolerant, as compared to HD2329 (thermosusceptible during grain-filling. The abundance of transcripts was further validated through northern blot analysis. The ESTs and their corresponding DEPs can be used as molecular marker for screening or targeted precision breeding program. PTMs identified in the DEPs can be used to elucidate the thermotolerance mechanism of wheat – a novel step towards the development of

  14. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) low phytic acid 1-1: an endosperm-specific, filial determinant of seed total phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboy, Victor; Cichy, Karen; Peterson, Kevin; Reichman, Sarah; Sompong, Utumporn; Srinives, Peerasak; Saneoka, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (Ins P6 or "phytic acid") typically accounts for 75 (± 10%) of seed total phosphorus (P). In some cases, genetic blocks in seed Ins P6 accumulation can also alter the distribution or total amount of seed P. In nonmutant barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) caryopses, ~80% of Ins P6 and total P accumulate in the aleurone layer, the outer layer of the endosperm, with the remainder in the germ. In barley low phytic acid 1-1 (Hvlpa1-1) seed, both endosperm Ins P6 and total P are reduced (~45% and ~25%, respectively), but germs are phenotypically wild type. This translates into a net reduction in whole-seed total P of ~15%. Nutrient culture studies demonstrate that the reduction in endosperm total P is not due to a reduction in the uptake of P into the maternal plant. Genetic tests (analyses of testcross and F2 seed) reveal that the Hvlpa1-1 genotype of the filial seed conditions the seed total P reduction; sibling seed in the same head of barley that differ in their Hvlpa1-1 genotype (heterozygous vs. homozygous recessive) differ in their total P (normal vs. reduced, respectively). Therefore, Hvlpa1 functions as a seed-specific or filial determinant of barley endosperm total P. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Genetic Association 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Preferred carbon precursors for lipid labelling in the heterotrophic endosperm of developing oat (Avena sativa L.) grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    Oat (Avena sativa L.) is unusual among the cereal grains in storing high amounts of oil in the endosperm; up to 90% of total grain oil. By using oat as a model species for oil metabolism in the cereal endosperm, we can learn how to develop strategies to redirect carbon from starch to achieve high-oil yielding cereal crops. Carbon precursors for lipid synthesis were compared in two genetically close oat cultivars with different endosperm oil content (about 6% and 10% of grain dw, medium-oil; MO, and high-oil; HO cultivar, respectively) by supplying a variety of (14)C-labelled substrates to the grain from both up- and downstream parts of glycolysis, either through detached oat panicles in vitro or by direct injection in planta. When supplied by direct injection, (14)C from acetate was identified to label the lipid fraction of the grain to the highest extent among substrates tested; 46% of net accumulated (14)C, demonstrating its applicability as a marker for lipids in the endosperm. Time course analyses of injected (14)C acetate during grain development suggested a more efficient transfer of fatty acids from polar lipids to triacylglycerol in the HO as compared to the MO cultivar, and turnover of triacylglycerol was suggested to not play a major role for the final oil content of oat grain endosperm despite the low amount of protective oleosins in this tissue. Moreover, availability of light was shown to drastically affect grain net carbon accumulation from (14)C-sucrose when supplied through detached panicles for the HO cultivar. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. CDNA cloning, characterization and expression of an endosperm-specific barley peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Welinder, K.G.; Hejgaard, J.

    1991-01-01

    A barley peroxidase (BP 1) of pI ca. 8.5 and M(r) 37000 has been purified from mature barley grains. Using antibodies towards peroxidase BP 1, a cDNA clone (pcR7) was isolated from cDNA expression library. The nucleotide sequence of pcR7 gave a derived amino acid sequence identical to the 158 C......-terminal amino acid residues of mature BP 1. The clone pcR7 encodes an additional C-terminal sequence of 22 residues, which apparently are removed during processing. BP 1 is less than 50% identical to other sequenced plant peroxidases. Analyses of RNA and protein from aleurone, endosperm and embryo tissue showed...

  17. Ricinosomes provide an early indicator of suspensor and endosperm cells destined to die during late seed development in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S

    2013-11-01

    In mature quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds, the lasting endosperm forms a micropylar cone covering the radicle. The suspensor cells lie within the centre of the cone. During the final stage of seed development, the cells of the lasting endosperm accumulate protein and lipids while the rest are crushed and disintegrated. Both the suspensor and endosperm die progressively from the innermost layers surrounding the embryo and extending towards the nucellar tissue. Ricinosomes are endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles that accumulate both the pro-form and the mature form of cysteine endopeptidase (Cys-EP), first identified in castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm during germination. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of ricinosomes and programmed cell death (PCD) hallmarks in suspensor and endosperm cells predestined to die during quinoa seed development. A structural study using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was performed. To detect the presence of Cys-EP, both western blot and in situ immunolocalization assays were carried out using anti-R. communis Cys-EP antibody. A TUNEL assay was used to determine DNA fragmentation. Except for the one or two cell layers that constitute the lasting endosperm in the mature seed, ricinosomes were found in suspensor and endosperm cells. These cells were also the site of morphological abnormalities, including misshapen and fragmented nuclei, vesiculation of the cytosol, vacuole collapse and cell wall disorganization. It is proposed that, in suspensor and endosperm cells, the early detection of Cys-EP in ricinosomes predicts the occurrence of PCD during late seed development.

  18. Ricinosomes provide an early indicator of suspensor and endosperm cells destined to die during late seed development in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, M. P.; Maldonado, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In mature quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds, the lasting endosperm forms a micropylar cone covering the radicle. The suspensor cells lie within the centre of the cone. During the final stage of seed development, the cells of the lasting endosperm accumulate protein and lipids while the rest are crushed and disintegrated. Both the suspensor and endosperm die progressively from the innermost layers surrounding the embryo and extending towards the nucellar tissue. Ricinosomes are endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles that accumulate both the pro-form and the mature form of cysteine endopeptidase (Cys-EP), first identified in castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm during germination. This study sought to identify associations between the presence of ricinosomes and programmed cell death (PCD) hallmarks in suspensor and endosperm cells predestined to die during quinoa seed development. Methods A structural study using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was performed. To detect the presence of Cys-EP, both western blot and in situ immunolocalization assays were carried out using anti-R. communis Cys-EP antibody. A TUNEL assay was used to determine DNA fragmentation. Results and Conclusions Except for the one or two cell layers that constitute the lasting endosperm in the mature seed, ricinosomes were found in suspensor and endosperm cells. These cells were also the site of morphological abnormalities, including misshapen and fragmented nuclei, vesiculation of the cytosol, vacuole collapse and cell wall disorganization. It is proposed that, in suspensor and endosperm cells, the early detection of Cys-EP in ricinosomes predicts the occurrence of PCD during late seed development. PMID:24061488

  19. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·(-) and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·(-) and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·(-), H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·(-), peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  20. The involvement of Opaque 2 on beta-prolamin gene regulation in maize and Coix suggests a more general role for this transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cord Neto, G; Yunes, J A; da Silva, M J; Vettore, A L; Arruda, P; Leite, A

    1995-03-01

    The maize opaque 2 (o2) mutation is known to have numerous pleiotropic effects. Some polypeptides have their expression depressed while others are enhanced. The best characterized effects of the o2 mutation are those exerted on endosperm genes encoding the storage protein class of the 22 kDa alpha-zeins and the ribosome inactivating protein b-32. The Opaque 2 (O2) locus encodes a basic domain-leucine zipper DNA-binding factor, O2, which transcriptionally regulates these genes. In the maize-related grass Coix lacryma-jobi, an O2-homologous protein regulates the 25 kDa alpha-coixin family. We show in this paper that O2 transcriptionally regulates the structurally and developmentally different class of the beta-prolamins. A new O2-binding box was identified in beta-prolamin genes from maize and Coix that, together with the boxes previously identified in other endosperm expressed genes, forms a curious collection of O2 cis elements. This may have regulatory implications on the role of O2 in the mechanism that controls coordinated gene expression in the developing endosperm. Considering that the O2 locus controls at least three distinct classes of genes in maize endosperm, we propose that the O2 protein may play a more general role in maize endosperm development than previously conceived.

  1. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  2. Alterations in seed development gene expression affect size and oil content of Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds.

  3. Metabolite profiling of somatic embryos of Cyclamen persicum in comparison to zygotic embryos, endosperm and testa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traud eWinkelmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system for many crops such as the important ornamental plant Cyclamen persicum, for which this regeneration pathway of somatic embryogenesis is of interest for the vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as elite plants. However, somatic embryogenesis is not commercially used in many crops due to several unsolved problems, such as malformations, asynchronous development, deficiencies in maturation and germination of somatic embryos. In contrast, zygotic embryos in seeds develop and germinate without abnormalities in most cases. Instead of time-consuming and labor-intensive experiments involving tests of different in vitro culture conditions and plant growth regulator supplements, we follow a more directed approach. Zygotic embryos served as a reference and were compared to somatic embryos in metabolomic analyses allowing the future optimization of the in vitro system. The aims of this study were to detect differences in the metabolite profiles of torpedo stage somatic and zygotic embryos of C. persicum. Moreover, major metabolites in endosperm and testa were identified and quantified.Two sets of extracts of two to four biological replicates each were analyzed. In total 52 metabolites were identified and quantified in the different tissues. One of the most significant differences between somatic and zygotic embryos was that the proline concentration in the zygotic embryos was about 40 times higher than that found in somatic embryos. Epicatechin, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, was found in highest abundance in the testa. Sucrose, the most abundant metabolite was detected in significantly higher concentrations in zygotic embryos. Also, a yet unknown trisaccharide, was significantly enriched in zygotic embryos.

  4. Metabolite profiling of somatic embryos of Cyclamen persicum in comparison to zygotic embryos, endosperm, and testa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Traud; Ratjens, Svenja; Bartsch, Melanie; Rode, Christina; Niehaus, Karsten; Bednarz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient in vitro plant regeneration system for many crops such as the important ornamental plant Cyclamen persicum, for which this regeneration pathway of somatic embryogenesis is of interest for the vegetative propagation of parental lines as well as elite plants. However, somatic embryogenesis is not commercially used in many crops due to several unsolved problems, such as malformations, asynchronous development, deficiencies in maturation and germination of somatic embryos. In contrast, zygotic embryos in seeds develop and germinate without abnormalities in most cases. Instead of time-consuming and labor-intensive experiments involving tests of different in vitro culture conditions and plant growth regulator supplements, we follow a more directed approach. Zygotic embryos served as a reference and were compared to somatic embryos in metabolomic analyses allowing the future optimization of the in vitro system. The aims of this study were to detect differences in the metabolite profiles of torpedo stage somatic and zygotic embryos of C. persicum. Moreover, major metabolites in endosperm and testa were identified and quantified. Two sets of extracts of two to four biological replicates each were analyzed. In total 52 metabolites were identified and quantified in the different tissues. One of the most significant differences between somatic and zygotic embryos was that the proline concentration in the zygotic embryos was about 40 times higher than that found in somatic embryos. Epicatechin, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species, was found in highest abundance in the testa. Sucrose, the most abundant metabolite was detected in significantly higher concentrations in zygotic embryos. Also, a yet unknown trisaccharide, was significantly enriched in zygotic embryos. PMID:26300898

  5. Recombinant human proinsulin from transgenic corn endosperm: solvent screening and extraction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Farinas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant pharmaceutical proteins are being produced in different systems such as bacteria and mammalian cell cultures. The use of transgenic plants as bioreactors has recently arisen as an alternative system offering many practical and economic advantages. However, finding an optimum strategy for the downstream processing (DSP of recombinant proteins from plants still remains a challenge. In this work, we studied the extraction of recombinant human proinsulin (rhProinsulin produced in the endosperm of transgenic corn seeds. An efficient extraction solvent was selected and the effects of temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, time, and impeller rotational speed on the extraction were evaluated using an experimental design. After an extraction kinetics study, temperature was further evaluated to maximize rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts and to minimize the native corn components carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and proteins. A high efficiency condition for extracting rhProinsulin with the selected solvent - 50 mM sodium bicarbonate buffer pH 10.0 and 5 mM DTT - was an extraction time of 2 h at a solvent-to-solid ratio of 10:1 and 25º C. The maximum rhProinsulin concentration in the extracts at that condition was 18.87 mg l-1 or 0.42% of the total soluble protein. These values are within the range in which the production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants can be competitive with other expression systems. The results presented provide information for the development of an additional production platform for the hormone insulin.

  6. PEMANFAATAN FRAKSI KAYA ASAM LAURAT HASIL HIDROLISIS DARI ENDOSPERM KELAPA MENGGUNAKAN LIPASE ENDOGENEUS SEBAGAI PENGAWET SUSU KEDELAI KEMASAN (Utilization of High Lauric Fraction that Produced from Coconut Endosperm Using Lipase Endogenous as Preservation of Soybean Milk Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Su'i

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of previous studies show that the high lauric fraction isolated from coconut endosperm is able to inhibit pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. This research aims to study the addition of high lauric fraction that hydrolysed of coconut endosperm of the storability of soy milk packaging. High lauric fraction isolated from coconut milk, then the fraction analized of the fatty acid composition with gas chromatography (GC and then used as a preservative soy milk. The fraction is added to the soy milk with concentrations of 0, 10, 15 and 20%, then stored for 3 days. Every day is observed until soy milk damaged. The results showed that the fraction isolated from coconut milk contains 50.45% lauric acid, 17.52% myristic acid, 7.02% palmitic acid, 6.46% capric acid, 5.52% caprylic acid, 5.12% linoleic acid, 1.89% oleic acid, and 0.11% caproic acid. The addition of lauric acid-rich fraction of 20% were able to preserve soy milk for 2 days with a total microbe 1.00 x 104 cfu/ml, free fatty acids 0.12 m mol/ml, pH 5.05 and a balanced aroma 4 (nice. Keywords: Coconut, lauric acid, soy milk, storage ABSTRAK Hasil penelitian sebelumnya menunjukkan bahwa fraksi kaya asam laurat hasil isolasi dari endosperm kelapa mampu menghambat bakteri patogen dan non patogen. Penelitian ini bertujuan mempelajari penambahan fraksi kaya asam laurat hasil hidrolisis dari endosperm kelapa terhadap daya simpan susu kedelai kemasan. Fraksi yang kaya asam laurat diisolasi dari santan kelapa kemudian fraksi tersebut diuji komposisi asam lemaknya menggunakan chromatografi gas (GC dan selanjutnya digunakan sebagai bahan pengawet susu kedelai. Fraksi kaya asam laurat ditambahkan ke dalam susu kedelai dengan konsentrasi 0, 10, 15 dan 20%, kemudian disimpan selama 3 hari. Setiap hari dilakukan pengamatan hingga susu mengalami kerusakan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa fraksi hasil isolasi dari santan kelapa mengandung asam laurat 50,45%, asam miristat 17,52%, asam palmitat

  7. Novas observações citológicas no endosperma de café Cytological observations on coffee endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixier M. Medina

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Contagens de cromossomos foram efetuadas em endosperma de algumas espécies de Coffea, empregando-se a técnica da orceína acética, já referida em trabalho anterior. Os resultados encontrados para C. arabica (variedades typica, semperflorens, 2n = 44, e plantas monossômicas, 2n = 43 ; C. canephora, 2n = 22, C. dewevrei, 2n = 22, C. eugenioides x C. kapakata, 2n = 22 e C. eugenioides duplicado, 2n = 44, são discutidos em cada caso. Em todo o material estudado foi constatada a endomitose. O endosperma é, no início, um tecido de constituição 3x, transformando-se depois num tecido quimérico com células polissomáticas de diferentes graus. As numerosas figuras conseguidas, que permitiram contagens ou microfotografias, confirmam que, no cafeeiro, o endosperma é um material favorável para pesquisas citológicas.Chromosome countings have been rnade on lhe endosperm of Coffea using the same technique of acetic oreein already referred to in previous work of the author. Endosperm from the varieties typica and semperflorens (2n = 44 and monosomic plants (2n = 43 of C. arabica as well as of other species as C. canephora (2n = 22, C. dewevrei (2n = 22, C. eugenioides x C. kapakata (2n = 22 and duplicated C. eugenioides (2n = 44 were studied. Gametic number of chromosomes are discussed leading in some cases to the conclusion that gametes with missing chromosomes and gametes with supernumerary chromosomes were functional. Endomitosis was observed in all material studied. Endosperm tissue is constituted, therefore, by polysomatic cells (6x, 12x in addition to the monosomatic ones (3x initially formed through fertilization. The possible relation of endomitosis and embryo development is also discussed. The great number of photomicrographies obtained indicates once more that coffee endosperm is a favourable material for cytological investigations.

  8. Separation and purification of soluble polymers and cell wall fractions from wheat, rye and hull less barley endosperm flours for structure-nutrition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comino, Penny; Shelat, Kinnari; Collins, Helen; Lahnstein, Jelle; Gidley, Michael J

    2013-12-11

    The nutritional values associated with the cell walls of cereal endosperm flours are due to a combination of solubilized arabinoxylan and (1-3,1-4)-β-d-glucan as well as residual nonsolubilized cell wall material. In order to investigate structure-nutrition relationships, an appropriate method for the complete functional and structural characterization of cell wall polysaccharides in various cereal endosperm flours is described. This involves the separation of soluble polymers and the residual cell wall fraction without using organic solvents, and the fractionation of soluble polymers into arabinoxylan- and (1-3,1-4)-β-d-glucan-rich fractions for subsequent analysis. This methodology is applied to endosperm flours from wheat, hull-less barley and rye, and could be extended to include studies on the effects of food processing with respect to yield and characteristics of the three fractions in order to better understand the structural basis for nutritional functionality.

  9. Rice alcohol dehydrogenase 1 promotes survival and has a major impact on carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm when seeds are germinated in partially oxygenated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Greenway, Hank; Matsumura, Hideo; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Nakazono, Mikio

    2014-04-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) has the rare ability to germinate and elongate a coleoptile under oxygen-deficient conditions, which include both hypoxia and anoxia. It has previously been shown that ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE 1 (ADH1) is required for cell division and cell elongation in the coleoptile of submerged rice seedlings by means of studies using a rice ADH1-deficient mutant, reduced adh activity (rad). The aim of this study was to understand how low ADH1 in rice affects carbohydrate metabolism in the embryo and endosperm, and lactate and alanine synthesis in the embryo during germination and subsequent coleoptile growth in submerged seedlings. Wild-type and rad mutant rice seeds were germinated and grown under complete submergence. At 1, 3, 5 and 7 d after imbibition, the embryo and endosperm were separated and several of their metabolites were measured and compared. In the rad embryo, the rate of ethanol fermentation was halved, while lactate and alanine concentrations were 2·4- and 5·7- fold higher in the mutant than in the wild type. Glucose and fructose concentrations in the embryos increased with time in the wild type, but not in the rad mutant. The rad mutant endosperm had lower amounts of the α-amylases RAMY1A and RAMY3D, resulting in less starch degradation and lower glucose concentrations. These results suggest that ADH1 is essential for sugar metabolism via glycolysis to ethanol fermentation in both the embryo and endosperm. In the endosperm, energy is presumably needed for synthesis of the amylases and for sucrose synthesis in the endosperm, as well as for sugar transport to the embryo.

  10. An Integrated “Multi-Omics” Comparison of Embryo and Endosperm Tissue-Specific Features and Their Impact on Rice Seed Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Galland

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although rice is a key crop species, few studies have addressed both rice seed physiological and nutritional quality, especially at the tissue level. In this study, an exhaustive “multi-omics” dataset on the mature rice seed was obtained by combining transcriptomics, label-free shotgun proteomics and metabolomics from embryo and endosperm, independently. These high-throughput analyses provide a new insight on the tissue-specificity related to rice seed quality. Foremost, we pinpointed that extensive post-transcriptional regulations occur at the end of rice seed development such that the embryo proteome becomes much more diversified than the endosperm proteome. Secondly, we observed that survival in the dry state in each seed compartment depends on contrasted metabolic and enzymatic apparatus in the embryo and the endosperm, respectively. Thirdly, it was remarkable to identify two different sets of starch biosynthesis enzymes as well as seed storage proteins (glutelins in both embryo and endosperm consistently with the supernumerary embryo hypothesis origin of the endosperm. The presence of a putative new glutelin with a possible embryonic favored abundance is described here for the first time. Finally, we quantified the rate of mRNA translation into proteins. Consistently, the embryonic panel of protein translation initiation factors is much more diverse than that of the endosperm. This work emphasizes the value of tissue-specificity-centered “multi-omics” study in the seed to highlight new features even from well-characterized pathways. It paves the way for future studies of critical genetic determinants of rice seed physiological and nutritional quality.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Esters of Indole-3-Acetic Acid from the Liquid Endosperm of the Horse Chestnut (Aesculus species) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Wojciech; Schulze, Aga; Bandurski, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    Esters of indole-3-acetic acid were extracted and purified from the liquid endosperm of immature fruits of various species of the horse chestnut (Aesculus parviflora, A. baumanni, A.pavia rubra, and A. pavia humulis). The liquid endosperm contained, at least 12 chromatographically distinct esters. One of these compounds was purified and characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and myo-inositol. A second compound was found to be an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and the disaccharide rutinose (glucosyl-rhamnose). A third compound was partially characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and a desoxyaminohexose. PMID:11539676

  12. Alterations in Seed Development Gene Expression Affect Size and Oil Content of Arabidopsis Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds. PMID:24014578

  13. Multiple forms of endo-1,4-beta-glucanases in the endosperm of Euphorbia heterophylla L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Cecilia N K; Giorgini, Jarbas F

    2003-09-01

    Germinating seeds of Euphorbia heterophylla L. contain endo-1,4-beta-glucanases which degrade carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). The activity decreased approximately 66% in extracts of endosperm containing isopropanol or ethanol. The endoglucanases were isolated from endosperm extracts using ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by Sephacryl S-100-HR chromatography resulting in two main peaks: I and II. Peak I endoglucanase was further purified about 15-fold on DEAE-Sephadex A50 and then by affinity chromatography (CF11-cellulose). Peak II endoglucanases were further purified 10-fold on CM-cellulose chromatography. The results indicated the occurrence of a 66 kDa endoglucanase (fractionated by SDS-PAGE and visualized by activity staining using Congo Red). Several acidic (pI 3.0 to 5.7) and basic (pI 8.5 to 10.0) forms from both peaks which differed in their capacities for degrading CMC or xyloglucans from Copaifera langsdorffii or Hymenaea courbaril were detected.

  14. Effect of high temperature on cell structure and gluten protein accumulation in the endosperm of the developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    High temperature during grain fill is one of the more significant environmental factors that alters wheat yield and flour quality. To identify endosperm responses to high temperature, cell structure and gluten protein composition were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Butte ...

  15. The effect of high temperature on cell structure and gluten protein accumulation in the endosperm of the developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    High temperature during grain fill is one of the more significant environmental factors that alters wheat yield and flour quality. To identify endosperm responses to high temperature, cell structure and gluten protein composition were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Butte ...

  16. Miniature1-encoded cell wall invertase is essential for assembly and function of wall-in-growth in the maize endosperm transfer cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    The miniature1 (mn1) seed phenotype in maize is due to a loss-of-function mutation at the Mn1 locus that encodes a cell wall invertase, INCW2, which localizes exclusively to the basal endosperm transfer cells (BETC) of developing seeds. A common feature of all transfer cells is the labyrinth-like wa...

  17. Sequential gene activation and gene imprinting during early embryo development in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Dexuan; Zhao, Jianyu; Zhao, Cheng; Luo, Haishan; Xie, Mujiao; Liu, Renyi; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Xiaolan; Jin, Weiwei

    2017-11-24

    Gene imprinting is a widely observed epigenetic phenomenon in maize endosperm; however, whether it also occurs in maize embryo remains controversial. Here, we used high throughput RNA sequencing on laser capture microdissection (LCM) and manually dissected maize embryos from reciprocal crosses between inbred lines B73 and Mo17 at six time points (3 to 13 days after pollination) to analyze allelic gene expression patterns. Co-expression analysis revealed sequential gene activation during maize embryo development. Gene imprinting was observed in maize embryos and a greater number of imprinted genes were identified at early embryo stages. Sixty-four strongly imprinted genes were identified (at the threshold of 9:1) on 5 DAP to 13 DAP manually dissected embryos (more imprinted genes on 5 DAP). Forty-one strongly imprinted genes were identified from 3 DAP and 5 DAP embryos obtained by LCM (more imprinted genes on 3DAP). Furthermore, of the 56 genes that were completely imprinted (at the threshold of 99:1), 36 were not previously identified as imprinted genes in endosperms and nor in embryos. In situ hybridization demonstrated that most of the imprinted genes were expressed abundantly in maize embryotic tissue. Our results shed lights on early maize embryo development and provide evidence supporting that gene imprinting occurs in maize embryos. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Enhancing sucrose synthase activity results in increased levels of starch and ADP-glucose in maize (Zea mays L.) seed endosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Muñoz, Francisco José; Ovecka, Miroslav; Montero, Manuel; Sesma, María Teresa; Alonso-Casajús, Nora; Almagro, Goizeder; Sánchez-López, Angela María; Hidalgo, Maite; Zamarbide, Marta; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sucrose and a nucleoside diphosphate into the corresponding nucleoside diphosphate glucose and fructose. In cereal endosperms, it is widely assumed that the stepwise reactions of SuSy, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) take place in the cytosol to convert sucrose into ADPG necessary for starch biosynthesis, although it has also been suggested that SuSy may participate in the direct conversion of sucrose into ADPG. In this study, the levels of the major primary carbon metabolites, and the activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes were assessed in endosperms of transgenic maize plants ectopically expressing StSUS4, which encodes a potato SuSy isoform. A total of 29 fertile lines transformed with StSUS4 were obtained, five of them containing a single copy of the transgene that was still functional after five generations. The number of seeds per ear of the five transgenic lines containing a single StSUS4 copy was comparable with that of wild-type (WT) control seeds. However, transgenic seeds accumulated 10-15% more starch at the mature stage, and contained a higher amylose/amylopectin balance than WT seeds. Endosperms of developing StSUS4-expressing seeds exhibited a significant increase in SuSy activity, and in starch and ADPG contents when compared with WT endosperms. No significant changes could be detected in the transgenic seeds in the content of soluble sugars, and in activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes when compared with WT seeds. A suggested metabolic model is presented wherein both AGP and SuSy are involved in the production of ADPG linked to starch biosynthesis in maize endosperm cells.

  19. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Different Involvement of Embryo and Endosperm Proteins during Aging of Yliangyou 2 Hybrid Rice Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Xue; Xu, Heng-Heng; Liu, Shu-Jun; Li, Ni; Wang, Wei-Qing; Møller, Ian M.; Song, Song-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Seed aging is a process that results in a delayed germination, a decreased germination percentage, and finally a total loss of seed viability. However, the mechanism of seed aging is poorly understood. In the present study, Yliangyou 2 hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds were artificially aged at 100% relative humidity and 40°C, and the effect of artificial aging on germination, germination time course and the change in protein profiles of embryo and endosperm was studied to understand the molecular mechanism behind seed aging. With an increasing duration of artificial aging, the germination percentage and germination rate of hybrid rice seeds decreased. By comparing the protein profiles from the seeds aged for 0, 10 and 25 days, a total of 91 and 100 protein spots were found to show a significant change of more than 2-fold (P rice seeds during artificial aging is caused by the development of hypoxic conditions in the embryos followed by ethanol accumulation. PMID:27708655

  20. Rice endosperm is cost-effective for the production of recombinant griffithsin with potent activity against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvaka, Evangelia; Arcalis, Elsa; Ramessar, Koreen; Evans, Abbey; O'Keefe, Barry R; Shattock, Robin J; Medina, Vicente; Stöger, Eva; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Protein microbicides containing neutralizing antibodies and antiviral lectins may help to reduce the rate of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) if it is possible to manufacture the components in large quantities at a cost affordable in HIV-endemic regions such as sub-Saharan Africa. We expressed the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT), which shows potent neutralizing activity against HIV, in the endosperm of transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa), to determine whether rice can be used to produce inexpensive GRFT as a microbicide ingredient. The yield of (OS) GRFT in the best-performing plants was 223 μg/g dry seed weight. We also established a one-step purification protocol, achieving a recovery of 74% and a purity of 80%, which potentially could be developed into a larger-scale process to facilitate inexpensive downstream processing. (OS) GRFT bound to HIV glycans with similar efficiency to GRFT produced in Escherichia coli. Whole-cell assays using purified (OS) GRFT and infectivity assays using crude extracts of transgenic rice endosperm confirmed that both crude and pure (OS) GRFT showed potent activity against HIV and the crude extracts were not toxic towards human cell lines, suggesting they could be administered as a microbicide with only minimal processing. A freedom-to-operate analysis confirmed that GRFT produced in rice is suitable for commercial development, and an economic evaluation suggested that 1.8 kg/ha of pure GRFT could be produced from rice seeds. Our data therefore indicate that rice could be developed as an inexpensive production platform for GRFT as a microbicide component. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The distal portion of the short arm of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 5D controls endosperm vitreosity and grain hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Craig F; Beecher, Brian S

    2012-07-01

    Kernel vitreosity is an important trait of wheat grain, but its developmental control is not completely known. We developed back-cross seven (BC(7)) near-isogenic lines in the soft white spring wheat cultivar Alpowa that lack the distal portion of chromosome 5D short arm. From the final back-cross, 46 BC(7)F(2) plants were isolated. These plants exhibited a complete and perfect association between kernel vitreosity (i.e. vitreous, non-vitreous or mixed) and Single Kernel Characterization System (SKCS) hardness. Observed segregation of 10:28:7 fit a 1:2:1 Chi-square. BC(7)F(2) plants classified as heterozygous for both SKCS hardness and kernel vitreosity (n = 29) were selected and a single vitreous and non-vitreous kernel were selected, and grown to maturity and subjected to SKCS analysis. The resultant phenotypic ratios were, from non-vitreous kernels, 23:6:0, and from vitreous kernels, 0:1:28, soft:heterozygous:hard, respectively. Three of these BC(7)F(2) heterozygous plants were selected and 40 kernels each drawn at random, grown to maturity and subjected to SKCS analysis. Phenotypic segregation ratios were 7:27:6, 11:20:9, and 3:28:9, soft:heterozygous:hard. Chi-square analysis supported a 1:2:1 segregation for one plant but not the other two, in which cases the two homozygous classes were under-represented. Twenty-two paired BC(7)F(2):F(3) full sibs were compared for kernel hardness, weight, size, density and protein content. SKCS hardness index differed markedly, 29.4 for the lines with a complete 5DS, and 88.6 for the lines possessing the deletion. The soft non-vitreous kernels were on average significantly heavier, by nearly 20%, and were slightly larger. Density and protein contents were similar, however. The results provide strong genetic evidence that gene(s) on distal 5DS control not only kernel hardness but also the manner in which the endosperm develops, viz. whether it is vitreous or non-vitreous.

  2. Characterization of opaque2 modifier QTLs and candidate genes in recombinant inbred lines derived from the K0326Y quality protein maize inbred

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, David R.

    2010-11-13

    Quality protein maize (QPM) is a high lysine-containing corn that is based on genetic modification of the opaque2 (o2) mutant. In QPM, modifier genes convert the starchy endosperm of o2 to the vitreous phenotype of wild type maize. There are multiple, unlinked o2 modifier loci (Opm) in QPM and their nature and mode of action are unknown. We previously identified seven Opm QTLs and characterized 16 genes that are differentially up-regulated at a significant level in K0326Y QPM, compared to the starchy endosperm mutant W64Ao2. In order to further characterize these Opm QTLs and the genes up-regulated in K0326Y QPM, we created a population of 314 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between K0326Y QPM and W64Ao2. The RILs were characterized for three traits associated with endosperm texture: vitreousness, density and hardness. Genetic linkage analysis of the RIL population confirmed three of the previously identified QTLs associated with o2 endosperm modification in K0326Y QPM. Many of the genes up-regulated in K0326Y QPM showed substantially higher levels of expression in vitreous compared with opaque RILs. These included genes associated with the upstream regulation of the ethylene response pathway, and a gene encoding a regulatory subunit of pyrophosphate-dependent fructose-6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase, an adaptive enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Functional analysis of genes involved in the regulation of development of reproductive organs in rice (Oryza sativa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Quality of the rice grain is determined mainly by starch and protein contents of the endosperm. In this thesis, the analyses of four genes involved in the regulation of development of rice grain and floret are presented. Two CCCH type zinc finger proteins, OsGZF1 and OsGZF2, were identified as novel

  4. The Vitrofural use in the chemical sterilization of the artificial endosperms of encapsulated somatic embryos of Saccharum spp hybrid var Cuba 87- 51

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Quiala

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the Vitrofural in the control of pollutants in the capsule study was carried out, as well as its toxic effect on the somatic embryos of sugar cane. Different dose of this compound was used (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 mg l-1, these they were applied to the cultivation medium with nudes somatic embryos, which was used previously autoclaved and without autoclaved, later these same doses were added to the synthetic endosperm. The Vitrofural can be employed in the chemical sterilization of the cultivation medium for the germination in vitro of the somatic embryos, as well as in the chemical protection of the synthetic endosperm, that which allowed to eliminate the autoclaved of the encapsulation medium, as well as to reduce the concentration of the agents gelificantes in 33% and to carry out all the operations under non sterile conditions. Key words: Encapsulation, sugarcane, synthetic seed

  5. A comparative glycoproteome study of developing endosperm in the hexose-deficient miniature1 (mn1 seed mutant and its wild type Mn1 in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia eSilva-Sanchez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In maize developing seeds, transfer cells are prominently located at the basal endosperm transfer layer (BETL. As the first filial cell layer, BETL is a gateway to sugars, nutrients and water from mother plant; and anchor of numerous functions such as sucrose turnover, auxin and cytokinin biosynthesis/accumulation, energy metabolism, defense response, and signaling between maternal and filial generations. Previous studies showed that basal developing endosperms of miniature1 (mn1 mutant seeds lacking the Mn1-encoded cell wall invertase II, are also deficient for hexose. Given the role of glucose as one of the key sugars in protein glycosylation and proper protein folding; we performed a comparative large scale glycoproteome profiling of total proteins of these two genotypes (mn1 mutant vs Mn1 wild type using 2D gel electrophoresis and glycosylation/total protein staining, followed by image analysis. Protein identification was done by LC-MS/MS. A total of 413 spots were detected; from which, 113 spots matched between the two genotypes. Of these, 45 showed > 20% decrease/increase in glycosylation level and were selected for protein identification. A large number of identified proteins showed decreased glycosylation levels in mn1 developing endosperms as compared to the Mn1. Functional classification of proteins, showed mainly of post-translational modification, protein turnover, chaperone activities, carbohydrate and amino acid biosynthesis / transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. These proteins and activities were related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR as a result of the low glycolsylation levels of the mutant proteins. Overall, these results provide for the first time a global glycoproteome profile of maize BETL-enriched basal endosperm to better understand their role in seed development in maize.

  6. High temperature during grain fill alters the morphology of protein and starch deposits in the starchy endosperm cells of developing wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurkman, William J; Wood, Delilah F

    2011-05-11

    High temperature during grain fill reduces wheat yield and alters flour quality. Starchy endosperm cell morphology was investigated in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L. 'Butte 86') grain produced under a 24/17 or 37/28 °C day/night regimen imposed from anthesis to maturity to identify changes in cell structure related to the functional properties of flour. The duration of grain fill decreased substantially under the 37/28 °C regimen, but, like the 24/17 °C regimen, endosperm cells in the mature grain were packed with starch and protein. However, A-type starch granules increased in number, decreased in size, and exhibited pitting; B-type granules decreased in both number and size; and the protein matrix was proportionally greater in endosperm cells of grain produced under the 37/28 °C regimen. Such changes in starch granule number, size, and structure and in protein amount are known to contribute to variations in wheat flour quality.

  7. Effect of drought stress on the development of endosperm starch granules and the composition and physicochemical properties of starches from soft and hard wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xurun; Li, Bo; Wang, Leilei; Chen, Xinyu; Wang, Wenjun; Gu, Yunjie; Wang, Zhong; Xiong, Fei

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) observe the effects of drought stress (DS) on the structural development of endosperm starch granules; (2) investigate the effects of DS on composition and physicochemical properties of starches; and (3) compare the different responses to DS between soft and hard wheat. DS resulted in large A-type starch granules at 12 d after anthesis (DAA) and a high percentage of B-type starch granules at 18 DAA in endosperm cells of the two wheat cultivars. DS decreased the 1000-grain weight, total starch and amylose contents, and amylose-to-amylopectin ratio of both starches. DS also decreased the percentage of B-type starch granules in NM13 and increased the number of hollows on the surface of A-type starch granules in XM33. DS further increased the swelling power and affected pasting properties of both starches. DS also significantly enhanced the hydrolysis degrees of starches by pancreatic α-amylase, Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase, and HCl in NM13. DS altered the contents of rapidly digestible, slowly digestible, and resistant starches in native, gelatinised, and retrograded starches. Overall, DS can affect the development of endosperm starch granules and the physicochemical properties of starches, thus affecting the qualities of the final wheat products. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Stable radicals and biochemical compounds in embryos and endosperm of wheat grains differentiating sensitive and tolerant genotypes--EPR and Raman studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdziel, Magdalena; Dłubacz, Aleksandra; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Filek, Maria; Łabanowska, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover the specific species in grains that might differentiate the wheat genotypes according to their tolerance to oxidative stress. Measurements by EPR and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used to examine whole grains and their parts (embryo, endosperm, seed coat) originating from four wheat genotypes with differing tolerance to drought stress. Raman spectra showed that, in spite of the similar amounts of proteins in whole grains from tolerant and sensitive genotypes, in tolerant ones they were accumulated mainly in embryos. Moreover, in embryos from these grains, a higher content of unsaturated fatty acids was observed. Endosperm of grains from the tolerant genotype, richer with starch than that of sensitive one, exhibited higher content of amylopectin. Detailed analysis of EPR signals and simulation procedures of the spectra allowed the estimation of the nature of interactions of Fe(III) and Mn(II) with organic and inorganic structures of grains and the character of organic stable radicals. Three types of these radicals: carbohydrate, semiquinone and phenoxyl, were identified. The amounts of these radicals were higher in grains of sensitive genotypes, mostly because of differences in carbohydrate radical content in endosperm. Taking into account the level of radical concentration and greater capacity for radical formation in grains from plants of lower tolerance to stress, the content of radicals, especially of a carbohydrate nature, was considered as a marker of the plant resistance to stress conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in rice endosperm reveals a metabolic bottleneck at the level of endogenous β-carotene hydroxylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chao; Berman, Judit; Farre, Gemma; Capell, Teresa; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2017-02-01

    Astaxanthin is a high-value ketocarotenoid rarely found in plants. It is derived from β-carotene by the 3-hydroxylation and 4-ketolation of both ionone end groups, in reactions catalyzed by β-carotene hydroxylase and β-carotene ketolase, respectively. We investigated the feasibility of introducing an extended carotenoid biosynthesis pathway into rice endosperm to achieve the production of astaxanthin. This allowed us to identify potential metabolic bottlenecks that have thus far prevented the accumulation of this valuable compound in storage tissues such as cereal grains. Rice endosperm does not usually accumulate carotenoids because phytoene synthase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step in the pathway, is not present in this tissue. We therefore expressed maize phytoene synthase 1 (ZmPSY1), Pantoea ananatis phytoene desaturase (PaCRTI) and a synthetic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii β-carotene ketolase (sCrBKT) in transgenic rice plants under the control of endosperm-specific promoters. The resulting grains predominantly accumulated the diketocarotenoids canthaxanthin, adonirubin and astaxanthin as well as low levels of monoketocarotenoids. The predominance of canthaxanthin and adonirubin indicated the presence of a hydroxylation bottleneck in the ketocarotenoid pathway. This final rate-limiting step must therefore be overcome to maximize the accumulation of astaxanthin, the end product of the pathway.

  10. In situ histochemical localisation of alkaloids and acetogenins in the endosperm and embryonic axis of Annona macroprophyllata Donn. Sm. seeds during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechú-Franco, A E; Laguna-Hernández, G; De la Cruz-Chacón, I; González-Esquinca, A R

    2016-02-01

    Currently, the Annonaceae family is characterised by the production of acetogenins (ACGs), and also by the biosynthesis of alkaloids, primarily benzylisoquinolines derived from tyrosine. The objective of this study was to confirm the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins in the idioblasts of the endosperm and the embryonic axis of A. macroprophyllata seeds in germination. The Dragendorff, Dittmar, Ellram, and Lugol reagents were used to test for alkaloids, and Kedde's reagent was used to determine the presence of acetogenins in fresh sections of the endosperm and embryonic axis of seeds after twelve days of germination. A positive reaction was observed for all the reagents, and the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins was confirmed in the idioblasts of the endosperm and those involved in the differentiation of the embryonic axis of the developing seedling. We concluded that the idioblasts store both metabolites, acetogenins and alkaloids. Beginning at differentiation, the idioblasts of the embryonic axis simultaneously biosynthesise acetogenins and alkaloids that are characteristic of the species during the development of the seedling. The method used here can be applied to histochemically confirm the presence of acetogenins and alkaloids in tissues and structures of the plant in different stages of its life cycle.

  11. Endosperm and whole grain rye breads are characterized by low post-prandial insulin response and a beneficial blood glucose profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Elin M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rye products have previously been shown to induce comparatively low post-prandial insulin responses; irrespectively of their glycaemic indices (GI. However, the mechanism behind this lowered insulin demand remains unknown. An improved insulin economy might contribute to the benefits seen in epidemiological studies with whole grain diets on metabolic risk factors and weight regulation. The objective of this study was to explore the mechanism for a reduced post-prandial insulin demand with rye products. Methods 12 healthy subjects were given flour based rye products made from endosperm, whole grain or bran, produced with different methods (baking, simulated sour-dough baking and boiling as breakfasts in random order in a cross-over design. White wheat bread (WWB was used as a reference. Blood glucose, serum insulin, plasma ghrelin and subjective satiety were measured during 180 minutes. To evaluate the course of post-meal glycaemia, a measure of the glycaemic profile (GP was introduced defined as the duration for the incremental post-prandial blood glucose response divided with the blood glucose incremental peak (min/mM. Results The study shows that whole grain rye breads and endosperm rye products induced significantly (p Conclusion Our study shows that endosperm and wholegrain rye products induce low acute insulinaemic responses and improved glycaemic profiles. The results also suggest that the rye products possess beneficial appetite regulating properties. Further studies are needed to identify the unknown property or bioactive component(s responsible for these beneficial metabolic features of rye.

  12. In situ histochemical localisation of alkaloids and acetogenins in the endosperm and embryonic axis of Annona macroprophyllata Donn. Sm. seeds during germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Brechú-Franco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the Annonaceae family is characterised by the production of acetogenins (ACGs, and also by the biosynthesis of alkaloids, primarily benzylisoquinolines derived from tyrosine. The objective of this study was to confirm the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins in the idioblasts of the endosperm and the embryonic axis of A. macroprophyllata seeds in germination. The Dragendorff, Dittmar, Ellram, and Lugol reagents were used to test for alkaloids, and Kedde’s reagent was used to determine the presence of acetogenins in fresh sections of the endosperm and embryonic axis of seeds after twelve days of germination. A positive reaction was observed for all the reagents, and the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins was confirmed in the idioblasts of the endosperm and those involved in the differentiation of the embryonic axis of the developing seedling. We concluded that the idioblasts store both metabolites, acetogenins and alkaloids. Beginning at differentiation, the idioblasts of the embryonic axis simultaneously biosynthesise acetogenins and alkaloids that are characteristic of the species during the development of the seedling. The method used here can be applied to histochemically confirm the presence of acetogenins and alkaloids in tissues and structures of the plant in different stages of its life cycle.

  13. Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga C; Lind-Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B.; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2009-12-08

    Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal KDEL were used. Transgenic plants were recovered in all four cases but no qualitative differences could be observed whether KDEL was added or not. Endo-xylanase activity in transgenic grains was increased between two and three fold relative to wild type. The grains were shriveled and had a 25-33% decrease in mass. Extensive analysis of the cell walls showed a 10-15% increase in arabinose to xylose ratio, a 50% increase in the proportion of water extractable arabinoxylan, and a shift in the MW of the water extractable arabinoxylan from being mainly larger than 85 kD to being between 2 kD and 85 kD. Ferulic acid esterase expressing grains were also shriveled and the seed weight was decreased by 20-50%. No ferulic acid esterase activity could be detected in wild type grains whereas ferulic acid esterase activity was detected in transgenic lines. The grain cell walls had 15-40% increase in water unextractable arabinoxylan and a decrease in monomeric ferulic acid between 13 and 34%. In all the plants the observed changes are consistent with a plant response that serves to minimize the effect of the heterologously expressed enzymes by increasing arabinoxylan biosynthesis and cross-linking.

  14. Cationic peptides from peptic hydrolysates of rice endosperm protein exhibit antimicrobial, LPS-neutralizing, and angiogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kawabe, Junya; Toyoda, Ryu; Namae, Toshiki; Ochiai, Akihito; Saitoh, Eiichi; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we hydrolyzed rice endosperm protein (REP) with pepsin and generated 20 fractions containing multifunctional cationic peptides with varying isoelectric point (pI) values using ampholyte-free isoelectric focusing (autofocusing). Subsequently, we determined antimicrobial activities of each fraction against the pathogens Prophyromonas gingivalis, Propionibacterium acnes, Streptocossus mutans, and Candida albicans. Fractions 18, 19, and 20 had pI values greater than 12 and exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, P. acnes, and C. albicans, but not against S. mutans. In further experiments, we purified and identified cationic peptides from fractions 18, 19, and 20 using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. We also chemically synthesized five identified peptides (RSVSKSR, RRVIEPR, ERFQPMFRRPG, RVRQNIDNPNRADTYNPRAG, and VVRRVIEPRGLL) with pI values greater than 10.5 and evaluated antimicrobial, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing, and angiogenic activities. Among these synthetic peptides, only VVRRVIEPRGLL exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, with an IC 50 value of 87μM. However, all five cationic peptides exhibited LPS-neutralizing and angiogenic activities with little or no hemolytic activity against mammalian red blood cells at functional concentrations. These present data show dual or multiple functions of the five identified cationic peptides with little or no hemolytic activity. Therefore, fractions containing cationic peptides from REP hydrolysates have the potential to be used as dietary supplements and functional ingredients in food products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The nutritional property of endosperm starch and its contribution to the health benefits of whole grain foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genyi; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2017-12-12

    Purported health benefits of whole grain foods in lowering risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are supported by epidemiological studies and scientific researches. Bioactive components including dietary fibers, phytochemicals, and various micronutrients present in the bran and germ are commonly considered as the basis for such benefits. Endosperm starch, as the major constituent of whole grains providing glucose to the body, has been less investigated regarding its nutritional property and contribution to the value of whole grain foods. Nutritional quality of starch is associated with its rate of digestion and glucose absorption. In whole grain foods, starch digestion and glucose delivery may vary depending on the form in which the food is delivered, some with starch being rapidly and others slowly digested. Furthermore, there are other inherent factors in whole grain products, such as phenolic compounds and dietary fibers, that may moderate glycemic profiles. A good understanding of the nutritional properties of whole grain starch is important to the development of food processing technologies to maximize their health benefits.

  16. In vitro fermentation characteristics of novel fibers, coconut endosperm fiber and chicory pulp, using canine fecal inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, M R C; Mitsuhashi, Y; Bauer, L L; Fahey, G C; Buff, P R; Swanson, K S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of in vitro fermentation of coconut endosperm fiber (CEF), chicory pulp (CHP), and selective blends of these substrates on SCFA production and changes in microbiota using canine fecal inocula. A total of 6 individual substrates, including short-chain fructooligosaccharide (scFOS; a well-established prebiotic source), pectin (PEC; used as a positive control), pelletized cellulose (PC; used as a negative control), beet pulp (BP; considered the gold standard fiber source in pet foods), CEF, and CHP, and 3 CEF:CHP blends (75:25% CEF:CHP [B1], 50:50% CEF:CHP [B2], and 25:75% CEF:CHP [B3]) were tested. Triplicate samples of each substrate were fermented for 0, 8, and 16 h after inoculation. A significant substrate × time interaction (P popular prebiotic and fiber substrates. Future research should investigate the effects of CEF, CHP, and their blends on gastrointestinal health and fecal quality in dogs.

  17. A plant-specific transcription factor IIB-related protein, pBRP2, is involved in endosperm growth control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Cavel

    Full Text Available General transcription factor IIB (TFIIB and TFIIB-related factor (BRF, are conserved RNA polymerase II/III (RNAPII/III selectivity factors that are involved in polymerase recruitment and transcription initiation in eukaryotes. Recent findings have shown that plants have evolved a third type of B-factor, plant-specific TFIIB-related protein 1 (pBRP1, which seems to be involved in RNAPI transcription. Here, we extend the repertoire of B-factors in plants by reporting the characterization of a novel TFIIB-related protein, plant-specific TFIIB-related protein 2 (pBRP2, which is found to date only in the Brassicacea family. Unlike other B-factors that are ubiquitously expressed, PBRP2 expression is restricted to reproductive organs and seeds as shown by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence labelling and GUS staining experiments. Interestingly, pbrp2 loss-of-function specifically affects the development of the syncytial endosperm, with both parental contributions required for wild-type development. pBRP2, is the first B-factor to exhibit cell-specific expression and regulation in eukaryotes, and might play a role in enforcing bi-parental reproduction in angiosperms.

  18. A plant-specific transcription factor IIB-related protein, pBRP2, is involved in endosperm growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavel, Emilie; Pillot, Marion; Pontier, Dominique; Lahmy, Sylvie; Bies-Etheve, Natacha; Vega, Danielle; Grimanelli, Daniel; Lagrange, Thierry

    2011-02-24

    General transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) and TFIIB-related factor (BRF), are conserved RNA polymerase II/III (RNAPII/III) selectivity factors that are involved in polymerase recruitment and transcription initiation in eukaryotes. Recent findings have shown that plants have evolved a third type of B-factor, plant-specific TFIIB-related protein 1 (pBRP1), which seems to be involved in RNAPI transcription. Here, we extend the repertoire of B-factors in plants by reporting the characterization of a novel TFIIB-related protein, plant-specific TFIIB-related protein 2 (pBRP2), which is found to date only in the Brassicacea family. Unlike other B-factors that are ubiquitously expressed, PBRP2 expression is restricted to reproductive organs and seeds as shown by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence labelling and GUS staining experiments. Interestingly, pbrp2 loss-of-function specifically affects the development of the syncytial endosperm, with both parental contributions required for wild-type development. pBRP2, is the first B-factor to exhibit cell-specific expression and regulation in eukaryotes, and might play a role in enforcing bi-parental reproduction in angiosperms.

  19. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  20. Cyanovirin-N produced in rice endosperm offers effective pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV-1BaL infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvaka, E; Evans, A; Ramessar, K; Krumpe, L R H; Shattock, R J; O'Keefe, B R; Christou, P; Capell, T

    2016-06-01

    Cyanovirin-N produced in rice endosperm provides efficient pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV-1 BaL infection in vitro. Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is a lectin with potent antiviral activity that has been proposed as a component of microbicides for the prevention of infection with Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The production of protein-based microbicide components requires a platform that is sufficiently economical and scalable to meet the demands of the large at-risk population, particularly in resource poor developing countries. We, therefore, expressed CV-N in rice endosperm, because the dried seed is ideal for storage and transport and crude extracts could be prepared locally and used as a microbicide component without further purification. We found that crude extracts from rice seeds expressing up to 10 µg CV-N per gram dry seed weight showed dose-dependent gp120 binding activity, confirming that the protein was soluble, correctly folded and active. The recombinant lectin ((OS)CV-N) reduced the infectivity of HIV-1BaL (an R5 virus strain representing the majority of transmitted infections) by ~90 % but showed only weak neutralization activity against HIV-1RF (representative of X4 virus, rarely associated with transmission), suggesting it would be highly effective for pre-exposure prophylaxis against the vast majority of transmitted strains. Crude extracts expressing (OS)CV-N showed no toxicity towards human cells at working dilutions indicating that microbicide components produced in rice endosperm are safe for direct application as topical microbicides in humans.

  1. Polycomb Group Gene OsFIE2 Regulates Rice (Oryza sativa) Seed Development and Grain Filling via a Mechanism Distinct from Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Zhang, Jian; Mujahid, Hana; Malone, Brandon M.; Bridges, Susan M.; Peng, Zhaohua

    2013-01-01

    Cereal endosperm represents 60% of the calories consumed by human beings worldwide. In addition, cereals also serve as the primary feedstock for livestock. However, the regulatory mechanism of cereal endosperm and seed development is largely unknown. Polycomb complex has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of endosperm development in Arabidopsis, but its role in cereal endosperm development remains obscure. Additionally, the enzyme activities of the polycomb complexes have not been demonstrated in plants. Here we purified the rice OsFIE2-polycomb complex using tandem affinity purification and demonstrated its specific H3 methyltransferase activity. We found that the OsFIE2 gene product was responsible for H3K27me3 production specifically in vivo. Genetic studies showed that a reduction of OsFIE2 expression led to smaller seeds, partially filled seeds, and partial loss of seed dormancy. Gene expression and proteomics analyses found that the starch synthesis rate limiting step enzyme and multiple storage proteins are down-regulated in OsFIE2 reduction lines. Genome wide ChIP–Seq data analysis shows that H3K27me3 is associated with many genes in the young seeds. The H3K27me3 modification and gene expression in a key helix-loop-helix transcription factor is shown to be regulated by OsFIE2. Our results suggest that OsFIE2-polycomb complex positively regulates rice endosperm development and grain filling via a mechanism highly different from that in Arabidopsis. PMID:23505380

  2. A WRKY transcription factor recruits the SYG1-like protein SHB1 to activate gene expression and seed cavity enlargement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Kang

    Full Text Available Seed development in Arabidopsis and in many dicots involves an early proliferation of the endosperm to form a large embryo sac or seed cavity close to the size of the mature seed, followed by a second phase during which the embryo grows and replaces the endosperm. Short hypocotyl under BLUE1 (SHB1 is a member of the SYG1 protein family in fungi, Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, and mammals. SHB1 gain-of-function enhances endosperm proliferation, increases seed size, and up-regulates the expression of the WRKY transcription factor gene MINISEED3 (MINI3 and the LRR receptor kinase gene HAIKU2 (IKU2. Mutations in either IKU2 or MINI3 retard endosperm proliferation and reduce seed size. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the seed cavity and hence the seed size remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of MINI3 and IKU2 is repressed before fertilization and after 4 days after pollination (DAP, but is activated by SHB1 from 2 to 4 DAP prior to the formation of the seed cavity. SHB1 associates with their promoters but without a recognizable DNA binding motif, and this association is abolished in mini3 mutant. MINI3 binds to W-boxes in, and recruits SHB1 to, its own and IKU2 promoters. Interestingly, SHB1, but not MINI3, activates transcription of pMINI3::GUS or pIKU2::GUS. We reveal a critical developmental switch through the activation of MINI3 expression by SHB1. The recruitment of SHB1 by MINI3 to its own and IKU2 promoters represents a novel two-step amplification to counter the low expression level of IKU2, which is a trigger for endosperm proliferation and seed cavity enlargement.

  3. A WRKY transcription factor recruits the SYG1-like protein SHB1 to activate gene expression and seed cavity enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaojun; Li, Wei; Zhou, Yun; Ni, Min

    2013-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis and in many dicots involves an early proliferation of the endosperm to form a large embryo sac or seed cavity close to the size of the mature seed, followed by a second phase during which the embryo grows and replaces the endosperm. Short hypocotyl under BLUE1 (SHB1) is a member of the SYG1 protein family in fungi, Caenorhabditis elegans, flies, and mammals. SHB1 gain-of-function enhances endosperm proliferation, increases seed size, and up-regulates the expression of the WRKY transcription factor gene MINISEED3 (MINI3) and the LRR receptor kinase gene HAIKU2 (IKU2). Mutations in either IKU2 or MINI3 retard endosperm proliferation and reduce seed size. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the establishment of the seed cavity and hence the seed size remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the expression of MINI3 and IKU2 is repressed before fertilization and after 4 days after pollination (DAP), but is activated by SHB1 from 2 to 4 DAP prior to the formation of the seed cavity. SHB1 associates with their promoters but without a recognizable DNA binding motif, and this association is abolished in mini3 mutant. MINI3 binds to W-boxes in, and recruits SHB1 to, its own and IKU2 promoters. Interestingly, SHB1, but not MINI3, activates transcription of pMINI3::GUS or pIKU2::GUS. We reveal a critical developmental switch through the activation of MINI3 expression by SHB1. The recruitment of SHB1 by MINI3 to its own and IKU2 promoters represents a novel two-step amplification to counter the low expression level of IKU2, which is a trigger for endosperm proliferation and seed cavity enlargement.

  4. Identification of genes and proteins involved in the regulation of orchid mycorrhiza

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Borges da Silva Valadares

    2014-01-01

    Orchids are characterized by producing minute endosperm-lacking seeds, which depend on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and embryo development. Some aclorophyllous orchids remain dependent on the mycorrhizal association for carbon acquisition during their whole life history, whereasother orchids develop photosynthesis. Despite the biological significance of orchid mycorrhiza, gene expression studies are lacking. We have used different highthroughput approaches in order to understanding the m...

  5. Characterization of the microchemical structure of seed endosperm within a cellular dimension among six barley varieties with distinct degradation kinetics, using ultraspatially resolved synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Yu, Peiqiang

    2010-07-14

    Barley varieties have similar chemical composition but exhibit different rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient availability. These biological differences may be related to molecular, structural, and chemical makeup among the seed endosperm tissue. No detailed study was carried out. The objectives of this study were: (1) to use a molecular spectroscopy technique, synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM), to determine the microchemical-structural features in seed endosperm tissue of six developed barley varieties; (2) to study the relationship among molecular-structural characteristics, degradation kinetics, and nutrient availability in six genotypes of barley. The results showed that inherent microchemical-structural differences in the endosperm among the six barley varieties were detected by the synchrotron-based analytical technique, SFTIRM, with the univariate molecular spectral analysis. The SFTIRM spectral profiles differed (P barley samples in terms of the peak ratio and peak area and height intensities of amides I (ca. 1650 cm(-1)) and II (ca. 1550 cm(-1)), cellulosic compounds (ca. 1240 cm(-1)), CHO component peaks (the first peak at the region ca. 1184-1132 cm(-1), the second peak at ca. 1132-1066 cm(-1), and the third peak at ca. 1066-950 cm(-1)). With the SFTIRM technique, the structural characteristics of the cereal seeds were illuminated among different cultivars at an ultraspatial resolution. The structural differences of barley seeds may be one reason for the various digestive behaviors and nutritive values in ruminants. The results show weak correlations between the functional groups' spectral data (peak area, height intensities, and ratios) and rumen biodegradation kinetics (rate and extent of nutrient degradation). Weak correlations may indicate that limited variations of these six barley varieties might not be sufficient to interpret the relationship between spectroscopic information and the nutrient value of

  6. Differentiation of Whole Grain from Refined Wheat (T. aestivum) Flour Using Lipid Profile of Wheat Bran, Germ, and Endosperm with UHPLC-HRAM Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Ping; Harnly, James M; Chen, Pei

    2015-07-15

    A comprehensive analysis of wheat lipids from milling fractions of bran, germ, and endosperm was performed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution accurate-mass multistage mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRAM-MS(n)) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in both positive and negative modes. About 155 lipid compounds, including free fatty acids (FA), oxylipins, alk(en)ylresorcinols (ARs), γ-oryzanol, sphingolipids, triglycerides (TGs), diglycerides (DGs), phospholipids, and galactolipids were characterized from the three milling fractions. Galactolipids and phospholipids were proposed to be potential discriminatory compounds for refined flour, whereas γ-oryzanols, ARs, TGs, and DGs could distinguish whole wheat flour from a refined one based on principal component analysis (PCA).

  7. Impact of gluten-friendly™ technology on wheat kernel endosperm and gluten protein structure in seeds by light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landriscina, L; D'Agnello, P; Bevilacqua, A; Corbo, M R; Sinigaglia, M; Lamacchia, C

    2017-04-15

    The main aim of this paper was to assess the impact of Gluten-Friendly™ (GF) technology (Italian priority patent n° 102015000084813 filed on 17th December 2015) on wheat kernel endosperm morphology and gluten protein structure, using SEM, light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Microscopy was combined with immunodetection with specific antibodies for gliadins, γ-gliadins, LMW subunits and antigenic epitopes to gain a better understanding of the technology at a molecular level. The results showed significant changes to gluten proteins after GF treatment; cross-reactivity towards the antibodies recognizing almost the entire range of gluten proteins as well as the antigenic epitopes through the sequences QQSF, QQSY, PEQPFPQGC and QQPFP was significantly reduced. The present study confirms the results from our previous work and shows, for the first time, the mechanism by which a chemical-physical treatment abolishes the antigenic capacity of gluten. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulation of starch bioaccessibility in wheat endosperm to regulate starch digestion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and gut hormone responses: a randomized controlled trial in healthy ileostomy participants12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Grundy, Myriam ML; Grassby, Terri; Vasilopoulou, Dafni; Frost, Gary S; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah EE; Sanderson, Jeremy; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cereal crops, particularly wheat, are a major dietary source of starch, and the bioaccessibility of starch has implications for postprandial glycemia. The structure and properties of plant foods have been identified as critical factors in influencing nutrient bioaccessibility; however, the physical and biochemical disassembly of cereal food during digestion has not been widely studied. Objectives: The aims of this study were to compare the effects of 2 porridge meals prepared from wheat endosperm with different degrees of starch bioaccessibility on postprandial metabolism (e.g., glycemia) and to gain insight into the structural and biochemical breakdown of the test meals during gastroileal transit. Design: A randomized crossover trial in 9 healthy ileostomy participants was designed to compare the effects of 55 g starch, provided as coarse (2-mm particles) or smooth (starch (RS) content of ileal effluent. Undigested food in the ileal output was examined microscopically to identify cell walls and encapsulated starch. Results: Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations were significantly lower (i.e., 33%, 43%, 40%, and 50% lower 120-min incremental AUC, respectively) after consumption of the coarse porridge than after the smooth porridge (P starch digestion was slower in the coarse porridge than in the smooth porridge (33% less starch digested at 90 min, P starch from the periphery toward the particle core. The structure of the test meal had no effect on the amount or pattern of RS output. Conclusion: The structural integrity of wheat endosperm is largely retained during gastroileal digestion and has a primary role in influencing the rate of starch amylolysis and, consequently, postprandial metabolism. This trial was registered at isrctn.org as ISRCTN40517475. PMID:26333512

  9. Manipulation of starch bioaccessibility in wheat endosperm to regulate starch digestion, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and gut hormone responses: a randomized controlled trial in healthy ileostomy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cathrina H; Grundy, Myriam Ml; Grassby, Terri; Vasilopoulou, Dafni; Frost, Gary S; Butterworth, Peter J; Berry, Sarah Ee; Sanderson, Jeremy; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-10-01

    Cereal crops, particularly wheat, are a major dietary source of starch, and the bioaccessibility of starch has implications for postprandial glycemia. The structure and properties of plant foods have been identified as critical factors in influencing nutrient bioaccessibility; however, the physical and biochemical disassembly of cereal food during digestion has not been widely studied. The aims of this study were to compare the effects of 2 porridge meals prepared from wheat endosperm with different degrees of starch bioaccessibility on postprandial metabolism (e.g., glycemia) and to gain insight into the structural and biochemical breakdown of the test meals during gastroileal transit. A randomized crossover trial in 9 healthy ileostomy participants was designed to compare the effects of 55 g starch, provided as coarse (2-mm particles) or smooth (starch (RS) content of ileal effluent. Undigested food in the ileal output was examined microscopically to identify cell walls and encapsulated starch. Blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide concentrations were significantly lower (i.e., 33%, 43%, 40%, and 50% lower 120-min incremental AUC, respectively) after consumption of the coarse porridge than after the smooth porridge (P starch digestion was slower in the coarse porridge than in the smooth porridge (33% less starch digested at 90 min, P starch from the periphery toward the particle core. The structure of the test meal had no effect on the amount or pattern of RS output. The structural integrity of wheat endosperm is largely retained during gastroileal digestion and has a primary role in influencing the rate of starch amylolysis and, consequently, postprandial metabolism. This trial was registered at isrctn.org as ISRCTN40517475.

  10. Identification of Alleles of Puroindoline Genes and Their Effect on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Grain Texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Štiasna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grain hardness is one of the most important quality characteristics of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. It is a significant property of wheat grains and relates to milling quality and end product quality. Grain hardness is caused by the presence of puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb. A collection of 25 genotypes of wheat with unusual grain colour (blue aleurone, purple and white pericarp, yellow endosperm was studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the diversity within Pina and Pinb (alleles: Pina-D1a, Pina-D1b, Pinb-D1a, Pinb- -D1b, Pinb-D1c and Pinb-D1d. The endosperm structure was determined by a non-destructive method using light transfl ectance meter and grain hardness by a texture analyser. Genotype Novosibirskaya 67 and isogenic ANK lines revealed hitherto unknown alleles at the locus for the annealing of primers of Pinb-D1. Allele Pinb-D1c was found to be absent from each genotype. The mealy endosperm ranged from 0 to 100 % and grain hardness from 15.10 to 26.87 N per sample.

  11. DNA polymorphisms and haplotype patterns of transcription factors involved in barley endosperm development are associated with key agronomic traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stracke Silke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping is receiving considerable attention in plant genetics for its potential to fine map quantitative trait loci (QTL, validate candidate genes, and identify alleles of interest. In the present study association mapping in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. is investigated by associating DNA polymorphisms with variation in grain quality traits, plant height, and flowering time to gain further understanding of gene functions involved in the control of these traits. We focused on the four loci BLZ1, BLZ2, BPBF and HvGAMYB that play a role in the regulation of B-hordein expression, the major fraction of the barley storage protein. The association was tested in a collection of 224 spring barley accessions using a two-stage mixed model approach. Results Within the sequenced fragments of four candidate genes we observed different levels of nucleotide diversity. The effect of selection on the candidate genes was tested by Tajima's D which revealed significant values for BLZ1, BLZ2, and BPBF in the subset of two-rowed barleys. Pair-wise LD estimates between the detected SNPs within each candidate gene revealed different intra-genic linkage patterns. On the basis of a more extensive examination of genomic regions surrounding the four candidate genes we found a sharp decrease of LD (r2 Significant marker-trait associations between SNP sites within BLZ1 and flowering time, BPBF and crude protein content and BPBF and starch content were detected. Most haplotypes occurred at frequencies BPBF was associated to crude protein content and starch content, BLZ2 showed association to thousand-grain weight and BLZ1 was found to be associated with flowering time and plant height. Conclusions Differences in nucleotide diversity and LD pattern within the candidate genes BLZ1, BLZ2, BPBF, and HvGAMYB reflect the impact of selection on the nucleotide sequence of the four candidate loci. Despite significant associations, the analysed candidate

  12. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhya Wakasa

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  13. Suppression of starch synthase I expression affects the granule morphology and granule size and fine structure of starch in wheat endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Studies in Arabidopsis and rice suggest that manipulation of starch synthase I (SSI) expression in wheat may lead to the production of wheat grains with novel starch structure and properties. This work describes the suppression of SSI expression in wheat grains using RNAi technology, which leads to a low level of enzymatic activity for SSI in the developing endosperm, and a low abundance of SSI protein inside the starch granules of mature grains. The amylopectin fraction of starch from the SSI suppressed lines showed an increased frequency of very short chains (degree of polymerization, dp 6 and 7), a lower proportion of short chains (dp 8–12), and more intermediate chains (dp 13–20) than in the grain from their negative segregant lines. In the most severely affected line, amylose content was significantly increased, the morphology of starch granules was changed, and the proportion of B starch granules was significantly reduced. The change of the fine structure of the starch in the SSI-RNAi suppression lines alters the gelatinization temperature, swelling power, and viscosity of the starch. This work demonstrates that the roles of SSI in the determination of starch structure and properties are similar among different cereals and Arabidopsis. PMID:24634486

  14. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeown, Peter C

    2011-08-12

    Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs) displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination). We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag) which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i) their size and (ii) which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1 seeds was

  15. Identification of imprinted genes subject to parent-of-origin specific expression in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennblom Trevor J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic regulation of gene dosage by genomic imprinting of some autosomal genes facilitates normal reproductive development in both mammals and flowering plants. While many imprinted genes have been identified and intensively studied in mammals, smaller numbers have been characterized in flowering plants, mostly in Arabidopsis thaliana. Identification of additional imprinted loci in flowering plants by genome-wide screening for parent-of-origin specific uniparental expression in seed tissues will facilitate our understanding of the origins and functions of imprinted genes in flowering plants. Results cDNA-AFLP can detect allele-specific expression that is parent-of-origin dependent for expressed genes in which restriction site polymorphisms exist in the transcripts derived from each allele. Using a genome-wide cDNA-AFLP screen surveying allele-specific expression of 4500 transcript-derived fragments, we report the identification of 52 maternally expressed genes (MEGs displaying parent-of-origin dependent expression patterns in Arabidopsis siliques containing F1 hybrid seeds (3, 4 and 5 days after pollination. We identified these MEGs by developing a bioinformatics tool (GenFrag which can directly determine the identities of transcript-derived fragments from (i their size and (ii which selective nucleotides were added to the primers used to generate them. Hence, GenFrag facilitates increased throughput for genome-wide cDNA-AFLP fragment analyses. The 52 MEGs we identified were further filtered for high expression levels in the endosperm relative to the seed coat to identify the candidate genes most likely representing novel imprinted genes expressed in the endosperm of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression in seed tissues of the three top-ranked candidate genes, ATCDC48, PDE120 and MS5-like, was confirmed by Laser-Capture Microdissection and qRT-PCR analysis. Maternal-specific expression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana F1

  16. The promoter of the asi gene directs expression in the maternal tissues of the seed in transgenic barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert; Scott, Kenneth; Meech, Sarah

    2003-07-01

    The bifunctional alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) is an abundant protein in barley seeds, proposed to play multiple and apparently diverse roles in regulation of starch hydrolysis and in seed defence against pathogens. In the Triticeae, the protein has evolved the ability to specifically inhibit the main group of alpha-amylases expressed during germination of barley and encoded by the amyl gene family found only in the Triticeae. The expression of the asi gene that encodes BASI has been reported to be controlled by the hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA). Despite many studies at the gene and protein level, the function of this gene in the plant remains unclear. In this study, the 5'-flanking region (1033 bp, 1033-asi promoter) and the 3'-flanking region (655 bp) of the asi gene were isolated and characterised. The 1033-asi promoter sequence showed homology to a number of ciselements that play a role in ABA and GA regulated expression of other genes. With a green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as reporter, the 1033-asi promoter was studied for spatial, temporal and hormonal control of gene expression. The 1033-asi promoter and its deletions direct transient gfp expression in the pericarp and at low levels in mature aleurone cells, and this expression is not regulated by ABA or GA. In transgenic barley plants, the 1033-asi promoter directed tissue-specific expression of the gfp gene in developing grain and germinating grain but not in roots or leaves. In developing grain, expression of gfp was observed specifically in the pericarp, the vascular tissue, the nucellar projection cells and the endosperm transfer cells and the hormones ABA or GA did not regulate this expression. In mature germinating grain gfp expression was observed in the embryo but not in aleurone or starchy endosperm. However, GA induced gfp expression in the aleurone of mature imbibed seeds from which the embryo had been removed. Expression in maternal rather than

  17. Postprandial differences in the plasma metabolome of healthy Finnish subjects after intake of a sourdough fermented endosperm rye bread versus white wheat bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The mechanism behind the lowered postprandial insulin demand observed after rye bread intake compared to wheat bread is unknown. The aim of this study was to use the metabolomics approach to identify potential metabolites related to amino acid metabolism involved in this mechanism. Methods A sourdough fermented endosperm rye bread (RB) and a standard white wheat bread (WB) as a reference were served in random order to 16 healthy subjects. Test bread portions contained 50 g available carbohydrate. In vitro hydrolysis of starch and protein were performed for both test breads. Blood samples for measuring glucose and insulin concentrations were drawn over 4 h and gastric emptying rate (GER) was measured. Changes in the plasma metabolome were investigated by applying a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry metabolomics platform (GC×GC-TOF-MS). Results Plasma insulin response to RB was lower than to WB at 30 min (P = 0.004), 45 min (P = 0.002) and 60 min (P bread intake, and plasma glucose response was significantly higher at time point 90 min after RB than WB intake (P = 0.045). The starch hydrolysis rate was higher for RB than WB, contrary to the in vitro protein digestibility. There were no differences in GER between breads. From 255 metabolites identified by the metabolomics platform, 26 showed significant postprandial relative changes after 30 minutes of bread intake (p and q values bread intake. Conclusions A single meal of a low fibre sourdough rye bread producing low postprandial insulin response brings in several changes in plasma amino acids and their metabolites and some of these might have properties beneficial for health. PMID:22011443

  18. Starch granules size distribution in superior and inferior grains of wheat is related to enzyme activities and their gene expressions during grain filling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chuanhui; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2010-01-01

    Mature wheat endosperm contains A-, B-, C-type starch granules, and each class has unique physiochemical properties which determine the quality of starch. The dynamics of the starch granule size distribution, activities of starch synthases and expression of starch synthase encoding genes were...... of starch synthase encoding genes explained well the dynamics of the starch granule size distribution....... studied in superior and inferior grains during grain filling. Compared with inferior grains, superior grains showed higher grain weight, contents of starch, amylose and amylopectin. The formation of A-, B-, C-type starch granules initiated at 4, 8, 20 DAF, respectively, and was well consistent...

  19. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhi; Yang, Lifu; Wang, Danhua; Huang, Qixing; Mo, Yeyong; Xie, Guishui

    2016-01-01

    WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae) genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III). Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae), comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  20. Gene Structures, Evolution and Transcriptional Profiling of the WRKY Gene Family in Castor Bean (Ricinus communis L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zou

    Full Text Available WRKY proteins comprise one of the largest transcription factor families in plants and form key regulators of many plant processes. This study presents the characterization of 58 WRKY genes from the castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphorbiaceae genome. Compared with the automatic genome annotation, one more WRKY-encoding locus was identified and 20 out of the 57 predicted gene models were manually corrected. All RcWRKY genes were shown to contain at least one intron in their coding sequences. According to the structural features of the present WRKY domains, the identified RcWRKY genes were assigned to three previously defined groups (I-III. Although castor bean underwent no recent whole-genome duplication event like physic nut (Jatropha curcas L., Euphorbiaceae, comparative genomics analysis indicated that one gene loss, one intron loss and one recent proximal duplication occurred in the RcWRKY gene family. The expression of all 58 RcWRKY genes was supported by ESTs and/or RNA sequencing reads derived from roots, leaves, flowers, seeds and endosperms. Further global expression profiles with RNA sequencing data revealed diverse expression patterns among various tissues. Results obtained from this study not only provide valuable information for future functional analysis and utilization of the castor bean WRKY genes, but also provide a useful reference to investigate the gene family expansion and evolution in Euphorbiaceus plants.

  1. De novo transcriptome assembly and identification of the gene conferring a "pandan-like" aroma in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saensuk, Chatree; Wanchana, Samart; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Wongpornchai, Sugunya; Kraithong, Tippaya; Imsabai, Wachiraya; Chaichoompu, Ekawat; Ruanjaichon, Vinitchan; Toojinda, Theerayut; Vanavichit, Apichart; Arikit, Siwaret

    2016-11-01

    Thailand's aromatic coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is a special type of green dwarf coconut, the liquid endosperm of which is characterized by a pleasant "pandan-like" aroma due to the presence of 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2AP). The aim of this study was to perform a de novo assembly of transriptome from C. nucifera endosperm and to identify the gene responsible for 2AP biosynthesis. CnAMADH2 was identified as an ortholog of the rice aromatic gene and a G-to-C substitution found in exon 14 was associated with 2AP content in the aromatic green dwarf coconut accessions. The base substitution caused an amino-acid change, alanine-to-proline, at position 442 (P442A). The presence of P at this position might alter the steric conformation at the loop region and subsequently result in an unstabilized dimer conformation that could lower AMADH enzyme activity. Among AMADH/BADH protein sequences in different plant species, the P442A mutation was found exclusively in aromatic coconut. The PCR marker developed based on this sequence variation can perfectly detect the aromatic and non-aromatic alleles of the gene. This study confirms the hypothesis that plants may share a mechanism of 2AP biosynthesis. This is the first identification of the gene associated with 2AP biosynthesis in a tree plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and computational annotation of genes differentially expressed in pulp development of Cocos nucifera L. by suppression subtractive hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is one of the world’s most versatile, economically important tropical crops. Little is known about the physiological and molecular basis of coconut pulp (endosperm) development and only a few coconut genes and gene product sequences are available in public databases. This study identified genes that were differentially expressed during development of coconut pulp and functionally annotated these identified genes using bioinformatics analysis. Results Pulp from three different coconut developmental stages was collected. Four suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed (forward and reverse libraries A and B between stages 1 and 2, and C and D between stages 2 and 3), and identified sequences were computationally annotated using Blast2GO software. A total of 1272 clones were obtained for analysis from four SSH libraries with 63% showing similarity to known proteins. Pairwise comparing of stage-specific gene ontology ids from libraries B-D, A-C, B-C and A-D showed that 32 genes were continuously upregulated and seven downregulated; 28 were transiently upregulated and 23 downregulated. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) analysis showed that 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT), phospholipase D, acetyl-CoA carboxylase carboxyltransferase beta subunit, 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase-like and pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 β subunit were associated with fatty acid biosynthesis or metabolism. Triose phosphate isomerase, cellulose synthase and glucan 1,3-β-glucosidase were related to carbohydrate metabolism, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was related to both fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Of 737 unigenes, 103 encoded enzymes were involved in fatty acid and carbohydrate biosynthesis and metabolism, and a number of transcription factors and other interesting genes with stage-specific expression were confirmed by real-time PCR, with validation of the SSH results as

  3. A GAMYB-like gene in tomato and its expression during seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuemei; Bewley, Derek J

    2008-09-01

    To understand the function of the gibberellin (GA) transduction pathway during germination, the transcription factor gene GAMYB, which responds to the GA signal, has been studied in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seeds. This gene, called LeGAMYBL1 is present as a single copy, and is expressed in both the embryo and endosperm during seed germination in gib-1 mutant (non-GA producing) and wild-type (cv. Glamour) seeds. It is also expressed in young vegetative tissues. There is an 83% similarity in the amino acid sequence of the binding domain of the protein that is encoded by this tomato GAMYB-like gene when compared to that encoded by the GAMYB genes from barley, rice and Arabidopsis. In both mutant and wild-type intact tomato seeds, LeGAMYBL1 expression increases during germination, is upregulated by gibberellic acid (GA(3)), and declines thereafter. LeGAMYBL1 transcripts are also present in non-germinating gib-1 mutant seeds imbibed in water, and they are upregulated by GA(3) during promotion of germination. However, dissected gib-1 embryos complete germination when imbibed in either water or GA(3), with almost no difference in the amount of mRNA transcribed by the LeGAMYBL1 gene during this event. This is indicative that GA(3) is not required for the expression of the LeGAMYBL1 gene, which is likely necessary, but not sufficient, for germination to be completed, especially in the intact seed. The germination-inhibiting hormone abscisic acid does not influence expression of this gene. Expression of the LeGAMYB1 gene also occurs in the endosperm, but there is no correlation between its expression and GA-promoted expression of the cell-wall-degrading enzyme endo-beta-mannanase.

  4. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  5. A Developmental Switch of Gene Expression in the Barley Seed Mediated by HvVP1 (Viviparous-1) and HvGAMYB Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Zamira; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Martínez, Manuel; Rubio-Somoza, Ignacio; Díaz, Isabel; Carbonero, Pilar; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of storage compounds in the starchy endosperm of developing cereal seeds is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. These compounds, mainly starch and proteins, are hydrolyzed upon germination to allow seedling growth. The transcription factor HvGAMYB is a master activator both in the maturation phase of seed development and upon germination, acting in combination with other transcription factors. However, the precise mechanism controlling the switch from maturation to germination programs remains unclear. We report here the identification and molecular characterization of Hordeum vulgare VIVIPAROUS1 (HvVP1), orthologous to ABA-INSENSITIVE3 from Arabidopsis thaliana HvVP1 transcripts accumulate in the endosperm and the embryo of developing seeds at early stages and in the embryo and aleurone of germinating seeds up to 24 h of imbibition. In transient expression assays, HvVP1 controls the activation of Hor2 and Amy6.4 promoters exerted by HvGAMYB. HvVP1 interacts with HvGAMYB in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the plant nuclei, hindering its interaction with other transcription factors involved in seed gene expression programs, like BPBF. Similarly, this interaction leads to a decrease in the DNA binding of HvGAMYB and the Barley Prolamine-Box binding Factor (BPBF) to their target sequences. Our results indicate that the HvVP1 expression pattern controls the full Hor2 expression activated by GAMYB and BPBF in the developing endosperm and the Amy6.4 activation in postgerminative reserve mobilization mediated by GAMYB. All these data demonstrate the participation of HvVP1 in antagonistic gene expression programs and support its central role as a gene expression switch during seed maturation and germination. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Mining genes involved in the stratification of Paris Polyphylla seeds using high-throughput embryo Transcriptome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis is an important medicinal plant. Seed dormancy is one of the main factors restricting artificial cultivation. The molecular mechanisms of seed dormancy remain unclear, and little genomic or transcriptome data are available for this plant. Results In this study, massive parallel pyrosequencing on the Roche 454-GS FLX Titanium platform was used to generate a substantial sequence dataset for the P. polyphylla embryo. 369,496 high quality reads were obtained, ranging from 50 to 1146 bp, with a mean of 219 bp. These reads were assembled into 47,768 unigenes, which included 16,069 contigs and 31,699 singletons. Using BLASTX searches of public databases, 15,757 (32.3%) unique transcripts were identified. Gene Ontology and Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins annotations revealed that these transcripts were broadly representative of the P. polyphylla embryo transcriptome. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes assigned 5961 of the unique sequences to specific metabolic pathways. Relative expression levels analysis showed that eleven phytohormone-related genes and five other genes have different expression patterns in the embryo and endosperm in the seed stratification process. Conclusions Gene annotation and quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis identified 464 transcripts that may be involved in phytohormone catabolism and biosynthesis, hormone signal, seed dormancy, seed maturation, cell wall growth and circadian rhythms. In particular, the relative expression analysis of sixteen genes (CYP707A, NCED, GA20ox2, GA20ox3, ABI2, PP2C, ARP3, ARP7, IAAH, IAAS, BRRK, DRM, ELF1, ELF2, SFR6, and SUS) in embryo and endosperm and at two temperatures indicated that these related genes may be candidates for clarifying the molecular basis of seed dormancy in P. polyphlla var. yunnanensis. PMID:23718911

  7. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carciofi, Massimiliano; Blennow, Per Gunnar Andreas; Jensen, Susanne Langgård

    2012-01-01

    to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed "resistant starch" (RS) escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which are linked to several health benefits. The RS...... is preferentially derived from amylose, which can be increased by suppressing amylopectin synthesis by silencing of starch branching enzymes (SBEs). However all the previous works attempting the production of high RS crops resulted in only partly increased amylose-content and/or significant yield loss. Results...... In this study we invented a new method for silencing of multiple genes. Using a chimeric RNAi hairpin we simultaneously suppressed all genes coding for starch branching enzymes (SBE I, SBE IIa, SBE IIb) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), resulting in production of amylose-only starch granules in the endosperm...

  8. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SUCROSE SYNTHASE 2 GENE (Sus2 IN DURUM WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa eVolpicella

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose transport is the central system for the allocation of carbon resources in vascular plants. Sucrose synthase, which reversibly catalyzes sucrose synthesis and cleavage, represents a key enzyme in the control of the flow of carbon into starch biosynthesis. In the present study the genomic identification and characterization of the Sus2-2A and Sus2-2B genes coding for sucrose synthase in durum wheat (cultivars Ciccio and Svevo is reported. The genes were analyzed for their expression in different tissues and at different seed maturation stages, in four tetraploid wheat genotypes (Svevo, Ciccio, Primadur and 5-BIL42. The activity of the encoded proteins was evaluated by specific activity assays on endosperm extracts and their structure established by modelling approaches. The combined results of SUS2 expression and activity levels were then considered in the light of their possible involvement in starch yield.

  9. Gene discovery for improvement of kernel quality-related traits in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motto M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing maize plants with improved kernel quality traits involves the ability to use existing genetic variation and to identify and manipulate commercially important genes. This will open avenues for designing novel variation in grain composition and will provide the basis for the development of the next generation of specialty maize. This paper provides an overview of current knowledge on the identification and exploitation of genes affecting the composition, development, and structure of the maize kernel with particular emphasis on pathways relevant to endosperm growth and development, differentiation of starch-filled cells, and biosynthesis of starches, storage proteins, lipids, and carotenoids. The potential that the new technologies of cell and molecular biology will provide for the creation of new variation in the future are also indicated and discussed.

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to arabinoxylan produced from wheat endosperm and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses (ID 830) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to provide a scientific opinion on a list of health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. This opinion addresses the scientific substantiation of a health...... claim in relation to arabinoxylan produced from wheat endosperm and reduction of post-prandial glycaemic responses. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA has received from....... The Panel considers that arabinoxylan produced from wheat endosperm is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect. The claimed effect is “carbohydrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity”. The target population is assumed to be individuals who wish to reduce their post-prandial glycaemic...

  11. The DapA gene encoding the lysine biosynthetic enzyme dihydrodipicolinate synthase from Coix lacryma-jobi: cloning, characterization, and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dante, R A; Neto, G C; Leite, A; Yunes, J A; Arruda, P

    1999-11-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS) is the main enzyme of a specific branch of the aspartate pathway leading to lysine biosynthesis in higher plants. We have cloned and characterized the DHPS-encoding Dap)A gene from the maize-related grass Coix lacryiana-jobi. The DapA open reading frame is interrupted by two introns and encodes the 326 amino acid-long Coix DHPS protein, which is 95% identical to the maize DHPS protein. Coix DNA gel blot analysis with maize DHPS cDNA as a probe showed a single strongly hybridizing band along with faint bands. RNA gel blot analysis showed that DHPS transcripts are present in coleoptiles, embryos, endosperms, and roots but are almost undetectable in blades of young leaves of both Coix and maize. The 5'-flanking region of the DapA gene contains a TGACTC GCN4-like element located 372 bp upstream the putative translation start codon. Steady-state levels of DHPS mRNA were slightly reduced in the endosperms and embryos of the maize lysine-rich opaque2 mutants when compared with those in normal kernels. Selective binding assay with the maize Opaque2 protein (O2) showed that the GCN4-like element is not an O2 binding site, suggesting that the DHPS gene is not under the control of O2.

  12. FUNCTIONAL SPECIALIZATION OF DUPLICATED FLAVONOID BIOSYNTHESIS GENES IN WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khlestkina E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication followed by subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization is of a great evolutionary importance. In plant genomes, duplicated genes may result from either polyploidization (homoeologous genes or segmental chromosome duplications (paralogous genes. In allohexaploid wheat Triticum aestivum L. (2n=6x=42, genome BBAADD, both homoeologous and paralogous copies were found for the regulatory gene Myc encoding MYC-like transcriptional factor in the biosynthesis of flavonoid pigments, anthocyanins, and for the structural gene F3h encoding one of the key enzymes of flavonoid biosynthesis, flavanone 3-hydroxylase. From the 5 copies (3 homoeologous and 2 paralogous of the Myc gene found in T. aestivum, only one plays a regulatory role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, interacting complementary with another transcriptional factor (MYB-like to confer purple pigmentation of grain pericarp in wheat. The role and functionality of the other 4 copies of the Myc gene remain unknown. From the 4 functional copies of the F3h gene in T. aestivum, three homoeologues have similar function. They are expressed in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins or in the endosperm, participating there in biosynthesis of uncolored flavonoid substances. The fourth copy (the B-genomic paralogue is transcribed neither in wheat organs colored with anthocyanins nor in seeds, however, it’s expression has been noticed in roots of aluminium-stressed plants, where the three homoeologous copies are not active. Functional diversification of the duplicated flavonoid biosynthesis genes in wheat may be a reason for maintenance of the duplicated copies and preventing them from pseudogenization.The study was supported by RFBR (11-04-92707. We also thank Ms. Galina Generalova for technical assistance.

  13. Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

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    Kang Il-Ho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte. Results Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm. Conclusions We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this

  14. The Arabidopsis ORANGE (AtOR) gene promotes carotenoid accumulation in transgenic corn hybrids derived from parental lines with limited carotenoid pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Judit; Zorrilla-López, Uxue; Medina, Vicente; Farré, Gemma; Sandmann, Gerhard; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2017-06-01

    The AtOR gene enhances carotenoid levels in corn by promoting the formation of plastoglobuli when the carotenoid pool is limited, but has no further effect when carotenoids are already abundant. The cauliflower orange (or) gene mutation influences carotenoid accumulation in plants by promoting the transition of proplastids into chromoplasts, thus creating intracellular storage compartments that act as metabolic sink. We overexpressed the Arabidopsis OR gene under the control of the endosperm-specific wheat LMW glutenin promoter in a white corn variety that normally accumulates only trace amounts of carotenoids. The total endosperm carotenoid content in the best-performing AtOR transgenic corn line was 32-fold higher than wild-type controls (~25 µg/g DW at 30 days after pollination) but the principal carotenoids remained the same, suggesting that AtOR increases the abundance of existing carotenoids without changing the metabolic composition. We analyzed the expression of endogenous genes representing the carotenoid biosynthesis and MEP pathways, as well as the plastid fusion/translocation factor required for chromoplast formation, but only the DXS1 gene was upregulated in the transgenic corn plants. The line expressing AtOR at the highest level was crossed with four transgenic corn lines expressing different carotenogenic genes and accumulating different carotenoids. The introgression of AtOR increased the carotenoid content of the hybrids when there was a limited carotenoid pool in the parental line, but had no effect when carotenoids were already abundant in the parent. The AtOR gene therefore appears to enhance carotenoid levels by promoting the formation of carotenoid-sequestering plastoglobuli when the carotenoid pool is limited, but has no further effect when carotenoids are already abundant because high levels of carotenoids can induce the formation of carotenoid-sequestering plastoglobuli even in the absence of AtOR.

  15. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Progress report, [March 15, 1989--April 14, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The long term aim of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate into starch via manipulation of the gene that encodes for ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, a key regulatory enzyme of starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as cereal seeds and tubers, starch biosynthesis is regulated by the gene activation and expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, branching enzyme and other ancillary starch modifying enzymes, as well as the allosteric-controlled behavior of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity. During the last two years we have obtained information on the structure of this enzyme from both potato tuber and rice endosperm, using a combination of biochemical and molecular biological approaches. Moreover, we present evidence that this enzyme may be localized at discrete regions of the starch grain within the amyloplast, and plays a role in controlling overall starch biosynthesis in potato tubers.

  16. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  17. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Qiu, Shuqing; Stone, Sandra L; Tibiche, Chabane; Cram, Dustin; Alting-Mees, Michelle; Nowak, Jacek; Cloutier, Sylvie; Deyholos, Michael; Bekkaoui, Faouzi; Sharpe, Andrew; Wang, Edwin; Rowland, Gordon; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-04-29

    Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise even low-expressed genes such as

  18. Microscopia eletrônica de varredura do endosperma de café (Coffea arabica L. durante o processo de secagem Scanning electron microscopy of the endosperm of coffee (Coffea arabica L. during the drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Saath

    2010-02-01

    content to 11% (bu. During the drying process the coffee grains were randomly sampled and fragments of the endosperm were prepared for scanning electron microscopy and eletromicrographs were taken. Measurements of the cells were taken for evaluating changes in the plasma membrane of the endosperm cells in relation to the moisture content and drying period. The cell cytoplasm of the coffee grains with 11% moisture content was not affected when dried under sun light and at the temperature of 40°C. When dried at 60°C, changes in the cellular structures of the cytoplasm were observed for coffees with moisture content of 20%.

  19. Protein disulfide isomerase-like protein 1-1 controls endosperm development through regulation of the amount and composition of seed proteins in rice.

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    Yeon Jeong Kim

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI is a chaperone protein involved in oxidative protein folding by acting as a catalyst and assisting folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. A genome database search showed that rice contains 19 PDI-like genes. However, their functions are not clearly identified. This paper shows possible functions of rice PDI-like protein 1-1 (PDIL1-1 during seed development. Seeds of the T-DNA insertion PDIL1-1 mutant, PDIL1-1Δ, identified by genomic DNA PCR and western blot analysis, display a chalky phenotype and a thick aleurone layer. Protein content per seed was significantly lower and free sugar content higher in PDIL1-1Δ mutant seeds than in the wild type. Proteomic analysis of PDIL1-1Δ mutant seeds showed that PDIL1-1 is post-translationally regulated, and its loss causes accumulation of many types of seed proteins including glucose/starch metabolism- and ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging-related proteins. In addition, PDIL1-1 strongly interacts with the cysteine protease OsCP1. Our data indicate that the opaque phenotype of PDIL1-1Δ mutant seeds results from production of irregular starch granules and protein body through loss of regulatory activity for various proteins involved in the synthesis of seed components.

  20. Evaluación del potencial tecnológico de galactomananos del endospermo de semillas de Prosopis sp. para el uso en la industria de alimentos Evaluation of the technological potential of galactomanan from the endosperm of Prosopis sp. to be used in food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oliva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las especies de leguminosas presentan galactomanano en mayor o menor cantidad en el endospermo de las semillas sus principales fuentes comerciales son la goma guar, caroba y tara, las que se emplean particularmente en la industria de alimentos, bebidas y farmacia. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar el potencial tecnológico del galactomanano del endospermo de semillas de algarrobo (Prosopis sp. para el uso en la industria de alimentos. Para esto se trabajó con galactomananos obtenidos a partir de extractos del endospermo de semillas provenientes de Quillagüa, Chile. Se evaluaron propiedades de interés industrial, como rendimiento, relación manosa/galactosa y características reológicas. Los resultados obtenidos confirman que el galactomanano posee características de hidrocoloide y muestra comportamiento no newtoniano y propiedades reológicas como la viscosidad. La relación manosa/galactosa y rendimiento variaron substancialmente con el método utilizado en la eliminación de la testa de la semilla.Legume species have galactomannans on the endosperm of their seeds, their principal commercial sources are guar, carob and tara gums, used particularly in the food, beverage and pharmaceutical industry. The aim of this work was to evaluate the technological potential of galactomannan obtained from the endosperm of algarrobo (Prosopis sp. seeds for its use in the food industry. To this purpose we worked with galactomannans obtained from seeds endosperm extract from Quillagüa, Chile. Properties of industrial interest were evaluated such as yield, manose/galactose ratio and reologic characteristics. The results obtained confirm that galactomannan has hidrocolloidal characteristics, showing non-newtonian behavior and reological properties such as viscosity. The manose/galactose ratio and yield had a substantial variation with the method used to eliminate the seed coat.

  1. Gene-dose dependent control of seed mass by endosperm-specific Miniature1 (Mn1)-encoded cell wall invertase (CWI), which also affects embryo mass and embryo sugar physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mn1 locus is a major determinant of sink strength of developing seeds through its control of both sink size, i.e., cell size and cell number, and sink activity via sucrose hydrolysis and the release of hexoses essential for energy and signaling functions. Hexoses are also essential for the devel...

  2. Cell wall invertase-2 (INCW2) encoded by Miniature-1 (Mn1) gene is associated with wall-in-growths (WIGs) in basal endosperm transfer cells (BETCs) in developing seeds of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell wall invertases (CWI) are ionically bound to the plant cell walls. A major CWI, INCW2, provides the gateway to sucrose metabolism in developing maize seeds as it is entirely localized to the BETCs that juxtapose the pedicel. The loss of INCW2 protein is the causal basis of the mn1 seed phenoty...

  3. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  4. Morphology, Carbohydrate Distribution, Gene Expression, and Enzymatic Activities Related to Cell Wall Hydrolysis in Four Barley Varieties during Simulated Malting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S. Betts

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes, such as cell wall hydrolysis and the mobilisation of nutrient reserves from the starchy endosperm, require stringent regulation to successfully malt barley (Hordeum vulgare grain in an industrial context. Much of the accumulated knowledge defining these events has been collected from individual, unrelated experiments, and data have often been extrapolated from Petri dish germination, rather than malting, experiments. Here, we present comprehensive morphological, biochemical, and transcript data from a simulated malt batch of the three elite malting cultivars Admiral, Navigator, and Flagship, and the feed cultivar Keel. Activities of lytic enzymes implicated in cell wall and starch depolymerisation in germinated grain have been measured, and transcript data for published cell wall hydrolytic genes have been provided. It was notable that Flagship and Keel exhibited generally similar patterns of enzyme and transcript expression, but exhibited a few key differences that may partially explain Flagship's superior malting qualities. Admiral and Navigator also showed matching expression patterns for these genes and enzymes, but the patterns differed from those of Flagship and Keel, despite Admiral and Navigator having Keel as a common ancestor. Overall (1,3;1,4-β-glucanase activity differed between cultivars, with lower enzyme levels and concomitantly higher amounts of (1,3;1,4-β-glucan in the feed variety, Keel, at the end of malting. Transcript levels of the gene encoding (1,3;1,4-β-glucanase isoenzyme EI were almost three times higher than those encoding isoenzyme EII, suggesting a previously unrecognised importance for isoenzyme EI during malting. Careful morphological examination showed that scutellum epithelial cells in mature dry grain are elongated but expand no further as malting progresses, in contrast to equivalent cells in other cereals, perhaps demonstrating a morphological change in this critical organ over

  5. CLAVATA3-like genes are differentially expressed in grape vine (Vitis vinifera) tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Nukumizu, Yuka; Wada, Takuji; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tetsumura, Takuya

    2013-10-15

    The CLAVATA3 (CLV3)/endosperm surrounding region [(ESR) CLE] peptides function as intercellular signaling molecules that regulate various physiological and developmental processes in diverse plant species. We identified five CLV3-like genes from grape vine (Vitis vinifera var. Pinot Noir): VvCLE 6, VvCLE 25-1, VvCLE 25-2, VvCLE 43 and VvCLE TDIF. These CLV3-like genes encode short proteins containing 43-128 amino acids. Except VvCLE TDIF, grape vine CLV3-like proteins possess a consensus amino acid sequence known as the CLE domain. Phylogenic analysis suggests that the VvCLE 6, VvCLE25-1, VvCLE25-2 and VvCLE43 genes have evolved from a single common ancestor to the Arabidopsis CLV3 gene. Expression analyses showed that the five grape CLV3-like genes are expressed in leaves, stems, roots and axillary buds with significant differences in their levels of expression. For example, while all of them were strongly expressed in axillary buds, VvCLE6 and VvCLE43 expression prevailed in roots, and VvCLE25-1, VvCLE25-2 and VvCLE TDIF expression in stems. The differential expression of the five grape CLV3-like peptides suggests that they play different roles in different organs and developmental stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. A roadmap for zinc trafficking in the developing barley grain based on laser capture microdissection and gene expression profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tauris, Birgitte; Borg, Søren; Gregersen, Per L

    2009-01-01

    Nutrients destined for the developing cereal grain encounter several restricting barriers on their path towards their final storage sites in the grain. In order to identify transporters and chelating agents that may be involved in transport and deposition of zinc in the barley grain, expression...... profiles have been generated of four different tissue types: the transfer cells, the aleurone layer, the endosperm, and the embryo. Cells from these tissues were isolated with the ‘laser capture microdissection' technology and the extracted RNA was subjected to three rounds of T7-based amplification....... The amplified RNA was subsequently hybridized to Affymetrix 22K Barley GeneChips. Due to the short average length of the amplified transcripts and the positioning of numerous probe sets at locations more than 400 base pairs (bp) from the poly(A)-tail, a normalization approach was used where the probe positions...

  7. Heterologous expression and transcript analysis of gibberellin biosynthetic genes of grasses reveals novel functionality in the GA3ox family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Stephen; Huttly, Alison K; Prosser, Ian M; Li, Yi-dan; Vaughan, Simon P; Gallova, Barbora; Patil, Archana; Coghill, Jane A; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Hedden, Peter; Phillips, Andrew L

    2015-06-05

    The gibberellin (GA) pathway plays a central role in the regulation of plant development, with the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases (2-ODDs: GA20ox, GA3ox, GA2ox) that catalyse the later steps in the biosynthetic pathway of particularly importance in regulating bioactive GA levels. Although GA has important impacts on crop yield and quality, our understanding of the regulation of GA biosynthesis during wheat and barley development remains limited. In this study we identified or assembled genes encoding the GA 2-ODDs of wheat, barley and Brachypodium distachyon and characterised the wheat genes by heterologous expression and transcript analysis. The wheat, barley and Brachypodium genomes each contain orthologous copies of the GA20ox, GA3ox and GA2ox genes identified in rice, with the exception of OsGA3ox1 and OsGA2ox5 which are absent in these species. Some additional paralogs of 2-ODD genes were identified: notably, a novel gene in the wheat B genome related to GA3ox2 was shown to encode a GA 1-oxidase, named as TaGA1ox-B1. This enzyme is likely to be responsible for the abundant 1β-hydroxylated GAs present in developing wheat grains. We also identified a related gene in barley, located in a syntenic position to TaGA1ox-B1, that encodes a GA 3,18-dihydroxylase which similarly accounts for the accumulation of unusual GAs in barley grains. Transcript analysis showed that some paralogs of the different classes of 2-ODD were expressed mainly in a single tissue or at specific developmental stages. In particular, TaGA20ox3, TaGA1ox1, TaGA3ox3 and TaGA2ox7 were predominantly expressed in developing grain. More detailed analysis of grain-specific gene expression showed that while the transcripts of biosynthetic genes were most abundant in the endosperm, genes encoding inactivation and signalling components were more highly expressed in the seed coat and pericarp. The comprehensive expression and functional characterisation of the multigene families encoding the 2-ODD

  8. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Primer 5.0 software. To adjust for RNA quality and diffe- rences in cDNA concentration, we amplified actin as an internal control with the following primers: PtActin-F (5′-TG. AAGGAGAAACTTGCGTAT-3′) and PtActin-R (5′-GCA. CAATGTTACCGTACAGAT-3′). These genes were ampli- fied from first-strand cDNA using ...

  9. Epigenetic chromatin modifiers in barley: IV. The study of barley Polycomb group (PcG genes during seed development and in response to external ABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanca Michele A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic phenomena have been associated with the regulation of active and silent chromatin states achieved by modifications of chromatin structure through DNA methylation, and histone post-translational modifications. The latter is accomplished, in part, through the action of PcG (Polycomb group protein complexes which methylate nucleosomal histone tails at specific sites, ultimately leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Different PcG complex variants operating during different developmental stages have been described in plants. In particular, the so-called FIE/MEA/FIS2 complex governs the expression of genes important in embryo and endosperm development in Arabidopsis. In our effort to understand the epigenetic mechanisms regulating seed development in barley (Hordeum vulgare, an agronomically important monocot plant cultivated for its endosperm, we set out to characterize the genes encoding barley PcG proteins. Results Four barley PcG gene homologues, named HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were identified and structurally and phylogenetically characterized. The corresponding genes HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were mapped onto barley chromosomes 7H, 4H, 2H and 5H, respectively. Expression analysis of the PcG genes revealed significant differences in gene expression among tissues and seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size. Furthermore, HvFIE and HvE(Z gene expression was responsive to the abiotic stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA known to be involved in seed maturation, dormancy and germination. Conclusion This study reports the first characterization of the PcG homologues, HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a and HvSu(z12b in barley. All genes co-localized with known chromosomal regions responsible for malting quality related traits, suggesting that they might be used for developing molecular markers to be applied in marker assisted selection. The Pc

  10. Discovery of diversity in xylan biosynthetic genes by transcriptional profiling of a heteroxylan containing mucilaginous tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jacob K.; Johnson, Nathan; Wilkerson, Curtis G.

    2013-01-01

    The exact biochemical steps of xylan backbone synthesis remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, three non-redundant genes from two glycosyltransferase (GT) families, IRX9 and IRX14 from GT43 and IRX10 from GT47, are candidates for forming the xylan backbone. In other plants, evidence exists that different tissues express these three genes at widely different levels, which suggests that diversity in the makeup of the xylan synthase complex exists. Recently we have profiled the transcripts present in the developing mucilaginous tissue of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk). This tissue was found to have high expression levels of an IRX10 homolog, but very low levels of the two GT43 family members. This contrasts with recent wheat endosperm tissue profiling that found a relatively high abundance of the GT43 family members. We have performed an in-depth analysis of all GTs genes expressed in four developmental stages of the psyllium mucilagenous layer and in a single stage of the psyllium stem using RNA-Seq. This analysis revealed several IRX10 homologs, an expansion in GT61 (homologs of At3g18170/At3g18180), and several GTs from other GT families that are highly abundant and specifically expressed in the mucilaginous tissue. Our current hypothesis is that the four IRX10 genes present in the mucilagenous tissues have evolved to function without the GT43 genes. These four genes represent some of the most divergent IRX10 genes identified to date. Conversely, those present in the psyllium stem are very similar to those in other eudicots. This suggests these genes are under selective pressure, likely due to the synthesis of the various xylan structures present in mucilage that has a different biochemical role than that present in secondary walls. The numerous GT61 family members also show a wide sequence diversity and may be responsible for the larger number of side chain structures present in the psyllium mucilage. PMID:23761806

  11. Discovery of diversity in xylan biosynthetic genes by transcriptional profiling of a heteroxylan containing mucilaginous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Kruger Jensen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The exact biochemical steps of xylan backbone synthesis remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, three non-redundant genes from two glycosyltransferase (GT families, IRX9 and IRX14 from GT43 and IRX10 from GT47, are candidates for forming the xylan backbone. In other plants, evidence exists that different tissues express these three genes at widely different levels, which suggests that diversity in the makeup of the xylan synthase complex exists. Recently we have profiled the transcripts present in the developing mucilaginous tissue of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk. This tissue was found to have high expression levels of an IRX10 homolog, but very low levels of the two GT43 family members. This contrasts with recent wheat endosperm tissue profiling that found a relatively high abundance of the GT43 family members. We have performed an in-depth analysis of all GTs genes expressed in four developmental stages of the psyllium mucilagenous layer and in a single stage of the psyllium stem using RNA-Seq. This analysis revealed several IRX10 homologs, an expansion in GT61 (homologs of At3g18170/At3g18180, and several GTs from other GT families that are highly abundant and specifically expressed in the mucilaginous tissue. Our current hypothesis is that the four IRX10 genes present in the mucilagenous tissues have evolved to function without the GT43 genes. These four genes represent some of the most divergent IRX10 genes identified to date. Conversely, those present in the psyllium stem are very similar to those in other eudicots. This suggests these genes are under selective pressure, likely due to the synthesis of the various xylan structures present in mucilage that has a different biochemical role than that present in secondary walls. The numerous GT61 family members also show a wide sequence diversity and may be responsible for the larger number of side chain structures present in the psyllium mucilage.

  12. Higher-level accumulation of foreign gene products in transgenic rice seeds by the callus-specific selection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic rice plants that accumulate the hypocholesterolemic pentapeptide lactostatin (IIAEK) as a fusion protein with the endosperm seed storage protein glutelin were developed. Plants were selected from Agrobacterium-mediated transformants using a mutated-rice acetolactate synthase (mALS) marker protein expressed under the control of the rice callus-specific promoter (CSP) (CSP:mALS). Lactostatin accumulation levels were compared in mature seeds of 78 independent transgenic rice lines selected for either the CSP:mALS gene cassette or hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT) under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter (35S:HPT). Transgenic rice seeds harboring a CSP:mALS gene cassette accumulated more (approximately 120-200% on average) lactostatin than those with a 35S:HPT gene cassette, and accumulation was largely independent of transgene copy number. Furthermore, transgenic rice seeds that were selected by HPT under the control of CSP (CSP:HPT) also accumulated more lactostatin (approximately 160% on average) than transgenic rice seeds with the 35S:HPT gene cassette. These results indicate that high-value bioactive peptides such as lactostatin can be produced at higher levels using callus-specific selection than by conventional constitutive selection. Specific expression of a marker gene at the selection stage may thus result in increased target peptide accumulation levels in seeds.

  13. Gene divergence of homeologous regions associated with a major seed protein content QTL in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji eLestari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding several modes of duplication contributing on the present genome structure is getting an attention because it could be related to numerous agronomically important traits. Since soybean serves as a rich protein source for animal feeds and human consumption, breeding efforts in soybean have been directed toward enhancing seed protein content. The publicly available soybean sequences and its genomically featured elements facilitate comprehending of quantitative trait loci (QTL for seed protein content in concordance with homeologous regions in soybean genome. Although parts of chromosome (Chr 20 and Chr 10 showed synteny, QTLs for seed protein content present only on Chr 20. Using comparative analysis of gene contents in recently duplicated genomic regions harboring QTL for protein/oil content on Chrs 20 and 10, a total of 27 genes are present in duplicated regions of both chromosomes. Notably, 4 tandem duplicates of the putative homeobox protein 22 (HB22 are present only on Chr 20 and this Medicago truncatula homolog expressed in endosperm at seed filling stage. These tandem duplicates could contribute on the protein/oil QTL of Chr 20. Our study suggests that non-shared gene contents within the duplicated genomic regions might lead to absence/presence of QTL related to protein/oil content.

  14. Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Maize (Zea mays L.) Carotenoid Epsilon Hydroxylase Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu; Berman, Judit; Sheng, Yanmin; Wang, Yingdian; Capell, Teresa; Shi, Lianxuan; Ni, Xiuzhen; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2015-01-01

    The assignment of functions to genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is necessary to understand how the pathway is regulated and to obtain the basic information required for metabolic engineering. Few carotenoid ε-hydroxylases have been functionally characterized in plants although this would provide insight into the hydroxylation steps in the pathway. We therefore isolated mRNA from the endosperm of maize (Zea mays L., inbred line B73) and cloned a full-length cDNA encoding CYP97C19, a putative heme-containing carotenoid ε hydroxylase and member of the cytochrome P450 family. The corresponding CYP97C19 genomic locus on chromosome 1 was found to comprise a single-copy gene with nine introns. We expressed CYP97C19 cDNA under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter in the Arabidopsis thaliana lut1 knockout mutant, which lacks a functional CYP97C1 (LUT1) gene. The analysis of carotenoid levels and composition showed that lutein accumulated to high levels in the rosette leaves of the transgenic lines but not in the untransformed lut1 mutants. These results allowed the unambiguous functional annotation of maize CYP97C19 as an enzyme with strong zeinoxanthin ε-ring hydroxylation activity.

  15. Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Maize (Zea mays L. Carotenoid Epsilon Hydroxylase Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Chang

    Full Text Available The assignment of functions to genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is necessary to understand how the pathway is regulated and to obtain the basic information required for metabolic engineering. Few carotenoid ε-hydroxylases have been functionally characterized in plants although this would provide insight into the hydroxylation steps in the pathway. We therefore isolated mRNA from the endosperm of maize (Zea mays L., inbred line B73 and cloned a full-length cDNA encoding CYP97C19, a putative heme-containing carotenoid ε hydroxylase and member of the cytochrome P450 family. The corresponding CYP97C19 genomic locus on chromosome 1 was found to comprise a single-copy gene with nine introns. We expressed CYP97C19 cDNA under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter in the Arabidopsis thaliana lut1 knockout mutant, which lacks a functional CYP97C1 (LUT1 gene. The analysis of carotenoid levels and composition showed that lutein accumulated to high levels in the rosette leaves of the transgenic lines but not in the untransformed lut1 mutants. These results allowed the unambiguous functional annotation of maize CYP97C19 as an enzyme with strong zeinoxanthin ε-ring hydroxylation activity.

  16. Cloning and Functional Characterization of the Maize (Zea mays L.) Carotenoid Epsilon Hydroxylase Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yanmin; Wang, Yingdian; Capell, Teresa; Shi, Lianxuan; Ni, Xiuzhen; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2015-01-01

    The assignment of functions to genes in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway is necessary to understand how the pathway is regulated and to obtain the basic information required for metabolic engineering. Few carotenoid ε-hydroxylases have been functionally characterized in plants although this would provide insight into the hydroxylation steps in the pathway. We therefore isolated mRNA from the endosperm of maize (Zea mays L., inbred line B73) and cloned a full-length cDNA encoding CYP97C19, a putative heme-containing carotenoid ε hydroxylase and member of the cytochrome P450 family. The corresponding CYP97C19 genomic locus on chromosome 1 was found to comprise a single-copy gene with nine introns. We expressed CYP97C19 cDNA under the control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter in the Arabidopsis thaliana lut1 knockout mutant, which lacks a functional CYP97C1 (LUT1) gene. The analysis of carotenoid levels and composition showed that lutein accumulated to high levels in the rosette leaves of the transgenic lines but not in the untransformed lut1 mutants. These results allowed the unambiguous functional annotation of maize CYP97C19 as an enzyme with strong zeinoxanthin ε-ring hydroxylation activity. PMID:26030746

  17. Integrating the genetic and physical maps of Arabidopsis thaliana: identification of mapped alleles of cloned essential (EMB genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Meinke

    Full Text Available The classical genetic map of Arabidopsis includes more than 130 genes with an embryo-defective (emb mutant phenotype. Many of these essential genes remain to be cloned. Hundreds of additional EMB genes have been cloned and catalogued (www.seedgenes.org but not mapped. To facilitate EMB gene identification and assess the current level of saturation, we updated the classical map, compared the physical and genetic locations of mapped loci, and performed allelism tests between mapped (but not cloned and cloned (but not mapped emb mutants with similar chromosome locations. Two hundred pairwise combinations of genes located on chromosomes 1 and 5 were tested and more than 1100 total crosses were screened. Sixteen of 51 mapped emb mutants examined were found to be disrupted in a known EMB gene. Alleles of a wide range of published EMB genes (YDA, GLA1, TIL1, AtASP38, AtDEK1, EMB506, DG1, OEP80 were discovered. Two EMS mutants isolated 30 years ago, T-DNA mutants with complex insertion sites, and a mutant with an atypical, embryo-specific phenotype were resolved. The frequency of allelism encountered was consistent with past estimates of 500 to 1000 EMB loci. New EMB genes identified among mapped T-DNA insertion mutants included CHC1, which is required for chromatin remodeling, and SHS1/AtBT1, which encodes a plastidial nucleotide transporter similar to the maize Brittle1 protein required for normal endosperm development. Two classical genetic markers (PY, ALB1 were identified based on similar map locations of known genes required for thiamine (THIC and chlorophyll (PDE166 biosynthesis. The alignment of genetic and physical maps presented here should facilitate the continued analysis of essential genes in Arabidopsis and further characterization of a broad spectrum of mutant phenotypes in a model plant.

  18. An atlas of type I MADS box gene expression during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-09-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis.

  19. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:20631316

  20. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Locating genes on a chromosome is important for understanding the gene function and its linkage and recombination. Knowledge of gene positions on chromosomes is necessary for annotation. The study is essential for disease genetics and genomics, among other aspects. Currently available...... software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...

  1. Mapping of a gene responsible for the difference in amylopectin structure between japonica-type and indica-type rice varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, T; Yano, M; Satoh, H; Shomura, A; Nakamura, Y

    2002-01-01

    The present investigation revealed that the alk and gel(t) genes, which cause the differences between a japonica rice variety Nipponbare and an indica rice variety Kasalath in terms of the disintegration of endosperm starch granules in alkali solution and their gelatinisation in a 4 M urea solution, respectively, cosegregated in backcross inbred lines derived from a cross between the two varieties. The segregation pattern of the profile for amylopectin chain-length, which was distinguished by enrichment in short chains of DPphysico-chemical properties of starch granules, and the gene was designated as acl(t). Gene-mapping analysis showed that the starch synthase IIa ( SSIIa) gene is located at the alk locus on chromosome 6 in the rice genome. These results lead us to the possibility that different alleles of the SSIIa gene are responsible for differences in amylopectin structure between the two varieties, in that SSIIa plays a distinct role in the elongation of short chains within clusters (A+B(1) chains) of amylopectin. It is proposed that the activity of SSIIa in japonica rice is reduced in amount or functional capacity relative to the activity of this enzyme in indica rice. This, in turn, would explain why starch from japonica rice has a lower gelatinisation temperature than starch from indica rice and is more susceptible to disintegration in alkali or urea. The evidence for this hypothesis is that the alk(t), gel(t), acl(t) and SSIIa genes all map to the same locus.

  2. An AP endonuclease functions in active DNA demethylation and gene imprinting in Arabidopsis [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair, beginning with removal of methylated cytosine by the ROS1/DME subfamily of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases. Active DNA demethylation in animals requires the DNA glycosylase TDG or MBD4, which functions after oxidation or deamination of 5-methylcytosine, respectively. However, little is known about the steps following DNA glycosylase action in the active DNA demethylation pathways in plants and animals. We show here that the Arabidopsis APE1L protein has apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease activities and functions downstream of ROS1 and DME. APE1L and ROS1 interact in vitro and co-localize in vivo. Whole genome bisulfite sequencing of ape1l mutant plants revealed widespread alterations in DNA methylation. We show that the ape1l/zdp double mutant displays embryonic lethality. Notably, the ape1l+/-zdp-/- mutant shows a maternal-effect lethality phenotype. APE1L and the DNA phosphatase ZDP are required for FWA and MEA gene imprinting in the endosperm and are important for seed development. Thus, APE1L is a new component of the active DNA demethylation pathway and, together with ZDP, regulates gene imprinting in Arabidopsis.

  3. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  4. Global Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Developing Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawu; Wu, Pingzhi; Zhang, Sheng; Song, Chi; Chen, Yaping; Li, Meiru; Jia, Yongxia; Fang, Xiaohua; Chen, Fan; Wu, Guojiang

    2012-01-01

    Background Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. Methodology/Principal Findings We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP). The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29–41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. Conclusions/Significance The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production. PMID:22574177

  5. Global analysis of gene expression profiles in developing physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawu Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physic nut (Jatropha curcas L. is an oilseed plant species with high potential utility as a biofuel. Furthermore, following recent sequencing of its genome and the availability of expressed sequence tag (EST libraries, it is a valuable model plant for studying carbon assimilation in endosperms of oilseed plants. There have been several transcriptomic analyses of developing physic nut seeds using ESTs, but they have provided limited information on the accumulation of stored resources in the seeds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied next-generation Illumina sequencing technology to analyze global gene expression profiles of developing physic nut seeds 14, 19, 25, 29, 35, 41, and 45 days after pollination (DAP. The acquired profiles reveal the key genes, and their expression timeframes, involved in major metabolic processes including: carbon flow, starch metabolism, and synthesis of storage lipids and proteins in the developing seeds. The main period of storage reserves synthesis in the seeds appears to be 29-41 DAP, and the fatty acid composition of the developing seeds is consistent with relative expression levels of different isoforms of acyl-ACP thioesterase and fatty acid desaturase genes. Several transcription factor genes whose expression coincides with storage reserve deposition correspond to those known to regulate the process in Arabidopsis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results will facilitate searches for genes that influence de novo lipid synthesis, accumulation and their regulatory networks in developing physic nut seeds, and other oil seeds. Thus, they will be helpful in attempts to modify these plants for efficient biofuel production.

  6. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or improve your body's ability to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Researchers are still studying how and ...

  7. The transcriptional activator Opaque2 recognizes two different target sequences in the 22-kD-like alpha-prolamin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, J A; Cord Neto, G; da Silva, M J; Leite, A; Ottoboni, L M; Arruda, P

    1994-01-01

    The maize Opaque2 (O2) protein is a "leucine zipper" DNA binding factor that interacts with the sequence TCCACGTAGA in the promoters of the 22-kD alpha-zein genes and activates its transcription. A completely different consensus sequence (GATGAPyPuTGPu) identified in b-32, a gene that encodes an abundant albumin that is also under control of the O2 locus, can also be bound by the O2 protein. We showed that the gene encoding the 22-kD-like alpha-coixin, the alpha-prolamin of the maize-related grass Coix, can also be transactivated by the O2 protein. A binding assay in vitro and footprint analysis demonstrated that the GACATGTC sequence of the alpha-coixin promoter can be recognized and protected by the maize O2 protein. Employing transient expression experiments in immature maize endosperm and tobacco mesophyll protoplasts, we demonstrated that the O2 protein can activate expression of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene placed under the control of the 22-kD-like alpha-coixin promoter. We also demonstrated that a 22-kD-like alpha-coixin pseudogene promoter is transactivated by the maize O2 protein. PMID:8148647

  8. beta-1,3-Glucanase gene expression in low-hydrated seeds as a mechanism for dormancy release during tobacco after-ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    An air-dry developmental state with low-hydrated tissues is a characteristic of most plant seeds. Seed dormancy is an intrinsic block of germination and can be released during after-ripening, that is air-dry storage of mature seeds. Both seed-covering layers, testa and endosperm, cause the coat-imposed dormancy of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). After-ripening and over-expression of class I beta-1,3-glucanase (betaGlu I) confer maternal effects on testa rupture and dormancy release. Very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of after-ripening and whether gene expression is possible in low-hydrated seeds. Transient, low-level betaGlu I transcription and translation was detected during tobacco seed after-ripening. (1)H NMR 2D micro-imaging showed uneven distribution of proton mobility in seeds. betaGlu I gene expression is associated spatially with the inner testa and temporally with the promotion of testa rupture. Local elevation in moisture content seems to permit local, low-level betaGlu I gene transcription and translation in the maternal tissues of air-dry, low-hydrated seeds. De novo gene expression is therefore proposed to be a novel molecular mechanism for the release of coat-imposed dormancy during oilseed after-ripening.

  9. Increasing the amylose content of durum wheat through silencing of the SBEIIa genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masci Stefania

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High amylose starch has attracted particular interest because of its correlation with the amount of Resistant Starch (RS in food. RS plays a role similar to fibre with beneficial effects for human health, providing protection from several diseases such as colon cancer, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. Amylose content can be modified by a targeted manipulation of the starch biosynthetic pathway. In particular, the inactivation of the enzymes involved in amylopectin synthesis can lead to the increase of amylose content. In this work, genes encoding starch branching enzymes of class II (SBEIIa were silenced using the RNA interference (RNAi technique in two cultivars of durum wheat, using two different methods of transformation (biolistic and Agrobacterium. Expression of RNAi transcripts was targeted to the seed endosperm using a tissue-specific promoter. Results Amylose content was markedly increased in the durum wheat transgenic lines exhibiting SBEIIa gene silencing. Moreover the starch granules in these lines were deformed, possessing an irregular and deflated shape and being smaller than those present in the untransformed controls. Two novel granule bound proteins, identified by SDS-PAGE in SBEIIa RNAi lines, were investigated by mass spectrometry and shown to have strong homologies to the waxy proteins. RVA analysis showed new pasting properties associated with high amylose lines in comparison with untransformed controls. Finally, pleiotropic effects on other starch genes were found by semi-quantitative and Real-Time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Conclusion We have found that the silencing of SBEIIa genes in durum wheat causes obvious alterations in granule morphology and starch composition, leading to high amylose wheat. Results obtained with two different methods of transformation and in two durum wheat cultivars were comparable.

  10. An auxin responsive CLE gene regulates shoot apical meristem development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant hormone auxin regulates most, if not all aspects of plant growth and development, including lateral root formation, organ pattering, apical dominance and tropisms. Peptide hormones are peptides with hormone activities. Some of the functions of peptide hormones in regulating plant growth and development are similar to that of auxin, however, the relationship between auxin and peptide hormones remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of OsCLE48, a rice (Oryza sativa CLE (CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION gene, as an auxin response gene, and the functional characterization of OsCLE48 in Arabidopsis and rice. OsCLE48 encodes a CLE peptide hormone that is similar to Arabidopsis CLEs. RT-PCR analysis showed that OsCLE48 was induced by exogenously application of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid, a naturally occurred auxin. Expression of integrated OsCLE48p:GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants was also induced by exogenously IAA treatment. These results indicate that OsCLE48 is an auxin responsive gene. Histochemical staining showed that GUS activity was detected in all the tissue and organs of the OsCLE48p:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis inhibited shoot apical meristem development. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the CLV3 native regulatory elements almost completely complemented clv3-2 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that OsCLE48 is functionally similar to CLV3. On the other hand, expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis has little, if any effects on root apical meristem development, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCLE48 are morphologically indistinguishable from wild type plants, suggesting that the functions of some CLE peptides may not be fully conserved in Arabidopsis and rice.

  11. Down-regulation of lipoxygenase gene reduces degradation of carotenoids of golden rice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Dipak; Ali, Nusrat; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2015-07-01

    Down-regulation of lipoxygenase enzyme activity reduces degradation of carotenoids of bio-fortified rice seeds which would be an effective tool to reduce huge post-harvest and economic losses of bio-fortified rice seeds during storage. Bio-fortified provitamin A-enriched rice line (golden rice) expressing higher amounts of β-carotene in the rice endosperm provides vitamin A for human health. However, it is already reported that degradation of carotenoids during storage is a major problem. The gene responsible for degradation of carotenoids during storage has remained largely unexplored till now. In our previous study, it has been shown that r9-LOX1 gene is responsible for rice seed quality deterioration. In the present study, we attempted to investigate if r9-LOX1 gene has any role in degradation of carotenoids in rice seeds during storage. To establish our hypothesis, the endogenous lipoxygenase (LOX) activity of high-carotenoid golden indica rice seed was silenced by RNAi technology using aleurone layer and embryo-specific Oleosin-18 promoter. To check the storage stability, LOX enzyme down-regulated high-carotenoid T3 transgenic rice seeds were subjected to artificial aging treatment. The results obtained from biochemical assays (MDA, ROS) also indicated that after artificial aging, the deterioration of LOX-RNAi lines was considerably lower compared to β-carotene-enriched transgenic rice which had higher LOX activity in comparison to LOX-RNAi lines. Furthermore, it was also observed by HPLC analysis that down-regulation of LOX gene activity decreases co-oxidation of β-carotene in LOX-RNAi golden rice seeds as compared to the β-carotene-enriched transgenic rice, after artificial aging treatment. Therefore, our study substantially establishes and verifies that LOX is a key enzyme for catalyzing co-oxidation of β-carotene and has a significant role in deterioration of β-carotene levels in the carotenoid-enriched golden rice.

  12. Cloning and functional analysis of the promoters that upregulate carotenogenic gene expression during flower development in Gentiana lutea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Changfu; Yang, Qingjie; Ni, Xiuzhen; Bai, Chao; Sheng, Yanmin; Shi, Lianxuan; Capell, Teresa; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, many carotenogenic genes have been cloned and used to generate metabolically engineered plants producing higher levels of carotenoids. However, comparatively little is known about the regulation of endogenous carotenogenic genes in higher plants, and this restricts our ability to predict how engineered plants will perform in terms of carotenoid content and composition. During petal development in the Great Yellow Gentian (Gentiana lutea), carotenoid accumulation, the formation of chromoplasts and the upregulation of several carotenogenic genes are temporally coordinated. We investigated the regulatory mechanisms responsible for this coordinated expression by isolating five G. lutea carotenogenic gene (GlPDS, GlZDS, GlLYCB, GlBCH and GlLYCE) promoters by inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Each promoter was sufficient for developmentally regulated expression of the gusA reporter gene following transient expression in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Micro-Tom). Interestingly, the GlLYCB and GlBCH promoters drove high levels of gusA expression in chromoplast-containing mature green fruits, but low levels in chloroplast-containing immature green fruits, indicating a strict correlation between promoter activity, tomato fruit development and chromoplast differentiation. As well as core promoter elements such as TATA and CAAT boxes, all five promoters together with previously characterized GlZEP promoter contained three common cis-regulatory motifs involved in the response to methyl jasmonate (CGTCA) and ethylene (ATCTA), and required for endosperm expression (Skn-1_motif, GTCAT). These shared common cis-acting elements may represent binding sites for transcription factors responsible for co-regulation. Our data provide insight into the regulatory basis of the coordinated upregulation of carotenogenic gene expression during flower development in G. lutea. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. Gene introgression into Coffea arabica by way of triploid hybrids (C. arabica x C. canephora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, J C; Combes, M C; Cortina, H; Alvarado, G; Lashermes, P

    2002-12-01

    Interspecific triploid hybrid plants between the tetraploid species Coffea arabica L. and the diploid species C. canephora P. were backcrossed to C. arabica. Although characterised by a low production and an important fruit dropping, all attempted crosses (ie, 6) generated BC(1) progenies. Flow cytometric analysis of the nuclear DNA content revealed that most of the BC1 individuals were nearly tetraploid. Among the male gametes produced by the interspecific triploid hybrids, those presenting a high number of chromosomes appeared strongly favoured. Only pollen mother cells having nearly 22 chromosomes were effective, the others leading to deficient endosperm and fruit dropping. Molecular markers (ie, microsatellite and AFLP) combined with evaluations of morphological characteristics and resistance to leaf rust were applied to verify the occurrence of gene transfer from C. canephora into C. arabica, and to estimate the amount of introgression present in BC(1) individuals. The results reveal a strong deficiency in the C. canephroa alleles indicating a severe counter-selection against the introgression of genetic material from C. canephora into C. arabica by way of triploid hybrids. However, introgressants displaying desirable traits such as a high resistance to leaf rust were obtained. The low level of introgression could be an advantage by facilitating the recovery of the recurrent parent and possibly reducing the number of required backcrosses. On the other hand, this could be a limitation when attempting the transfer of a complex trait or several simply inherited traits.

  14. The metacaspase gene family of Vitis vinifera L.: characterization and differential expression during ovule abortion in stenospermocarpic seedless grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaohong; Gong, Peijie; Wei, Rong; Li, Shuxiu; Zhang, Xutong; Yu, Yihe; Wang, Yuejin

    2013-10-10

    In both plants and animals, programmed cell death (PCD) is an indispensable process that removes redundant cells. In seedless grapes (Vitis vinifera), abnormal PCD in ovule cells and subsequent ovule abortion play key roles in stenospermocarpy. Metacaspase, a type of cysteine-dependent protease, plays an essential role in PCD. To reveal the characteristics of the metacaspase (MC) gene family and the relationship between metacaspases and the seedless trait, we identified the 6 V. vinifera metacaspases VvMC1-VvMC6, from the grape genome, using BLASTN against the 9 known Arabidopsis metacaspases. We also obtained full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR. Each of the 6 grape metacaspases contains small (p10-like) and a large (p20-like) conserved structural domains. Phylogenetic analysis of 6 grape and 9 Arabidopsis metacaspases showed that all metacaspases could be grouped into two classes: Type I and Type II. Each phylogenetic branch shares a similar exon/intron structure. Furthermore, the putative promoters of the grape metacaspases contained cis-elements that are involved in grape endosperm development. Moreover, expression analysis of metacaspases using real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that VvMC1 and VvMC2 were able to be detected in any tissue, and VvMC3, VvMC4, VvMC5 and VvMC6 exhibited tissue-specific expression. Lastly, in cv. Thompson seedless grapes VvMC1, VvMC3, and VvMC4 were significantly up-regulated at the 35 DAF during ovule development, roughly same stage as endosperm abortion. In addition, the expression trend of VvMC2 and VvMC5 was similar between cv. Pinot Noir and cv. Thompson grape ovule development and that of VvMC6 was sustained in a relatively low level except the expression of cv. Pinot Noir significantly up-regulated in 25 DAF. Our data provided new insights into PCD by identifying the grape metacaspase gene family and provide a useful reference for further functional analysis of metacaspases in grape. © 2013.

  15. Comparative analysis of ADS gene promoter in seven Artemisia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-23

    Dec 23, 2014 ... ness, salicylic acid and abscisic acid responsiveness, induc- tion upon fungal elicitation, endosperm expression, MeJA- responsiveness, low-temperature responsiveness, elicitation, wounding and pathogen responsiveness were also found in. ADS promoters of all or some of the seven Artemisia species.

  16. Barriers to gene flow in interspecific hybridization in Fuchsia L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    combination and the number of pollen tubes at the base of the style was low. In these combinations, postzygotic barriers ranging through embryo abortion and a failure of endosperm development, nongermination of seeds to when germination occurred the plants were subviable. The per- centage of unfilled seeds ranged ...

  17. Nicotianamine synthase overexpression positively modulates iron homeostasis-related genes in high iron rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eWang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of the world population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anemia or impaired mental development. Biofortification of rice, which is a staple crop for nearly half of the world’s population, can significantly contribute in alleviating iron deficiency. NFP rice (transgenic rice expressing nicotianamine synthase, ferritin and phytase genes has a more than six-fold increase in iron content in polished rice grains, resulting from the synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase (NAS and ferritin transgenes. We investigated iron homeostasis in NFP plants by analyzing the expression of 28 endogenous rice genes known to be involved in the homeostasis of iron and other metals, in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient conditions. RNA was collected from different tissues (roots, flag leaves, grains and at three developmental stages during grain filling. NFP plants showed increased sensitivity to iron-deficiency conditions and changes in the expression of endogenous genes involved in nicotianamine (NA metabolism, in comparison to their non-transgenic siblings. Elevated transcript levels were detected in NFP plants for several iron transporters. In contrast, expression of OsYSL2, which encodes a member of Yellow Stripe-like protein family, and a transporter of the NA-Fe(II complex was reduced in NFP plants under low iron conditions, indicating that expression of OsYSL2 is regulated by the endogenous iron status. Expression of the transgenes did not significantly affect overall iron homeostasis in NFP plants, which establishes the engineered push-pull mechanism as a suitable strategy to increase rice endosperm iron content.

  18. Transgenic rice expressing the cry2AX1 gene confers resistance to multiple lepidopteran pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, M; Reddy, P Sairam; Mustafa, G; Rajesh, G; Narasu, V M Laxmi; Udayasuriyan, V; Rana, Debashis

    2016-10-01

    A chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis toxin (Bt) gene, cry2AX1was cloned in a bi-selectable marker free binary vector construct. The cry2AX1 gene, driven by the Chrysanthemum rbcS1 promoter, was introduced into JK1044R, the restorer line (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica) of a notified commercially grown rice hybrid in India, by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Its effect against two major lepidopteran insect pests viz., yellow stem borer (YSB) Scirpophaga incertulas, rice leaf folder (RLF) Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and one minor insect pest, oriental army worm (OAW) Mythimna separata was demonstrated through bioassays of transgenic rice plants under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The rbcS1 promoter with chloroplast signal peptide was used to avoid Cry2AX1 protein expression in rice seed endosperm tissue. A total of 37 independent transformants were generated, of which after preliminary molecular characterization and YSB bioassay screening, five events were selected for their protein expression and bioefficacy against all three rice insect. One elite transgenic rice line, BtE15, was identified with Cry2AX1 expression ranging from 0.68 to 1.34 µg g(-1) leaf fresh weight and with 80-92 % levels of resistance against rice pests at the vegetative and reproductive stages. Increase in Cry2AX1 protein concentration was also observed with crop maturity. The Cry2AX1protein concentration in the de-husked seeds was negligible (as low as 2.7-3.6 ng g(-1)). These results indicate the potential application of cry2AX1 gene in rice for protection against YSB, RLF and OAW.

  19. An in vitro system for the rapid functional characterization of genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chao; Rivera, Sol M; Medina, Vicente; Alves, Rui; Vilaprinyo, Ester; Sorribas, Albert; Canela, Ramon; Capell, Teresa; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu

    2014-02-01

    We have developed an assay based on rice embryogenic callus for rapid functional characterization of metabolic genes. We validated the assay using a selection of well-characterized genes with known functions in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, allowing rapid visual screening of callus phenotypes based on tissue color. We then used the system to identify the functions of two uncharacterized genes: a chemically synthesized β-carotene ketolase gene optimized for maize codon usage, and a wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the cauliflower Orange gene. In contrast to previous reports (Lopez, A.B., Van Eck, J., Conlin, B.J., Paolillo, D.J., O'Neill, J. and Li, L. () J. Exp. Bot. 59, 213-223; Lu, S., Van Eck, J., Zhou, X., Lopez, A.B., O'Halloran, D.M., Cosman, K.M., Conlin, B.J., Paolillo, D.J., Garvin, D.F., Vrebalov, J., Kochian, L.V., Küpper, H., Earle, E.D., Cao, J. and Li, L. () Plant Cell 18, 3594-3605), we found that the wild-type Orange allele was sufficient to induce chromoplast differentiation. We also found that chromoplast differentiation was induced by increasing the availability of precursors and thus driving flux through the pathway, even in the absence of Orange. Remarkably, we found that diverse endosperm-specific promoters were highly active in rice callus despite their restricted activity in mature plants. Our callus system provides a unique opportunity to predict the effect of metabolic engineering in complex pathways, and provides a starting point for quantitative modeling and the rational design of engineering strategies using synthetic biology. We discuss the impact of our data on analysis and engineering of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston K. Mazandu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide coverage and biological relevance of the Gene Ontology (GO, confirmed through its successful use in protein function prediction, have led to the growth in its popularity. In order to exploit the extent of biological knowledge that GO offers in describing genes or groups of genes, there is a need for an efficient, scalable similarity measure for GO terms and GO-annotated proteins. While several GO similarity measures exist, none adequately addresses all issues surrounding the design and usage of the ontology. We introduce a new metric for measuring the distance between two GO terms using the intrinsic topology of the GO-DAG, thus enabling the measurement of functional similarities between proteins based on their GO annotations. We assess the performance of this metric using a ROC analysis on human protein-protein interaction datasets and correlation coefficient analysis on the selected set of protein pairs from the CESSM online tool. This metric achieves good performance compared to the existing annotation-based GO measures. We used this new metric to assess functional similarity between orthologues, and show that it is effective at determining whether orthologues are annotated with similar functions and identifying cases where annotation is inconsistent between orthologues.

  1. THE EXPERIENCE OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF SOME CULTIVATED PLANTS WITH THE GENE UGT ENCODING THE SYNTHESIS OF UDPG-TRANSFERASE IN ORDER TO CHANGE THE HORMONAL STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekoslavskaya N.I.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The gene ugt/iaglu was isolated from cDNA library obtained from seedlings of Zea mays L. Positive clones prepared by Lambda ZAPII (Stratagene, USA procedure were screened via western blot with antibodies to UDPG-transferase from corn endosperm raised in rabbit serum. The plasmid pBluescript harboring the gene ugt/iaglu was placed into Escherichia coli (E.coli DH5a under T7/T3 promoter. The gene ugt/iaglu was sequenced and the size was determined as much as 1740 bp. The UDPG-transferase or by trivial name Indoleacetic acid (IAA - glucose synthase (IAGlu-synthase binds IAA with glucose from UDPG thereby making the temporary inactivation and storing of this phytohormone which is capable to be released after the demand from cells. Several cultivated plants were used for transfromation with the gene ugt/iaglu from corn: tomato, potato, lettuce, egg-plant, pepper, strawberry, cucumber, squash, aspen, poplar, pine and others. All plants transformed with the gene ugt/iaglu showed fast growth, better flowering and harvest. The insertion and expression of the gene ugt/iaglu was confirmed in transformed tomato, potato and aspen with PCR, RT-PCR, southern and northern blottings. The contents of free IAA and its bound form IAGlu were higher as much as twice in tomato, potato and aspen transformed with the gene ugt/iaglu. The harvest of tomato was 3-4 times higher in transgenic tomato. The amount of potato tubers and their whole masses were 1.5 - 2 times higher in transgenic potato of several varieties in comparison to control.

  2. Allelic variation, alternative splicing and expression analysis of Psy1 gene in Hordeum chilense Roem. et Schult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rodríguez-Suárez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The wild barley Hordeum chilense Roem. et Schult. is a valuable source of genes for increasing carotenoid content in wheat. Tritordeums, the amphiploids derived from durum or common wheat and H. chilense, systematically show higher values of yellow pigment colour and carotenoid content than durum wheat. Phytoene synthase 1 gene (Psy1 is considered a key step limiting the carotenoid biosynthesis, and the correlation of Psy1 transcripts accumulation and endosperm carotenoid content has been demonstrated in the main grass species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyze the variability of Psy1 alleles in three lines of H. chilense (H1, H7 and H16 representing the three ecotypes described in this species. Moreover, we analyze Psy1 expression in leaves and in two seed developing stages of H1 and H7, showing mRNA accumulation patterns similar to those of wheat. Finally, we identify thirty-six different transcripts forms originated by alternative splicing of the 5' UTR and/or exons 1 to 5 of Psy1 gene. Transcripts function is tested in a heterologous complementation assay, revealing that from the sixteen different predicted proteins only four types (those of 432, 370, 364 and 271 amino acids, are functional in the bacterial system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of transcripts originated by alternative splicing of Psy1, and the coexistence of functional and non functional forms, suggest a fine regulation of PSY activity in H. chilense. This work is the first analysis of H. chilense Psy1 gene and the results reported here are the bases for its potential use in carotenoid enhancement in durum wheat.

  3. Quantification of amylose, amylopectin, and β-glucan in search for genes controlling the three major quality traits in barley by genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoli; Rasmussen, Søren K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for amylose, amylopectin and β-glucan concentration in a collection of 254 European spring barley varieties allowed to identify 20, 17, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers, respectively, associated with these important grain quality traits. Negative correlations between the content of amylose and β-glucan (R = −0.62, P < 0.01) and amylopectin and β-glucan (R = −0.487, P < 0.01) were found in this large collection of spring barley varieties. Besides HvCslF6, amo1 and AGPL2, sex6, and waxy were identified among the major genes responsible for β-glucan, amylose and amylopectin content, respectively. Several minor genes like HvGSL4, HvGSL3, and HvCesA6, PWD were also detected by GWAS for the first time. Furthermore, the gene encoding β-fructofuranosidase, located on the short arm of chromosome 7H at 1.49 cM, and SRF6, encoding “leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase protein” on chromosome 2 H, are proposed to be new candidate genes for amylopectin formation in barley endosperm. Several of the associated SNPs on chromosome 1, 5, 6, and 7H mapped to overlapping regions containing QTLs and genes controlling the three grain constituents. In particular chromosomes 5 and 7H carry many QTLs controlling barley grain quality. Amylose, amylopectin and β-glucan were interacted among each other through a metabolic network connected by UDP showing pleiotropic effects. Taken together, these results showed that cereal quality traits related each other and regulated through an interaction network, the identified major genes and genetic regions for amylose, amylopectin and β-glucan is a helpful for further research on carbohydrates and barley breeding. PMID:24860587

  4. Development of low phytate rice by RNAi mediated seed-specific silencing of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase gene (IPK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Karabi; Datta, Swapan K

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (InsP(6)) is considered to be the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in most cereal grains. However, InsP(6) is not utilized efficiently by monogastric animals due to lack of phytase enzyme. Furthermore, due to its ability to chelate mineral cations, phytic acid is considered to be an antinutrient that renders these minerals unavailable for absorption. In view of these facts, reducing the phytic acid content in cereal grains is a desired goal for the genetic improvement of several crops. In the present study, we report the RNAi-mediated seed-specific silencing (using the Oleosin18 promoter) of the IPK1 gene, which catalyzes the last step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. The presence of the transgene cassette in the resulting transgenic plants was confirmed by molecular analysis, indicating the stable integration of the transgene. The subsequent T4 transgenic seeds revealed 3.85-fold down-regulation in IPK1 transcripts, which correlated to a significant reduction in phytate levels and a concomitant increase in the amount of inorganic phosphate (Pi). The low-phytate rice seeds also accumulated 1.8-fold more iron in the endosperm due to the decreased phytic acid levels. No negative effects were observed on seed germination or in any of the agronomic traits examined. The results provide evidence that silencing of IPK1 gene can mediate a substantial reduction in seed phytate levels without hampering the growth and development of transgenic rice plants.

  5. Development of Low Phytate Rice by RNAi Mediated Seed-Specific Silencing of Inositol 1,3,4,5,6-Pentakisphosphate 2-Kinase Gene (IPK1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nusrat; Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Datta, Karabi; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (InsP6) is considered to be the major source of phosphorus and inositol phosphates in most cereal grains. However, InsP6 is not utilized efficiently by monogastric animals due to lack of phytase enzyme. Furthermore, due to its ability to chelate mineral cations, phytic acid is considered to be an antinutrient that renders these minerals unavailable for absorption. In view of these facts, reducing the phytic acid content in cereal grains is a desired goal for the genetic improvement of several crops. In the present study, we report the RNAi-mediated seed-specific silencing (using the Oleosin18 promoter) of the IPK1 gene, which catalyzes the last step of phytic acid biosynthesis in rice. The presence of the transgene cassette in the resulting transgenic plants was confirmed by molecular analysis, indicating the stable integration of the transgene. The subsequent T4 transgenic seeds revealed 3.85-fold down-regulation in IPK1 transcripts, which correlated to a significant reduction in phytate levels and a concomitant increase in the amount of inorganic phosphate (Pi). The low-phytate rice seeds also accumulated 1.8-fold more iron in the endosperm due to the decreased phytic acid levels. No negative effects were observed on seed germination or in any of the agronomic traits examined. The results provide evidence that silencing of IPK1 gene can mediate a substantial reduction in seed phytate levels without hampering the growth and development of transgenic rice plants. PMID:23844166

  6. Production of human growth hormone in transgenic rice seeds: co-introduction of RNA interference cassette for suppressing the gene expression of endogenous storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, Takanari; Ozaki, Shinji; Saito, Yuhi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Morita, Shigeto; Satoh, Shigeru; Masumura, Takehiro

    2012-03-01

    Rice seeds are potentially useful hosts for the production of pharmaceutical proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have been observed in many cases because recombinant proteins compete with endogenous storage proteins. Therefore, we attempt to suppress endogenous seed storage proteins by RNA interference (RNAi) to develop rice seeds as a more efficient protein expression system. In this study, human growth hormone (hGH) was expressed in transgenic rice seeds using an endosperm-specific promoter from a 10 kDa rice prolamin gene. In addition, an RNAi cassette for reduction of endogenous storage protein expressions was inserted into the hGH expression construct. Using this system, the expression levels of 13 kDa prolamin and glutelin were effectively suppressed and hGH polypeptides accumulated to 470 μg/g dry weight at the maximum level in transgenic rice seeds. These results suggest that the suppression of endogenous protein gene expression by RNAi could be of great utility for increasing transgene products.

  7. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition as a potent diagnostic tool for gene function in plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Christer; Sun, Chuanxin; Ghebramedhin, Haile; Hoglund, Anna-Stina; Jansson, Christer

    2008-01-15

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) inhibition emerges as an effective means for probing gene function in plant cells. Employing this method we have established the importance of the SUSIBA2 transcription factor for regulation of starch synthesis in barley endosperm, and arrived at a model for the role of the SUSIBAs in sugar signaling and source-sink commutation during cereal endosperm development. In this addendum we provide additional data demonstrating the suitability of the antisense ODN technology in studies on starch branching enzyme activities in barley leaves. We also comment on the mechanism for ODN uptake in plant cells. Antisense ODNs are short (12-25 nt-long) stretches of single-stranded ODNs that hybridize to the cognate mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, thereby inhibiting gene expression. They are naturally occurring in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes where they partake in gene regulation and defense against viral infection. The mechanisms for antisense ODN inhibition are not fully understood but it is generally considered that the ODN either sterically interferes with translation or promotes transcript degradation by RNase H activation. The earliest indication of the usefulness of antisense ODN technology for the purposes of molecular biology and medical therapy was the demonstration in 1978 that synthetic ODNs complementary to Raos sarcoma virus could inhibit virus replication in tissue cultures of chick embryo fibroblasts. Since then the antisense ODN technology has been widely used in animal sciences and as an important emerging therapeutic approach in clinical medicine. However, antisense ODN inhibition has been an under-exploited strategy for plant tissues, although the prospects for plant cells in suspension cultures to take up single-stranded ODNs was reported over a decade ago. In 2001, two reports from Malho and coworker demonstrated the use of cationic-complexed antisense ODNs to suppress expression of genes encoding pollen

  8. A promoter analysis of MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 1 (JcMFT1), a seed-preferential gene from the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Bin; Luo, Li; He, Liang-Liang; Ni, Jun; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-07-01

    MOTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (MFT)-like genes belong to the phosphatidylethanoamine-binding protein (PEBP) gene family in plants. In contrast to their homologs FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)-like and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1)-like genes, which are involved in the regulation of the flowering time pathway, MFT-like genes function mainly during seed development and germination. In this study, a full-length cDNA of the MFT-like gene JcMFT1 from the biodiesel plant Jatropha curcas (L.) was isolated and found to be highly expressed in seeds. The promoter of JcMFT1 was cloned and characterized in transgenic Arabidopsis. A histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) assay indicated that the JcMFT1 promoter was predominantly expressed in both embryos and endosperms of transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Fluorometric GUS analysis revealed that the JcMFT1 promoter was highly active at the mid to late stages of seed development. After seed germination, the JcMFT1 promoter activity decreased gradually. In addition, both the JcMFT1 expression in germinating Jatropha embryos and its promoter activity in germinating Arabidopsis embryos were induced by abscisic acid (ABA), possibly due to two ABA-responsive elements, a G-box and an RY repeat, in the JcMFT1 promoter region. These results show that the JcMFT1 promoter is seed-preferential and can be used to control transgene expression in the seeds of Jatropha and other transgenic plants.

  9. Special Issue: Gene Conversion in Duplicated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Innan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is an outcome of recombination, causing non-reciprocal transfer of a DNA fragment. Several decades later than the discovery of crossing over, gene conversion was first recognized in fungi when non-Mendelian allelic distortion was observed. Gene conversion occurs when a double-strand break is repaired by using homologous sequences in the genome. In meiosis, there is a strong preference to use the orthologous region (allelic gene conversion, which causes non-Mendelian allelic distortion, but paralogous or duplicated regions can also be used for the repair (inter-locus gene conversion, also referred to as non-allelic and ectopic gene conversion. The focus of this special issue is the latter, interlocus gene conversion; the rate is lower than allelic gene conversion but it has more impact on phenotype because more drastic changes in DNA sequence are involved.

  10. Maize sugary enhancer1 (se1) is a presence-absence variant of a previously uncharacterized gene and development of educational videos to raise the profile of plant breeding and improve curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro von Mogel, Karl J.

    Carbohydrate metabolism is a biologically, economically, and culturally important process in crop plants. Humans have selected many crop species such as maize (Zea mays L.) in ways that have resulted in changes to carbohydrate metabolic pathways, and understanding the underlying genetics of this pathway is therefore exceedingly important. A previously uncharacterized starch metabolic pathway mutant, sugary enhancer1 (se1), is a recessive modifier of sugary1 (su1) sweet corn that increases the sugar content while maintaining an appealing creamy texture. This allele has been incorporated into many sweet corn varieties since its discovery in the 1970s, however, testing for the presence of this allele has been difficult. A genetic stock was developed that allowed the presence of se1 to be visually scored in segregating ears, which were used to genetically map se1 to the deletion of a single gene model located on the distal end of the long arm of chromosome 2. An analysis of homology found that this gene is specific to monocots, and the gene is expressed in the endosperm and developing leaf. The se1 allele increased water soluble polysaccharide (WSP) and decreased amylopectin in maize endosperm, but there was no overall effect on starch content in mature leaves due to se1. This discovery will lead to a greater understanding of starch metabolism, and the marker developed will assist in breeding. There is a present need for increased training for plant breeders to meet the growing needs of the human population. To raise the profile of plant breeding among young students, a series of videos called Fields of Study was developed. These feature interviews with plant breeders who talk about what they do as plant breeders and what they enjoy about their chosen profession. To help broaden the education of students in college biology courses, and assist with the training of plant breeders, a second video series, Pollination Methods was developed. Each video focuses on one or two

  11. Hydrogen storage in carbon derived from solid endosperm of coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Viney; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Shahi, R. R.; T.P. Yadav; Srivastava, O.N.

    2014-01-01

    Carbons are being widely investigated as hydrogen storage material owing to their light weight, fast hydrogen adsorption kinetics and cost effectiveness. However, these materials suffer from low hydrogen storage capacity, particularly at room temperature. The aim of the present study is to develop carbon-based material from natural bio-precursor which shows at least moderate hydrogen storage at room temperature. For this purpose, hydrogenation characteristics of carbon derived from solid endo...

  12. Molecular Features of Wheat Endosperm Arabinoxylan Inclusion in Functional Bread

    OpenAIRE

    Weili Li; Hui Hu; Qi Wang; Charles S. Brennan

    2013-01-01

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is a major dietary fibre component found in a variety of cereals. Numerous health benefits of arabinoxylans have been reported to be associated with their solubility and molecular features. The current study reports the development of a functional bread using a combination of AX-enriched material (AEM) and optimal commercial endoxylanase. The total AX content of bread was increased to 8.2 g per 100 g available carbohydrates. The extractability of AX in breads with and withou...

  13. Molecular Features of Wheat Endosperm Arabinoxylan Inclusion in Functional Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinoxylan (AX is a major dietary fibre component found in a variety of cereals. Numerous health benefits of arabinoxylans have been reported to be associated with their solubility and molecular features. The current study reports the development of a functional bread using a combination of AX-enriched material (AEM and optimal commercial endoxylanase. The total AX content of bread was increased to 8.2 g per 100 g available carbohydrates. The extractability of AX in breads with and without endoxylanase was determined. The results demonstrate that water-extractable AX (WE-AX increased progressively through the bread making process. The application of endoxylanase also increased WE-AX content. The presence of 360 ppm of endoxylanase had positive effects on the bread characteristics in terms of bread volume and firmness by converting the water unextractable (WU-AX to WE-AX. In addition, the molecular weight (Mw distribution of the WE-AX of bread with and without endoxylanase was characterized by size-exclusion chromatography. The results show that as the portion of WE-AX increased, the amount of high Mw WE-AX (higher than 100 kDa decreased, whereas the amount of low Mw WE-AX (lower than 100 kDa increased from 33.2% to 44.2% through the baking process. The low Mw WE-AX further increased to 75.5% with the application of the optimal endoxylanase (360 ppm.

  14. Molecular Features of Wheat Endosperm Arabinoxylan Inclusion in Functional Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weili; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qi; Brennan, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    Arabinoxylan (AX) is a major dietary fibre component found in a variety of cereals. Numerous health benefits of arabinoxylans have been reported to be associated with their solubility and molecular features. The current study reports the development of a functional bread using a combination of AX-enriched material (AEM) and optimal commercial endoxylanase. The total AX content of bread was increased to 8.2 g per 100 g available carbohydrates. The extractability of AX in breads with and without endoxylanase was determined. The results demonstrate that water-extractable AX (WE-AX) increased progressively through the bread making process. The application of endoxylanase also increased WE-AX content. The presence of 360 ppm of endoxylanase had positive effects on the bread characteristics in terms of bread volume and firmness by converting the water unextractable (WU)-AX to WE-AX. In addition, the molecular weight (Mw) distribution of the WE-AX of bread with and without endoxylanase was characterized by size-exclusion chromatography. The results show that as the portion of WE-AX increased, the amount of high Mw WE-AX (higher than 100 kDa) decreased, whereas the amount of low Mw WE-AX (lower than 100 kDa) increased from 33.2% to 44.2% through the baking process. The low Mw WE-AX further increased to 75.5% with the application of the optimal endoxylanase (360 ppm). PMID:28239111

  15. Normal and hetero-yellow endosperm grain sorghum as substitute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.P. Hayes. Department of Poultry Science, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch 7600, Republic of South Africa. An experiment was conducted to evaluate a .... based diet based diet. Ingredient. (%). Maize. 63,94. G766W sorghum. 63,94. Normal GL sorghum. 63,94. Wheaten bran. 17,60. 17,70. 17,70. Fishmeal. 9,00.

  16. Induction and multiplication of callus from endosperm of Cycas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... Martin (2004), on the other hand, stated that embryogenesis callus initiated from leaf explants of Centella asiatica in suspended half-strength. MS medium supplemented with 2.69 µM NAA developed a mean of 204.3 somatic embryos per 100 mg of callus. In that experiment, 88% of the embryos underwent.

  17. Starch synthesis and carbon partitioning in developing endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emes, M J; Bowsher, C G; Hedley, C; Burrell, M M; Scrase-Field, E S F; Tetlow, I J

    2003-01-01

    The biosynthesis of starch is the major determinant of yield in cereal grains. In this short review, attention is focused on the synthesis of the soluble substrate for starch synthesis, ADPglucose (ADPG). Consideration is given to the pathway of ADPG production, its subcellular compartmentation, and the role of metabolite transporters in mediating its delivery to the site of starch synthesis. As ADPG is an activated sugar, the dependence of its production on respiration, changes which occur during development, and the constraints which ATP production may place on carbon partitioning into different end-products are discussed.

  18. Inducement and identification of an endosperm mutant in maize

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-30

    Nov 30, 2011 ... kernels taste sweet because of the increase of water- soluble polysaccharides. The mature ... Preparation of maize calli. According to the method introduced by Fu et al. (2005), immature ... treatments], used to determine the influence of mutation treatments with gamma-ray and NaN3 on callus growth, and ...

  19. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carciofi Massimiliano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Starch is stored in higher plants as granules composed of semi-crystalline amylopectin and amorphous amylose. Starch granules provide energy for the plant during dark periods and for germination of seeds and tubers. Dietary starch is also a highly glycemic carbohydrate being degraded to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed “resistant starch” (RS escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA which are linked to several health benefits. The RS is preferentially derived from amylose, which can be increased by suppressing amylopectin synthesis by silencing of starch branching enzymes (SBEs. However all the previous works attempting the production of high RS crops resulted in only partly increased amylose-content and/or significant yield loss. Results In this study we invented a new method for silencing of multiple genes. Using a chimeric RNAi hairpin we simultaneously suppressed all genes coding for starch branching enzymes (SBE I, SBE IIa, SBE IIb in barley (Hordeum vulgare L., resulting in production of amylose-only starch granules in the endosperm. This trait was segregating 3:1. Amylose-only starch granules were irregularly shaped and showed peculiar thermal properties and crystallinity. Transgenic lines retained high-yield possibly due to a pleiotropic upregualtion of other starch biosynthetic genes compensating the SBEs loss. For gelatinized starch, a very high content of RS (65 % was observed, which is 2.2-fold higher than control (29%. The amylose-only grains germinated with same frequency as control grains. However, initial growth was delayed in young plants. Conclusions This is the first time that pure amylose has been generated with high yield in a living organism. This was achieved by a new method of simultaneous suppression of the entire complement of genes encoding starch

  20. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...

  1. Identification and evaluation of ω-3 fatty acid desaturase genes for hyperfortifying α-linolenic acid in transgenic rice seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua Liang; Yin, Zhi Jie; Xiao, Li; Xu, Yi Nong; Qu, Le Qing

    2012-05-01

    α-Linolenic acid (ALA) deficiency and a skewed of ω6:ω3 fatty acid ratio in the diet are a major explanation for the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. There is a need to enhance the ALA content and to reduce the ratio of linoleic acid (LA) to ALA. Six ω-3 (Δ-15) fatty acid desaturase (FAD) genes were cloned from rice and soybean. The subcellular localizations of the proteins were identified. The FAD genes were introduced into rice under the control of an endosperm-specific promoter, GluC, or a Ubi-1 promoter to evaluate their potential in increasing the ALA content in seeds. The ALA contents in the seeds of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized GmFAD3-1 and OsFAD3 overexpression lines increased from 0.36 mg g⁻¹ to 8.57 mg g⁻¹ and 10.06 mg g⁻¹, respectively, which was 23.8- and 27.9-fold higher than that of non-transformants. The trait of high ALA content was stably inheritable over three generations. Homologous OsFAD3 is more active than GmFAD3-1 in catalysing LA conversion to ALA in rice seeds. Overexpression of ER-localized GmFAD3-2/3 and chloroplast-localized OsFAD7/8 had less effect on increasing the ALA content in rice seeds. The GluC promoter is advantageous compared with Ubi-1 in this experimental system. The enhanced ALA was preferentially located at the sn-2 position in triacylglycerols. A meal-size portion of high ALA rice would meet >80% of the daily adult ALA requirement. The ALA-rich rice could be expected to ameliorate much of the global dietary ALA deficiency.

  2. Gene structure, expression pattern and interaction of Nuclear Factor-Y family in castor bean (Ricinus communis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Wei; Chen, Zexi; Han, Bing; Haque, Mohammad E; Liu, Aizhong

    2017-11-08

    Nuclear Factor-Y transcription factors, which function in regulating seed development (including storage reservoir accumulation) and responding to abiotic stresses, were identified and characterized in castor bean. Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors in plants contain three subunits (NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC), and function as a heterodimer or heterotrimer complex in regulating plant growth, development and response to stresses. Castor bean (Ricinus communis, Euphorbiaceae) one of the most economically important non-edible oilseed crops, able to grow in diverse soil conditions and displays high tolerance to abiotic stresses. Due to increasing demands for its seed oils, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of growth and development. Based on the available genome data, we identified 25 RcNF-Y members including six RcNF-YAs, 12 RcNF-YBs and seven RcNF-YCs, and characterized their gene structures. Yeast two-hybrid assays confirmed the protein-protein interactions among three subunits. Using transcriptomic data from different tissues, we found that six members were highly or specifically expressed in endosperms (in particular, two LEC1-type members RcNF-YB2 and RcNF-YB12), implying their involvement in regulating seed development and storage reservoir accumulation. Further, we investigated the expression changes of RcNF-Y members in two-week-old seedlings under drought, cold, hot and salt stresses. We found that the expression levels of 20 RcNF-Y members tested were changed and three RcNF-Y members might function in response to abiotic stresses. This study is the first reported on genomic characterization of NF-Y transcription factors in the family Euphorbiaceae. Our results provide the basis for improved understanding of how NF-Y genes function in the regulation of seed development and responses to abiotic stresses in both castor bean and other plants in this family.

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Rice Laccase Gene (OsLAC Family and Ectopic Expression of OsLAC10 Enhances Tolerance to Copper Stress in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingquan Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laccases are encoded by a multigene family and widely distributed in plant genomes where they play roles oxidizing monolignols to produce higher-order lignin involved in plant development and stress responses. We identified 30 laccase genes (OsLACs from rice, which can be divided into five subfamilies, mostly expressed during early development of the endosperm, growing roots, and stems. OsLACs can be induced by hormones, salt, drought, and heavy metals stresses. The expression level of OsLAC10 increased 1200-fold after treatment with 20 μM Cu for 12 h. The laccase activities of OsLAC10 were confirmed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Lignin accumulation increased in the roots of Arabidopsis over-expressing OsLAC10 (OsLAC10-OX compared to wild-type controls. After growth on 1/2 Murashige and Skoog (MS medium containing toxic levels of Cu for seven days, roots of the OsLAC10-OX lines were significantly longer than those of the wild type. Compared to control plants, the Cu concentration decreased significantly in roots of the OsLAC10-OX line under hydroponic conditions. These results provided insights into the evolutionary expansion and functional divergence of OsLAC family. In addition, OsLAC10 is likely involved in lignin biosynthesis, and reduces the uptake of Cu into roots required for Arabidopsis to develop tolerance to Cu.

  4. 1444-IJBCS-Article-Pamphile Nguema+

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Endosperm: the cross road of development. Plant Biology, 6: 42-50. Bommert P, Werr W. 2001. Gene expression patterns in the maize caryopsis: clues to decisions in embryo and endosperm development. Gene, 271: 131-142. Brady T, Clutter ME. 1972. Cytolocalization of ribosomial cistrons in plant polytene chromosomes.

  5. Development-dependent changes in the tight DNA-protein complexes of barley on chromosome and gene level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juodka Benediktas

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tightly bound to DNA proteins (TBPs is a protein group that remains attached to DNA with covalent or non-covalent bonds after its deproteinisation. The functional role of this group is as yet not completely understood. The main goal of this study was to evaluate tissue specific changes in the TBP distribution in barley genes and chromosomes in different phases of shoot and seed development. We have: 1. investigated the TBP distribution along Amy32b and Bmy1 genes encoding low pI α-amylase A and endosperm specific β-amylase correspondingly using oligonucleotide DNA arrays; 2. characterized the polypeptide spectrum of TBP and proteins with affinity to TBP-associated DNA; 3. localized the distribution of DNA complexes with TBP (TBP-DNA on barley 1H and 7H chromosomes using mapped markers; 4. compared the chromosomal distribution of TBP-DNA complexes to the distribution of the nuclear matrix attachment sites. Results In the Amy32b gene transition from watery ripe to the milky ripeness stage of seed development was followed by the decrease of TBP binding along the whole gene, especially in the promoter region and intron II. Expression of the Bmy1 gene coupled to ripening was followed by release of the exon III and intron III sequences from complexes with TBPs. Marker analysis revealed changes in the association of chromosome 1H and 7H sites with TBPs between first leaf and coleoptile and at Zadoks 07 and Zadoks 10 stages of barley shoot development. Tight DNA-protein complexes of the nuclear matrix and those detected by NPC-chromatography were revealed as also involved in tissue- and development-dependent transitions, however, in sites different from TBP-DNA interactions. The spectrum of TBPs appeared to be organ and developmental-stage specific. Development of the first leaf and root system (from Zadoks 07 to Zadoks 10 stage was shown as followed by a drastic increase in the TBP number in contrast to coleoptile, where the

  6. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  7. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  8. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  9. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Tang

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD, which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177, Cys (219] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112, Arg (389, Ser (395], except that Ser (395 in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF, close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  10. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient Health Information News media interested in ... One of the most common birth defects is hearing loss or deafness (congenital), which can affect as ...

  11. Epigenetics: beyond genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fossey, A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory processes lead to differential gene expression and are referred to as epigenetic phenomena; these are ubiquitous processes in the biological world. These reversible heritable changes concern DNA and RNA, their interactions...

  12. Polydactyly and genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phadke, Shubha R; Sankar, V H

    2010-01-01

    .... A lot of information about genes involved in development is available now. Genetics of hand development and genes involved in polydactyly syndromes is discussed in this article as a prototype to know about genetics of malformations...

  13. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolutionary history of duplicated genes within a given lineage. The timings of gene duplication events can be inferred ... evolutionary history of the creatures in which various globin genes are found, the timings of the ..... But I cannot find heart to give any part of my life for money-making purposes ... : In 1901, one of the large ...

  15. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  16. Gene therapy in periodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ‘the use of genes as medicine’. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone. PMID:23869119

  17. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  18. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  19. Retrieval with gene queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Padmini

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Results Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline. For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. Conclusion We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  20. [Abnormal floral meristem development in transgenic tomato plants do not depend on the expression of genes encoding defense-related PR-proteins and antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliluev, M R; Chaban, I A; Kononenko, N V; Baranova, E N; Dolgov, S V; Kharchenko, P N; Poliakov, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the morphological and cytoembryological analyses of the tomato plants transformed with the genes encoding chitin-binding proteins (ac and RS-intron-Shir) from Amaranthus caudatus L. andA. retroflexus L., respectively, as well as the gene amp2 encoding hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from Stellaria media L., have been performed. The transgenic lines were adapted to soil and grown the greenhouse. The analysis of putative transgenic tomato plants revealed several lines that did not differ phenotypically from the wild type plants and three lines with disruption in differentiation of the inflorescence shoot and the flower, as well as the fruit formation (modified plants of each line were transformed with a single gene as noted before). Abnormalities in the development of the generative organs were maintained for at least six vegetative generations. These transgenic plants were shown to be defective in the mail gametophyte formation, fertilization, and, consequently, led to parthenocarpic fruits. The detailed analysis of growing ovules in the abnormal transgenic plants showed that the replacement tissue was formed and proliferated instead of unfertilized embryo sac. The structure of the replacement tissue differed from both embryonic and endosperm tissue of the normal ovule. The formation of the replacement tissue occurred due to continuing proliferation of the endothelial cells that lost their ability for differentiation. The final step in the development of the replacement tissue was its death, which resulted in the cell lysis. The expression of the genes used was confirmed by RT-PCR in all three lines with abnormal phenotype, as well as in several lines that did not phenotypically differ from the untransformed control. This suggests that abnormalities in the organs of the generative sphere in the transgenic plants do not depend on the expression of the foreign genes that were introduced in the tomato genome. Here, we argue that agrobacterial

  1. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  2. Primetime for Learning Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Keifer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF, by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be “poised” for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  3. Viral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño-Corvo, P; Martín-Duque, P

    2006-12-01

    Cancer is a multigenic disorder involving mutations of both tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A large body of preclinical data, however, has suggested that cancer growth can be arrested or reversed by treatment with gene transfer vectors that carry a single growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic gene or a gene that can recruit immune responses against the tumor. Many of these gene transfer vectors are modified viruses. The ability for the delivery of therapeutic genes, made them desirable for engineering virus vector systems. The viral vectors recently in laboratory and clinical use are based on RNA and DNA viruses processing very different genomic structures and host ranges. Particular viruses have been selected as gene delivery vehicles because of their capacities to carry foreign genes and their ability to efficiently deliver these genes associated with efficient gene expression. These are the major reasons why viral vectors derived from retroviruses, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, herpesvirus and poxvirus are employed in more than 70% of clinical gene therapy trials worldwide. Because these vector systems have unique advantages and limitations, each has applications for which it is best suited. Retroviral vectors can permanently integrate into the genome of the infected cell, but require mitotic cell division for transduction. Adenoviral vectors can efficiently deliver genes to a wide variety of dividing and nondividing cell types, but immune elimination of infected cells often limits gene expression in vivo. Herpes simplex virus can deliver large amounts of exogenous DNA; however, cytotoxicity and maintenance of transgene expression remain as obstacles. AAV also infects many non-dividing and dividing cell types, but has a limited DNA capacity. This review discusses current and emerging virusbased genetic engineering strategies for the delivery of therapeutic molecules or several approaches for cancer treatment.

  4. Genetic fine-mapping of DIPLOSPOROUS in Taraxacum (dandelion; Asteraceae) indicates a duplicated DIP-gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijverberg, Kitty; Milanovic-Ivanovic, Slavica; Bakx-Schotman, Tanja; van Dijk, Peter J

    2010-07-26

    DIPLOSPOROUS (DIP) is the locus for diplospory in Taraxacum, associated to unreduced female gamete formation in apomicts. Apomicts reproduce clonally through seeds, including apomeiosis, parthenogenesis, and autonomous or pseudogamous endosperm formation. In Taraxacum, diplospory results in first division restitution (FDR) nuclei, and inherits as a dominant, monogenic trait, independent from the other apomixis elements. A preliminary genetic linkage map indicated that the DIP-locus lacks suppression of recombination, which is unique among all other map-based cloning efforts of apomeiosis to date. FDR as well as apomixis as a whole are of interest in plant breeding, allowing for polyploidization and fixation of hybrid vigor, respectively. No dominant FDR or apomixis genes have yet been isolated. Here, we zoom-in to the DIP-locus by largely extending our initial mapping population, and by analyzing (local) suppression of recombination and allele sequence divergence (ASD). We identified 24 recombinants between two most closely linked molecular markers to DIP in an F1-population of 2227 plants that segregates for diplospory and lacks parthenogenesis. Both markers segregated c. 1:1 in the entire population, indicating a 1:1 segregation rate of diplospory. Fine-mapping showed three amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) closest to DIP at 0.2 cM at one flank and a single AFLP at 0.4 cM at the other flank. Our data lacked strong evidence for ASD at marker regions close to DIP. An unexpected bias towards diplosporous plants among the recombinants (20 out of 24) was found. One third of these diplosporous recombinants showed incomplete penetrance of 50-85% diplospory. Our data give interesting new insights into the structure of the diplospory locus in Taraxacum. We postulate a locus with a minimum of two DIP-genes and possibly including one or two enhancers or cis-regulatory elements on the basis of the bias towards diplosporous recombinants and incomplete penetrance

  5. Gene manupulations in invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Čermáková, Eliška

    2017-01-01

    Gene manipulations in invertebrates are based on the same approches used in vertebrates. The are applied for the development of new genotypes in model species, convenient as model systems of human hereditary diseases etc. Gene manipulations are important as well for practical purposes, which is shown by the example of trangenic mosquitoes. Recently, it has been proved that programmable nucleases can be successfully used in invertebrates. Key words: Gene manipulations, invertebrates, methods, ...

  6. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  7. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reference: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE Forde BG, Heyworth A, Pywell J, Kreis M Nucleotide sequence of a B1 hordein gene and the identifica...tion of possible upstream regulatory elements in endosperm storage protein genes fr

  9. Chromatin loops, gene positioning, and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, S.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments and intense research over the last years have led to a better understanding of the 3D structure of the genome and its influence on genome function inside the cell nucleus. We will summarize topological studies performed on four model gene loci: the alpha- and beta-globin

  10. One gene's shattering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M

    2012-05-29

    A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

  11. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  12. Gene therapy flexes muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2005-09-01

    This commentary highlights the promising results of recent studies in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that have clearly demonstrated the potential of gene therapy for tackling these diseases. In the absence of effective drugs or other treatments, these advances in gene therapy technology represent the best hope for those patients and families that are blighted by these diseases. Diseases characterized by progressive muscle degeneration are often incurable and affect a relatively large number of individuals. The progressive deterioration of muscle function is like the sword of Damocles that constantly reminds patients suffering from these diseases of their tragic fate, since most of them will eventually die from cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction. Some of these disorders are due to mutations in genes that directly influence the integrity of muscle fibers, such as in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a recessive X-linked genetic disease. Others result from a progressive neurodegeneration of the motoneurons that are essential for maintaining muscle function, such as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The genetic basis of DMD is relatively well understood as it is due to mutations in the dystrophin gene that encodes the cognate sarcolemmal protein. In contrast, the cause of ALS is poorly defined, with the exception of some dominantly inherited familial cases of ALS that are due to gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SODG93A). Gene therapy for these disorders has been hampered by the inability to achieve widespread gene transfer. Moreover, since familial ALS is due to a dominant gain-of-function mutation, inhibition of gene expression (rather than gene augmentation) would be required to correct the phenotype, which is particularly challenging. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  14. Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Tuddenham, Edward G D

    2017-10-01

    The best currently available treatments for hemophilia A and B (factor VIII or factor IX deficiency, respectively) require frequent intravenous infusion of highly expensive proteins that have short half-lives. Factor levels follow a saw-tooth pattern that is seldom in the normal range and falls so low that breakthrough bleeding occurs. Most hemophiliacs worldwide do not have access to even this level of care. In stark contrast, gene therapy holds out the hope of a cure by inducing continuous endogenous expression of factor VIII or factor IX following transfer of a functional gene to replace the hemophilic patient's own defective gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genes underlying altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Graham J; Hurd, Peter L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals.

  16. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  17. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  18. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  19. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular...

  20. Ribosomal genes in focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Pliss, Artem; Mašata, Martin; Večeřová, Jaromíra; Fialová, Markéta; Bednár, Jan; Raška, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    T he organization of transcriptionally active ribosomal genes in animal cell nucleoli is investigated in this study in order to address the long-standing controversy with regard to the intranucleolar localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings. On the light microscopy (LM) level, ribosomal genes map in 10–40 fluorescence foci per nucleus, and transcription activity is associated with most foci. We demonstrate that each nucleolar focus observed by LM corresponds, on the EM level, to an individual fibrillar center (FC) and surrounding dense fibrillar components (DFCs). The EM data identify the DFC as the nucleolar subcompartment in which rRNA synthesis takes place, consistent with detection of rDNA within the DFC. The highly sensitive method for mapping nascent transcripts in permeabilized cells on ultrastructural level provides intense and unambiguous clustered immunogold signal over the DFC, whereas very little to no label is detected over the FC. This signal is strongly indicative of nascent “Christmas trees” of rRNA associated with individual rDNA genes, sampled on the surface of thin sections. Stereological analysis of the clustered transcription signal further suggests that these Christmas trees may be contorted in space and exhibit a DNA compaction ratio on the order of 4–5.5. PMID:12034768

  1. On sports and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Our genes influence our athletic ability. However, the causal genetic factors and mechanisms, and the extent of their effects, remain largely elusive. Many studies investigate this association between specific genes and athletic performance. Such studies have increased in number over the past few years, as recent developments and patents in DNA sequencing have made large amounts of sequencing data available for such analysis. In this paper, we consider four of the most intensively studied genes in relation to athletic ability: angiotensin I-converting enzyme, alpha-actinin 3, peroxismose proliferator-activator receptor alpha and nitric oxide synthase 3. We investigate the connection between genotype and athletic phenotype in the context of these four genes in various sport fields and across different ethnicities and genders. We do an extensive literature survey on these genes and the polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms or indels) found to be associated with athletic performance. We also present, for each of these polymorphisms, the allele frequencies in the different ethnicities reported in the pilot phase of the 1000 Genomes Project - arguably the largest human genome-sequencing endeavor to date. We discuss the considerable success, and significant drawbacks, of past research along these lines, and propose interesting directions for future research.

  2. Recombination in immunoglobulin gene loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komisarenko S. V.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene network of the lymphoid cell differentiation coordinates precisely the recombination process in immunoglobulin gene loci. In our opinion, cellular microRNAs can contribute to the allelic exclusion through microRNA-directed DNA methylation and participate in retargeting recombinases activity from the gene loci of heavy immunoglobulin chains to the gene loci of light chains

  3. Characterization of the Entire Cystatin Gene Family in Barley and Their Target Cathepsin L-Like Cysteine-Proteases, Partners in the Hordein Mobilization during Seed Germination1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Manuel; Cambra, Ines; Carrillo, Laura; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Diaz, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Plant cystatins are inhibitors of cysteine-proteases of the papain C1A and legumain C13 families. Cystatin data from multiple plant species have suggested that these inhibitors act as defense proteins against pests and pathogens and as regulators of protein turnover. In this study, we characterize the entire cystatin gene family from barley (Hordeum vulgare), which contain 13 nonredundant genes, and identify and characterize their target enzymes, the barley cathepsin L-like proteases. Cystatins and proteases were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cultures. Each cystatin was found to have different inhibitory capability against barley cysteine-proteases in in vitro inhibitory assays using specific substrates. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that inhibitors and enzymes present a wide variation in their messenger RNA expression patterns. Their transcripts were mainly detected in developing and germinating seeds, and some of them were also expressed in leaves and roots. Subcellular localization of cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases fused to green fluorescent protein demonstrated the presence of both protein families throughout the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Proteases and cystatins not only colocalized but also interacted in vivo in the plant cell, as revealed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The functional relationship between cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases was inferred from their common implication as counterparts of mobilization of storage proteins upon barley seed germination. The opposite pattern of transcription expression in gibberellin-treated aleurones presented by inhibitors and enzymes allowed proteases to specifically degrade B, C, and D hordeins stored in the endosperm of barley seeds. PMID:19759340

  4. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  5. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  6. Mechanisms of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Cafini Barrado, Fabio; Medrano Romero, Verónica; Morikawa, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays important roles in the evolution of S. aureus, and indeed, a variety of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes are embedded in a series of mobile genetic elements. In this chapter, we review the mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer, including recent findings on the natural genetic competence. Then, we consider the transfer of two important antibiotic resistance genes: the methicillin resistance gene, mecA (in Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome) and ...

  7. Idiomatic (gene) expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V

    2003-05-01

    Hidden among the myriad nucleotide variants that constitute each species' gene pool are a few variants that contribute to phenotypic variation. Many of these differences that make a difference are non-coding cis-regulatory variants, which, unlike coding variants, can only be identified through laborious experimental analysis. Recently, Cowles et al.1 described a screening method that does an end-run around this problem by searching for genes whose cis regulation varies without having to find the polymorphic nucleotides that influence transcription. While we will continue to require a diverse arsenal of experimental methods, this versatile method will speed the identification of functional genetic variation. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Bayesian approach to gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Hsu, Sen-Yen

    2009-01-01

    In the study of genomics, it is essential to address gene-gene and gene-environment interactions for describing the complex traits that involves disease-related mechanisms. In this work, our goal is to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions resulting from the analysis of chronic fatigue syndrome patients' genetic and demographic factors including SNPs, age, gender and BMI. We employed the dataset that was original to the previous study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Group. To investigate gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, we implemented a Bayesian based method for identifying significant interactions between factors. Here, we employed a two-stage Bayesian variable selection methodology based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches. By applying our Bayesian based approach, NR3C1 was found in the significant two-locus gene-gene effect model, as well as in the significant two-factor gene-environment effect model. Furthermore, a significant gene-environment interaction was identified between NR3C1 and gender. These results support the hypothesis that NR3C1 and gender may play a role in biological mechanisms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. We demonstrated that our Bayesian based approach is a promising method to assess the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in chronic fatigue syndrome patients by using genetic factors, such as SNPs, and demographic factors such as age, gender and BMI.

  9. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  10. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy and ... by a "bad" gene. continue Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  11. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  12. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His other interests include reading, photography and listening to classical music. The first part of this general article appeared in April 1997. S C Lakhotia. The first part of this article traced the evolution of the concept of a gene from Mendel's times to the middle of this century: starting from the imaginary factors of Mendel, the.

  13. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwatkin, R.B.L. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  14. (FIE) gene from soybean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... Harb. Protoc. doi:10.1101/pdb.prot4666. Xu H, Li Y, Yan Y, Wang K, Gao Y, Hu Y (2010). Genome-scale identification of Soybean BURP domain-containing genes and their expression under stress treatments. BMC Plant Biol. 10: 197. Yadegari R, Kinoshita T, Lotan O, Cohen G, Katz A, Choi Y, Nakashima.

  15. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 4. Silence of the Genes - 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath Saumitra Das. General Article Volume 12 Issue 4 April 2007 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    research for several decades (See Resonance, Vol. 12, pp.47–53,. March 2007). RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel mechanism for controlling gene expression. In this mechanism, tiny double-stranded RNA molecules called 'small interfering RNA' (siRNA) degrade cellu- lar mRNA that has sequence similarity with them.

  17. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  18. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  19. Pleiotropy and its limited dissection through a metabolic gene Miniature1 (Mn1) that encodes a cell wall invertase in developing seeds of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mn1-encoded endosperm-specific cell wall invertase is a major determinant of sink strength of developing seeds through its control of both sink size, cell number and cell size, and sink activity via sucrose hydrolysis and release of hexoses essential for energy and signaling functions. Consequen...

  20. Using gene expression noise to understand gene regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsky, B.; Neuert, G.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression "noise," has been suggested as a

  1. SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 associates with MINISEED3 and HAIKU2 promoters in vivo to regulate Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiangyu; Zhang, Xiansheng; Ni, Min

    2009-01-01

    Seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana undergoes an initial phase of endosperm proliferation followed by a second phase in which the embryo grows at the expense of the endosperm. As mature seed size is largely attained during the initial phase, seed size is coordinately determined by the growth of the maternal ovule, endosperm, and embryo. Here, we identify SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 (SHB1) as a positive regulator of Arabidopsis seed development that affects both cell size and cell number. shb1-D, a gain-of-function overexpression allele, increases seed size, and shb1, a loss-of-function allele, reduces seed size. SHB1 is transmitted zygotically. The increase in shb1-D seed size is associated with endosperm cellurization, chalazal endosperm enlargement, and embryo development. SHB1 is required for the proper expression of two other genes that affect endosperm development, MINISEED3 (MINI3) and HAIKU2 (IKU2), a WRKY transcription factor gene and a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase gene. SHB1 associates with both MINI3 and IKU2 promoters in vivo. SHB1 may act with other proteins that bind to MINI3 and IKU2 promoters to promote a large seed cavity and endosperm growth in the early phase of seed development. In the second phase, SHB1 enhances embryo cell proliferation and expansion through a yet unknown IKU2-independent pathway.

  2. Programmed Cell Death During Female Gametophyte Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Gary, N.

    2004-09-15

    Endosperm is a storage tissue in the angiosperm seed that is important both biologically and agriculturally. Endosperm is biologically important because it provides nutrients to the embryo during seed development and agriculturally important because it is a significant source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. Approximately two-thirds of human calories are derived from endosperm, either directly or indirectly through animal feed. Furthermore, endosperm is used as a raw material for numerous industrial products including ethanol. A major event in endosperm development is the transition between the syncytial phase, during which the endosperm nuclei undergo many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis, and the cellularized phase, during which cell walls form around the endosperm nuclei. Understanding how the syncytial-cellular transition is regulated is agriculturally important because it influences seed size, seed sink strength, and grain weight. However, the molecular processes controlling this transition are not understood. This project led to the identification of the AGL62 gene that regulates the syncytial-cellular transition during endosperm development. AGL62 is expressed during the syncytial phase and suppresses endosperm cellularization during this period. AGL62 most likely does so by suppressing the expression of genes required for cellularization. At the end of the syncytial phase, the FIS PcG complex suppresses AGL62 expression, which allows expression of the cellularization genes and triggers the initiation of the cellularized phase. Endosperm arises following fertilization of the central cell within the female gametophyte. This project also led to the identification of the AGL80 gene that is required for development of the central cell into the endosperm. Within the ovule and seed, AGL80 is expressed exclusively in the central cell and uncellularized endosperm. AGL80 is required for expression of several central cell-expressed genes, including

  3. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  4. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  5. GenBank blastx search result: AK063533 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK063533 001-117-B08 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  6. GenBank blastx search result: AK119477 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK119477 001-134-B09 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK060772 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060772 001-033-B05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  8. GenBank blastx search result: AK119569 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK119569 002-117-A08 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  9. GenBank blastn search result: AK109423 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK109423 006-305-G05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  10. GenBank blastn search result: AK100132 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK100132 J023010C03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  11. GenBank blastn search result: AK069187 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK069187 J023009G22 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK058605 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK058605 001-018-A02 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  13. GenBank blastn search result: AK109722 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK109722 002-146-B04 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK059048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059048 001-021-D12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  15. GenBank blastn search result: AK060205 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060205 001-002-A05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  16. GenBank blastn search result: AK106843 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK106843 002-116-H10 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK060340 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060340 001-008-D02 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK064276 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK064276 002-105-F03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  19. GenBank blastn search result: AK120398 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK120398 J013087C11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  20. GenBank blastx search result: AK059681 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059681 001-031-H08 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  1. GenBank blastx search result: AK059987 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059987 006-212-H01 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  2. Reference: 744 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available elopment, AGL62 expression is strong during the syncytial phase and then declines abruptly just before cellu...ss Polycomb group genes, the endosperm fails to cellularize and AGL62 expression fails to decline. Together,

  3. The occurrence of phenotypically complementary apomixis-recombinants in crosses between sexual and apomictic dandelions ( Taraxacum officinale ).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, P.J.; Baarlen, van P.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Apomictic seed development in dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) involves (1) restitutional meiosis (diplospory), (2) egg cell parthenogenesis, and (3) autonomous endosperm development. The question is whether these elements of apomixis are controlled by one single gene or by several independent

  4. The occurrence of phenotypically complementary apomixis-recombinants in crosses between sexual and apomictic dandelions (Taraxacum officinale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, P.J.; Van Baarlen, P.; De Jong, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Apomictic seed development in dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) involves (1) restitutional meiosis (diplospory), (2) egg cell parthenogenesis, and (3) autonomous endosperm development. The question is whether these elements of apomixis are controlled by one single gene or by several independent

  5. GenBank blastn search result: AK063493 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK063493 001-116-C12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  6. GenBank blastn search result: AK064276 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK064276 002-105-F03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK106752 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK106752 002-115-D01 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  8. GenBank blastn search result: AK111471 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK111471 002-183-E12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  9. GenBank blastn search result: AK070880 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK070880 J023064I03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  10. GenBank blastn search result: AK109912 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK109912 002-149-H11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  11. GenBank blastn search result: AK071961 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK071961 J013077G18 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  12. GenBank blastn search result: AK120496 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK120496 J013120I03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK109716 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK109716 002-145-H10 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  14. GenBank blastn search result: AK072535 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK072535 J023133G14 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  15. GenBank blastx search result: AK062180 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK062180 001-046-D08 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  16. GenBank blastx search result: AK058710 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK058710 001-019-D05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  17. GenBank blastx search result: AK059271 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059271 001-025-B11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK062235 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK062235 001-047-D12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK060277 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060277 001-005-H07 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  20. GenBank blastx search result: AK104337 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK104337 001-033-D06 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  1. GenBank blastx search result: AK106843 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK106843 002-116-H10 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  2. GenBank blastn search result: AK100455 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR r...AK100455 J023091E18 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, partial cds; putative Cf-2, fer

  3. GenBank blastx search result: AK058204 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK058204 001-010-A06 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  4. GenBank blastx search result: AK119480 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK119480 001-134-B12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  5. GenBank blastx search result: AK059302 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059302 001-025-F07 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  6. GenBank blastx search result: AK061866 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK061866 001-040-H09 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  7. GenBank blastx search result: AK060458 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060458 001-012-A11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  8. GenBank blastx search result: AK060385 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060385 001-009-F05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  9. GenBank blastx search result: AK060739 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060739 001-032-C11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  10. GenBank blastx search result: AK104005 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK104005 001-002-F05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  11. GenBank blastx search result: AK111471 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK111471 002-183-E12 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK060922 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK060922 001-035-H05 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK059605 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK059605 001-030-E11 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  14. GenBank blastx search result: AK103954 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al cds; putative Cf-2, fertilization-independent endosperm proteins, hypothetical protein, putative non-LTR ...AK103954 001-014-H03 AF466200.2 Sorghum bicolor putative protein kinase gene, parti

  15. Genes, stress, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J

    2005-05-01

    A relationship between genetic makeup and susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD) has long been suspected on the basis of family and twin studies. A metaanalysis of reports on the basis of twin studies has estimated MDD's degree of heritability to be 0.33 (confidence interval, 0.26-0.39). Among families exhibiting an increased prevalence of MDD, risk of developing the illness was enhanced in members exposed to a highly stressful environment. Aberrant genes can predispose to depression in a number of ways, for example, by diminishing production of growth factors that act during brain development. An aberrant gene could also increase or decrease a neurotransmitter's release into synapses, its actions, or its duration of activity. The gene products of greatest interest at present are those involved in the synthesis and actions of serotonin; among them, the serotonin-uptake protein localized within the terminals and dendrites of serotonin-releasing neurons. It has been found that the Vmax of platelet serotonin uptake is low in some patients with MDD; also, Vmax is highly correlated in twins. Antidepressant drugs such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors act on this uptake protein. The specific genetic locus causing serotonin uptake to be lower in some patients with major depression involves a polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter region of the gene for the uptake protein. The gene itself exists as several alleles, the short "S" allele and the long "L" allele. The S variant is associated with less, and the L variant with more, of the uptake protein. The effect of stressful life events on depressive symptoms in young adults was found to be significantly stronger among SS or SL subjects than among LL subjects. Neuroimaging studies showed that people with the SS or SL alleles exhibited a greater activation of the amygdala in response to fearful stimuli than those with LL. It has been reported recently that mutations in the gene that controls

  16. Vertebrate gene predictions and the problem of large genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Li, ShengTing; Zhang, Yong

    2003-01-01

    To find unknown protein-coding genes, annotation pipelines use a combination of ab initio gene prediction and similarity to experimentally confirmed genes or proteins. Here, we show that although the ab initio predictions have an intrinsically high false-positive rate, they also have a consistent...

  17. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein.

  18. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Farjadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable.

  19. The sulfatase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, G; Meroni, G; Ballabio, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past few years, molecular analyses have provided important insights into the biochemistry and genetics of the sulfatase family of enzymes, identifying the molecular bases of inherited diseases caused by sulfatase deficiencies. New members of the sulfatase gene family have been identified in man and other species using a genomic approach. These include the gene encoding arylsulfatase E, which is involved in X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, a disorder of cartilage and bone development. Another important breakthrough has been the discovery of the biochemical basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a severe of all sulfatase activities. These discoveries, together with the resolution of the crystallographic structure of sulfatases, have improved our understanding of the function and evolution of this fascinating family of enzymes.

  20. Brains, Genes and Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  1. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  2. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  3. Genealogy and gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    Heredity can be followed in persons or in genes. Persons can be identified only a few generations back, but simplified models indicate that universal ancestors to all now living persons have occurred in the past. Genetic variability can be characterized as variants of DNA sequences. Data are available only from living persons, but from the pattern of variation gene trees can be inferred by means of coalescence models. The merging of lines backwards in time leads to a MRCA (most recent common ancestor). The time and place of living for this inferred person can give insights in human evolutionary history. Demographic processes are incorporated in the model, but since culture and customs are known to influence demography the models used ought to be tested against available genealogy. The Icelandic data base offers a possibility to do so and points to some discrepancies. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome patterns give a rather consistent view of human evolutionary history during the latest 100 000 years but the earlier epochs of human evolution demand gene trees with longer branches. The results of such studies reveal as yet unsolved problems about the sources of our genome.

  4. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  5. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  6. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  7. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  8. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  9. Optimal gene partition into operons correlates with gene functional order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Mayo, Avi; Ronen, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Gene arrangement into operons varies between bacterial species. Genes in a given system can be on one operon in some organisms and on several operons in other organisms. Existing theories explain why genes that work together should be on the same operon, since this allows for advantageous lateral gene transfer and accurate stoichiometry. But what causes the frequent separation into multiple operons of co-regulated genes that act together in a pathway? Here we suggest that separation is due to benefits made possible by differential regulation of each operon. We present a simple mathematical model for the optimal distribution of genes into operons based on a balance of the cost of operons and the benefit of regulation that provides 'just-when-needed' temporal order. The analysis predicts that genes are arranged such that genes on the same operon do not skip functional steps in the pathway. This prediction is supported by genomic data from 137 bacterial genomes. Our work suggests that gene arrangement is not only the result of random historical drift, genome re-arrangement and gene transfer, but has elements that are solutions of an evolutionary optimization problem. Thus gene functional order may be inferred by analyzing the operon structure across different genomes.

  10. Somatic gene therapy for dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belalcazar, M; Chan, L

    1999-09-01

    Somatic gene transfer is a valuable tool for the in vivo evaluation of lipoprotein metabolism. It has been used to dissect metabolic pathways, to establish structure-function relationships of various gene products, and to evaluate conventional lipid-lowering and novel therapeutic genes for the treatment of lipoprotein disorders. In this article we review some general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. We highlight some recent advances in adenoviral vector development that make this vector an attractive system for clinical trials.

  11. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  12. Tumor-suppressing gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A

    2003-01-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes play pivotal roles in maintaining genome integrity and in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Their loss-of-function mutations are related directly to tumorigenesis. Thus, use of tumor-suppressor genes as anticancer therapeutics has been investigated rigorously in both experimental and clinical researches. Transfer of various tumor-suppressor genes directly to cancer cells has been demonstrated to suppress tumor growth via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest and, in some cases, with evidence for bystander effects. Various studies also have shown that combination of tumor-suppressor gene therapy with conventional anticancer therapy can yield synergistic therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials with tumor-suppressor genes, especially the p53 gene, have demonstrated that the treatment is well tolerated, and; favorable clinical responses, including a pathologically complete responses, have been observed in a subset of patients with advanced disease or with cancers resistant to conventional therapy. Yet, current gene replacement approaches in cancer gene therapy must be improved if they are to have a broader clinical impact. Efficient systemic gene delivery systems will be required ultimately for treatment of metastatic disease. In this review, we have recently summarized achievements in tumor-suppressor gene therapy with a focus on the p53 gene.

  13. Horizontal gene transfer in choanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), also known as lateral gene transfer, results in the rapid acquisition of genes from another organism. HGT has long been known to be a driving force in speciation in prokaryotes, and there is evidence for HGT from symbiotic and infectious bacteria to metazoans, as well as from protists to bacteria. Recently, it has become clear that as many as a 1,000 genes in the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis may have been acquired by HGT. Interestingly, these genes reportedly come from algae, bacteria, and other choanoflagellate prey. Some of these genes appear to have allowed an ancestral choanoflagellate to exploit nutrient-poor environments and were not passed on to metazoan descendents. However, some of these genes are also found in animal genomes, suggesting that HGT into a common ancestor of choanozoans and animals may have contributed to metazoan evolution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  15. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A. [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  16. From gene expression to gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Chris J; Manfield, Iain W; Bulpitt, Andrew J; Gilmartin, Philip M; Westhead, David R

    2009-09-03

    The elucidation of networks from a compendium of gene expression data is one of the goals of systems biology and can be a valuable source of new hypotheses for experimental researchers. For Arabidopsis, there exist several thousand microarrays which form a valuable resource from which to learn. A novel Bayesian network-based algorithm to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is introduced and applied to learn parts of the transcriptomic network in Arabidopsis thaliana from a large number (thousands) of separate microarray experiments. Starting from an initial set of genes of interest, a network is grown by iterative addition to the model of the gene, from another defined set of genes, which gives the 'best' learned network structure. The gene set for iterative growth can be as large as the entire genome. A number of networks are inferred and analysed; these show (i) an agreement with the current literature on the circadian clock network, (ii) the ability to model other networks, and (iii) that the learned network hypotheses can suggest new roles for poorly characterized genes, through addition of relevant genes from an unconstrained list of over 15,000 possible genes. To demonstrate the latter point, the method is used to suggest that particular GATA transcription factors are regulators of photosynthetic genes. Additionally, the performance in recovering a known network from different amounts of synthetically generated data is evaluated. Our results show that plausible regulatory networks can be learned from such gene expression data alone. This work demonstrates that network hypotheses can be generated from existing gene expression data for use by experimental biologists.

  17. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksat Ashyraliyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  18. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  19. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  20. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene...... expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  1. The infinitely many genes model with horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Baumdicker, Franz; Pfaffelhuber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The genome of bacterial species is much more flexible than that of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distributed genome hypothesis for bacteria states that the total number of genes present in a bacterial population is greater than the genome of every single individual. The pangenome, i.e. the set of all genes of a bacterial species (or a sample), comprises the core genes which are present in all living individuals, and accessory genes, which are carried only by some individuals. In order to use acce...

  2. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12, a previou......We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  3. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Gene set analysis for GWAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss the use of modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistics in the context of gene set analysis and review corresponding null and alternative hypotheses. Especially, we show that, when enhancing the impact of highly significant genes in the calculation of the test statistic...... parameter and the genesis and distribution of the gene-level statistics, and illustrate the effects of differential weighting in a real-life example....

  5. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  6. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  7. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  8. Pompe disease gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barry J.; Falk, Darin J.; Pacak, Christina A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Elder, Melissa E.; Collins, Shelley W.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Clement, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian D.; Cloutier, Denise A.; Porvasnik, Stacy L.; Islam, Saleem; Elmallah, Mai K.; Martin, Anatole; Smith, Barbara K.; Fuller, David D.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Mah, Cathryn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic myopathy caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase and results in cellular lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation. A wide spectrum of disease exists from hypotonia and severe cardiac hypertrophy in the first few months of life due to severe mutations to a milder form with the onset of symptoms in adulthood. In either condition, the involvement of several systems leads to progressive weakness and disability. In early-onset severe cases, the natural history is characteristically cardiorespiratory failure and death in the first year of life. Since the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the clinical outcomes have improved. However, it has become apparent that a new natural history is being defined in which some patients have substantial improvement following ERT, while others develop chronic disability reminiscent of the late-onset disease. In order to improve on the current clinical outcomes in Pompe patients with diminished clinical response to ERT, we sought to address the cause and potential for the treatment of disease manifestations which are not amenable to ERT. In this review, we will focus on the preclinical studies that are relevant to the development of a gene therapy strategy for Pompe disease, and have led to the first clinical trial of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene-based therapy for Pompe disease. We will cover the preliminary laboratory studies and rationale for a clinical trial, which is based on the treatment of the high rate of respiratory failure in the early-onset patients receiving ERT. PMID:21518733

  9. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  10. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lin (Honghuang); M. Mueller-Nurasyid; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); D.E. Arking (Dan); J. Barnard (John); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); Geelhoed, B. (Bastiaan); S. Trompet (Stella); M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje); T. Kacprowski (Tim); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Klarin, D. (Derek); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed Z.); L. Chen (Lin); J.D. Smith (Jonathan); D.R. van Wagoner (David); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); A.E. Hendricks (Audrey E.); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); N. Verweij (Niek); P. van der Harst (Pim); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); I. Ford (Ian); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Heeringa (Jan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.A. Kors (Jan); Weiss, S. (Stefan); H. Völzke (Henry); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Natarajan, P. (Pradeep); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); S. Kääb (Stefan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); S.A. Rienstra; J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.M. Albert (Christine); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility.

  11. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Arking, Dan E.; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N.; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I.; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Chen, Lin Y.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H.; Kors, Jan A.; Weiss, Stefan; Volzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kaab, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Liu, Yongmei; Marz, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J. Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H.; Dorr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed

  12. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  13. Electro-acupuncture-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Qin, Y; Fu, A; Tang, J; Chen, G; Cai, D; Han, J

    1998-10-01

    Gene transfer is one of the key techniques in gene therapy application. Unfortunately, it seems that by now, there still exists no approach with simplicity, easiness, efficiency and safety. A novel method for gene delivery, electro-acupuncture needle-mediated gene transfer which combined the Chinese traditional acupuncture with modem gene introduction, was developed. With acupuncture needle carrying exogenous gene into muscle after direct electronic stimuli, efficient gene delivery was achieved.

  14. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  15. Uncovering trends in gene naming

    OpenAIRE

    Seringhaus, Michael R.; Cayting, Philip D; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov’s dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future.

  16. Uncovering trends in gene naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seringhaus, Michael R; Cayting, Philip D; Gerstein, Mark B

    2008-01-31

    We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov's dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future.

  17. Gene Synthesis with HG Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana. Marvin H Caruthers. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp ... Keywords. Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine tRNA and E. coli supressor tRNA; Khorana's philosophy on science.

  18. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  19. On meme--gene coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, L; Holland, O; Blackmore, S

    2000-01-01

    In this article we examine the effects of the emergence of a new replicator, memes, on the evolution of a pre-existing replicator, genes. Using a version of the NKCS model we examine the effects of increasing the rate of meme evolution in relation to the rate of gene evolution, for various degrees of interdependence between the two replicators. That is, the effects of memes' (suggested) more rapid rate of evolution in comparison to that of genes is investigated using a tunable model of coevolution. It is found that, for almost any degree of interdependence between the two replicators, as the rate of meme evolution increases, a phase transition-like dynamic occurs under which memes have a significantly detrimental effect on the evolution of genes, quickly resulting in the cessation of effective gene evolution. Conversely, the memes experience a sharp increase in benefit from increasing their rate of evolution. We then examine the effects of enabling genes to reduce the percentage of gene-detrimental evolutionary steps taken by memes. Here a critical region emerges as the comparative rate of meme evolution increases, such that if genes cannot effectively select memes a high percentage of the time, they suffer from meme evolution as if they had almost no selective capability.

  20. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa....... Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until...... formation. TtrNot expression is absent in unfertilized eggs, in embryos prior to gastrulation, and in settled individuals during and after metamorphosis. Comparison with the expression patterns of Not genes in other metazoan phyla suggests an ancestral role for this gene in gastrulation and germ layer...

  1. CNS Genes Implicated in Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard M. Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse is a condition that impacts not only the individual drug user, but society as a whole. Although prevention of initial drug use is the most effective way to prevent addiction, avoiding relapse is a crucial component of drug addiction recovery. Recent studies suggest that there is a set of genes whose expression is robustly and stably altered following drug use and ensuing abstinence. Such stable changes in gene expression correlate with ultrastructural changes in brain as well as alterations in behavior. As persistent molecular changes, these genes may provide targets for the development of therapeutics. Developing a list of well-characterized candidate genes and examining the effect of manipulating these genes will contribute to the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments to prevent relapse to drug use.

  2. Gene Discovery Methods from Large-Scale Gene Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Akifumi; Yano, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    Microarrays provide genome-wide gene expression changes. In current analyses, the majority of genes on the array are frequently eliminated for further analysis just in order for computational effort to be affordable. This strategy risks failure to discover whole sets of genes related to a quantitative trait of interest, which is generally controlled by several loci that might be eliminated in current approaches. Here, we describe a high-throughput gene discovery method based on correspondence analysis with a new index for expression ratios [arctan (1/ratio)] and three artificial marker genes. This method allows us to quickly analyze the whole microarray dataset without elimination and discover up/down-regulated genes related to a trait of interest. We employed an example dataset to show the theoretical advantage of this method. We then used the method to identify 88 cancer-related genes from a published microarray data from patients with breast cancer. This method can be easily performed and the result is also visible in three-dimensional viewing software that we have developed. Our method is useful for revaluating the wealth of microarray data available from web-sites.

  3. Gene recognition by combination of several gene-finding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Takagi, T

    1998-01-01

    A number of programs have been developed to predict the eukaryotic gene structures in DNA sequences. However, gene finding is still a challenging problem. We have explored the effectiveness when the results of several gene-finding programs were re-analyzed and combined. We studied several methods with four programs (FEXH, GeneParser3, GEN-SCAN and GRAIL2). By HIGHEST-policy combination method or BOUNDARY method, approximate correlation (AC) improved by 3-5% in comparison with the best single gene-finding program. From another viewpoint, OR-based combination of the four programs is the most reliable to know whether a candidate exon overlaps with the real exon or not, although it is less sensitive than GENSCAN for exon-intron boundaries. Our methods can easily be extended to combine other programs. We have developed a server program (Shirokane System) and a client program (GeneScope) to use the methods. GeneScope is available through a WWW site (http://gf.genome.ad.jp/). (katsu,takagi)@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

  4. Reference gene screening for analyzing gene expression across goat tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xing; Li, Yun-Sheng; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yun-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2) in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  5. Reference Gene Screening for Analyzing Gene Expression Across Goat Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2 in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Casey W; Luo, Xi; Wu, Zhijin

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of gene expression have great potential for addressing a wide range of questions. These analyses will, for example, identify genes that have evolutionary shifts in expression that are correlated with evolutionary changes in morphological, physiological, and developmental characters of interest. This will provide entirely new opportunities to identify genes related to particular phenotypes. There are, however, 3 key challenges that must be addressed for such studies to realize their potential. First, data on gene expression must be measured from multiple species, some of which may be field-collected, and parameterized in such a way that they can be compared across species. Second, it will be necessary to develop comparative phylogenetic methods suitable for large multidimensional datasets. In most phylogenetic comparative studies to date, the number n of independent observations (independent contrasts) has been greater than the number p of variables (characters). The behavior of comparative methods for these classic problems is now well understood under a wide variety of conditions. In studies of gene expression, and in studies based on other high-throughput tools, the number n of samples is dwarfed by the number p of variables. The estimated covariance matrices will be singular, complicating their analysis and interpretation, and prone to spurious results. Third, new approaches are needed to investigate the expression of the many genes whose phylogenies are not congruent with species phylogenies due to gene loss, gene duplication, and incomplete lineage sorting. Here we outline general considerations of project design for phylogenetic analyses of gene expression and suggest solutions to these three categories of challenges. These topics are relevant to high-throughput phenotypic data well beyond gene expression.

  7. Gene Prediction Using Multinomial Probit Regression with Bayesian Gene Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Wang, Xiaodong; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2004-12-01

    A critical issue for the construction of genetic regulatory networks is the identification of network topology from data. In the context of deterministic and probabilistic Boolean networks, as well as their extension to multilevel quantization, this issue is related to the more general problem of expression prediction in which we want to find small subsets of genes to be used as predictors of target genes. Given some maximum number of predictors to be used, a full search of all possible predictor sets is combinatorially prohibitive except for small predictors sets, and even then, may require supercomputing. Hence, suboptimal approaches to finding predictor sets and network topologies are desirable. This paper considers Bayesian variable selection for prediction using a multinomial probit regression model with data augmentation to turn the multinomial problem into a sequence of smoothing problems. There are multiple regression equations and we want to select the same strongest genes for all regression equations to constitute a target predictor set or, in the context of a genetic network, the dependency set for the target. The probit regressor is approximated as a linear combination of the genes and a Gibbs sampler is employed to find the strongest genes. Numerical techniques to speed up the computation are discussed. After finding the strongest genes, we predict the target gene based on the strongest genes, with the coefficient of determination being used to measure predictor accuracy. Using malignant melanoma microarray data, we compare two predictor models, the estimated probit regressors themselves and the optimal full-logic predictor based on the selected strongest genes, and we compare these to optimal prediction without feature selection.

  8. Gene Prediction Using Multinomial Probit Regression with Bayesian Gene Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue for the construction of genetic regulatory networks is the identification of network topology from data. In the context of deterministic and probabilistic Boolean networks, as well as their extension to multilevel quantization, this issue is related to the more general problem of expression prediction in which we want to find small subsets of genes to be used as predictors of target genes. Given some maximum number of predictors to be used, a full search of all possible predictor sets is combinatorially prohibitive except for small predictors sets, and even then, may require supercomputing. Hence, suboptimal approaches to finding predictor sets and network topologies are desirable. This paper considers Bayesian variable selection for prediction using a multinomial probit regression model with data augmentation to turn the multinomial problem into a sequence of smoothing problems. There are multiple regression equations and we want to select the same strongest genes for all regression equations to constitute a target predictor set or, in the context of a genetic network, the dependency set for the target. The probit regressor is approximated as a linear combination of the genes and a Gibbs sampler is employed to find the strongest genes. Numerical techniques to speed up the computation are discussed. After finding the strongest genes, we predict the target gene based on the strongest genes, with the coefficient of determination being used to measure predictor accuracy. Using malignant melanoma microarray data, we compare two predictor models, the estimated probit regressors themselves and the optimal full-logic predictor based on the selected strongest genes, and we compare these to optimal prediction without feature selection.

  9. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  10. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  11. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  12. GENES IN SPORT AND DOPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliszewski, P.; Majorczyk, E.; Zembroń-Łacny, A.

    2013-01-01

    Genes control biological processes such as muscle production of energy, mitochondria biogenesis, bone formation, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasodilation, neurogenesis, etc. DNA profiling for athletes reveals genetic variations that may be associated with endurance ability, muscle performance and power exercise, tendon susceptibility to injuries and psychological aptitude. Already, over 200 genes relating to physical performance have been identified by several research groups. Athletes’ genotyping is developing as a tool for the formulation of personalized training and nutritional programmes to optimize sport training as well as for the prediction of exercise-related injuries. On the other hand, development of molecular technology and gene therapy creates a risk of non-therapeutic use of cells, genes and genetic elements to improve athletic performance. Therefore, the World Anti-Doping Agency decided to include prohibition of gene doping within their World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. In this review article, we will provide a current overview of genes for use in athletes’ genotyping and gene doping possibilities, including their development and detection techniques. PMID:24744482

  13. GENES IN SPORT AND DOPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Pokrywka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes control biological processes such as muscle production of energy, mitochondria biogenesis, bone formation erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasodilation, neurogenesis, etc. DNA profiling for athletes reveals genetic variations that may be associated with endurance ability, muscle performance and power exercise, tendon susceptibility to injuries and psychological aptitude. Already, over 200 genes relating to physical performance have been identified by several research groups. Athletes’ genotyping is developing as a tool for the formulation of personalized training and nutritional programmes to optimize sport training as well as for the prediction of exercise-related injuries. On the other hand, development of molecular technology and gene therapy creates a risk of non-therapeutic use of cells, genes and genetic elements to improve athletic performance. Therefore, the World Anti-Doping Agency decided to include prohibition of gene doping within their World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. In this review article, we will provide a current overview of genes for use in athletes’ genotyping and gene doping possibilities, including their development and detection techniques.

  14. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 mus......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  15. Cloning and selection of reference genes for gene expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full length mRNA sequences of Ac-β-actin and Ac-gapdh, and partial mRNA sequences of Ac-18SrRNA and Ac-ubiquitin were cloned from pineapple in this study. The four genes were tested as housekeeping genes in three experimental sets. GeNorm and NormFinder analysis revealed that β-actin was the most ...

  16. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  17. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  18. Gene Therapy Approaches to Hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giuliana; Cavazzana, Marina; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies is currently based on transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells genetically modified with a lentiviral vector expressing a globin gene under the control of globin transcriptional regulatory elements. Preclinical and early clinical studies showed the safety and potential efficacy of this therapeutic approach as well as the hurdles still limiting its general application. In addition, for both beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, an altered bone marrow microenvironment reduces the efficiency of stem cell harvesting as well as engraftment. These hurdles need be addressed for gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies to become a clinical reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  20. Genomics screens for metastasis genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinchun; Huang, Qihong

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer mortality. The process of metastasis is complex, requiring the coordinated expression and fine regulation of many genes in multiple pathways in both the tumor and host tissues. Identification and characterization of the genetic programs that regulate metastasis is critical to understanding the metastatic process and discovering molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of metastasis. Genomic approaches and functional genomic analyses can systemically discover metastasis genes. In this review, we summarize the genetic tools and methods that have been used to identify and characterize the genes that play critical roles in metastasis. PMID:22684367

  1. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chicago Learn More Close The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy ASGCT is the primary membership organization for scientists, ... Therapeutics Official Journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy is the leading journal for gene ...

  2. Gene Expression Analysis of Breast Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerald, Wiliam L

    2004-01-01

    ... to identify genes, gene expression profiles and molecular pathways associated with metastatic BC we have performed genome-wide gene expression analysis of a large number of breast cancer samples...

  3. The OCL3 promoter from Sorghum bicolor directs gene expression to abscission and nutrient-transfer zones at the bases of floral organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Krishna K; Roche, Dominique J; Clemente, Tom E; Ge, Zhengxiang; Carman, John G

    2014-09-01

    During seed fill in cereals, nutrients are symplasmically unloaded to vascular parenchyma in ovules, but thereafter nutrient transport is less certain. In Zea mays, two mechanisms of nutrient passage through the chalaza and nucellus have been hypothesized, apoplasmic and symplasmic. In a recent study, nutrients first passed non-selectively to the chalazal apoplasm and were then selectively absorbed by the nucellus before being released to the endosperm apoplasm. This study reports that the promoter of OUTER CELL LAYER3 (PSbOCL3) from Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) directs gene expression to chalazal cells where the apoplasmic barrier is thought to form. The aims were to elucidate PSbOCL3 expression patterns in sorghum and relate them to processes of nutrient pathway development in kernels and to recognized functions of the homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) IV transcription factor family to which the promoter belongs. PSbOCL3 was cloned and transformed into sorghum as a promoter-GUS (β-glucuronidase) construct. Plant tissues from control and transformed plants were then stained for GUS, and kernels were cleared and characterized using differential interference contrast microscopy. A symplasmic disconnect between the chalaza and nucellus during seed fill is inferred by the combination of two phenomena: differentiation of a distinct nucellar epidermis adjacent to the chalaza, and lysis of GUS-stained chalazal cells immediately proximal to the nucellar epidermis. Compression of the GUS-stained chalazal cells during kernel maturation produced the kernel abscission zone (closing layer). The results suggest that the HD-Zip IV transcription factor SbOCL3 regulates kernel nutrition and abscission. The latter is consistent with evidence that members of this transcription factor group regulate silique abscission and dehiscence in Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, the findings suggest that processes of floral organ abscission are conserved among angiosperms and may in some

  4. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most...... of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol...

  5. Candidate genes in panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, A. S.; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Bani-Fatemi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of molecular genetics approaches in examination of panic disorder (PD) has implicated several variants as potential susceptibility factors for panicogenesis. However, the identification of robust PD susceptibility genes has been complicated by phenotypic diversity, underpowered...

  6. Sleep deprivation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Souza, Annie; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occurs in a wide range of animal species as a vital process for the maintenance of homeostasis, metabolic restoration, physiological regulation, and adaptive cognitive functions in the central nervous system. Long-term perturbations induced by the lack of sleep are mostly mediated by changes at the level of transcription and translation. This chapter reviews studies in humans, rodents, and flies to address the various ways by which sleep deprivation affects gene expression in the nervous system, with a focus on genes related to neuronal plasticity, brain function, and cognition. However, the effects of sleep deprivation on gene expression and the functional consequences of sleep loss are clearly not restricted to the cognitive domain but may include increased inflammation, expression of stress-related genes, general impairment of protein translation, metabolic imbalance, and thermal deregulation.

  7. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  8. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  9. Gene expression based cancer classification

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Tarek; Reda Abd Elwahab; Mahmoud Shoman

    2017-01-01

    Cancer classification based on molecular level investigation has gained the interest of researches as it provides a systematic, accurate and objective diagnosis for different cancer types. Several recent researches have been studying the problem of cancer classification using data mining methods, machine learning algorithms and statistical methods to reach an efficient analysis for gene expression profiles. Studying the characteristics of thousands of genes simultaneously offered a deep in...

  10. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  11. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  12. Rice Multi-Gene Analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gdyang

    Maps of all the intronic MIR genes analyzed using MPSS database in rice. Click here for a legend that explains the icons and colors in the image below. Click here to jump in the page below to the specific gene. osa-MIR159f osa-MIR399i osa-MIR418 osa-MIR437 osa-MIR439b osa-MIR439j osa-MIR440 osa-MIR442.

  13. Degradable Polymers for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Joel; Bhise, Nupura; Green, Jordan J.

    2014-01-01

    Degradable polymers were synthesized that self-assemble with DNA to form particles that are effective for gene delivery. Small changes to polymer synthesis conditions, particle formulation conditions, and polymer structure led to significant changes to efficacy in a cell-type dependent manner. Polymers presented here are more effective than Lipofectamine 2000 or polyethylenimine for gene delivery to cancerous fibroblasts or human primary fibroblasts. These materials may be useful for cancer therapeutics and regenerative medicine. PMID:19964958

  14. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  15. ASPM gene expression in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcani-Freitas, Tânia M; Saba-Silva, Najsla; Cappellano, Andréa; Cavalheiro, Sérgio; Marie, Sueli K N; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Malheiros, Suzana M F; de Toledo, Sílvia Regina Caminada

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant tumors of the central nervous system in childhood. The incidence is about 19-20% between children younger than 16 years old with peak incidence between 4 and 7 years. Despite its sensibility to no specific therapeutic means like chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment is very aggressive and frequently results in regression, growth deficit, and endocrine dysfunction. From this point of view, new treatment approaches are needed such as molecular targeted therapies. Studies in glioblastoma demonstrated that ASPM gene was overexpressed when compared to normal brain and ASPM inhibition by siRNA-mediated inhibits tumor cell proliferation and neural stem cell proliferation, supporting ASPM gene as a potential molecular target in glioblastoma. The aim of this work was to evaluate ASPM expression in medulloblastoma fragment samples, and to compare the results with the patient clinical features. Analysis of gene expression was performed by quantitative PCR real time using SYBR Green system in tumor samples from 37 children. The t test was used to analyze the gene expression, and Mann-Whitney test was performed to analyze the relationship between gene expressions and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier test evaluated curve survival. All samples overexpressed ASPM gene more than 40-fold. However, we did not find any association between the overexpressed samples and the clinical parameters. ASPM overexpression may modify the ability of stem cells to differentiate during the development of the central nervous system, contributing to the development of medulloblastoma, a tumor of embryonic origin from cerebellar progenitor cells.

  16. New Gene Evolution: Little Did We Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Manyuan; VanKuren, Nicholas W.; Chen, Sidi; Vibranovski, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Genes are perpetually added to and deleted from genomes during evolution. Thus, it is important to understand how new genes are formed and evolve as critical components of the genetic systems determining the biological diversity of life. Two decades of effort have shed light on the process of new gene origination, and have contributed to an emerging comprehensive picture of how new genes are added to genomes, ranging from the mechanisms that generate new gene structures to the presence of new genes in different organisms to the rates and patterns of new gene origination and the roles of new genes in phenotypic evolution. We review each of these aspects of new gene evolution, summarizing the main evidence for the origination and importance of new genes in evolution. We highlight findings showing that new genes rapidly change existing genetic systems that govern various molecular, cellular and phenotypic functions. PMID:24050177

  17. Novel gene transfer systems: intelligent gene transfer vectors for gene medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery systems for gene transfer are called 'vectors'. These systems were originally invented as a delivery system for the transfection in vitro or in vivo. Several vectors are then developed for clinical use of gene medicines and currently some of them are approved as animal drugs. Conventional drug delivery system generally consists of approved (existing) materials to avoid additional pre-clinical or clinical studies. However, current vectors contain novel materials to improve an efficacy of gene medicines. Thus, these vectors have functions more than a mere delivery of active ingredients. For example some vectors have immunological functions such as adjuvants in vaccines. These new types of vectors are called 'intelligent' or 'innovative' vector system', since the concept or strategy for the development is completely different from conventional drug delivery systems. In this article, we described a current status of 'intelligent gene transfer vectors and discussed on the potentials of them.

  18. The biology of novel animal genes: Mouse APEX gene knockout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacInnes, M.; Altherr, M.R.; Ludwig, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pedersen, R.; Mold, C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The controlled breeding of novel genes into mice, including the gene knockout (KO), or conversely by adding back transgenes provide powerful genetic technologies that together suffice to determine in large part the biological role(s) of novel genes. Inbred mouse remains the best understood and most useful mammalian experimental system available for tackling the biology of novel genes. The major mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APE), is involved in a key step in the repair of spontaneous and induced AP sites in DNA. Efficient repair of these lesions is imperative to prevent the stable incorporation of mutations into the cellular genome which may lead to cell death or transformation. Loss or modulation of base excison repair activity in vivo may elevate the spontaneous mutation rate in cells, and may lead to a substantial increase in the incidence of cancer. Despite extensive biochemical analysis, however, the significance of these individual APE functions in vivo has not been elucidated. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells heterozygous for a deletion mutation in APE have been generated and whole animals containing the APE mutation have been derived from these ES cells. Animals homozygous for the APE null mutation die early in gestation, underscoring the biological significance of this DNA repair gene.

  19. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Shankar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy.

  20. Reduced rates of gene loss, gene silencing, and gene mutation in Dnmt1-deficient embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, M.F.; van Amerongen, R.; Nijjar, T.; Cuppen, E.; Jones, P.A.; Laird, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene inactivation is a crucial event in oncogenesis. Gene inactivation mechanisms include events resulting in loss of heterozygosity (LOH), gene mutation, and transcriptional silencing. The contribution of each of these different pathways varies among tumor suppressor genes and by

  1. PoplarGene: poplar gene network and resource for mining functional information for genes from woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Ding, Changjun; Chu, Yanguang; Chen, Jiafei; Zhang, Weixi; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2016-08-12

    Poplar is not only an important resource for the production of paper, timber and other wood-based products, but it has also emerged as an ideal model system for studying woody plants. To better understand the biological processes underlying various traits in poplar, e.g., wood development, a comprehensive functional gene interaction network is highly needed. Here, we constructed a genome-wide functional gene network for poplar (covering ~70% of the 41,335 poplar genes) and created the network web service PoplarGene, offering comprehensive functional interactions and extensive poplar gene functional annotations. PoplarGene incorporates two network-based gene prioritization algorithms, neighborhood-based prioritization and context-based prioritization, which can be used to perform gene prioritization in a complementary manner. Furthermore, the co-functional information in PoplarGene can be applied to other woody plant proteomes with high efficiency via orthology transfer. In addition to poplar gene sequences, the webserver also accepts Arabidopsis reference gene as input to guide the search for novel candidate functional genes in PoplarGene. We believe that PoplarGene (http://bioinformatics.caf.ac.cn/PoplarGene and http://124.127.201.25/PoplarGene) will greatly benefit the research community, facilitating studies of poplar and other woody plants.

  2. Combining gene prediction methods to improve metagenomic gene annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Gail L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional gene annotation methods rely on characteristics that may not be available in short reads generated from next generation technology, resulting in suboptimal performance for metagenomic (environmental samples. Therefore, in recent years, new programs have been developed that optimize performance on short reads. In this work, we benchmark three metagenomic gene prediction programs and combine their predictions to improve metagenomic read gene annotation. Results We not only analyze the programs' performance at different read-lengths like similar studies, but also separate different types of reads, including intra- and intergenic regions, for analysis. The main deficiencies are in the algorithms' ability to predict non-coding regions and gene edges, resulting in more false-positives and false-negatives than desired. In fact, the specificities of the algorithms are notably worse than the sensitivities. By combining the programs' predictions, we show significant improvement in specificity at minimal cost to sensitivity, resulting in 4% improvement in accuracy for 100 bp reads with ~1% improvement in accuracy for 200 bp reads and above. To correctly annotate the start and stop of the genes, we find that a consensus of all the predictors performs best for shorter read lengths while a unanimous agreement is better for longer read lengths, boosting annotation accuracy by 1-8%. We also demonstrate use of the classifier combinations on a real dataset. Conclusions To optimize the performance for both prediction and annotation accuracies, we conclude that the consensus of all methods (or a majority vote is the best for reads 400 bp and shorter, while using the intersection of GeneMark and Orphelia predictions is the best for reads 500 bp and longer. We demonstrate that most methods predict over 80% coding (including partially coding reads on a real human gut sample sequenced by Illumina technology.

  3. SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 or HAIKU2 mixepression alters canola and Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yu-Guo; Sun, Qing-Bin; Kang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Chang-Bin; Ni, Min

    2016-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is a widely cultivated species and provides important resources of edible vegetable oil, biodiesel production and animal feed. Seed development in Arabidopsis and canola shares a similar path: an early proliferation of endosperm to form a large seed cavity, followed by a second phase in which the embryo grows to replace the endosperm. In Arabidopsis, the seed reaches almost its final volume before the enlargement of the embryo. SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 (SHB1) is a key regulatory gene of seed development with a broad expression beyond endosperm development. By contrast, its two target genes, MINISEED3 (MINI3) and HAIKU2 (IKU2), are narrowly expressed in early developing endosperm and early embryo. We overexpressed SHB1 in canola to explore the possibility of altering seed development. As an alternative strategy, we expressed the canola IKU2 ortholog in Arabidopsis endosperm under the control of a stronger MINI3 promoter. SHB1 targeted canola orthologs of Arabidopsis MINI3 and IKU2 and caused a significantly increased seed mass. Overaccumulation of IKU2 in the early stage of Arabidopsis seed development also significantly increased the final seed mass. Our studies provide a strong case for increasing the final seed mass by manipulating endosperm proliferation at a rather early developmental stage in crops. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. COGNATE: comparative gene annotation characterizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbrandt, Jeanne; Misof, Bernhard; Niehuis, Oliver

    2017-07-17

    The comparison of gene and genome structures across species has the potential to reveal major trends of genome evolution. However, such a comparative approach is currently hampered by a lack of standardization (e.g., Elliott TA, Gregory TR, Philos Trans Royal Soc B: Biol Sci 370:20140331, 2015). For example, testing the hypothesis that the total amount of coding sequences is a reliable measure of potential proteome diversity (Wang M, Kurland CG, Caetano-Anollés G, PNAS 108:11954, 2011) requires the application of standardized definitions of coding sequence and genes to create both comparable and comprehensive data sets and corresponding summary statistics. However, such standard definitions either do not exist or are not consistently applied. These circumstances call for a standard at the descriptive level using a minimum of parameters as well as an undeviating use of standardized terms, and for software that infers the required data under these strict definitions. The acquisition of a comprehensive, descriptive, and standardized set of parameters and summary statistics for genome publications and further analyses can thus greatly benefit from the availability of an easy to use standard tool. We developed a new open-source command-line tool, COGNATE (Comparative Gene Annotation Characterizer), which uses a given genome assembly and its annotation of protein-coding genes for a detailed description of the respective gene and genome structure parameters. Additionally, we revised the standard definitions of gene and genome structures and provide the definitions used by COGNATE as a working draft suggestion for further reference. Complete parameter lists and summary statistics are inferred using this set of definitions to allow down-stream analyses and to provide an overview of the genome and gene repertoire characteristics. COGNATE is written in Perl and freely available at the ZFMK homepage ( https://www.zfmk.de/en/COGNATE ) and on github ( https

  5. Technology evaluation: HIV ribozyme gene therapy, Gene Shears Pty Ltd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Feyter, R; Li, P

    2000-06-01

    Ribozymes (catalytic RNAs) can be made to specifically cleave target RNAs that are involved in disease conditions and therefore have potential as therapeutic agents. Gene Shears Pty Ltd is developing hammerhead ribozyme technology for therapy against HIV infection, targeting either the tat gene or the RNA packaging sequence (Psi) of HIV. These ribozymes have been expressed from constructs that were introduced into hematopoietic cells in culture, thereby protecting the cells against viral infection. Two phase I clinical trials are underway to test the safety and feasibility of the approach with the anti-tat ribozyme in human subjects.

  6. [Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    The current clinical trials of gene therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) are based on three strategies. 1. To restore the local production of dopamine by introducing genes associated with dopamine-synthesizing enzymes into the putamen. 2. To protect nigrostriatal projection by delivering the neurturin gene, a trophic factor for dopaminergic neurons, both in the putamen and the substantia nigra. 3. To modulate the neural activity by transducing the subthalamic nucleus with vectors expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase. A phase I clinical study was initiated in 2007 to determine the safety of intra-putaminal infusion of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding aromatic (L)-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). All six patients enrolled in the trial showed improvements from baseline in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores in the OFF medication state at 36 months after treatment. Although this trial was a small, open-label study and the use of a non-blinded, uncontrolled analysis limits interpretation, the efficacy outcomes are encouraging and indicate that the AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of AADC may benefit advanced PD patients. A similar approach, delivering AAV vector carrying AADC gene into the putamen ameliorated the symptoms in children with AADC deficiency.

  7. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  8. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  9. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  10. Molecular Studies on Preproinsulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin plays an important role in maintaining the blood glucose level of the body. The β-cells of pancreas produce insulin in the form of precursor that is preproinsulin. The gene of preproinsulin provides an interesting system for addressing question related to molecular evolution. Recombinant DNA technology has made it possible to isolate and sequence the chromosomal genes coding for unique protein products. Although preproinsulin of various organism has been isolated and cloned, but there is no report from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis that is our major livestock. The genomic DNA of buffalo was isolated using Laura-Lee-Boodram method. The part of preproinsulin gene (596bp and 520bp using BPPI-UPS and bpiful_F as forward and BC1-C as reverse primer was amplified. Cloning of amplified fragments of gene were performed in pCR 2.1 vector. Positive clones were screened on the basis of blue white selection. The band obtained on 596bp and 520bp after colony PCR confirmed the successful cloning of preproinsulin gene in pCR 2.1 vector.

  11. Gene Therapy Applications in Gastroenterology and Hepatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H Wu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Advantages and disadvantages of viral vectors and nonviral vectors for gene delivery to digestive organs are reviewed. Advances in systems for the introduction of new gene expression are described, including self-deleting retroviral transfer vectors, chimeric viruses and chimeric oligonucleotides. Systems for inhibition of gene expression are discussed, including antisense oligonucleotides, ribozymes and dominant-negative genes.

  12. Evolving chromosomes and gene regulatory networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aswin

    Many processes change genomes. Koonin and Wolf. 2008. Page 5 .. including horizontal gene transfer. Koonin and Wolf. 2008. Page 6. Horizontal gene transfer. Drastic modification of genetic material. Rapid exploration of ne niches and phenot pes. Page 7. Horizontal gene transfer regulates. New selective forces for gene ...

  13. A Gene Ontology Tutorial in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesztrocy, Alex Warwick; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    This chapter is a tutorial on using Gene Ontology resources in the Python programming language. This entails querying the Gene Ontology graph, retrieving Gene Ontology annotations, performing gene enrichment analyses, and computing basic semantic similarity between GO terms. An interactive version of the tutorial, including solutions, is available at http://gohandbook.org .

  14. How Gene Patents May Inhibit Scientific Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we point out three possible ways gene patents could impede scientific research. First, gene patent laws might exacerbate the culture of secrecy ubiquitous in science. Second, gene patents may limit researchers’ ability to study poly or multigenic diseases without access to all genetic etiologies. Third, gene patents could result in a “patent thicket”.

  15. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene ...

  16. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  17. A hybrid approach of gene sets and single genes for the prediction of survival risks with gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated biological knowledge is often encoded as gene sets, collections of genes associated with similar biological functions or pathways. The use of gene sets in the analyses of high-throughput gene expression data has been intensively studied and applied in clinical research. However, the main interest remains in finding modules of biological knowledge, or corresponding gene sets, significantly associated with disease conditions. Risk prediction from censored survival times using gene sets hasn't been well studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid method that uses both single gene and gene set information together to predict patient survival risks from gene expression profiles. In the proposed method, gene sets provide context-level information that is poorly reflected by single genes. Complementarily, single genes help to supplement incomplete information of gene sets due to our imperfect biomedical knowledge. Through the tests over multiple data sets of cancer and trauma injury, the proposed method showed robust and improved performance compared with the conventional approaches with only single genes or gene sets solely. Additionally, we examined the prediction result in the trauma injury data, and showed that the modules of biological knowledge used in the prediction by the proposed method were highly interpretable in biology. A wide range of survival prediction problems in clinical genomics is expected to benefit from the use of biological knowledge.

  18. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun

    2008-01-01

    than ten percent. Pseudogenes in the rice genome with low similarity to Arabidopsis genes showed greater likelihood for gene conversion than those with high similarity to Arabidopsis genes. Functional annotations suggest that at least 14 multigene families related to disease or bacteria resistance were......BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes......-chromosomal conversions distributed between chromosome 1 and 5, 2 and 6, and 3 and 5 are more frequent than genome average (Z-test, P

  19. Evolution of Hemoglobin and Its Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Ross C.

    2012-01-01

    Insights into the evolution of hemoglobins and their genes are an abundant source of ideas regarding hemoglobin function and regulation of globin gene expression. This article presents the multiple genes and gene families encoding human globins, summarizes major events in the evolution of the hemoglobin gene clusters, and discusses how these studies provide insights into regulation of globin genes. Although the genes in and around the α-like globin gene complex are relatively stable, the β-like globin gene clusters are more dynamic, showing evidence of transposition to a new locus and frequent lineage-specific expansions and deletions. The cis-regulatory modules controlling levels and timing of gene expression are a mix of conserved and lineage-specific DNA, perhaps reflecting evolutionary constraint on core regulatory functions shared broadly in mammals and adaptive fine-tuning in different orders of mammals. PMID:23209182

  20. Metagenomics and novel gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culligan, Eamonn P; Sleator, Roy D; Marchesi, Julian R; Hill, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics provides a means of assessing the total genetic pool of all the microbes in a particular environment, in a culture-independent manner. It has revealed unprecedented diversity in microbial community composition, which is further reflected in the encoded functional diversity of the genomes, a large proportion of which consists of novel genes. Herein, we review both sequence-based and functional metagenomic methods to uncover novel genes and outline some of the associated problems of each type of approach, as well as potential solutions. Furthermore, we discuss the potential for metagenomic biotherapeutic discovery, with a particular focus on the human gut microbiome and finally, we outline how the discovery of novel genes may be used to create bioengineered probiotics. PMID:24317337

  1. Gene Therapy in Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S.V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has progressed from a dream to a bedside reality in quite a few human diseases. From its first application in adenosine deaminase deficiency, through the years, its application has evolved to vascular angiogenesis and cardiac arrhythmias. Gene based biological pacemakers using viral vectors or mesenchymal cells tested in animal models hold much promise. Induction of pacemaker activity within the left bundle branch can provide stable heart rates. Genetic modification of the AV node mimicking beta blockade can be therapeutic in the management of atrial fibrillation. G protein overexpression to modify the AV node also is experimental. Modification and expression of potassium channel genes altering the delayed rectifier potassium currents may permit better management of congenital long QT syndromes. Arrhythmias in a failing heart are due to abnormal calcium cycling. Potential targets for genetic modulation include the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump, calsequestrin and sodium calcium exchanger.Lastly the ethical concerns need to be addressed.

  2. Glass transitions of barley starch and protein in the endosperm and isolated form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.; Martinez, J.T.; Frijters, H.; Noordman, T.R.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2015-01-01

    When studying the glass-to-rubber transition inside natural materials, it is important to take into account not only the moisture content but also the moisture distribution over the components in the material. We measured the Tg of protein and starch isolated from barley at different moisture

  3. Effect of endosperm hardness on an ethanol process using a granular starch hydrolyzing enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GSHE) can hydrolyze starch at low temperature (32 deg C). The dry grind process using GSHE (GSH process) has fewer unit operations and no changes in process conditions (pH 4.0 and 32 deg C) compared to the conventional process because it dispenses with the cookin...

  4. Iminosugar inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes that underpin cereal grain germination and endosperm metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Rejzek, Martin; Rugen, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Starch is a major energy store in plants. It provides most of the calories in the human diet and, as a bulk commodity, it is used across broad industry sectors. Starch synthesis and degradation are not fully understood, owing to challenging biochemistry at the liquid/solid interface and relatively...... limited knowledge about the nature and control of starch degradation in plants. Increased societal and commercial demand for enhanced yield and quality in starch crops requires a better understanding of starch metabolism as a whole. Here we review recent advances in understanding the roles of carbohydrate...

  5. Structure and Composition of Protein Bodies from Wild-Type and High-Lysine Barley Endosperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.

    1975-01-01

    with a granular component. Particles with the same structure were present in the protein body preparation from the mutant, where, however, the granular component was the most prominent. Amino-acid composition and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the proteins from the protein body preparation revealed...

  6. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedley, Paula L; Haundrup, Ole; Andersen, Paal S

    2011-01-01

    as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic...... disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response....

  7. Candidate Gene Identification of Flowering Time Genes in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrinne E. Grover

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Flowering time control is critically important to all sexually reproducing angiosperms in both natural ecological and agronomic settings. Accordingly, there is much interest in defining the genes involved in the complex flowering-time network and how these respond to natural and artificial selection, the latter often entailing transitions in day-length responses. Here we describe a candidate gene analysis in the cotton genus , which uses homologs from the well-described flowering network to bioinformatically and phylogenetically identify orthologs in the published genome sequence from Ulbr., one of the two model diploid progenitors of the commercially important allopolyploid cottons, L. and L. Presence and patterns of expression were evaluated from 13 aboveground tissues related to flowering for each of the candidate genes using allopolyploid as a model. Furthermore, we use a comparative context to determine copy number variability of each key gene family across 10 published angiosperm genomes. Data suggest a pattern of repeated loss of duplicates following ancient whole-genome doubling events in diverse lineages. The data presented here provide a foundation for understanding both the parallel evolution of day-length neutrality in domesticated cottons and the flowering-time network, in general, in this important crop plant.

  8. Effect Alpha Globlin Gene Deletion And Gamma Globin Gene -158 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the Xmn1 polymorphism (C/T) in γ- globin gene position -158 of β- thalassemia as a modulating factor of the disease severity. Presence of the polymorphism was found in two patients and this was not sufficient to explain the diversity of the phenotype encountered. Co-inheritance of alpha thalassaemia as a ...

  9. FunGeneClusterS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla; Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2016-01-01

    and industrial biotechnology applications. We have previously published a method for accurate prediction of clusters from genome and transcriptome data, which could also suggest cross-chemistry, however, this method was limited both in the number of parameters which could be adjusted as well as in user......Secondary metabolites of fungi are receiving an increasing amount of interest due to their prolific bioactivities and the fact that fungal biosynthesis of secondary metabolites often occurs from co-regulated and co-located gene clusters. This makes the gene clusters attractive for synthetic biology...

  10. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each......%). Fifteen nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins were all down-regulated in CRC. We identified several chromosomal locations with clusters of either potential oncogenes or potential tumor suppressors. Some of these, such as aminopeptidase N/CD13 and sigma B3 protein on chromosome 15q25, coincided...

  11. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrones: los coleccionistas de genes Integrons: gene collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Di Conza

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Los integrones son estructuras genéticas que han despertado gran interés, debido a que algunos de ellos vehiculizan genes de resistencia a los antimicrobianos. Están formados por un fragmento que codifica una integrasa (intI y, a continuación, una secuencia attI a la que se unen los genes en casetes que codifican diferentes mecanismos de resistencia. Dentro de intI, en su extremo 3´, hay una secuencia promotora Pc a partir de la cual se transcriben los casetes de resistencia integrados, ya que estos genes carecen de promotor. Sin embargo, estos casetes presentan una secuencia específica denominada attC, la cual es reconocida por la integrasa que se une, por recombinación, a la secuencia attI del integrón en la orientación adecuada para su expresión. Los integrones se han clasificado según la secuencia de su integrasa, pero en la actualidad se prefiere clasificarlos según su localización. Se habla, en general, de "integrones móviles" para referirse a aquellos asociados a secuencias de inserción, transposones y/o plásmidos conjugativos, los que en su mayoría median mecanismos de resistencia, y de "superintegrones", de localización cromosómica y con grandes arreglos de genes en casetes. Los integrones móviles de clase 1 son los más abundantes en aislamientos clínicos y suelen estar asociados a transposones del subgrupo Tn21, seguidos por los de clase 2, derivados principalmente de Tn7. Estos elementos no son móviles por sí mismos, pero su asociación con elementos que sí lo son facilita su transferencia horizontal, lo que explica su amplia difusión entre las bacterias. Esta revisión intenta recopilar la información disponible acerca de los integrones móviles descritos en Argentina hasta la fecha.Integrons gained great interest due to their participation in resistance gene recruitment and expression. Their basic structure includes a fragment that encodes an integrase (intI followed by a recognition sequence (attI into

  13. Detecting Sequence Homology at the Gene Cluster Level with MultiGeneBlast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Nowick, Katja

    The genes encoding many biomolecular systems and pathways are genomically organized in operons or gene clusters. With MultiGeneBlast, we provide a user-friendly and effective tool to perform homology searches with operons or gene clusters as basic units, instead of single genes. The

  14. Machine Learning-Based Gene Prioritization Identifies Novel Candidate Risk Genes for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Ofer; Dotan, Iris; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2017-09-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders, associated with genetic, immunologic, and environmental factors. Although hundreds of genes are implicated in IBD etiology, it is likely that additional genes play a role in the disease process. We developed a machine learning-based gene prioritization method to identify novel IBD-risk genes. Known IBD genes were collected from genome-wide association studies and annotated with expression and pathway information. Using these genes, a model was trained to identify IBD-risk genes. A comprehensive list of 16,390 genes was then scored and classified. Immune and inflammatory responses, as well as pathways such as cell adhesion, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and sulfur metabolism were identified to be related to IBD. Scores predicted for IBD genes were significantly higher than those for non-IBD genes (P genes had a high prediction score (>0.8). A literature review of the genes, excluding those used to train the model, identified 67 genes without any publication concerning IBD. These genes represent novel candidate IBD-risk genes, which can be targeted in future studies. Our method successfully differentiated IBD-risk genes from non-IBD genes by using information from expression data and a multitude of gene annotations. Crucial features were defined, and we were able to detect novel candidate risk genes for IBD. These findings may help detect new IBD-risk genes and improve the understanding of IBD pathogenesis.

  15. Interactive visualization of gene regulatory networks with associated gene expression time series data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, Michel A.; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Lulko, Andrzej T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Linsen, L; Hagen, H; Hamann, B

    2008-01-01

    We present GENeVis, an application to visualize gene expression time series data in a gene regulatory network context. This is a network of regulator proteins that regulate the expression of their respective target genes. The networks are represented as graphs, in which the nodes represent genes,

  16. A gene-based information gain method for detecting gene-gene interactions in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Huang, Dongli; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Lv, Hongchao; Wang, Limei

    2015-11-01

    Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interactions (GGIs) in genome-wide association studies are divided into SNP-based methods and gene-based methods. Generally, the gene-based methods can be more powerful than SNP-based methods. Some gene-based entropy methods can only capture the linear relationship between genes. We therefore proposed a nonparametric gene-based information gain method (GBIGM) that can capture both linear relationship and nonlinear correlation between genes. Through simulation with different odds ratio, sample size and prevalence rate, GBIGM was shown to be valid and more powerful than classic KCCU method and SNP-based entropy method. In the analysis of data from 17 genes on rheumatoid arthritis, GBIGM was more effective than the other two methods as it obtains fewer significant results, which was important for biological verification. Therefore, GBIGM is a suitable and powerful tool for detecting GGIs in case-control studies.

  17. Gene therapy on demand: site specific regulation of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazwa, Agnieszka; Florczyk, Urszula; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2013-08-10

    Since 1990 when the first clinical gene therapy trial was conducted, much attention and considerable promise have been given to this form of treatment. Gene therapy has been used with success in patients suffering from severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes (X-SCID and ADA-deficiency), Leber's congenital amaurosis, hemophilia, β-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy. Last year, the first therapeutic vector (Glybera) for treatment of lipoprotein lipase deficiency has been registered in the European Union. Nevertheless, there are still several numerous issues that need to be improved to make this technique more safe, effective and easily accessible for patients. Introduction of the therapeutic gene to the given cells should provide the level of expression which will restore the production of therapeutic protein to normal values or will provide therapeutic efficacy despite not fully physiological expression. However, in numerous diseases the expression of therapeutic genes has to be kept at certain level for some time, and then might be required to be switched off to be activated again when worsening of the symptoms may aggravate the risk of disease relapse. In such cases the promoters which are regulated by local conditions may be more required. In this article the special emphasis is to discuss the strategies of regulation of gene expression by endogenous stimuli. Particularly, the hypoxia- or miRNA-regulated vectors offer the possibilities of tight but, at the same time, condition-dependent and cell-specific expression. Such means have been already tested in certain pathophysiological conditions. This creates the chance for the translational approaches required for development of effective treatments of so far incurable diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistence drives gene clustering in bacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Eduardo PC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene clustering plays an important role in the organization of the bacterial chromosome and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain its extent. However, the controversies raised about the validity of each of these mechanisms remind us that the cause of this gene organization remains an open question. Models proposed to explain clustering did not take into account the function of the gene products nor the likely presence or absence of a given gene in a genome. However, genomes harbor two very different categories of genes: those genes present in a majority of organisms – persistent genes – and those present in very few organisms – rare genes. Results We show that two classes of genes are significantly clustered in bacterial genomes: the highly persistent and the rare genes. The clustering of rare genes is readily explained by the selfish operon theory. Yet, genes persistently present in bacterial genomes are also clustered and we try to understand why. We propose a model accounting specifically for such clustering, and show that indispensability in a genome with frequent gene deletion and insertion leads to the transient clustering of these genes. The model describes how clusters are created via the gene flux that continuously introduces new genes while deleting others. We then test if known selective processes, such as co-transcription, physical interaction or functional neighborhood, account for the stabilization of these clusters. Conclusion We show that the strong selective pressure acting on the function of persistent genes, in a permanent state of flux of genes in bacterial genomes, maintaining their size fairly constant, that drives persistent genes clustering. A further selective stabilization process might contribute to maintaining the clustering.

  19. Gene-gene and gene-environment interaction on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Bala, Kiran; Chhillar, Mitrabasu; Chhillar, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Even with numerous studies the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive. It has been hypothesized that interactions between genetic and environmental factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. To examine the gene-gene and gene-environment interaction on PD risk with respect to gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and glutathione S-transferases pi 1 (GSTP1), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and metals. This study included 70 patients of PD and 100 age-matched controls. The restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for analysis of genetic polymorphism. OCPs and serum metal levels were estimated by using gas chromatography and an autoanalyser respectively. The CYP2D6*4 mt and GSTP1 *B allelic variants were significantly associated with increase in PD risk. We found a statistically significant difference in β -hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), dieldrin, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(pchlorophenyl) ethylene (pp'-DDE) and copper levels between the patients and controls. We found significantly high levels of β-HCH, dieldrin and pp'-DDE in the CYP2D6*4 mt allelic variants, β-HCH and pp'-DDE in the GSTP1*B allelic variants and dieldrin in the GSTP1*C allelic variants when comparing CYP2D6*4 non-mt, GSTP1 non-*B and GSTP1 non-*C allelic variants in patients of PD respectively. This study demonstrates that the CYP2D6*4 and GSTP1 genes may be considered as candidate genes for PD and they may also interact with β- HCH, dieldrin and pp'-DDE to influence the risk for PD.

  20. Genome position and gene amplification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsová, Pavla; Snijders, A.M.; Kwek, S.; Roydasgupta, R.; Fridlyand, J.; Tokuyasu, T.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 6 (2007), r120 ISSN 1474-760X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * array comparative genomic hybridization * oncogene Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.589, year: 2007