WorldWideScience

Sample records for endoscopic subsurface imaging

  1. [PACS-based endoscope image acquisition workstation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J B; Zhuang, T G

    2001-01-01

    A practical PACS-based Endoscope Image Acquisition Workstation is here introduced. By a Multimedia Video Card, the endoscope video is digitized and captured dynamically or statically into computer. This workstation realizes a variety of functions such as the endoscope video's acquisition and display, as well as the editing, processing, managing, storage, printing, communication of related information. Together with other medical image workstation, it can make up the image sources of PACS for hospitals. In addition, it can also act as an independent endoscopy diagnostic system.

  2. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography for imaging the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Bornitz, Matthias; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that enables micrometer-scale contactless subsurface imaging of biological tissue. Endoscopy, as another imaging method, has the potential of imaging tubular organs and cavities and therefore has opened up several application areas not accessible before. The combination of OCT and endoscopy uses the advantages of both methods and consequently allows additional imaging of structures beneath surfaces inside cavities. Currently, visual investigations on the surface of the human tympanic membrane are possible but only with expert eyes. up to now, visual imaging of the outer ear up to the tympanic membrane can be carried out by an otoscope, an operating microscope or an endoscope. In contrast to these devices, endoscopy has the advantage of imaging the whole tympanic membrane with one view. The intention of this research is the development of an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) device for imaging the tympanic membrane depth-resolved and structures behind it. Detection of fluids in the middle ear, which function as an indicator for otitis media, could help to avoid the application of antibiotics. It is possible to detect a congeries of fluids with the otoscope but the ambition is to the early detection by OCT. The developed scanner head allows imaging in working distances in the range from zero up to 5 mm with a field of view of 2 mm. In the next step, the scanner head should be improved to increase the working distance and the field of view.

  3. Fundus imaging with a nasal endoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mahesh Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide field fundus imaging is needed to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients with retinal pathology. This is more applicable for pediatric patients as repeated evaluation is a challenge. The presently available imaging machines though provide high definition images, but carry the obvious disadvantages of either being costly or bulky or sometimes both, which limits its usage only to large centers. We hereby report a technique of fundus imaging using a nasal endoscope coupled with viscoelastic. A regular nasal endoscope with viscoelastic coupling was placed on the cornea to image the fundus of infants under general anesthesia. Wide angle fundus images of various fundus pathologies in infants could be obtained easily with readily available instruments and without the much financial investment for the institutes.

  4. Image acquisition in laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Brijesh S.; Georgeson, Keith E.; Hardin, William D., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery rely uniquely on high quality display of acquired images, but a multitude of problems plague the researcher who attempts to reproduce such images for educational purposes. Some of these are intrinsic limitations of current laparoscopic/endoscopic visualization systems, while others are artifacts solely of the process used to acquire and reproduce such images. Whatever the genesis of these problems, a glance at current literature will reveal the extent to which endoscopy suffers from an inability to reproduce what the surgeon sees during a procedure. The major intrinsic limitation to the acquisition of high-quality still images from laparoscopic procedures lies in the inability to couple directly a camera to the laparoscope. While many systems have this capability, this is useful mostly for otolaryngologists, who do not maintain a sterile field around their scopes. For procedures in which a sterile field must be maintained, one trial method has been to use a beam splitter to send light both to the still camera and the digital video camera. This is no solution, however, since this results in low quality still images as well as a degradation of the image that the surgeon must use to operate, something no surgeon tolerates lightly. Researchers thus must currently rely on other methods for producing images from a laparoscopic procedure. Most manufacturers provide an optional slide or print maker that provides a hardcopy output from the processed composite video signal. The results achieved from such devices are marginal, to say the least. This leaves only one avenue for possible image production, the videotape record of an endoscopic or laparoscopic operation. Video frame grabbing is at least a problem to which industry has applied considerable time and effort to solving. Our own experience with computerized enhancement of videotape frames has been very promising. Computer enhancement allows the researcher to correct several of the

  5. Automatic specular reflections removal for endoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ke; Wang, Bin; Gao, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Endoscopy imaging is utilized to provide a realistic view about the surfaces of organs inside the human body. Owing to the damp internal environment, these surfaces usually have a glossy appearance showing specular reflections. For many computer vision algorithms, the highlights created by specular reflections may become a significant source of error. In this paper, we present a novel method for restoration of the specular reflection regions from a single image. Specular restoration process starts with generating a substitute specular-free image with RPCA method. Then the specular removed image was obtained by taking the binary weighting template of highlight regions as the weighting for merging the original specular image and the substitute image. The modified template was furthermore discussed for the concealment of artificial effects in the edge of specular regions. Experimental results on the removal of the endoscopic image with specular reflections demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method comparing to the existing methods.

  6. In-situ Planetary Subsurface Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Weber, R. C.; Dimech, J. L.; Kedar, S.; Neal, C. R.; Siegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical and seismic instruments are considered the most effective tools for studying the detailed global structures of planetary interiors. A planet's interior bears the geochemical markers of its evolutionary history, as well as its present state of activity, which has direct implications to habitability. On Earth, subsurface imaging often involves massive data collection from hundreds to thousands of geophysical sensors (seismic, acoustic, etc) followed by transfer by hard links or wirelessly to a central location for post processing and computing, which will not be possible in planetary environments due to imposed mission constraints on mass, power, and bandwidth. Emerging opportunities for geophysical exploration of the solar system from Venus to the icy Ocean Worlds of Jupiter and Saturn dictate that subsurface imaging of the deep interior will require substantial data reduction and processing in-situ. The Real-time In-situ Subsurface Imaging (RISI) technology is a mesh network that senses and processes geophysical signals. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and computing in-situ, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image in real-time that can be transmitted under bandwidth and resource constraints. Seismic imaging algorithms (including traveltime tomography, ambient noise imaging, and microseismic imaging) have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world terrestrial seismic data sets. The prototype hardware system has been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform tailored specifically for a wide variety of planetary uses, including crustal mapping, ice and ocean structure, and geothermal systems. The team is applying the RISI technology to real off-world seismic datasets. For example, the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) deployed during the Apollo 17 Moon mission consisted of four geophone instruments

  7. [Digital imaging and robotics in endoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, P M

    1998-05-23

    The introduction of endoscopical surgery has among other things influenced technical developments in surgery. Owing to digitalisation, major progress will be made in imaging and in the sophisticated technology sometimes called robotics. Digital storage makes the results of imaging diagnostics (e.g. the results of radiological examination) suitable for transmission via video conference systems for telediagnostic purposes. The availability of digital video technique renders possible the processing, storage and retrieval of moving images as well. During endoscopical operations use may be made of a robot arm which replaces the camera man. The arm does not grow tired and provides a stable image. The surgeon himself can operate or address the arm and it can remember fixed image positions to which it can return if ordered to do so. The next step is to carry out surgical manipulations via a robot arm. This may make operations more patient-friendly. A robot arm can also have remote control: telerobotics. At the Internet site of this journal a number of supplements to this article can be found, for instance three-dimensional (3D) illustrations (which is the purpose of the 3D spectacles enclosed with this issue) and a quiz (http:@appendix.niwi. knaw.nl).

  8. Using Muons to Image the Subsurface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonal, Nedra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cashion, Avery Ted [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cieslewski, Grzegorz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dorsey, Daniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foris, Adam [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Barry L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Su, Jiann-Cherng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dreesen, Wendi [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States); Green, J. Andrew [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwellenbach, David [NSTec, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Muons are subatomic particles that can penetrate the earth 's crust several kilometers and may be useful for subsurface characterization . The absorption rate of muons depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity, making them beneficial for subsurface investigation . Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. This work consists of three parts to address the use of muons for subsurface characterization : 1) assess the use of muon scattering for estimating density differences of common rock types, 2 ) using muon flux to detect a void in rock, 3) measure muon direction by designing a new detector. Results from this project lay the groundwork for future directions in this field. Low-density objects can be detected by muons even when enclosed in high-density material like lead, and even small changes in density (e.g. changes due to fracturing of material) can be detected. Rock density has a linear relationship with muon scattering density per rock volume when this ratio is greater than 0.10 . Limitations on using muon scattering to assess density changes among common rock types have been identified. However, other analysis methods may show improved results for these relatively low density materials. Simulations show that muons can be used to image void space (e.g. tunnels) within rock but experimental results have been ambiguous. Improvements are suggested to improve imaging voids such as tunnels through rocks. Finally, a muon detector has been designed and tested to measure muon direction, which will improve signal-to-noise ratio and help address fundamental questions about the source of upgoing muons .

  9. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storbeck, B.; Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F.; Weber, C.; University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  10. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ''data fusion,'' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site

  12. Chromaticity based smoke removal in endoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaka, Kevin; Pawar, Vijay M.; Stoyanov, Danail

    2017-02-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, image quality is a critical pre-requisite to ensure a surgeons ability to perform a procedure. In endoscopic procedures, image quality can deteriorate for a number of reasons such as fogging due to the temperature gradient after intra-corporeal insertion, lack of focus and due to smoke generated when using electro-cautery to dissect tissues without bleeding. In this paper we investigate the use of vision processing techniques to remove surgical smoke and improve the clarity of the image. We model the image formation process by introducing a haze medium to account for the degradation of visibility. For simplicity and computational efficiency we use an adapted dark-channel prior method combined with histogram equalization to remove smoke artifacts to recover the radiance image and enhance the contrast and brightness of the final result. Our initial results on images from robotic assisted procedures are promising and show that the proposed approach may be used to enhance image quality during surgery without additional suction devices. In addition, the processing pipeline may be used as an important part of a robust surgical vision pipeline that can continue working in the presence of smoke.

  13. Method of imaging the electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy C.

    2017-09-26

    A method of imaging electrical conductivity distribution of a subsurface containing metallic structures with known locations and dimensions is disclosed. Current is injected into the subsurface to measure electrical potentials using multiple sets of electrodes, thus generating electrical resistivity tomography measurements. A numeric code is applied to simulate the measured potentials in the presence of the metallic structures. An inversion code is applied that utilizes the electrical resistivity tomography measurements and the simulated measured potentials to image the subsurface electrical conductivity distribution and remove effects of the subsurface metallic structures with known locations and dimensions.

  14. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  15. Subsurface offset behaviour in velocity analysis with extended reflectivity images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Migration velocity analysis with the constant-density acoustic wave equation can be accomplished by the focusing of extended migration images, obtained by introducing a subsurface shift in the imaging condition. A reflector in a wrong velocity model will show up as a curve in the extended image. In

  16. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blohm, M.; Hatch, W.E.; Hoekstra, P.; Porter, D.W.

    1994-01-01

    Effective site characterization requires that many relevant geologic, hydrogeologic and biological properties of the subsurface be evaluated. A parameter that often directly influences chemical processes, ground water flow, contaminant transport, and biological activities is the lateral and vertical distribution of clays. The objective of the research an development under this contract is to improve non-invasive methods for detecting clay lenses. The percentage of clays in soils influences most physical properties that have an impact on environmental restoration and waste management. For example, the percentage of clays determine hydraulic permeability and the rate of contaminant migration, absorption of radioactive elements, and interaction with organic compounds. Therefore, improvements in non-invasive mapping of clays in the subsurface will result in better: characterization of contaminated sites, prediction of pathways of contaminant migration, assessment of risk of contaminants to public health if contaminants reach water supplies, design of remedial action and evaluation of alternative action

  17. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  18. Subsurface offset behaviour in velocity analysis with extended reflectivity images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Migration velocity analysis with the wave equation can be accomplished by focusing of extended migration images, obtained by introducing a subsurface offset or shift. A reflector in the wrong velocity model will show up as a curve in the extended image. In the correct model, it should collapse to a

  19. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rayapudi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3-4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP by a community gastroenterologist failed to cannulate the CBD. At the University Center, type 1 Mirizzi syndrome was noted on endoscopic ultrasound with narrowing of the CBD with extrinsic compression from cystic duct stone. During repeat ERCP, the CBD could be cannulated over the pancreatic duct wire. A mid CBD narrowing, distal CBD stones, proximal CBD and extrahepatic duct dilation were noted, and biliary sphincterotomy was performed. A small stone in the distal CBD was removed with an extraction balloon. The cystic duct stone was moved with the biliary balloon into the CBD, mechanical basket lithotripsy was performed and stone fragments were delivered out with an extraction balloon. The patient was seen 7 weeks later in the clinic. Skin and scleral icterus had cleared up and he is scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy. Mirizzi syndrome refers to biliary obstruction resulting from impacted stone in the cystic duct or neck of the gallbladder and commonly presents with obstructive jaundice. Type 1 does not have cholecystocholedochal fistulas, but they present in types 2, 3 and 4. Surgery is the mainstay of therapy. Endoscopic treatment is effective and can also be used as a temporizing measure or definitive treatment in poor surgical risk candidates.

  20. Imaging subsurface geology and volatile organic compound plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualheim, B.J.; Daley, P.F.; Johnson, V.; McPherrin, R.V.; Laguna, G.

    1992-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (Fig. 1) is in the final stages of the Superfund decisionmaking process for site remediation and restoration. In the process of characterizing the subsurface of the LLNL site, we have developed unique methods of collecting, storing, retrieving, and imaging geologic and chemical data from more than 350 drill holes. The lateral and vertical continuity of subsurface paleostream channels were mapped for the entire LLNL site using geologic descriptions from core samples, cuttings, and interpretations from geophysical logs. A computer-aided design and drafting program, SLICE, written at LLNL, was used to create two-dimensional maps of subsurface sediments, and state-of-the-art software produced three-dimensional images of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plumes using data from water and core fluid analyses

  1. Image-based navigation for a robotized flexible endoscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stap, N.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Luo, Xiongbiao; Reichl, Tobias; Mirota, Daniel; Soper, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Robotizing flexible endoscopy enables image-based control of endoscopes. Especially during high-throughput procedures, such as a colonoscopy, navigation support algorithms could improve procedure turnaround and ergonomics for the endoscopist. In this study, we have developed and implemented a

  2. The potential of imaging subsurface heterogeneities by local, natural earthquakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishitsuji, Y.; Doi, I.; Draganov, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a new imaging technique of subsurface heterogeneities that uses Sp-waves from natural earthquakes. This technique can be used as a first screening tool in frontier exploration areas before conventional active exploration. Analyzing Sp-waves from 28 earthquakes (Mj 2.0 to 4.2)

  3. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Joon Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  4. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Mo Yang

    Full Text Available We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  5. Quantitative subsurface analysis using frequency modulated thermal wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, S. K.; Suresh, B.; Ghali, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative depth analysis of the anomaly with an enhanced depth resolution is a challenging task towards the estimation of depth of the subsurface anomaly using thermography. Frequency modulated thermal wave imaging introduced earlier provides a complete depth scanning of the object by stimulating it with a suitable band of frequencies and further analyzing the subsequent thermal response using a suitable post processing approach to resolve subsurface details. But conventional Fourier transform based methods used for post processing unscramble the frequencies with a limited frequency resolution and contribute for a finite depth resolution. Spectral zooming provided by chirp z transform facilitates enhanced frequency resolution which can further improves the depth resolution to axially explore finest subsurface features. Quantitative depth analysis with this augmented depth resolution is proposed to provide a closest estimate to the actual depth of subsurface anomaly. This manuscript experimentally validates this enhanced depth resolution using non stationary thermal wave imaging and offers an ever first and unique solution for quantitative depth estimation in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging.

  6. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) noninvasively maps the 3-D resistivity field in the subsurface. It can be used on a scale from feet to kilometers. The 3-D resistivity field can be used to infer subsurface hydrogeological features and provides good resolution mapping of confining layers of various types. ERT imaging has been used for real-time monitoring and process control of remediation processes such as soil heating, pump and treat, steam injection, electrokinetics, Dynamic Underground Stripping (TechID 7), Hydrous Pyrolysis/Oxidation (TechID 1519) and more. ERT can be deployed via rapid and inexpensive installation of electrodes using a Cone Penetrometer (TechID 243). Additional applications are described under TechID 140 (Tanks) and TechID 2120 (Injected Subsurface Barriers); see also the related technology TechID 2121 (EIT)

  7. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in

  8. Subsurface Profile Mapping using 3-D Compressive Wave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazreek Z A M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geotechnical site investigation related to subsurface profile mapping was commonly performed to provide valuable data for design and construction stage based on conventional drilling techniques. From past experience, drilling techniques particularly using borehole method suffer from limitations related to expensive, time consuming and limited data coverage. Hence, this study performs subsurface profile mapping using 3-D compressive wave imaging in order to minimize those conventional method constraints. Field measurement and data analysis of compressive wave (p-wave, vp was performed using seismic refraction survey (ABEM Terraloc MK 8, 7 kg of sledgehammer and 24 units of vertical geophone and OPTIM (SeisOpt@Picker & SeisOpt@2D software respectively. Then, 3-D compressive wave distribution of subsurface studied was obtained using analysis of SURFER software. Based on 3-D compressive wave image analyzed, it was found that subsurface profile studied consist of three main layers representing top soil (vp = 376 – 600 m/s, weathered material (vp = 900 – 2600 m/s and bedrock (vp > 3000 m/s. Thickness of each layer was varied from 0 – 2 m (first layer, 2 – 20 m (second layer and 20 m and over (third layer. Moreover, groundwater (vp = 1400 – 1600 m/s starts to be detected at 2.0 m depth from ground surface. This study has demonstrated that geotechnical site investigation data related to subsurface profiling was applicable to be obtained using 3-D compressive wave imaging. Furthermore, 3-D compressive wave imaging was performed based on non destructive principle in ground exploration thus consider economic, less time, large data coverage and sustainable to our environment.

  9. Implementation of real-time digital endoscopic image processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chul Gyu; Lee, Young Mook; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Won Ky; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Myoung Ho

    1997-10-01

    Endoscopy has become a crucial diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in clinical areas. Over the past four years, we have developed a computerized system to record and store clinical data pertaining to endoscopic surgery of laparascopic cholecystectomy, pelviscopic endometriosis, and surgical arthroscopy. In this study, we developed a computer system, which is composed of a frame grabber, a sound board, a VCR control board, a LAN card and EDMS. Also, computer system controls peripheral instruments such as a color video printer, a video cassette recorder, and endoscopic input/output signals. Digital endoscopic data management system is based on open architecture and a set of widely available industry standards; namely Microsoft Windows as an operating system, TCP/IP as a network protocol and a time sequential database that handles both images and speech. For the purpose of data storage, we used MOD and CD- R. Digital endoscopic system was designed to be able to store, recreate, change, and compress signals and medical images. Computerized endoscopy enables us to generate and manipulate the original visual document, making it accessible to a virtually unlimited number of physicians.

  10. Imaging of common bile duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malay; Sharma; Amit; Pathak; Abid; Shoukat; Chittapuram; Srinivasan; Rameshbabu; Akash; Ajmera; Zeeshn; Ahamad; Wani; Praveer; Rai

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of common bile duct(CBD) can be done by many techniques. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is considered the gold standard for imaging of CBD. A standard technique of imaging of CBD by endoscopic ultrasound(EUS) has not been specifically described. The available descriptions mention different stations of imaging from the stomach and duodenum. The CBD lies closest to duodenum and choice of imaging may be restricted to duodenum for many operators. Generally most operators prefer multi station imaging during EUS and the choice of selecting the initial station varies from operator to operator. Detailed evaluation of CBD is frequently the main focus of imaging during EUS and in such situations multi station imaging with a high-resolution ultrasound scanner may provide useful information. Examination of the CBD is one of the primary indications for doing an EUS and it can be done from five stations:(1) the fundus of stomach;(2) body of stomach;(3) duodenal bulb;(4) descending duodenum; and(5) antrum. Following down the upper 1/3rd of CBD can do imaging of entire CBD from the liver window and following up the lower 1/3rd of CBD can do imaging of entire CBD from the pancreatic window. This article aims at simplifying the techniques of imaging of CBD by linear EUS.

  11. Subsurface imaging by electrical and EM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This report consists of 3 subjects. 1) Three dimensional inversion of resistivity data with topography : In this study, we developed a 3-D inversion method based on the finite element calculation of model responses, which can effectively accommodate the irregular topography. In solving the inverse problem, the iterative least-squares approach comprising the smoothness-constraints was taken along with the reciprocity approach in the calculation of Jacobian. Furthermore the Active Constraint Balancing, which has been recently developed by ourselves to enhance the resolving power of the inverse problem, was also employed. Since our new algorithm accounts for the topography in the inversion step, topography correction is not necessary as a preliminary processing and we can expect a more accurate image of the earth. 2) Electromagnetic responses due to a source in the borehole : The effects of borehole fluid and casing on the borehole EM responses should thoroughly be analyzed since they may affect the resultant image of the earth. In this study, we developed an accurate algorithm for calculating the EM responses containing the effects of borehole fluid and casing when a current-carrying ring is located on the borehole axis. An analytic expression for primary vertical magnetic field along the borehole axis was first formulated and the fast Fourier transform is to be applied to get the EM fields at any location in whole space. 3) High frequency electromagnetic impedance survey : At high frequencies the EM impedance becomes a function of the angle of incidence or the horizontal wavenumber, so the electrical properties cannot be readily extracted without first eliminating the effect of horizontal wavenumber on the impedance. For this purpose, this paper considers two independent methods for accurately determining the horizontal wavenumber, which in turn is used to correct the impedance data. The 'apparent' electrical properties derived from the corrected impedance

  12. Assessment of colonoscopy by use of magnetic endoscopic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    and a difficult case. SETTING: Center for Clinical Education, Capital Region of Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: By using magnetic endoscopic imaging, we developed a colonoscopy progression score (CoPS). A pass/fail score was established by using the contrast-group method. RESULTS: We found significant...... differences in performance between the 2 groups using the CoPS in both case scenarios (easy: P heterogeneity of the experienced group resulted in a high passing score for the difficult case, which led to the failing of the less experienced...... in the group. The CoPS does not consider polyp detection rate, tissue damage, or patient discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a score of progression in colonoscopy, based on magnetic endoscopic imaging. With the same tool, a map of progression in colonoscopy can be provided. The CoPS and map of progression...

  13. Pancreas imaging by computed tomography after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.P.; O'Leary, J.F.; Salomonowitz, E.; Stoltenberg, E.; Hutton, S.; Gedgaudas, E.

    1984-01-01

    A method using CT after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (CT-ERP) is described for pancreatic imaging. When using an ERP technique in the canine model comparable to that used in humans, small amounts of contrast material in peripheral pancreatic radicles resulted in enhancement of the pancreas on CT scans. Nine patients were also studied by CT-ERP images. The main pancreatic duct was seen on delayed images. In cases of chronic pancreatitis (n = 2), pancreatic opacification was patchy and heterogeneous. There was no contrast-material enhancement in areas of pancreatic carcimomas (n = 2). CT-ERP showed the true extent of carcinoma better than ERP alone

  14. Development of an integrated filing system for endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, M A; Ikeda, M; Yamamoto, Y; Kinose, T; Tachikawa, H; Morozumi, A; Sano, S; Kojima, Y; Nakamura, T; Kawai, T

    1991-01-01

    A new integrated filing system for endoscopic images has been developed, comprising a main image filing system and subsystems located at different stations. A hybrid filing system made up of both digital and analog filing devices was introduced to construct this system that combines the merits of the two filing methods. Each subsystem provided with a video processor, is equipped with a digital filing device, and routine images were recorded in the analog image filing device of the main system. The use of a multi-input adapter enabled simultaneous input of analog images from up to 8 video processors. Recorded magneto-optical disks make it possible to recall the digital images at any station in the hospital; the disks are copied without image degradation and also utilised for image processing. This system promises reliable storage and integrated, efficient management of endoscopic information. It also costs less to install than the so-called PACS (picture archiving and communication system), which connects all the stations of the hospital using optical fiber cables.

  15. Crowdsourcing for reference correspondence generation in endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Hein, Lena; Mersmann, Sven; Kondermann, Daniel; Stock, Christian; Kenngott, Hannes Gotz; Sanchez, Alexandro; Wagner, Martin; Preukschas, Anas; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Helfert, Stefanie; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted minimally-invasive surgery (MIS) is often based on algorithms that require establishing correspondences between endoscopic images. However, reference annotations frequently required to train or validate a method are extremely difficult to obtain because they are typically made by a medical expert with very limited resources, and publicly available data sets are still far too small to capture the wide range of anatomical/scene variance. Crowdsourcing is a new trend that is based on outsourcing cognitive tasks to many anonymous untrained individuals from an online community. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to investigate the concept of crowdsourcing in the context of endoscopic video image annotation for computer-assisted MIS. According to our study on publicly available in vivo data with manual reference annotations, anonymous non-experts obtain a median annotation error of 2 px (n = 10,000). By applying cluster analysis to multiple annotations per correspondence, this error can be reduced to about 1 px, which is comparable to that obtained by medical experts (n = 500). We conclude that crowdsourcing is a viable method for generating high quality reference correspondences in endoscopic video images.

  16. Image segmentation of pyramid style identifier based on Support Vector Machine for colorectal endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takumi; Koide, Tetsushi; Sugi, Koki; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Anh-Tuan Hoang; Tamaki, Toru; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Mieno, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-08-01

    With the increase of colorectal cancer patients in recent years, the needs of quantitative evaluation of colorectal cancer are increased, and the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system which supports doctor's diagnosis is essential. In this paper, a hardware design of type identification module in CAD system for colorectal endoscopic images with narrow band imaging (NBI) magnification is proposed for real-time processing of full high definition image (1920 × 1080 pixel). A pyramid style image segmentation with SVMs for multi-size scan windows, which can be implemented on an FPGA with small circuit area and achieve high accuracy, is proposed for actual complex colorectal endoscopic images.

  17. AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Slob, Evert; Turk, Ahmet Serdar; Crocco, Lorenzo; Catapano, Ilaria; Di Matteo, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The FP7-IRSES project AMISS - Active and passive MIcrowaves for Security and Subsurface imaging is based on a well-combined network among research institutions of EU, Associate and Third Countries (National Research Council of Italy - Italy, Technische Universiteit Delft - The Netherlands, Yildiz Technical University - Turkey, Bauman Moscow State Technical University - Russia, Usikov Institute for Radio-physics and Electronics and State Research Centre of Superconductive Radioelectronics "Iceberg" - Ukraine and University of Sao Paulo - Brazil) with the aims of achieving scientific advances in the framework of microwave and millimeter imaging systems and techniques for security and safety social issues. In particular, the involved partners are leaders in the scientific areas of passive and active imaging and are sharing their complementary knowledge to address two main research lines. The first one regards the design, characterization and performance evaluation of new passive and active microwave devices, sensors and measurement set-ups able to mitigate clutter and increase information content. The second line faces the requirements to make State-of-the-Art processing tools compliant with the instrumentations developed in the first line, suitable to work in electromagnetically complex scenarios and able to exploit the unexplored possibilities offered by new instrumentations. The main goals of the project are: 1) Development/improvement and characterization of new sensors and systems for active and passive microwave imaging; 2) Set up, analysis and validation of state of art/novel data processing approach for GPR in critical infrastructure and subsurface imaging; 3) Integration of state of art and novel imaging hardware and characterization approaches to tackle realistic situations in security, safety and subsurface prospecting applications; 4) Development and feasibility study of bio-radar technology (system and data processing) for vital signs detection and

  18. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared...... and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions...

  19. Ultrahigh speed en face OCT capsule for endoscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaicheng; Traverso, Giovanni; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Wang, Zhao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Giacomelli, Michael; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Barman, Ross; Cable, Alex; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Fujimoto, James G

    2015-04-01

    Depth resolved and en face OCT visualization in vivo may have important clinical applications in endoscopy. We demonstrate a high speed, two-dimensional (2D) distal scanning capsule with a micromotor for fast rotary scanning and a pneumatic actuator for precision longitudinal scanning. Longitudinal position measurement and image registration were performed by optical tracking of the pneumatic scanner. The 2D scanning device enables high resolution imaging over a small field of view and is suitable for OCT as well as other scanning microscopies. Large field of view imaging for screening or surveillance applications can also be achieved by proximally pulling back or advancing the capsule while scanning the distal high-speed micromotor. Circumferential en face OCT was demonstrated in living swine at 250 Hz frame rate and 1 MHz A-scan rate using a MEMS tunable VCSEL light source at 1300 nm. Cross-sectional and en face OCT views of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract were generated with precision distal pneumatic longitudinal actuation as well as proximal manual longitudinal actuation. These devices could enable clinical studies either as an adjunct to endoscopy, attached to an endoscope, or as a swallowed tethered capsule for non-endoscopic imaging without sedation. The combination of ultrahigh speed imaging and distal scanning capsule technology could enable both screening and surveillance applications.

  20. Endoscopic device for functional imaging of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Simon; Lohani, Sweyta; Martell, Bret; Soliz, Peter; Ts'o, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of retinal function based on the recording of spatially distributed reflectance changes evoked by visual stimuli has to-date been performed primarily using modified commercial fundus cameras. We have constructed a prototype retinal functional imager, using a commercial endoscope (Storz) for the frontend optics, and a low-cost back-end that includes the needed dichroic beam splitter to separate the stimulus path from the imaging path. This device has been tested to demonstrate its performance for the delivery of adequate near infrared (NIR) illumination, intensity of the visual stimulus and reflectance return in the imaging path. The current device was found to be capable of imaging reflectance changes of 0.1%, similar to that observable using the modified commercial fundus camera approach. The visual stimulus (a 505nm spot of 0.5secs) was used with an interrogation illumination of 780nm, and a sequence of imaged captured. At each pixel, the imaged signal was subtracted and normalized by the baseline reflectance, so that the measurement was ΔR/R. The typical retinal activity signal observed had a ΔR/R of 0.3-1.0%. The noise levels were measured when no stimulus was applied and found to vary between +/- 0.05%. Functional imaging has been suggested as a means to provide objective information on retina function that may be a preclinical indicator of ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. The endoscopic approach promises to yield a significantly more economical retinal functional imaging device that would be clinically important.

  1. A novel fusion imaging system for endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe; Saftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Navigation of a flexible endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) probe inside the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is problematic due to the small window size and complex anatomy. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of a novel fusion imaging (FI) system which uses...... time was 24.6 ± 6.6 min, while the time to reach the clinical target was 8.7 ± 4.2 min. CONCLUSIONS: The FI system is feasible for clinical use, and can reduce the learning curve for EUS procedures and improve navigation and targeting in difficult anatomic locations....

  2. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Megumi; Endo, Shota; Nakao, Shinichi; Yoshida, Munehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework.

  3. Endoscopic hyperspectral imaging: light guide optimization for spectral light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology used in remote sensing, food processing and documentation recovery. Recently, this approach has been applied in the medical field to spectrally interrogate regions of interest within respective substrates. In spectral imaging, a two (spatial) dimensional image is collected, at many different (spectral) wavelengths, to sample spectral signatures from different regions and/or components within a sample. Here, we report on the use of hyperspectral imaging for endoscopic applications. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd leading cancer for incidences and deaths in the US. One factor of severity is the miss rate of precancerous/flat lesions ( 65% accuracy). Integrating HSI into colonoscopy procedures could minimize misdiagnosis and unnecessary resections. We have previously reported a working prototype light source with 16 high-powered light emitting diodes (LEDs) capable of high speed cycling and imaging. In recent testing, we have found our current prototype is limited by transmission loss ( 99%) through the multi-furcated solid light guide (lightpipe) and the desired framerate (20-30 fps) could not be achieved. Here, we report on a series of experimental and modeling studies to better optimize the lightpipe and the spectral endoscopy system as a whole. The lightpipe was experimentally evaluated using an integrating sphere and spectrometer (Ocean Optics). Modeling the lightpipe was performed using Monte Carlo optical ray tracing in TracePro (Lambda Research Corp.). Results of these optimization studies will aid in manufacturing a revised prototype with the newly designed light guide and increased sensitivity. Once the desired optical output (5-10 mW) is achieved then the HIS endoscope system will be able to be implemented without adding onto the procedure time.

  4. Mitigating fluorescence spectral overlap in wide-field endoscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The number of molecular species suitable for multispectral fluorescence imaging is limited due to the overlap of the emission spectra of indicator fluorophores, e.g., dyes and nanoparticles. To remove fluorophore emission cross-talk in wide-field multispectral fluorescence molecular imaging, we evaluate three different solutions: (1) image stitching, (2) concurrent imaging with cross-talk ratio subtraction algorithm, and (3) frame-sequential imaging. A phantom with fluorophore emission cross-talk is fabricated, and a 1.2-mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) is used to test and compare these approaches. Results show that fluorophore emission cross-talk could be successfully avoided or significantly reduced. Near term, the concurrent imaging method of wide-field multispectral fluorescence SFE is viable for early stage cancer detection and localization in vivo. Furthermore, a means to enhance exogenous fluorescence target-to-background ratio by the reduction of tissue autofluorescence background is demonstrated. PMID:23966226

  5. Development of CMOS Imager Block for Capsule Endoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafie, S; Fodzi, F A M; Tung, L Q; Lioe, D X; Halin, I A; Hasan, W Z W; Jaafar, H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development of imager block to be associated in a capsule endoscopy system. Since the capsule endoscope is used to diagnose gastrointestinal diseases, the imager block must be in small size which is comfortable for the patients to swallow. In this project, a small size 1.5 V button battery is used as the power supply while the voltage supply requirements for other components such as microcontroller and CMOS image sensor are higher. Therefore, a voltage booster circuit is proposed to boost up the voltage supply from 1.5 V to 3.3 V. A low power microcontroller is used to generate control pulses for the CMOS image sensor and to convert the 8-bits parallel data output to serial data to be transmitted to the display panel. The results show that the voltage booster circuit was able to boost the voltage supply from 1.5 V to 3.3 V. The microcontroller precisely controls the CMOS image sensor to produce parallel data which is then serialized again by the microcontroller. The serial data is then successfully translated to 2fps image and displayed on computer.

  6. Reevaluation of JPEG image compression to digitalized gastrointestinal endoscopic color images: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher Y.

    1999-05-01

    Endoscopic images p lay an important role in describing many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. The field of radiology has been on the leading edge of creating, archiving and transmitting digital images. With the advent of digital videoendoscopy, endoscopists now have the ability to generate images for storage and transmission. X-rays can be compressed 30-40X without appreciable decline in quality. We reported results of a pilot study using JPEG compression of 24-bit color endoscopic images. For that study, the result indicated that adequate compression ratios vary according to the lesion and that images could be compressed to between 31- and 99-fold smaller than the original size without an appreciable decline in quality. The purpose of this study was to expand upon the methodology of the previous sty with an eye towards application for the WWW, a medium which would expand both clinical and educational purposes of color medical imags. The results indicate that endoscopists are able to tolerate very significant compression of endoscopic images without loss of clinical image quality. This finding suggests that even 1 MB color images can be compressed to well under 30KB, which is considered a maximal tolerable image size for downloading on the WWW.

  7. Automated endoscopic navigation and advisory system from medical image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwoh, Chee K.; Khan, Gul N.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the research conducted by our group to design an automatic endoscope navigation and advisory system. The whole system can be viewed as a two-layer system. The first layer is at the signal level, which consists of the processing that will be performed on a series of images to extract all the identifiable features. The information is purely dependent on what can be extracted from the 'raw' images. At the signal level, the first task is performed by detecting a single dominant feature, lumen. Few methods of identifying the lumen are proposed. The first method used contour extraction. Contours are extracted by edge detection, thresholding and linking. This method required images to be divided into overlapping squares (8 by 8 or 4 by 4) where line segments are extracted by using a Hough transform. Perceptual criteria such as proximity, connectivity, similarity in orientation, contrast and edge pixel intensity, are used to group edges both strong and weak. This approach is called perceptual grouping. The second method is based on a region extraction using split and merge approach using spatial domain data. An n-level (for a 2' by 2' image) quadtree based pyramid structure is constructed to find the most homogenous large dark region, which in most cases corresponds to the lumen. The algorithm constructs the quadtree from the bottom (pixel) level upward, recursively and computes the mean and variance of image regions corresponding to quadtree nodes. On reaching the root, the largest uniform seed region, whose mean corresponds to a lumen is selected that is grown by merging with its neighboring regions. In addition to the use of two- dimensional information in the form of regions and contours, three-dimensional shape can provide additional information that will enhance the system capabilities. Shape or depth information from an image is estimated by various methods. A particular technique suitable for endoscopy is the shape from shading

  8. CMP reflection imaging via interferometry of distributed subsurface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Brown, L. D.; Quiros, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical foundations of recovering body wave energy via seismic interferometry are well established. However in practice, such recovery remains problematic. Here, synthetic seismograms computed for subsurface sources are used to evaluate the geometrical combinations of realistic ambient source and receiver distributions that result in useful recovery of virtual body waves. This study illustrates how surface receiver arrays that span a limited distribution suite of sources, can be processed to reproduce virtual shot gathers that result in CMP gathers which can be effectively stacked with traditional normal moveout corrections. To verify the feasibility of the approach in practice, seismic recordings of 50 aftershocks following the magnitude of 5.8 Virginia earthquake occurred in August, 2011 have been processed using seismic interferometry to produce seismic reflection images of the crustal structure above and beneath the aftershock cluster. Although monotonic noise proved to be problematic by significantly reducing the number of usable recordings, the edited dataset resulted in stacked seismic sections characterized by coherent reflections that resemble those seen on a nearby conventional reflection survey. In particular, "virtual" reflections at travel times of 3 to 4 seconds suggest reflector sat approximately 7 to 12 km depth that would seem to correspond to imbricate thrust structures formed during the Appalachian orogeny. The approach described here represents a promising new means of body wave imaging of 3D structure that can be applied to a wide array of geologic and energy problems. Unlike other imaging techniques using natural sources, this technique does not require precise source locations or times. It can thus exploit aftershocks too small for conventional analyses. This method can be applied to any type of microseismic cloud, whether tectonic, volcanic or man-made.

  9. MR imaging of colorectal carcinomas using an MR endoscopic coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murano, Akihiko; Kido, Choichiro; Sasaki, Fumio; Nakamura, Tsuneya; Kobayashi, Semi; Katoh, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    Diagnosis of the depth of wall invasion by rectal carcinoma using MR endoscopy was performed in ten resected specimens, including five rectal carcinomas, three colon carcinomas, two normal gastric wall. In addition, the gastric wall of a pig was examined. MR imaging was done with a 1.5-T Signa Advantage (GE Medical System) system, with the surface coil of the MR endoscope acting as the receiver coil. Five layers could be distinguished in the bowel wall: mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria divided into circular muscle, longitudinal muscle and intervening connective tissue. Tumors had almost the same signal intensity as muscle. The MR images of colon carcinomas, rectal carcinomas, and extrinsically metastatic involvement of the sigmoid colon by rectal carcinoma all correlated well with the pathological findings. The normal structure of the gastric wall was similar to that of the colon. 3D-fast Spoiled Grass (SPGR) sequence has a fairly short scanning time. Thus, the possibility of precise clinical diagnosis by this method was suggested. (author)

  10. Early Use of Magnetic Endoscopic Imaging by Novice Colonoscopists: Improved Performance without Increase in Workload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Coderre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic endoscopic imaging represents a recent advance in colonoscopy training. This technique provides adjunct information to the endoscopist, specifically with regard to colonoscope loop formation.

  11. Three-dimensional CT endoscopic images of the larynx. Clinical application of helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Eiji; Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with several laryngeal ailments underwent helical computed tomography (CT) on 37 occasions. Ten of these 27 patients suffered from unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Three-dimensional (3D) images of the laryngeal lumen viewed from various angles were produced for all sets of CT volumetric data, except for three which contained excessive motion artifacts. The present paper examined whether 3D endoscopic images could offer useful diagnostic and therapeutic information about UVFP. The 3D endoscopic images viewed from the tracheal side and the hemilaryngeal images viewed from the opposite side could delineate the vocal folds, ventricular fold and ventricle three-dimensionally. Atrophy and hypotonic changes to the vocal fold and expansion of the ventricle on the affected side were clearly shown. The 3D endoscopic images accurately showed the phonosurgical effects on the laryngeal structures. The 3D endoscopic images could be produced even when the vocal folds could not be observed with conventional endoscopy due to their overadduction. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images in the coronal plane were reconstructed at a right angle to the glottic axis when the whole larynx was deviated. In addition, coronal MPR images showed a better resolution among the different layers of the vocal fold soft tissue than X-ray tomography. In conclusion, 3D endoscopic images combined with coronal MPR images can provide useful diagnostic an therapeutic information about UVFP, although motion artifacts may occur. (author)

  12. Design of a modified endoscope illuminator for spectral imaging of colorectal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Craig M.; Mayes, Samuel; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    The gold standard for locating colonic polyps is a white light endoscope in a colonoscopy, however, polyps smaller than 5 mm can be easily missed. Modified procedures such as narrow band imaging have shown only marginal increases in detection rates. Spectral imaging is a potential solution to improve the sensitivity and specificity of colonoscopies by providing the ability to distinguish molecular fluorescence differences in tissues. The goal of this work is to implement a spectral endoscopic light source to acquire spectral image data of colorectal tissues. A beta-version endoscope light source was developed, by retrofitting a white light endoscope light source (Olympus, CLK-4) with 16 narrow band LEDs. This redesigned, beta-prototype uses high-power LEDs with a minimum output of 500 mW to provide sufficient spectral output (0.5 mW) through the endoscope. A mounting apparatus was designed to provide sufficient heat dissipation. Here, we report recent results of our tests to characterize the intensity output through the light source and endoscope to determine the flat spectral output for imaging and intensity losses through the endoscope. We also report preliminary spectral imaging data from transverse pig colon that demonstrates the ability to result in working practical spectral data. Preliminary results of this revised prototype spectral endoscope system demonstrate that there is sufficient power to allow the imaging process to continue and potentially determine spectral differences in cancerous and normal tissue from imaging ex vivo pairs. Future work will focus on building a spectral library for the colorectal region and refining the user interface the system for in vivo use.

  13. Terahertz endoscopic imaging for colorectal cancer detection: Current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil; Giles, Robert H

    2017-08-16

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is progressing as a robust platform for myriad applications in the field of security, health, and material science. The THz regime, which comprises wavelengths spanning from microns to millimeters, is non-ionizing and has very low photon energy: Making it inherently safe for biological imaging. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of death in the world, while the conventional screening and standard of care yet relies exclusively on the physician's experience. Researchers have been working on the development of a flexible THz endoscope, as a potential tool to aid in colorectal cancer screening. This involves building a single-channel THz endoscope, and profiling the THz response from colorectal tissue, and demonstrating endogenous contrast levels between normal and diseased tissue when imaging in reflection modality. The current level of contrast provided by the prototype THz endoscopic system represents a significant step towards clinical endoscopic application of THz technology for in-vivo colorectal cancer screening. The aim of this paper is to provide a short review of the recent advances in THz endoscopic technology and cancer imaging. In particular, the potential of single-channel THz endoscopic imaging for colonic cancer screening will be highlighted.

  14. Simple fibre based dispersion management for two-photon excited fluorescence imaging through an endoscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marti, Dominik; Andersen, Peter E.

    2018-01-01

    We want to implement two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) into endoscopes, since TPEFM can provide relevant biomarkers for cancer staging and grading in hollow organs, endoscopically accessible through natural orifices. However, many obstacles must be overcome, among others...... the delivery of short laser pulses to the distal end of the endoscope. To this avail, we present imaging results using an all-fibre dispersion management scheme in a TPEFM setup. The scheme has been conceived by Jespersen et al. in 20101 and relies on the combination of a single mode fibre with normal...

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Endoscopic Trimodal Imaging for the Detection and Differentiation of Colonic Polyps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Frank J. C.; Fockens, Paul; van Eeden, Susanne; Kara, Mohammed A.; Hardwick, James C. H.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Dekker, Evelien

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: Endoscopic trimodal imaging (ETMI) incorporates high-resolution endoscopy (HRE) and autofluorescence imaging (AFI) for adenoma detection, and narrow-band imaging (NBI) for differentiation of adenomas from nonneoplastic polyps. The aim of this study was to compare AFI with HRE for

  16. A deep learning approach for detecting and correcting highlights in endoscopic images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Antonio; Chea, Daly; Azzopardi, George; Stabinger, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The image of an object changes dramatically depending on the lightning conditions surrounding that object. Shadows, reflections and highlights can make the object very difficult to be recognized for an automatic system. Additionally, images used in medical applications, such as endoscopic images and

  17. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  18. Neuro-fuzzy Classification System for Wireless-Capsule Endoscopic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Vassilis S. Kodogiannis; John N. Lygouras

    2008-01-01

    In this research study, an intelligent detection system to support medical diagnosis and detection of abnormal lesions by processing endoscopic images is presented. The images used in this study have been obtained using the M2A Swallowable Imaging Capsule - a patented, video color-imaging disposable capsule. Schemes have been developed to extract texture features from the fuzzy texture spectra in the chromatic and achromatic domains for a selected region of interest from ...

  19. The feasibility of endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck without prospective endoscope tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Scott Ingram

    Full Text Available Endoscopic examinations are frequently-used procedures for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy, but radiation treatment plans are created on computed tomography (CT scans. Image registration between endoscopic video and CT could be used to improve treatment planning and analysis of radiation-related normal tissue toxicity. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of endoscopy-CT image registration without prospective physical tracking of the endoscope during the examination.A novel registration technique called Location Search was developed. This technique uses physical constraints on the endoscope's view direction to search for the virtual endoscope coordinates that maximize the similarity between the endoscopic video frame and the virtual endoscopic image. Its performance was tested on phantom and patient images and compared to an established registration technique, Frame-To-Frame Tracking.In phantoms, Location Search had average registration errors of 0.55 ± 0.60 cm for point measurements and 0.29 ± 0.15 cm for object surface measurements. Frame-To-Frame Tracking achieved similar results on some frames, but it failed on others due to the virtual endoscope becoming lost. This weakness was more pronounced in patients, where Frame-To-Frame tracking could not make it through the nasal cavity. On successful patient video frames, Location Search was able to find endoscope positions with an average distance of 0.98 ± 0.53 cm away from the ground truth positions. However, it failed on many frames due to false similarity matches caused by anatomical structural differences between the endoscopic video and the virtual endoscopic images.Endoscopy-CT image registration without prospective physical tracking of the endoscope is possible, but more development is required to achieve an accuracy suitable for clinical translation.

  20. Virtual endoscopic images by 3D FASE cisternography for neurovascular compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Takashi; Nakano, Satoru; Kagawa, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional fast asymmetric spin echo (3D FASE) cisternography provides high spatial resolution and excellent contrast as a water image acquisition technique. It is also useful for the evaluation of various anatomical regions. This study investigated the usefulness and limitations of virtual endoscopic images obtained by 3D FASE MR cisternography in the preoperative evaluation of patients with neurovascular compression. The study included 12 patients with neurovascular compression: 10 with hemifacial spasm and two with trigeminal neuralgia. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all patients. The virtual endoscopic images obtained were judged to be of acceptable quality for interpretation in all cases. The areas of compression identified in preoperative diagnosis with virtual endoscopic images showed good agreement with those observed from surgery, except in one case in which the common trunk of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA-PICA) bifurcated near the root exit zone of the facial nerve. The veins are displayed in some cases but not in others. The main advantage of generating virtual endoscopic images is that such images can be used for surgical simulation, allowing the neurosurgeon to perform surgical procedures with greater confidence. (author)

  1. Laser scanning endoscope via an imaging fiber bundle for fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Lorenz D.; Nestler, Dirk; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on a laser scanning endoscope via an imaging fiber bundle, a new approach for a tumor diagnostic system has been developed to assist physicians in the diagnosis before the actual PDT is carried out. Laser induced, spatially resolved fluorescence images of diseased tissue can be compared with images received by video endoscopy using a white light source. The set- up is required to produce a better contrast between infected and healthy tissue and might serve as a constructive diagnostic help for surgeons. The fundamental idea is to scan a low-power laser beam on an imaging fiber bundle and to achieve a spatially resolved projection on the tissue surface. A sufficiently high laser intensity from the diode laser is concentrated on each single spot of the tissue exciting fluorescence when a dye has previously been accumulated. Subsequently, video image of the tissue is recorded and stored. With an image processing unit, video and fluorescence images are overlaid producing a picture of the fluorescence intensity in the environment of the observed tissue.

  2. Flow mapping of multiphase flows using a novel single stem endoscopic particle image velocimetry instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lad, N; Adebayo, D; Aroussi, A

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a successful flow mapping technique which can optically quantify large portions of a flow regime. This enables the method to be completely non-intrusive. The ability to be non-intrusive to any flow has allowed PIV to be used in a large range of industrial sectors for many applications. However, a fundamental disadvantage of the conventional PIV technique is that it cannot easily be used with flows which have no or limited optical access. Flows which have limited optical access for PIV measurement have been addressed using endoscopic PIV techniques. This system uses two separate probes which relay a light sheet and imaging optics to a planar position within the desired flow regime. This system is effective in medical and engineering applications. The present study has been involved in the development of a new endoscopic PIV system which integrates the illumination and imaging optics into one rigid probe. This paper focuses on the validation of the images taken from the novel single stem endoscopic PIV system. The probe is used within atomized spray flow and is compared with conventional PIV measurement and also pitot-static data. The endoscopic PIV system provides images which create localized velocity maps that are comparable with the global measurement of the conventional PIV system. The velocity information for both systems clearly show similar results for the spray characterization and are also validated using the pitot-static data

  3. Kinematics of reflections in subsurface offset and angle-domain image gathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafni, Raanan; Symes, William W.

    2018-05-01

    Seismic migration in the angle-domain generates multiple images of the earth's interior in which reflection takes place at different scattering-angles. Mechanically, the angle-dependent reflection is restricted to happen instantaneously and at a fixed point in space: Incident wave hits a discontinuity in the subsurface media and instantly generates a scattered wave at the same common point of interaction. Alternatively, the angle-domain image may be associated with space-shift (regarded as subsurface offset) extended migration that artificially splits the reflection geometry. Meaning that, incident and scattered waves interact at some offset distance. The geometric differences between the two approaches amount to a contradictory angle-domain behaviour, and unlike kinematic description. We present a phase space depiction of migration methods extended by the peculiar subsurface offset split and stress its profound dissimilarity. In spite of being in radical contradiction with the general physics, the subsurface offset reveals a link to some valuable angle-domain quantities, via post-migration transformations. The angle quantities are indicated by the direction normal to the subsurface offset extended image. They specifically define the local dip and scattering angles if the velocity at the split reflection coordinates is the same for incident and scattered wave pairs. Otherwise, the reflector normal is not a bisector of the opening angle, but of the corresponding slowness vectors. This evidence, together with the distinguished geometry configuration, fundamentally differentiates the angle-domain decomposition based on the subsurface offset split from the conventional decomposition at a common reflection point. An asymptotic simulation of angle-domain moveout curves in layered media exposes the notion of split versus common reflection point geometry. Traveltime inversion methods that involve the subsurface offset extended migration must accommodate the split geometry

  4. Target-oriented retrieval of subsurface wave fields - Pushing the resolution limits in seismic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Ivan; Ozmen, Neslihan; van der Neut, Joost; Cui, Tianci

    2017-04-01

    Travelling wide-bandwidth seismic waves have long been used as a primary tool in exploration seismology because they can probe the subsurface over large distances, while retaining relatively high spatial resolution. The well-known Born resolution limit often seems to be the lower bound on spatial imaging resolution in real life examples. In practice, data acquisition cost, time constraints and other factors can worsen the resolution achieved by wavefield imaging. Could we obtain images whose resolution beats the Born limits? Would it be practical to achieve it, and what are we missing today to achieve this? In this talk, we will cover aspects of linear and nonlinear seismic imaging to understand elements that play a role in obtaining "super-resolved" seismic images. New redatuming techniques, such as the Marchenko method, enable the retrieval of subsurface fields that include multiple scattering interactions, while requiring relatively little knowledge of model parameters. Together with new concepts in imaging, such as Target-Enclosing Extended Images, these new redatuming methods enable new targeted imaging frameworks. We will make a case as to why target-oriented approaches to reconstructing subsurface-domain wavefields from surface data may help in increasing the resolving power of seismic imaging, and in pushing the limits on parameter estimation. We will illustrate this using a field data example. Finally, we will draw connections between seismic and other imaging modalities, and discuss how this framework could be put to use in other applications

  5. A new high-resolution electromagnetic method for subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wanjie

    For most electromagnetic (EM) geophysical systems, the contamination of primary fields on secondary fields ultimately limits the capability of the controlled-source EM methods. Null coupling techniques were proposed to solve this problem. However, the small orientation errors in the null coupling systems greatly restrict the applications of these systems. Another problem encountered by most EM systems is the surface interference and geologic noise, which sometimes make the geophysical survey impossible to carry out. In order to solve these problems, the alternating target antenna coupling (ATAC) method was introduced, which greatly removed the influence of the primary field and reduced the surface interference. But this system has limitations on the maximum transmitter moment that can be used. The differential target antenna coupling (DTAC) method was proposed to allow much larger transmitter moments and at the same time maintain the advantages of the ATAC method. In this dissertation, first, the theoretical DTAC calculations were derived mathematically using Born and Wolf's complex magnetic vector. 1D layered and 2D blocked earth models were used to demonstrate that the DTAC method has no responses for 1D and 2D structures. Analytical studies of the plate model influenced by conductive and resistive backgrounds were presented to explain the physical phenomenology behind the DTAC method, which is the magnetic fields of the subsurface targets are required to be frequency dependent. Then, the advantages of the DTAC method, e.g., high-resolution, reducing the geologic noise and insensitive to surface interference, were analyzed using surface and subsurface numerical examples in the EMGIMA software. Next, the theoretical advantages, such as high resolution and insensitive to surface interference, were verified by designing and developing a low-power (moment of 50 Am 2) vertical-array DTAC system and testing it on controlled targets and scaled target coils. At last, a

  6. Image-based overlay measurement using subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, M. S.; van der Lans, M. J.; Sadeghian, H.

    2018-03-01

    Image Based Overlay (IBO) measurement is one of the most common techniques used in Integrated Circuit (IC) manufacturing to extract the overlay error values. The overlay error is measured using dedicated overlay targets which are optimized to increase the accuracy and the resolution, but these features are much larger than the IC feature size. IBO measurements are realized on the dedicated targets instead of product features, because the current overlay metrology solutions, mainly based on optics, cannot provide sufficient resolution on product features. However, considering the fact that the overlay error tolerance is approaching 2 nm, the overlay error measurement on product features becomes a need for the industry. For sub-nanometer resolution metrology, Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is widely used, though at the cost of very low throughput. The semiconductor industry is interested in non-destructive imaging of buried structures under one or more layers for the application of overlay and wafer alignment, specifically through optically opaque media. Recently an SPM technique has been developed for imaging subsurface features which can be potentially considered as a solution for overlay metrology. In this paper we present the use of Subsurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy (SSURFM) used for IBO measurement. We used SSURFM for imaging the most commonly used overlay targets on a silicon substrate and photoresist. As a proof of concept we have imaged surface and subsurface structures simultaneously. The surface and subsurface features of the overlay targets are fabricated with programmed overlay errors of +/-40 nm, +/-20 nm, and 0 nm. The top layer thickness changes between 30 nm and 80 nm. Using SSURFM the surface and subsurface features were successfully imaged and the overlay errors were extracted, via a rudimentary image processing algorithm. The measurement results are in agreement with the nominal values of the programmed overlay errors.

  7. Computer-based endoscopic image-processing technology for endourology and laparoscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Naya, Yukio

    2009-01-01

    Endourology and laparoscopic surgery are evolving in accordance with developments in instrumentation and progress in surgical technique. Recent advances in computer and image-processing technology have enabled novel images to be created from conventional endoscopic and laparoscopic video images. Such technology harbors the potential to advance endourology and laparoscopic surgery by adding new value and function to the endoscope. The panoramic and three-dimensional images created by computer processing are two outstanding features that can address the shortcomings of conventional endoscopy and laparoscopy, such as narrow field of view, lack of depth cue, and discontinuous information. The wide panoramic images show an anatomical map' of the abdominal cavity and hollow organs with high brightness and resolution, as the images are collected from video images taken in a close-up manner. To assist in laparoscopic surgery, especially in suturing, a three-dimensional movie can be obtained by enhancing movement parallax using a conventional monocular laparoscope. In tubular organs such as the prostatic urethra, reconstruction of three-dimensional structure can be achieved, implying the possibility of a liquid dynamic model for assessing local urethral resistance in urination. Computer-based processing of endoscopic images will establish new tools for endourology and laparoscopic surgery in the near future. (author)

  8. The establishment of enteral nutrition with minimally-invasive interventional procedure under endoscopic or imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng; Cheng Yingsheng

    2010-01-01

    For patients unable to get the necessary nutrition orally, a variety of techniques,including surgical way, to make gastrostomy with tube placement have been employed. For recent years, gastrostomy and tube placement with the help of endoscopic guidance or percutaneous interventional management has been developed, which is superior to surgical procedure in minimizing injuries, decreasing cost and reducing complications. In certain clinical situations, both endoscopic method and interventional method can be employed. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the indications, techniques and skills, advantages and disadvantages of both the endoscopy-guided and the imaging-guided percutaneous gastrojejunostomy for the establishment of enteral nutrition. (authors)

  9. WE-AB-BRA-12: Virtual Endoscope Tracking for Endoscopy-CT Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, W; Rao, A; Wendt, R; Court, L; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The use of endoscopy in radiotherapy will remain limited until we can register endoscopic video to CT using standard clinical equipment. In this phantom study we tested a registration method using virtual endoscopy to measure CT-space positions from endoscopic video. Methods: Our phantom is a contorted clay cylinder with 2-mm-diameter markers in the luminal surface. These markers are visible on both CT and endoscopic video. Virtual endoscope images were rendered from a polygonal mesh created by segmenting the phantom’s luminal surface on CT. We tested registration accuracy by tracking the endoscope’s 6-degree-of-freedom coordinates frame-to-frame in a video recorded as it moved through the phantom, and using these coordinates to measure CT-space positions of markers visible in the final frame. To track the endoscope we used the Nelder-Mead method to search for coordinates that render the virtual frame most similar to the next recorded frame. We measured the endoscope’s initial-frame coordinates using a set of visible markers, and for image similarity we used a combination of mutual information and gradient alignment. CT-space marker positions were measured by projecting their final-frame pixel addresses through the virtual endoscope to intersect with the mesh. Registration error was quantified as the distance between this intersection and the marker’s manually-selected CT-space position. Results: Tracking succeeded for 6 of 8 videos, for which the mean registration error was 4.8±3.5mm (24 measurements total). The mean error in the axial direction (3.1±3.3mm) was larger than in the sagittal or coronal directions (2.0±2.3mm, 1.7±1.6mm). In the other 2 videos, the virtual endoscope got stuck in a false minimum. Conclusion: Our method can successfully track the position and orientation of an endoscope, and it provides accurate spatial mapping from endoscopic video to CT. This method will serve as a foundation for an endoscopy-CT registration

  10. WE-AB-BRA-12: Virtual Endoscope Tracking for Endoscopy-CT Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, W; Rao, A; Wendt, R; Court, L [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, J; Beadle, B [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of endoscopy in radiotherapy will remain limited until we can register endoscopic video to CT using standard clinical equipment. In this phantom study we tested a registration method using virtual endoscopy to measure CT-space positions from endoscopic video. Methods: Our phantom is a contorted clay cylinder with 2-mm-diameter markers in the luminal surface. These markers are visible on both CT and endoscopic video. Virtual endoscope images were rendered from a polygonal mesh created by segmenting the phantom’s luminal surface on CT. We tested registration accuracy by tracking the endoscope’s 6-degree-of-freedom coordinates frame-to-frame in a video recorded as it moved through the phantom, and using these coordinates to measure CT-space positions of markers visible in the final frame. To track the endoscope we used the Nelder-Mead method to search for coordinates that render the virtual frame most similar to the next recorded frame. We measured the endoscope’s initial-frame coordinates using a set of visible markers, and for image similarity we used a combination of mutual information and gradient alignment. CT-space marker positions were measured by projecting their final-frame pixel addresses through the virtual endoscope to intersect with the mesh. Registration error was quantified as the distance between this intersection and the marker’s manually-selected CT-space position. Results: Tracking succeeded for 6 of 8 videos, for which the mean registration error was 4.8±3.5mm (24 measurements total). The mean error in the axial direction (3.1±3.3mm) was larger than in the sagittal or coronal directions (2.0±2.3mm, 1.7±1.6mm). In the other 2 videos, the virtual endoscope got stuck in a false minimum. Conclusion: Our method can successfully track the position and orientation of an endoscope, and it provides accurate spatial mapping from endoscopic video to CT. This method will serve as a foundation for an endoscopy-CT registration

  11. Endoscopic OCT for in-vivo imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Snopova, Ludmila; Denisenko, Arkady; Almasov, Valentin

    1998-01-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in gastrointestinal and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT system has ben created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, stomach and uterine cervix as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancerous tissue is distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  12. Integrated endoscopic OCT system and in-vivo images of human internal organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Snopova, Ludmila; Shakhov, Andrei; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Denisenko, Arkady; Pochinko, Vitaly; Chumakov, Yuri; Almasov, Valentin

    1998-04-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for in vivo studies of human mucosa in respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT (EOCT) system has been created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, larynx, stomach, urinary bladder, uterine cervix and endometrium as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancered tissue is distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  13. In vivo endoscopic OCT imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, R. V.; Gladkova, N. D.; Shakhova, N. M.; Snopova, L. B.; Shakhov, A. V.; Kuznetzova, I. A.; Denisenko, A. N.; Pochinko, V. V.; Chumakov, Yu P.; Streltzova, O. S.

    1997-12-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT (EOCT) system has been created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, larynx, stomach, urinary bladder, uterine cervix and body as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancered tissue are distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  14. Ultrahigh sensitivity endoscopic camera using a new CMOS image sensor: providing with clear images under low illumination in addition to fluorescent images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hisae; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshiyuki; Fukuyo, Tsuneo; Chiba, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We developed a new ultrahigh-sensitive CMOS camera using a specific sensor that has a wide range of spectral sensitivity characteristics. The objective of this study is to present our updated endoscopic technology that has successfully integrated two innovative functions; ultrasensitive imaging as well as advanced fluorescent viewing. Two different experiments were conducted. One was carried out to evaluate the function of the ultrahigh-sensitive camera. The other was to test the availability of the newly developed sensor and its performance as a fluorescence endoscope. In both studies, the distance from the endoscopic tip to the target was varied and those endoscopic images in each setting were taken for further comparison. In the first experiment, the 3-CCD camera failed to display the clear images under low illumination, and the target was hardly seen. In contrast, the CMOS camera was able to display the targets regardless of the camera-target distance under low illumination. Under high illumination, imaging quality given by both cameras was quite alike. In the second experiment as a fluorescence endoscope, the CMOS camera was capable of clearly showing the fluorescent-activated organs. The ultrahigh sensitivity CMOS HD endoscopic camera is expected to provide us with clear images under low illumination in addition to the fluorescent images under high illumination in the field of laparoscopic surgery.

  15. Quantitative sub-surface and non-contact imaging using scanning microwave microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gramse, Georg; Kasper, Manuel; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Brinciotti, Enrico; Rankl, Christian; Kienberger, Ferry; Lucibello, Andrea; Marcelli, Romolo; Patil, Samadhan B.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    The capability of scanning microwave microscopy for calibrated sub-surface and non-contact capacitance imaging of silicon (Si) samples is quantitatively studied at broadband frequencies ranging from 1 to 20 GHz. Calibrated capacitance images of flat Si test samples with varying dopant density (10 15 –10 19 atoms cm −3 ) and covered with dielectric thin films of SiO 2 (100–400 nm thickness) are measured to demonstrate the sensitivity of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) for sub-surface imaging. Using standard SMM imaging conditions the dopant areas could still be sensed under a 400 nm thick oxide layer. Non-contact SMM imaging in lift-mode and constant height mode is quantitatively demonstrated on a 50 nm thick SiO 2 test pad. The differences between non-contact and contact mode capacitances are studied with respect to the main parameters influencing the imaging contrast, namely the probe tip diameter and the tip–sample distance. Finite element modelling was used to further analyse the influence of the tip radius and the tip–sample distance on the SMM sensitivity. The understanding of how the two key parameters determine the SMM sensitivity and quantitative capacitances represents an important step towards its routine application for non-contact and sub-surface imaging. (paper)

  16. An Unusual Endoscopic Image of a Submucosal Angiodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is responsible for 2–10% of the cases of digestive bleeding. Angiodysplasia is the most common cause. The authors report a case of a 70-year-old female patient admitted to our Gastrointestinal Intensive Care Unit with a significant digestive bleeding. Standard upper and lower endoscopy showed no abnormalities, and we decided to perform a capsule enteroscopy that revealed a submucosal nodule with active bleeding in the jejunum. An intraoperative enteroscopy confirmed the presence of a small submucosal lesion with a central ulceration, and subsequently a segmental enterectomy was performed. Surprisingly, the histopathological diagnosis was angiodysplasia. The patient remains well after a two-year period of follow-up. We present this case of obscure/overt gastrointestinal bleeding to emphasize the role of capsule and intraoperative enteroscopy in the evaluation of these situations, and because of the unusual endoscopic appearance of the angiodysplasia responsible for the hemorrhage.

  17. New Insights on Subsurface Imaging of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composites via Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minhua; Ming, Bin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Gibbons, Luke J.; Gu, Xiaohong; Nguyen, Tinh; Park, Cheol; Lillehei, Peter T.; Villarrubia, J. S.; Vladar, Andras E.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies of subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composites via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), significant controversy exists concerning the imaging depth and contrast mechanisms. We studied CNT-polyimide composites and, by threedimensional reconstructions of captured stereo-pair images, determined that the maximum SEM imaging depth was typically hundreds of nanometers. The contrast mechanisms were investigated over a broad range of beam accelerating voltages from 0.3 to 30 kV, and ascribed to modulation by embedded CNTs of the effective secondary electron (SE) emission yield at the polymer surface. This modulation of the SE yield is due to non-uniform surface potential distribution resulting from current flows due to leakage and electron beam induced current. The importance of an external electric field on SEM subsurface imaging was also demonstrated. The insights gained from this study can be generally applied to SEM nondestructive subsurface imaging of conducting nanostructures embedded in dielectric matrices such as graphene-polymer composites, silicon-based single electron transistors, high resolution SEM overlay metrology or e-beam lithography, and have significant implications in nanotechnology.

  18. 4-mm-diameter three-dimensional imaging endoscope with steerable camera for minimally invasive surgery (3-D-MARVEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sam Y; Korniski, Ronald J; Shearn, Michael; Manohara, Harish M; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging (stereo imaging) by endoscopes in minimally invasive surgery, especially in space-constrained applications such as brain surgery, is one of the most desired capabilities. Such capability exists at larger than 4-mm overall diameters. We report the development of a stereo imaging endoscope of 4-mm maximum diameter, called Multiangle, Rear-Viewing Endoscopic Tool (MARVEL) that uses a single-lens system with complementary multibandpass filter (CMBF) technology to achieve 3-D imaging. In addition, the system is endowed with the capability to pan from side-to-side over an angle of [Formula: see text], which is another unique aspect of MARVEL for such a class of endoscopes. The design and construction of a single-lens, CMBF aperture camera with integrated illumination to generate 3-D images, and the actuation mechanism built into it is summarized.

  19. Imaging of Subsurface Faults using Refraction Migration with Fault Flooding

    KAUST Repository

    Metwally, Ahmed Mohsen Hassan

    2017-05-31

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  20. Application of seismic refraction tomography for subsurface imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seismic refraction tomography involves the measurement of the travel times of seismic refracted raypaths in order to define an image of seismic velocity in the intervening ground. This technique was used to estimate the depth to the fresh basement, estimate thickness of the weathered basement and to determine the ...

  1. Imaging of Subsurface Faults using Refraction Migration with Fault Flooding

    KAUST Repository

    Metwally, Ahmed Mohsen Hassan; Hanafy, Sherif; Guo, Bowen; Kosmicki, Maximillian Sunflower

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  2. Endoscopic Tri-Modal Imaging (ETMI With Optical Magnification in the Detection of Barrett's Early Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmed S. Sami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early lesion detection and characterisation is vital to ensure accurate management in patients with gastrointestinal neoplasia. Endoscopic Tri-modal Imaging (ETMI technology has been shown to improve the targeted detection of early dysplastic lesions in Barrett's Oesophagus, but these results were not confirmed in non-expert hands [1]. This technology incorporates high resolution while light endoscopy (HRE, Auto Fluorescence Imaging (AFI and Narrow Band Imaging (NBI in one endoscope. The mucosa is first inspected with HRE, and then AFI is switched on to help in highlighting any suspicious areas in the mucosa [2]. These areas can be further examined by switching to NBI mode with magnification which helps to characterise mucosal patterns and identify early neoplasia [3].

  3. Averaged subtracted polarization imaging for endoscopic diagnostics of surface microstructures on translucent mucosae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Katsuhiro

    2016-07-01

    An endoscopic image processing technique for enhancing the appearance of microstructures on translucent mucosae is described. This technique employs two pairs of co- and cross-polarization images under two different linearly polarized lights, from which the averaged subtracted polarization image (AVSPI) is calculated. Experiments were then conducted using an acrylic phantom and excised porcine stomach tissue using a manual experimental setup with ring-type lighting, two rotating polarizers, and a color camera; better results were achieved with the proposed method than with conventional color intensity image processing. An objective evaluation method that uses texture analysis was developed and used to evaluate the enhanced microstructure images. This paper introduces two types of online, rigid-type, polarimetric endoscopic implementations using a polarized ring-shaped LED and a polarimetric camera. The first type uses a beam-splitter-type color polarimetric camera, and the second uses a single-chip monochrome polarimetric camera. Microstructures on the mucosa surface were enhanced robustly with these online endoscopes regardless of the difference in the extinction ratio of each device. These results show that polarimetric endoscopy using AVSPI is both effective and practical for hardware implementation.

  4. The Role of Adjunct Imaging in Endoscopic Detection of Dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Pujan; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-07-01

    Advances in imaging technologies have demonstrated promise in early detection of dysplasia and cancer in Barrett's esophagus (BE). Optical chromoendoscopy, dye-based chromoendoscopy, and novel technologies have provided the opportunity to visualize the cellular and subcellular structures. Only narrow-band imaging and acetic acid chromoendoscopy have reached benchmarks for clinical use. Volumetric laser endomicroscopy and molecular imaging are not established for routine use. Best practice in management of BE should be focused on careful endoscopic examination, resection, or ablation of the entire abnormal lesion, as well as the use of available imaging technique that has good diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system for microscopic and endoscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2016-04-01

    Current microscopic and endoscopic technologies for cancer screening utilize white-light illumination sources. Hyper-spectral imaging has been shown to improve sensitivity while retaining specificity when compared to white-light imaging in both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have historically suffered from slow acquisition times due to the narrow bandwidth of spectral filters. Often minutes are required to gather a full image stack. We have developed a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides 2-3 orders of magnitude increased signal strength. This reduces acquisition times significantly, allowing for live video acquisition. Here, we describe a preliminary prototype excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system that can be coupled with endoscopes or microscopes for hyperspectral imaging of tissues and cells. Our system is comprised of three subsystems: illumination, transmission, and imaging. The illumination subsystem employs light-emitting diode arrays to illuminate at different wavelengths. The transmission subsystem utilizes a unique geometry of optics and a liquid light guide. Software controls allow us to interface with and control the subsystems and components. Digital and analog signals are used to coordinate wavelength intensity, cycling and camera triggering. Testing of the system shows it can cycle 16 wavelengths at as fast as 1 ms per cycle. Additionally, more than 18% of the light transmits through the system. Our setup should allow for hyperspectral imaging of tissue and cells in real time.

  6. A standardized imaging protocol for the endoscopic prediction of dysplasia within sessile serrated polyps (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, David J; Jayanna, Mahesh; Awadie, Halim; Desomer, Lobke; Lee, Ralph; Heitman, Steven J; Sidhu, Mayenaaz; Goodrick, Kathleen; Burgess, Nicholas G; Mahajan, Hema; McLeod, Duncan; Bourke, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Dysplasia within sessile serrated polyps (SSPs) is difficult to detect and may be mistaken for an adenoma, risking incomplete resection of the background serrated tissue, and is strongly implicated in interval cancer after colonoscopy. The use of endoscopic imaging to detect dysplasia within SSPs has not been systematically studied. Consecutively detected SSPs ≥8 mm in size were evaluated by using a standardized imaging protocol at a tertiary-care endoscopy center over 3 years. Lesions suspected as SSPs were analyzed with high-definition white light then narrow-band imaging. A demarcated area with a neoplastic pit pattern (Kudo type III/IV, NICE type II) was sought among the serrated tissue. If this was detected, the lesion was labeled dysplastic (sessile serrated polyp with dysplasia); if not, it was labeled non-dysplastic (sessile serrated polyp without dysplasia). Histopathology was reviewed by 2 blinded specialist GI pathologists. A total of 141 SSPs were assessed in 83 patients. Median lesion size was 15.0 mm (interquartile range 10-20), and 54.6% were in the right side of the colon. Endoscopic evidence of dysplasia was detected in 36 of 141 (25.5%) SSPs; of these, 5 of 36 (13.9%) lacked dysplasia at histopathology. Two of 105 (1.9%) endoscopically designated non-dysplastic SSPs had dysplasia at histopathology. Endoscopic imaging, therefore, had an accuracy of 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.1%-97.6%) and a negative predictive value of 98.1% (95% CI, 92.6%-99.7%) for detection of dysplasia within SSPs. Dysplasia within SSPs can be detected accurately by using a simple, broadly applicable endoscopic imaging protocol that allows complete resection. Independent validation of this protocol and its dissemination to the wider endoscopic community may have a significant impact on rates of interval cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT03100552.). Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  7. Segmentation of Clinical Endoscopic Images Based on the Classification of Topological Vector Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Dunaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we describe a prototype of an automatic segmentation system and annotation of endoscopy images. The used algorithm is based on the classification of vectors of the topological features of the original image. We use the image processing scheme which includes image preprocessing, calculation of vector descriptors defined for every point of the source image and the subsequent classification of descriptors. Image preprocessing includes finding and selecting artifacts and equalizating the image brightness. In this work, we give the detailed algorithm of the construction of topological descriptors and the classifier creating procedure based on mutual sharing the AdaBoost scheme and a naive Bayes classifier. In the final section, we show the results of the classification of real endoscopic images.

  8. Advances in interpretation of subsurface processes with time-lapse electrical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kaminit; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Johnson, Tim B.; Slater, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical geophysical methods, including electrical resistivity, time-domain induced polarization, and complex resistivity, have become commonly used to image the near subsurface. Here, we outline their utility for time-lapse imaging of hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical processes, focusing on new instrumentation, processing, and analysis techniques specific to monitoring. We review data collection procedures, parameters measured, and petrophysical relationships and then outline the state of the science with respect to inversion methodologies, including coupled inversion. We conclude by highlighting recent research focused on innovative applications of time-lapse imaging in hydrology, biology, ecology, and geochemistry, among other areas of interest.

  9. Near-infrared dental imaging using scanning fiber endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaxuan; Lee, Robert; Sadr, Alireza; Seibel, Eric J.

    2018-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range of 1300-1500nm has the potential to outperform or augment other dental imaging modalities such as fluorescence imaging, owing to its lower scattering coefficient in enamel and trans- parency on stains and non-cariogenic plaque. However, cameras in this wavelength range are bulky and expensive, which lead to difficulties for in-vivo use and commercialization. Thus, we have proposed a new imaging device combining the scanning fiber endoscopy (SFE) and NIR imaging technology. The NIR SFE system has the advantage of miniature size (1.6 mm), flexible shaft, video frame rate (7Hz) and expandable wide field-of-view (60 degrees). Eleven extracted human teeth with or without occlusal caries were scanned by micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) to obtain 3D micro-CT images, which serve as the standard for comparison. NIR images in reflection mode were then taken on all the occlusal surfaces, using 1310nm super luminescent diode and 1460nm laser diode respectively. Qualitative comparison was performed between near-infrared im- ages and micro-CT images. Enamel demineralization in NIR appeared as areas of increased reflectivity, and distinguished from non-carious staining at the base of occlusal fissures or developmental defects on cusps. This preliminary work presented proof for practicability of combining NIR imaging technology with SFE for reliable and noninvasive dental imaging with miniaturization and low cost.

  10. High resolution axicon-based endoscopic FD OCT imaging with a large depth range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kye-Sung; Hurley, William; Deegan, John; Dean, Scott; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic imaging in tubular structures, such as the tracheobronchial tree, could benefit from imaging optics with an extended depth of focus (DOF). This optics could accommodate for varying sizes of tubular structures across patients and along the tree within a single patient. In the paper, we demonstrate an extended DOF without sacrificing resolution showing rotational images in biological tubular samples with 2.5 μm axial resolution, 10 ìm lateral resolution, and > 4 mm depth range using a custom designed probe.

  11. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussally, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this applied research and development project is to develop a system known as '3-D SISAR'. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments found at DOE storage sites. Three-dimensional maps of the object locations will be produced which can assist the development of remediation strategies and the characterization of the digface during remediation operations. It is expected that the 3-D SISAR will also prove useful for monitoring hydrocarbon based contaminant migration after remediation. The underground imaging technique being developed under this contract utilizes a spotlight mode Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach which, due to its inherent stand-off capability, will permit the rapid survey of a site and achieve a high degree of productivity over large areas. When deployed from an airborne platform, the stand-off techniques is also seen as a way to overcome practical survey limitations encountered at vegetated sites

  12. First Application of 7T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2018-01-01

    Background Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of skull base. In this study, we apply a 7T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images to clinical standard of care. Methods Images were acquired at 7T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5T, 3T, and 7T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and ICA branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were utilized for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Results Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7T. 7T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Conclusion Our study represents the first application of 7T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7T MRI compared to 3T and 1.5 T, and found that integration of 7T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7T, 3T, and 1.5 T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. PMID:28359922

  13. First Application of 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-07-01

    Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7-T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of the skull base. In this study, we apply a 7-T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images with clinical standard of care. Images were acquired at 7 T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and internal carotid artery (ICA) branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were used for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7 T. The 7-T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Our study represents the first application of 7-T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7-T MRI compared with 3- and 1.5-T MRI, and found that integration of 7 T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7-T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7-, 3-, and 1.5-T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7-T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved planning of endoscopic sinonasal surgery from 3-dimensional images with Osirix® and stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Serafín; Herrero-Salado, Tomás F; Maza-Solano, Juan M; Ropero-Romero, Francisco; González-García, Jaime; Ambrosiani-Fernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The high variability of sinonasal anatomy requires the best knowledge of its three-dimensional (3D) conformation to perform surgery more safely and efficiently. The aim of the study was to validate the utility of Osirix® and stereolithography in improving endoscopic sinonasal surgery planning. Osirix® was used as a viewer and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) 3D imaging manager to improve planning for 114 sinonasal endoscopic operations with polyposis (86) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) (28). Stereolithography rapid prototyping was used for 7 frontoethmoidal mucoceles. Using Osirix® and stereolithography, a greater number of anatomical structures were identified and this was done faster, with a statistically-significant clinical-radiological correlation (Pvirtual reality, allows surgeons to perform endoscopic sinonasal surgery with greater confidence and in less time than using 2D images. Residents also achieve surgical competence faster, more safely and with fewer complications. This beneficial impact is increased when the surgical team has stereolithography rapid prototyping in more complex cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of artificial intelligence using a convolutional neural network for detecting gastric cancer in endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Aoyama, Kazuharu; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Ishihara, Soichiro; Shichijo, Satoki; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Keigo; Fujisaki, Junko; Tada, Tomohiro

    2018-07-01

    Image recognition using artificial intelligence with deep learning through convolutional neural networks (CNNs) has dramatically improved and been increasingly applied to medical fields for diagnostic imaging. We developed a CNN that can automatically detect gastric cancer in endoscopic images. A CNN-based diagnostic system was constructed based on Single Shot MultiBox Detector architecture and trained using 13,584 endoscopic images of gastric cancer. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, an independent test set of 2296 stomach images collected from 69 consecutive patients with 77 gastric cancer lesions was applied to the constructed CNN. The CNN required 47 s to analyze 2296 test images. The CNN correctly diagnosed 71 of 77 gastric cancer lesions with an overall sensitivity of 92.2%, and 161 non-cancerous lesions were detected as gastric cancer, resulting in a positive predictive value of 30.6%. Seventy of the 71 lesions (98.6%) with a diameter of 6 mm or more as well as all invasive cancers were correctly detected. All missed lesions were superficially depressed and differentiated-type intramucosal cancers that were difficult to distinguish from gastritis even for experienced endoscopists. Nearly half of the false-positive lesions were gastritis with changes in color tone or an irregular mucosal surface. The constructed CNN system for detecting gastric cancer could process numerous stored endoscopic images in a very short time with a clinically relevant diagnostic ability. It may be well applicable to daily clinical practice to reduce the burden of endoscopists.

  16. Comparison of Narrowband Imaging with Autofluorescence Imaging for Endoscopic Visualization of Superficial Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lesions of the Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhisa Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare narrowband imaging (NBI and autofluorescence imaging (AFI endoscopic visualization for identifying superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. Methods. Twenty-four patients with superficial esophageal carcinomas diagnosed at previous hospitals were enrolled in this study. Lesions were initially detected using white-light endoscopy and then observed with both NBI and AFI. Endoscopic images documented each method, and three endoscopists experienced in esophageal imaging retrospectively reviewed respective images of histologically confirmed esophageal SCCs. Images were assessed for quality in identifying superficial SCCs and rated as excellent, fair, or poor by the three reviewers with interobserver agreement calculated using kappa (κ statistics. Results. Thirty-one lesions histologically confirmed as superficial esophageal SCCs were detected in 24 patients. NBI images of 27 lesions (87% were rated as excellent, three as fair, and one as poor compared to AFI images of 19 lesions (61% rated as excellent, 10 as fair and two as poor (P<0.05. Moderate interobserver agreement (κ=0.42, 95% CI 0.24–0.60 resulted in NBI while fair agreement (κ=0.35, 95% CI 0.18–0.51 was achieved using AFI. Conclusion. NBI may be more effective than AFI for visualization of esophageal SCC.

  17. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  18. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Broekaert, José A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings

  19. Mobile depth profiling and sub-surface imaging techniques for historical paintings—A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfeld, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.alfeld@desy.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry, Groenenbrogerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Broekaert, José A.C., E-mail: jose.broekaert@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry, Martin-Luther-King Platz 6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Hidden, sub-surface paint layers and features contain valuable information for the art-historical investigation of a painting's past and for its conservation for coming generations. The number of techniques available for the study of these features has been considerably extended in the last decades and established techniques have been refined. This review focuses on mobile non-destructive subsurface imaging and depth profiling techniques, which allow for the in-situ investigation of easel paintings, i.e. paintings on a portable support. Among the techniques discussed are: X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography, which are long established methods and are in use for several decades. Their capabilities of element/species specific imaging have been extended by the introduction of energy/wavelength resolved measurements. Scanning macro-X-ray fluorescence analysis made it for the first time possible to acquire elemental distribution images in-situ and optical coherence tomography allows for the non-destructive study the surface paint layers in virtual cross-sections. These techniques and their variants are presented next to other techniques, such as Terahertz imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance depth profiling and established techniques for non destructive testing (thermography, ultrasonic imaging and laser based interference methods) applied in the conservation of historical paintings. Next to selected case studies the capabilities and limitations of the techniques are discussed. - Highlights: • All mobile sub-surface and depth-profiling techniques for paintings are reviewed. • The number of techniques available has increased considerably in the last years. • X-ray radiography and infrared reflectography are still the most used techniques. • Scanning macro-XRF and optical coherence tomography begin to establish. • Industrial non destructive testing techniques support the preservation of paintings.

  20. Eyewear-style three-dimensional endoscope derived from microstructured polymer fiber with the function of image transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong De-Peng; Wang Li-Li; He Zheng-Quan; Ma Tian; Chu Jiu-Rong

    2013-01-01

    A method of fabricating multi-core polymer image fiber is proposed. Image fiber preform is fabricated by stacking thousands of polymer fibers each with a 0.25-mm diameter orderly in a die by only one step. The preform is heated and stretched into image fiber with an outer diameter of 2 mm. Then a portable eyewear-style three-dimensional (3D) endoscope system is designed, fabricated, and characterized. This endoscopic system is composed of two graded index lenses, two pieces of 0.35-m length image guide fibers, and a pair of oculars. It shows good flexibility and portability, and can provide the depth information accordingly. (general)

  1. High resolution microphotonic needle for endoscopic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin; Mohanty, Aseema; Roberts, Samantha P.; Barbosa, Felippe; Lipson, Michal

    2017-02-01

    GRIN (Graded index) lens have revolutionized micro endoscopy enabling deep tissue imaging with high resolution. The challenges of traditional GRIN lenses are their large size (when compared with the field of view) and their limited resolution. This is because of the relatively weak NA in standard graded index lenses. Here we introduce a novel micro-needle platform for endoscopy with much higher resolution than traditional GRIN lenses and a FOV that corresponds to the whole cross section of the needle. The platform is based on polymeric (SU-8) waveguide integrated with a microlens micro fabricated on a silicon substrate using a unique molding process. Due to the high index of refraction of the material the NA of the needle is much higher than traditional GRIN lenses. We tested the probe in a fluorescent dye solution (19.6 µM Alexa Flour 647 solution) and measured a numerical aperture of 0.25, focal length of about 175 µm and minimal spot size of about 1.6 µm. We show that the platform can image a sample with the field of view corresponding to the cross sectional area of the waveguide (80x100 µm2). The waveguide size can in principle be modified to vary size of the imaging field of view. This demonstration, combined with our previous work demonstrating our ability to implant the high NA needle in a live animal, shows that the proposed system can be used for deep tissue imaging with very high resolution and high field of view.

  2. Automatic classification of minimally invasive instruments based on endoscopic image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Stefanie; Benzko, Julia; Krappe, Sebastian; Sudra, Gunther; Azad, Pedram; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is nowadays a frequently applied technique and can be regarded as a major breakthrough in surgery. The surgeon has to adopt special operation-techniques and deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination and restricted mobility. To alleviate these constraints we propose to enhance the surgeon's capabilities by providing a context-aware assistance using augmented reality techniques. To analyze the current situation for context-aware assistance, we need intraoperatively gained sensor data and a model of the intervention. A situation consists of information about the performed activity, the used instruments, the surgical objects, the anatomical structures and defines the state of an intervention for a given moment in time. The endoscopic images provide a rich source of information which can be used for an image-based analysis. Different visual cues are observed in order to perform an image-based analysis with the objective to gain as much information as possible about the current situation. An important visual cue is the automatic recognition of the instruments which appear in the scene. In this paper we present the classification of minimally invasive instruments using the endoscopic images. The instruments are not modified by markers. The system segments the instruments in the current image and recognizes the instrument type based on three-dimensional instrument models.

  3. Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum: Imaging characteristics with endoscopic and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Cho, Jin Han; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Choi, Sun Seob; Kwon, Hee Jin; Yoon, Jung Hee; Kim, Su Jin

    2008-01-01

    Benign submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum are occasionally encountered during endoscopy. But endoscopy has its limitations in the diagnosis and differentiation of these lesions, because submucosal lesions are often difficult to visualize at endoscopy due to minimal change of the overlying mucosa. Furthermore, endoscopic biopsy may not always yield adequate tissue for diagnosis due to the submucosal location of the lesions. For this reason, the role of radiologic imaging is important in the diagnosis of submucosal lesions of the stomach and duodenum. Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) and sonographic technology are helpful in narrowing the differential diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions. In contrast to endoscopy and barium studies, CT or ultrasonography (US) provides information about both the gastric wall and the extragastric extent of the disease. Arterial phase contrast enhanced CT enables us to discriminate a mass of submucosal from that of a mucosal origin in the differential diagnosis of gastric or duodenal lesions. Although endoscopic sonography has been considered the better modality in the diagnosis of gastroduodenal submucosal lesions, transabdominal sonography can still be an alternative method to endoscopic sonography in assessing of the origin and character of the submucosal lesions. Some gastroduodenal submucosal lesions have similar radiologic findings that make differentiation difficult. But despite overlaps in radiologic findings, some lesions have characteristic radiologic features that may suggest a specific diagnosis. Knowledge of the differential diagnosis of benign submucosal lesions in the stomach and duodenum may promote correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment

  4. Subsurface probing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Imaging techniques that can be used to translate seismic and electromagnetic wave signals into visual representation are briefly discussed. The application of these techniques is illustrated on the example of determining the subsurface structure of a proposed power plant. Imaging makes the wave signals intelligible to the non-geologists. R and D work needed in this area are tabulated

  5. The combination design for open and endoscopic surgery using fluorescence molecular imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Ye, Jinzuo; An, Yu; Yang, Xin; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    For clinical surgery, it is still a challenge to objectively determine tumor margins during surgery. With the development of medical imaging technology, fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) method can provide real-time intraoperative tumor margin information. Furthermore, surgical navigation system based on FMI technology plays an important role for the aid of surgeons' precise tumor margin decision. However, detection depth is the most limitation exists in the FMI technique and the method convenient for either macro superficial detection or micro deep tissue detection is needed. In this study, we combined advantages of both open surgery and endoscopic imaging systems with FMI technology. Indocyanine green (ICG) experiments were performed to confirm the feasibility of fluorescence detection in our system. Then, the ICG signal was photographed in the detection area with our system. When the system connected with endoscope lens, the minimum quantity of ICG detected by our system was 0.195 ug. For aspect of C mount lens, the sensitivity of ICG detection with our system was 0.195ug. Our experiments results proved that it was feasible to detect fluorescence images with this combination method. Our system shows great potential in the clinical applications of precise dissection of various tumors

  6. Anatomy of Old Faithful from subsurface seismic imaging of the Yellowstone Upper Geyser Basin

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Sin-Mei

    2017-10-03

    The Upper Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park contains one of the highest concentrations of hydrothermal features on Earth including the iconic Old Faithful geyser. Although this system has been the focus of many geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies for decades, the shallow (<200 m) subsurface structure remains poorly characterized. To investigate the detailed subsurface geologic structure including the hydrothermal plumbing of the Upper Geyser Basin, we deployed an array of densely spaced three-component nodal seismographs in November of 2015. In this study, we extract Rayleigh-wave seismic signals between 1-10 Hz utilizing non-diffusive seismic waves excited by nearby active hydrothermal features with the following results. 1) imaging the shallow subsurface structure by utilizing stationary hydrothermal activity as a seismic source, 2) characterizing how local geologic conditions control the formation and location of the Old Faithful hydrothermal system, and 3) resolving a relatively shallow (10-60 m) and large reservoir located ~100 m southwest of Old Faithful geyser.

  7. Color reproduction and processing algorithm based on real-time mapping for endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tareq H; Mohammed, Shahed K; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time preprocessing algorithm for image enhancement for endoscopic images. A novel dictionary based color mapping algorithm is used for reproducing the color information from a theme image. The theme image is selected from a nearby anatomical location. A database of color endoscopy image for different location is prepared for this purpose. The color map is dynamic as its contents change with the change of the theme image. This method is used on low contrast grayscale white light images and raw narrow band images to highlight the vascular and mucosa structures and to colorize the images. It can also be applied to enhance the tone of color images. The statistic visual representation and universal image quality measures show that the proposed method can highlight the mucosa structure compared to other methods. The color similarity has been verified using Delta E color difference, structure similarity index, mean structure similarity index and structure and hue similarity. The color enhancement was measured using color enhancement factor that shows considerable improvements. The proposed algorithm has low and linear time complexity, which results in higher execution speed than other related works.

  8. Subsurface imaging of water electrical conductivity, hydraulic permeability and lithology at contaminated sites by induced polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurya, P. K.; Balbarini, Nicola; Møller, I.

    2018-01-01

    At contaminated sites, knowledge about geology and hydraulic properties of the subsurface and extent of the contamination is needed for assessing the risk and for designing potential site remediation. In this study, we have developed a new approach for characterizing contaminated sites through time...... geological logs. On average the IP-derived and measured permeability values agreed within one order of magnitude, except for those close to boundaries between lithological layers (e.g. between sand and clay), where mismatches occurred due to the lack of vertical resolution in the geophysical imaging...

  9. Contribution of thermal infrared images on the understanding of the subsurface/atmosphere exchanges on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Teodolina; Antoine, Raphaël; Baratoux, David; Rabinowicz, Michel

    2017-04-01

    High temporal resolution of space-based thermal infrared images (METEOSAT, MODIS) and the development of field thermal cameras have permitted the development of thermal remote sensing in Earth Sciences. Thermal images are influenced by many factors such as atmosphere, solar radiation, topography and physico-chemical properties of the surface. However, considering these limitations, we have discovered that thermal images can be used in order to better understand subsurface hydrology. In order to reduce as much as possible the impact of these perturbing factors, our approach combine 1) field observations and 2) numerical modelling of surface/subsurface thermal processes. Thermal images of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Réunion Island), acquired by hand, show that the Formica Leo inactive scoria cone and some fractures close to the Bory-Dolomieu caldera are always warmer, inducing a thermal difference with the surrounding of at least 5°C and a Self-Potential anomaly [1, 2]. Topography cannot explain this thermal behaviour, but Piton de la Fournaise is known as highly permeable. This fact allows the development of an air convection within the whole permeable structure volcanic edifice [2]. Cold air enters the base of the volcano, and exits warmer upslope, as the air is warmed by the geothermal flow [1,2]. Then, we have decided to understand the interaction between subsurface hydrogeological flows and the humidity in the atmosphere. In the Lake Chad basin, regions on both sides of Lake Chad present a different thermal behaviour during the diurnal cycle and between seasons [3]. We propose that this thermal behaviour can only be explained by lateral variations of the surface permeability that directly impact the process of evaporation/condensation cycle. These studies bring new highlights on the understanding of the exchanges between subsurface and the atmosphere, as the presence of a very permeable media and/or variations of the surface permeability may enhance or

  10. Detection of stiff nanoparticles within cellular structures by contact resonance atomic force microscopy subsurface nanomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Angeloni, Livia; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; Barteri, Mario; De Angelis, Francesca; Persiconi, Irene; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Rossi, Marco

    2017-05-04

    Detecting stiff nanoparticles buried in soft biological matrices by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques represents a new frontier in the field of scanning probe microscopies, originally developed as surface characterization methods. Here we report the detection of stiff (magnetic) nanoparticles (NPs) internalized in cells by using contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM) employed as a potentially non-destructive subsurface characterization tool. Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) NPs were internalized in microglial cells from cerebral cortices of mouse embryos of 18 days by phagocytosis. Nanomechanical imaging of cells was performed by detecting the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) of an AFM cantilever held in contact with the sample. Agglomerates of NPs internalized in cells were visualized on the basis of the local increase in the contact stiffness with respect to the surrounding biological matrix. A second AFM-based technique for nanomechanical imaging, i.e., HarmoniX™, as well as magnetic force microscopy and light microscopy were used to confirm the CR-AFM results. Thus, CR-AFM was demonstrated as a promising technique for subsurface imaging of nanomaterials in biological samples.

  11. Low-complexity video encoding method for wireless image transmission in capsule endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kenichi; Hamaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a low-complexity video encoding method applicable for wireless image transmission in capsule endoscopes. This encoding method is based on Wyner-Ziv theory, in which side information available at a transmitter is treated as side information at its receiver. Therefore complex processes in video encoding, such as estimation of the motion vector, are moved to the receiver side, which has a larger-capacity battery. As a result, the encoding process is only to decimate coded original data through channel coding. We provide a performance evaluation for a low-density parity check (LDPC) coding method in the AWGN channel.

  12. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction; Lungenemphysem. Bildgebung bei endoskopischer Lungenvolumenreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, B. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schroeder, T.H. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology; Weber, C. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  13. Classification of endoscopic capsule images by using color wavelet features, higher order statistics and radial basis functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, C S; Barbosa, D; Ramos, J; Tavares, A; Monteiro, L; Carvalho, L

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a system to support medical diagnosis and detection of abnormal lesions by processing capsule endoscopic images. Endoscopic images possess rich information expressed by texture. Texture information can be efficiently extracted from medium scales of the wavelet transform. The set of features proposed in this paper to code textural information is named color wavelet covariance (CWC). CWC coefficients are based on the covariances of second order textural measures, an optimum subset of them is proposed. Third and forth order moments are added to cope with distributions that tend to become non-Gaussian, especially in some pathological cases. The proposed approach is supported by a classifier based on radial basis functions procedure for the characterization of the image regions along the video frames. The whole methodology has been applied on real data containing 6 full endoscopic exams and reached 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity.

  14. Sub-surface defects detection of by using active thermography and advanced image edge detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, Peter W.; Wang, Gaochao

    2017-01-01

    Active or pulsed thermography is a popular non-destructive testing (NDT) tool for inspecting the integrity and anomaly of industrial equipment. One of the recent research trends in using active thermography is to automate the process in detecting hidden defects. As of today, human effort has still been using to adjust the temperature intensity of the thermo camera in order to visually observe the difference in cooling rates caused by a normal target as compared to that by a sub-surface crack exists inside the target. To avoid the tedious human-visual inspection and minimize human induced error, this paper reports the design of an automatic method that is capable of detecting subsurface defects. The method used the technique of active thermography, edge detection in machine vision and smart algorithm. An infrared thermo-camera was used to capture a series of temporal pictures after slightly heating up the inspected target by flash lamps. Then the Canny edge detector was employed to automatically extract the defect related images from the captured pictures. The captured temporal pictures were preprocessed by a packet of Canny edge detector and then a smart algorithm was used to reconstruct the whole sequences of image signals. During the processes, noise and irrelevant backgrounds exist in the pictures were removed. Consequently, the contrast of the edges of defective areas had been highlighted. The designed automatic method was verified by real pipe specimens that contains sub-surface cracks. After applying such smart method, the edges of cracks can be revealed visually without the need of using manual adjustment on the setting of thermo-camera. With the help of this automatic method, the tedious process in manually adjusting the colour contract and the pixel intensity in order to reveal defects can be avoided. (paper)

  15. Endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging: in vivo small animal tumor model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Liu, Xia; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Background: Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides a great potential for clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques through using clinical approved radiotracers. However, it is difficult to obtain the Cerenkov luminescence signal of deeper biological tissues due to the small magnitude of the signal. To efficiently acquire the weak Cerenkov luminescence, we developed an endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system to reduce the in vivo imaging depth with minimum invasion, and validated the system on small animal tumor models. Methods: For the ECLI system, the laparoscope was connected to a high sensitive charge-couple device (CCD) camera (DU888+, Andor, UK) by a custom made adapter. We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments by use of the system. In the in vitro experiment, the endoscopic luminescence images of the 18F-FDG with various activities in EP tubes were acquired using ECLI system, and the sensitivity was compared with conventional CLI system. In the in vivo tumor experiment, 18F-FDG with the activity of 200μCi were intravenously injected into 3 tumor mice. Then the ECLI system was used to acquire the optical images for both non-invasive and invasive conditions. Conclusion: Experimental data showed the ECLI system could detect the 18F-FDG with the activity as low as 1μCi. Furthermore, our preliminary results indicated the possibility of ECLI technique for detecting Cerenkov signals inside the tumor tissue with deeper depth and guiding the surgical operation of tumor excision. We believe that this technique can help to accelerate the clinical translation of CLI.

  16. Spectrally enhanced imaging of occlusal surfaces and artificial shallow enamel erosions with a scanning fiber endoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2012-07-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope, originally developed for cancer diagnosis, was used to image dental occlusal surfaces as well as shallow artificially induced enamel erosions from human extracted teeth (n=40). Enhanced image resolution of occlusal surfaces was obtained using a short-wavelength 405-nm illumination laser. In addition, artificial erosions of varying depths were also imaged with 405-, 404-, 532-, and 635-nm illumination lasers. Laser-induced autofluorescence images of the teeth using 405-nm illumination were also obtained. Contrast between sound and eroded enamel was quantitatively computed for each imaging modality. For shallow erosions, the image contrast with respect to sound enamel was greatest for the 405-nm reflected image. It was also determined that the increased contrast was in large part due to volume scattering with a smaller component from surface scattering. Furthermore, images obtained with a shallow penetration depth illumination laser (405 nm) provided the greatest detail of surface enamel topography since the reflected light does not contain contributions from light reflected from greater depths within the enamel tissue. Multilayered Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to confirm the experimental results.

  17. 3D seismic imaging of the subsurface for underground construction and drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhlin, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    3D seismic imaging of underground structure has been carried out in various parts of the world for various purposes. Examples shown below were introduced in the presentation. - CO 2 storage in Ketzin, Germany; - Mine planning at the Millennium Uranium Deposit in Canada; - Planned Forsmark spent nuclear fuel repository in Sweden; - Exploring the Scandinavian Mountain Belt by Deep Drilling: the COSC drilling project in Sweden. The author explained that seismic methods provide the highest resolution images (5-10 m) of deeper (1-5 km) sub-surfaces in the sedimentary environment, but further improvement is required in crystalline rock environments, and the integration of geology, geophysics, and drilling will provide an optimal interpretation. (author)

  18. Tracking snowmelt in the subsurface: time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging on an alpine hill slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, D.; Parsekian, A.; Hyde, K.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    In the mountain West region the winter snowpack provides more than 70% of our annual water supply. Modeling and predicting the timing and magnitude of snowmelt-driven water yield is difficult due to the complexities of hydrologic systems that move meltwater from snow to rivers. Particular challenges are understanding the temporal and spatial domain of subsurface hydraulic processes at relevant scales, which range from points to catchments. Subsurface characterization often requires borehole instrumentation, which is expensive and extremely difficult to install in remote, rugged terrain. Advancements in non-invasive geophysical methods allow us to monitor changes in geophysical parameters over time and infer changes in hydraulic processes. In the No-Name experimental catchment in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, we are conducting a multi-season, time-lapse electrical resistivity imaging survey on a sub-alpine hill slope. This south-facing, partially forested slope ranges from 5 degrees to 35 degrees in steepness and consists of a soil mantle covering buried glacial talus deposits of unknown depth. A permanent grid of down-slope and cross-slope electrode arrays is monitored up to four times a day. The arrays span the entire vertical distance of the slope, from an exposed bedrock ridge to a seasonal drainage below, and cover treed and non-treed areas. Geophysical measurements are augmented by temperature and moisture time-series instrumented below the surface in a contiguous 3 meter borehole. A time-series of multiple resistivity models each day from May to July shows the changing distribution of subsurface moisture during a seasonal drying sequence punctuated by isolated rain events. Spatial patterns of changing moisture indicate that soil and gravel in the top two meters drain into a saturated layer parallel to the slope which overlies less saturated material. These results suggest that water from snowmelt and rain events tends to move down-slope beneath

  19. Application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging in endoscopic aqueductoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqiang; Zheng, Jiaping; Xiao, Qing; Liu, Yunsheng

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endoscopic aqueductoplasty (EA) for patients with obstructive hydrocephalus. The clinical diagnosis of hydrocephalus caused by aqueduct obstruction in 23 patients was confirmed by phase-contrast cine MRI examination. The patients were treated with EA and MRI was repeated during the follow-up. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocity in the aqueduct was measured to determine whether the aqueduct was obstructed. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations indicated that there was no CSF flow in the aqueduct for all patients prior to surgery. Aqueductoplasty was successfully performed in all patients. The results of phase-contrast cine MRI examinations performed a week after surgery demonstrated an average CSF flow velocity of 4.74±1.77 cm/sec. During the follow-up, intracranial hypertension recurred in two patients in whom CSF flow was not observed in the aqueduct by the phase-contrast cine MRI scan. Aqueduct re-occlusion was revealed by an endoscopic exploration. By measuring the CSF flow velocity, phase-contrast cine MRI accurately identifies aqueduct obstruction. Cine MRI is a nontraumatic, simple and reliable method for determining whether the aqueduct is successfully opened following aqueductoplasty.

  20. Essential pre-treatment imaging examinations in patients with endoscopically-diagnosed early gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunaga Mari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been no reports discussing which imaging procedures are truly necessary before treatment of endoscopically-diagnosed early gastric cancer (eEGC. The aim of this pilot study was to show which imaging examinations are essential to select indicated treatment or appropriate strategy in patients with eEGC. Methods In 140 consecutive patients (95 men, 45 women; age, 66.4 +/- 11.3 years [mean +/- standard deviation], range, 33-90 with eEGC which were diagnosed during two years, the pre-treatment results of ultrasonography (US and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT of the abdomen, barium enema (BE and chest radiography (CR were retrospectively reviewed. Useful findings that might affect indication or strategy were evaluated. Results US demonstrated useful findings in 13 of 140 patients (9.3%: biliary tract stones (n = 11 and other malignant tumors (n = 2. Only one useful finding was demonstrated on CT (pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous tumor but not on US (0.7%; 95% confidential interval [CI], 2.1%. BE demonstrated colorectal carcinomas in six patients and polyps in 10 patients, altering treatment strategy (11.4%; 95%CI, 6.1-16.7%. Of these, only two colorectal carcinomas were detected on CT. CR showed three relevant findings (2.1%: pulmonary carcinoma (n = 1 and cardiomegaly (n = 2. Seventy-nine patients (56% were treated surgically and 56 patients were treated by endoscopic intervention. The remaining five patients received no treatment due to various reasons. Conclusions US, BE and CR may be essential as pre-treatment imaging examinations because they occasionally detect findings which affect treatment indication and strategy, although abdominal contrast-enhanced CT rarely provide additional information.

  1. Electrical imaging of subsurface nanoparticle propagation for in-situ groundwater remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Gallistl, Jakob; Schmid, Doris; Micic Batka, Vesna; Bücker, Matthias; Hofmann, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    Application of nanoparticles has emerged as a promising in situ remediation technology for the remediation of contaminated groundwater, particularly for areas difficult to access by other remediation techniques. The performance of nanoparticle injections, as a foremost step within this technology, is usually assessed through the geochemical analysis of soil and groundwater samples. This approach is not well suited for a real-time monitoring, and often suffers from a poor spatio-temporal resolution and only provides information from areas close to the sampling points. To overcome these limitations we propose the application of non-invasive Induced Polarization (IP) imaging, a geophysical method that provides information on the electrical properties of the subsurface. The analysis of temporal changes in the electrical images allows tracking the propagation of the injected nanoparticle suspension and detection of the induced bio-geochemical changes in the subsurface. Here, we present IP monitoring results for data collected during the injection of Nano-Goethite particles (NGP) used for simulation of biodegradation of a BTEX plume (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) at the Spolchemie II site, CZ. Frequency-domain IP measurements were collected parallel to the groundwater flow direction and centred on the NGP injection point. Pre-injection imaging results revealed high electrical conductivities (> 10 S/m) and negligible polarization effects in the BTEX-contaminated part of the saturated zone (below 5 m depth). The apparently contradictory observation - BTEX compounds are poor electrical conductors - can be explained by the release of carbonic acids (a metabolic by-product of the biodegradation of hydrocarbons), which leads to an increase of the electrical conductivity. Post-injection images revealed a significant decrease (> 50%) of the electrical conductivity, with even larger changes in the proximity of the injection points, most likely due to the

  2. Shuttle Imaging Radar - Physical controls on signal penetration and subsurface scattering in the Eastern Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Olhoeft, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Interpretation of Shuttle Imaging Radar-A (SIR-A) images by McCauley et al. (1982) dramatically changed previous concepts of the role that fluvial processes have played over the past 10,000 to 30 million years in shaping this now extremely flat, featureless, and hyperarid landscape. In the present paper, the near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include (1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, (2) extremely low moisture content and (3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1.3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, here called 'radar imaging depth', was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1.5 m, or 0.25 of the calculated 'skin depth', for the sediment blanket. Radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials. Diverse permittivity interfaces and volume scatterers within the shallow subsurface are responsible for most of the observed backscatter not directly attributable to grazing outcrops. Calcium carbonate nodules and rhizoliths concentrated in sandy alluvium of Pleistocene age south of Safsaf oasis in south Egypt provide effective contrast in premittivity and thus act as volume scatterers that enhance SIR-A portrayal of younger inset stream channels.

  3. An algorithm for improving the quality of structural images of turbid media in endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potlov, A. Yu.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    High-quality OCT structural images reconstruction algorithm for endoscopic optical coherence tomography of biological tissue is described. The key features of the presented algorithm are: (1) raster scanning and averaging of adjacent Ascans and pixels; (2) speckle level minimization. The described algorithm can be used in the gastroenterology, urology, gynecology, otorhinolaryngology for mucous membranes and skin diagnostics in vivo and in situ.

  4. Intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic (IVUP) endoscope with 2.2-mm diameter catheter for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Nhat Quang; Hlaing, Kyu Kyu; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Oh, Yun-Ok; Fan, Xiao Feng; Lee, Yong Wook; Nam, Seung Yun; Kang, Hyun Wook; Oh, Junghwan

    2015-10-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is extremely important for detection and characterization of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques as well as gastrointestinal diseases. Recently, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging has been used to differentiate the composition of biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution. The combination of these imaging techniques could provide morphological information and molecular screening to characterize abnormal tissues, which would help physicians to ensure vital therapeutic value and prognostic significance for patients before commencing therapy. In this study, integration of a high-frequency IVUS imaging catheter (45MHz, single-element, unfocused, 0.7mm in diameter) with a multi-mode optical fiber (0.6mm in core diameter, 0.22 NA), an integrated intravascular ultrasonic-photoacoustic (IVUP) imaging catheter, was developed to provide spatial and functional information on light distribution in a turbid sample. Simultaneously, IVUS imaging was co-registered to IVPA imaging to construct 3D volumetric sample images. In a phantom study, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) tissue-mimicking arterial vessel phantom with indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB) inclusion was used to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping the biological dyes, which are used in cardiovascular and cancer diagnostics. For the ex vivo study, an excised sample of pig intestine with ICG was utilized to target the biomarkers present in the gastrointestinal tumors or the atherosclerotic plaques with the proposed hybrid technique. The results indicated that IVUP endoscope with the 2.2-mm diameter catheter could be a useful tool for medical imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-C-18A-02: Image-Based Camera Tracking: Towards Registration of Endoscopic Video to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, S; Rao, A; Wendt, R; Castillo, R; Court, L; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Endoscopic examinations are routinely performed on head and neck and esophageal cancer patients. However, these images are underutilized for radiation therapy because there is currently no way to register them to a CT of the patient. The purpose of this work is to develop a method to track the motion of an endoscope within a structure using images from standard clinical equipment. This method will be incorporated into a broader endoscopy/CT registration framework. Methods: We developed a software algorithm to track the motion of an endoscope within an arbitrary structure. We computed frame-to-frame rotation and translation of the camera by tracking surface points across the video sequence and utilizing two-camera epipolar geometry. The resulting 3D camera path was used to recover the surrounding structure via triangulation methods. We tested this algorithm on a rigid cylindrical phantom with a pattern spray-painted on the inside. We did not constrain the motion of the endoscope while recording, and we did not constrain our measurements using the known structure of the phantom. Results: Our software algorithm can successfully track the general motion of the endoscope as it moves through the phantom. However, our preliminary data do not show a high degree of accuracy in the triangulation of 3D point locations. More rigorous data will be presented at the annual meeting. Conclusion: Image-based camera tracking is a promising method for endoscopy/CT image registration, and it requires only standard clinical equipment. It is one of two major components needed to achieve endoscopy/CT registration, the second of which is tying the camera path to absolute patient geometry. In addition to this second component, future work will focus on validating our camera tracking algorithm in the presence of clinical imaging features such as patient motion, erratic camera motion, and dynamic scene illumination

  6. Location of disease on imaging may predict radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Moon Hyung; Jung, Seung Eun; Yoon, Seung Bae; Lee, In Seokand; Byun, Jae Young

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is performed for various diseases. The aim of this study is to evaluate the difference of dose-area product (DAP) during the ERCP procedures according to location of the lesion. We performed a retrospective study of consecutive 217 therapeutic ERCP examinations performed between November 2014 and April 2015 at a tertiary care center. ERCP procedures divided into two groups according to location of the lesion identified on imaging: lesions in the common hepatic duct (CHD) or the common bile duct (CBD) and lesions in the hepatic hilum or the intrahepatic duct (IHD). The mean DAP of the hilum-IHD group (48.7 Gy cm 2 ) was significantly higher than that of the CBD-CHD group (34.9 Gy cm 2 ) (P = 0.003). Radiation exposure during ERCP was significantly different according to location of bile duct lesion. (authors)

  7. An Entropy-Based Propagation Speed Estimation Method for Near-Field Subsurface Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last forty years, Subsurface Radar (SR has been used in an increasing number of noninvasive/nondestructive imaging applications, ranging from landmine detection to breast imaging. To properly assess the dimensions and locations of the targets within the scan area, SR data sets have to be reconstructed. This process usually requires the knowledge of the propagation speed in the medium, which is usually obtained by performing an offline measurement from a representative sample of the materials that form the scan region. Nevertheless, in some novel near-field SR scenarios, such as Microwave Wood Inspection (MWI and Breast Microwave Radar (BMR, the extraction of a representative sample is not an option due to the noninvasive requirements of the application. A novel technique to determine the propagation speed of the medium based on the use of an information theory metric is proposed in this paper. The proposed method uses the Shannon entropy of the reconstructed images as the focal quality metric to generate an estimate of the propagation speed in a given scan region. The performance of the proposed algorithm was assessed using data sets collected from experimental setups that mimic the dielectric contrast found in BMI and MWI scenarios. The proposed method yielded accurate results and exhibited an execution time in the order of seconds.

  8. An Entropy-Based Propagation Speed Estimation Method for Near-Field Subsurface Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tapia, Daniel; Pistorius, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    During the last forty years, Subsurface Radar (SR) has been used in an increasing number of noninvasive/nondestructive imaging applications, ranging from landmine detection to breast imaging. To properly assess the dimensions and locations of the targets within the scan area, SR data sets have to be reconstructed. This process usually requires the knowledge of the propagation speed in the medium, which is usually obtained by performing an offline measurement from a representative sample of the materials that form the scan region. Nevertheless, in some novel near-field SR scenarios, such as Microwave Wood Inspection (MWI) and Breast Microwave Radar (BMR), the extraction of a representative sample is not an option due to the noninvasive requirements of the application. A novel technique to determine the propagation speed of the medium based on the use of an information theory metric is proposed in this paper. The proposed method uses the Shannon entropy of the reconstructed images as the focal quality metric to generate an estimate of the propagation speed in a given scan region. The performance of the proposed algorithm was assessed using data sets collected from experimental setups that mimic the dielectric contrast found in BMI and MWI scenarios. The proposed method yielded accurate results and exhibited an execution time in the order of seconds.

  9. High-spatial-resolution sub-surface imaging using a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Oluwaseyi; Cole, Garrett D; Huber, Robert; Chinn, Diane; Murray, Todd W; Spicer, James B

    2011-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy techniques operating at frequencies in the gigahertz range are suitable for the elastic characterization and interior imaging of solid media with micrometer-scale spatial resolution. Acoustic wave propagation at these frequencies is strongly limited by energy losses, particularly from attenuation in the coupling media used to transmit ultrasound to a specimen, leading to a decrease in the depth in a specimen that can be interrogated. In this work, a laser-based acoustic microscopy technique is presented that uses a pulsed laser source for the generation of broadband acoustic waves and an optical interferometer for detection. The use of a 900-ps microchip pulsed laser facilitates the generation of acoustic waves with frequencies extending up to 1 GHz which allows for the resolution of micrometer-scale features in a specimen. Furthermore, the combination of optical generation and detection approaches eliminates the use of an ultrasonic coupling medium, and allows for elastic characterization and interior imaging at penetration depths on the order of several hundred micrometers. Experimental results illustrating the use of the laser-based acoustic microscopy technique for imaging micrometer-scale subsurface geometrical features in a 70-μm-thick single-crystal silicon wafer with a (100) orientation are presented.

  10. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR: PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON SIGNAL PENETRATION AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING IN THE EASTERN SAHARA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) signal penetration and subsurface backscatter within the upper meter or so of the sediment blanket in the Eastern Sahara of southern Egypt and northern Sudan are enhanced both by radar sensor parameters and by the physical and chemical characteristics of eolian and alluvial materials. The near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include 1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, 2) extremely low moisture content and 3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1. 3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, called radar imaging depth, was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1. 5 m, or 0. 25 times the calculated skin depth, for the sediment blanket. The radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials.

  11. A standardised protocol for texture feature analysis of endoscopic images in gynaecological cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattichis Marios S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the development of tissue classification methods, classifiers rely on significant differences between texture features extracted from normal and abnormal regions. Yet, significant differences can arise due to variations in the image acquisition method. For endoscopic imaging of the endometrium, we propose a standardized image acquisition protocol to eliminate significant statistical differences due to variations in: (i the distance from the tissue (panoramic vs close up, (ii difference in viewing angles and (iii color correction. Methods We investigate texture feature variability for a variety of targets encountered in clinical endoscopy. All images were captured at clinically optimum illumination and focus using 720 × 576 pixels and 24 bits color for: (i a variety of testing targets from a color palette with a known color distribution, (ii different viewing angles, (iv two different distances from a calf endometrial and from a chicken cavity. Also, human images from the endometrium were captured and analysed. For texture feature analysis, three different sets were considered: (i Statistical Features (SF, (ii Spatial Gray Level Dependence Matrices (SGLDM, and (iii Gray Level Difference Statistics (GLDS. All images were gamma corrected and the extracted texture feature values were compared against the texture feature values extracted from the uncorrected images. Statistical tests were applied to compare images from different viewing conditions so as to determine any significant differences. Results For the proposed acquisition procedure, results indicate that there is no significant difference in texture features between the panoramic and close up views and between angles. For a calibrated target image, gamma correction provided an acquired image that was a significantly better approximation to the original target image. In turn, this implies that the texture features extracted from the corrected images provided for better

  12. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content distribution in the subsurface. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickx, J.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of the project is to evaluate Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( NMRI) for determining water content distribution in the subsurface. In NMRI the interaction of the magnetic moment of hydrogen ( protons) nuclei with external applied electromagnetic ( EM ) fields is measured. In surface NMRI the Earth''s magnetic field causes alignment of the spinning protons. An alternating EM field is generated by a loop of wire laid on the Earth surface. The alternating current driven through the loop at the Lamor frequency of protons in liquid water. The component of the EM field perpendicular to the Earth''s field causes a precession of protons from their equilibrium position. Water content distribution in the subsurface is derived from measurements on the EM field caused by the return of the precessing protons to equilibrium after the current in the transmitter loop is terminated. The scientific goals of the R and D are: to verify and validate the theoretical concepts and experimental results of Russian scientists, who first introduced this method; to evaluate the range of applications and limitations of this technology for practical field measurements. NMRI has the potential of providing a remote, direct, unique method for subsurface water measurements. All present methods are either intrusive or indirect ( e.g. electrical resitivity measurements). In the past year progress has been made along two separate paths. These are: (1) Field Measurements. Surface NMRI equipment manufactured by IRIS Instruments of France was tested over a number of sites with good hydrogeologic control. The results of these measurements can be summarized as follows: The NMRI measurement directly and uniquely determines water distribution in coarse grained aquifers; geologic formation from which water can be readily withdrawn. Water content can not be determined by this technique in fine grained sediments. The signal to be measured is very small and EM interference''s from power

  13. [Study of Image Quality Comparison Based on the MTF Method Between Different Medical Rigid Endoscopes in an In Vitro Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunlong; Ji, Jun; Jiang, Changsong; Huang, Zengyue

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed to use the method of modulation transfer function (MTF) to compare image quality among three different Olympus medical rigid cystoscopes in an in vitro model. During the experimental processes, we firstly used three different types of cystoscopes (i. e. OLYMPUS cystourethroscopy with FOV of 12 degrees, OLYMPUS Germany A22003A and OLYMPUS A2013A) to collect raster images at different brightness with industrial camera and computer from the resolution target which is with different spatial frequency, and then we processed the collected images using MALAB software with the optical transfer function MTF to obtain the values of MTF at different brightness and different spatial frequency. We then did data mathematical statistics and compared imaging quality. The statistical data showed that all three MTF values were smaller than 1. MTF values with the spatial frequency gradually increasing would decrease approaching 0 at the same brightness. When the brightness enhanced in the same process at the same spatial frequency, MTF values showed a slowly increasing trend. The three endoscopes' MTF values were completely different. In some cases the MTF values had a large difference, and the maximum difference could reach 0.7. Conclusion can be derived from analysis of experimental data that three Olympus medical rigid cystoscopes have completely different imaging quality abilities. The No. 3 endoscope OLYMPUS A2013A has low resolution but high contrast. The No. 1 endoscope OLYMPUS cystourethroscopy with FOV of 12 degrees, on the contrary, had high resolution and lower contrast. The No. 2 endoscope OLYMPUS Germany A22003A had high contrast and high resolution, and its image quality was the best.

  14. Simulation, image reconstruction and SiPM characterisation for a novel endoscopic positron emission tomography detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvolsky, Milan

    2017-12-01

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for ultrasound (US) endoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional biomarkers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The detector system comprises a small detector probe mounted on an ultrasound endoscope and an external detector plate. The detection of the gamma rays is realised by scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out. For the characterisation of over 4000 SiPMs for the external plate, an automatised measurement and data analysis procedure is established. The key properties of the SiPMs like breakdown voltage and dark count rate (DCR) are extracted. This knowledge is needed both as a quality assurance as well as for the calibration of the detector. The spread between minimum and maximum breakdown voltage within a SiPM array of 4 x 4 is at maximum 0.43 V with a mean of 0.15 V and an RMS of 0.06 V. This assures the optimal biasing of each SiPM at its individual operating voltage. The mean DCR amounts to 1.49 MHz with an RMS of 0.54 MHz and is thus well below the acceptable threshold of 3 MHz. Two spare modules from the external plate are re-measured and analysed several years after the module assembly, revealing a potential alteration of the SiPM noise properties over time. For the characterisation of SiPMs from different vendors, a software framework for the automatic extraction of performance parameters from pulseheight spectra, including a t of the entire spectrum, is developed and tested. In order to facilitate the modelling of the response of the EndoTOFPET-US detector, a framework is developed which is built around the Geant4-based simulation toolkit GAMOS, to simulate and reconstruct realistic imaging scenarios with this asymmetric PET detector. The simulation studies are used to compare different possible detector designs, guide the

  15. Simulation, image reconstruction and SiPM characterisation for a novel endoscopic positron emission tomography detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvolsky, Milan

    2017-12-15

    In the scope of the EndoTOFPET-US project, a novel multimodal device for ultrasound (US) endoscopy and positron emission tomography (PET) is being developed. The project aims at detecting and quantifying morphologic and functional biomarkers and developing new biomarkers for pancreas and prostate oncology. The detector system comprises a small detector probe mounted on an ultrasound endoscope and an external detector plate. The detection of the gamma rays is realised by scintillator crystals with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) read-out. For the characterisation of over 4000 SiPMs for the external plate, an automatised measurement and data analysis procedure is established. The key properties of the SiPMs like breakdown voltage and dark count rate (DCR) are extracted. This knowledge is needed both as a quality assurance as well as for the calibration of the detector. The spread between minimum and maximum breakdown voltage within a SiPM array of 4 x 4 is at maximum 0.43 V with a mean of 0.15 V and an RMS of 0.06 V. This assures the optimal biasing of each SiPM at its individual operating voltage. The mean DCR amounts to 1.49 MHz with an RMS of 0.54 MHz and is thus well below the acceptable threshold of 3 MHz. Two spare modules from the external plate are re-measured and analysed several years after the module assembly, revealing a potential alteration of the SiPM noise properties over time. For the characterisation of SiPMs from different vendors, a software framework for the automatic extraction of performance parameters from pulseheight spectra, including a t of the entire spectrum, is developed and tested. In order to facilitate the modelling of the response of the EndoTOFPET-US detector, a framework is developed which is built around the Geant4-based simulation toolkit GAMOS, to simulate and reconstruct realistic imaging scenarios with this asymmetric PET detector. The simulation studies are used to compare different possible detector designs, guide the

  16. Endoscopic tri-modal imaging for detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus: a multi-centre feasibility study using high-resolution endoscopy, autofluorescence imaging and narrow band imaging incorporated in one endoscopy system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, W. L.; Singh, R.; Song, L.-M. Wong-Kee; Wolfsen, H. C.; Ragunath, K.; Wang, K.; Wallace, M. B.; Fockens, P.; Bergman, J. J. G. H. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic potential of endoscopic tri-modal imaging and the relative contribution of each imaging modality (i.e. high-resolution endoscopy (HRE), autofluorescence imaging (AFI) and narrow-band imaging (NBI)) for the detection of early neoplasia in Barrett's oesophagus.

  17. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography using micromotor imaging catheter and VCSEL technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Potsaid, Benjamin; Tao, Yuankai K; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Heim, Peter J S; Kraus, Martin F; Zhou, Chao; Hornegger, Joachim; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Cable, Alex E; Fujimoto, James G

    2013-07-01

    We developed a micromotor based miniature catheter with an outer diameter of 3.2 mm for ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) at a 1 MHz axial scan rate. The micromotor can rotate a micro-prism at several hundred frames per second with less than 5 V drive voltage to provide fast and stable scanning, which is not sensitive to the bending of the catheter. The side-viewing probe can be pulled back to acquire a three-dimensional (3D) data set covering a large area on the specimen. The VCSEL provides a high axial scan rate to support dense sampling under high frame rate operation. Using a high speed data acquisition system, in vivo 3D-OCT imaging in the rabbit GI tract and ex vivo imaging of a human colon specimen with 8 μm axial resolution, 8 μm lateral resolution and 1.2 mm depth range in tissue at a frame rate of 400 fps was demonstrated.

  18. Quantifying the dynamics of flow within a permeable bed using time-resolved endoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (EPIV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blois, G. [University of Birmingham, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Birmingham (United Kingdom); University of Illinois, Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Urbana, IL (United States); Sambrook Smith, G.H.; Lead, J.R. [University of Birmingham, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Best, J.L. [University of Illinois, Departments of Geology, Geography, Mechanical Science and Engineering, and Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, Urbana, IL (United States); Hardy, R.J. [Durham University, Department of Geography, Science Laboratories, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents results of an experimental study investigating the mean and temporal evolution of flow within the pore space of a packed bed overlain by a free-surface flow. Data were collected by an endoscopic PIV (EPIV) technique. EPIV allows the instantaneous velocity field within the pore space to be quantified at a high spatio-temporal resolution, thus permitting investigation of the structure of turbulent subsurface flow produced by a high Reynolds number freestream flow (Re{sub s} in the range 9.8 x 10{sup 3}-9.7 x 10{sup 4}). Evolution of coherent flow structures within the pore space is shown to be driven by jet flow, with the interaction of this jet with the pore flow generating distinct coherent flow structures. The effects of freestream water depth, Reynolds and Froude numbers are investigated. (orig.)

  19. Subsurface imaging of water electrical conductivity, hydraulic permeability and lithology at contaminated sites by induced polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, P. K.; Balbarini, N.; Møller, I.; Rønde, V.; Christiansen, A. V.; Bjerg, P. L.; Auken, E.; Fiandaca, G.

    2018-05-01

    At contaminated sites, knowledge about geology and hydraulic properties of the subsurface and extent of the contamination is needed for assessing the risk and for designing potential site remediation. In this study, we have developed a new approach for characterizing contaminated sites through time-domain spectral induced polarization. The new approach is based on: (1) spectral inversion of the induced polarization data through a reparametrization of the Cole-Cole model, which disentangles the electrolytic bulk conductivity from the surface conductivity for delineating the contamination plume; (2) estimation of hydraulic permeability directly from the inverted parameters using a laboratory-derived empirical equation without any calibration; (3) the use of the geophysical imaging results for supporting the geological modelling and planning of drilling campaigns. The new approach was tested on a data set from the Grindsted stream (Denmark), where contaminated groundwater from a factory site discharges to the stream. Two overlapping areas were covered with seven parallel 2-D profiles each, one large area of 410 m × 90 m (5 m electrode spacing) and one detailed area of 126 m × 42 m (2 m electrode spacing). The geophysical results were complemented and validated by an extensive set of hydrologic and geologic information, including 94 estimates of hydraulic permeability obtained from slug tests and grain size analyses, 89 measurements of water electrical conductivity in groundwater, and four geological logs. On average the IP-derived and measured permeability values agreed within one order of magnitude, except for those close to boundaries between lithological layers (e.g. between sand and clay), where mismatches occurred due to the lack of vertical resolution in the geophysical imaging. An average formation factor was estimated from the correlation between the imaged bulk conductivity values and the water conductivity values measured in groundwater, in order to

  20. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    A new research infrastructure for supporting ground-based remote sensing observations in the different phases of georisk management cycle is presented. This instrumental facility has been designed and realised by TeRN, a public-private consortium on Earth Observations and Natural Risks, in the frame of the project "ImpresAmbiente" funded by Italian Ministry of Research and University. The new infrastructure is equipped with ground-based sensors (hyperspectral cameras, thermal cameras, laser scanning and electromagnetic antennae) able to remotely map physical parameters and/or earth-surface properties (temperature, soil moisture, land cover, etc…) and to illuminate near-surface geological structures (fault, groundwater tables, landslide bodies etc...). Furthermore, the system can be used for non-invasive investigations of architectonic buildings and civil infrastructures (bridges, tunnel, road pavements, etc...) interested by natural and man-made hazards. The hyperspectral cameras can acquire high resolution images of earth-surface and cultural objects. They are operating in the Visible Near InfraRed (0.4÷1.0μm) with 1600 spatial pixel and 3.7nm of spectral sampling and in the Short Wave InfraRed (1.3÷2.5µm) spectral region with 320 spatial pixel and 5nm of spectral sampling. The IR cameras are operating in the Medium Wavelength InfraRed (3÷5µm; 640x512; NETDcultural heritage. As a consequence, laser data can be useful integrated with traditional monitoring techniques. The Laser Scanner is characterized by very high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface tomographic images. The main components are a fully automatic

  1. Clinical evaluation of endoscopic trimodal imaging for the detection and differentiation of colonic polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Frank J C; Fockens, Paul; Van Eeden, Susanne; Kara, Mohammed A; Hardwick, James C H; Reitsma, Johannes B; Dekker, Evelien

    2009-03-01

    Endoscopic trimodal imaging (ETMI) incorporates high-resolution endoscopy (HRE) and autofluorescence imaging (AFI) for adenoma detection, and narrow-band imaging (NBI) for differentiation of adenomas from nonneoplastic polyps. The aim of this study was to compare AFI with HRE for adenoma detection and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of NBI for differentiation of polyps. This was a randomized trial of tandem colonoscopies. The study was performed at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. One hundred patients underwent colonoscopy with ETMI. Each colonic segment was examined twice for polyps, once with HRE and once with AFI, in random order per patient. All detected polyps were assessed with NBI for pit pattern and with AFI for color, and subsequently removed. Histopathology served as the gold standard for diagnosis. The main outcome measures of this study were adenoma miss-rates of AFI and HRE, and diagnostic accuracy of NBI and AFI for differentiating adenomas from nonneoplastic polyps. Among 50 patients examined with AFI first, 32 adenomas were detected initially. Subsequent inspection with HRE identified 8 additional adenomas. Among 50 patients examined with HRE first, 35 adenomas were detected initially. Successive AFI yielded 14 additional adenomas. The adenoma miss-rates of AFI and HRE therefore were 20% and 29%, respectively (P = .351). The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of NBI for differentiation were 90%, 70%, and 79%, respectively; corresponding figures for AFI were 99%, 35%, and 63%, respectively. The overall adenoma miss-rate was 25%; AFI did not significantly reduce the adenoma miss-rate compared with HRE. Both NBI and AFI had a disappointing diagnostic accuracy for polyp differentiation, although AFI had a high sensitivity.

  2. Endoscopic Laser-Based 3D Imaging for Functional Voice Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Semmler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported on the in vivo application of a miniaturized measuring device for 3D visualization of the superior vocal fold vibrations from high-speed recordings in combination with a laser projection unit (LPU. As a long-term vision for this proof of principle, we strive to integrate the further developed laserendoscopy as a diagnostic method in daily clinical routine. The new LPU mainly comprises a Nd:YAG laser source (532 nm/CW/2 ω and a diffractive optical element (DOE generating a regular laser grid (31 × 31 laser points that is projected on the vocal folds. By means of stereo triangulation, the 3D coordinates of the laser points are reconstructed from the endoscopic high-speed footage. The new design of the laserendoscope constitutes a compromise between robust image processing and laser safety regulations. The algorithms for calibration and analysis are now optimized with respect to their overall duration and the number of required interactions, which is objectively assessed using binary classifiers. The sensitivity and specificity of the calibration procedure are increased by 40.1% and 22.3%, which is statistically significant. The overall duration for the laser point detection is reduced by 41.9%. The suggested semi-automatic reconstruction software represents an important stepping-stone towards potential real time processing and a comprehensive, objective diagnostic tool of evidence-based medicine.

  3. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging protocol for endoscopic cranial base image-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindle, Christopher R; Curry, Joseph M; Kang, Melissa D; Evans, James J; Rosen, Marc R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing utilization of image-guided surgery, no radiology protocols for obtaining magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of adequate quality are available in the current literature. At our institution, more than 300 endonasal cranial base procedures including pituitary, extended pituitary, and other anterior skullbase procedures have been performed in the past 3 years. To facilitate and optimize preoperative evaluation and assessment, there was a need to develop a magnetic resonance protocol. Retrospective Technical Assessment was performed. Through a collaborative effort between the otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and neuroradiology departments at our institution, a skull base MR image-guided (IGS) protocol was developed with several ends in mind. First, it was necessary to generate diagnostic images useful for the more frequently seen pathologies to improve work flow and limit the expense and inefficiency of case specific MR studies. Second, it was necessary to generate sequences useful for IGS, preferably using sequences that best highlight that lesion. Currently, at our institution, all MR images used for IGS are obtained using this protocol as part of preoperative planning. The protocol that has been developed allows for thin cut precontrast and postcontrast axial cuts that can be used to plan intraoperative image guidance. It also obtains a thin cut T2 axial series that can be compiled separately for intraoperative imaging, or may be fused with computed tomographic images for combined modality. The outlined protocol obtains image sequences effective for diagnostic and operative purposes for image-guided surgery using both T1 and T2 sequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Wide-field phase imaging for the endoscopic detection of dysplasia and early-stage esophageal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, C. R. M.; Gordon, G. S. D.; Sawyer, T. W.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.

    2018-02-01

    Esophageal cancer has a 5-year survival rate below 20%, but can be curatively resected if it is detected early. At present, poor contrast for early lesions in white light imaging leads to a high miss rate in standard-of- care endoscopic surveillance. Early lesions in the esophagus, referred to as dysplasia, are characterized by an abundance of abnormal cells with enlarged nuclei. This tissue has a different refractive index profile to healthy tissue, which results in different light scattering properties and provides a source of endogenous contrast that can be exploited for advanced endoscopic imaging. For example, point measurements of such contrast can be made with scattering spectroscopy, while optical coherence tomography generates volumetric data. However, both require specialist interpretation for diagnostic decision making. We propose combining wide-field phase imaging with existing white light endoscopy in order to provide enhanced contrast for dysplasia and early-stage cancer in an image format that is familiar to endoscopists. Wide-field phase imaging in endoscopy can be achieved using coherent illumination combined with phase retrieval algorithms. Here, we present the design and simulation of a benchtop phase imaging system that is compatible with capsule endoscopy. We have undertaken preliminary optical modelling of the phase imaging setup, including aberration correction simulations and an investigation into distinguishing between different tissue phantom scattering coefficients. As our approach is based on phase retrieval rather than interferometry, it is feasible to realize a device with low-cost components for future clinical implementation.

  5. Staging of Klatskin tumours (hilar cholangiocarcinomas): comparison of MR cholangiography, MR imaging, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Schwarz, Wolfram O.; Heller, Matthias; Herzog, Christopher; Zangos, Stephan; Hammerstingl, Renate M.; Hintze, Rainer E.; Neuhaus, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare prospectively magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) in the diagnosis and staging of Klatskin tumours of the biliary tree (hilar cholangiocarcinomas). Forty-six patients with suspected Klatskin tumours of the biliary tract underwent MRI and heavily T2-weighted, non-breathhold, respiratory-triggered fast spin-echo MRC. Forty-two patients underwent ERC within 24 h; in four patients, ERC was not feasible, and percutaneous trans-hepatic cholangiography (PTC) was carried out instead. Two independent investigators evaluated imaging results for the presence of tumour, bile duct dilatation, and stenosis. Clinical and histopathological correlation revealed Klatskin tumours in 33 patients. MRI revealed a slightly hyperintense signal of infiltrated bile ducts in T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The malignant lesion was regularly visualized as a hypointense area in T1-weighted gradient-echo sequences with substantial contrast enhancement along the involved bile duct walls. MRC revealed the location and extension of the tumour in 31 of 33 cases correctly (sensitivity 94%, specificity 100%, diagnostic accuracy 95%). In 27 of 31 cases, ERC enabled accurate staging and diagnosis of Klatskin tumours with a sensitivity of 87%. ERC and PTC combined yielded a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 97%. Tumours were grouped according to the Bismuth classification, with MRC allowing correct identification of type I tumour in seven patients, type II tumour in four patients, type III tumour in 12 patients, and type IV tumour in ten patients. MRC provided superior visualization of completely obstructed peripheral systems. MRC in combination with MRI is a reliable non-invasive diagnostic method for the pre-therapeutic staging of Klatskin tumours. (orig.)

  6. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Endocrinology: Imaging of the Adrenals and the Endocrine Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Peter Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) imaging of adrenal glands and its application to diagnostic procedures of adrenal diseases has been reported since 1998. It can be considered a relevant advantage in the field of adrenal diseases. Indeed, EUS allows the detection of adrenal lesions (even very small ones) and their characterization, the assessment of malignancy criteria, the early detection of neoplastic recurrences, the preoperative identification of morphologically healthy parts of the glands, the differentiation of extra-adrenal from adrenal tumors, and of the pathological entities associated with adrenal insufficiency, and the fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) of suspicious lesions. At the same time, its clinical relevance depends on the experience of the endosonographer. Moreover, EUS is also by far the best and most sensitive imaging technique to detect and assess the follow-up of pancreatic manifestation of MEN1 disease. It furthermore enables the preoperatively localization of insulinomas and critical structures in their neighborhood, and may be relevant in planning surgical strategy. A positive EUS in a case of insulinoma furthermore confirms the endocrine diagnosis, especially considering the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia factitia by oral antidiabetics. It can be supplemented by EUS-FNA. Again, it has to be considered that EUS may reveal false positive and false negative results, and the quality of the findings largely depends on the endosonographer's skills and experience. The most important technical details together with the advantages and limitations of EUS, and the pathognomonic characteristic of benign and malignant disorders of the adrenals and pancreas are presented here. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Capabilities of seismic and georadar 2D/3D imaging of shallow subsurface of transport route using the Seismobile system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecki, Zenon; Isakow, Zbigniew; Czarny, Rafał; Pilecka, Elżbieta; Harba, Paulina; Barnaś, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the capabilities of the Seismobile system for shallow subsurface imaging of transport routes, such as roads, railways, and airport runways, in different geological conditions were presented. The Seismobile system combines the advantages of seismic profiling using landstreamer and georadar (GPR) profiling. It consists of up to four seismic measuring lines and carriage with a suspended GPR antenna. Shallow subsurface recognition may be achieved to a maximum width of 10.5 m for a distance of 3.5 m between the measurement lines. GPR measurement is performed in the axis of the construction. Seismobile allows the measurement time, labour and costs to be reduced due to easy technique of its installation, remote data transmission from geophones to accompanying measuring modules, automated location of the system based on GPS and a highly automated method of seismic wave excitation. In this paper, the results of field tests carried out in different geological conditions were presented. The methodologies of acquisition, processing and interpretation of seismic and GPR measurements were broadly described. Seismograms and its spectrum registered by Seismobile system were compared to the ones registered by Geode seismograph of Geometrix. Seismic data processing and interpretation software allows for the obtaining of 2D/3D models of P- and S-wave velocities. Combined seismic and GPR results achieved sufficient imaging of shallow subsurface to a depth of over a dozen metres. The obtained geophysical information correlated with geological information from the boreholes with good quality. The results of performed tests proved the efficiency of the Seismobile system in seismic and GPR imaging of a shallow subsurface of transport routes under compound conditions.

  8. An Automatic Framework Using Space-Time Processing and TR-MUSIC for Subsurface and Through-Wall Multitarget Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-hao Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an automatic framework combined space-time signal processing with Time Reversal electromagnetic (EM inversion for subsurface and through-wall multitarget imaging using electromagnetic waves. This framework is composed of a frequency-wavenumber (FK filter to suppress direct wave and medium bounce, a FK migration algorithm to automatically estimate the number of targets and identify target regions, which can be used to reduce the computational complexity of the following imaging algorithm, and a EM inversion algorithm using Time Reversal Multiple Signal Classification (TR-MUSIC to reconstruct hidden objects. The feasibility of the framework is demonstrated with simulated data generated by GPRMAX.

  9. More noise, please: How cultural overprinting in the urban environment can be exploited for improved subsurface imaging (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    A long standing issue for geophysical imaging methods revolves around the proper treatment of "noise": Defining what noise is; separating "noise" for "signal"; filtering and suppressing noise; and recently, challenging the prevailing view that noise is a nuisance to see if, instead, it may contribute favorably toward improving subsurface imaging fidelity. This last point is particularly relevant to geophysical imaging in the urban environment where noise sources are abundant, complex, and logistical constraints on geophysical field procedures prohibit a crude "turning up the volume" approach to simply drown out the noise with powerful sources of electromagnetic and seismic energy. In this contribution I explore the concept passive geophysical imaging which uses uncorrelated ambient noise as the source of geophysical imaging energy to be used in the urban environment. Examples will be presented from seismic and ground penetrating radar methods, in addition to new theoretical results bearing on the feasibility of low-frequency electromagnetic induction techniques.

  10. FY1995 development of a endoscopic surgical system utilizing multi-modal functional images; 1995 nendo tashu kino gazo wo mochiiru teishinshu naishikyo shujutsu system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an endoscope system for neurosurgery that can provide not only conventional endoscopic images but also ultraviolet-visible spectra, fluorescence spectra, near infrared spectra, and ultra-soundimages of tissue aiming for real-time identification of pathological tissue. The system also incorporates surgical manipulator and devices such as micro forceps and laser surgical instruments for endoscopic image guided surgery. Surgical Manipulator should be a high performance and easy to operate surgical instrument as well as conventional surgical tools such as scissors and knife. Since living tissue deforms during surgical operation, pre-operative three dimensional information for registration of pathological tissue should be modified based on information obtained during surgery. Thus surgical manipulator should be operated under guidance of surgeon's observation. Consequently, surgical manipulator should have various types of imaging and measurement devices such as an endoscope and an ultrasound imaging probe at its end effectors. Based on this concept, a prototype of a new multi channel surgical manipulator system CM cube (CM3, Computer aided Micro Multichannel Manipulator) that has various types of imaging and measurement devices such as ultra-violet-visible camera for spectroscopic measurement, ultra-sound imaging probe, three dimensional endoscope, together with micro surgical instruments and laser surgical systems has been developed. Its performance was evaluated through in vitro/in vivo experiments and clinical application. (NEDO)

  11. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neauport, J.; Cormont, P.; Destribats, J.; Legros, P.; Ambard, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding induces a fluorescence that marks the subsurface damages and eases its observation. Such residual traces might also be involved in the laser damage process. (authors)

  12. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r 2 = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r 2 = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  13. Feasibility study of novel endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system in detecting and quantifying gastrointestinal disease: first human results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Li, Shujun; Yao, Liping; Liang, Jie; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun [Fourth Military Medical University, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Cao, Xin; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli [Xidian University, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an (China); Kang, Fei; Wang, Jing [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China); Wang, Min [Xi' an Children' s Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Xi' an (China)

    2015-06-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides potential to use clinical radiotracers for optical imaging. The goal of this study was to present a newly developed endoscopic CLI (ECLI) system and illustrate its feasibility and potential in distinguishing and quantifying cancerous lesions of the GI tract. The ECLI system was established by integrating an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera with a flexible fibre endoscope. Phantom experiments and animal studies were conducted to test and illustrate the system in detecting and quantifying the presence of radionuclide in vitro and in vivo. A pilot clinical study was performed to evaluate our system in clinical settings. Phantom and mice experiments demonstrated its ability to acquire both the luminescent and photographic images with high accuracy. Linear quantitative relationships were also obtained when comparing the ECLI radiance with the radiotracer activity (r{sup 2} = 0.9779) and traditional CLI values (r{sup 2} = 0.9025). Imaging of patients revealed the potential of ECLI in the identification and quantification of cancerous tissue from normal, which showed good consistence with the clinical PET examination. The new ECLI system shows good consistence with the clinical PET examination and has great potential for clinical translation and in aiding detection of the GI tract disease. (orig.)

  14. Broadband Ground Penetrating Radar with conformal antennas for subsurface imaging from a rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, D. E.; Oden, C. P.; Grimm, R. E.; Ragusa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) allows subsurface imaging to provide geologic context and will be flown on the next two martian rovers (WISDOM on ExoMars and RIMFAX on Mars 2020). The motivation of our research is to minimize the engineering challenges of mounting a GPR antenna to a spacecraft, while maximizing the scientific capabilities of the GPR. The scientific capabilities increase with the bandwidth as it controls the resolution. Furthermore, ultra-wide bandwidth surveys allow certain mineralogies and rock units to be discriminated based on their frequency-dependent EM or scattering properties. We have designed and field-tested a prototype GPR that utilizes bi-static circularly polarized spiral antennas. Each antenna has a physical size of 61 x 61 x 4 cm, therefore two antennas could be mounted to the underbelly of a MSL-class rover. Spiral antennas were chosen because they have an inherent broadband response and provide a better low frequency response compared with similarly sized linearly polarized antennas. A horizontal spiral radiator emits energy both upward and downward directions. After the radiator is mounted to a metal surface (i.e. the underside of a rover), a cavity is formed that causes the upward traveling energy to reverberate and cause unwanted interference. This interference is minimized by 1) using a high metallization ratio on the spiral to reduce cavity emissions, and 2) placing absorbing material inside the cavity. The resulting antennas provide high gain (0 to 8 dBi) from 200 to 1000 MHz. The low frequency response can be improved by increasing the antenna thickness (i.e., cavity depth). In an initial field test, the antennas were combined with impulse GPR electronics that had ~140 dB of dynamic range (not including antennas) and a sand/clay interface 7 feet deep was detected. To utilize the full bandwidth the antennas, a gated Frequency Modulated Continuous Waveform system will be developed - similar to RIMFAX. The goal is to reach a

  15. High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging and Stratigraphy of Quaternary Deposits, Marapanim Estuary, Northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C. A.; Souza Filho, P. M.; Gouvea Luiz, J.

    2007-05-01

    The Marapanim estuary is situated in the Para Coastal Plain, North Brazil. It is characterized by an embayed coastline developed on Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the Barreiras and Pos-Barreiras Group. This system is strongly influenced by macrotidal regimes with semidiurnal tides and by humid tropical climate conditions. The interpretation of GPR-reflections presented in this paper is based on correlation of the GPR signal with stratigraphic data acquired on the coastal plain through five cores that were taken along GPR survey lines from the recent deposits and outcrops observed along to the coastal area. The profiles were obtained using a Geophysical Survey Systems Inc., Model YR-2 GPR, with monostatic 700 MHz antenna that permitted to get records of subsurface deposits at 20m depth. Were collected 54 radar sections completing a total of 4.360m. The field data were analyzed using a RADAN software and applying different filters. The interpretation of radar facies following the principles of seismic stratigraphy that permitted analyze the sedimentary facies and facies architecture in order to understand the lithology, depositional environments and stratigraphic evolution of this sedimentary succession as well as to leading to a more precise stratigraphic framework for the Neogene to Quaternary deposits at Marapanim coastal plain. Facies characteristics and sedimentologic analysis (i.e., texture, composition and structure aspects) were investigated from five cores collected through a Rammkernsonde system. The locations were determined using a Global Positioning System. Remote sensing images (Landsat-7 ETM+ and RADARSAT-1 Wide) and SRTM elevation data were used to identify and define the distribution of the different morphologic units. The Coastal Plain extends west-east of the mouth of the Marapanim River, where were identified six morphologic units: paleodune, strand plain, recent coastal dune, macrotidal sandy beach, mangrove and salt marsh. The integration

  16. Data Processing Methods for 3D Seismic Imaging of Subsurface Volcanoes: Applications to the Tarim Flood Basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Tian, Wei; Shi, Yongmin

    2017-08-07

    The morphology and structure of plumbing systems can provide key information on the eruption rate and style of basalt lava fields. The most powerful way to study subsurface geo-bodies is to use industrial 3D reflection seismological imaging. However, strategies to image subsurface volcanoes are very different from that of oil and gas reservoirs. In this study, we process seismic data cubes from the Northern Tarim Basin, China, to illustrate how to visualize sills through opacity rendering techniques and how to image the conduits by time-slicing. In the first case, we isolated probes by the seismic horizons marking the contacts between sills and encasing strata, applying opacity rendering techniques to extract sills from the seismic cube. The resulting detailed sill morphology shows that the flow direction is from the dome center to the rim. In the second seismic cube, we use time-slices to image the conduits, which corresponds to marked discontinuities within the encasing rocks. A set of time-slices obtained at different depths show that the Tarim flood basalts erupted from central volcanoes, fed by separate pipe-like conduits.

  17. Endoscopic trans-nasal approach for biopsy of orbital tumors using image-guided neuro-navigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieskiewicz, A.; Mariak, Z.; Rogowski, M.; Lyson, T.

    2008-01-01

    Histopathological diagnosis of intraorbital tumors is of crucial value for planning further therapy. The aim of the study was to explore clinical utility of image-guided endoscopy for biopsy of orbital tumors. Trans-nasal endoscopic biopsy of intraorbital mass lesions was performed in 6 patients using a neuro-navigation system (Medtronic Stealth Station Treon plus). The CT and MRI 1 mm slice images were fused by the system in order to visualise both bony and soft tissue structures. The anatomic fiducial registration protocol was used during the procedure. All lesions were precisely localised and the biopsies could be taken from the representative part of the pathological mass. None of the patients developed aggravation of ocular symptoms after the procedure. The operative corridor as well as the size of orbital wall fenestration could be limited to a minimum. The accuracy of neuro-navigation remained high and stable during the entire procedure. The image-guided neuro-navigation system facilitated endoscopic localisation and biopsy of intraorbital tumors and contributed to the reduction of surgical trauma during the procedure. The technique was particularly useful in small, medially located, retrobulbar tumors and in unclear situations when the structure of the lesion resembled surrounding intraorbital tissue. (author)

  18. Radio-interferometric imaging of the subsurface emissions from the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. O.; Zeilik, M.; Gisler, G. R.; Borovsky, J. E.; Baker, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of total and polarized intensities from Mercury's subsurface layers have been mapped using VLA observations. The first detection of a hot pole along the Hermean equator is reported and modeled as black-body reradiation from preferential diurnal heating. These observations appear to rule out any internal sources of heat within Mercury. Polarized emission from the limb of the planet is also found, and is understood in terms of the dielectric properties of the Hermean surface.

  19. In vivo subsurface morphological and functional cellular and subcellular imaging of the gastrointestinal tract with confocal mini-microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Goetz; Beena Memadathil; Stefan Biesterfeld; Constantin Schneider; Sebastian Gregor; Peter R Galle; Markus F Neurath; Ralf Kiesslich

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a newly developed hand-held confocal probe for in vivo microscopic imaging of the complete gastrointestinal tract in rodents.METHODS: A novel rigid confocal probe (diameter 7 mm) was designed with optical features similar to the flexible endomicroscopy system for use in humans using a 488 nm single line laser for fluorophore excitation.Light emission was detected at 505 to 750 nm. The field of view was 475 μm × 475 μm. Optical slice thickness was 7 μm with a lateral resolution of 0.7 μm. Subsurface serial images at different depths (surface to 250 μm)were generated in real time at 1024 × 1024 pixels (0.8 frames/s) by placing the probe onto the tissue in gentle,stable contact. Tissue specimens were sampled for histopathological correlation.RESULTS: The esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine and meso, liver, pancreas and gall bladder were visualised in vivo at high resolution in n = 48 mice.Real time microscopic imaging with the confocal minimicroscopy probe was easy to achieve. The different staining protocols (fluorescein, acriflavine, FITC-labelled dextran and L. esculentum lectin) each highlighted specific aspects of the tissue, and in vivo imaging correlated excellently with conventional histology. In vivo blood flow monitoring added a functional quality to morphologic imaging.CONCLUSION: Confocal microscopy is feasible in vivo allowing the visualisation of the complete GI tract at high resolution even of subsurface tissue structures.The new confocal probe design evaluated in this study is compatible with laparoscopy and significantly expands the field of possible applications to intra-abdominal organs. It allows immediate testing of new in vivo staining and application options and therefore permits rapid transfer from animal studies to clinical use in patients.

  20. Image-based overlay and alignment metrology through optically opaque media with sub-surface probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Maarten H.; Mohtashami, Abbas; Piras, Daniele; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2018-03-01

    Nondestructive subsurface nanoimaging through optically opaque media is considered to be extremely challenging and is essential for several semiconductor metrology applications including overlay and alignment and buried void and defect characterization. The current key challenge in overlay and alignment is the measurement of targets that are covered by optically opaque layers. Moreover, with the device dimensions moving to the smaller nodes and the issue of the so-called loading effect causing offsets between between targets and product features, it is increasingly desirable to perform alignment and overlay on product features or so-called on-cell overlay, which requires higher lateral resolution than optical methods can provide. Our recently developed technique known as SubSurface Ultrasonic Resonance Force Microscopy (SSURFM) has shown the capability for high-resolution imaging of structures below a surface based on (visco-)elasticity of the constituent materials and as such is a promising technique to perform overlay and alignment with high resolution in upcoming production nodes. In this paper, we describe the developed SSURFM technique and the experimental results on imaging buried features through various layers and the ability to detect objects with resolution below 10 nm. In summary, the experimental results show that the SSURFM is a potential solution for on-cell overlay and alignment as well as detecting buried defects or voids and generally metrology through optically opaque layers.

  1. Single-Blinded Prospective Implementation of a Preoperative Imaging Checklist for Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Error, Marc; Ashby, Shaelene; Orlandi, Richard R; Alt, Jeremiah A

    2018-01-01

    Objective To determine if the introduction of a systematic preoperative sinus computed tomography (CT) checklist improves identification of critical anatomic variations in sinus anatomy among patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery. Study Design Single-blinded prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods Otolaryngology residents were asked to identify critical surgical sinus anatomy on preoperative CT scans before and after introduction of a systematic approach to reviewing sinus CT scans. The percentage of correctly identified structures was documented and compared with a 2-sample t test. Results A total of 57 scans were reviewed: 28 preimplementation and 29 postimplementation. Implementation of the sinus CT checklist improved identification of critical sinus anatomy from 24% to 84% correct ( P identification of sinus anatomic variants, including those not directly included in the systematic review implemented. Conclusion The implementation of a preoperative endoscopic sinus surgery radiographic checklist improves identification of critical anatomic sinus variations in a training population.

  2. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Palladino; Andrea Mardighian; Marilina D’Amora; Luca Roberto; Francesco Lassandro; Claudia Rossi; Gianluca Gatta; Mariano Scaglione; Guglielmi Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation) versus surgical (Heller myotomy) treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females) were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before a...

  3. Imaging in the Evaluation of Endoscopic or Surgical Treatment for Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Palladino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic (pneumatic dilation versus surgical (Heller myotomy treatment in patients affected by esophageal achalasia using barium X-ray examination of the digestive tract performed before and after the treatment. Materials and Methods. 19 patients (10 males and 9 females were enrolled in this study; each patient underwent a barium X-ray examination to evaluate the esophageal diameter and the height of the barium column before and after endoscopic or surgical treatment. Results. The mean variation of oesophageal diameter before and after treatment is −2.1 mm for surgery and 1.74 mm for pneumatic dilation (OR 0.167, CI 95% 0.02–1.419, and P: 0.10. The variations of all variables, with the exception of the oesophageal diameter variation, are strongly related to the treatment performed. Conclusions. The barium X-ray study of the digestive tract, performed before and after different treatment approaches, demonstrates that the surgical treatment has to be considered as the treatment of choice of achalasia, reserving endoscopic treatment to patients with high operative risk and refusing surgery.

  4. Imaging near-subsurface subrosion structures and faults using SH-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, Sonja; Polom, Ulrich; Buness, Hermann; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Subrosion is a term for underground leaching of soluble rocks and is a global phenomenon. It involves dissolution of evaporites due to the presence of unsaturated water, fractures and faults. Fractures and faults are pathways for water to circulate and to generate subsurface cavities. Depending on the leached material and the parameters of the generation process, especially the dissolution rate, different kinds of subrosion structures evolve in the subsurface. The two end members are collapse and depression structures. Subrosion is a natural process, but it can be enhanced by anthropogenic factors like manipulation of the aquifer system and groundwater flow and by e.g. extraction of saline water. The formation of sinkholes and depressions are a dangerous geohazard, especially if they occur in urban areas, which often leads to building and infrastructural damage and life-threatening situations. For this reason investigations of the processes that induce subrosion and a detailed analysis of the resulting structures are of importance. To develop a comprehensive model of near-subsurface subrosion structures, reflection seismics is one of the methods used by the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics. The study area is located in the city of Bad Frankenhausen in northern Thuringia, Germany. Most of the geological underground of Thuringia is characterized by Permian deposits. Bad Frankenhausen is situated directly south of the Kyffhäuser mountain range at the Kyffhäuser Southern Margin Fault. This major fault is one of the main pathways for the circulating ground- and meteoric waters that leach the Permian deposits, especially the Leine-, Staßfurt- and Werra Formations. 2014 and 2015 eight shear wave reflection seismic profiles were carried out in the urban area of Bad Frankenhausen and three profiles in the countrified surroundings. Altogether ca. 3.6 km were surveyed using a landstreamer as receiver and an electro-dynamic vibrator as source. The surveys were

  5. Towards an ultra-thin medical endoscope: multimode fibre as a wide-field image transferring medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriš, Miroslav; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian; Hughes, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Multimode optical fibres are attractive for biomedical and industrial applications such as endoscopes because of the small cross section and imaging resolution they can provide in comparison to widely-used fibre bundles. However, the image is randomly scrambled by propagation through a multimode fibre. Even though the scrambling is unpredictable, it is deterministic, and therefore the scrambling can be reversed. To unscramble the image, we treat the multimode fibre as a linear, disordered scattering medium. To calibrate, we scan a focused beam of coherent light over thousands of different beam positions at the distal end and record complex fields at the proximal end of the fibre. This way, the inputoutput response of the system is determined, which then allows computational reconstruction of reflection-mode images. However, there remains the problem of illuminating the tissue via the fibre while avoiding back reflections from the proximal face. To avoid this drawback, we provide here the first preliminary confirmation that an image can be transferred through a 2x2 fibre coupler, with the sample at its distal port interrogated in reflection. Light is injected into one port for illumination and then collected from a second port for imaging.

  6. Endoscopic case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a ten-year-old female patient referred to Gastroenterolgy consultation for abdominal pain and cramping, usually worse after eating, recurring diarrhoea, hypochromic and microcytic anaemia with low serum iron and ferritin levels. Moderate to severe Crohn’s disease of the terminal ileum e right colon (L3 was diagnosed, based on endoscopic image and biopsy. The patient was treated with prednisone and azathioprine, but after one year of treatment she was steroids dependent and treatment was switched to infliximab. One year after beginning this treatment, the patient achieved remission (clinical and laboratorial parameters. A control colonoscopy showed mucosal healing with scars and deformation with stenosis of ileocecal valve (Figures 1-2. Surgical intervention will be probably necessary in near future.

  7. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Sekii, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  8. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of terahertz time-domain imaging (THz-TDI). Subsurface structures have been detected at different depths inside the lime-based plaster of the wall painting until approximately 1 cm from the surface. The surface morphology of the buried structures has been 3D imaged in detail, providing a substantial contribution in their characterization.

  9. Study on multi-detector computed tomography in the virtual endoscope mode to phantom of saliva gland duct application. Image quality evaluation of geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Tomonori; Innami, Hisashi; Oyake, Reira; Shinohara, Yuki; Yamaaki, Fumi; Koizumi, Nobuhide; Okumura, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis ability of the radiographic imaging has been greatly improved by the advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), Which is now a the prerequisite to the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases. MDCT conducted in the virtual endoscope mode can be used for various image compositions, and the space in a structure such as the large intestines can be visualized similarly as with an actual endoscope. Using a phantom of a salivary gland duct, I performed the image analysis to determine whether this endoscope mode could able to be applied to the oral cavity. I searched for the optimum conditions and the best position for taking pictures, and evaluated whether the salivary gland ducts could be reproducibly imitated by the phantom. Modulation transfer function (MTF), Wiener spectrum (WS) analysis were used to examined the utility of MDCT in the virtual endoscope mode for use in the oral cavity. As a result, the following conclusions were made: The best image was obtained within 40 mm from the center part of the gantry by the MTF and the WS analyses. Decreases in the MTF and the WS as the decrease were seen at 20 mAs and 80 kV, and the decrease were seen in the sharpness of the image decreased as the value of the reconstruction function became smaller. The image was somewhat distorted when pictures were taken of the parallel or the direction of the slice by the inclination within 90 deg±15 deg as much as possible Z axially for running of the duct in the evaluation of internal reproducibility. The influence was admitted to go out easily in an inside form as the inside diameter became thin. The salivary gland phantom was evaluated geometrically by MDCT in the virtual endoscope mode, and the optimal conditions were obtained from the above-mentioned results. The utility of MDCT in the mode was thus suggested. (author)

  10. Subsurface imaging reveals a confined aquifer beneath an ice-sealed Antarctic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dugan, H. A.; Doran, P. T.; Tulaczyk, S.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water oases are rare under extreme cold desert conditions found in the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys. Here we report geophysical results that indicate that Lake Vida, one of the largest lakes in the region, is nearly frozen and underlain by widespread cryoconcentrated brine. A ground...... this zone to be a confined aquifer situated in sediments with a porosity of 23-42%. Discovery of this aquifer suggests that subsurface liquid water may be more pervasive in regions of continuous permafrost than previously thought and may represent an extensive habitat for microbial populations. Key Points...... Geophysical survey finds low resistivities beneath a lake in Antarctic Dry Valleys Liquid brine abundant beneath Antarctic lake Aquifer provides microbial refugium in cold desert environment...

  11. Imaging the Antarctic Ice Sheet Subsurface with the HF GPR TAPIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Ciarletti, V.; Berthelier, J.; Reineix, A.; Ney, R.; Bonaimé, S.; Corbel, C.

    2006-12-01

    An HF impulse polarimetric Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) operating at very low frequencies (ranging from ~2 to 8MHz) has been developed in the frame of the NetLander mission. This instrument, named TAPIR (Terrestrial And Planetary Investigation by Radar), was designed to probe the Martian subsurface down to kilometric depth and search for potential water reservoirs. Although the NetLander mission was cancelled in 2003, the interest on the exploration of Martian subsurface was recently enhanced by the promising observations of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on board of the ESA Mars Express orbiter. In particular, MARSIS detected the base of the North Polar Layered Deposits, penetrating up to ~1.8km the ice-rich upper layer of the underground. Such results suggest that TAPIR, which operates in the same frequency range as MARSIS and can performed a higher number of coherent integrations, is able to reach deeper structures. Yet, in contrast with classical GPRs, TAPIR can not move onto the surface and thus won't provide 2D or 3D scan of the subsurface. To retrieve, in spite of this NetLander restraint, the 3D distribution of the reflecting facets of the underground, the instrument was equipped with two electrical dipoles and a rotating magnetic sensor. These antennas allow to derive, from the measured values of 5 components of the wave field, the direction of arrival of the reflected waves hence the inclination of the buried reflectors. The first validation of this innovative concept was carried out during the RANETA (RAdar of NEtlander in Terre Adélie) campaign organized by the Institute Paul-Emile Victor in January-February 2004. This campaign took place on the Antarctic ice sheet close to the French-Italian Cap Prudhomme station. 8 soundings of the ice shelf were performed on various sites corresponding to different altitudes above the sea level (ranging from ~285m to ~1100m). We shall provide a detailed description of the

  12. Visual servoing in medical robotics: a survey. Part I: endoscopic and direct vision imaging - techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Khoshnam, Mahta; Najmaei, Nima; Patel, Rajni V

    2014-09-01

    Intra-operative imaging is widely used to provide visual feedback to a clinician when he/she performs a procedure. In visual servoing, surgical instruments and parts of tissue/body are tracked by processing the acquired images. This information is then used within a control loop to manoeuvre a robotic manipulator during a procedure. A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed for the period 2000-2013 to provide a survey of the visual servoing applications in medical robotics. The focus is on medical applications where image-based tracking is used for closed-loop control of a robotic system. Detailed classification and comparative study of various contributions in visual servoing using endoscopic or direct visual images are presented and summarized in tables and diagrams. The main challenges in using visual servoing for medical robotic applications are identified and potential future directions are suggested. 'Supervised automation of medical robotics' is found to be a major trend in this field. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Massively parallel electrical conductivity imaging of the subsurface: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Gregory A.; Commer, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) geophysical imaging is now receiving considerable attention for electrical conductivity mapping of potential offshore oil and gas reservoirs. The imaging technology employs controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) fields and treats geological media exhibiting transverse anisotropy. Moreover when combined with established seismic methods, direct imaging of reservoir fluids is possible. Because of the size of the 3D conductivity imaging problem, strategies are required exploiting computational parallelism and optimal meshing. The algorithm thus developed has been shown to scale to tens of thousands of processors. In one imaging experiment, 32,768 tasks/processors on the IBM Watson Research Blue Gene/L supercomputer were successfully utilized. Over a 24 hour period we were able to image a large scale field data set that previously required over four months of processing time on distributed clusters based on Intel or AMD processors utilizing 1024 tasks on an InfiniBand fabric. Electrical conductivity imaging using massively parallel computational resources produces results that cannot be obtained otherwise and are consistent with timeframes required for practical exploration problems.

  14. Massively parallel electrical conductivity imaging of the subsurface: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Gregory A; Commer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) geophysical imaging is now receiving considerable attention for electrical conductivity mapping of potential offshore oil and gas reservoirs. The imaging technology employs controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) fields and treats geological media exhibiting transverse anisotropy. Moreover when combined with established seismic methods, direct imaging of reservoir fluids is possible. Because of the size of the 3D conductivity imaging problem, strategies are required exploiting computational parallelism and optimal meshing. The algorithm thus developed has been shown to scale to tens of thousands of processors. In one imaging experiment, 32,768 tasks/processors on the IBM Watson Research Blue Gene/L supercomputer were successfully utilized. Over a 24 hour period we were able to image a large scale field data set that previously required over four months of processing time on distributed clusters based on Intel or AMD processors utilizing 1024 tasks on an InfiniBand fabric. Electrical conductivity imaging using massively parallel computational resources produces results that cannot be obtained otherwise and are consistent with timeframes required for practical exploration problems.

  15. Interferometric microstructured polymer optical fiber ultrasound sensor for optoacoustic endoscopic imaging in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, Daniel; Sáez-Rodríguez, David; Webb, David

    2014-01-01

    to conventional piezoelectric transducers. These kind of sensors, made of biocompatible polymers, are good candidates for the sensing element in an optoacoustic endoscope because of its high sensitivity, its shape and its non-brittle and non-electric nature. The acoustic sensitivity of the intrinsic fiber optic......We report a characterization of the acoustic sensitivity of microstructured polymer optical fiber interferometric sensors at ultrasonic frequencies from 100kHz to 10MHz. The use of wide-band ultrasonic fiber optic sensors in biomedical ultrasonic and optoacoustic applications is an open alternative...... interferometric sensors depends strongly of the material which is composed of. In this work we compare experimentally the intrinsic ultrasonic sensitivities of a PMMA mPOF with other three optical fibers: a singlemode silica optical fiber, a single-mode polymer optical fiber and a multimode graded...

  16. Optical fiber-based full Mueller polarimeter for endoscopic imaging using a two-wavelength simultaneous measurement method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizet, Jérémy; Manhas, Sandeep; Tran, Jacqueline; Validire, Pierre; Benali, Abdelali; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Pierangelo, Angelo; De Martino, Antonello; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a technique based on spectrally differential measurement for determining the full Mueller matrix of a biological sample through an optical fiber. In this technique, two close wavelengths were used simultaneously, one for characterizing the fiber and the other for characterizing the assembly of fiber and sample. The characteristics of the fiber measured at one wavelength were used to decouple its contribution from the measurement on the assembly of fiber and sample and then to extract sample Mueller matrix at the second wavelength. The proof of concept was experimentally validated by measuring polarimetric parameters of various calibrated optical components through the optical fiber. Then, polarimetric images of histological cuts of human colon tissues were measured, and retardance, diattenuation, and orientation of the main axes of fibrillar regions were displayed. Finally, these images were successfully compared with images obtained by a free space Mueller microscope. As the reported method does not use any moving component, it offers attractive integration possibilities with an endoscopic probe.

  17. Folate receptor overexpression can be visualized in real time during pituitary adenoma endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery with near-infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Y K; Cho, Steve S; Zeh, Ryan; Pierce, John T; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Newman, Jason G; Learned, Kim O; White, Caitlin; Kharlip, Julia; Snyder, Peter; Low, Philip S; Singhal, Sunil; Grady, M Sean

    2017-08-25

    OBJECTIVE Pituitary adenomas account for approximately 10% of intracranial tumors and have an estimated prevalence of 15%-20% in the general US population. Resection is the primary treatment for pituitary adenomas, and the transsphenoidal approach remains the most common. The greatest challenge with pituitary adenomas is that 20% of patients develop tumor recurrence. Current approaches to reduce recurrence, such as intraoperative MRI, are costly, associated with high false-positive rates, and not recommended. Pituitary adenomas are known to overexpress folate receptor alpha (FRα), and it was hypothesized that OTL38, a folate analog conjugated to a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, could provide real-time intraoperative visual contrast of the tumor versus the surrounding nonneoplastic tissues. The preliminary results of this novel clinical trial are presented. METHODS Nineteen adult patients who presented with pituitary adenoma were enrolled. Patients were infused with OTL38 2-4 hours prior to surgery. A 4-mm endoscope with both visible and NIR light capabilities was used to visualize the pituitary adenoma and its margins in real time during surgery. The signal-to-background ratio (SBR) was recorded for each tumor and surrounding tissues at various endoscope-to-sella distances. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to assess the FRα expression levels in all specimens and classify patients as having either high or low FRα expression. RESULTS Data from 15 patients (4 with null cell adenomas, 1 clinically silent gonadotroph, 1 totally silent somatotroph, 5 with a corticotroph, 3 with somatotrophs, and 1 somatocorticotroph) were analyzed in this preliminary analysis. Four patients were excluded for technical considerations. Intraoperative NIR imaging delineated the main tumors in all 15 patients with an average SBR of 1.9 ± 0.70. The FRα expression level of the adenomas and endoscope-to-sella distance had statistically significant impacts on the fluorescent

  18. Delineation of subsurface hydrocarbon contamination at a former hydrogenation plant using spectral induced polarization imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Orozco, Adrián; Kemna, Andreas; Oberdörster, Christoph; Zschornack, Ludwig; Leven, Carsten; Dietrich, Peter; Weiss, Holger

    2012-08-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements were conducted at a former hydrogenation plant in Zeitz (NE Germany) to investigate the potential of SIP imaging to delineate areas with different BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene) concentrations. Conductivity images reveal a poor correlation with the distribution of contaminants; whereas phase images exhibit two main anomalies: low phase shift values (product (BTEX concentrations > 1.7 g/l), and higher phase values for lower BTEX concentrations. Moreover, the spectral response of the areas with high BTEX concentration and free-phase products reveals a flattened spectrum in the low frequencies (< 40 Hz), while areas with lower BTEX concentrations exhibit a response characterized by a frequency peak. The SIP response was modelled using a Debye decomposition to compute images of the median relaxation-time. Consistent with laboratory studies, we observed an increase in the relaxation-time associated with an increase in BTEX concentrations. Measurements were also collected in the time domain (TDIP), revealing imaging results consistent with those obtained for frequency domain (SIP) measurements. Results presented here demonstrate the potential of the SIP imaging method to discriminate source and plume of dissolved contaminants at BTEX contaminated sites.

  19. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1997-01-26

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

  20. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit

  1. High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report, January 26, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EIVI) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHZ), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) We tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) We conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) We ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit

  2. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An approach to suspected gallstone pancreatitis'based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) was adopted in 1976 and was followed in 29 patients. ERCp became the routine method of early biliary tract assessment when gallstone pancreatitis was suspected on ...

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  4. Endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomies in the infant: Pre- and post-operative Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation elective project undergraduate prize 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharman, Anna

    2000-12-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether it is possible to select patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, in the under 1 age group for endoscopic third ventriculocisternostomy (ETV) using pre-operative T2 weighted turbo spin echo (T2W-TSE) sagittal sequence Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging; and to assess ventriculocisternostomy patency using post-operative T2W-TSE MR. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of MR examinations and clinical notes of 11 patients under 1 year of age who had ETV, was performed. The post-operative flow MR images were divided into the presence or absence of flow-related signal changes. RESULTS: In 6 of the 11 patients, ETV was successful (54.5%) i.e. no VP shunt or revision of the ETV was required. 9 patients had post-operative T2W-TSE MR examinations -- 8 of these 9 MR studies correlated to the clinical situation (89%). The remaining MR examination showed a CSF flow void but the ETV failed at 3 weeks. CONCLUSION: Pre-operative MR using T2W-TSE to select suitable candidates for ETV improves the success rate from < 40% to 54.5%. Post-operatively MRI is a good predictor of whether the ETV has been successful or not. Sharman, A. (2000)

  5. Smart imaging of acute lung injury: exploration of myeloperoxidase activity using in vivo endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagnon, Frédéric; Bourgouin, Alexandra; Lebel, Réjean; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Eric; Lepage, Martin; Lesur, Olivier

    2015-09-15

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) is well characterized, but its real-time assessment at bedside remains a challenge. When patients do not improve after 1 wk despite supportive therapies, physicians have to consider open lung biopsy (OLB) to identify the process(es) at play. Sustained inflammation and inadequate repair are often observed in this context. OLB is neither easy to perform in a critical setting nor exempt from complications. Herein, we explore intravital endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy (ECFM) of the lung in vivo combined with the use of fluorescent smart probe(s) activated by myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO is a granular enzyme expressed by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), catalyzing the synthesis of hypoclorous acid, a by-product of hydrogen peroxide. Activation of these probes was first validated in vitro in relevant cells (i.e., AMs and PMNs) and on MPO-non-expressing cells (as negative controls) and then tested in vivo using three rat models of ALI and real-time intravital imaging with ECFM. Semiquantitative image analyses revealed that in vivo probe-related cellular/background fluorescence was associated with corresponding enhanced lung enzymatic activity and was partly prevented by specific MPO inhibition. Additional ex vivo phenotyping was performed, confirming that fluorescent cells were neutrophil elastase(+) (PMNs) or CD68(+) (AMs). This work is a first step toward "virtual biopsy" of ALI without OLB. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Imaging latex–carbon nanotube composites by subsurface electrostatic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Sajan; Petty, Clayton W.; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic modes of atomic force microscopy have shown to be non-destructive and relatively simple methods for imaging conductors embedded in insulating polymers. Here we use electrostatic force microscopy to image the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a latex-based conductive composite, which brings forth features not observed in previously studied systems employing linear polymer films. A fixed-potential model of the probe-nanotube electrostatics is presented which in principle gives access to the conductive nanoparticle's depth and radius, and the polymer film dielectric constant. Comparing this model to the data results in nanotube depths that appear to be slightly above the film–air interface. Furthermore, this result suggests that water-mediated charge build-up at the film–air interface may be the source of electrostatic phase contrast in ambient conditions.

  7. The utility of high-resolution intraoperative MRI in endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary macroadenomas: early experience in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Hasan A.; De Los Reyes, Kenneth; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Litvack, Zachary N.; Bi, Wenya Linda; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Dunn, Ian F.; Laws, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic skull base surgery has become increasingly popular among the skull base surgery community, with improved illumination and angled visualization potentially improving tumor resection rates. Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is used to detect residual disease during the course of the resection. This study is an investigation of the utility of 3-T iMRI in combination with transnasal endoscopy with regard to gross-total resection (GTR) of pituitary macroadenomas. Methods The authors retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic transsphenoidal operations performed in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite from November 2011 to December 2014. Inclusion criteria were patients harboring presumed pituitary macroadenomas with optic nerve or chiasmal compression and visual loss, operated on by a single surgeon. Results Of the 27 patients who underwent transsphenoidal resection in the AMIGO suite, 20 patients met the inclusion criteria. The endoscope alone, without the use of iMRI, would have correctly predicted 13 (65%) of 20 cases. Gross-total resection was achieved in 12 patients (60%) prior to MRI. Intraoperative MRI helped convert 1 STR and 4 NTRs to GTRs, increasing the number of GTRs from 12 (60%) to 16 (80%). Conclusions Despite advances in visualization provided by the endoscope, the incidence of residual disease can potentially place the patient at risk for additional surgery. The authors found that iMRI can be useful in detecting unexpected residual tumor. The cost-effectiveness of this tool is yet to be determined. PMID:26926058

  8. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakins, D. E.; Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  9. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eakins, D. E.; Chapman, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology

  10. Subsurface imaging of carbon nanotube networks in polymers with DC-biased multifrequency dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hank T; Barroso-Bujans, Fabienne; Herrero, Julio Gomez; Reifenberger, Ron; Raman, Arvind

    2013-04-05

    The characterization of dispersion and connectivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) networks inside polymers is of great interest in polymer nanocomposites in new material systems, organic photovoltaics, and in electrodes for batteries and supercapacitors. We focus on a technique using amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) in the attractive regime of operation, using both single and dual mode excitation, which upon the application of a DC tip bias voltage allows, via the phase channel, the in situ, nanoscale, subsurface imaging of CNT networks dispersed in a polymer matrix at depths of 10-100 nm. We present an in-depth study of the origins of phase contrast in this technique and demonstrate that an electrical energy dissipation mechanism in the Coulomb attractive regime is key to the formation of the phase contrast which maps the spatial variations in the local capacitance and resistance due to the CNT network. We also note that dual frequency excitation can, under some conditions, improve the contrast for such samples. These methods open up the possibility for DC-biased amplitude modulation AFM to be used for mapping the variations in local capacitance and resistance in nanocomposites with conducting networks.

  11. Investigating the Surface and Subsurface in Karstic Regions – Terrestrial Laser Scanning versus Low-Altitude Airborne Imaging and the Combination with Geophysical Prospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Tilly

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining measurements of the surface and subsurface is a promising approach to understand the origin and current changes of karstic forms since subterraneous processes are often the initial driving force. A karst depression in south-west Germany was investigated in a comprehensive campaign with remote sensing and geophysical prospecting. This contribution has two objectives: firstly, comparing terrestrial laser scanning (TLS and low-altitude airborne imaging from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV regarding their performance in capturing the surface. Secondly, establishing a suitable way of combining this 3D surface data with data from the subsurface, derived by geophysical prospecting. Both remote sensing approaches performed satisfying and the established digital elevation models (DEMs differ only slightly. These minor discrepancies result essentially from the different viewing geometries and post-processing concepts, for example whether the vegetation was removed or not. Validation analyses against high-accurate DGPS-derived point data sets revealed slightly better results for the DEMTLS with a mean absolute difference of 0.03 m to 0.05 m and a standard deviation of 0.03 m to 0.07 m (DEMUAV: mean absolute difference: 0.11 m to 0.13 m; standard deviation: 0.09 m to 0.11 m. The 3D surface data and 2D image of the vertical cross section through the subsurface along a geophysical profile were combined in block diagrams. The data sets fit very well and give a first impression of the connection between surface and subsurface structures. Since capturing the subsurface with this method is limited to 2D and the data acquisition is quite time consuming, further investigations are necessary for reliable statements about subterraneous structures, how these may induce surface changes, and the origin of this karst depression. Moreover, geophysical prospecting can only produce a suspected image of the subsurface since the apparent resistivity is measured

  12. Full image-processing pipeline in field-programmable gate array for a small endoscopic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Sheikh Shanawaz; Sousa, L. Natércia; Ferreira, Nuno Fábio; Sousa, Ricardo M.; Santos, Joao; Wäny, Martin; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopy is an imaging procedure used for diagnosis as well as for some surgical purposes. The camera used for the endoscopy should be small and able to produce a good quality image or video, to reduce discomfort of the patients, and to increase the efficiency of the medical team. To achieve these fundamental goals, a small endoscopy camera with a footprint of 1 mm×1 mm×1.65 mm is used. Due to the physical properties of the sensors and human vision system limitations, different image-processing algorithms, such as noise reduction, demosaicking, and gamma correction, among others, are needed to faithfully reproduce the image or video. A full image-processing pipeline is implemented using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) to accomplish a high frame rate of 60 fps with minimum processing delay. Along with this, a viewer has also been developed to display and control the image-processing pipeline. The control and data transfer are done by a USB 3.0 end point in the computer. The full developed system achieves real-time processing of the image and fits in a Xilinx Spartan-6LX150 FPGA.

  13. Potential of electrical resistivity tomography and muon density imaging to study spatio-temporal variations in the sub-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Courbet, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    affecting density and electrical resistivity physical parameters. We show with data sets acquired before and after an important rainfall event how muon density and electrical resistivity imaging may complementary characterize variations of the medium properties. The development of such innovative experiments for hydrogeophysical studies presents then the ability to supply new information on fluid dynamics in the sub-surface.

  14. Terahertz endoscopic imaging for colorectal cancer detection: Current status and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil; Giles, Robert H

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is progressing as a robust platform for myriad applications in the field of security, health, and material science. The THz regime, which comprises wavelengths spanning from microns to millimeters, is non-ionizing and has very low photon energy: Making it inherently safe for biological imaging. Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of death in the world, while the conventional screening and standard of care yet relies exclusively on the physician?s experie...

  15. MR appearance of normal and abnormal bile: Correlation with imaging and endoscopic finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kyung [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk, E-mail: kimsuk@medimail.co.kr [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Suk Hong [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Gwang Ha [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyung Il [Department of Surgery, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    Identification of abnormal bile related to various pathological processes in the pancreaticobiliary tract can be important in the diagnosis of disease and the determination of appropriate treatment. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can allow comprehensive evaluation of abnormal bile because MR usually provides better tissue characterization than other imaging modalities. A high-intensity signal from bile is frequently encountered on T1-weighted images and can be seen in concentrated bile, sludge, stones, or hemobilia. Contrast-enhanced MR features, such as inhomogeneous hepatic enhancement in the arterial phase and papillitis or mild-to-moderate bile duct wall thickening with enhancement, along with clinical characteristics, may suggest clinically significant bile, such as sludge or purulent bile, rather than merely concentrated bile. A history of trauma and appropriate imaging findings in the hepatobiliary tract can support a diagnosis of hemobilia. MR imaging may assist in diagnosing intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct via detection of an intraductal mass or several indirect signs, suggesting a large amount of mucin. Additionally, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR may delineate mucin as a filling defect surrounding hyperintense bile. A floating filling defect on all MR sequences is helpful in discriminating pneumobilia from other intraluminal filling defects. Familiarity with the various different MR features of abnormal bile signals can therefore facilitate accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  16. MR appearance of normal and abnormal bile: Correlation with imaging and endoscopic finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Suk Hong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Dong Uk; Kim, Gwang Ha; Seo, Hyung Il

    2010-01-01

    Identification of abnormal bile related to various pathological processes in the pancreaticobiliary tract can be important in the diagnosis of disease and the determination of appropriate treatment. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can allow comprehensive evaluation of abnormal bile because MR usually provides better tissue characterization than other imaging modalities. A high-intensity signal from bile is frequently encountered on T1-weighted images and can be seen in concentrated bile, sludge, stones, or hemobilia. Contrast-enhanced MR features, such as inhomogeneous hepatic enhancement in the arterial phase and papillitis or mild-to-moderate bile duct wall thickening with enhancement, along with clinical characteristics, may suggest clinically significant bile, such as sludge or purulent bile, rather than merely concentrated bile. A history of trauma and appropriate imaging findings in the hepatobiliary tract can support a diagnosis of hemobilia. MR imaging may assist in diagnosing intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct via detection of an intraductal mass or several indirect signs, suggesting a large amount of mucin. Additionally, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR may delineate mucin as a filling defect surrounding hyperintense bile. A floating filling defect on all MR sequences is helpful in discriminating pneumobilia from other intraluminal filling defects. Familiarity with the various different MR features of abnormal bile signals can therefore facilitate accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Predictors of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery outcome in acromegaly: patient and tumor characteristics evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bunderen, Christa C.; van Varsseveld, Nadège C.; Baayen, Johannes C.; van Furth, Wouter R.; Aliaga, Esther Sanchez; Hazewinkel, Marieke J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Freling, Nicole J. M.; Lips, Paul; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H.; Drent, Madeleine L.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of various first-line treatment modalities for acromegaly and evolving surgical techniques emphasize the need for accurately defined predictors of surgical outcome. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of 30 patients with acromegaly after initial endoscopic transsphenoidal

  18. Determination of optimal ultrasound planes for the initialisation of image registration during endoscopic ultrasound-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmati, Ester; Hu, Yipeng; Gibson, Eli; Uribarri, Laura; Keane, Geri; Gurusami, Kurinchi; Davidson, Brian; Pereira, Stephen P; Clarkson, Matthew J; Barratt, Dean C

    2018-06-01

    Navigation of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system can be technically challenging due to the small fields-of-view of ultrasound and optical devices, as well as the anatomical variability and limited number of orienting landmarks during navigation. Co-registration of an EUS device and a pre-procedure 3D image can enhance the ability to navigate. However, the fidelity of this contextual information depends on the accuracy of registration. The purpose of this study was to develop and test the feasibility of a simulation-based planning method for pre-selecting patient-specific EUS-visible anatomical landmark locations to maximise the accuracy and robustness of a feature-based multimodality registration method. A registration approach was adopted in which landmarks are registered to anatomical structures segmented from the pre-procedure volume. The predicted target registration errors (TREs) of EUS-CT registration were estimated using simulated visible anatomical landmarks and a Monte Carlo simulation of landmark localisation error. The optimal planes were selected based on the 90th percentile of TREs, which provide a robust and more accurate EUS-CT registration initialisation. The method was evaluated by comparing the accuracy and robustness of registrations initialised using optimised planes versus non-optimised planes using manually segmented CT images and simulated ([Formula: see text]) or retrospective clinical ([Formula: see text]) EUS landmarks. The results show a lower 90th percentile TRE when registration is initialised using the optimised planes compared with a non-optimised initialisation approach (p value [Formula: see text]). The proposed simulation-based method to find optimised EUS planes and landmarks for EUS-guided procedures may have the potential to improve registration accuracy. Further work will investigate applying the technique in a clinical setting.

  19. Skin surface and sub-surface strain and deformation imaging using optical coherence tomography and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Maiti, R.; Liu, X.; Gerhardt, L. C.; Lee, Z. S.; Byers, R.; Franklin, S. E.; Lewis, R.; Matcher, S. J.; Carré, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Bio-mechanical properties of the human skin deformed by external forces at difference skin/material interfaces attract much attention in medical research. For instance, such properties are important design factors when one designs a healthcare device, i.e., the device might be applied directly at skin/device interfaces. In this paper, we investigated the bio-mechanical properties, i.e., surface strain, morphological changes of the skin layers, etc., of the human finger-pad and forearm skin as a function of applied pressure by utilizing two non-invasive techniques, i.e., optical coherence tomography (OCT) and digital image correlation (DIC). Skin deformation results of the human finger-pad and forearm skin were obtained while pressed against a transparent optical glass plate under the action of 0.5-24 N force and stretching naturally from 90° flexion to 180° full extension respectively. The obtained OCT images showed the deformation results beneath the skin surface, however, DIC images gave overall information of strain at the surface.

  20. Detection of ossicular chain abnormalities using CT imaging. Comparison of axial and virtual middle ear endoscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Motomichi; Kamagata, Masaki; Harada, Kuniaki; Shirase, Ryuji; Oomoto, Hidechika; Himi, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of axial and three-dimensional imaging (virtual endoscopy) with helical CT for the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. In 15 patients who had traumatic ossicular dislocation, disruption, and congenital ossicular defect and anomaly, axial helical CT scanning of the temporal bone was performed with GE HSA. Axial and three-dimensional imaging was carried out in normal ears (15 ears) and abnormal ears (10 ears), for the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using a continuous reporting scale. Furthermore, ROC testing was done to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy in the detection of ossicular chain abnormalities with three-dimensional imaging (A z =0.967, SD=0.022) was not significantly better than that of axial imaging (A z =0.930, SD=0.046); however, the interobserver standard deviation was better for three-dimensional imaging. Three-dimensional imaging resulted in an increase in true positive cases and a decrease in false negatives. Three-dimensional imaging also showed higher sensitivity and accuracy. In the evaluation of ossicular chain abnormalities, three-dimensional imaging (virtual endoscopy) is useful and provides additional information. Three-dimensional imaging may have an important role in diagnostic procedures and/or preoperative evaluation in otology. (author)

  1. Diagnostic study of the usefulness of virtual endoscopic images and 3-D modeling for lower urinary tract obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Soh, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Kazue

    2012-01-01

    I observed bladder and urethral morphology and lumen by making a virtual endoscopy (VE) of the bladder and a urethra for patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. I have herein reported the procedures to use this model to evaluate the condition of patients more precisely. Of those referred for investigation of lower urinary tract symptoms, subjects were 22 boys (5-13 years old, mean 9) in whom voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) was suspected for urethral obstruction between March, 2009 and October, 2010. Eleven of these 22 cases were extracted at random and underwent voiding computed tomography (VCT). Except one dropped out, the 21 cases were assigned to a VCT/VCUG combination group or a VCUG-single group. We confirmed the two groups, the rate of agreement of imaging views and cystourethroscopy (CS) views, and the effectiveness of endoscopic operation. I made the following imaging diagnoses in the VCT/VCUG combination group: congenital obstructive posterior urethral membrane (COPUM), n =7; Cobb's collar, n =1; and COPUM and Cobb's collar combined, n =3. In contrast, in the VCUG-single group, I diagnosed COPUM, n =5; bulbar region urethral stricture, n =2; posterior urethral expansion, n =2; and bladder form abnormality, n =1. The rate of agreement between preoperative diagnosis and CS views on imaging was 72.7% in the VCT/VCUG combination group, and 33.3% in the VCUG-single group. All patients underwent transurethral incision (TUI) of the urethral obstruction. In the VCT/VCUG combination group, effectiveness of the TUI was assessed as good in 2 cases and moderate in 6 cases giving an overall effectiveness rate (good + moderate) of 72.7%. In the VCUG-single group, effectiveness was rated as moderate in 5 cases (overall effectiveness rate=50%). I developed a method of VE for lower urinary tract obstruction of children and examined the effectiveness. This method was found to be more effective than conventional urinary tract imaging. With the developments in the

  2. Sinonasal imaging after Caldwell-Luc surgery: MDCT findings of an abandoned procedure in times of functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Peloschek, Philipp; Koelblinger, Claus; Mehrain, Sheida; Krestan, Christian Robert; Czerny, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is performed in most of the patients with sinonasal inflammatory disease. The postoperative imaging findings of FESS in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) considerably differ from those of historic Caldwell-Luc (CL) maxillary sinus surgery which is an uncommon procedure today. Thus, the postoperative CL imaging findings may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation. Therefore, this study explicitly presents the MDCT findings of post-CL patients which have not been described previously. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with clinically suspected sinusitis and documented history of CL-procedure underwent 16 row MDCT (MDCT Mx8000 IDT Philips) with multiplanar reconstructions of the paranasal sinuses in the axial plane. The following parameters were used: 140 kV, 50 mAs; 16 mm x 0.75 mm detector collimation; 1 mm reconstructed slice thickness; 0.5 mm increment. The studies were reconstructed with a bone algorithm (W3000/L600; 1 mm slice thickness) in axial plane and coronal plane (3 mm slice thickness). The images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of normal surgery-related and pathological findings. Results: Surgery-related imaging characteristics presented as follows: an anterior and a medial bony wall defect and sclerosis and sinus wall thickening were observed in all 28/28 cases (100%). Collaps of the sinus cavity was seen in 26/28 cases (92.9%). Furthermore, inflammatory disease of the operated sinus(es) was found in 23/28 cases (82.1%): 14/28 patients (50%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening of the operated sinus(es) as well as of other sinonasal cavities and 9/28 patients (32.1%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening limited to the operated sinus(es). A postoperative mucocele was depicted in 3/28 cases (10.7%). 2/28 patients (7.1%) showed neither maxillary nor other mucosal swelling. Conclusion: MDCT with multiplanar reconstructions is a precise method to evaluate

  3. A three-dimensional QP imaging of the shallowest subsurface of Campi Flegrei offshore caldera, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlenga, Vincenzo; de Lorenzo, Salvatore; Russo, Guido; Amoroso, Ortensia; Virieux, Jean; Garambois, Stephane; Zollo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    We build a three-dimensional attenuation image of the shallowest subsurface of Campi Flegrei caldera, a resurgent caldera located 15 km west of Naples, southern Italy. Extracting tstar (t*) measurements from an active seismic dataset can be achieved by a spectral ratio method which has been intensively used for earthquakes. The applicability of such measurement has to be validated for active seismic datasets which have a narrower frequency band compared to frequency band of quakes. The validation, as well as the robustness, of such extraction for narrow Ricker source wavelet has been checked through many synthetic and realistic tests. These tests allow us to conclude that this measurement is valid as long as 1) short signal time window are chosen to perform the spectral analysis; 2) the effects caused by heterogeneities of the sampled medium on the seismic spectra have to be taken into account in the description of elastic Green's function. Through such a deconvolution strategy, contributions of the fine velocity structure on signal amplitudes have been significantly removed: in case of suspicious behavior of the spectrum ratio, the measurement is disregarded. This procedure, a kind of deconvolution of the phase propagation imprint, is expected to leave nearly untouched the attenuation signature of seismic traces we are interested in. Such refined measurement approach based on the spectral ratio method has been applied to the real active seismic SERAPIS database providing us a reasonable dataset of 11,873 differential t* measurements (dt*). These data are used for imaging anelastic properties of Campi Flegrei caldera through a linearized, iterative, damped attenuation tomography. Based on configuration of sources and receivers, an attenuating volume as large as 13 x 13 x 1.5 km3 has been imaged. The tomography, with a resolution of 1 km in the horizontal directions and 0.5 km in the vertical direction, allowed to image important features whose reliability has been

  4. Trimodal endoscopic imaging for the detection and differentiation of colorectal adenomas: a prospective single-centre clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondano, Gianluca; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Sansone, Stefano; Prisco, Antonio; Meucci, Costantino; Garofano, Maria Lucia; Cipolletta, Livio

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate an endoscopic trimodal imaging (ETMI) system (high resolution, autofluorescence, and NBI) in the detection and differentiation of colorectal adenomas. A prospective randomised trial of tandem colonoscopies was carried out using the Olympus XCF-FH260AZI system. Each colonic segment was examined twice for lesions, once with HRE and once with AFI, in random order per patient. All detected lesions were assessed with NBI for pit pattern and with AFI for colour. All lesions were removed and sent for histology. Any lesion identified on the second examination was considered as missed by the first examination. Outcome measures are adenoma miss rates of AFI and HRE, and diagnostic accuracy of NBI and AFI for differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic lesions. Ninety-four patients underwent colonoscopy with ETMI (47 in each group). Among 47 patients examined with AFI first, 31 adenomas in 15 patients were detected initially [detection rate 0.66 (0.52-0.75)]. Subsequent HRE inspection identified six additional adenomas. Among 47 patients examined with HRE first, 29 adenomas in 14 patients were detected initially [detection rate 0.62 (0.53-0.79)]. Successive AFI yielded seven additional adenomas. Adenoma miss rates of AFI and HRE were 14% and 16.2%, respectively (p = 0.29). Accuracy of AFI alone for differentiation was lower than NBI (63% vs. 80%, p HRE. AFI alone had a disappointing accuracy for adenoma differentiation, which could be improved by combination of AFI and NBI.

  5. Primary Endoscopic Transnasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Magnetic Resonance Image-Positive Cushing Disease: Outcomes of a Series over 14 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Yen, Yu-Shu; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2015-09-01

    There are scant data of endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery (ETS) with adjuvant therapies of Cushing disease (CD). To report the remission rate, secondary management, and outcomes of a series of CD patients. Patients with CD with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-positive adenoma who underwent ETS as the first and primary treatment were included. The diagnostic criteria were a combination of 24-hour urine-free cortisol, elevated serum cortisol levels, or other tests (e.g., inferior petrosal sinus sampling). All clinical and laboratory evaluations and radiological examinations were reviewed. Forty consecutive CD patients, with an average age of 41.0 years, were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 40.2 ± 29.6 months. These included 22 patients with microadenoma and 18 with macroadenoma, including 9 cavernous invasions. The overall remission rate of CD after ETS was 72.5% throughout the entire follow-up. Patients with microadenoma or noninvasive macroadenoma had a higher remission rate than those who had macroadenoma with cavernous sinus invasion (81.8% or 77.8% vs. 44.4%, P = 0.02). After ETS, the patients who had adrenocorticotropic hormone-positive adenoma had a higher remission rate than those who had not (76.5% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). In the 11 patients who had persistent/recurrent CD after the first ETS, 1 underwent secondary ETS, 8 received gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKRS), and 2 underwent both. At the study end point, two (5%) of these CD patients had persistent CD and were under the medication of ketoconazole. For MRI-positive CD patients, primary (i.e., the first) ETS yielded an overall remission rate of 72.5%. Adjuvant therapies, including secondary ETS, GKRS, or both, yielded an ultimate remission rate of 95%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multisensor fusion in gastroenterology domain through video and echo endoscopic image combination: a challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debon, Renaud; Le Guillou, Clara; Cauvin, Jean-Michel; Solaiman, Basel; Roux, Christian

    2001-08-01

    Medical domain makes intensive use of information fusion. In particular, the gastro-enterology is a discipline where physicians have the choice between several imagery modalities that offer complementary advantages. Among all existing systems, videoendoscopy (based on a CCD sensor) and echoendoscopy (based on an ultrasound sensor) are the most efficient. The use of each system corresponds to a given step in the physician diagnostic elaboration. Nowadays, several works aim to achieve automatic interpretation of videoendoscopic sequences. These systems can quantify color and superficial textures of the digestive tube. Unfortunately the relief information, which is important for the diagnostic, is very difficult to retrieve. On the other hand, some studies have proved that 3D information can be easily quantified using echoendoscopy image sequences. That is why the idea to combine these information, acquired from two very different points of view, can be considered as a real challenge for the medical image fusion topic. In this paper, after a review of actual works concerning numerical exploitation of videoendoscopy and echoendoscopy, the following question will be discussed: how can the use of complementary aspects of the different systems ease the automatic exploitation of videoendoscopy ? In a second time, we will evaluate the feasibility of the achievement of a realistic 3D reconstruction based both on information given by echoendoscopy (relief) and videoendoscopy (texture). Enumeration of potential applications of such a fusion system will then follow. Further discussions and perspectives will conclude this first study.

  7. Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery of Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netuka, David; Májovský, Martin; Masopust, Václav; Belšán, Tomáš; Marek, Josef; Kršek, Michal; Hána, Václav; Ježková, Jana; Hána, Václav; Beneš, Vladimír

    2016-07-01

    The effect of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) on the extent of sellar region tumors treated endonasally has been described in previous research. However, the effects of iMRI on endocrinologic outcome of growth hormone-secreting adenomas have been studied in only a few small cohort studies. Inclusion criteria were primary transsphenoidal surgery for growth hormone-secreting adenoma from January 2009 to December 2014, a minimum follow-up of 1 year, complete endocrinologic data, at least 1 iMRI, and at least 2 postoperative magnetic resonance images. The cohort consisted of 105 patients (54 females, 51 males) with a mean age of 48.3 years (range, 7-77 years). There were 16 microadenomas and 89 macroadenomas. Endocrinologic remission in the whole cohort was achieved in 64 of the patients (60.9%). Resection after iMRI was attempted in 22 of the cases (20.9%). Resection after iMRI led to hormonal remission in 9 cases (8.6%). Endocrinologic postoperative deficit was observed in 10 cases (12.5%). Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage indicated the necessity to reoperate in 3 cases (3.8%). No neurologic deterioration was observed. iMRI influences not only the morphologic extent of pituitary adenomas resection but also the endocrinologic results. We encourage the routine application of iMRI in pituitary adenoma surgery, including hormone-secreting pituitary tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopes with latest technology and concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh

    2003-09-01

    Endoscopic imaging systems that perform as the "eye" of the operator during endoscopic surgical procedures have developed rapidly due to various technological developments. In addition, since the most recent turn of the century robotic surgery has increased its scope through the utilization of systems such as Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci System. To optimize the imaging required for precise robotic surgery, a unique endoscope has been developed, consisting of both a two dimensional (2D) image optical system for wider observation of the entire surgical field, and a three dimensional (3D) image optical system for observation of the more precise details at the operative site. Additionally, a "near infrared radiation" endoscopic system is under development to detect the sentinel lymph node more readily. Such progress in the area of endoscopic imaging is expected to enhance the surgical procedure from both the patient's and the surgeon's point of view.

  9. Prediction of Helicobacter pylori status by conventional endoscopy, narrow-band imaging magnifying endoscopy in stomach after endoscopic resection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Saka, Akiko; Nozawa, Yujiro; Nakamura, Atsuo

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of metachronous gastric carcinoma after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy has been endorsed. It is not unusual for such patients to be H. pylori negative after eradication or for other reasons. If it were possible to predict H. pylori status using endoscopy alone, it would be very useful in clinical practice. To clarify the accuracy of endoscopic judgment of H. pylori status, we evaluated it in the stomach after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of gastric cancer. Fifty-six patients treated by ESD were enrolled. The diagnostic criteria for H. pylori status by conventional endoscopy and narrow-band imaging (NBI)-magnifying endoscopy were decided, and H. pylori status was judged by two endoscopists. Based on the H. pylori stool antigen test as a diagnostic gold standard, conventional endoscopy and NBI-magnifying endoscopy were compared for their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Interobserver agreement was assessed in terms of κ value. Interobserver agreement was moderate (0.56) for conventional endoscopy and substantial (0.77) for NBI-magnifying endoscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.79, 0.52, 0.70, and 0.63 for conventional endoscopy and 0.91, 0.83, 0.88, and 0.86 for NBI-magnifying endoscopy, respectively. Prediction of H. pylori status using NBI-magnifying endoscopy is practical, and interobserver agreement is substantial. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography for gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Giacomelli, Michael G; Potsaid, Benjamin M; Tao, Yuankai K; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Figueiredo, Marisa; Huang, Qin; Cable, Alex E; Fujimoto, James; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    We describe an ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for clinical gastroenterology using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and micromotor imaging catheter. The system had a 600 kHz axial scan rate and 8 µm axial resolution in tissue. Imaging was performed with a 3.2 mm diameter imaging catheter at 400 frames per second with a 12 µm spot size. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) imaging was performed in patients with a cross section of pathologies undergoing upper and lower endoscopy. The use of distally actuated imaging catheters enabled OCT imaging with more flexibility, such as volumetric imaging in the small intestine and the assessment of hiatal hernia using retroflex imaging. The high rotational scanning stability of the micromotor enabled 3D volumetric imaging with micron scale volumetric accuracy for both en face OCT and cross-sectional imaging, as well as OCT angiography (OCTA) for 3D visualization of subsurface microvasculature. The ability to perform both structural and functional 3D OCT imaging in the GI tract with microscopic accuracy should enable a wide range of studies and enhance the sensitivity and specificity of OCT for detecting pathology.

  11. Design and validation of a near-infrared fluorescence endoscope for detection of early esophageal malignancy using a targeted imaging probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Dale J.; Joseph, James; Neves, Andre A.; di Pietro, Massimiliano; Brindle, Kevin M.; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a condition that predisposes patients to esophageal cancer. Early detection of cancer in these patients can be curative, but is confounded by a lack of contrast in white light endoscopy (WLE). Application of fluorescently-labeled lectins to the esophagus during endoscopy can more accurately delineate dysplasia emerging within Barrett's than WLE1, but strong tissue autofluorescence has limited sensitivity and dynamic range of this approach. To overcome this challenge, we synthesized a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent lectin and have constructed a clinically translatable endoscope for simultaneous WLE and NIR imaging. An imaging fiber bundle, shielded from patient contact using a disposable catheter, relays collected light into an optical path that splits the WL reflectance and NIR emission onto two cameras for simultaneous video-rate recording. The captured images are co-registered and the honeycomb artifact arising from the fiber bundle is removed using interpolation between image points derived from individual fibers. A minimum detectable concentration of 110 nM was determined using a dilution series of IRDye800CW-lectin in black well plates. We have demonstrated the ability to use our endoscope to distinguish between different tissue types in ex vivo mouse stomachs. Future work using human ex vivo tissue specimens will determine safe illumination limits and sensitivity for dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus, prior to commencing clinical trials.

  12. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas fault in southern California: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) and strong ground motion expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuis, Gary S.; Bauer, Klaus; Goldman, Mark R.; Ryberg, Trond; Langenheim, Victoria; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Rymer, Michael J.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Graves, Robert; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2017-01-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is one of the most studied strike‐slip faults in the world; yet its subsurface geometry is still uncertain in most locations. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken to image the structure surrounding the SAF and also its subsurface geometry. We present SSIP studies at two locations in the Coachella Valley of the northern Salton trough. On our line 4, a fault‐crossing profile just north of the Salton Sea, sedimentary basin depth reaches 4 km southwest of the SAF. On our line 6, a fault‐crossing profile at the north end of the Coachella Valley, sedimentary basin depth is ∼2–3  km">∼2–3  km and centered on the central, most active trace of the SAF. Subsurface geometry of the SAF and nearby faults along these two lines is determined using a new method of seismic‐reflection imaging, combined with potential‐field studies and earthquakes. Below a 6–9 km depth range, the SAF dips ∼50°–60°">∼50°–60° NE, and above this depth range it dips more steeply. Nearby faults are also imaged in the upper 10 km, many of which dip steeply and project to mapped surface fault traces. These secondary faults may join the SAF at depths below about 10 km to form a flower‐like structure. In Appendix D, we show that rupture on a northeast‐dipping SAF, using a single plane that approximates the two dips seen in our study, produces shaking that differs from shaking calculated for the Great California ShakeOut, for which the southern SAF was modeled as vertical in most places: shorter‐period (TTfault.

  13. [Virtual endoscopic navigation and body transparency based on computed tomography. A step towards in vivo imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Gombergh, Rodolphe; Castro, Albert; Gandjbakhch, Iradj; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Dubois, François

    2011-06-01

    Progress in HR-CTdata processing has led to lower X-ray exposure and to better diagnostic performance. We describe 19 adult patients (among 5000) examined by HR CT with 64 detectors, acquisition and exposure protocols in mSv, spiral, 0.6-mm slices, 5To PACS. After the two usual processing steps (60 gray values, 5122 and 10242 matrices, dedicated workstations for coronaroscopy and virtual coloscopy, 2D multiplanar reformation, surfacic, 3D volumes with dissection and navigation), a third original data processing step on additional workstations was added. Variable matrix extrapolated images, flexible colored curves (different from anatomical conventions), lighting (sources) and transparencies (unavailable with traditional endoscopy) were used. The digital film is a 16-minute "journey "consisting of 19 endo-body navigations in 5 regions, from the head to the bronchi, from the heart to the coronary arteries, and from the digestive tract to the abdomen and pelvis. One possible application is post-operative verification of an aortic graft. The movie is illustrated here with ten plates. This new approach is cost-effective and beneficial for the patient, in terms of early diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up. Ethical issues are also examined.

  14. Development of image-guided operation system having integrated information of the patient for procedure of endoscopic surgery of digestive tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Asaki; Suzuki, Naoki; Tanoue, Kazuo; Ieiri, Satoshi; Konishi, Kozo; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kenmotsu, Hajime; Hashizume, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the development of patient's integrated information-displaying system at image-guided, robotic peroral endoscopic operation of digestive tracts as well as the actual operative field for the operator not to look aside. The peroral endoscope has, at its top, a magnetic position sensor and 2 robotic manipulative forceps at right and left side to navigate the surgery through following 3 windows of superimposing display: the inner peritoneal 3D structure of the real operative field reconstructed from preoperative CT and MR images by volume rendering, presentation of the robot top tip in the structure above and in the preoperative CT or MR image as an ordinary navigation. Furthermore, the robot has a function to measure softness of its grabbing tissue which is displayed in the corresponding right and left superimposing windows, and signs like the real-time blood pressure and heart rate are also given in another window. All of the patient's integrated information-displaying can be handled at will during the operation. Improvement of user interface and of navigation display is further to be conducted. (T.T.)

  15. VISUALIZATION OF REGISTERED SUBSURFACE ANATOMY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for visualization of subsurface anatomy includes obtaining a first image from a first camera and a second image from a second camera or a second channel of the first camera, where the first and second images contain shared anatomical structures. The second camera and the secon....... A visual interface displays the registered visualization of the first and second images. The system and method are particularly useful for imaging during minimally invasive surgery, such as robotic surgery....

  16. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis: A case report with images and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Lemos Moura

    Full Text Available Summary Necrotizing pancreatitis with fluid collections can occur as a complication of acute pancreatitis. The management of these patients depends on the severity and involves multiple medical treatment modalities, as clinical intensive care and surgical intervention. In this article, we show a severe case of walled-off pancreatic necrosis that was conducted by endoscopic drainage with great clinical outcome.

  17. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors Using Image-Based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the most common approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, misdirection, vascular damage, intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and optic nerve injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less-experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation coupled with neuronavigation in localizing neurovascular structures during TSS. Twenty-five patients with a pituitary tumor underwent preoperative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI images loaded into the navigation platform were used for segmentation and preoperative planning. After patient registration and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe or Doppler probe on or as close as possible to the target. Preoperative segmentation of the internal carotid artery and cavernous sinus matched with the intraoperative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. Image guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of cases. The mean accuracy of the measurements was 1.20 ± 0.21 mm. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation, especially with 3-dimensional reconstruction, is highly informative preoperatively and potentially could assist less-experienced neurosurgeons in preventing vascular and neural injury during TSS. In addition, the accuracy found in this study is comparable to previously reported neuronavigation measurements. This preliminary study is encouraging for future prospective intraoperative validation with larger numbers of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Robot-assisted endoscope guidance versus manual endoscope guidance in functional endonasal sinus surgery (FESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Klaus Wolfgang; Westphal, Ralf; Rilk, Markus; Last, Carsten; Bootz, Friedrich; Wahl, Friedrich; Jakob, Mark; Send, Thorsten

    2017-10-01

    Having one hand occupied with the endoscope is the major disadvantage for the surgeon when it comes to functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Only the other hand is free to use the surgical instruments. Tiredness or frequent instrument changes can thus lead to shaky endoscopic images. We collected the pose data (position and orientation) of the rigid 0° endoscope and all the instruments used in 16 FESS procedures with manual endoscope guidance as well as robot-assisted endoscope guidance. In combination with the DICOM CT data, we tracked the endoscope poses and workspaces using self-developed tracking markers. All surgeries were performed once with the robot and once with the surgeon holding the endoscope. Looking at the durations required, we observed a decrease in the operating time because one surgeon doing all the procedures and so a learning curve occurred what we expected. The visual inspection of the specimens showed no damages to any of the structures outside the paranasal sinuses. Robot-assisted endoscope guidance in sinus surgery is possible. Further CT data, however, are desirable for the surgical analysis of a tracker-based navigation within the anatomic borders. Our marker-based tracking of the endoscope as well as the instruments makes an automated endoscope guidance feasible. On the subjective side, we see that RASS brings a relief for the surgeon.

  19. Endoscopic inspection of steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliniemi, H.; Muukka, E.

    1990-01-01

    For over ten years, Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) has developed, complementary inspection methods for steam turbine condition monitoring, which can be applied both during operation and shutdown. One important method used periodically during outages is endoscopic inspection. The inspection is based on the method where the internal parts of the turbine is inspected through access borings with endoscope and where the magnified figures of the internal parts is seen on video screen. To improve inspection assurance, an image-processing based pattern recognition method for cracks has been developed for the endoscopic inspection of turbine blades. It is based on the deduction conditions derived from the crack shape. The computer gives an alarm of a crack detection and prints a simulated image of the crack, which is then checked manually

  20. Scoping the scope: endoscopic evaluation of endoscope working channels with a new high-resolution inspection endoscope (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Monique T; Girotra, Mohit; Huang, Robert J; Banerjee, Subhas

    2018-02-06

    Outbreaks of transmission of infection related to endoscopy despite reported adherence to reprocessing guidelines warrant scrutiny of all potential contributing factors. Recent reports from ambulatory surgery centers indicated widespread significant occult damage within endoscope working channels, raising concerns regarding the potential detrimental impact of this damage on the adequacy of endoscope reprocessing. We inspected working channels of all 68 endoscopes at our academic institution using a novel flexible inspection endoscope. Inspections were recorded and videos reviewed by 3 investigators to evaluate and rate channel damage and/or debris. Working channel rinsates were obtained from all endoscopes, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence was measured. Overall endoscope working channel damage was rated as minimal and/or mild and was consistent with expected wear and tear (median 1.59 on our 5-point scale). Our predominant findings included superficial scratches (98.5%) and scratches with adherent peel (76.5%). No channel perforations, stains, or burns were detected. The extent of damage was not predicted by endoscope age. Minor punctate debris was common, and a few small drops of fluid were noted in 42.6% of endoscopes after reprocessing and drying. The presence of residual fluid predicted higher ATP bioluminescence values. The presence of visualized working channel damage or debris was not associated with elevated ATP bioluminescence values. The flexible inspection endoscope enables high-resolution imaging of endoscope working channels and offers endoscopy units an additional modality for endoscope surveillance, potentially complementing bacterial cultures and ATP values. Our study, conducted in a busy academic endoscopy unit, indicated predominately mild damage to endoscope working channels, which did not correlate with elevated ATP values. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Subsurface geometry of the San Andreas fault in southern California: Results from the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) and strong ground motion expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuis, Gary S.; Bauer, Klaus; Goldman, Mark R.; Ryberg, Trond; Langenheim, Victoria; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Rymer, Michael J.; Stock, Joann M.; Hole, John A.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Graves, Robert; Aagaard, Brad T.

    2017-01-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is one of the most studied strike‐slip faults in the world; yet its subsurface geometry is still uncertain in most locations. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) was undertaken to image the structure surrounding the SAF and also its subsurface geometry. We present SSIP studies at two locations in the Coachella Valley of the northern Salton trough. On our line 4, a fault‐crossing profile just north of the Salton Sea, sedimentary basin depth reaches 4 km southwest of the SAF. On our line 6, a fault‐crossing profile at the north end of the Coachella Valley, sedimentary basin depth is ∼2–3  km">∼2–3  km and centered on the central, most active trace of the SAF. Subsurface geometry of the SAF and nearby faults along these two lines is determined using a new method of seismic‐reflection imaging, combined with potential‐field studies and earthquakes. Below a 6–9 km depth range, the SAF dips ∼50°–60°">∼50°–60° NE, and above this depth range it dips more steeply. Nearby faults are also imaged in the upper 10 km, many of which dip steeply and project to mapped surface fault traces. These secondary faults may join the SAF at depths below about 10 km to form a flower‐like structure. In Appendix D, we show that rupture on a northeast‐dipping SAF, using a single plane that approximates the two dips seen in our study, produces shaking that differs from shaking calculated for the Great California ShakeOut, for which the southern SAF was modeled as vertical in most places: shorter‐period (TT<1  s) shaking is increased locally by up to a factor of 2 on the hanging wall and is decreased locally by up to a factor of 2 on the footwall, compared to shaking calculated for a vertical fault.

  2. Swirl and blade wakes in the interaction between gas turbines and exhaust diffusers investigated by endoscopic particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opilat, Victor

    2011-10-21

    Exhaust diffusers studied in this thesis are installed behind the last turbine stage of gas turbines, including those used in combined cycle power plants. Extensive research made in recent years proved that effects caused by an upstream turbine need to be taken into account when designing efficient diffusers. Under certain conditions these effects can stabilize the boundary layer in diffusers and prevent separation. In this research the impact of multiple parameters, such as tip leakage flow, swirl, and rotating blade wakes, on the performance of a diffuser is studied. Experiments were conducted using a diffuser test rig with a rotating bladed wheel as a turbine effect generator and with an additional tip leakage flow insert. The major advantages of this test rig are modularity and easy variation of the main parameters. To capture the complexity and understand the physics of diffuser flow, and to clarify the phenomenon of the flow stabilisation, the 2D endoscopic laser optical measurement technique Partide Image Velocimetry (PIV) was adopted to the closed ''rotating'' diffuser test rig. Intensity and distribution of vortices in the blade tip area are decisive for diffuser performance. Large vortices in the annular diffuser inlet behind the blade tips interact with the boundary layer in diffusers. At design point these vortices are very early suppressed by the main flow. For the operating point with a low value of the flow coefficient (negative swirl), vortices are ab out two tim es stronger than for design point and the boundary layer is destabilized. V mtices develop in the direction contrary to swirl in the main flow and just cause flow destabilization. Coherent back flow zones are induced and reduction of diffuser performance occurs. For the operating point with positive swirl (for a high flow coefficient value), these vortices are also strong but do not counteract the main flow because they develop in the same direction with the swirl in the

  3. Classification of atrophic mucosal patterns on Blue LASER Imaging for endoscopic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-related gastritis: A retrospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Yoshio; Murakami, Hidehiro; Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Hino, Kaori; Sasaki, Chise; Nishikawa, Megumi

    2018-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis can be classified according to characteristic mucosal patterns observed by Blue LASER Imaging (BLI) in a medium-range to distant view. To facilitate the endoscopic diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP)-related gastritis, we investigated whether atrophic mucosal patterns correlated with HP infection based on the image interpretations of three endoscopists blinded to clinical features. This study included 441 patients diagnosed as having atrophic gastritis by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at Nishikawa Gastrointestinal Clinic between April 1, 2015 and March 31, 2016. The presence/absence of HP infection was not taken into consideration. Endoscopy was performed using a Fujifilm EG-L580NW scope. Atrophic mucosal patterns observed by BLI were classified into Spotty, Cracked and Mottled. Image interpretation results were that 89, 122 and 228 patients had the Spotty, Cracked and Mottled patterns, respectively, and 2 patients an undetermined pattern. Further analyses were performed on 439 patients, excluding the 2 with undetermined patterns. The numbers of patients testing negative/positive for HP infection in the Spotty, Cracked and Mottled pattern groups were 12/77, 105/17, and 138/90, respectively. The specificity, positive predictive value and positive likelihood ratio for endoscopic diagnosis with positive HP infection based on the Spotty pattern were 95.3%, 86.5% and 8.9, respectively. In all patients with the Spotty pattern before HP eradication, the Cracked pattern was observed on subsequent post-eradication endoscopy. The Spotty pattern may represent the presence of HP infection, the Cracked pattern, a post-inflammatory change as seen after HP eradication, and the Mottled pattern, intestinal metaplasia.

  4. Dosimetry in endoscopic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldred, Martha Aurelia; Paes, Walter Siqueira; Fausto, Agnes M.F.; Nucci, Jose Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Okuno, Emico; Maruta, Luis Massuo

    1996-01-01

    Equivalent and effective doses in occupational exposures are evaluated considering that some specific endoscopic examinations, radiographic and fluoroscopic images of patients are taken with the medical staff near to the radiation field. Examinations are simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom as a member of the medical staff. Thermoluminescent dosemeters are attached in several positions of the phantom in order to determine some organ doses. From the comparison between the doses experimentally determined and the International and the Brazilian recommended occupational dose limits, the maximum number of examination that any member of the staff can perform was calculated

  5. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors using Image-based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is a well-known approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, lateral misdirection and vascular damage, intraoperative CSF leakage, and optic nerve and vascular injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation in localization of neurovascular structures during TSS. Methods Twenty-five patients with pituitary tumors underwent preoperative 3TMRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE sequences. Images were reviewed by an expert independent neuroradiologist. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet (16/25 cases) or Stryker (9/25 cases) image guidance platforms for segmentation and pre-operative planning. After patient registration into the neuronavigation system and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe on or as close as possible to the target. The audible pulsations of the bilateral ICA were confirmed using a micro-Doppler probe. Results Pre-operative segmentation of the ICA and cavernous sinus matched with the intra-operative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases (Dice Similarity Coefficient =1). This information reassured the surgeons with regard to the lateral extent of bone removal at the sellar floor and the limits of lateral exploration. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. This assisted in preventing unnecessary removal of the normal pituitary gland. Image-guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of the cases and the diaphragma sella in 52% of cases, which helped to determine the limits of upward exploration and to decrease the risk of CSF

  6. Endoscopic ampullectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bourke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ampullectomy offers a minimally invasive method of effectively treating non-invasive neoplasms of the ampulla of Vater and surrounding peri-ampullary region with high success and relative safety. These lesions would otherwise require surgical intervention, including pancreatico-duodenectomy. However, major complications may occur and a careful assessment of the patients comorbidities and their ability to tolerate adverse events needs to be factored into the treatment decision. Careful staging, often multi-modality is required, particularly for extensive lesions. Complete en-bloc excision of the entire neoplasm should be the goal with conventional papillary adenomas. Large lesions with extra-papillary extension currently require extended piecemeal excision, however with meticulous technique, recurrence is uncommon in longterm follow up.

  7. State of the art in advanced endoscopic imaging for the detection and evaluation of dysplasia and early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coda S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Coda,1,2 Andrew V Thillainayagam1,2 1Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine and Photonics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London, UK; 2Endoscopy Unit, Charing Cross Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Abstract: Ideally, endoscopists should be able to detect, characterize, and confirm the nature of a lesion at the bedside, minimizing uncertainties and targeting biopsies and resections only where necessary. However, under conventional white-light inspection – at present, the sole established technique available to most of humanity – premalignant conditions and early cancers can frequently escape detection. In recent years, a range of innovative techniques have entered the endoscopic arena due to their ability to enhance the contrast of diseased tissue regions beyond what is inherently possible with standard white-light endoscopy equipment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art advanced endoscopic imaging techniques available for clinical use that are impacting the way precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are currently detected and characterized at endoscopy. The basic instrumentation and the physics behind each method, followed by the most influential clinical experience, are described. High-definition endoscopy, with or without optical magnification, has contributed to higher detection rates compared with white-light endoscopy alone and has now replaced ordinary equipment in daily practice. Contrast-enhancement techniques, whether dye-based or computed, have been combined with white-light endoscopy to further improve its accuracy, but histology is still required to clarify the diagnosis. Optical microscopy techniques such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy enable in vivo histology during endoscopy; however, although of invaluable assistance for tissue characterization, they have not

  8. Endoscopic retrograde cholanglopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, S.C.; Garra, B.S.; Zeman, R.K.; Krasner, B.H.; Lo, S.C.B.; Davros, W.J.; Silverman, P.M.; Cattau, E.L.; Fleischer, D.E.; Benjamin, S.B.S.B.

    1989-01-01

    As part of the clinical evaluation of image management and communications system (IMACS), the authors undertook a prospective study to compare conventional film versus digitized film viewed on a workstation. Twenty-five each of normal and abnormal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic (ERCP) studies were digitized with a 1,684 x 2,048-pixel matrix and evaluated in a single-blind fashion on the workstation. The resulting interpretations were then compared with those resulting from interpretation of film (spot film and 100-mm photospot) images. They report that no significant differences were found in ability to see anatomic detail or pathology. A second study involved performing 10 ERCP studies in a lithotripsy suite equipped with biplane digital fluoroscopy. The digital video displays were comparable in quality to that of film. Progress is being made in using the IMACS for archiving and retrieval of all current ERCP images

  9. Extracting subsurface fingerprints using optical coherence tomography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akhoury, SS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface Fingerprints using Optical Coherence Tomography Sharat Saurabh Akhoury, Luke Nicholas Darlow Modelling and Digital Science, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Abstract Physiologists have found... approach to extract the subsurface fingerprint representation using a high-resolution imaging technology known as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). ...

  10. Micromotor endoscope catheter for in vivo, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, P. R.; Chen, Y.; Aguirre, A. D.; Schneider, K.; Hsiung, P.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Madden, K.; Schmitt, J.; Goodnow, J.; Petersen, C.

    2004-10-01

    A distally actuated, rotational-scanning micromotor endoscope catheter probe is demonstrated for ultrahigh-resolution in vivo endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The probe permits focus adjustment for visualization of tissue morphology at varying depths with improved transverse resolution compared with standard OCT imaging probes. The distal actuation avoids nonuniform scanning motion artifacts that are present with other probe designs and can permit a wider range of imaging speeds. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic imaging is demonstrated in a rabbit with micromotor endoscope catheter probe promises to improve OCT imaging performance in future endoscopic imaging applications.

  11. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  12. Endoscopic root canal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Michaeli, Eli; Nahlieli, Oded

    2009-10-01

    To describe an innovative endoscopic technique for root canal treatment. Root canal treatment was performed on 12 patients (15 teeth), using a newly developed endoscope (Sialotechnology), which combines an endoscope, irrigation, and a surgical microinstrument channel. Endoscopic root canal treatment of all 15 teeth was successful with complete resolution of all symptoms (6-month follow-up). The novel endoscope used in this study accurately identified all microstructures and simplified root canal treatment. The endoscope may be considered for use not only for preoperative observation and diagnosis but also for active endodontic treatment.

  13. I. The effect of volcanic aerosols on ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica. II. A novel method for enhancing subsurface radar imaging using radar interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitas, Steven Ronald

    The theory of radiative transfer is used to explain how a stratospheric aerosol layer may, for large solar zenith angles, increase the flux of UV-B light at the ground. As previous explanations are heuristic and incomplete, I first provide a rigorous and complete explanation of how this occurs. I show that an aerosol layer lying above Antarctica during spring will decrease the integrated daily dose of biologically weighted irradiance, weighted by the erythema action spectrum, by only up to 5%. Thus after a volcanic eruption, life in Antarctica during spring will suffer the combined effects of the spring ozone hole and ozone destruction induced by volcanic aerosols, with the latter effect only slightly offset by aerosol scattering. I extend subsurface radar imaging by considering the additional information that may be derived from radar interferometry. I show that, under the conditions that temporal and spatial decorrelation between observations is small so that the effects of these decorrelations do not swamp the signature expected from a subsurface layer, the depth of burial of the lower surface may be derived. Also, the echoes from the lower and upper surfaces may be separated. The method is tested with images acquired by SIR-C of the area on the Egypt/Sudan border where buried river channels were first observed by SIR-A. Temporal decorrelation between the images, due to some combination of physical changes in the scene, changes in the spacecraft attitude and errors in the processing by NASA of the raw radar echoes into the synthetic aperture radar images, swamps the expected signature for a layer up to 40 meters thick. I propose a test to determine whether or not simultaneous observations are required, and then detail the radar system requirements for successful application of the method for both possible outcomes of the test. I also describe in detail the possible applications of the method. These include measuring the depth of burial of ice in the polar

  14. 70 nm resolution in subsurface optical imaging of silicon integrated-circuits using pupil-function engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrels, K. A.; Ramsay, E.; Reid, D. T.

    2009-02-01

    We present experimental evidence for the resolution-enhancing effect of an annular pupil-plane aperture when performing nonlinear imaging in the vectorial-focusing regime through manipulation of the focal spot geometry. By acquiring two-photon optical beam-induced current images of a silicon integrated-circuit using solid-immersion-lens microscopy at 1550 nm we achieved 70 nm resolution. This result demonstrates a reduction in the minimum effective focal spot diameter of 36%. In addition, the annular-aperture-induced extension of the depth-of-focus causes an observable decrease in the depth contrast of the resulting image and we explain the origins of this using a simulation of the imaging process.

  15. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993--September 22, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground.

  16. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993 - September 22, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground

  17. Imaging subsurface migration of dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer using 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Doetsch, Joseph; Fiandaca, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by leaking CO2 is a potential risk of carbon sequestration. With the help of a field experiment in western Denmark, we investigate to what extent surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can detect and image dissolved CO2 in a shallow aquifer. For this purpose...... the injection start. During these 120days, the CO2 migrates about 25m in the expected groundwater flow direction. Water electrical conductivity (EC) sampling using small screens in 29 wells allows for very good verification of the ERT results. Water EC and ERT results generally agree very well, with the water...

  18. Systems workplace for endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irion, K M; Novak, P

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) a decade ago, the requirements for operating rooms (OR) and their equipment have been increased. Compared with conventional open surgery, the new endoscopic techniques require additional tools. Television systems, for video-assisted image acquisition and visualisation, including cameras, monitors and light systems, as well as insufflators, pumps, high-frequency units, lasers and motorised therapy units, are nowadays usually made available on carts during endoscopic surgery. In conjunction with a set of endoscopic instruments, these high-tech units allow new operating techniques to be performed. The benefit for patients has become clear in recent years; however, the technical complexity of OR has also increased considerably. To minimise this problem for the OR personnel, the MIS concept 'OR1' (Operating Room 1) was developed and implemented. OR1 is a fully functional and integrated multi-speciality surgical suite for MIS. The centrepieces of the OR1 are the Storz Communication Bus (SCB) and the advanced image and data archiving system (Aida) from Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany. Both components allow monitoring, access and networking of the MIS equipment and other OR facilities, as well as the acquisition, storage and display of image, patient and equipment data during the endoscopic procedure. A central user interface allows efficient, simplified operation and online clinical images. Due to the system integration, the handling of complex equipment is considerably simplified, logistical procedures in the OR are improved, procedure times are shorter and, particularly noteworthy, operative risk can be reduced through simplified device operation.

  19. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yad Ram Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Jenssen, Christian; Arcidiacono, Paolo G

    2015-01-01

    become a reality due to elastography, which is a recently developed technique. Elastography has already been proving its added value as a complementary imaging method, helpful to better characterize and differentiate between benign and malignant masses. The current applications of elastography in lymph...

  1. endoscope-i: an innovation in mobile endoscopic technology transforming the delivery of patient care in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, N; Coulson, C; George, A

    2017-11-01

    Digital and mobile device technology in healthcare is a growing market. The introduction of the endoscope-i, the world's first endoscopic mobile imaging system, allows the acquisition of high definition images of the ear, nose and throat (ENT). The system combines the e-i Pro camera app with a bespoke engineered endoscope-i adaptor which fits securely onto the iPhone or iPod touch. Endoscopic examination forms a salient aspect of the ENT work-up. The endoscope-i therefore provides a mobile and compact alternative to the existing bulky endoscopic systems currently in use which often restrict the clinician to the clinic setting. Areas covered: This article gives a detailed overview of the endoscope-i system together with its applications. A review and comparison of alternative devices on the market offering smartphone adapted endoscopic viewing systems is also presented. Expert commentary: The endoscope-i fulfils unmet needs by providing a compact, highly portable, simple to use endoscopic viewing system which is cost-effective and which makes use of smartphone technology most clinicians have in their pocket. The system allows real-time feedback to the patient and has the potential to transform the way that healthcare is delivered in ENT as well as having applications further afield.

  2. THE IMAGES OF SUBSURFACE TERTIARY – QUARTENARY DEPOSITS BASED ON GROUND PENETRATING RADAR RECORDS OF SUBI KECIL ISLAND COAST, NATUNA DISTRICT, RIAU ARCHIPELAGO PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Budiono

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface Tertiary to Quaternary deposits from coast of Subi Kecil Island, Natuna Distric, Riau Archipelago Province, were imaged with Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR. The GPR survey was carried out by using GSSI Surveyor III/20 with 270 MHz and 40 MHz of 3200 MLF antennas. GPR data were processed using software GSSI’s RADAN for Windows NT™. The interpretation were done by using the radar facies as a groups of radar reflections. The GPR images of study area can be recoqnized in to several facies such as parallel, sub parallel, chaotic, oblique, mound and reflection-free. The calibration were done with geological data along the coast (cliff and outcrop. Unit A is the uppermost layer which is characterized by continous to non continous pararel reflection, srong reflector and high amplitude and is interpreted as alluvium deposits. Below the unit A is unit B which is characterized by non continous sub parallel, chaotic and mound reflector, strong reflector and high amplitude. Unit C and D (Mio-Oligocene are overlain by unit A and B include chaotic, reflection-free and, locally, discontinuous parallel, oblique mound reflector radar facies, correlatable at the cliff face to massive sands, mostly representing near coastal deposits. These units are bounded by continuous, high amplitude reflections that can be easily correlatable throughout the GPR profiles, serving as important stratigraphic markers. The GPR survey may improve the reconstruction of the depositional environments through the recognition of massive and unconsolidated sand deposits within unit A and B (Holocene. The stratigraphic framework was also improved through the recognition of the discontinuity surface between Units C and D.

  3. Fluorescence-based endoscopic imaging of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen to improve early detection of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Shinji; Yu, James Y H; Quang, Timothy; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Kao, Stephanie; Holt, Alex; Erskind, Jalysa; McClure, Richard; Siuta, Michael; Kitamura, Tokio; Tobita, Etsuo; Koike, Seiji; Wilson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Liu, Eric; Washington, Kay; Omary, Reed; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2015-03-01

    Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen belongs to the mucin-type tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Notably, TF antigen is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) but is rarely expressed in normal colonic tissue. Increased TF antigen expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we sought to validate a novel nanobeacon for imaging TF-associated CRC in a preclinical animal model. We developed and characterized the nanobeacon for use with fluorescence colonoscopy. In vivo imaging was performed on an orthotopic rat model of CRC. Both white light and fluorescence colonoscopy methods were utilized to establish the ratio-imaging index for the probe. The nanobeacon exhibited specificity for TF-associated cancer. Fluorescence colonoscopy using the probe can detect lesions at the stage which is not readily confirmed by conventional visualization methods. Further, the probe can report the dynamic change of TF expression as tumor regresses during chemotherapy. Data from this study suggests that fluorescence colonoscopy can improve early CRC detection. Supplemented by the established ratio-imaging index, the probe can be used not only for early detection, but also for reporting tumor response during chemotherapy. Furthermore, since the data obtained through in vivo imaging confirmed that the probe was not absorbed by the colonic mucosa, no registered toxicity is associated with this nanobeacon. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel probe for imaging TF antigen as a biomarker for the early detection and prediction of the progression of CRC at the molecular level. © 2014 UICC.

  4. Novel computer-based endoscopic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovitz, R.; Hai, N.; Abraham, Martin D.; Adler, Doron; Nissani, M.; Fridental, Ron; Vitsnudel, Ilia

    1995-05-01

    We have introduced a computer-based endoscopic camera which includes (a) unique real-time digital image processing to optimize image visualization by reducing over exposed glared areas and brightening dark areas, and by accentuating sharpness and fine structures, and (b) patient data documentation and management. The image processing is based on i Sight's iSP1000TM digital video processor chip and Adaptive SensitivityTM patented scheme for capturing and displaying images with wide dynamic range of light, taking into account local neighborhood image conditions and global image statistics. It provides the medical user with the ability to view images under difficult lighting conditions, without losing details `in the dark' or in completely saturated areas. The patient data documentation and management allows storage of images (approximately 1 MB per image for a full 24 bit color image) to any storage device installed into the camera, or to an external host media via network. The patient data which is included with every image described essential information on the patient and procedure. The operator can assign custom data descriptors, and can search for the stored image/data by typing any image descriptor. The camera optics has extended zoom range of f equals 20 - 45 mm allowing control of the diameter of the field which is displayed on the monitor such that the complete field of view of the endoscope can be displayed on all the area of the screen. All these features provide versatile endoscopic camera with excellent image quality and documentation capabilities.

  5. Combination of panoramic and fluorescence endoscopic images to obtain tumor spatial distribution information useful for bladder cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijnyk, S.; Hernández Mier, Y.; Blondel, W. C. P. M.; Daul, C.; Wolf, D.; Bourg-Heckly, G.

    2007-07-01

    Bladder cancer is widely spread. Moreover, carcinoma in situ can be difficult to diagnose as it may be difficult to see, and become invasive in 50 % of case. Non invasive diagnosis methods like photodynamic or autofluorescence endoscopy allow enhancing sensitivity and specificity. Besides, bladder tumors can be multifocal. Multifocality increases the probability of recurrence and infiltration into bladder muscle. Analysis of spatial distribution of tumors could be used to improve diagnosis. We explore the feasibility to combine fluorescence and spatial information on phantoms. We developed a system allowing the acquisition of consecutive images under white light or UV excitation alternatively and automatically along the video sequence. We also developed an automatic image processing algorithm to build a partial panoramic image from a cystoscopic sequence of images. Fluorescence information is extracted from wavelength bandpass filtered images and superimposed over the cartography. Then, spatial distribution measures of fluorescent spots can be computed. This cartography can be positioned on a 3D generic shape of bladder by selecting some reference points. Our first results on phantoms show that it is possible to obtain cartography with fluorescent spots and extract quantitative information of their spatial distribution on a "wide" field of view basis.

  6. Endoscopic submucosal dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Ponchon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    evidence). 2 ESGE recommends endoscopic resection with a curative intent for visible lesions in Barrett's esophagus (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). ESD has not been shown to be superior to EMR for excision of mucosal cancer, and for that reason EMR should be preferred. ESD may...... RECOMMENDATIONS: 1 ESGE recommends endoscopic en bloc resection for superficial esophageal squamous cell cancers (SCCs), excluding those with obvious submucosal involvement (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) may be considered in such lesions when...

  7. A multicenter validation of an endoscopic classification with narrow band imaging for gastric precancerous and cancerous lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pimentel-Nunes, P.; Dinis-Ribeiro, M.; Soares, J. B.; Marcos-Pinto, R.; Santos, C.; Rolanda, C.; Bastos, R. P.; Areia, M.; Afonso, L.; Bergman, J.; Sharma, P.; Gotoda, T.; Henrique, R.; Moreira-Dias, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and study aim: The reliability and external validity of narrow band imaging (NBI) in the stomach have not been described consistently. The aim of the current study was to describe and estimate the accuracy and reliability of a simplified classification system for NBI in the diagnosis of

  8. Towards automated visual flexible endoscope navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stap, Nanda; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2013-10-01

    The design of flexible endoscopes has not changed significantly in the past 50 years. A trend is observed towards a wider application of flexible endoscopes with an increasing role in complex intraluminal therapeutic procedures. The nonintuitive and nonergonomical steering mechanism now forms a barrier in the extension of flexible endoscope applications. Automating the navigation of endoscopes could be a solution for this problem. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in image-based navigation algorithms. The objectives are to find the most promising navigation system(s) to date and to indicate fields for further research. A systematic literature search was performed using three general search terms in two medical-technological literature databases. Papers were included according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 135 papers were analyzed. Ultimately, 26 were included. Navigation often is based on visual information, which means steering the endoscope using the images that the endoscope produces. Two main techniques are described: lumen centralization and visual odometry. Although the research results are promising, no successful, commercially available automated flexible endoscopy system exists to date. Automated systems that employ conventional flexible endoscopes show the most promising prospects in terms of cost and applicability. To produce such a system, the research focus should lie on finding low-cost mechatronics and technologically robust steering algorithms. Additional functionality and increased efficiency can be obtained through software development. The first priority is to find real-time, robust steering algorithms. These algorithms need to handle bubbles, motion blur, and other image artifacts without disrupting the steering process.

  9. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  10. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  11. Endoscopic Devices for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Kartik; Dinani, Amreen M; Rothstein, Richard I

    2016-06-01

    The obesity epidemic, recognized by the World Health Organization in 1997, refers to the rising incidence of obesity worldwide. Lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy are often ineffective long-term solutions; bariatric surgery remains the gold standard for long-term obesity weight loss. Despite the reported benefits, it has been estimated that only 1% of obese patients will undergo surgery. Endoscopic treatment for obesity represents a potential cost-effective, accessible, minimally invasive procedure that can function as a bridge or alternative intervention to bariatric surgery. We review the current endoscopic bariatric devices including space occupying devices, endoscopic gastroplasty, aspiration technology, post-bariatric surgery endoscopic revision, and obesity-related NOTES procedures. Given the diverse devices already FDA approved and in development, we discuss the future directions of endoscopic therapies for obesity.

  12. Performance and Emission Investigations of Jatropha and Karanja Biodiesels in a Single-Cylinder Compression-Ignition Engine Using Endoscopic Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistri, Gayatri K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Longman, Douglas; Agarwal, Avinash K.

    2015-09-07

    Biofuels produced from non-edible sources that are cultivated on marginal lands represent a viable source of renewable and carbon-neutral energy. In this context, biodiesel obtained from Jatropha and Karanja oil seeds have received significant interest, especially in South Asian subcontinent. Both of these fuels are produced from non-edible plant seeds with high oil content, which can be grown on marginal lands. In this research, we have investigated the performance and emission characteristics of Jatropha and Karanja methyl esters (biodiesel) and their blends with diesel. Another objective is to examine the effect of long-term storage on biodiesel’s oxidative stability. The biodiesels were produced at Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, (IIT Kanpur), India, and the engine experiments were performed in a single cylinder, 4-stroke, compression ignition engine at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Chicago. An endoscope was used to visualize in-cylinder combustion events and examine the soot distribution. The effects of fuel and start of injection (SOI) on engine performance and emissions were investigated. Results indicated that ignition delay was shorter with biodiesel. Consequently the cylinder pressure and premixed heat release were higher for diesel compared to biodiesel. Engine performance data for biodiesel (J100, K100) and biodiesel blends (J30, K30) showed an increase in break thermal efficiency (BTE) (10.9%, 7.6% for biodiesel and blend, respectively), BSFC (13.1% and 5.6%), and NOx emission (9.8% and 12.9%), and a reduction in BSHC (8.64% and 12.9%), and BSCO (15.56% and 4.0%). The soot analysis from optical images qualitatively showed that biodiesel and blends produced less soot compared to diesel. The temperature profiles obtained from optical imaging further supported higher NOx in biodiesels and their blends compared to diesel. Additionally, the data indicated that retarding the injection timing leads to higher BSFC, but lower flame temperatures

  13. Wall Painting Investigation by Means of Non-invasive Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI): Inspection of Subsurface Structures Buried in Historical Plasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of subsurface features of wall paintings is important in conservation and technical art history as well as in building archaeology and architecture fields. In this study, an area of the apsidal wall painting of Nebbelunde Church (Rødby, Denmark) has been investigated by means of ...

  14. Evanescent Waves in High Numerical Aperture Aplanatic Solid Immersion Microscopy: Effects of Forbidden Light on Subsurface Imaging (Open Access, Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Subsurface microscopy of integrated circuits with angular spectrum and polarization control ,” Opt. Lett. 34(8), 1261–1263 (2009). 6. K. A. Serrels...E. Ramsay, R. J. Warburton, and D. T. Reid, “Nanoscale optical microscopy in the vectorial focusing regime,” Nature Pho. 2(5), 311–314 (2008). 7. A

  15. Liver parenchumography following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revert, A.; Arana, E.; Pertejo, V.; Berenguer, M.; Masip, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Focal liver opacification during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) is an uncommon complication caused by excessive pressure during contrast injection. In this situation, ERCP must be interrupted and the position of the cannula checked. We recommend that these images be excluded from the diagnosis of tumor or cystic cavities. 4 refs

  16. Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Calle

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements

  17. Method for radiometric calibration of an endoscope's camera and light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2008-03-01

    An endoscope is a commonly used instrument for performing minimally invasive visual examination of the tissues inside the body. A physician uses the endoscopic video images to identify tissue abnormalities. The images, however, are highly dependent on the optical properties of the endoscope and its orientation and location with respect to the tissue structure. The analysis of endoscopic video images is, therefore, purely subjective. Studies suggest that the fusion of endoscopic video images (providing color and texture information) with virtual endoscopic views (providing structural information) can be useful for assessing various pathologies for several applications: (1) surgical simulation, training, and pedagogy; (2) the creation of a database for pathologies; and (3) the building of patient-specific models. Such fusion requires both geometric and radiometric alignment of endoscopic video images in the texture space. Inconsistent estimates of texture/color of the tissue surface result in seams when multiple endoscopic video images are combined together. This paper (1) identifies the endoscope-dependent variables to be calibrated for objective and consistent estimation of surface texture/color and (2) presents an integrated set of methods to measure them. Results show that the calibration method can be successfully used to estimate objective color/texture values for simple planar scenes, whereas uncalibrated endoscopes performed very poorly for the same tests.

  18. Deep subsurface microbial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Information on the microbiology of the deep subsurface is necessary in order to understand the factors controlling the rate and extent of the microbially catalyzed redox reactions that influence the geophysical properties of these environments. Furthermore, there is an increasing threat that deep aquifers, an important drinking water resource, may be contaminated by man's activities, and there is a need to predict the extent to which microbial activity may remediate such contamination. Metabolically active microorganisms can be recovered from a diversity of deep subsurface environments. The available evidence suggests that these microorganisms are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of organic matter coupled to a variety of electron acceptors just as microorganisms do in surface sediments, but at much slower rates. The technical difficulties in aseptically sampling deep subsurface sediments and the fact that microbial processes in laboratory incubations of deep subsurface material often do not mimic in situ processes frequently necessitate that microbial activity in the deep subsurface be inferred through nonmicrobiological analyses of ground water. These approaches include measurements of dissolved H2, which can predict the predominant microbially catalyzed redox reactions in aquifers, as well as geochemical and groundwater flow modeling, which can be used to estimate the rates of microbial processes. Microorganisms recovered from the deep subsurface have the potential to affect the fate of toxic organics and inorganic contaminants in groundwater. Microbial activity also greatly influences 1 the chemistry of many pristine groundwaters and contributes to such phenomena as porosity development in carbonate aquifers, accumulation of undesirably high concentrations of dissolved iron, and production of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Although the last decade has seen a dramatic increase in interest in deep subsurface microbiology, in comparison with the study of

  19. Site Recommendation Subsurface Layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.L. Linden

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to develop a Subsurface Facility layout that is capable of accommodating the statutory capacity of 70,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU), as well as an option to expand the inventory capacity, if authorized, to 97,000 MTU. The layout configuration also requires a degree of flexibility to accommodate potential changes in site conditions or program requirements. The objective of this analysis is to provide a conceptual design of the Subsurface Facility sufficient to support the development of the Subsurface Facility System Description Document (CRWMS M andO 2000e) and the ''Emplacement Drift System Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 2000i). As well, this analysis provides input to the Site Recommendation Consideration Report. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Evaluation of the existing facilities and their integration into the Subsurface Facility design. (2) Identification and incorporation of factors influencing Subsurface Facility design, such as geological constraints, thermal loading, constructibility, subsurface ventilation, drainage control, radiological considerations, and the Test and Evaluation Facilities. (3) Development of a layout showing an available area in the primary area sufficient to support both the waste inventories and individual layouts showing the emplacement area required for 70,000 MTU and, if authorized, 97,000 MTU

  20. EIAGRID: In-field optimization of seismic data acquisition by real-time subsurface imaging using a remote GRID computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, B. Z.; Vallenilla Ferrara, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    The constant growth of contaminated sites, the unsustainable use of natural resources, and, last but not least, the hydrological risk related to extreme meteorological events and increased climate variability are major environmental issues of today. Finding solutions for these complex problems requires an integrated cross-disciplinary approach, providing a unified basis for environmental science and engineering. In computer science, grid computing is emerging worldwide as a formidable tool allowing distributed computation and data management with administratively-distant resources. Utilizing these modern High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies, the GRIDA3 project bundles several applications from different fields of geoscience aiming to support decision making for reasonable and responsible land use and resource management. In this abstract we present a geophysical application called EIAGRID that uses grid computing facilities to perform real-time subsurface imaging by on-the-fly processing of seismic field data and fast optimization of the processing workflow. Even though, seismic reflection profiling has a broad application range spanning from shallow targets in a few meters depth to targets in a depth of several kilometers, it is primarily used by the hydrocarbon industry and hardly for environmental purposes. The complexity of data acquisition and processing poses severe problems for environmental and geotechnical engineering: Professional seismic processing software is expensive to buy and demands large experience from the user. In-field processing equipment needed for real-time data Quality Control (QC) and immediate optimization of the acquisition parameters is often not available for this kind of studies. As a result, the data quality will be suboptimal. In the worst case, a crucial parameter such as receiver spacing, maximum offset, or recording time turns out later to be inappropriate and the complete acquisition campaign has to be repeated. The

  1. Subsurface Contamination Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the

  2. Ultrasound-assisted endoscopic partial plantar fascia release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure.

  3. Learning endoscopic resection in the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vilsteren, Frederike G. I.; Pouw, Roos E.; Herrero, Lorenza Alvarez; Bisschops, Raf; Houben, Martin; Peters, Frans T. M.; Schenk, B. E.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Schoon, Erik J.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.

    Background: Endoscopic resection is the cornerstone of endoscopic management of esophageal early neoplasia. However, endoscopic resection is a complex technique requiring knowledge and expertise. Our aims were to identify the most important learning points in performing endoscopic resection in a

  4. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: System morphodynamics of the Fly and Beni Rivers revealed by novel sub-surface sonar, deep coring, and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth's fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories, prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux. However, the underlying bed & floodplain strata are poorly understood. Available data commonly stem from skin-deep approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can interpret large tropical river morphology using analogies to small temperate systems. Systems in a dynamic state of response to sea level rise or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. Last August we conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~5,350 CMS) and this September we investigated the Beni River in Northern Bolivia (discharge ~3,500 CMS). Results were obtained using a novel measurement method: a high-power (>4kW) dual-frequency SyQwest sub-bottom profiler customized to best image 10-20m below the river/lake bed in shallow water. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), bank samples, and push cores confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS records of water/bed elevations that could be used to parameterize numerical models. We have now analyzed these results in some detail. Findings for the Fly River include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed of the Lower Fly River and many locations along the Strickland River, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River, where the

  5. The Serpentinite Subsurface Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Nelson, B. Y.; Brazelton, W. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial habitats hosted in ultramafic rocks constitute substantial, globally-distributed portions of the subsurface biosphere, occurring both on the continents and beneath the seafloor. The aqueous alteration of ultramafics, in a process known as serpentinization, creates energy rich, high pH conditions, with low concentrations of inorganic carbon which place fundamental constraints upon microbial metabolism and physiology. Despite their importance, very few studies have attempted to directly access and quantify microbial activities and distributions in the serpentinite subsurface microbiome. We have initiated microbiological studies of subsurface seeps and rocks at three separate continental sites of serpentinization in Newfoundland, Italy, and California and compared these results to previous analyses of the Lost City field, near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In all cases, microbial cell densities in seep fluids are extremely low, ranging from approximately 100,000 to less than 1,000 cells per milliliter. Culture-independent analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed low-diversity microbial communities related to Gram-positive Firmicutes and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Interestingly, unlike Lost City, there has been little evidence for significant archaeal populations in the continental subsurface to date. Culturing studies at the sites yielded numerous alkaliphilic isolates on nutrient-rich agar and putative iron-reducing bacteria in anaerobic incubations, many of which are related to known alkaliphilic and subsurface isolates. Finally, metagenomic data reinforce the culturing results, indicating the presence of genes associated with organotrophy, hydrogen oxidation, and iron reduction in seep fluid samples. Our data provide insight into the lifestyles of serpentinite subsurface microbial populations and targets for future quantitative exploration using both biochemical and geochemical approaches.

  6. New endoscope shaft for endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindert, E.J. van; Grotenhuis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a new endoscope shaft developed for suction-aspiration during endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. METHODS: A custom-made shaft for a Wolf endoscope (Richard Wolf GmbH, Knittlingen, Germany) was developed with a height of 10 mm and a width of 5 mm, allowing an

  7. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.; Novotny, R.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES)

  9. [Endoscopic extraction of gallbladder calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühner, W; Frimberger, E; Ottenjann, R

    1984-06-29

    Endoscopic extraction of gallbladder stones were performed, as far as we know for the first time, in three patients with combined choledochocystolithiasis. Following endoscopic papillotomy (EPT) and subsequent mechanical lithotripsy of multiple choledochal concrements measuring up to 3 cm the gallbladder stones were successfully extracted with a Dormia basket through the cystic duct. The patients have remained free of complications after the endoscopic intervention.

  10. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  11. Endoscopic management of colorectal adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel; Fischer, Andreas; Schmidt, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal adenomas are well known precursors of invasive adenocarcinoma. Colonoscopy is the gold standard for adenoma detection. Colonoscopy is far more than a diagnostic tool, as it allows effective treatment of colorectal adenomas. Endoscopic resection of colorectal adenomas has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer. Difficult resection techniques are available, such as endoscopic mucosal resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection and endoscopic full-thickness resection. This review aims to provide an overview of the different endoscopic resection techniques and their indications, and summarizes the current recommendations in the recently published guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

  12. Combining endoscopes with PIV and digital holography for the study of vessel model mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arévalo, Laura; Palero, Virginia; Andrés, Nieves; Arroyo, M P; Lobera, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In this work traditional fluid and solid mechanics measurement techniques have been combined with endoscopes for the study of blood vessel models’ mechanical properties. Endoscopes have been used as the imaging part of a high-speed PIV system to obtain the velocity field in a vessel model immersed in a container with a refractive index-matching liquid. In this way, we take advantage of the fact that the endoscope tip can be immersed in liquid. Endoscopes have also been used as the imaging and illuminating part of a digital holographic set-up for wall deformation measurement. The novelty of this work is that only one endoscope was used for illuminating and observing the vessel model, using the endoscope’s own illuminating system as the illumination source. The performance of endoscopes in different vessel models has been tested. The results of flow velocity and wall deformation in the different blood vessel models are presented. (paper)

  13. Subsurface quality assurance practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report addresses only the concept of applying Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) practices to repository shaft and subsurface design and construction; how NQA will be applied; and the level of detail required in the documentation for construction of a shaft and subsurface repository in contrast to the level of detail required in the documentation for construction of a traditional mine. This study determined that NQA practices are viable, attainable, as well as required. The study identified the appropriate NQA criteria and the repository's major structures, systems, items, and activities to which the criteria are applicable. A QA plan, for design and construction, and a list of documentation, for construction, are presented. 7 refs., 1 fig., 18 tabs

  14. Comparison of microscopic and endoscopic view of the internal acoustic meatus: A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montibeller, Guilherme Ramina; Hendrix, Philipp; Fries, Fabian N; Becker, Kurt W; Oertel, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    The endoscope is thought to provide an improved exposure of the internal acoustic meatus after retrosigmoid craniotomy for microsurgical resection of intrameatal tumors. The aim of this study is to quantify the differences in internal acoustic meatus (IAM) exposure comparing microscopic and endoscopic visualization. A retrosigmoid approach was performed on 5 cadaver heads. A millimeter gauge was introduced into the internal acoustic meatus, and examinations with a surgical microscope and 0°, 30° and 70° rigid endoscopes were performed. The extent of IAM depth visualized with the microscope and the different angled endoscopes were analyzed. The microscopic view allowed an average IAM depth visualization of 2.8 mm. The endoscope allowed an improved exposure of IAM in all cases. The 0°, 30° and 70° endoscopes permitted an exposure that was respectively 96% (5.5 mm), 139% (6.7 mm) and 200% (8.4 mm) more lateral than the microscopic view. Angled optics, however, provided an image distortion, specifically the 70° endoscope. The endoscope provides a superior visualization of the IAM compared to the microscope when using a retrosigmoid approach. The 30° endoscope represented an ideal compromise of superior visualization with marginal image distortion. Additional implementation of the endoscope into microsurgery of intrameatal tumors likely facilitates complete tumor removal and might spare facial and vestibulocochlear function. Clin. Anat. 31:398-403, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A Primer on Endoscopic Electronic Medical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and co...

  16. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites

  17. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  18. Enhancements to and characterization of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) prototype instrument and applications to shallow subsurface imaging at sites in the DOE complex. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, W.C.; Wright, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to enhance the state-of-the-art of electromagnetic imaging of the shallow (0 to 5 m) subsurface in electrically conductive media where ground penetrating radar (GPR) provides insufficient penetration and time domain electromagnetic (TEM) systems provide insufficient resolution. This objective is being pursued by instrumentation enhancements to the existing very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) system coupled with physical and numerical modeling. Success in this endeavor will improve the speed and accuracy of waste pit and trench location and characterization, and could have additional applications to shallow DNAPL and LNAPL spill and cleanup monitoring, clay cap integrity assessment, and landfill stabilization monitoring. This could result in significant savings in time and money during characterization, remediation, and decommissioning of facilities. This report summarizes accomplishments after 8 months of a three-year project. The authors have focused mainly on instrumentation and numerical modeling during this time.'

  19. Design of Endoscopic Capsule With Multiple Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingke; Xie, Xiang; Li, Guolin; Sun, Tianjia; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the miss rate of the wireless capsule endoscopy, in this paper, we propose a new system of the endoscopic capsule with multiple cameras. A master-slave architecture, including an efficient bus architecture and a four level clock management architecture, is applied for the Multiple Cameras Endoscopic Capsule (MCEC). For covering more area of the gastrointestinal tract wall with low power, multiple cameras with a smart image capture strategy, including movement sensitive control and camera selection, are used in the MCEC. To reduce the data transfer bandwidth and power consumption to prolong the MCEC's working life, a low complexity image compressor with PSNR 40.7 dB and compression rate 86% is implemented. A chipset is designed and implemented for the MCEC and a six cameras endoscopic capsule prototype is implemented by using the chipset. With the smart image capture strategy, the coverage rate of the MCEC prototype can achieve 98% and its power consumption is only about 7.1 mW.

  20. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  1. Update on endoscopic pancreatic function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tyler Stevens; Mansour A Parsi

    2011-01-01

    Hormone-stimulated pancreatic function tests (PFTs) are considered the gold standard for measuring pancreatic exocrine function. PFTs involve the administration of intravenous secretin or cholecystokinin, followed by collection and analysis of pancreatic secretions. Because exocrine function may decline in the earliest phase of pancreatic fibrosis, PFTs are considered accurate for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Unfortunately, these potentially valuable tests are infrequently performed except at specialized centers, because they are time consuming and complicated. To overcome these limitations, endoscopic PFT methods have been developed which include aspiration of pancreatic secretions through the suction channel of the endoscope. The secretin endoscopic pancreatic function test (ePFT) involves collection of duodenal aspirates at 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after secretin stimulation. A bicarbonate concentration greater than 80 mmol/L in any of the samples is considered a normal result. The secretin ePFT has demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity compared with various reference standards, including the "Dreiling tube" secretin PFT, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical histology. Furthermore, a standard autoanalyzer can be used for bicarbonate analysis, which allows the secretin ePFT to be performed at any hospital. The secretin ePFT may complement imaging tests like endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis.This paper will review the literature validating the use of ePFT in the diagnosis of exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis. Newer developments will also be discussed, including the feasibility of combined EUS/ePFT, the use of cholecystokinin alone or in combination with secretin, and the discovery of new protein and lipid pancreatic juice biomarkers which may complement traditionalfluid analysis.

  2. Transaxillary Endoscopic Breast Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Bo Sim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The axillary technique is the most popular approach to breast augmentation among Korean women. Transaxillary breast augmentation is now conducted with sharp electrocautery dissection under direct endoscopic vision throughout the entire process. The aims of this method are clear: both a bloodless pocket and a sharp non-traumatic dissection. Round textured or anatomical cohesive gel implants have been used to make predictable well-defined inframammary creases because textured surface implants demonstrated a better stability attributable to tissue adherence compared with smooth surface implants. The axillary endoscopic technique has greatly evolved, and now the surgical results are comparable to those with the inframammary approach. The author feels that this technique is an excellent choice for young patients with an indistinct or absent inframammary fold, who do not want a scar in the aesthetic unit of their chest.

  3. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Christopher J; Cunningham, Chris; Bach, Simon P

    2014-02-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is a well established method of accurate resection of specimens from the rectum under binocular vision. This review examines its role in the treatment of benign conditions of the rectum and the evidence to support its use and compliment existing endoscopic treatments. The evolution of TEMS in early rectal cancer and the concepts and outcomes of how it has been utilised to treat patients so far are presented. The bespoke nature of early rectal cancer treatment is changing the standard algorithms of rectal cancer care. The future of TEMS in the organ preserving treatment of early rectal cancer is discussed and how as clinicians we are able to select the correct patients for neoadjuvant or radical treatments accurately. The role of radiotherapy and outcomes from combination treatment using TEMS are presented with suggestions for areas of future research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. [GERD: endoscopic antireflux therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caca, K

    2006-08-02

    A couple of minimally-invasive, endoscopic antireflux procedures have been developed during the last years. Beside endoscopic suturing these included injection/implantation technique of biopolymers and application of radiofrequency. Radiofrequency (Stretta) has proved only a very modest effect, while implantation techniques have been abandoned due to lack of long-term efficacy (Gatekeeper) or serious side effects (Enteryx). While first generation endoluminal suturing techniques (EndoCinch, ESD) demonstrated a proof of principle their lack of durability, due to suture loss, led to the development of a potentially durable transmural plication technique (Plicator). In a prospective-randomized, sham-controlled trial the Plicator procedure proved superiority concerning reflux symptoms, medication use and esophageal acid exposure (24-h-pH-metry). While long-term data have to be awaited to draw final conclusions, technical improvements will drive innovation in this field.

  5. Cultivating the Deep Subsurface Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, C. P.; Osburn, M. R.; Flynn, T. M.; Masterson, A.; Kruger, B.

    2017-12-01

    Subterranean ecosystems are poorly understood because many microbes detected in metagenomic surveys are only distantly related to characterized isolates. Cultivating microorganisms from the deep subsurface is challenging due to its inaccessibility and potential for contamination. The Deep Mine Microbial Observatory (DeMMO) in Lead, SD however, offers access to deep microbial life via pristine fracture fluids in bedrock to a depth of 1478 m. The metabolic landscape of DeMMO was previously characterized via thermodynamic modeling coupled with genomic data, illustrating the potential for microbial inhabitants of DeMMO to utilize mineral substrates as energy sources. Here, we employ field and lab based cultivation approaches with pure minerals to link phylogeny to metabolism at DeMMO. Fracture fluids were directed through reactors filled with Fe3O4, Fe2O3, FeS2, MnO2, and FeCO3 at two sites (610 m and 1478 m) for 2 months prior to harvesting for subsequent analyses. We examined mineralogical, geochemical, and microbiological composition of the reactors via DNA sequencing, microscopy, lipid biomarker characterization, and bulk C and N isotope ratios to determine the influence of mineralogy on biofilm community development. Pre-characterized mineral chips were imaged via SEM to assay microbial growth; preliminary results suggest MnO2, Fe3O4, and Fe2O3 were most conducive to colonization. Solid materials from reactors were used as inoculum for batch cultivation experiments. Media designed to mimic fracture fluid chemistry was supplemented with mineral substrates targeting metal reducers. DNA sequences and microscopy of iron oxide-rich biofilms and fracture fluids suggest iron oxidation is a major energy source at redox transition zones where anaerobic fluids meet more oxidizing conditions. We utilized these biofilms and fluids as inoculum in gradient cultivation experiments targeting microaerophilic iron oxidizers. Cultivation of microbes endemic to DeMMO, a system

  6. Endoscopic tissue diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2008-09-01

    The extremely poor outcome in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, in large part, reflects the late presentation of these tumors and the challenging nature of establishing a tissue diagnosis. Establishing a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma requires obtaining evidence of malignancy from sampling of the epithelium of the biliary tract, which has proven to be challenging. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration performs slightly better than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosing cholangiocarcinoma, both endoscopic approaches demonstrate disappointing performance characteristics.

  7. Novel methods for endoscopic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, C E; Jowell, P S; Baillie, J

    1995-04-01

    The development of past, present, and future endoscopic training methods is described. A historical perspective of endoscopy training guidelines and devices is used to demonstrate support for the use of novel endoscopic training techniques. Computer simulation of endoscopy, interactive learning, and virtual reality applications in endoscopy and surgery are reviewed. The goals of endoscopic simulation and challenges facing investigators in this field are discussed, with an emphasis on current and future research.

  8. An Innovate Robotic Endoscope Guidance System for Transnasal Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, D T; Sommer, F; Scheithauer, M O; Greve, J; Hoffmann, T K; Schuler, P J

    2017-12-01

    Objective  Advanced transnasal sinus and skull base surgery remains a challenging discipline for head and neck surgeons. Restricted access and space for instrumentation can impede advanced interventions. Thus, we present the combination of an innovative robotic endoscope guidance system and a specific endoscope with adjustable viewing angle to facilitate transnasal surgery in a human cadaver model. Materials and Methods  The applicability of the robotic endoscope guidance system with custom foot pedal controller was tested for advanced transnasal surgery on a fresh frozen human cadaver head. Visualization was enabled using a commercially available endoscope with adjustable viewing angle (15-90 degrees). Results  Visualization and instrumentation of all paranasal sinuses, including the anterior and middle skull base, were feasible with the presented setup. Controlling the robotic endoscope guidance system was effectively precise, and the adjustable endoscope lens extended the view in the surgical field without the common change of fixed viewing angle endoscopes. Conclusion  The combination of a robotic endoscope guidance system and an advanced endoscope with adjustable viewing angle enables bimanual surgery in transnasal interventions of the paranasal sinuses and the anterior skull base in a human cadaver model. The adjustable lens allows for the abandonment of fixed-angle endoscopes, saving time and resources, without reducing the quality of imaging.

  9. New flexible endoscope for otologic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchan, Mark L.

    1993-07-01

    Endoscopy has become an important procedure in many medical specialties. For the Otologist, however, space limitations within the ear have restricted development of endoscopic procedures. The desire for minimally invasive techniques in Otology has demonstrated itself through the work of numerous physicians who have performed procedures ranging from diagnostic inspection of the middle ear to viewing the interior of the cochlea. To assist in performing such endoscopic procedures, Xomed-Treace has developed a line of flexible fiberoptic endoscopes for use by the Otologist. These scopes combine illumination and imaging fiber bundles within a small diameter unit ranging in size from 0.8 mm to 1.2 mm. The 1.2 mm scope is produced with an angled, rigid stainless steel sheath. The 0.8 mm scope is flexible with the ability to articulate 120 degree(s) in one direction. The fiberscopes have been designed for the Otologist to produce a good resolution image while allowing ease of operation through ergonomics and consideration of the surgical anatomy.

  10. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Sepsis After Transanal Endoscopic Resection of a Rectal Lateral Spreading Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, Marcelo de Melo Andrade; de Almeida, Romulo Medeiros; Moreira, Natascha Mourão; de Sousa, João Batista; de Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves

    2017-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is considered a safe, appropriate, and minimally invasive approach, and complications after endoscopic microsurgery are rare. We report a case of sepsis and pneumoretroperitoneum after resection of a rectal lateral spreading tumor. The patient presented with rectal mucous discharge. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal lateral spreading tumor. The patient underwent an endoscopic transanal resection of the lesion. He presented with sepsis of the abdominal focus, and imaging tests revealed pneumoretroperitoneum. A new surgical intervention was performed with a loop colostomy. Despite the existence of other reports on pneumoretroperitoneum after transanal endoscopic microsurgery, what draws attention to this case is the association with sepsis. PMID:28761873

  11. Subsurface Biogeochemistry of Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Univ. Relations and Science Education; Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.

    2016-06-29

    A major scientific challenge in environmental sciences is to identify the dominant processes controlling actinide transport in the environment. It is estimated that currently, over 2200 metric tons of plutonium (Pu) have been deposited in the subsurface worldwide, a number that increases yearly with additional spent nuclear fuel (Ewing et al., 2010). Plutonium has been shown to migrate on the scale of kilometers, giving way to a critical concern that the fundamental biogeochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface are not well understood (Kersting et al., 1999; Novikov et al., 2006; Santschi et al., 2002). Neptunium (Np) is less prevalent in the environment; however, it is predicted to be a significant long-term dose contributor in high-level nuclear waste. Our focus on Np chemistry in this Science Plan is intended to help formulate a better understanding of Pu redox transformations in the environment and clarify the differences between the two long-lived actinides. The research approach of our Science Plan combines (1) Fundamental Mechanistic Studies that identify and quantify biogeochemical processes that control actinide behavior in solution and on solids, (2) Field Integration Studies that investigate the transport characteristics of Pu and test our conceptual understanding of actinide transport, and (3) Actinide Research Capabilities that allow us to achieve the objectives of this Scientific Focus Area (SFA and provide new opportunities for advancing actinide environmental chemistry. These three Research Thrusts form the basis of our SFA Science Program (Figure 1).

  12. Ultrathin endoscopes based on multicore fibers and adaptive optics: a status review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Sivankutty, Siddharth; Tsvirkun, Viktor; Bouwmans, Géraud; Rigneault, Hervé

    2016-12-01

    We take stock of the progress that has been made into developing ultrathin endoscopes assisted by wave front shaping. We focus our review on multicore fiber-based lensless endoscopes intended for multiphoton imaging applications. We put the work into perspective by comparing with alternative approaches and by outlining the challenges that lie ahead.

  13. Endoscopic anatomy of the orbital floor and maxillary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Corey C; Bromwich, Matthew; Roth, Kathy; Matic, Damir B

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic repair of orbital blow-out fractures could become a predictable and efficient treatment alternative to traditional methods. However, maxillary sinus endoscopy provides a complex and disorienting view of the orbital floor. To be a useful and consistent technique for providing access to the orbital floor, specific knowledge of maxillary endoscopic anatomy is required. The purpose of the study was to provide an anatomic description of the orbital floor via the endoscopic approach. Objectives include defining consistent landmarks for use in endoscopic repair of orbital floor fractures. Using 0- and 30-degree rigid endoscopes, 6 fresh cadavers (12 maxillary sinuses) were examined via a standard Caldwell-Luc approach. Computed tomographic scans, plastic molds, and digital images were used to compare observable averages within bony anatomy. Potential bony landmarks were correlated with soft-tissue anatomy in fresh specimens. The maxillary ostium, orbital floor, and lateral ethmoid air cells were visualized, and their structures were described. Observations were made in relation to the anatomy of the orbital floor and maxillary sinus, including fracture pattern and force transmission pathways. An "orbitomaxillary" sinus bony thickening was identified and described for the first time. This study provides the basis for further refinement of surgical technique and opens the door for future clinical trials using endoscopic repair.

  14. Endoscopic Therapeutic Approach for Dysplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Noh Hong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-standing intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD induces dysplastic change in the intestinal mucosa and increases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer. The evolving endoscopic techniques and technologies, including dye spraying methods and high-definition images, have been replacing random biopsies and have been revealed as more practical and efficient for detection of dysplasia in IBD patients. In addition, they have potential usefulness in detailed characterization of lesions and in the assessment of endoscopic resectability. Most dysplastic lesions without an unclear margin, definite ulceration, non-lifting sign, and high index of malignant change with suspicion for lymph node or distant metastases can be removed endoscopically. However, endoscopic resection of dysplasia in chronic IBD patients is usually difficult because it is often complicated by submucosal fibrosis. In patients with dysplasias that demonstrate submucosa fibrosis or a large size (≥20 mm, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD or ESD with snaring (simplified or hybrid ESD is an alternative option and may avoid a colectomy. However, a standardized endoscopic therapeutic approach for dysplasia in IBD has not been established yet, and dedicated specialized endoscopists with interest in IBD are needed to fully investigate recent emerging techniques and technologies.

  15. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for a Suprasellar Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenonos, Georgios A; Snyderman, Carl H; Gardner, Paul A

    2018-04-01

    Objectives  The current video presents the nuances of an endoscopic endonasal approach to a suprasellar craniopharyngioma. Design  The video analyzes the presentation, preoperative workup and imaging, surgical steps and technical nuances of the surgery, the clinical outcome, and follow-up imaging. Setting  The patient was treated by a skull base team consisting of a neurosurgeon and an ENT surgeon, at a teaching academic institution. Participants  The case refers to a 67-year-old man who presented with vision loss and headaches, and was found to have a suprasellar mass, with imaging characteristics consistent with a craniopharyngioma. Main Outcome Measures  The main outcome measures consistent of the reversal of the patient symptoms (vision loss and headaches), the recurrence-free survival based on imaging, as well as the absence of any complications. Results  The patient's vision improved after the surgery; at his last follow-up there was no evidence of recurrence on imaging. Conclusions  The endoscopic endonasal approach is safe and effective in treating suprasellar craniopharyngiomas. The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/p1VXbwnAWCo .

  16. Endoscopic mode for three-dimensional CT display of normal and pathologic laryngeal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Yumoto, Eiji; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    The recent development of helical (spiral) computed tomography allows collection of volumetric data to obtain high quality three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed images. The authors applied the 3D CT endoscopic imaging technique to asses normal and pathologic laryngeal structures. The latter included trauma, vocal fold atrophy, cancer of the larynx and recurrent nerve palsy. This technique was able to show normal laryngeal structures and characteristic findings of each pathology. The 3D CT endoscopic images can be rotated around any axis, allowing optimal depiction of pathologic lesion. The use of 3D CT endoscopic technique provides the display of the location and extent of pathology and affords accurate therapeutic planning. (author)

  17. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000

  18. Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The objective was to prove the advantage of endoscopic laser-urethroplasty over internal urethrotomy in acquired urethral strictures. Patients and Method: From January, 1996 to June, 2005, 35 patients with a mean age of 66 years were submitted to endoscopic laser-urethroplasty for strictures of either the bulbar (30) or membranous (5) urethra. The operations were carried out under general anesthesia. First of all, the strictures were incised at the 4, 8 and 12 o'clock position by means of a Sachse-urethrotom. Then the scar flap between the 4 and 8 o'clock position was vaporized using a Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1060 nm and a 600 pm bare fiber, the latter always being in contact with the tissue. The laser worked at 40W power in continuous mode. The total energy averaged 2574 J. An indwelling catheter was kept in place overnight and the patients were discharged the following day. Urinalysis, uroflowmetry and clinical examination were performed at two months after surgery and from then on every six months. Results: No serious complications were encountered. Considering a mean follow-up of 18 months, the average peak flow improved from 7.3 ml/s preoperatively to 18.7 mVs postoperatively. The treatment faded in 5 patients ( 14.3% ) who finally underwent open urethroplasty. Conclusions: Endoscopic laser-urethroplasty yields better short-term results than internal visual urethrotomy. Long-term follow-up has yet to confirm its superiority in the treatment of acquired urethral strictures.

  19. Craniopharyngioma - Transnasal Endoscopic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Bhagat,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas are slow growing tumours arising from remnants of the craniopharyngeal duct and occupy the sellar region. The patients may remain asymptomatic for long duration or present with headache or visual disturbances. Surgery is the mainstay of the treatment. Traditionally these tumours have been removed by neurosurgeons through the cranial approach but the advent of nasal endoscopes has opened new avenues for ENT surgeons to treat such patients. We hereby present a case of craniopharyngioma who was successfully treated by Trans-nasal Hypophysectomy.

  20. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-12-16

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods.

  1. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  2. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex; Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D

    2010-01-01

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 μm full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  3. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-25

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  4. Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

  5. Duodenal endoscopic findings and histopathologic confirmation of intestinal lymphangiectasia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R N; Ginn, J A; Bell, C M; Davis, M J; Foy, D S

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) has been associated with characteristic duodenal mucosal changes. However, the sensitivity and specificity of the endoscopic duodenal mucosal appearance for the diagnosis of IL are not reported. To evaluate the utility of endoscopic images of the duodenum for diagnosis of IL. Endoscopic appearance of the duodenal mucosal might predict histopathologic diagnosis of IL with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. 51 dogs that underwent upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and endoscopic biopsies. Retrospective review of images acquired during endoscopy. Dogs were included if adequate biopsies were obtained during upper GI endoscopy and digital images were saved during the procedure. Images were assessed for the presence and severity of IL. Using histopathology as the gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of endoscopy for diagnosing IL were calculated. Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) was diagnosed in 25/51 dogs. Gross endoscopic appearance of the duodenal mucosa had a sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of 68% (46%, 84%) and 42% (24%, 63%), respectively for diagnosis of IL. Endoscopic images in cases with lymphopenia, hypocholesterolemia, and hypoalbuminemia had a sensitivity of 80%. Endoscopic duodenal mucosa appearance alone lacks specificity and has only a moderate sensitivity for diagnosis of IL. Evaluation of biomarkers associated with PLE improved the sensitivity; however, poor specificity for diagnosis of IL supports the need for histopathologic confirmation. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Endoscopic approach to achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J; Wehrmann, Till

    2013-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder. The etiology is still unknown and therefore all treatment options are strictly palliative with the intention to weaken the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Current established endoscopic therapeutic options include pneumatic dilation (PD) or botulinum toxin injection. Both treatment approaches have an excellent symptomatic short term effect, and lead to a reduction of LES pressure. However, the long term success of botulinum toxin (BT) injection is poor with symptom recurrence in more than 50% of the patients after 12 mo and in nearly 100% of the patients after 24 mo, which commonly requires repeat injections. In contrast, after a single PD 40%-60% of the patients remain asymptomatic for ≥ 10 years. Repeated on demand PD might become necessary and long term remission can be achieved with this approach in up to 90% of these patients. The main positive predictors for a symptomatic response to PD are an age > 40 years, a LES-pressure reduction to 40 years, was nearly equivalent to surgery. A new promising technique might be peroral endoscopic myotomy, although long term results are needed and practicability as well as safety issues must be considered. Treatment with a temporary self expanding stent has been reported with favorable outcomes, but the data are all from one study group and must be confirmed by others before definite recommendations can be made. In addition to its use as a therapeutic tool, endoscopy also plays an important role in the diagnosis and surveillance of patients with achalasia. PMID:23951393

  7. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporatesconcepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopicsurgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizinga submucosal tunnel as an operating space.Although intended for the palliation of symptoms ofachalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is alsoefficacious in the management of spastic esophagealdisorders. The technique requires an understanding ofthe pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders aswell as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut.POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% ofpatients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition,it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremesof age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken.Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist tomanage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical asfailure to do so could result in significant morbidity. Themajor late adverse event is gastroesophageal refluxwhich appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients.Research is being conducted to clarify the optimaltechnique for POEM and a personalized approach bymeasuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junctiondistensibility appears promising. In addition toesophageal disorders,POEM is being studied in themanagement of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy)with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility.Although POEM represents a paradigm shift themanagement of esophageal motility disorders, theresults of prospective randomized controlled trials withlong-term follow up are eagerly awaited.

  8. High-quality endoscope reprocessing decreases endoscope contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristoforo, P; Kaltseis, J; Fritz, A; Edlinger, M; Posch, W; Wilflingseder, D; Lass-Flörl, C; Orth-Höller, D

    2018-02-24

    Several outbreaks of severe infections due to contamination of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes, mainly duodenoscopes, have been described. The rate of microbial endoscope contamination varies dramatically in literature. The aim of this multicentre prospective study was to evaluate the hygiene quality of endoscopes and automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs) in Tyrol/Austria. In 2015 and 2016, a total of 463 GI endoscopes and 105 AERs from 29 endoscopy centres were analysed by a routine (R) and a combined routine and advanced (CRA) sampling procedure and investigated for microbial contamination by culture-based and molecular-based analyses. The contamination rate of GI endoscopes was 1.3%-4.6% according to the national guideline, suggesting that 1.3-4.6 patients out of 100 could have had contacts with hygiene-relevant microorganisms through an endoscopic intervention. Comparison of R and CRA sampling showed 1.8% of R versus 4.6% of CRA failing the acceptance criteria in phase I and 1.3% of R versus 3.0% of CRA samples failing in phase II. The most commonly identified indicator organism was Pseudomonas spp., mainly Pseudomonas oleovorans. None of the tested viruses were detected in 40 samples. While AERs in phase I failed (n = 9, 17.6%) mainly due to technical faults, phase II revealed lapses (n = 6, 11.5%) only on account of microbial contamination of the last rinsing water, mainly with Pseudomonas spp. In the present study the contamination rate of endoscopes was low compared with results from other European countries, possibly due to the high quality of endoscope reprocessing, drying and storage. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric Loros

    2001-01-01

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation

  10. Subsurface imaging in a sector of Cerro Prieto transform fault near to pull-apart basin, Mexicali Valley, Baja California, Mexico, based on crooked lines 2D seismic reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares-Agüero, M. A.; González-Escobar, M.; Arregui, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the transition zone between San Andres continental transformation system and the coupled transform faults system and rifting of Gulf of California is located the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin delimitated by Imperial fault (northeast) and Cerro Prieto fault (CPF) (southwest), this last, is the limit west of Cerro Prieto geothermic field (CPGF). Crooked lines 2D seismic reflection, covering a portion near the intersection of CPF and CPGF are processed and interpreted. The seismic data were obtained in the early 80's by Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX). By decades, technical and investigation works in Cerro Prieto geothermic field and its vicinity had mapped faults at several depths but do not stablish a clear limit where this faults and CPF interact due the complex hydrothermal effects imaging the subsurface. The profiles showing the presence of a zone of uplift effect due to CPF. Considering the proximity of the profiles to CPF, it is surprising almost total absence of faults. A strong reflector around 2 km of depth, it is present in all profiles. This seismic reflector is considered a layer of shale, result of the correlation with a well located in the same region.

  11. Subsurface remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Groves, Joel L.

    2002-01-01

    Subsurface remote sensing measurements are widely used for oil and gas exploration, for oil and gas production monitoring, and for basic studies in the earth sciences. Radiation sensors, often including small accelerator sources, are used to obtain bulk properties of the surrounding strata as well as to provide detailed elemental analyses of the rocks and fluids in rock pores. Typically, instrument packages are lowered into a borehole at the end of a long cable, that may be as long as 10 km, and two-way data and instruction telemetry allows a single radiation instrument to operate in different modes and to send the data to a surface computer. Because these boreholes are often in remote locations throughout the world, the data are frequently transmitted by satellite to various locations around the world for almost real-time analysis and incorporation with other data. The complete system approach that permits rapid and reliable data acquisition, remote analysis and transmission to those making decisions is described

  12. Endoscopic surgery of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado, Silvio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (NAJ is a tumor with vascular component, slow growing, benign but very aggressive because of its local invasiveness. The NAJ is rare, accounting for 0.05% of all head and neck cancers. The classic triad of epistaxis, unilateral nasal obstruction and a mass in the nasopharynx suggests the diagnosis of NAJ and is then supplemented by imaging. Over the past 10 years the treatment of this disease has been discussed with the aim of designing a management protocol. Currently, surgery appears to be the best treatment of the NAJ. Other methods such as hormone therapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment modalities are now used occasionally as complementary treatments. Objective: To present the cases of this disease in the Hospital Infantil between October 2007 and August 2008. Methods: A retrospective case study of five cases of NAJ underwent surgery solely with endoscopic technique of two surgeons. Classifieds between IIA and IIIA. All patients underwent angiography with embolization of the tumor 3-4 days before surgery. Follow-up after surgery to detect recurrence. Results: There were two relapses in the following two years after surgery. Conclusion: Given the short period of patient follow-up, there were only two relapses in one year. So there is need for further action to claim that this technique has a low recurrence rate, since the recurrence is probably related to incomplete resection the initial tumor.

  13. A primer on endoscopic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreja, Ashish; Rizk, Maged; Gurland, Brooke

    2010-02-01

    Endoscopic electronic medical record systems (EEMRs) are now increasingly utilized in many endoscopy centers. Modern EEMRs not only support endoscopy report generation, but often include features such as practice management tools, image and video clip management, inventory management, e-faxes to referring physicians, and database support to measure quality and patient outcomes. There are many existing software vendors offering EEMRs, and choosing a software vendor can be time consuming and confusing. The goal of this article is inform the readers about current functionalities available in modern EEMR and provide them with a framework necessary to find an EEMR that is best fit for their practice.

  14. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report...

  15. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harith M. Alkhateeb

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: (1 Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2 A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3 Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective.

  16. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; el Nawar, A; Van Gossum, A

    1992-01-01

    From March 87 to March 92, fifty eight patients were referred to our department for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). The modality of the feeding tube insertion is described. The most common indications for placement were neurologic disorders in 62% of the cases (n = 36) and malignant diseases in 32% (n = 19). The success rate of the technique was 98.3% (n = 57). No procedure-related mortality was observed. A low rate of major complication (1.7%) and minor complication (10.5%) was noted. Feeding tubes were removed in 21% of patients (n = 12); none of them with malignant disease. Survival curve analysis demonstrated that 50% of patients died within 3 months of PEG placement. Such results raise questions about the selection of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience of patients undergoing PEG. Our experience suggests that PEG is easy and safe, even in debilitated patients, having an acceptable life expectancy.

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  18. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncica, Ana Maria; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...

  19. [Transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach for the surgery of pituitary abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huanxin; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach for the surgery of pituitary abscess. Eighteen pathologically diagnosed pituitary abscess were resected through transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach at Tianjing Huanhu hospital between January 2000 and December 2011.Retrospective analysis was done upon clinical presentations and imaging features. There were 6 males and 12 females. The average age was 48.5 years old and the average disease course was 5.8 years. The typical clinical manifestations included headache (13 cases), pituitary dysfunction (10 cases), Diabetes Insipidus (4 cases) visual interference (8 cases) and fever (4 cases). All cases were resected by transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach with general anesthesia. The postoperative symptoms and follow-up results were recorded. All patients were followed up from 6 months to 6 years. Postoperatively, headache was recovered in 13 cases, visual was improved in 6 cases, hypopituitarism was relieved in 8 cases and polyuria was disappeared in 3 cases. One case was recurrent and cured by transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach. Transsphenoidal endoscopic endonasal approach for the surgery of pituitary abscess is effective.

  20. Endoscopic Management of a Primary Duodenal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albin Abraham

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoids are rare, slow-growing tumors originating from a variety of different neuroendocrine cell types. They are identified histologically by their affinity for silver salts and by positive reactions to neuroendocrine markers such as neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin and chromogranin. They can present with various clinical symptoms and are difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 43-year-old woman who was referred for evaluation of anemia. Upper endoscopy showed a duodenal bulb mass around 1 cm in size. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry staining were consistent with the diagnosis of a carcinoid tumor. Further imaging and endoscopic studies showed no other synchronous carcinoid lesions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS revealed a 1 cm lesion confined to the mucosa and no local lymphadenopathy. Successful endoscopic mucosal resection of the mass was performed. Follow-up surveillance 6 months later with EUS and Octreoscan revealed no new lesions suggestive of recurrence. No consensus guidelines exist for the endoscopic management of duodenal carcinoid tumors. However, endoscopic resection is safe and preferred for tumors measuring 1 cm or less with no evidence of invasion of the muscularis layer.

  1. Gastric schwannomas: radiological features with endoscopic and pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, H.S. [Department of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, H.K. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr; Won, H.J.; Byun, J.H.; Shin, Y.M.; Kim, A.Y.; Kim, P.N.; Lee, M.-G. [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, G.H. [Internal Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M.J. [Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To describe the radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of gastric schwannomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: The radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of 16 surgically proven cases of gastric schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) and four patients were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal series. Two radiologists reviewed the CT and upper gastrointestinal series images by consensus with regard to tumour size, contour, margin, and growth pattern, the presence or absence of ulcer, cystic change, and the CT enhancement pattern. Endoscopy was performed in eight of these 16 patients. Six patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography. Pathological specimens were obtained from and reviewed in all 16 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed for c-kit, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. Results: On radiographic examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumours with the CT features of well-demarcated, homogeneous, and uncommonly ulcerated masses. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, submucosal masses contiguous with the muscularis propria in all six examined cases. On pathological examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as well-circumscribed and homogeneous tumours in the muscularis propria and consisted microscopically of interlacing bundles of spindle cells. Strong positivity for S-100 protein was demonstrated in all 16 cases on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Gastric schwannomas appear as submucosal tumours of the stomach and have well-demarcated and homogeneous features on CT, endoscopic ultrasonography, and gross pathology. Immunohistochemistry consistently reveals positivity for S-100 protein in the tumours.

  2. Gastric schwannomas: radiological features with endoscopic and pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, H.S.; Ha, H.K.; Won, H.J.; Byun, J.H.; Shin, Y.M.; Kim, A.Y.; Kim, P.N.; Lee, M.-G.; Lee, G.H.; Kim, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To describe the radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of gastric schwannomas in 16 patients. Materials and methods: The radiological, endoscopic, and pathological findings of 16 surgically proven cases of gastric schwannoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent computed tomography (CT) and four patients were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal series. Two radiologists reviewed the CT and upper gastrointestinal series images by consensus with regard to tumour size, contour, margin, and growth pattern, the presence or absence of ulcer, cystic change, and the CT enhancement pattern. Endoscopy was performed in eight of these 16 patients. Six patients underwent endoscopic ultrasonography. Pathological specimens were obtained from and reviewed in all 16 patients. Immunohistochemistry was performed for c-kit, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. Results: On radiographic examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as submucosal tumours with the CT features of well-demarcated, homogeneous, and uncommonly ulcerated masses. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated homogeneous, submucosal masses contiguous with the muscularis propria in all six examined cases. On pathological examination, gastric schwannomas appeared as well-circumscribed and homogeneous tumours in the muscularis propria and consisted microscopically of interlacing bundles of spindle cells. Strong positivity for S-100 protein was demonstrated in all 16 cases on immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Gastric schwannomas appear as submucosal tumours of the stomach and have well-demarcated and homogeneous features on CT, endoscopic ultrasonography, and gross pathology. Immunohistochemistry consistently reveals positivity for S-100 protein in the tumours

  3. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigby, D.; Mrugala, M.; Shideler, G.; Davidsavor, T.; Leem, J.; Buesch, D.; Sun, Y.; Potyondy, D.; Christianson, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  4. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce

  5. Active infrared thermography for visualizing subsurface micro voids in an epoxy molding compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ji Yeol [Test and Package Center, Samsung Electronics, Asan(Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Soon Kyu; Choi, Jae Mook; Sohn, Hoon [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    This paper presents an automated subsurface micro void detection technique based on pulsed infrared thermography for inspecting epoxy molding compounds (EMC) used in electronic device packaging. Subsurface micro voids are first detected and visualized by extracting a lock-in amplitude image from raw thermal images. Binary imaging follows to achieve better visualization of subsurface micro voids. A median filter is then applied for removing sparse noise components. The performance of the proposed technique is tested using 36 EMC samples, which have subsurface (below 150 μm ~ 300 μm from the inspection surface) micro voids (150 μm ~ 300 μm in diameter). The experimental results show that the subsurface micro voids can be successfully detected without causing any damage to the EMC samples, making it suitable for automated online inspection.

  6. Full optical model of micro-endoscope with optical coherence microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and visible capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Kiekens, Kelli C.; Syson, Nikolas C.; Romano, Gabriella; Baker, Tressa; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    While Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), Multiphoton Microscopy (MPM), and narrowband imaging are powerful imaging techniques that can be used to detect cancer, each imaging technique has limitations when used by itself. Combining them into an endoscope to work in synergy can help achieve high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis at the point of care. Such complex endoscopes have an elevated risk of failure, and performing proper modelling ensures functionality and minimizes risk. We present full 2D and 3D models of a multimodality optical micro-endoscope to provide real-time detection of carcinomas, called a salpingoscope. The models evaluate the endoscope illumination and light collection capabilities of various modalities. The design features two optical paths with different numerical apertures (NA) through a single lens system with a scanning optical fiber. The dual path is achieved using dichroic coatings embedded in a triplet. A high NA optical path is designed to perform OCM and MPM while a low NA optical path is designed for the visible spectrum to navigate the endoscope to areas of interest and narrowband imaging. Different tests such as the reflectance profile of homogeneous epithelial tissue were performed to adjust the models properly. Light collection models for the different modalities were created and tested for efficiency. While it is challenging to evaluate the efficiency of multimodality endoscopes, the models ensure that the system is design for the expected light collection levels to provide detectable signal to work for the intended imaging.

  7. SUBSURFACE CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.E. Kramer

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify appropriate construction methods and develop a feasible approach for construction and development of the repository subsurface facilities. The objective of this analysis is to support development of the subsurface repository layout for License Application (LA) design. The scope of the analysis for construction and development of the subsurface Repository facilities covers: (1) Excavation methods, including application of knowledge gained from construction of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). (2) Muck removal from excavation headings to the surface. This task will examine ways of preventing interference with other subsurface construction activities. (3) The logistics and equipment for the construction and development rail haulage systems. (4) Impact of ground support installation on excavation and other construction activities. (5) Examination of how drift mapping will be accomplished. (6) Men and materials handling. (7) Installation and removal of construction utilities and ventilation systems. (8) Equipping and finishing of the emplacement drift mains and access ramps to fulfill waste emplacement operational needs. (9) Emplacement drift and access mains and ramps commissioning prior to handover for emplacement operations. (10) Examination of ways to structure the contracts for construction of the repository. (11) Discussion of different construction schemes and how to minimize the schedule risks implicit in those schemes. (12) Surface facilities needed for subsurface construction activities

  8. Program overview: Subsurface science program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The OHER Subsurface Science Program is DOE's core basic research program concerned with subsoils and groundwater. These practices have resulted in contamination by mixtures of organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, and radionuclides. A primary long-term goal is to provide a foundation of knowledge that will lead to the reduction of environmental risks and to cost-effective cleanup strategies. Since the Program was initiated in 1985, a substantial amount of research in hydrogeology, subsurface microbiology, and the geochemistry of organically complexed radionuclides has been completed, leading to a better understanding of contaminant transport in groundwater and to new insights into microbial distribution and function in the subsurface environments. The Subsurface Science Program focuses on achieving long-term scientific advances that will assist DOE in the following key areas: providing the scientific basis for innovative in situ remediation technologies that are based on a concept of decontamination through benign manipulation of natural systems; understanding the complex mechanisms and process interactions that occur in the subsurface; determining the influence of chemical and geochemical-microbial processes on co-contaminant mobility to reduce environmental risks; improving predictions of contaminant transport that draw on fundamental knowledge of contaminant behavior in the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneities to improve cleanup effectiveness and to predict environmental risks

  9. Thematic survey of subsurface drainage systems in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlapáková, L.; Žaloudík, J.; Kolejka, Jaromír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2016), s. 55-65 ISSN 1744-5647 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : subsurface drainage system * remote sensing * image interpretation * drainage recognition and mapping Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016 http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17445647.2016.1259129?scroll=top&needAccess=true

  10. Hybrid model based unified scheme for endoscopic Cerenkov and radio-luminescence tomography: Simulation demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Cao, Xin; Ren, Qingyun; Chen, Xueli; He, Xiaowei

    2018-05-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is an imaging method that uses an optical imaging scheme to probe a radioactive tracer. Application of CLI with clinically approved radioactive tracers has opened an opportunity for translating optical imaging from preclinical to clinical applications. Such translation was further improved by developing an endoscopic CLI system. However, two-dimensional endoscopic imaging cannot identify accurate depth and obtain quantitative information. Here, we present an imaging scheme to retrieve the depth and quantitative information from endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence tomography, which can also be applied for endoscopic radio-luminescence tomography. In the scheme, we first constructed a physical model for image collection, and then a mathematical model for characterizing the luminescent light propagation from tracer to the endoscopic detector. The mathematical model is a hybrid light transport model combined with the 3rd order simplified spherical harmonics approximation, diffusion, and radiosity equations to warrant accuracy and speed. The mathematical model integrates finite element discretization, regularization, and primal-dual interior-point optimization to retrieve the depth and the quantitative information of the tracer. A heterogeneous-geometry-based numerical simulation was used to explore the feasibility of the unified scheme, which demonstrated that it can provide a satisfactory balance between imaging accuracy and computational burden.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound features of chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    As endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is the most sensitive imaging modality for diagnosing pancreatic disorders, it can demonstrate subtle alterations in the pancreatic parenchymal and ductal structure even before traditional imaging and functional testing demonstrate any abnormality. In spite...... of this fact and abundant literature, the exact role of EUS in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is still not established. The EUS features to diagnose CP have evolved over a period from a pure qualitative approach to more advanced and complicated scoring systems incorporating multiple parenchymal...... to define the exact role of these criteria. The measurement of strain ratio using quantitative EUS elastography and thus allowing quantification of pancreatic fibrosis seems to be a promising new technique....

  12. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Săftoiu, A; Dietrich, C F; Vilmann, P

    2012-01-01

    Second-generation intravenous blood-pool ultrasound contrast agents are increasingly used in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for characterization of microvascularization, differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal lesions, and improving staging and guidance of therapeutic procedures. Although...... initially used as Doppler signal enhancers, second-generation microbubble contrast agents are now used with specific contrast harmonic imaging techniques, which benefit from the highly nonlinear behavior of the microbubbles. Contrast-specific modes based on multi-pulse technology are used to perform...... contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS based on a very low mechanical index (0.08 - 0.12). Quantification techniques based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound have been recommended for perfusion imaging and monitoring of anti-angiogenic treatment, mainly based on time-intensity curve analysis. Most...

  13. Subsurface microbial habitats on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P. J.; Mckay, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    We developed scenarios for shallow and deep subsurface cryptic niches for microbial life on Mars. Such habitats could have considerably prolonged the persistence of life on Mars as surface conditions became increasingly inhospitable. The scenarios rely on geothermal hot spots existing below the near or deep subsurface of Mars. Recent advances in the comparatively new field of deep subsurface microbiology have revealed previously unsuspected rich aerobic and anaerobic microbal communities far below the surface of the Earth. Such habitats, protected from the grim surface conditions on Mars, could receive warmth from below and maintain water in its liquid state. In addition, geothermally or volcanically reduced gases percolating from below through a microbiologically active zone could provide the reducing power needed for a closed or semi-closed microbial ecosystem to thrive.

  14. [Endoscopic full-thickness resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Schmidt, A; Caca, K

    2016-08-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are powerful tools for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms. However, those techniques are limited to the superficial layers of the GI wall (mucosa and submucosa). Lesions without lifting sign (usually arising from deeper layers) or lesions in difficult anatomic positions (appendix, diverticulum) are difficult - if not impossible - to resect using conventional techniques, due to the increased risk of complications. For larger lesions (>2 cm), ESD appears to be superior to the conventional techniques because of the en bloc resection, but the procedure is technically challenging, time consuming, and associated with complications even in experienced hands. Since the development of the over-the-scope clips (OTSC), complications like bleeding or perforation can be endoscopically better managed. In recent years, different endoscopic full-thickness resection techniques came to the focus of interventional endoscopy. Since September 2014, the full-thickness resection device (FTRD) has the CE marking in Europe for full-thickness resection in the lower GI tract. Technically the device is based on the OTSC system and combines OTSC application and snare polypectomy in one step. This study shows all full-thickness resection techniques currently available, but clearly focuses on the experience with the FTRD in the lower GI tract.

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. M Brand, D Bisoz. Abstract. Background. Antibiotic prophylaxis for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is controversial. We set out to assess the current antibiotic prescribing practice among ...

  16. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ... endoscopic management at a median of 12 days (range 2 - 104 days) after surgery. Presenting features included intra-abdominal collections with pain in 58 cases ...

  17. Evaluation of robotically controlled advanced endoscopic instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    Background Advanced flexible endoscopes and instruments with multiple degrees of freedom enable physicians to perform challenging procedures such as the removal of large sections of mucosal tissue. However, these advanced endoscopes are difficult to control and require several physicians to

  18. Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated

  19. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration. The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer. The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255–7.064; P = 0.013). The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  20. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  1. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  2. Endoscopic and keyhole endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches: a qualitative survey on technical challenges and technological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Cundy, Thomas P; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    The literature reflects a resurgence of interest in endoscopic and keyhole endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches as alternatives to conventional microsurgical approaches in carefully selected cases. The aim of this study was to assess the technical challenges of neuroendoscopy, and the scope for technological innovations to overcome these barriers. All full members of the Society of British Neurosurgeons (SBNS) were electronically invited to participate in an online survey. The open-ended structured survey asked three questions; firstly, whether the surgeon presently utilises or has experience with endoscopic or endoscope-assisted approaches; secondly, what they consider to be the major technical barriers to adopting such approaches; and thirdly, what technological advances they foresee improving safety and efficacy in the field. Responses were subjected to a qualitative research method of multi-rater emergent theme analysis. Three clear themes emerged: 1) surgical approach and better integration with image-guidance systems (20%), 2) intra-operative visualisation and improvements in neuroendoscopy (49%), and 3) surgical manipulation and improvements in instruments (74%). The analysis of responses to our open-ended survey revealed that although opinion was varied three major themes could be identified. Emerging technological advances such as augmented reality, high-definition stereo-endoscopy, and robotic joint-wristed instruments may help overcome the technical difficulties associated with neuroendoscopic approaches. Results of this qualitative survey provide consensus amongst the technology end-user community such that unambiguous goals and priorities may be defined. Systems integrating these advances could improve the safety and efficacy of endoscopic and endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches.

  3. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbiest, G. J., E-mail: Verbiest@physik.rwth-aachen.de [JARA-FIT and II. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J., E-mail: Rost@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  4. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  5. Feasibility of a subsurface storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This report analyses the notion of subsurface storage under the scientifical, technical and legal aspects. This reflection belongs to the studies about long duration storage carried out in the framework of the axis 3 of the December 30, 1991 law. The report comprises 3 parts. The first part is a synthesis of the complete subsurface storage study: definitions, aim of the report, very long duration storage paradigm, description files of concepts, thematic synthesis (legal aspects, safety, monitoring, sites, seismicity, heat transfers, corrosion, concretes, R and works, handling, tailings and dismantlement, economy..), multi-criteria/multi-concept cross-analysis. The second part deals with the technical aspects of the subsurface storage: safety approach (long duration impact, radiation protection, mastery of effluents), monitoring strategy, macroscopic inventory of B-type waste packages, inventory of spent fuels, glasses, hulls and nozzles, geological contexts in the French territory (sites selection and characterization), on-site activities, hydrogeological and geochemical aspects, geo-technical works and infrastructures organization, subsurface seismic effects, cooling modes (ventilation, heat transfer with the geologic environment), heat transfer research programs (convection, poly-phase cooling in porous media), handling constraints, concretes (use, behaviour, durability), corrosion of metallic materials, technical-economical analysis, international context (experience feedback from Sweden (CLAB) and the USA (Yucca Mountain), other European and French facilities). The last part of the report is a graphical appendix with 3-D views and schemes of the different concepts. (J.S.)

  6. Safety analysis in subsurface repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The development of mathematical models to represent the repository-geosphere-biosphere system, and the development of a structure for data acquisition, processing, and use to analyse the safety of subsurface repositories, are presented. To study the behavior of radionuclides in geosphere a laboratory to determine the hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient was constructed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Peeking Beneath the Caldera: Communicating Subsurface Knowledge of Newberry Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark-Moser, M.; Rose, K.; Schultz, J.; Cameron, E.

    2016-12-01

    "Imaging the Subsurface: Enhanced Geothermal Systems and Exploring Beneath Newberry Volcano" is an interactive website that presents a three-dimensional subsurface model of Newberry Volcano developed at National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Created using the Story Maps application by ArcGIS Online, this format's dynamic capabilities provide the user the opportunity for multimedia engagement with the datasets and information used to build the subsurface model. This website allows for an interactive experience that the user dictates, including interactive maps, instructive videos and video capture of the subsurface model, and linked information throughout the text. This Story Map offers a general background on the technology of enhanced geothermal systems and the geologic and development history of Newberry Volcano before presenting NETL's modeling efforts that support the installation of enhanced geothermal systems. The model is driven by multiple geologic and geophysical datasets to compare and contrast results which allow for the targeting of potential EGS sites and the reduction of subsurface uncertainty. This Story Map aims to communicate to a broad audience, and provides a platform to effectively introduce the model to researchers and stakeholders.

  8. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.W. Markman

    2001-01-01

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M andO 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M andO 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree

  9. Use of remote sensing for identification and description of subsurface drainage system condition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlapáková, L.; Žaloudík, Jiří; Kulhavý, Z.; Pelíšek, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2015), s. 1587-1599 ISSN 1211-8516 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : subsurface drainage * remote sensing * aerial image interpretation * RPAS Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology

  10. Sensing of subsurface faults based on an imaging technique for teleseismic waveform data. 2. Feasibility study for application to oblique incidence, multi-event and noise data; Enchi jishin hakei data wo mochiita chika kozo imaging ni yoru chichu danso kenshutsu no kokoromi. 2. Naname nyusha, multi event, noise wo fukumu hakei eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakoshi, T; Takenaka, H; Saita, T [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Science; Suetsugu, D [Building Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Furumura, T [Hokkaido University of Education, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    An examination was made on the method in which imaging of subsurface was carried out with teleseismic waveform data for sensing of faults. In the examination, an experiment was done on the sensing of faults with higher precision, by applying oblique incidence as well as perpendicular upward incidence of SH plane waves, and thereby stacking the imaging in plural events. In numerical experiments, 28 observation points were arranged at 500m spaces apart on the surface, and the incident waves were made the SH plane waves having a bell-shaped time function, with incidence made at an angle varied as 0{degree}, +15{degree} and -15{degree} from the lowest layer of a model. In the calculation of the wave motion field, a difference calculus with secondary accuracy was used for both time and space. In addition, data was prepared with a random noise added to a synthesized waveform to be used as observation data. The calculated waveform data were likened to the observation waveform, to which the method for imaging faults was applied. Consequently, it was noted that satisfactory results were obtained compared with the case where faults were sensed by one event alone. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Advanced virtual endoscopy for endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsberger, Stefan; Neubauer, André; Bühler, Katja; Wegenkittl, Rainer; Czech, Thomas; Gentzsch, Stephan; Böcher-Schwarz, Hans-Gerd; Knosp, Engelbert

    2006-11-01

    Virtual endoscopy (vE) is the navigation of a camera through a virtual anatomical space that is computationally reconstructed from radiological image data. Inside this three-dimensional space, arbitrary movements and adaptations of viewing parameters are possible. Thereby, vE can be used for noninvasive diagnostic purposes and for simulation of surgical tasks. This article describes the development of an advanced system of vE for endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery and its application to teaching, training, and in the routine clinical setting. The vE system was applied to a series of 35 patients with pituitary pathology (32 adenomas, three Rathke's cleft cysts) operated endoscopically via the transsphenoidal route at the Department of Neurosurgery of the Medical University Vienna between 2004 and 2006. The virtual endoscopic images correlated well with the intraoperative view. For the transsphenoidal approach, vE improved intraoperative orientation by depicting anatomical landmarks and variations. For planning a safe and tailored opening of the sellar floor, transparent visualization of the pituitary adenoma and the normal gland in relation to the internal carotid arteries was useful. According to our experience, vE can be a valuable tool for endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary surgery for training purposes and preoperative planning. For the novice, it can act as a simulator for endoscopic anatomy and for training surgical tasks. For the experienced pituitary surgeon, vE can depict the individual patient's anatomy, and may, therefore, improve intraoperative orientation. By prospectively visualizing unpredictable anatomical variations, vE may increase the safety of this surgical procedure.

  12. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Rösch, T.; Fockens, P.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of achalasia is complicated by symptom recurrence and a significant risk for severe complications. Endoscopic myotomy was developed in the search for a highly efficacious treatment with lower risks. Since its introduction in 2010, several centers have adopted the technique and published

  13. Colonic perforation following endoscopic retrograde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We highlight a potentially lethal complication of acute severe pancreatitis that may not be suspected in severely ill patients. A 41-year-old woman developed acute severe pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for suspected choledocholithiasis. When her condition deteriorated ...

  14. Integrated geomechanical modelling for deep subsurface damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Orlic, B.; Zijl, W.; Jongerius, P.; Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.

    2001-01-01

    Government, E&P and mining industry increasingly demand fundamental insight and accurate predictions on subsurface and surface deformation and damage due to exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues (e.g. CO2). At this moment deformation is difficult to

  15. 3D Endoscope to Boost Safety, Cut Cost of Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory worked with the brain surgeon who directs the Skull Base Institute in Los Angeles to create the first endoscope fit for brain surgery and capable of producing 3D video images. It is also the first to be able to steer its lens back and forth. These improvements to visibility are expected to improve safety, speeding patient recovery and reducing medical costs.

  16. Subsurface Noble Gas Sampling Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, C. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The intent of this document is to provide information about best available approaches for performing subsurface soil gas sampling during an On Site Inspection or OSI. This information is based on field sampling experiments, computer simulations and data from the NA-22 Noble Gas Signature Experiment Test Bed at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS). The approaches should optimize the gas concentration from the subsurface cavity or chimney regime while simultaneously minimizing the potential for atmospheric radioxenon and near-surface Argon-37 contamination. Where possible, we quantitatively assess differences in sampling practices for the same sets of environmental conditions. We recognize that all sampling scenarios cannot be addressed. However, if this document helps to inform the intuition of the reader about addressing the challenges resulting from the inevitable deviations from the scenario assumed here, it will have achieved its goal.

  17. Subsurface transport program: Research summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    DOE's research program in subsurface transport is designed to provide a base of fundamental scientific information so that the geochemical, hydrological, and biological mechanisms that contribute to the transport and long term fate of energy related contaminants in subsurface ecosystems can be understood. Understanding the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the transport of single and co-contaminants is the underlying concern of the program. Particular attention is given to interdisciplinary research and to geosphere-biosphere interactions. The scientific results of the program will contribute to resolving Departmental questions related to the disposal of energy-producing and defense wastes. The background papers prepared in support of this document contain additional information on the relevance of the research in the long term to energy-producing technologies. Detailed scientific plans and other research documents are available for high priority research areas, for example, in subsurface transport of organic chemicals and mixtures and in the microbiology of deep aquifers. 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Experimental transapical endoscopic ventricular visualization and mitral repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttkay, Tamas; Czesla, Markus; Nagy, Henrietta; Götte, Julia; Baksa, Gabor; Patonay, Lajos; Doll, Nicolas; Galajda, Zoltan

    2015-04-01

    An increasing number of experimental beating heart animal studies describe simple transapical mitral valve repairs based on the direct endoscopic visualization of the left ventricle. The aim of our human cadaveric study was to develop a method for more complex transapical endoscopic procedures by on-pump heart operations. After preparation of 20 human fresh cadavers, a standard left anterolateral minithoracotomy was performed in the fifth intercostal space and the pericardium was entered. A rigid 0 degree endoscope and the instruments were introduced through a silicon apical port. To restore the natural form of the left heart, CO2 was insufflated. To test the mitral valve competence, the left ventricle was pressure-injected with saline after each step. After transecting the chords of the A2 segment of the anterior mitral leaflet before the experimental mitral valve repair, the tendinous chord was replaced using an especially designed clip chord. The second part of the experiment consisted of a segmental excision of the P2 segment of the posterior mitral leaflet followed by a standard valvuloplasty and suture annuloplasty. With the help of the described transapical endoscopic mitral valve repair technique, we gained direct visual information of the coaptation line of the mitral leaflets as well as the anatomy and function of the subvalvular apparatus. Using intracardiac imaging, we could perform successful transapical complex mitral repair in each case. The minimally invasive transapical endoscopic method has the potential to offer advantages for on-pump mitral valve repair procedures even in complex mitral valve repair cases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Outcomes after endoscopic port surgery for spontaneous intracerebral hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalski, Pawel; Chivukula, Srinivas; Shin, Samuel; Prevedello, Daniel; Engh, Johnathan

    2014-05-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) cause significant morbidity and mortality. Traditional open surgical management strategies offer limited benefit except for the most superficial hemorrhages in select patients. Recent reports suggest that endoscopic approaches may improve outcomes, particularly for deep subcortical hemorrhages. However, the management of these patients remains controversial. We reviewed our experience using endoscopic port surgery to identify characteristics that may predict acceptable outcomes. We completed a retrospective chart and imaging review of patients who underwent endoscopic port surgery for evacuation of spontaneous ICH at a single center. Data were gathered regarding patient demographics, hemorrhage locations, operative findings, and clinical outcomes. From 2007 to 2011, 18 patients underwent evacuation of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas using an endoscopic port. The mean age in years was 62 years (range, 43-84 years). Six of 18 patients (33%) died before discharge, and 2 others (11%) died after at least 1 month of survival. Of 12 initial survivors, all were discharged to a rehabilitation or nursing facility. Complete hematoma evacuation was achieved in 7 of 18 patients, with the remaining 11 having a partial evacuation. The patients who died (n = 6) before discharge were statistically more likely to have a left-sided hemorrhage, partial evacuation, or older age than the survivors; death at least 1  month after evacuation was additionally associated with greater preoperative hematoma volumes. Our series demonstrates that endoscopic port surgery for acute intracerebral hematoma evacuation has the ability to achieve significant decompression of large and deep-seated hematomas. Patient age, extent of evacuation, laterality, and preoperative hematoma volume appear to influence patient outcome. Most overall outcomes remain poor. Future studies are necessary to determine if surgical evacuation is in fact superior to best

  20. [Virtual bronchoscopy: the correlation between endoscopic simulation and bronchoscopic findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvolini, L; Gasparini, S; Baldelli, S; Bichi Secchi, E; Amici, F

    1997-11-01

    We carried out a preliminary clinical validation of 3D spiral CT virtual endoscopic reconstructions of the tracheobronchial tree, by comparing virtual bronchoscopic images with actual endoscopic findings. Twenty-two patients with tracheobronchial disease suspected at preliminary clinical, cytopathological and plain chest film findings were submitted to spiral CT of the chest and bronchoscopy. CT was repeated after endobronchial therapy in 2 cases. Virtual endoscopic shaded-surface-display views of the tracheobronchial tree were reconstructed from reformatted CT data with an Advantage Navigator software. Virtual bronchoscopic images were preliminarily evaluated with a semi-quantitative quality score (excellent/good/fair/poor). The depiction of consecutive airway branches was then considered. Virtual bronchoscopies were finally submitted to double-blind comparison with actual endoscopies. Virtual image quality was considered excellent in 8 cases, good in 14 and fair in 2. Virtual exploration was stopped at the lobar bronchi in one case only; the origin of segmental bronchi was depicted in 23 cases and that of some subsegmental branches in 2 cases. Agreement between actual and virtual bronchoscopic findings was good in all cases but 3 where it was nevertheless considered satisfactory. The yield of clinically useful information differed in 8/24 cases: virtual reconstructions provided more information than bronchoscopy in 5 cases and vice versa in 3. Virtual reconstructions are limited in that the procedure is long and difficult and needing a strictly standardized threshold value not to alter virtual findings. Moreover, the reconstructed surface lacks transparency, there is the partial volume effect and the branches < or = 4 pixels phi and/or meandering ones are difficult to explore. Our preliminary data are encouraging. Segmental bronchi were depicted in nearly all cases, except for the branches involved by disease. Obstructing lesions could be bypassed in some cases

  1. Improving superficial target delineation in radiation therapy with endoscopic tracking and registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weersink, R. A.; Qiu, J.; Hope, A. J.; Daly, M. J.; Cho, B. C. J.; DaCosta, R. S.; Sharpe, M. B.; Breen, S. L.; Chan, H.; Jaffray, D. A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada) and Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Target delineation within volumetric imaging is a critical step in the planning process of intensity modulated radiation therapy. In endoluminal cancers, endoscopy often reveals superficial areas of visible disease beyond what is seen on volumetric imaging. Quantitatively relating these findings to the volumetric imaging is prone to human error during the recall and contouring of the target. We have developed a method to improve target delineation in the radiation therapy planning process by quantitatively registering endoscopic findings contours traced on endoscopic images to volumetric imaging. Methods: Using electromagnetic sensors embedded in an endoscope, 2D endoscopic images were registered to computed tomography (CT) volumetric images by tracking the position and orientation of the endoscope relative to a CT image set. Regions-of-interest (ROI) in the 2D endoscopic view were delineated. A mesh created within the boundary of the ROI was projected onto the 3D image data, registering the ROI with the volumetric image. This 3D ROI was exported to clinical radiation treatment planning software. The precision and accuracy of the procedure was tested on two solid phantoms with superficial markings visible on both endoscopy and CT images. The first phantom was T-shaped tube with X-marks etched on the interior. The second phantom was an anatomically correct skull phantom with a phantom superficial lesion placed on the pharyngeal surface. Markings were contoured on the endoscope images and compared with contours delineated in the treatment planning system based on the CT images. Clinical feasibility was tested on three patients with early stage glottic cancer. Image-based rendering using manually identified landmarks was used to improve the registration. Results: Using the T-shaped phantom with X-markings, the 2D to 3D registration accuracy was 1.5-3.5 mm, depending on the endoscope position relative to the markings. Intraobserver standard variation was 0

  2. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncică, Ana Maria; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...... cancers and visualization of the portal venous system and esophageal varices. In addition, contrast agents can be used to differentiate pancreatic lesions. The use of color Doppler further increases the ability to diagnose and differentiate various pancreatic malignancies. The sensitivity of power Doppler...

  3. Advances in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xiangping

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is a well-established advanced endoscopic technique for the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatobiliary diseases. New advances have been made in the treatment concept and techniques of ERCP in recent years. This article elaborates on the recent advances in ERCP, including the application of pancreatic duct stent, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and aggressive hydration to prevent postoperative pancreatitis, covered metal stent for the treatment of benign bile duct stenosis, intraluminal radiofrequency ablation for malignant bile duct stenosis, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy and covered metal stent for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, peroral choledochoscopy for qualitative diagnosis of bile duct stenosis and huge refractory stones, definition of difficult intubation, timing of pre-cut technique, and ERCP after gastrointestinal reconstruction.

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound and pancreas divisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Surinder S; Gonen, Can; Vilmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pancreas divisum is the most common congenital anatomic variation of the pancreatic ductal anatomy and in most of the individuals it is asymptomatic. However, in minority of individuals it is presumed to cause recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiop......Pancreas divisum is the most common congenital anatomic variation of the pancreatic ductal anatomy and in most of the individuals it is asymptomatic. However, in minority of individuals it is presumed to cause recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde...... of the parenchyma also. Therefore EUS, both radial and linear, has potential for being a minimally invasive diagnostic modality for pancreas divisum. A number of EUS criteria have been suggested for the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. These criteria have varying sensitivity and specificity and hence there is a need...

  5. Endoscopic Endonasal Management of Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Brad E; Amine, Muhamad; Anand, Vijay; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2016-02-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a rare clinical entity that poses a significant management challenge given their location and propensity to recur. As part of a minimally disruptive treatment paradigm, the expanded endonasal approach has the potential to improve rates of resection, improve postoperative visual recovery, and minimize surgical morbidity. This article updates the otolaryngologic community on the basic principles and techniques regarding the incorporation of the endoscopic, endonasal approach in the management paradigm of craniopharyngioma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoscopic Management of Posterior Epistaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, J.; Kanotra, Sohit Paul; Kanotra, Sonika

    2011-01-01

    The traditional method of management of posterior epistaxis has been with anteroposterior nasal packing. Apart from the high failure rate of 26–50% reported in various series, nasal packing is associated with marked discomfort and several complications. In order to avoid nasal packing, we started doing endoscopic cauterization in cases of posterior epistaxis. A total of 23 patients with posterior epistaxis were subjected to nasal endoscopy with the intent to stop bleeding by cauterization of ...

  7. Seismic imaging of complex subsurface in areas with rugged topography and crooked-line geometries. 1. Time migration and dipmoveout; Rikujo nanchiiki data ni kansuru imaging shori no mondaiten. 1. Jikan ryoiki shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Age, S; Ota, Y [Japex Jeoscience Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Minegishi, M [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-22

    Concerning the analysis of data from seismic reflection survey, time migration and DMO treatment are discussed. As a tool for dealing with irregular changes in elevation, a technique is developed that can define the local reference level working effectively in the Kirchhoff-type treatment. In this technique, for each migration or dipmovement trace outputted, processing is repeatedly performed for imaging and local reference level. In dealing with the curvature of a traverse line, a 3-dimensional DMO treatment with cross-dip correction is performed, for the development of a method for simultaneously applying projection and accumulation to stacked traverse lines. A migration projection plane is set separately from the CMP traverse line, and this enables a quasi-3-dimensional treatment approximately corresponding to the curvature of the traverse line. A technique to respond to irregular shock points is discussed, in which input traces corrected by NMO having uniform amplitude distribution are presumed, DMO treatment is conducted for each irregular shock point, and the results are used as a normalization factor usable in the process of real DMO stacking. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  9. [Risk management for endoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taizo

    2010-05-01

    The number of medical accidents in endoscopic surgery has recently increased. Surgical complications caused by inadequate preparation or immature technique or those resulting in serious adverse outcomes may be referred to as medical accidents. The Nationwide Survey of Endoscopic Surgery showed that bile duct injury and uncontrollable bleeding were seen in 0.68% and in 0.58%, respectively, of cholecystectomy patients; interoperative and postoperative complications in 0.84% and in 3.8%, respectively, of gastric cancer surgery patients; and operative complications in 6.74% of bowel surgery patients. Some required open repair, and 49 patients died. The characteristic causes of complications in endoscopic surgery are a misunderstanding of anatomy, handling of organs outside the visual field, burn by electrocautery, and injuries caused by forceps. Bleeding that requires a laparotomy for hemostasis is also a complication. Furthermore, since the surgery is usually videorecorded, immature techniques resulting in complications are easily discovered. To decrease the frequency of accidents, education through textbooks and seminars, training using training boxes, simulators, or animals, proper selection of the surgeon depending on the difficulty of the procedure, a low threshold for conversion to laparotomy, and use of the best optical equipment and surgical instruments are important. To avoid malpractice lawsuits, informed consent obtained before surgery and proper communication after accidents are necessary.

  10. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  11. Endoscopic management of posterior epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J; Kanotra, Sohit Paul; Kanotra, Sonika

    2011-04-01

    The traditional method of management of posterior epistaxis has been with anteroposterior nasal packing. Apart from the high failure rate of 26-50% reported in various series, nasal packing is associated with marked discomfort and several complications. In order to avoid nasal packing, we started doing endoscopic cauterization in cases of posterior epistaxis. A total of 23 patients with posterior epistaxis were subjected to nasal endoscopy with the intent to stop bleeding by cauterization of the bleeding vessel. Of these, in four cases unsuspected diagnosis was made. Of the remaining 19, in three patients, the bleeding point could not be localized accurately and these patients were managed by anteroposterior packing. The rest of the 16 patients were managed by endoscopic cauterization. In four patients, there was recurrence of bleeding within 24 h. In one of these, cauterization controlled the bleeding while in the rest nasal packing had to be resorted to. Thus, of the 23 patients of posterior epistaxis subjected to nasal endoscopy, we could avoid nasal packing in 17 (74%). To conclude, endoscopic nasal cauterization is recommended as the first line to treatment in all cases of posterior epistaxis. This will not only prevent the uncomfortable and potentially dangerous nasal packing but also help in finding the underlying pathology.

  12. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  13. [Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous for biliary drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Marie Høxbro; Vilmann, Peter; Hassan, Hazem; Karstensen, John Gésdal

    2015-04-27

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) is currently standard treatment for biliary drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) is a novel method to overcome an unsuccessful biliary drainage procedure. Under endoscopic ultrasound guidance a guidewire is passed via a needle from the stomach or duodenum to the common bile duct and from there on to the duodenum enabling ERCP. With a relatively high rate of success EUS-RV should be considered as an alternative to biliary drainage and surgical intervention.

  14. Endoscopic Medial Maxillectomy Breaking New Frontiers

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Sanjeev; Gopinath, M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopy has changed the perspective of rhinologist towards the nose. It has revolutionised the surgical management of sinonasal disorders. Sinus surgeries were the first to get the benefit of endoscope. Gradually the domain of endoscopic surgery extended to the management of sino nasal tumours. Traditionally medial maxillectomy was performed through lateral rhinotomy or mid facial degloving approach. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy has been advocated by a number of authors in the management ...

  15. New techniques in gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Antonio Luengas Tello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal endoscopic surgery has been making great progress since the seventies in the management paradigms of conditions such as gastrointestinal bleeding, polyp resection and diagnostic and therapeutic management of the biliary tract. The current challenge is the development of techniques that allow endoscopic treatment of emerging diseases such as cancer, morbid obesity, gastro-esophageal reflux and achalasia. This article reports on new techniques and expectations for the future in the endoscopic management of these diseases.

  16. Thematic survey of subsurface drainage systems in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tlapáková, L.; Žaloudík, Jiří; Kolejka, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 55-65 ISSN 1744-5647 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68145535 Keywords : subsurface drainage system * remote sensing * image interpretation * drainage recognition and mapping Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality; DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography (UGN-S) OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Physical geography (UGN-S) Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2016

  17. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy breaking new frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjeev; Gopinath, M

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopy has changed the perspective of rhinologist towards the nose. It has revolutionised the surgical management of sinonasal disorders. Sinus surgeries were the first to get the benefit of endoscope. Gradually the domain of endoscopic surgery extended to the management of sino nasal tumours. Traditionally medial maxillectomy was performed through lateral rhinotomy or mid facial degloving approach. Endoscopic medial maxillectomy has been advocated by a number of authors in the management of benign sino-nasal tumours. We present our experience of endoscopic medial maxillectomy in the management of sinonasal pathologies.

  18. Asymptomatic Esophageal Varices Should Be Endoscopically Treated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nib Soehendra

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment has generally been accepted in the management of bleeding esophageal varices. Both the control of acute variceal bleeding and elective variceal eradication to prevent recurrent bleeding can be achieved via endoscopic methods. In contrast to acute and elective treatment, the role of endoscopic therapy in asymptomatic patients who have never had variceal bleeding remains controversial because of the rather disappointing results obtained from prophylactic sclerotherapy. Most published randomized controlled trials showed that prophylactic sclerotherapy had no effect on survival. In some studies, neither survival rate nor bleeding risk was improved. In this article, the author champions the view that asymptomatic esophageal varices should be endoscopically treated.

  19. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices.

  20. The Mojave Subsurface Bio-Geochemistry Explorer (MOSBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J.; Beegle, L.; Abbey, W.; Bhartia, R.; Kounaves, S.; Russell, M.; Towles, D.

    2012-01-01

    The MOSBE Team has developed a terrestrial field campaign to explore two subsurface biological habitats under the Mojave Desert. This field campaign will not only help us understand terrestrial desert biology, but also will develop methodologies and strategies for potential future Mars missions that would seek to explore the Martian subsurface. We have proposed to the ASTEP program to integrate a suite of field demonstrated instruments with a 20 m subsurface drill as a coherent unit, the Mojave Subsurface Bio-geochemistry Explorer. The ATK Space Modular Planetary Drill System (MPDS) requires no drilling fluid, which allows aseptic sampling, can penetrate lithic ground up to 20 meters of depth, and utilizes less than 100 Watts throughout the entire depth. The drill has been developed and demonstrated in field testing to a depth of 10 meters in Arizona, December 2002. In addition to caching a continuous core throughout the drilling depth, it also generates and caches cuttings and fines that are strata-graphically correlated with the core. As a core segment is brought to the surface, it will be analyzed for texture and structure by a color microscopic imager and for relevant chemistry and mineralogy with a UV fluorescence/Raman spectrometer. Organic and soluble ionic species will be identified through two instruments -- a microcapillary electrophoresis, and an ion trap mass spectrometer that have been developed under PIDDP, ASTID and MIDP funding.

  1. Storage, access, and retrieval of endoscopic and laparoscopic video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaire, Gunter; Steines, Daniel; Graschew, Georgi; Thiel, Andreas; Bernarding, Johannes; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Schlag, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The system presented here enhances documentation and data- secured, second-opinion facilities by integrating video into DICOM3.0. Digital stereoscopic video sequences (DSVS) are especially in demand for surgery (laparoscopy, microsurgery, surgical microscopy, second opinion, virtual reality). Therefore DSVS are also integrated into the DICOM video concept. We present an implementation for a medical video server extended by a DICOM interface. Security mechanisms conforming with DICOM are integrated to enable secure internet access. Digital (stereoscopic) video sequences relevant for surgery should be examined regarding the clip length necessary for diagnosis and documentation and the clip size manageable with today's hardware. Methods for DSVS compression are described, implemented, and tested. Image sources relevant for this paper include, among others, a stereoscopic laparoscope and a monoscopic endoscope. Additionally, an approach is presented to analyze the motion of the endoscopic camera for future automatic video- cutting.

  2. Cholangiocarcinoma in Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography and Fascioliasis in Endoscopic Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mohammad Alizadeh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fascioliasis is a worldwide zoonotic infection with Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. The zoonoses are particularly endemic in sheep-raising countries and are also endemic in Iran. Typical symptoms that may be associated with fascioliasis can be divided by phases of the disease, including the acute or liver phase, the chronic or biliary phase, and ectopic or pharyngeal fascioliasis. Cholestatic symptoms may be absent, and in some cases diagnosis and treatment may be preceded by a long period of abdominal pain, eosinophilia and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a case with epigastric and upper quadrant abdominal pain for the last 4 years, with imaging suggesting cholangiocarcinoma. Considering a new concept of endoscopic ultrasonography, at last F. hepatica was extracted with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.

  3. Subsurface material identification and sensor selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    T, H.; Reghunadh, R.; Ramesh, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    In India, most of the landslides occur during monsoon season and causes huge loss of life and property. Design of an early warning system for highly landslide prone area will reduce losses to a great extent. The in-situ monitoring systems needs deployment of several sensors inside a borehole for monitoring a particular slope. Amrita Center for Wireless Networks and Applications (AmritaWNA), Amrita University has designed, developed and deployed a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for real time landslide monitoring using geotechnical instruments and sensors like rain gauge, moisture sensor, piezometer, strain gauge, tilt meter and geophone inside a Deep Earth Probe (DEP) at different locations. These sensors provide point measurements of the subsurface at a higher accuracy. Every landslide prone terrain is unique with respect to its geology, hydrological conditions, meteorological conditions, velocity of movement etc. The decision of installing different geotechnical instruments in a landslide prone terrain is a crucial step to be considered. Rain gauge, moisture sensor, and piezometer are usually used in clay rich areas to sense the moisture and pore pressure values. Geophone and Crack meter are instruments used in rocky areas to monitor cracks and vibrations associated with a movement. Inclinometer and Strain gauge are usually placed inside a casing and can be used in both rocky and soil areas. In order to place geotechnical instruments and sensors at appropriate places Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can be used. Variation in electrical resistivity values indicate the changes in composition, layer thickness, or contaminant levels. The derived true resistivity image can be used for identifying the type of materials present in the subsurface at different depths. We have used this method for identifying the type of materials present in our site at Chandmari (Sikkim). Fig 1 shows the typical resistivity values of a particular area in Chandmari site. The

  4. Microbial activity in the terrestrial subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, J.P.; Bollag, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Little is known about the layers under the earth's crust. Only in recent years have techniques for sampling the deeper subsurface been developed to permit investigation of the subsurface environment. Prevailing conditions in the subsurface habitat such as nutrient availability, soil composition, redox potential, permeability and a variety of other factors can influence the microflora that flourish in a given environment. Microbial diversity varies between geological formations, but in general sandy soils support growth better than soils rich in clay. Bacteria predominate in subsurface sediments, while eukaryotes constitute only 1-2% of the microorganisms. Recent investigations revealed that most uncontaminated subsurface soils support the growth of aerobic heteroorganotrophic bacteria, but obviously anaerobic microorganisms also exist in the deeper subsurface habitat. The microorganisms residing below the surface of the earth are capable of degrading both natural and xenobiotic contaminants and can thereby adapt to growth under polluted conditions. (author) 4 tabs, 77 refs

  5. Controlling Subsurface Fractures and Fluid Flow: A Basic Research Agenda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pietraß, Tanja [USDOE Office of Science, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-05-22

    . In response, the Office of Science, through its Office of Basic Energy Science (BES), convened a roundtable consisting of 15 national lab, university and industry geoscience experts to brainstorm basic research areas that underpin the SubTER goals but are currently underrepresented in the BES research portfolio. Held in Germantown, Maryland on May 22, 2015, the round-table participants developed a basic research agenda that is detailed in this report. Highlights include the following: -A grand challenge calling for advanced imaging of stress and geological processes to help understand how stresses and chemical substances are distributed in the subsurface—knowledge that is critical to all aspects of subsurface engineering; -A priority research direction aimed at achieving control of fluid flow through fractured media; -A priority research direction aimed at better understanding how mechanical and geochemical perturbations to subsurface rock systems are coupled through fluid and mineral interactions; -A priority research direction aimed at studying the structure, permeability, reactivity and other properties of nanoporous rocks, like shale, which have become critical energy materials and exhibit important hallmarks of mesoscale materials; -A cross-cutting theme that would accelerate development of advanced computational methods to describe heterogeneous time-dependent geologic systems that could, among other potential benefits, provide new and vastly improved models of hydraulic fracturing and its environmental impacts; -A cross-cutting theme that would lead to the creation of “geo-architected materials” with controlled repeatable heterogeneity and structure that can be tested under a variety of thermal, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical conditions relevant to subsurface systems; -A cross-cutting theme calling for new laboratory studies on both natural and geo-architected subsurface materials that deploy advanced high-resolution 3D imaging and chemical analysis

  6. Tuberculosis and the pancreas: a diagnostic challenge solved by endoscopic ultrasound. A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Suvadip; Schmid, Matthias L; Anderson, Kirsty; Oppong, Kofi W

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis is a rare disease. It can be easily confused with malignancy or pancreatitis on imaging. This could result in unnecessary surgery. As this is a treatable disease it is imperative to diagnose this condition pre-operatively. We report three cases of pancreatic tuberculosis that were diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound. In conclusion, endoscopic ultrasound is the diagnostic modality of choice for pancreatic tuberculosis facilitating high resolution imaging, as well as sampling of tissue for staining, cytology, culture and polymerase chain reaction assay.

  7. Sphincter of Oddi stenosis: diagnosis using hepatobiliary scintigraphy and endoscopic manometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.G.L.; Gregg, J.A.; Koroshetz, A.M.; Hill, T.C.; Clouse, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the role of radionuclide imaging in diagnosing sphincter of Oddi stenosis, 21 patients with symptoms suggesting this disorder underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, cholescintigraphy, and, when possible, endoscopic manometry. Those patients with abnormal hepatobiliary scintigraphy results had a mean basal sphincter pressure of 38.5 mm Hg. Sphincter pressures could not be measured in six patients with sphincters too tight to cannulate. Ten patients who underwent hepatobiliary scanning both before and after sphincter surgery had normal scan results of the repeat study. Hepatobiliary imaging appears useful for diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi stenosis in selected patients in whom manometry cannot be performed and for objective assessment of response to therapy

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering rigid endoscope toward robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Fukushima, S; Niioka, H; Deguchi, S; Hashimoto, M

    2018-02-01

    Label-free visualization of nerves and nervous plexuses will improve the preservation of neurological functions in nerve-sparing robot-assisted surgery. We have developed a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) rigid endoscope to distinguish nerves from other tissues during surgery. The developed endoscope, which has a tube with a diameter of 12 mm and a length of 270 mm, achieved 0.91% image distortion and 8.6% non-uniformity of CARS intensity in the whole field of view (650 μm diameter). We demonstrated CARS imaging of a rat sciatic nerve and visualization of the fine structure of nerve fibers.

  9. Endoscopic visualization of luminal organ and great vessels with three dimensional CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Amemiya, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Thirty cases examined by three dimensional CT scanner (3DCT) are reported. The observation of inner view using 3DCT were performed in 12 large vessels with vascular disorder, 10 pulmonary bronchi with lung cancer and 8 common bile ducts involved obstructive disease. In order to visualize interface of the lumen, a new software, which was developed by HITACHI MEDICO Inc., was used. In all cases but one the inner view of the luminal organ was clearly demonstrated as 3D images and it was possible to judge some changes of luminal interface involved by the diseases. The 3DCT endoscopic image might be useful as a new endoscopic technique without fiberscopy. (author)

  10. Epigastric hernia contiguous with the laparoscopic port site after endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Otani, Jun; Okuda, Junzo; Maemoto, Ryo

    2018-03-23

    Both laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery are widely accepted for many abdominal surgeries. However, the port site for the laparoscope cannot be easily sutured without defect, particularly in the cranial end; this can result in a port-site incisional hernia and trigger the progressive thinning and stretching of the linea alba, leading to epigastric hernia. In the present case, we encountered an epigastric hernia contiguous with an incisional scar at the port site from a previous endoscopic robotic total prostatectomy. Abdominal ultrasound and CT revealed that the width of the linea alba was 30-48 mm. Previous CT images prepared before endoscopic robotic prostatectomy had shown a thinning of the linea alba. We should be aware of the possibility of epigastric hernia after laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery. In laparoscopic and endoscopic robotic surgery for a high-risk patient for epigastric hernia, we should consider additional sutures cranial to the port-site incision to prevent of an epigastric hernia. © 2018 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Endoscopic resection of cavernoma of foramen of Monro in a patient with familial multiple cavernomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Ricardo; Galeano, Inmaculada

    2008-09-01

    Intraventricular cavernomas are extremely infrequent and only 11 cases of cavernous hemangioma to occur at the foramen of Monro have been reported in the literature. This 56 years old patient was admitted with progressive and intractable headache of 10 days of evolution. He was known to suffer familial multiple cavernomatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealed obstructive hydrocephalus due to a cavernoma located in the area of the left foramen of Monro. Under neuronavigation guidance, complete endoscopic resection of the cavernoma was performed and normal ventricular size achieved. The patient experienced transient recent memory loss that resolved within a month after surgery. In the literature attempted endoscopic resection is reported to be abandoned due to bleeding and ineffectiveness of piecemeal endoscopic resection. In this case, the multiplicity of the lesions made it advisable to resect the lesion endoscopically, to avoid an open procedure in a patient with multiple potentially surgical lesions. Endoscopic resection was uneventful with easy control of bleeding with irrigation, suction, and bipolar coagulation despite dense vascular appearance of the lesion. During the procedure, precise visualization of the vascular structures around the foramen of Monro allowed complete resection with satisfactory control of the instruments. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first published cavernoma of foramen of Monro successfully resected using an endoscopic approach.

  12. Transoral endoscopic esophageal myotomy based on esophageal function testing in a survival porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perretta, Silvana; Dallemagne, Bernard; Donatelli, Gianfranco; Diemunsch, Pierre; Marescaux, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The most effective treatment of achalasia is Heller myotomy. To explore a submucosal endoscopic myotomy technique tailored on esophageal physiology testing and to compare it with the open technique. Prospective acute and survival comparative study in pigs (n = 12; 35 kg). University animal research center. Eight acute-4 open and 4 endoscopic-myotomies followed by 4 survival endoscopic procedures. Preoperative and postoperative manometry; esophagogastric junction (EGJ) distensibility before and after selective division of muscular fibers at the EGJ and after the myotomy was prolonged to a standard length by using the EndoFLIP Functional Lumen Imaging Probe (Crospon, Galway, Ireland). All procedures were successful, with no intraoperative and postoperative complications. In the survival group, the animals recovered promptly from surgery. Postoperative manometry demonstrated a 50% drop in mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESp) in the endoscopic group (mean preoperative LESp, 22.2 ± 3.3 mm Hg; mean postoperative LESp, 11.34 ± 2.7 mm Hg; P open procedure group (mean preoperative LESp, 24.2 ± 3.2 mm Hg; mean postoperative LESp, 7.4 ± 4 mm Hg; P myotomy is feasible and safe. The lack of a significant difference in EGJ distensibility between the open and endoscopic procedure is very appealing. Were it to be perfected in a human population, this endoscopic approach could suggest a new strategy in the treatment of selected achalasia patients. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Virtual endoscopy combined with intraoperative neuronavigation for planning of endoscopic surgery in patients with occlusive hydrocephalus and intracranial cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krombach, G.A.; Haage, P.; Kilbinger, M.; Rohde, V.; Struffert, T.; Thron, A.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the clinical value of MR ventriculoscopy (virtual endoscopy, VE) combined with image-guided frameless stereotaxy for endoscopic surgery of occlusive hydrocephalus and intracranial cysts. VE was obtained in 20 patients with hydrocephalus and three with intracranial cysts. All surgical operations were endoscopic. The path of the rigid endoscope to the target point was planned using neuronavigation. VE was carried out along the same trajectory retrospectively in 20 cases and prospectively in three. The results were analysed for demonstration of anatomical landmarks and structures at risk. VE was successful in all patients. Possible obstacles to endoscopic access to the lamina terminalis and the basal cisterns and structures at risk, such as the basilar artery, were clearly shown in relation to the direction of the endoscope. However, the floor of the third ventricle and septum pellucidum were not clearly seen and possible abnormalities could therefore not be appreciated. VE can provide realistic simulation of endoscopic third ventriculostomy and cystostomy. The appropriate trepanation point and trajectory of the endoscope can be assessed with regard to the size of the foramen of Monro and the position of vulnerable structures. This simulated trajectory can be adapted to the field of operation by image-guided neuronavigation. This regime may potentially reduce the risk of damage to intracranial structures. (orig.)

  14. Endoscopic approach to the infratemporal fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Youssef

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic endonasal transpterygoid approach is considered one of the most useful surgical solutions to manage selected tumors that involve the infratemporal fossa. A good understanding of the endoscopic anatomy of infratemporal fossa allows safe and complete resection of lesions arising or extending to infratemporal fossa.

  15. Duodenal diverticular bleeding: an endoscopic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Valdivielso-Cortázar

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticula are an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Until recently, it was primarily managed with surgery, but advances in the field of endoscopy have made management increasingly less invasive. We report a case of duodenal diverticular bleeding that was endoscopically managed, and review the literature about the various endoscopic therapies thus far described.

  16. Endoscopic palliation in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivieso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The integral search for improved living conditions for those patients with gastric cancer who have not received curative surgical treatment continues to challenge the knowledge, dexterity and ethical foundations of medical teams. The justification for palliative treatment must be based on a thorough consideration of the available options and the particular situation in each case. This article reviews endoscopic therapy with auto expandable prosthetics for palliative treatment of gastric cancer, as well as the scientific evidence that supports its use and the factors that determine its indication.

  17. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  18. Endoscopic findings following retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Alexey V; Dmitriev, Ilya V; Shmarina, Nonna V; Teterin, Yury S; Balkarov, Aslan G; Storozhev, Roman V; Anisimov, Yuri A; Gasanov, Ali M

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation of the efficacy of endoscopic methods for the diagnosis and correction of surgical and immunological complications after retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation. From October 2011 to March 2015, 27 patients underwent simultaneous retroperitoneal pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT). Diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with protocol biopsy of the donor and recipient duodenal mucosa and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) were performed to detect possible complications. Endoscopic stenting of the main pancreatic duct with plastic stents and three-stage endoscopic hemostasis were conducted to correct the identified complications. Endoscopic methods showed high efficiency in the timely diagnosis and adequate correction of complications after retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Advanced core-analyses for subsurface characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R.

    2017-12-01

    The heterogeneity of geological formations varies over a wide range of length scales and represents a major challenge for predicting the movement of fluids in the subsurface. Although they are inherently limited in the accessible length-scale, laboratory measurements on reservoir core samples still represent the only way to make direct observations on key transport properties. Yet, properties derived on these samples are of limited use and should be regarded as sample-specific (or `pseudos'), if the presence of sub-core scale heterogeneities is not accounted for in data processing and interpretation. The advent of imaging technology has significantly reshaped the landscape of so-called Special Core Analysis (SCAL) by providing unprecedented insight on rock structure and processes down to the scale of a single pore throat (i.e. the scale at which all reservoir processes operate). Accordingly, improved laboratory workflows are needed that make use of such wealth of information by e.g., referring to the internal structure of the sample and in-situ observations, to obtain accurate parameterisation of both rock- and flow-properties that can be used to populate numerical models. We report here on the development of such workflow for the study of solute mixing and dispersion during single- and multi-phase flows in heterogeneous porous systems through a unique combination of two complementary imaging techniques, namely X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The experimental protocol is applied to both synthetic and natural porous media, and it integrates (i) macroscopic observations (tracer effluent curves), (ii) sub-core scale parameterisation of rock heterogeneities (e.g., porosity, permeability and capillary pressure), and direct 3D observation of (iii) fluid saturation distribution and (iv) the dynamic spreading of the solute plumes. Suitable mathematical models are applied to reproduce experimental observations, including both 1D and 3D

  20. Sub-surface defect detection using transient thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaki Umar; Huda Abdullah; Abdul Razak Hamzah; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah; Ibrahim Ahmad; Vavilov, Vladimir

    2009-04-01

    An experimental research had been carried out to study the potential of transient thermography in detecting sub-surface defect of non-metal material. In this research, eight pieces of bakelite material were used as samples. Each samples had a sub-surface defect in the circular shape with different diameters and depths. Experiment was conducted using one-sided Pulsed Thermal technique. Heating of samples were done using 30 k Watt adjustable quartz lamp while infra red (IR) images of samples were recorded using THV 550 IR camera. These IR images were then analysed with thermo fit TM Pro software to obtain the Maximum Absolute Differential Temperature Signal value, ΔT max and the time of its appearance, τ max (ΔT). Result showed that all defects were able to be detected even for the smallest and deepest defect (diameter = 5 mm and depth = 4 mm). However the highest value of Differential Temperature Signal (ΔT max ), were obtained at defect with the largest diameter, 20 mm and at the shallowest depth, 1 mm. As a conclusion, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique to detect sub-surface defects of bakelite material is proportionately related with the size of defect diameter if the defect area at the same depth. On the contrary, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique inversely related with the depth of defect if the defects have similar diameter size. (author)

  1. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  2. Fluorescence-Raman Dual Modal Endoscopic System for Multiplexed Molecular Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sinyoung; Kim, Yong-Il; Kang, Homan; Kim, Gunsung; Cha, Myeong Geun; Chang, Hyejin; Jung, Kyung Oh; Kim, Young-Hwa; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Yun-Sang; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Jeong, Dae Hong

    2015-03-01

    Optical endoscopic imaging, which was recently equipped with bioluminescence, fluorescence, and Raman scattering, allows minimally invasive real-time detection of pathologies on the surface of hollow organs. To characterize pathologic lesions in a multiplexed way, we developed a dual modal fluorescence-Raman endomicroscopic system (FRES), which used fluorescence and surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoprobes (F-SERS dots). Real-time, in vivo, and multiple target detection of a specific cancer was successful, based on the fast imaging capability of fluorescence signals and the multiplex capability of simultaneously detected SERS signals using an optical fiber bundle for intraoperative endoscopic system. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on the breast cancer xenografts in a mouse orthotopic model were successfully detected in a multiplexed way, illustrating the potential of FRES as a molecular diagnostic instrument that enables real-time tumor characterization of receptors during routine endoscopic procedures.

  3. [Inspecting the cochlear scala tympanic with flexible and semi-flexible micro-endoscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daoxcing; Zhang, Yankun

    2006-02-01

    Flexible and semi-flexible micro-endoscopes were used in cochlear scala tympani inspection , to explore their application in inner ear examination. Fifteen profound hearing loss patients preparing for cochlear implant were included in this study. During the operation, micro-endoscopy was performed after opening the cochlear scala tympani. And 1 mm diameter semi-flexible micro-endoscope could go as deep as 9 mm into the cochlear scala tympani, while 0. 5 mm diameter flexible micro-endoscope could go as deep as 25 mm. The inspecting results were compared with video recording. Using 0.5 mm flexible micro-endoscope, we canould check cochlear scala tympani with depth range of 15-25 mm, but the video imaging was not clear enough to examine the microstructure in the cochlear. With 1 mm diameter semi-flexible micro-endoscope, we could reach 9 mm deep into the cochlear. During the examination, we found 3 cases with calcification deposit in osseous spiral lamina, l case with granulation tissue in the lateral wall of scala tympani, no abnormal findings in the other 11 cases. Inspecting the cochlear scala tympani with 0.5 mm flexible micro-endoscope, even though we can reach the second circuit of the cochlear, it is difficult to find the pathology in the cochlear because of the poor video imaging. With 1 mm semi-flexible micro-endoscope, we can identify the microstructure of the cochlear clearly and find the pathologic changes, but the inserting depth was limited to 9 mm with limitation to examine the whole cochlear.

  4. Video-based measurements for wireless capsule endoscope tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, Evaggelos; Iakovidis, Dimitris K

    2014-01-01

    The wireless capsule endoscope is a swallowable medical device equipped with a miniature camera enabling the visual examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It wirelessly transmits thousands of images to an external video recording system, while its location and orientation are being tracked approximately by external sensor arrays. In this paper we investigate a video-based approach to tracking the capsule endoscope without requiring any external equipment. The proposed method involves extraction of speeded up robust features from video frames, registration of consecutive frames based on the random sample consensus algorithm, and estimation of the displacement and rotation of interest points within these frames. The results obtained by the application of this method on wireless capsule endoscopy videos indicate its effectiveness and improved performance over the state of the art. The findings of this research pave the way for a cost-effective localization and travel distance measurement of capsule endoscopes in the GI tract, which could contribute in the planning of more accurate surgical interventions. (paper)

  5. Video-based measurements for wireless capsule endoscope tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Evaggelos; Iakovidis, Dimitris K.

    2014-01-01

    The wireless capsule endoscope is a swallowable medical device equipped with a miniature camera enabling the visual examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It wirelessly transmits thousands of images to an external video recording system, while its location and orientation are being tracked approximately by external sensor arrays. In this paper we investigate a video-based approach to tracking the capsule endoscope without requiring any external equipment. The proposed method involves extraction of speeded up robust features from video frames, registration of consecutive frames based on the random sample consensus algorithm, and estimation of the displacement and rotation of interest points within these frames. The results obtained by the application of this method on wireless capsule endoscopy videos indicate its effectiveness and improved performance over the state of the art. The findings of this research pave the way for a cost-effective localization and travel distance measurement of capsule endoscopes in the GI tract, which could contribute in the planning of more accurate surgical interventions.

  6. Drawing the subsurface : an integrative design approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooimeijer, F.L.; Lafleur, F.; Trinh, T.T.; Gogu, Constantin Radu; Campbell, Diarmad; de Beer, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The sub-surface, with its man-made and natural components, plays an important, if not crucial, role in the urban climate and global energy transition. On the one hand, the sub-surface is associated with a variety of challenges such as subsidence, pollution, damage to infrastructure and shortages of

  7. Automatic WEMVA by Focusing Subsurface Offset Virtual Sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Bingbing

    2017-05-26

    Macro velocity building is important for subsequent prestack depth migration and full waveform inversion. Wave equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) utilizes band-limited waveform to invert the velocity in an automatic manner. Normally, inversion would be implemented by focusing the subsurface offset common image gathers(SOCIGs). We re-examine it with a different perspective and propose to view the SOCIGs and the background wavefield together as subsurface offset virtual sources(SOVS). A linear system connecting the perturbation of the position of those SOVS and velocity is derived and solved subsequently using a conjugate gradient method. Both synthetic and real dataset examples verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Integrated approach to 3-D seismic acquisition geometry analysis : Emphasizing the influence of the inhomogeneous subsurface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuizen, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    The seismic reflection method for imaging of the earth's interior is an essential part of the exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources. A seismic survey should be designed such that the acquired data leads to a sufficiently accurate subsurface image. The survey geometry analysis method

  9. Optical transfection using an endoscope-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nan; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-02-01

    Optical transfection is a powerful method for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to biological cells. A tightly focused pulsed laser beam may transiently change the permeability of a cell membrane to facilitate the delivery of foreign genetic material into cells. We report the first realization of an endoscope-like integrated system for optical transfection. An imaging fiber (coherent optical fiber bundle) with ∼ 6000 cores (pixels) embedded in a fiber cladding of ∼ 300 μm in diameter, produces an image circle (area) of ∼ 270 μm diam. This imaging fiber, with an ordered axicon lens array chemically etched at its exit face, is used for the delivery of a femtosecond laser to the cell membrane for optical transfection along with subcellular resolution imaging. A microcapillary-based microfluidic system for localized drug delivery was also combined in this miniature, flexible system. Using this novel system, a plasmid transfection efficiency up to ∼ 72% was obtained for CHO-K1 cells. This endoscope-like system opens a range of exciting applications, in particular, in the targeted in vivo optical microsurgery area.

  10. Optical characterization and polarization calibration for rigid endoscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Missael; Gruev, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    Polarization measurements give orthogonal information to spectral images making them a great tool in the characterization of environmental parameters in nature. Thus, polarization imagery has proven to be remarkably useful in a vast range of biomedical applications. One such application is the early diagnosis of flat cancerous lesions in murine colorectal tumor models, where polarization data complements NIR fluorescence analysis. Advances in nanotechnology have led to compact and precise bio-inspired imaging sensors capable of accurately co-registering multidimensional spectral and polarization information. As more applications emerge for these imagers, the optics used in these instruments get very complex and can potentially compromise the original polarization state of the incident light. Here we present a complete optical and polarization characterization of three rigid endoscopes of size 1.9mm x 10cm (Karl Storz, Germany), 5mm x 30cm, and 10mm x 33cm (Olympus, Germany), used in colonoscopy for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer. Characterization results show that the telescope optics act as retarders and effectively depolarize the linear component. These incorrect readings can cause false-positives or false-negatives leading to an improper diagnosis. In this paper, we offer a polarization calibration scheme for these endoscopes based on Mueller calculus. By modeling the optical properties from training data as real-valued Mueller matrices, we are able to successfully reconstruct the initial polarization state acquired by the imaging system.

  11. Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kong Yew; Narayanan, Prepageran; Waran, Vicknes

    2018-02-01

    Objectives  To demonstrate, step-by-step, the technique and efficacy of endoscopic transsphenoidal approach in resection of a suprasellar craniopharyngioma. Design  The video shows a step-by-step approach to the resection, covering the exposure, access, resection, and confirmation of resection and reconstruction. Setting  The surgery was performed in the University of Malaya Medical Centre, a tertiary referral center in the capital of Malaysia. Participants  Surgery was performed jointly by Professor Prepageran from the department of otorhinolaryngology and Professor Vicknes Waran from the division of neurosurgery. Both surgeons are from the University of Malaya. Video compilation, editing, and voice narration was done by Dr. Kong Yew Liew. Main Outcome Measures  Completeness of resection and avoidance of intra- and postoperative complications. Results  Based on intraoperative views and MRI findings, the tumor was completely resected with the patient suffering only transient diabetes insipidus. Conclusion  Central suprasellar tumors can be removed completely via an endoscopic transsphenoidal approach with minimal morbidity to the patient. The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/ZNIHfk12cYg .

  12. A Panoramic Wireless Endoscope System Design for the Application of Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hsiang Peng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS is the current trend in surgery. Compared to traditional surgery, MIS can substantially decrease recovery time and expenses needed by patients after surgeries, reduce pain during surgical procedures, and is highly regarded by physicians and patients. An endoscope is widely used in the diagnosis and treatments of various medical disciplines, such as hysteroscopy, laparoscopy, and colonoscopy, and have been adopted by many branches of medicine. However, the limited image field of MIS is often the most difficult obstacles faced by surgeons and medical students, especially to less experienced physicians and difficult surgical procedures; the limited field of view of endoscopic imaging does not provide a whole picture of the surgery area, making the procedures difficult and full of uncertainty. In light of this problem, we proposed a "Panoramic Wireless Endoscope System design", hoping to provide physicians with a wide field of view of the endoscopic image. We combine images captured from two parallel-mounted endoscope lenses into a single, wide-angle image, giving physicians a wider field of view and easier access to the surgical area. In addition, we developed a wireless transmission system so the image can be transmitted to various display platforms, eliminating the needs for excessive cabling on surgical tools and enable physicians to better operate on the patient. Finally, our system allows surgical assistants a better view of the operation process, and enables other physicians and nurses to remotely observe the process. Our experiment results have shown that we can increase the image to 152% of its original size. We used the PandaBoard ES platform with an ARM9 processor and 1G of onboard RAM, and continuously implementing animal trials to verify the reliability of our system.

  13. 21 CFR 884.4100 - Endoscopic electrocautery and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endoscopic electrocautery and accessories. 884... Surgical Devices § 884.4100 Endoscopic electrocautery and accessories. (a) Identification. An endoscopic electrocautery is a device used to perform female sterilization under endoscopic observation. It is designed to...

  14. Endoscopic approaches to treatment of achalasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Iqbal, Shahzad; Grendell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy for achalasia is directed at disrupting or weakening the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The two most commonly utilized endoscopic interventions are large balloon pneumatic dilation (PD) and botulinum toxin injection (BTI). These interventions have been extensively scrutinized and compared with each other as well as with surgical disruption (myotomy) of the LES. PD is generally more effective in improving dysphagia in achalasia than BTI, with the latter reserved for infirm older people, and PD may approach treatment results attained with myotomy. However, PD may need to be repeated. Small balloon dilation and endoscopic stent placement for achalasia have only been used in select centers. Per oral endoscopic myotomy is a newer endoscopic modality that will likely change the treatment paradigm for achalasia. It arose from the field of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery and represents a scarless endoscopic approach to Heller myotomy. This is a technique that requires extensive training and preparation and thus there should be rigorous accreditation and monitoring of outcomes to ensure safety and efficacy. PMID:23503707

  15. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Farooqi, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  16. Interactive navigation-guided ophthalmic plastic surgery: navigation enabling of telescopes and their use in endoscopic lacrimal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Javed Ali,1 Swati Singh,1 Milind N Naik,1 Swathi Kaliki,2 Tarjani Vivek Dave1 1The Institute of Dacryology, 2The Operation Eyesight Universal Institute for Eye Cancer, L.V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India Purpose: The aims of this study were to report the preliminary experience of using telescopes, which were enabled for navigation guidance, and their utility in complex endoscopic lacrimal surgeries. Methods: Navigation enabling of the telescope was achieved by using the AxiEM™ malleable neuronavigation shunt stylet. Image-guided dacryolocalization was performed in five patients using the intraoperative image-guided StealthStation™ system in the electromagnetic mode. The “look ahead” protocol software was used to assist the surgeon in assessing the intraoperative geometric location of the endoscope and what lies ahead in real time. All patients underwent navigation-guided powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy. The utility of uninterrupted navigation guidance throughout the surgery with the endoscope as the navigating tool was noted. Results: Intraoperative geometric localization of the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct could be easily deciphered. Constant orientation of the lacrimal drainage system and the peri-lacrimal anatomy was possible without the need for repeated point localizations throughout the surgery. The “look ahead” features could accurately alert the surgeon of anatomical structures that exists at 5, 10 and 15 mm in front of the endoscope. Good securing of the shunt stylet with the telescope was found to be essential for constant and accurate navigation. Conclusion: Navigation-enabled endoscopes provide the surgeon with the advantage of sustained stereotactic anatomical awareness at all times during the surgery. Keywords: telescope, endoscope, image guidance, navigation, lacrimal surgery, powered endoscopic DCR

  17. New endoscopic ultrasonography techniques for pancreticobiliary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamata, Ken; Kitano, Masayuki; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Miyata, Takeshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Yamao, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Kudo, Masatoshii [Dept. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is widely used to evaluate pancreaticobiliary diseases, especially pancreatic masses. EUS has a good ability to detect pancreatic masses, but it is not sufficient for the differential diagnosis of various types of lesions. In order to address the limitations of EUS, new techniques have been developed to improve the characterization of the lesions detected by EUS. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been used for diagnosing pancreatic tumors. In order to improve the histological diagnostic yield, a EUS-FNA needle with a core trap has recently been developed. Contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS is a new imaging modality that uses an ultrasonographic contrast agent to visualize blood flow in fine vessels. This technique is useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic solid lesions and in confirming the presence of vascularity in mural nodules for cystic lesions. EUS elastography analyzes several different variables to measure tissue elasticity, color patterns, and strain ratio, using analytical techniques such as hue-histogram analysis, and artificial neural networks, which are useful for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  18. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery for giant polyps of the rectum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levic, K; Bulut, O; Hesselfeldt, P

    2014-01-01

    in the rectum. We present our results with TEM in the removal of giant polyps equal or greater than 4 cm in diameter. METHODS: In the period between 1998 and 2012, TEM was performed in 39 patients with rectal polyps measuring at least 4 cm in diameter. Transrectal ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging......, these recurrences were treated with endoscopic removal or re-TEM. The remaining 5 underwent total mesorectal excision and/or chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Full-thickness TEM provides a safe and efficient treatment for excision of giant polyps. In case of unexpected cancer, TEM can be curative. Local recurrence can...

  19. The appearance of the pre-Achilles fat pad after endoscopic calcaneoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Zwiers, Ruben; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; Maas, Mario M.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the imaging features of the retrocalcaneal recess normalize on a conventional radiograph after surgery for retrocalcaneal bursitis and evaluate whether it can be reused if complaints reoccur. Patients who underwent an endoscopic calcaneoplasty at least 2 years before were

  20. Ma_MISS on ExoMars: Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Altieri, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Biondi, David; De Angelis, Simone; Meini, Marco; Mondello, Giuseppe; Novi, Samuele; Paolinetti, Riccardo; Soldani, Massimo; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Vago, Jorge L.; Ma_MISS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Ma_MISS (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) experiment is the visible and near infrared (VNIR) miniaturized spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover. Ma_MISS will perform IR spectral reflectance investigations in the 0.4-2.2 μm range to characterize the mineralogy of excavated borehole walls at different depths (between 0 and 2 m). The spectral sampling is about 20 nm, whereas the spatial resolution over the target is 120 μm. Making use of the drill's movement, the instrument slit can scan a ring and build up hyperspectral images of a borehole. The main goal of the Ma_MISS instrument is to study the martian subsurface environment. Access to the martian subsurface is crucial to our ability to constrain the nature, timing, and duration of alteration and sedimentation processes on Mars, as well as habitability conditions. Subsurface deposits likely host and preserve H2O ice and hydrated materials that will contribute to our understanding of the H2O geochemical environment (both in the liquid and in the solid state) at the ExoMars 2020 landing site. The Ma_MISS spectral range and sampling capabilities have been carefully selected to allow the study of minerals and ices in situ before the collection of samples. Ma_MISS will be implemented to accomplish the following scientific objectives: (1) determine the composition of subsurface materials, (2) map the distribution of subsurface H2O and volatiles, (3) characterize important optical and physical properties of materials (e.g., grain size), and (4) produce a stratigraphic column that will inform with regard to subsurface geological processes. The Ma_MISS findings will help to refine essential criteria that will aid in our selection of the most interesting subsurface formations from which to collect samples.

  1. Clinical endoscopic management and outcome of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chen Lin

    Full Text Available Post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding is a common complication of biliary sphincterotomy, and the incidence varies from 1% to 48%. It can be challenging to localize the bleeder or to administer various interventions through a side-viewing endoscope. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding and the outcome of endoscopic intervention therapies. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 513 patients who underwent biliary sphincterotomy in Mackay Memorial Hospital between 2011 and 2016. The blood biochemistry, comorbidities, indication for sphincterotomy, severity of bleeding, endoscopic features of bleeder, and type of endoscopic therapy were analyzed. Post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding occurred in 65 (12.6% patients. Forty-five patients had immediate bleeding and 20 patients had delayed bleeding. The multivariate analysis of risk factors associated with post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding were liver cirrhosis (P = 0.029, end-stage renal disease (P = 0.038, previous antiplatelet drug use (P<0.001, and duodenal ulcer (P = 0.023. The complications of pancreatitis and cholangitis were higher in the bleeding group, with statistical significance. Delayed bleeding occurred within 1 to 7 days (mean, 2.5 days, and 60% (12/20 of the patients received endoscopic evaluation. In the delayed bleeding group, the successful hemostasis rate was 71.4% (5/7, and 65% (13/20 of the patients had ceased bleeding without endoscopic hemostasis therapy. Comparison of different therapeutic modalities showed that cholangitis was higher in patients who received epinephrine spray (P = 0.042 and pancreatitis was higher in patients who received epinephrine injection and electrocoagulation (P = 0.041 and P = 0.039 respectively. Clinically, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding and further endoscopic hemostasis therapy increase the complication rate of pancreatitis and cholangitis. Realizing the effectiveness of each

  2. Modeling subsurface contamination at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.W.; Flinn, J.C.; Ruwe, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald site is located about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati. Fernald produced refined uranium metal products from ores between 1953 and 1989. The pure uranium was sent to other DOE sites in South Carolina, Tennessee, Colorado,and Washington in support of the nation's strategic defense programs. Over the years of large-scale uranium production, contamination of the site's soil and groundwater occurred.The contamination is of particular concern because the Fernald site is located over the Great Miami Aquifer, a designated sole-source drinking water aquifer. Contamination of the aquifer with uranium was found beneath the site, and migration of the contamination had occurred well beyond the site's southern boundary. As a result, Fernald was placed on the National Priorities (CERCLA/Superfund) List in 1989. Uranium production at the site ended in 1989,and Fernald's mission has been changed to one of environmental restoration. This paper presents information about computerized modeling of subsurface contamination used for the environmental restoration project at Fernald

  3. Modeling Subsurface Hydrology in Floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cristina M.; Dritschel, David G.; Singer, Michael B.

    2018-03-01

    Soil-moisture patterns in floodplains are highly dynamic, owing to the complex relationships between soil properties, climatic conditions at the surface, and the position of the water table. Given this complexity, along with climate change scenarios in many regions, there is a need for a model to investigate the implications of different conditions on water availability to riparian vegetation. We present a model, HaughFlow, which is able to predict coupled water movement in the vadose and phreatic zones of hydraulically connected floodplains. Model output was calibrated and evaluated at six sites in Australia to identify key patterns in subsurface hydrology. This study identifies the importance of the capillary fringe in vadose zone hydrology due to its water storage capacity and creation of conductive pathways. Following peaks in water table elevation, water can be stored in the capillary fringe for up to months (depending on the soil properties). This water can provide a critical resource for vegetation that is unable to access the water table. When water table peaks coincide with heavy rainfall events, the capillary fringe can support saturation of the entire soil profile. HaughFlow is used to investigate the water availability to riparian vegetation, producing daily output of water content in the soil over decadal time periods within different depth ranges. These outputs can be summarized to support scientific investigations of plant-water relations, as well as in management applications.

  4. Introduction: energy and the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Hari S.

    2016-01-01

    This theme issue covers topics at the forefront of scientific research on energy and the subsurface, ranging from carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration to the recovery of unconventional shale oil and gas resources through hydraulic fracturing. As such, the goal of this theme issue is to have an impact on the scientific community, broadly, by providing a self-contained collection of articles contributing to and reviewing the state-of-the-art of the field. This collection of articles could be used, for example, to set the next generation of research directions, while also being useful as a self-study guide for those interested in entering the field. Review articles are included on the topics of hydraulic fracturing as a multiscale problem, numerical modelling of hydraulic fracture propagation, the role of computational sciences in the upstream oil and gas industry and chemohydrodynamic patterns in porous media. Complementing the reviews is a set of original research papers covering growth models for branched hydraulic crack systems, fluid-driven crack propagation in elastic matrices, elastic and inelastic deformation of fluid-saturated rock, reaction front propagation in fracture matrices, the effects of rock mineralogy and pore structure on stress-dependent permeability of shales, topographic viscous fingering and plume dynamics in porous media convection. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597784

  5. Endoscopic repair of transsellar transsphenoidal meningoencephalocele; case report and review of approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalessi, M.D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an extremely rare case of transsellar transsphenoidal meningoencephalocele in a 36-year-old woman with pituitary dwarfism complaining of nasal obstruction. Imaging studies showed a bony defect in the sellar floor and sphenoid sinus with huge nasopharyngeal mass and 3rd ventricle involvement. Using endoscopic endonasal approach the sac was partially removed and the defect was reconstructed with fat and fascial graft, and buttressed with titanium mesh and septal flap. Visual field improvement was noticed post-operatively and no complication was encountered during follow-up. So, endoscopic endonasal approach with partial resection of the sac is a safe and effective treatment for this disease

  6. Papillary Ependymoma WHO Grade II of the Aqueduct Treated by Endoscopic Tumor Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M. Stark

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary ependymoma is a rare tumor that may be located along the ventricular walls or within the spinal cord. We report the case of a 54-year-old patient with a papillary ependymoma WHO grade II arising at the entrance of the aqueduct. The tumor caused hydrocephalus. The tumor was completely removed via a right-sided endoscopic approach with restoration of the aqueduct. The free cerebrospinal fluid passage through the aqueduct was not only visualized by endoscopy but also controlled by intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore, an additional endoscopic third ventriculostomy was unneccessary.

  7. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  8. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography with a focus-adjustable probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wenchao; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Wenxin; Peng, Zhangkai; Zhang, Xiao; Ai, Shengnan; Fu, Deyong; Zhou, Tieying; Xue, Ping

    2017-10-15

    We present a focus-adjustable endoscopic probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT), which is able to acquire images with different focal planes and overcome depth-of-focus limitations by image fusing. The use of a two-way shape-memory-alloy spring enables the probe to adjust working distance over 1.5 mm, providing a large scanning range with high resolution and no sensitivity loss. Equipped with a homemade hollow-core ultrasonic motor, the probe is capable of performing an unobstructed 360 deg field-of-view distal scanning. Both the axial resolution and the best lateral resolution are ∼4  μm, with a sensitivity of 100.3 dB. Spectral-domain OCT imaging of phantom and biological tissues with the probe is also demonstrated.

  9. Cholangiography and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cholangiography and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of severe acute gallstone pancreatitis discovered at diag~osticlaparotomy. ... in these cases Included cholecystectomy and Ttube drainage (2 patients) cholecystostomy drainage (3 patients), and closure of the abdomen without drainage (2 patients).

  10. Endoscopic appearance of irradiated gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sagher, L I; Van den Heule, B; Van Houtte, P; Engelholm, L; Balikdjan, D; Bleiberg, H

    1979-09-01

    Irradiation of the epigastric area for gastric cancer may induce actinic lesions of the stomach characterized on endoscopic examination by ulcerations, haemorrhagic gastritis, fragility of the mucosa, thickening and congestion of the gastric folds.

  11. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy versus ventriculoperitoneal shunt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' medical records, operative notes, and neural tube database records were used to complete a structured questionnaire. The difference in ... likely after 6 months. Keywords: obstructive hydrocephalus; endoscopic third ventriculostomy; ventriculoperitoneal shunt; children; paediatric surgery; neurosurgery; Ethiopia ...

  12. Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A comparative analysis. Rinki Saha, Anuradha Sinha, Jyoti Prakash Phukan. Abstract. Background: Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) consists of creating a lacrimal drainage pathway to the nasal cavity to restore permanent drainage of previously obstructed ...

  13. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that ea...

  14. PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gasanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we report the incidence and etiology of pulmonary hemorrhage, and modern classifications according to the literature data. Methods of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hemorrhage are analyzed.

  15. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to a Suprasellar Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Alexandre B; Montaser, Alaa S; Shahein, Mostafa; Revuelta, Juan Manuel; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2018-04-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old male who presented with progressive right side vision loss whose workup revealed a large suprasellar lesion with invasion of the third ventricle. The pituitary stalk was not visible. Hormonal panel showed no hormonal deficits. The initial diagnosis was of a type II transinfundibular craniopharyngioma (as classified by Kassam et al). An endoscopic endonasal transplanum transtuberculum approach was done using a standard binostril four-hand technique, with the patient positioned supine with the head turned to the right side and tilted to the left, fixed in a three-pin head clamp, under imaging guidance. The tumor was carefully dissected away from the optic apparatus while preserving the vessels, mainly the superior hypophyseal artery. The stalk was identified around the tumor and preserved. The third ventricle was entered and inspected at the end of the procedure and a near-total resection (a small residual in the right hypothalamus) with decompression of the optic apparatus was achieved. Reconstruction was done in a multilayered fashion, using collagen matrix and a nasoseptal flap. Patient had an uneventful postoperative stay and was discharged on POD 4, neurologically stable with no hormonal deficits. Pathology confirmed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. Due to a small growth of the residual, patient underwent fractionated stereotactic radiation (50.4Gy in 28 sessions). He presented with panhypopituitarism 2 years after radiation therapy. At 3-month follow-up, his vision was back to normal and 6-year postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed no signs of recurrence. The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/chG7XIz7a_A .

  16. Reliability in endoscopic diagnosis of portal hypertensive gastropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, George Fred Soares; Ferreira, Fabio Gonçalves; Ribeiro, Maurício Alves; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Rossini, Lucio Giovanni Battista

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To analyze reliability among endoscopists in diagnosing portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) and to determine which criteria from the most utilized classifications are the most suitable. METHODS: From January to July 2009, in an academic quaternary referral center at Santa Casa of São Paulo Endoscopy Service, Brazil, we performed this single-center prospective study. In this period, we included 100 patients, including 50 sequential patients who had portal hypertension of various etiologies; who were previously diagnosed based on clinical, laboratory and imaging exams; and who presented with esophageal varices. In addition, our study included 50 sequential patients who had dyspeptic symptoms and were referred for upper digestive endoscopy without portal hypertension. All subjects underwent upper digestive endoscopy, and the images of the exam were digitally recorded. Five endoscopists with more than 15 years of experience answered an electronic questionnaire, which included endoscopic criteria from the 3 most commonly used Portal Hypertensive Gastropathy classifications (McCormack, NIEC and Baveno) and the presence of elevated or flat antral erosive gastritis. All five endoscopists were blinded to the patients’ clinical information, and all images of varices were deliberately excluded for the analysis. RESULTS: The three most common etiologies of portal hypertension were schistosomiasis (36%), alcoholic cirrhosis (20%) and viral cirrhosis (14%). Of the 50 patients with portal hypertension, 84% were Child A, 12% were Child B, 4% were Child C, 64% exhibited previous variceal bleeding and 66% were previously endoscopic treated. The endoscopic parameters, presence or absence of mosaic-like pattern, red point lesions and cherry-red spots were associated with high inter-observer reliability and high specificity for diagnosing Portal Hypertensive Gastropathy. Sensitivity, specificity and reliability for the diagnosis of PHG (%) were as follows: mosaic-like pattern

  17. Modelling of a laser-pumped light source for endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Valerie J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Hanna, George B.; Neil, Mark A. A.

    2008-09-01

    A white light source, based on illumination of a yellow phosphor with a fibre-coupled blue-violet diode laser, has been designed and built for use in endoscopic surgery. This narrow light probe can be integrated into a standard laparoscope or inserted into the patient separately via a needle. We present a Monte Carlo model of light scattering and phosphorescence within the phosphor/silicone matrix at the probe tip, and measurements of the colour, intensity, and uniformity of the illumination. Images obtained under illumination with this light source are also presented, demonstrating the improvement in illumination quality over existing endoscopic light sources. This new approach to endoscopic lighting has the advantages of compact design, improved ergonomics, and more uniform illumination in comparison with current technologies.

  18. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of this document is to develop a preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architecture for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines an overall control system concept that encompasses and integrates the many diverse process and communication systems being developed for the subsurface repository design. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The Subsurface Repository Integrated Control System design will be composed of a series of diverse process systems and communication networks. The subsurface repository design contains many systems related to instrumentation and control (I andC) for both repository development and waste emplacement operations. These systems include waste emplacement, waste retrieval, ventilation, radiological and air monitoring, rail transportation, construction development, utility systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire protection, backfill emplacement, and performance confirmation. Each of these systems involves some level of I andC and will typically be integrated over a data communications network throughout the subsurface facility. The subsurface I andC systems will also interface with multiple surface-based systems such as site operations, rail transportation, security and safeguards, and electrical/piped utilities. In addition to the I andC systems, the subsurface repository design also contains systems related to voice and video communications. The components for each of these systems will be distributed and linked over voice and video communication networks throughout the subsurface facility. The scope and primary objectives of this design analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system-level functions and interfaces (Section 6.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels the engineered process systems will be monitored

  19. DOE UST interim subsurface barrier technologies workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This document contains information which was presented at a workshop regarding interim subsurface barrier technologies that could be used for underground storage tanks, particularly the tank 241-C-106 at the Hanford Reservation

  20. Design and maintenance of subsurface gravel wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center (UNHSC) evaluation of : a review of Subsurface Gravel Wetlands design and specifications used by the New Hampshire : Department of Transportation (NHDOT or Department). : Subsur...

  1. Component-based framework for subsurface simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B J; Fang, Yilin; Hammond, Glenn; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya

    2007-01-01

    Simulations in the subsurface environment represent a broad range of phenomena covering an equally broad range of scales. Developing modelling capabilities that can integrate models representing different phenomena acting at different scales present formidable challenges both from the algorithmic and computer science perspective. This paper will describe the development of an integrated framework that will be used to combine different models into a single simulation. Initial work has focused on creating two frameworks, one for performing smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid systems, the other for performing grid-based continuum simulations of reactive subsurface flow. The SPH framework is based on a parallel code developed for doing pore scale simulations, the continuum grid-based framework is based on the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) code developed at PNNL Future work will focus on combining the frameworks together to perform multiscale, multiphysics simulations of reactive subsurface flow

  2. Subsurface Prospecting by Planetary Drones, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed program innovates subsurface prospecting by planetary drones to seek a solution to the difficulty of robotic prospecting, sample acquisition, and sample...

  3. Current Status of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young Kwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been established as an optional treatment for achalasia. POEM is an endoluminal procedure that involves dissection of esophageal muscle fibers followed by submucosal tunneling. Inoue first attempted to use POEM for the treatment of achalasia in humans. Expanded indications of POEM include classic indications such as type I, type II, type III achalasia, failed prior treatments, including Botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic balloon dilation, laparoscopic ...

  4. An unusual experience with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is known for its varied diagnostic and therapeutic utility for a variety of disorders. However it has greater likelihood of procedure related complications among the endoscopic procedures of gastrointestinal tract. The extraluminal hemorrhagic complications following ERCP are potentially life threatening though relatively rare. We present a 50 year patient with choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis developing rare complication of subcapsular hepatic hematoma, following ERCP due to guide wire injury.

  5. Importance of radiographic monitoring of endoscopic sphincterotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, H.M.; Goldberg, H.I.; Shapiro, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic features of endoscopic sphincterotomies performed in 44 patients were evaluated. Radiographic landmarks aided in proper sphincterotome placement and also disclosed conditions and anatomic variations that made catheter placement difficult. Fluoroscopic and radiographic monitoring not only assisted the performance of endoscopic sphincterotomy, but also confirmed successful results and revealed reasons for failure. Radiographic changes in the biliary tract after sphincterotomy, as well as potential complications of sphincterotomy, are discussed and illustrated

  6. Endoscopic resection of acetabular screw tip to decompress sciatic nerve following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sun-Jung; Park, Myung-Sik; Matsuda, Dean K; Choi, Yun Ho

    2018-06-04

    Sciatic nerve injuries following total hip arthroplasty are disabling complications. Although degrees of injury are variable from neuropraxia to neurotmesis, mechanical irritation of sciatic nerve might be occurred by protruding hardware. This case shows endoscopic decompression for protruded acetabular screw irritating sciatic nerve, the techniques described herein may permit broader arthroscopic/endoscopic applications for management of complications after reconstructive hip surgery. An 80-year-old man complained of severe pain and paresthesias following acetabular component revision surgery. Physical findings included right buttock pain with radiating pain to lower extremity. Radiographs and computed tomography imaging showed that the sharp end of protruded screw invaded greater sciatic foramen anterior to posterior and distal to proximal direction at sciatic notch level. A protruding tip of the acetabular screw at the sciatic notch was decompressed by use of techniques gained from experience performing endoscopic sciatic nerve decompression. The pre-operative pain and paresthesias resolved post-operatively after recovering from anesthesia. This case report describes the first documented endoscopic resection of the tip of the acetabular screw irritating sciatic nerve after total hip arthroplasty. If endoscopic resection of an offending acetabular screw can be performed in a safe and minimally invasive manner, one can envision a future expansion of the role of hip arthroscopic surgery in several complications management after total hip arthroplasty.

  7. Successful Gastric Volvulus Reduction and Gastropexy Using a Dual Endoscope Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith H. Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric volvulus is a life threatening condition characterized by an abnormal rotation of the stomach around an axis. Although the first line treatment of this disorder is surgical, we report here a case of gastric volvulus that was endoscopically managed using a novel strategy. An 83-year-old female with a history of pancreatic cancer status postpylorus-preserving Whipple procedure presented with a cecal volvulus requiring right hemicolectomy. Postoperative imaging included a CT scan and upper GI series that showed a gastric volvulus with the antrum located above the diaphragm. An upper endoscopy was advanced through the pylorus into the duodenum and left in this position to keep the stomach under the diaphragm. A second pediatric endoscope was advanced alongside and used to complete percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement for anterior gastropexy. The patient’s volvulus resolved and there were no complications. From our review of the literature, the dual endoscopic technique employed here has not been previously described. Patients who are poor surgical candidates or those who do not require emergent surgery can possibly benefit the most from similar minimally invasive endoscopic procedures as described here.

  8. Current Status of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Kwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been established as an optional treatment for achalasia. POEM is an endoluminal procedure that involves dissection of esophageal muscle fibers followed by submucosal tunneling. Inoue first attempted to use POEM for the treatment of achalasia in humans. Expanded indications of POEM include classic indications such as type I, type II, type III achalasia, failed prior treatments, including Botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic balloon dilation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy, and hypertensive motor disorders such as diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus. Contraindications include prior radiation therapy to the esophagus and prior extensive esophageal mucosal resection/ablation involving the POEM field. Most of the complications are minor and self-limited and can be managed conservatively. As POEM emerged as the main treatment for achalasia, various adaptations to tunnel endoscopic surgery have been attempted. Tunnel endoscopic surgery includes POEM, peroral endoscopic tumor resection, gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy. POEM has been widely accepted as a treatment for all types of achalasia, even for specific cases such as achalasia with failed prior treatments, and hypertensive motor disorders.

  9. Current Status of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Kwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2018-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been established as an optional treatment for achalasia. POEM is an endoluminal procedure that involves dissection of esophageal muscle fibers followed by submucosal tunneling. Inoue first attempted to use POEM for the treatment of achalasia in humans. Expanded indications of POEM include classic indications such as type I, type II, type III achalasia, failed prior treatments, including Botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic balloon dilation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy, and hypertensive motor disorders such as diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus. Contraindications include prior radiation therapy to the esophagus and prior extensive esophageal mucosal resection/ablation involving the POEM field. Most of the complications are minor and self-limited and can be managed conservatively. As POEM emerged as the main treatment for achalasia, various adaptations to tunnel endoscopic surgery have been attempted. Tunnel endoscopic surgery includes POEM, peroral endoscopic tumor resection, gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy. POEM has been widely accepted as a treatment for all types of achalasia, even for specific cases such as achalasia with failed prior treatments, and hypertensive motor disorders. PMID:29397656

  10. Current Status of Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Kwan Cho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM has been established as an optional treatment for achalasia. POEM is an endoluminal procedure that involves dissection of esophageal muscle fibers followed by submucosal tunneling. Inoue first attempted to use POEM for the treatment of achalasia in humans. Expanded indications of POEM include classic indications such as type I, type II, type III achalasia, failed prior treatments, including Botulinum toxin injection, endoscopic balloon dilation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy, and hypertensive motor disorders such as diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus. Contraindications include prior radiation therapy to the esophagus and prior extensive esophageal mucosal resection/ablation involving the POEM field. Most of the complications are minor and self-limited and can be managed conservatively. As POEM emerged as the main treatment for achalasia, various adaptations to tunnel endoscopic surgery have been attempted. Tunnel endoscopic surgery includes POEM, peroral endoscopic tumor resection, gastric peroral endoscopic pyloromyotomy. POEM has been widely accepted as a treatment for all types of achalasia, even for specific cases such as achalasia with failed prior treatments, and hypertensive motor disorders.

  11. Dune advance into a coastal forest, equatorial Brazil: A subsurface perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buynevich, Ilya V.; Filho, Pedro Walfir M. Souza; Asp, Nils E.

    2010-06-01

    A large active parabolic dune along the coast of Pará State, northern Brazil, was analyzed using aerial photography and imaged with high-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to map the subsurface facies architecture and point-source anomalies. Most high-amplitude (8-10 dB) subsurface anomalies are correlated with partially buried mangrove trees along the leading edge (slipface) of the advancing dune. Profiles along a 200-m long basal stoss side of the dune reveal 66 targets, most of which lie below the water table and are thus inaccessible by other methods. Signal amplitudes of point-source anomalies are substantially higher than those associated with the reflections from continuous subsurface features (water table, sedimentary layers). When complemented with exposures and excavations, GPR provides the best means of rapid continuous imaging of the geological record of complex interactions between vegetation and aeolian deposition.

  12. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus endoscopic mucosal resection for large rectal adenomas (TREND-study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.C. van den Broek (Frank); E.J.R. de Graaf (Eelco); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); J.B. Reitsma (Johannes); J. Haringsma (Jelle); R. Timmer (Robin); B.L. Weusten (Bas); M.F. Gerhards (Michael); E.C. Consten (Esther); M.P. Schwartz (Matthijs); M.J. Boom (Maarten); E.J. Derksen (Erik); A.B. Bijnen (Bart); P.H.P. Davids (Paul); C. Hoff (Christiaan); H.M. van Dullemen (Hendrik); G.D.N. Heine (Dimitri); K. van der Linde (Klaas); J.M. Jansen (Jeroen); R.C.H. Mallant-Hent (Rosalie); R. Breumelhof (Ronald); H. Geldof (Han); J.C. Hardwick (James); P. Doornebosch (Pascal); A.C.T.M. Depla (Annekatrien); M.F. Ernst (Miranda); I.P. van Munster (Ivo); I.H.J.T. de Hingh (Ignace); E.J. Schoon (Erik); W.A. Bemelman (Willem); P. Fockens (Paul); E. Dekker (Evelien)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recent non-randomized studies suggest that extended endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is equally effective in removing large rectal adenomas as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). If equally effective, EMR might be a more cost-effective approach as this strategy does

  13. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery versus endoscopic mucosal resection for large rectal adenomas (TREND-study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Frank J. C.; de Graaf, Eelco J. R.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Haringsma, Jelle; Timmer, Robin; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Consten, Esther C. J.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Boom, Maarten J.; Derksen, Erik J.; Bijnen, A. Bart; Davids, Paul H. P.; Hoff, Christiaan; van Dullemen, Hendrik M.; Heine, G. Dimitri N.; van der Linde, Klaas; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie C. H.; Breumelhof, Ronald; Geldof, Han; Hardwick, James C. H.; Doornebosch, Pascal G.; Depla, Annekatrien C. T. M.; Ernst, Miranda F.; van Munster, Ivo P.; de Hingh, Ignace H. J. T.; Schoon, Erik J.; Bemelman, Willem A.; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien; Reitsma, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent non-randomized studies suggest that extended endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is equally effective in removing large rectal adenomas as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). If equally effective, EMR might be a more cost-effective approach as this strategy does not require

  14. Foot-controlled robotic-enabled endoscope holder for endoscopic sinus surgery: A cadaveric feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jason Y K; Leung, Iris; Navarro-Alarcon, David; Lin, Weiyang; Li, Peng; Lee, Dennis L Y; Liu, Yun-hui; Tong, Michael C F

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of a unique prototype foot-controlled robotic-enabled endoscope holder (FREE) in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Cadaveric study. Using human cadavers, we investigated the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of the robotic endoscope holder in performing endoscopic sinus surgery with two hands in five cadaver heads, mimicking a single nostril three-handed technique. The FREE robot is relatively easy to use. Setup was quick, taking less than 3 minutes from docking the robot at the head of the bed to visualizing the middle meatus. The unit is also relatively small, takes up little space, and currently has four degrees of freedom. The learning curve for using the foot control was short. The use of both hands was not hindered by the presence of the endoscope in the nasal cavity. The tremor filtration also aided in the smooth movement of the endoscope, with minimal collisions. The FREE endoscope holder in an ex-vivo cadaver test corroborated the feasibility of the robotic prototype, which allows for a two-handed approach to surgery equal to a single nostril three-handed technique without the holder that may reduce operating time. Further studies will be needed to evaluate its safety profile and use in other areas of endoscopic surgery. NA. Laryngoscope, 126:566-569, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography in digestive diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Itoh, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Itoh, Yuya; Nakamura, Yosuke; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sumi, Hajime; Hayashi, Daijiro; Ohmiya, Naoki; Miyahara, Ryoji; Nakamura, Masanao; Funasaka, Kohei; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Katano, Yoshiaki; Goto, Hidemi

    2012-10-01

    Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography (CE-EUS) was introduced in the early 1990s. The concept of the injection of carbon dioxide microbubbles into the hepatic artery as a contrast material (enhanced ultrasonography) led to "endoscopic ultrasonographic angiography". After the arrival of the first-generation contrast agent, high-frequency (12 MHz) EUS brought about the enhancement of EUS images in the diagnosis of pancreatico-biliary diseases, upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, and submucosal tumors. The electronic scanning endosonoscope with both radial and linear probes enabled the use of high-end ultrasound machines and depicted the enhancement of both color/power Doppler flow-based imaging and harmonic-based imaging using second-generation contrast agents. Many reports have described the usefulness of the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases and other abdominal lesions. Quantitative evaluation of CE-EUS images was an objective method of diagnosis using the time-intensity curve (TIC), but it was limited to the region of interest. Recently developed Inflow Time Mapping™ can be generated from stored clips and used to display the pattern of signal enhancement with time after injection, offering temporal difference of contrast agents and improved tumor characterization. On the other hand, three-dimensional CE-EUS images added new information to the literature, but lacked positional information. Three-dimensional CE-EUS with accurate positional information is awaited. To date, most reports have been related to pancreatic lesions or lymph nodes. Hemodynamic analysis might be of use for diseases in other organs: upper GI cancer diagnosis, submucosal tumors, and biliary disorders, and it might also provide functional information. Studies of CE-EUS in diseases in many other organs will increase in the near future.

  16. The Lusi eruption site: insights from surface and subsurface investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Indonesian Lusi eruption has been spewing boiling water, gas, and sediments since the 29th of May 2006. Initially, numerous aligned eruptions sites appeared along the Watukosek fault system (WFS) that was reactivated after the Yogyakarta earthquake occurring the 27th of May in the Java Island. Within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. To date Lusi is still active and an area of 7 km2is covered by mud. Since its birth Lusi erupted with a pulsating behaviour. In the framework of the ERC grant "Lusi Lab" we conducted several years of monitoring and regional investigations coupling surface sampling and subsurface imaging in the region around Lusi. Ambient noise tomography studies, obtained with a local network of 31 stations, revealed for the first time subsurface images of the Lusi region and the adjacent Arjuno-Welirang (AW) volcanic complex. Results show that below the AW volcanic complex are present 5km deep magma chambers that are connected, through a defined corridor, with the roots of the Lusi eruption site. The Lusi subsurface shows the presence of a defined vertical hydrothermal plume that extends to at least 5km. Chemical analyses of the seeping fluids sampled from 1) the Lusi plume (using a specifically designed drone), 2) the region around Lusi, and 3) the fumaroles and the hydro thermal springs of AW, revealed striking similarities. More specifically a mantellic signature of the Lusi fluids confirms the scenario that Lusi represents a magmatic-driven hydrothermal system hosted in sedimentary basin. Seismic profiles interpretation, surface mapping, and fluid sampling show that the WFS, connecting AW and extending towards the NE of Java, acted as a preferential pathway for the igneous intrusion and fluids migration towards the subsurface. Petrography and dating of the clasts erupted at Lusi record high temperatures and indicate that the roots of the active conduit extend to at least 5km

  17. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  18. Ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography using a VCSEL light source and micromotor catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ahsen, Osman O.; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Liang, Kaicheng; Giacomelli, Michael G.; Potsaid, Benjamin M.; Tao, Yuankai K.; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Kraus, Martin F.; Hornegger, Joachim; Figueiredo, Marisa; Huang, Qin; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Cable, Alex E.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2014-03-01

    We developed an ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for clinical gastroenterology using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and micromotor based imaging catheter, which provided an imaging speed of 600 kHz axial scan rate and 8 μm axial resolution in tissue. The micromotor catheter was 3.2 mm in diameter and could be introduced through the 3.7 mm accessory port of an endoscope. Imaging was performed at 400 frames per second with an 8 μm spot size using a pullback to generate volumetric data over 16 mm with a pixel spacing of 5 μm in the longitudinal direction. Three-dimensional OCT (3D-OCT) imaging was performed in patients with a cross section of pathologies undergoing standard upper and lower endoscopy at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System (VABHS). Patients with Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia, and inflammatory bowel disease were imaged. The use of distally actuated imaging catheters allowed OCT imaging with more flexibility such as volumetric imaging in the terminal ileum and the assessment of the hiatal hernia using retroflex imaging. The high rotational stability of the micromotor enabled 3D volumetric imaging with micron scale volumetric accuracy for both en face and cross-sectional imaging. The ability to perform 3D OCT imaging in the GI tract with microscopic accuracy should enable a wide range of studies to investigate the ability of OCT to detect pathology as well as assess treatment response.

  19. Training in Endoscopy: Endoscopic Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Min Cho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS has been recently established as an indispensable modality for the diagnosis and management of pancreatobiliary and gastrointestinal (GI disorders. EUS proficiency requires both cognitive and technical abilities, including an understanding of the appropriate indications, the performance of appropriate evaluations before and after the procedure, and the management of procedure-related complications. An increasing demand for skills to handle a growing range of interventional EUS procedures and a continual shortage of EUS training programs are two major obstacles for EUS training. Acquiring the skills necessary to comprehend and conduct EUS often requires training beyond the scope of a standard GI fellowship program. In addition to traditional formal EUS training and preceptorships, regular short-term intensive EUS training programs that provide training at various levels may help EUS practitioners improve and maintain EUS-related knowledges and skills. Theoretical knowledge can be acquired from lectures, textbooks, atlases, slides, videotapes, digital video discs, interactive compact discs, and websites. Informal EUS training is generally based on 1- or 2-day intensive seminars, including didactic lectures, skills demonstrated by expert practitioners through live video-streaming of procedures, and hands-on learning using animal or phantom models.

  20. Endoscopic treatment of prepatellar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chih; Yeh, Wen-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Operative treatment of prepatellar bursitis is indicated in intractable bursitis. The most common complication of surgical treatment for prepatellar bursitis is skin problems. For traumatic prepatellar bursitis, we propose a protocol of outpatient endoscopic surgery under local anaesthesia. From September 1996 to February 2001, 60 cases of failed nonoperative treatment for prepatellar bursitis were included. The average age was 33.5 ± 11.1 years (range 21-55). The average operation duration was 18 minutes. Two to three mini-arthroscopic portals were used in our series. No sutures or a simple suture was needed for the portals after operation. After follow-up for an average of 36.3 months, all patients are were symptom-free and had regained knee function. None of the population had local tenderness or hypo-aesthesia around their wound. Their radiographic and sonographic examinations showed no recurrence of bursitis. Outpatient arthroscopic bursectomy under local anaesthesia is an effective procedure for the treatment of post-traumatic prepatellar bursitis after failed conservative treatments. Both the cosmetic results and functional results were satisfactory.

  1. Intelligent SUBsurface Quality : Intelligent use of subsurface infrastructure for surface quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooimeijer, F.L.; Kuzniecow Bacchin, T.; Lafleur, F.; van de Ven, F.H.M.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.; Broere, W.; Laumann, S.J.; Klaassen, R.G.; Marinetti, C.

    2016-01-01

    This project focuses on the urban renewal of (delta) metropolises and concentrates on the question how to design resilient, durable (subsurface) infrastructure in urban renewal projects using parameters of the natural system – linking in an efficient way (a) water cycle, (b) soil and subsurface

  2. Extended Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Suprasellar Craniopharyngioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, D; Pozzi, F; Agresta, G; Padovan, S; Karligkiotis, A; Castelnuovo, P

    2018-02-01

    Objectives  We illustrate a suprasellar craniopharyngiomas treated with an extended endoscopic endonasal approach (EEEA). Design  Case report of a 43-year-old male affected by cerebral lesion located in suprasellar region involving the third ventricle and compressing the neurovascular structures, causing an anterosuperior dislocation of the chiasma. There is a complete disruption of the pituitary stalk that can explain the clinical finding of partial anterior hypopituitarism and hyperprolactinemia. The lesion is characterized by a solid and cystic component. Considering the absence of lateral extension and the suprasellar location of the lesion, an EEEA is preferred. Setting  University Hospital "Ospedale di Circolo," Department of Neurosurgery, Varese, Italy. Participants  Neurosurgical and ENT Skull Base Team. Main Outcome Measures  A bilateral parasagittal approach is performed using a four-hand technique. The first step of the surgery is the preparation of the Hadad's flap. The approach is extended to the planum sphenoidalis to expose the suprasellar region. The lesion is completely removed employing also an ultrasound aspirator. Skull base reconstruction is performed with three-layer technique: graft of fat tissue, fascia lata, and nasoseptal flap. Results  No postoperative complications occurred. In the post-op, the patient presents a panhypopituitarism and an improvement in neurological status. The visual deficit remains stable. Post-op magnetic resonance imaging at 1 year documents the complete absence of pathological contrast enhancement. Conclusions  EEEA is a feasible approach in treating craniopharyngioma with suprasellar extension. The advantages include optimal visualization, good resection rate, and absence of brain retraction. The link to the video can be found at: https://youtu.be/IYm-8P1jbBo .

  3. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy and Foraminoplasty after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Zheng, Changkun

    2017-07-01

    The most common causes of pain following lumbar spinal fusions are residual herniation, or foraminal fibrosis and foraminal stenosis that is ignored, untreated, or undertreated. The original surgeon may advise his patient that nothing more can be done in his opinion that the nerve was visually decompressed by the original surgery. Post-operative imaging or electrophysiological assessment may be inadequate to explain all the reasons for residual or recurrent symptoms. Treatment of failed lumbar spinal fusions by repeat traditional open revision surgery usually incorporates more extensive decompression causing increased instability and back pain. The authors, having limited their practice to endoscopic surgery over the last 10 years, report on their experience gained during that period to relieve pain by transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions. To assess the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty in patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusion. Retrospective study. Inpatient surgery center. Sixteen consecutive patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusions presenting with back and leg pain that had supporting imaging diagnosis of foraminal stenosis and/or residual/recurrent disc herniation, or whose pain complaint was supported by relief from diagnostic and therapeutic injections, were offered percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty over a repeat open procedure. Each patient sought consultation following a transient successful, partially successful or unsuccessful open lumbar spinal fusions treatment for disc herniation or spinal stenosis. Endoscopic foraminoplasty was also performed to either decompress the bony foramen in the case of foraminal stenosis, or to allow for endoscopic visual examination of the affected traversing and exiting nerve roots in the axilla. The average follow-up time was 30.3 months, minimum 12 months. Outcome data at each visit

  4. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I andC) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I andC and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I andC systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures

  5. SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Fernado

    1998-09-17

    The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that

  6. Defining the Limits of Endoscopic Access to Internal Auditory Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Master, Adam; Hamiter, Mickie; Cosetti, Maura

    2016-12-01

    To quantify surgical access to the internal auditory canal (IAC) using an exclusively endoscopic transcanal approach (EETA) and investigate surgically relevant relationships with neurovascular and osseous landmarks of the temporal bone. Anatomical dissection of two paired temporal bones and 15 unpaired temporal bones was performed using an exclusively endoscopic approach to IAC. The dissection proceeded until the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) could be accessed. Following dissection, all the specimens were subjected to computed tomography (CT) imaging. Anatomage InVivo5 software was used to analyze the CT scans and record measurements. CPA access and visualization of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve were achieved in all specimens. The mean distances from the carotid artery, jugular bulb, and middle fossa to the surgical opening (or fundostomy) of IAC were 4.1±1.5, 6.4±2.5, and 5.5±1.9 mm, respectively. The mean cross-sectional areas of the fundostomy and tympanic ring were 30.8±10.4 and 67.7±11.3 mm2. The mean distances from the osteo-cartilaginous junction and tympanic ring to the porus acusticus were 29±2.6 and 21±2.3 mm, respectively. Transcanal access to the entire IAC can be safely achieved using an exclusively endoscopic approach. Generous removal of the cochlear promontory can be accomplished while a safe distance is maintained from key neurovascular structures. EETA to IAC offers a minimally invasive alternative to patients without serviceable hearing for intrameatal and medial IAC tumors. Increased knowledge of crucial anatomical relationships involved in this approach will facilitate acceptance and utilization.

  7. Subsurface barrier verification technologies, informal report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    One of the more promising remediation options available to the DOE waste management community is subsurface barriers. Some of the uses of subsurface barriers include surrounding and/or containing buried waste, as secondary confinement of underground storage tanks, to direct or contain subsurface contaminant plumes and to restrict remediation methods, such as vacuum extraction, to a limited area. To be most effective the barriers should be continuous and depending on use, have few or no breaches. A breach may be formed through numerous pathways including: discontinuous grout application, from joints between panels and from cracking due to grout curing or wet-dry cycling. The ability to verify barrier integrity is valuable to the DOE, EPA, and commercial sector and will be required to gain full public acceptance of subsurface barriers as either primary or secondary confinement at waste sites. It is recognized that no suitable method exists for the verification of an emplaced barrier's integrity. The large size and deep placement of subsurface barriers makes detection of leaks challenging. This becomes magnified if the permissible leakage from the site is low. Detection of small cracks (fractions of an inch) at depths of 100 feet or more has not been possible using existing surface geophysical techniques. Compounding the problem of locating flaws in a barrier is the fact that no placement technology can guarantee the completeness or integrity of the emplaced barrier. This report summarizes several commonly used or promising technologies that have been or may be applied to in-situ barrier continuity verification

  8. Subsurface Science Program Bibliography, 1985--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The Subsurface Science Program sponsors long-term basic research on (1) the fundamental physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms that control the reactivity, mobilization, stability, and transport of chemical mixtures in subsoils and ground water; (2) hydrogeology, including the hydraulic, microbiological, and geochemical properties of the vadose and saturated zones that control contaminant mobility and stability, including predictive modeling of coupled hydraulic-geochemical-microbial processes; and (3) the microbiology of deep sediments and ground water. TWs research, focused as it is on the natural subsurface environments that are most significantly affected by the more than 40 years of waste generation and disposal at DOE sites, is making important contributions to cleanup of DOE sites. Past DOE waste-disposal practices have resulted in subsurface contamination at DOE sites by unique combinations of radioactive materials and organic and inorganic chemicals (including heavy metals), which make site cleanup particularly difficult. The long- term (10- to 30-year) goal of the Subsurface Science Program is to provide a foundation of fundamental knowledge that can be used to reduce environmental risks and to provide a sound scientific basis for cost-effective cleanup strategies. The Subsurface Science Program is organized into nine interdisciplinary subprograms, or areas of basic research emphasis. The subprograms currently cover the areas of Co-Contaminant Chemistry, Colloids/Biocolloids, Multiphase Fluid Flow, Biodegradation/ Microbial Physiology, Deep Microbiology, Coupled Processes, Field-Scale (Natural Heterogeneity and Scale), and Environmental Science Research Center

  9. Subsurface Shielding Source Term Specification Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.Su

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to establish appropriate and defensible waste-package radiation source terms for use in repository subsurface shielding design. This calculation supports the shielding design for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The objective is to identify the limiting waste package and specify its associated source terms including source strengths and energy spectra. Consistent with the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M and O 2001, p. 15), the scope of work includes the following: (1) Review source terms generated by the Waste Package Department (WPD) for various waste forms and waste package types, and compile them for shielding-specific applications. (2) Determine acceptable waste package specific source terms for use in subsurface shielding design, using a reasonable and defensible methodology that is not unduly conservative. This calculation is associated with the engineering and design activity for the waste emplacement and retrieval system, and subsurface facility system. The technical work plan for this calculation is provided in CRWMS M and O 2001. Development and performance of this calculation conforms to the procedure, AP-3.12Q, Calculations

  10. MEMS-based non-rotatory circumferential scanning optical probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingshun; Singh, Janak; Siang, Teo Hui; Ramakrishna, Kotlanka; Premchandran, C. S.; Sheng, Chen Wei; Kuan, Chuah Tong; Chen, Nanguang; Olivo, Malini C.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present a non-rotatory circumferential scanning optical probe integrated with a MEMS scanner for in vivo endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is an emerging optical imaging technique that allows high resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure. To extend its usage to endoscopic applications, a miniaturized optical probe based on Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques is currently desired. A 3D electrothermally actuated micromirror realized using micromachining single crystal silicon (SCS) process highlights its very large angular deflection, about 45 degree, with low driving voltage for safety consideration. The micromirror is integrated with a GRIN lens into a waterproof package which is compatible with requirements for minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. To implement circumferential scanning substantially for diagnosis on certain pathological conditions, such as Barret's esophagus, the micromirror is mounted on 90 degree to optical axis of GRIN lens. 4 Bimorph actuators that are connected to the mirror on one end via supporting beams and springs are selected in this micromirror design. When actuators of the micromirror are driven by 4 channels of sinusoidal waveforms with 90 degree phase differences, beam focused by a GRIN is redirected out of the endoscope by 45 degree tilting mirror plate and achieve circumferential scanning pattern. This novel driving method making full use of very large angular deflection capability of our micromirror is totally different from previously developed or developing micromotor-like rotatory MEMS device for circumferential scanning.

  11. Combined transnasal and transoral endoscopic approach to a transsphenoidal encephalocele in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sien Hui; Mun, Kein Seong; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Manuel, Anura Michelle; Prepageran, Narayanan; Waran, Vicknes; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports an unusual case of a transsphenoidal encephalocele and discusses our experience with a minimally invasive management. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of a combined endoscopic transnasal and transoral approach to a transsphenoidal encephalocele in an infant. A 17-day-old boy, who was referred for further assessment of upper airway obstruction, presented with respiratory distress and feeding difficulties. Bronchoscopy and imaging revealed a transsphenoidal encephalocele. At the age of 48 days, he underwent a combined endoscopic transnasal and transoral excision of the nasal component of the encephalocele. This approach, with the aid of neuronavigation, allows good demarcation of the extra-cranial neck of the transsphenoidal encephalocele. We were able to cauterize and carefully dissect the sac prior to excision. The defect of the neck was clearly visualized, and Valsalva manoeuvre was performed to exclude any CSF leak. As the defect was small, it was allowed to heal by secondary intention. The patient's recovery was uneventful, and he tolerated full feeds orally on day 2. Postoperative imaging demonstrated no evidence of recurrence of the nasal encephalocele. Endoscopic follow-up showed good healing of the mucosa and no cerebrospinal fluid leak. The surgical management of transsphenoidal encephalocele in neonates and infants is challenging. We describe a safe technique with low morbidity in managing such a condition. The combined endoscopic transnasal and transoral approach with neuronavigation is a minimally invasive, safe and feasible alternative, even for children below 1 year of age.

  12. Endoscopic biopsy of foramen of Monro and third ventricle lesions guided by frameless neuronavigation: usefulness and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Ricardo; Galeano, Inmaculada

    2009-09-01

    To describe our institution experience regarding the usefulness and limitations of frameless neuronavigation in the endoscopic biopsy of foramen of Monro and third ventricle lesions. We report our experience with 22 patients harbouring intraventricular lesions located in the region of the foramen of Monro or the third ventricle who underwent endoscopic biopsy guided by the neuronavigation system. Nine lesions were located on the posterior aspect of the third ventricle or at the pineal region, and thirteen lesions were located at the foramen of Monro or anterior third ventricle region. The endoscopes were introduced via an operating sheath, which had previously been inserted with a trocar under neuronavigational control. After approaching the foramen of Monro from the planned angle, surgery was continued under direct visualisation until the lesion was reached, if it was located on the third ventricle. In cases where the lesion was located at the foramen of Monro, an excellent view of the lesion was obtained and neuronavigation was used to determine the location of critical areas. Histological examination of biopsy specimens obtained endoscopically was diagnostic in all cases. Open surgery following endoscopic biopsy was only needed in 1 patient out of 22. In our experience, image-guided neuroendoscopy can improve the accuracy of the endoscopic approach, minimising brain trauma. It can be particularly helpful when performing a brain biopsy in the absence of clear intraventricular landmarks or in the event of adverse visual conditions such as intraventricular bleeding.

  13. Nasal encephalocele: endoscopic excision with anesthetic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; El-Bosraty, Hussam; Qotb, Mohamed; El-Hamamsy, Mostafa; El-Sonbaty, Mohamed; Abdel-Badie, Hazem; Zynabdeen, Mustapha

    2010-08-01

    Nasal encephalocele may presents as a nasal mass, its treatment is surgical and it should be done early in life. When removal is indicated, there are multiple surgical approaches; including lateral rhinotomy, a transnasal approach and a coronal flap approach. However, the treatment of a basal intranasal encephalocele using transnasal endoscopic approach could obviates the possible morbidity associated with other approaches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic removal of intranasal encephalocele, also to document the role of anesthetist in the operative and postoperative periods. Nine cases with nasal encephalocele were included in this study; CT and/or MRI were used in their examination. The lesions were removed via transnasal endoscopic approach. Preoperative evaluation, intervention and postoperative follow-up were presented with discussion of anesthesia used for those children. The lesions of all patients were removed successfully with no recurrence through the follow-up period of at least 21 months. No cases showed morbidity or mortality intra- or post-operatively. Endoscopic excision of intranasal encephalocele is an effective method with high success rate. Anesthetist plays an important role in the operative and postoperative period, even during the endoscopic follow up; sedation of the children is usually needed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David I; Immanuel, Arul

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is extremely common in Western countries. For selected patients, there is an established role for the surgical treatment of reflux, and possibly an emerging role for endoscopic antireflux procedures. Randomized trials have compared medical versus surgical management, laparoscopic versus open surgery and partial versus total fundoplications. However, the evidence base for endoscopic procedures is limited to some small sham-controlled studies, and cohort studies with short-term follow-up. Laparoscopic fundoplication has been shown to be an effective antireflux operation. It facilitates quicker convalescence and is associated with fewer complications, but has a similar longer term outcome compared with open antireflux surgery. In most randomized trials, antireflux surgery achieves at least as good control of reflux as medical therapy, and these studies support a wider application of surgery for the treatment of moderate-to-severe reflux. Laparoscopic partial fundoplication is an effective surgical procedure with fewer side effects, and it may achieve high rates of patient satisfaction at late follow-up. Many of the early endoscopic antireflux procedures have failed to achieve effective reflux control, and they have been withdrawn from the market. Newer procedures have the potential to fashion a surgical fundoplication. However, at present there is insufficient evidence to establish the safety and efficacy of endoscopic procedures for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, and no endoscopic procedure has achieved equivalent reflux control to that achieved by surgical fundoplication.

  15. [Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sik; Kim, Chul Young; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2008-03-01

    Recently, the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy is developing rapidly. Once limited to the gastroinstestinal lumen, the endoscopic technology is now breaking the barriers and extending its boundary to peritoneal and pleural space. In 2004, Dr. Kalloo, a gastroenterologist, observed intraperitoneal organs of a pig using a conventional endoscope through the stomach wall. Since then, new endoscopic technique of intraperitoneal intervention with transluminal approach named the Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery or NOTES has been introduced. NOTES reaches the target organ by inserting the endoscope through a natural orifice (e.g. mouth, anus, vagina, urethra) and entering the peritoneal lumen by means of making an incision on the luminal wall. After a series of successful experiences in animal studies, NOTES are now being tried on human subjects. There are still many obstacles to overcome, but bright future for this new technology is expected because of its proposed advantages of less pain, lower complication rate, short recovery time, and scarless access. In this review, we plan to learn about NOTES.

  16. Limits of the endoscopic transnasal transtubercular approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellner, Verena; Tomazic, Peter V

    2018-06-01

    The endoscopic transnasal trans-sphenoidal transtubercular approach has become a standard alternative approach to neurosurgical transcranial routes for lesions of the anterior skull base in particular pathologies of the anterior tubercle, sphenoid plane, and midline lesions up to the interpeduncular cistern. For both the endoscopic and the transcranial approach indications must strictly be evaluated and tailored to the patients' morphology and condition. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the evidence in literature of the limitations of the endoscopic transtubercular approach. A PubMed/Medline search was conducted in January 2018 entering following keywords. Upon initial screening 7 papers were included in this review. There are several other papers describing the endoscopic transtubercular approach (ETTA). We tried to list the limitation factors according to the actual existing literature as cited. The main limiting factors are laterally extending lesions in relation to the optic canal and vascular encasement and/or unfavorable tumor tissue consistency. The ETTA is considered as a high level transnasal endoscopic extended skull base approach and requires excellent training, skills and experience.

  17. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery: a New Zealand experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Ian; Van Dalen, Roelof; Lolohea, Simione; Wu, Linus

    2017-12-03

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is a proven alternative therapy to either radical surgery or endoscopic mucosal resection for rectal neoplasms. It has proven benefits with lower morbidity and mortality compared with total mesorectal excision, and a lower local recurrence rate when compared to endoscopic mucosal techniques. A retrospective data collection of TEMS procedures performed through Waikato District Health Board, New Zealand, from 2010 to 2015 was conducted. Supportive follow-up data were sourced from patient records and from local centres around New Zealand. A total of 137 procedures were performed over the study period, with five being repeat procedures. Procedures were mostly performed for benign lesions (66.4%) with an overall complication rate of 15.3%, only five of which were Clavien-Dindo grade III (3.6%). Our local recurrence rate after resection of benign lesions was 5.1%. Our data set demonstrates the TEMS procedure to be safe compared to radical resection (total mesorectal excision) for sessile rectal lesions. Close endoscopic follow-up is recommended, especially for close or incomplete margins. Good therapeutic results can be obtained for appropriately selected early malignant lesions. TEMS provides better oncological results than endoscopic mucosal resection or transanal excision. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. The role of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Bhutani, Manoop S

    2016-01-01

    contrast agents for early detection, tridimensional and fusion techniques for enhanced staging and resectability assessment but also novel applications of perfusion imaging for monitoring ablative therapy, improved local detection through EUS-guided sampling of portal vein flow or enhanced drug delivery......Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) allows characterization, differentiation, and staging of focal pancreatic masses. The method has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma which is visualized as hypo-enhanced as compared to the rest...... of the parenchyma while chronic pancreatitis and neuroendocrine tumors are generally either iso-enhanced or hyper-enhanced. The development of contrast-enhanced low mechanical index harmonic imaging techniques used in real time during endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allowed perfusion imaging and the quantification...

  19. 21 CFR 876.4300 - Endoscopic electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Endoscopic electrosurgical unit and accessories. (a) Identification. An endoscopic electrosurgical unit and... device includes the electrosurgical generator, patient plate, electric biopsy forceps, electrode, flexible snare, electrosurgical alarm system, electrosurgical power supply unit, electrical clamp, self...

  20. Endoscopic Radial Artery Harvest for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ming Chiu

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Endoscopic harvest of the radial artery is technically demanding, but excellent results can be achieved. The endoscopic approach can provide suitable conduits in a less invasive way than the open harvest technique.

  1. Sequelae of Endoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair : Incidence, evaluation and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgmans, J.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic preperitoneal technique (TEP) is an appealing inguinal hernia repair technique, theoretically superior to other approaches. In practice some problems remain unsolved. Real incidences of chronic postoperative inguinal pain (CPIP) and other important sequelae of endoscopic hernia repair

  2. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    Full Text Available To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery.In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems.The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons.The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon's skills and knowledge, not as a substitute.

  3. A Novel Augmented Reality Navigation System for Endoscopic Sinus and Skull Base Surgery: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Wu, Wenbo; Xue, Jin; Liang, Ping; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To verify the reliability and clinical feasibility of a self-developed navigation system based on an augmented reality technique for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery. Materials and Methods In this study we performed a head phantom and cadaver experiment to determine the display effect and accuracy of our navigational system. We compared cadaver head-based simulated operations, the target registration error, operation time, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index scores of our navigation system to conventional navigation systems. Results The navigation system developed in this study has a novel display mode capable of fusing endoscopic images to three-dimensional (3-D) virtual images. In the cadaver head experiment, the target registration error was 1.28 ± 0.45 mm, which met the accepted standards of a navigation system used for nasal endoscopic surgery. Compared with conventional navigation systems, the new system was more effective in terms of operation time and the mental workload of surgeons, which is especially important for less experienced surgeons. Conclusion The self-developed augmented reality navigation system for endoscopic sinus and skull base surgery appears to have advantages that outweigh those of conventional navigation systems. We conclude that this navigational system will provide rhinologists with more intuitive and more detailed imaging information, thus reducing the judgment time and mental workload of surgeons when performing complex sinus and skull base surgeries. Ultimately, this new navigational system has potential to increase the quality of surgeries. In addition, the augmented reality navigational system could be of interest to junior doctors being trained in endoscopic techniques because it could speed up their learning. However, it should be noted that the navigation system serves as an adjunct to a surgeon’s skills and knowledge, not as a substitute. PMID:26757365

  4. Spatial resolution and the geologic interpretation of Martian morphology - implications for subsurface volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimbelman, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images of the Acheron Fossae on Mars are presented and analyzed, with an emphasis on the impact of image resolution on the interpretation. High-resolution (less than 10 m/pixel) images reveal small mounds which can be interpreted as aeolian dunes, but these features are not evident on images with resolution of 50 m/pixel or greater. Also reported are the results of a visual inspection of 527 usable high-resolution images: it is found that all of the morphological features identified can arise in the absence of subsurface volatiles. 21 references

  5. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In support of its vision for technological excellence, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) has identified three strategic goals. The three goals of the SCFA are: Contain and/or stabilize contamination sources that pose an imminent threat to surface and ground waters; Delineate DNAPL contamination in the subsurface and remediate DNAPL-contaminated soils and ground water; and Remove a full range of metal and radionuclide contamination in soils and ground water. To meet the challenges of remediating subsurface contaminants in soils and ground water, SCFA funded more than 40 technologies in fiscal year 1997. These technologies are grouped according to the following product lines: Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids; Metals and Radionuclides; Source Term Containment; and Source Term Remediation. This report briefly describes the SCFA 1997 technologies and showcases a few key technologies in each product line

  6. Complete Subsurface Elemental Composition Measurements With PING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will measure the complete bulk elemental composition of the subsurface of Mars as well as any other solid planetary body. PING can thus be a highly effective tool for both detailed local geochemistry science investigations and precision measurements of Mars subsurface reSOurces in preparation for future human exploration. As such, PING is thus fully capable of meeting a majority of both ncar and far term elements in Challenge #1 presented for this conference. Measuring the ncar subsurface composition of Mars will enable many of the MEPAG science goals and will be key to filling an important Strategic Knowledge Gap with regard to In situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) needs for human exploration. [1, 2] PING will thus fill an important niche in the Mars Exploration Program.

  7. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jye Hae Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG can improve nutritional status and reduce the amount of time needed to feed neurologically impaired children. We evaluated the characteristics, complications, and outcomes of neurologically impaired children treated with PEG. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 32 neurologically impaired children who underwent PEG between March 2002 and August 2008 at our medical center. Forty-two PEG procedures comprising 32 PEG insertions and 10 PEG exchanges, were performed. The mean follow-up time was 12.2 (6.6 months. Results: Mean patient age was 9.4 (4.5 years. The main indications for PEG insertion were swallowing difficulty with GI bleeding due to nasogastric tube placement and/or the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The overall rate of complications was 47%, with early complications evident in 25% of patients and late complications in 22%. The late complications included one gastro-colic fistula, two cases of aggravated GERD, and four instances of wound infection. Among the 15 patients with histological evidence of GERD before PEG, 13 (87% had less severe GERD, experienced no new aspiration events, and showed increased body weight after PEG treatment. Conclusion: PEG is a safe, effective, and relatively simple technique affording long-term enteral nutritional support in neurologically impaired children. Following PEG treatment, the body weight of most patients increased and the levels of vomiting, GI bleeding, and aspiration fell. We suggest that PEG with post-procedural observation be considered for enteral nutritional support of neurologically impaired children.

  8. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected