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  1. Laparoscopic-assisted percutaneous endoscopic transgastrostomy jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimofte, Mihail-Gabriel; Porumb, Vlad; Nicolescu, Simona; Ristescu, Irina; Lunca, Sorinel

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic protocols for patients with end-stage Parkinson disease include a carbidopa/levodopa combination using continuous, modulated enteral administration via a portable pump. The typical approach involves a percutaneous endoscopic transgastrostomy jejunostomy (PEG-J), which requires a combination of procedures designed to ensure that no organ is interposed between the abdominal wall and the gastric surface. Lack of transillumination in maximal endoscopic light settings is a major contraindication for PEG-J, and we decided to use a different approach to establish enteric access for long-term medication delivery via pump, using a minimally invasive procedure. In all patients, we performed a laparoscopic-assisted percutaneous transgastrostomy jejunostomy (LAPEG-J) after an unsuccessful endoscopic transillumination. Five patients with end-stage Parkinson disease were referred to our department after successful therapeutic testing with administration of levodopa/carbidopa via naso-jejunal tube. All patients failed the endoscopic transillumination during the endoscopic procedure and were considered for LAPEG-J. In all patients, the LAPEG-J procedure was uneventful. The most common reason identified for failed transillumination was a high position of the stomach, followed by interposition of the liver or colon between the stomach and anterior abdominal wall. There were no complications regarding the LAPEG-J procedure, and all patients were discharged during the second postprocedural day. LAPEG-J provides a simple and safe option for placing a jejunostomy after an unsuccessful PEG-J attempt.

  2. Laparoscopic-assisted percutaneous endoscopic transgastrostomy jejunostomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dimofte, Mihail-Gabriel; Porumb, Vlad; Nicolescu, Simona; Ristescu, Irina; Lunca, Sorinel

    2014-01-01

    .... The typical approach involves a percutaneous endoscopic transgastrostomy jejunostomy (PEG-J), which requires a combination of procedures designed to ensure that no organ is interposed between the abdominal wall and the gastric surface...

  3. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy performed with gastroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay P Choksi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is a well-known approach for achieving enteral feeding, direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ is a technique that allows endoscopic placement of percutaneous/transabdominal feeding tube directly into the jejunum. It offers a non-surgical alternative for postpyloric enteral feeding for long-term nutritional support when gastric feeding is not technically possible or is inappriopriate. Conventionally DPEJ is done with pediatric colonoscope or small bowel enteroscope. Here, we report a case where DPEJ was accomplished with gastroscope.

  4. Current considerations of direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy.

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    Zhu, Yanfei; Shi, Liping; Tang, Hao; Tao, Guoqing

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUOND: Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is a well-known approach to deliver postpyloric enteral nutritional support to individuals who cannot tolerate gastric feeding. However, it is technically difficult, and some case series have reported significant procedural failure rates. The present article describes current indications, successes and complications of DPEJ placement. A MEDLINE database search was performed to identify relevant articles using the key words "direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy", "percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy", and "percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with a jejunal extension tube". Additional articles were identified by a manual search of the references cited in the key articles obtained in the primary search. DPEJ is gradually becoming more common in the treatment of patients who cannot tolerate gastric feeding. Differences in patient selection and technique modifications may contribute to the various success rates reported. Failure is most often due to inadequate transillumination or gastroduodenal obstruction. Currently, there are limited data to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of DPEJ. The clinical use of DPEJ is increasing. With appropriate care and expertise, DPEJ may prove to be reliable and safe.

  5. Current Considerations in Direct Percutaneous Endoscopic Jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients who are unable to meet their nutritional needs orally, enteral feeding via a percutaneous approach has become the mainstay of therapy. However, traditional enteral feeding methods, such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, may not be viable options for patients with severe gastroparesis or gastric outlet obstruction. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ is an enteral access method that was first described more than 20 years ago and has gained popularity among gastroenterologists. This review discusses the indications for and contraindications to DPEJ, the procedure, the application of DPEJ in specific subsets of patients with gastrointestinal disorders, and presents a brief tabular summary of complications and success rates of DPEJ in case series published since 2000.

  6. Current considerations in direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanfei; Shi, Liping; Tang, Hao; Tao, Guoqing

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is a well-known approach to deliver postpyloric enteral nutritional support to individuals who cannot tolerate gastric feeding. However, it is technically difficult, and some case series have reported significant procedural failure rates. The present article describes current indications, successes and complications of DPEJ placement METHODS: A MEDLINE database search was performed to identify relevant articles using the key words “direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy”, “percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy”, and “percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy with a jejunal extension tube”. Additional articles were identified by a manual search of the references cited in the key articles obtained in the primary search. RESULTS: DPEJ is gradually becoming more common in the treatment of patients who cannot tolerate gastric feeding. Differences in patient selection and technique modifications may contribute to the various success rates reported. Failure is most often due to inadequate transillumination or gastroduodenal obstruction. Currently, there are limited data to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of DPEJ. CONCLUSION: The clinical use of DPEJ is increasing. With appropriate care and expertise, DPEJ may prove to be reliable and safe. PMID:22312608

  7. Endoscopic identification of the jejunum facilitates minimally invasive jejunostomy tube insertion in selected cases.

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    Selim, Niazy M

    2009-11-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy, and laparoscopic feeding tube insertion are established techniques for placing a feeding tube. However, these techniques may be difficult or contraindicated after previous gastric or upper abdominal surgery. A total of 10 patients underwent minimally invasive jejunostomy tube insertion via endoscopic identification of the jejunum. The indications for the procedure were dysphagia, poor nutritional status, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and gastroparesis. Eight of the patients had undergone previous upper abdominal surgeries and were rejected for either PEG or direct percutaneous jejunostomy. With the patients under general anesthesia, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed. The jejunum was identified and intubated. A small abdominal incision (1 in.) was made. The proximal jejunum was identified easily by the light and digital palpation of the endoscope. The jejunum was delivered in the wound, and the jejunostomy tube was inserted using Witzel's technique. The wound was closed. All the patients tolerated the procedure well. The mean time for the procedure was 29 +/- 13 min. There was no mortality related to the procedure and no complications. Jejunal feeding started on the first postoperative day. The use of intraoperative endoscopy facilitated identification of the jejunum. Easy, safe, and quick, the procedure saved the patient a formal laparotomy and extensive manipulation.

  8. The Role of Percutaneous Endoscopic Transgastric Jejunostomy in the Management of Enteral Tube Feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong

    2016-01-01

    Feeding-related adverse events after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) such as aspiration pneumonia can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes with gastric decompression function may improve outcomes by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of excessive gastric secretions. This report describes a case where PEG-J was successful in maintaining enteral tube feeding in a 72-yea...

  9. Endoscopic Evaluation of Esophago-Gastro-Jejunostomy in Rat Model of Barrett’s Esophagus

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    Lu, Shaoying; Lowe, Anson W; Triadafilopoulos, George; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Hao, Ying; Crawford, James M; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Background and aims Endoscopy can be used to monitor the onset of metaplastic transformation and to observe the progression of neoplasia in small animal models of Barrett’s esophagus. By avoiding animal sacrifice, the natural history of this disease can be studied in a longitudinal fashion. We aim to characterize the endoscopic features of esophageal mucosa at various stages of the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in a rat reflux model of Barrett’s for comparison with histology. Methods Acid and bile reflux was produced by introducing a side-to-side esophago-gastro-jejunostomy in Sprague-Dawley rats. Endoscopic examination of the distal esophagus was performed in 24 surgically-altered and 4 control rats, between weeks 24 to 36 after the operation in 4 week intervals, and all rats were biopsied and sacrificed at 36 weeks. Endoscopic images were classified based on the surface mucosal patterns of the distal esophagus and then compared to histology. The endoscopic appearance were classified as: 1) normal, characterized by a smooth surface; 2) intestinal metaplasia, defined as elevated plaques/ridges, deep grooves and thin linear folds; 3) dysplasia, indicated by coarse folds/grooves, mesh-like villi, and foveolar appearance, and 4) carcinoma, suggested by irregular shaped mass lesions with ulcerations. Results The endoscopic criteria for intestinal metaplasia yielded a sensitivity of 100% in comparison to histology. Intestinal metaplasia with high-grade dysplasia was found in 2 rats and with low-grade dysplasia in 3 rats. Both focally-invasive squamous cell carcinoma and invasive adenocarcinoma were found in 1 rat. Conclusions Small animal endoscopy in a rat model of Barrett’s esophagus can be used to perform surveillance, classify mucosal patterns, observe the onset of intestinal metaplasia, and monitor the progression of neoplastic transformation, representing a useful tool for studying the natural history of this disease. PMID:19473210

  10. Laparo-endoscopic Assisted Percutaneous Drainage Gastrostomy and Feeding Jejunostomy

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    Vishwanath Golash

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Acquired tracheo-esophageal Fistula (TEF is a rare but serious complication of prolonged endotracheal intubation. Patients of TEF are usually very critically ill and prone to repeated aspiration and pneumonia. The first stage of treatment involves the diversion of salivary and gastric contents away from the fistula site, improving the nutritional status and control of sepsis. A drainage gastrostomy and feeding jejunostomy is often required to divert the gastric contents away from the fistula and for nutrition.

  11. The Role of Percutaneous Endoscopic Transgastric Jejunostomy in the Management of Enteral Tube Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong

    2016-06-01

    Feeding-related adverse events after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) such as aspiration pneumonia can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes with gastric decompression function may improve outcomes by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of excessive gastric secretions. This report describes a case where PEG-J was successful in maintaining enteral tube feeding in a 72-year-old man when PEG feeding was not tolerated. Patients with unsuccessful PEG feeding can be offered the option of jejunal feeding before terminating enteral nutrition.

  12. Outcomes of double-balloon enteroscopy-assisted direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bawardy, Badr; Gorospe, Emmanuel C; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Bruining, David H; Coelho-Prabhu, Nayantara; Rajan, Elizabeth; Wong Kee Song, Louis M

    2016-06-01

    In a large series, conventional direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) tube placement with push endoscopes failed in approximately one-third of patients. In a pilot study, double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE)-assisted DPEJ tube placement was successful in all patients in whom attempted conventional DPEJ had failed. The study aim was to assess the technical success of and adverse events related to DBE-DPEJ tube placement in a large cohort of patients. The medical records of all patients who underwent DBE-DPEJ tube placement between July 2010 and November 2013 were reviewed using a prospectively maintained electronic database. Data were abstracted for patient demographics, indications for DPEJ, gut anatomy, technical success rate, causes of failure, and adverse events. The study comprised a total of 94 patients (39 men; mean age 56 years; body mass index [BMI] 23 ± 6.4 kg/m(2)). The most common indication for DPEJ was gastroparesis (n = 29). Altered gut anatomy was present in 36 patients (38 %). DBE-DPEJ tube placement was technically successful in 87 patients (93 %). The mean procedure duration was 33 minutes (range 15 - 88). DBE-DPEJ tube placement failed in seven patients (7 %), primarily because of limited instrument advancement in the setting of presumed surgical adhesions. Post-procedural adverse events occurred in eight patients (9 %), with one serious adverse event, which was a gastric interposition requiring surgical repair. Compared with the published outcomes of DPEJ by conventional endoscopy, DBE-DPEJ tube placement was technically successful in a high proportion of patients (93 %) and with a relatively low rate of significant adverse events. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Small intestinal intussusceptions due to the placement of a percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takayuki; Sawada, Kazue; Satoh, Miyuki; Yohko, Kikuchi; Yamada, Masataka; Zaitsu, Masaaki; Osada, Tadahiro; Sawaya, Reiji; Nata, Toshie; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Ikuta, Katsuya; Mizukami, Yusuke; Watari, Jiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ) has been developed and is considered to be a better method than percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for preventing the occurrence of aspiration pneumonia. However, the incidence of other complications associated with this procedure is less clear. We herein report a rare case with a small intestinal intussusception due to a PEJ placement. In this case, a radiologic examination with gastrografin was useful to detect the typical findings of a small intestinal intussusception, a beak-like filling defect, and identify the location of the lesion. An endoscopic examination that was carefully performed with a thin scope was effective to observe the ischaemic change of the small intestine and immediately determine the indication for surgical treatment. This case highlights the necessity to carefully manage patients with a PEJ placement, considering the risk of small intestinal intussusceptions when the patient complains of symptoms that are suspicious for an intestinal obstruction. PMID:22715249

  14. A new endoscopic therapeutic method for acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis post Roux-en-Y anastomosis: endoscopic retrograde cholangiography through jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo YANG

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available  Objective  To probe the value of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC through jejunostomy in patients in whom ERC could not be performed via the mouth after Roux-en-Y anastomosis on the upper gastrointestinal tract. Methods  In two patients suffering from acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis after a radical operation for cholangiocarcinoma, ERC could not be performed through the mouth due to the presence of a long non-functional jejunal loop. A jejunostomy was first done in the afferent loop of the jejunum, and a gastroscope was then inserted via the jejunostomy and passed retrogradely, to find the stoma of the cholangiointestinal anastomosis. ERC was then successfully performed, and followed by endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD. Results  The operation was successful. It was found that cholangio-jejunostomy stoma was narrow, and a large amount of purulent mucus was present in the enlarged intrahepatic duct. ERC was done to enlarge the stoma, and a stent was placed into the main branch of the intrahepatic duct. Two patients achieved surgical success and smooth recovery after the operation. Conclusion  ERC through a jejunostomy in the patients who had Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy following radical resection for cholangiocarcinoma, is a safe and effective surgical procedure.

  15. Assessment of the safety and efficacy of percutaneous laparoscopic endoscopic jejunostomy (PLEJ).

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    Belsha, Dalis; Thomson, Mike; Dass, Dipankar R; Lindley, Richard; Marven, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Gastric feeding may not be possible in the neurologically impaired child with foregut dysmotility. Post-duodenal feeding can be crucial, thereby avoiding the need for parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study is to evaluate the technical success, complication and clinical outcome of our institution's technique in creating a jejunostomy using the percutaneous laparoscopic-endoscopic jejunostomy (PLEJ) technique. Retrospective review of all paediatric patients (<18) with PLEJ between January 2008 and April 2015 was conducted. Patients were identified using the electronic procedure code and clinic letters. Data were collected in regard to the procedure technical success, short and long-term complications and clinical outcomes. Sixteen patients (age range, 2-17years) were identified. The procedure was successful in all cases. At a median follow up of 25months, eleven patients (68%) had significant improvement of their symptoms of feeding intolerance/aspirations and are permanently PLEJ fed and two (13%) were regraded to gastric feeds. Two patients moved from total parenteral nutrition to partial parenteral nutrition while on PLEJ feeds. All patients had experienced weight gain and either went up or maintained their weight centile. The only major complication was small bowel volvulus encountered in two patients with abnormal gastrointestinal anatomy requiring surgical intervention. In our small case series, PLEJ placement was safe as it provides valuable visualization of the bowel loops intraabdominally. It is a technically feasible and successful approach for children requiring long-term jejunal feeding especially those with foregut dysmotility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy in pediatric age with a pexies triangulation system: report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alberca-de-las-Parras

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ is an infrequent procedure as it is not always easy to obtain transillumination, being this the main reason for failure of this technique. In patients with previous surgery, this procedure is more complex and there are only 6 reported cases in pediatric population. In our case, we provide the use of an endoscopic triangulation system with "T" pexies not used before in these cases. With this technique, we guarantee not to replace the introduction system afterwards, obtaining the placement of a balloon fixation system initially. We also provide several improvements that helped us developing the procedure: Placement of the jejunostomy through a gastrostomy; use of water column to avoid penetration in hollow viscus; use of a guide wire, and a triangulation pexy system.

  17. Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy in pediatric age with a pexies triangulation system: report of a case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberca-de-Las-Parras, Fernando; Navalón-Rubio, María; Egea-Valenzuela, Juan; Álvarez-Higueras, Francisco-Javier; Antón-Ródenas, Gonzalo; Alajarín-Cervera, Miriam; Serrano-Giménez, Andrés; Gil-Ortega, David; Muñoz-Tornero, María; Ono-Ono, Akiko; Carballo-Álvarez, Luis Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is an infrequent procedure as it is not always easy to obtain transillumination, being this the main reason for failure of this technique. In patients with previous surgery, this procedure is more complex and there are only 6 reported cases in pediatric population. In our case, we provide the use of an endoscopic triangulation system with "T" pexies not used before in these cases. With this technique, we guarantee not to replace the introduction system afterwards, obtaining the placement of a balloon fixation system initially. We also provide several improvements that helped us developing the procedure: Placement of the jejunostomy through a gastrostomy; use of water column to avoid penetration in hollow viscus; use of a guide wire, and a triangulation pexy system.

  18. Effective treatment of a highly active antiretroviral regimen through jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florit-Sureda, Marta; Giner-Soriano, Maria; Antonio, Javier Mateu-de; Carmona-Yelo, Alexia

    2014-06-01

    A 49-year-old woman voluntarily not receiving HIV treatment was admitted to the emergency department showing sepsis and peritonism. She required several surgical procedures for intestinal perforations. Finally, a proximal-terminal jejunostomy and a distal mucous jejunostomy were performed. At this time, her HIV viral load was 531 388 copies/ml and CD4 count was 193 cells/μl. Then, HAART was restarted with lopinavir/ritonavir 400/100 mg plus lamivudine 150 mg/12 hours, and etravirine 400 mg/24 hours. Each drug was dissolved in 20 ml of water and administered through the distal jejunostomy. In 2 months, her HIV viral load decreased in 3·9 log and CD4 count increased in 70 cells/μl. On day 250, an intestinal tract reconstruction was performed and short after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was restarted orally. Lopinavir/ritonavir, etravirine, and lamivudine administered through a jejunostomy resulted effective in decreasing HIV viral load and increasing CD4 lymphocyte count in a HIV patient who could not receive treatment orally.

  19. New method of direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy tube placement using balloon-assisted enteroscopy with fluoroscopy.

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    Velázquez-Aviña, Jacobo; Beyer, Ryan; Díaz-Tobar, Claudia P; Peter, Shajan; Kyanam Kabir Baig, Kondal R; Wilcox, C Mel; Mönkemüller, Klaus

    2015-03-01

    Direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is a useful method to provide nutrition to patients with a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) problems. The present study describes a new method of DPEJ using balloon-assisted-enteroscopy. This observational, retrospective, single-arm case study conducted at a tertiary care hospital during a 15-month period included 25 patients (12 females, 13 males, mean age 54 years, age range 31-79 years) with necrotizing pancreatitis, n = 7; complex upper GI surgery, n = 6; complex fistula, n = 6; impossibility to place a gastrostomy tube, n = 5; and bowel obstruction, n = 1. The new DPEJ technique focused on three key components: (i) use of balloon-assisted overtube; (ii) use of fluoroscopy; (iii) leaving the overtube in place during the entire procedure (and also for DPEJ removal). Technical success was 96%. Mean time of the procedure was 30.5 min (range 24 to 45 min). Clinical success was 100% (24/24); all DPEJ could be used for their intended purpose. This new method of inserting a DPEJ using balloon enteroscopy and fluoroscopy was safe and successful. Future comparative studies are now warranted. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  20. Direct Percutaneous Endoscopic Jejunostomy (DPEJ) Tube Placement: A Single Institution Experience and Outcomes to 30 Days and Beyond.

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    Strong, Andrew T; Sharma, Gautam; Davis, Matthew; Mulcahy, Michael; Punchai, Suriya; O'Rourke, Colin P; Brethauer, Stacy A; Rodriguez, John; Ponsky, Jeffrey L; Kroh, Matthew D

    2017-03-01

    Patients with prior foregut surgery requiring long-term enteral access typically undergo operative jejunostomy tube placement; however, direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) is a viable alternative. All de novo DPEJ procedures performed by surgical and advanced endoscopists from May 2003 to June 2015 were retrospectively reviewed following approval by the Institutional Review Board. There were 59 cases identified. Our cohort had a mean age of 50.3 ± 16.9 years and 35 (59.3%) were female. All but two patients previously had foregut surgery including 19 patients (34.5%) with prior bariatric surgery. The composite of malnutrition and dehydration was the indication for DPEJ in 29 patients (49.1%) and was the initial enteral access placed in 47 patients (79.7%). Moderate sedation was used in 32 cases (54.2%), and 29 procedures (49.2%) were performed in the operating room. Within 30 days, there were six complications in five patients, giving a peri-procedural complication rate of 12.5%. Beyond 30 days, the most common complications were peri-tube leakage and dislodgement (each 16.9%). The median time to complication was 197 days. In patients with surgically altered foregut anatomy, DPEJ offers a less invasive alternative to operative jejunostomy tube placement. DPEJ can be placed in the endoscopy suite or operating room with an acceptable risk of perioperative complications.

  1. A survey of the reasons patients do not chose percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy (PEG/PEJ) as a route for long-term feeding.

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    Lin, Li-Chan; Li, Mei-Hui; Watson, Roger

    2011-03-01

    To investigate why patients do not choose percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy as a route for long-term feeding. Home enteral tube feeding is well recognised as a valuable therapeutic option for patients requiring nutritional support following discharge from hospital. The number of patients discharged from hospital and receiving home enteral tube feeding increases annually in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study. Participants (n = 607) were chosen from one free-standing home care agency and three hospital-based home care departments in Taipei. A review of the patients' records to gather demographic data, medical diagnosis, length of home care and length of intubation prior to the home visit was conducted. A face-to-face interview was conducted at the time of the home visit. The prevalence rate of home enteral tube feeding was 70.3% (n = 427). Of the 427 tube-fed subjects, 93.4% were fed with a nasogastric tube. The most common reasons for refusing to use percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy were 'too old to suffer from an operation', 'worried about wound infection or leakage after performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy' and 'to keep subjects' body integrity'. Stroke, no dementia, poor activities of daily living and poor cognitive status were significant predictors of being tube-fed, while higher education and better cognitive status were significant predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy use. The reasons patients refused to use percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy reflect the influence of cultural values and the level of patients' education, which home health care nurses need to discuss with patients in detail. Investigating patients' perspective on the meaning of 'body' in Taiwanese culture and the decision-making processes related to home enteral tube feeding is recommended for nurses to provide

  2. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J): a retrospective analysis on its utility in maintaining enteral nutrition after unsuccessful gastric feeding

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Ezekiel Wong Toh; Yoneda, Kaori; Nakamura, Shinya; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the method of choice for long-term enteral nutrition, feeding-related adverse events such as aspiration pneumonia and peristomal leakage can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes may help by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of gastric secretions. Methods 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) who received PEG-...

  3. Efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic gastro-jejunostomy (PEG-J) decompression therapy for patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, H; Fuyuki, A; Arimoto, J; Higurashi, T; Nonaka, T; Inoh, Y; Iida, H; Inamori, M; Kaneda, T; Nakajima, A

    2017-12-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is an intractable rare digestive disease manifesting persistent small bowel distension without any mechanical cause. Intestinal decompression is a key treatment, but conventional method including a trans-nasal small intestinal tube is invasive and painful. Therefore, a less invasive and tolerable new decompression method is urgently desired. We conducted a pilot study and assessed the efficacy and safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastro-jejunostomy (PEG-J) decompression therapy in CIPO patients. Seven definitive CIPO patients (2 males and 5 females) were enrolled. All patients received PEG-J decompression therapy. The number of days with any abdominal symptoms in a month (NODASIM), body mass index (BMI), serum albumin level (Alb), and small intestinal volume before and after PEG-J were compared in all patients. Percutaneous endoscopic gastro-jejunostomy was well tolerated and oral intake improved in all patients. NODASIM has significantly decreased (24.3 vs 9.3 days/months) and BMI/Alb have significantly increased (14.9 vs 17.2 kg/m2 and 2.6 vs 3.8 g/dL, respectively), whereas total volume of the small intestine has not significantly reduced (4.05 vs 2.59 L, P=.18). Reflux esophagitis and chemical dermatitis were observed in one case but was successfully treated conservatively. Percutaneous endoscopic gastro-jejunostomy decompression therapy can contribute greatly to improvement of abdominal symptoms and nutritional status in CIPO patients. Although sufficient attention should be paid to acid reflux symptoms, PEG-J has the potential to be a non-invasive novel decompression therapy for CIPO available at home. However, accumulation of more CIPO patients and long-term observation are needed (UMIN000017574). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Two cases of afferent loop syndrome caused by obstruction at the jejuno-jejunostomy site in the Roux-en-Y loop that were successfully treated by endoscopic balloon dilatation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Atsushi; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Imano, Motohiro; Yasuda, Takushi; Okuno, Kiyokata

    2014-11-01

    We report 2 rare cases of afferent loop syndrome caused by obstruction at the jejuno-jejunostomy site in the Roux-en-Y loop after total gastrectomy, which was successfully treated by endoscopic balloon dilatation of the anastomotic stenosis. Case 1: A 62-year-old woman presented with malaise and lower abdominal distension 6 months after laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. She was diagnosed with afferent loop syndrome; CT imaging indicated marked dilatation of the afferent loop, with membranous obstruction at the jejuno-jejunostomy site in the Roux-en-Y loop. Although almost complete occlusion was noted at the jejuno-jejunostomy site, the obstruction was successfully relieved by endoscopic balloon dilation using TandemTM XL Triple Lumen ERCP Cannula (Boston Scientific)®. Case 2: A 70-year-old man presented with malaise and lower abdominal distension 3 years after laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction. He was diagnosed with afferent loop syndrome; CT imaging indicated complete obstruction at the jejuno-jejunostomy site in the Roux-en-Y loop. As in case 1, the obstruction was successfully treated by endoscopic balloon dilatation of the occluded anastomosis.

  5. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J): a retrospective analysis on its utility in maintaining enteral nutrition after unsuccessful gastric feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh Yoon, Ezekiel Wong; Yoneda, Kaori; Nakamura, Shinya; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the method of choice for long-term enteral nutrition, feeding-related adverse events such as aspiration pneumonia and peristomal leakage can impede the use of PEG. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) using large-bore jejunal tubes may help by circumventing gastric passage during enteral nutrition and improving drainage of gastric secretions. 20 patients (12 males and 8 females) who received PEG-J after unsuccessful PEG feeding during a 6-year period in our institution were analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of large-bore jejunal feeding tubes in maintaining enteral nutrition. The median age was 83.5 (71-96) years. The median period between PEG and PEG-J was 33 (14-280) days. Indications were aspiration due to gastro-oesophageal reflux in 18 patients and severe peristomal leakage in 2 patients. Tube placements were successful in all patients. There were 6 (30%) in-hospital mortalities, with 3 (15%) occurring within 30 days after procedure. PEG-J can be performed safely in patients with PEG and may facilitate the maintenance of enteral nutrition in most of the patients. Patients with unsuccessful PEG feeding can be offered the option of jejunal feeding before considering termination of enteral nutrition.

  6. Surgical technique. Intracorporeal laparoscopic-guided feeding jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, G. P.; Cheruvu, C. V.; Fiennes, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is a safe and reproducible method of establishing enteral feeding in patients in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated. Current technology enables the jejunostomy to be achieved within the peritoneal cavity, without retrieval of the small bowel through the abdominal wall. This quick and simple technique is described. PMID:9422878

  7. Surgical technique. Intracorporeal laparoscopic-guided feeding jejunostomy.

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, G. P.; Cheruvu, C. V.; Fiennes, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is a safe and reproducible method of establishing enteral feeding in patients in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is contraindicated. Current technology enables the jejunostomy to be achieved within the peritoneal cavity, without retrieval of the small bowel through the abdominal wall. This quick and simple technique is described.

  8. High-quality endoscope reprocessing decreases endoscope contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decristoforo, Petra; Kaltseis, Josef; Fritz, Andreas; Edlinger, Michael; Posch, Wilfried; Wilflingseder, Doris; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Orth-Höller, Dorothea

    2018-02-02

    Several outbreaks of severe infections due to contamination of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes, mainly duodenoscopes have been described previously. The rate of microbial endoscope contamination is varying dramatically in literature. Thus, the aim of this multicentre prospective study was to evaluate the hygiene quality of endoscopes and automated endoscope reprocessors (AERs) in Tyrol/Austria. In 2015 and 2016, a total of 463 GI endoscopes and 105 AERs from 29 endoscopy centres were analysed by a routine (R) and a combined routine and advanced (CRA) sampling procedure and investigated for microbial contamination by culture- and molecular-based analyses. The contamination rate of GI endoscopes was 1.3-4.6% according to national guideline, suggesting that 1.3-4.6 patients out of 100 could have had contacts with hygiene relevant microorganisms through an endoscopic intervention. Comparison of R and CRA sampling showed 1.8% of R versus 4.6% of CRA failing the acceptance criteria in phase I and 1.3% of R versus 3.0% of CRA samples in phase II. The most commonly identified indicator organism was Pseudomonas spp., mainly P. oleovorans. None of the tested viruses were detected in 40 samples. While AERs in phase I failed (n=9, 17.6%) mainly due to technical faults, phase II revealed lapses (n=6, 11.5%) only on account to microbial contamination of the last rinsing water, mainly with Pseudomonas spp. In the present study the contamination rate of endoscopes was low compared to results from other European countries, possibly due to high quality of endoscope reprocessing, drying and storage. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. TECHNIQUE OF JEJUNOSTOMY

    OpenAIRE

    E. Tarcoveanu

    2005-01-01

    Feeding difficulties is an important problem of some patients (postoperative feeding in major interventions, acute pancreatitis etc.). Many of these patients are managed by jejunostomy. This paper presents the surgical technique for temporary or permanent jejunostomy by laparoscopic and open approach. Standard technique is Witzel jejunostomy but in some cases it is indicated other types of interventions: Stamm, Liffmann, Albert or Roux jejunostomy. It is also presented postoperative complic...

  10. [Current options for percutaneous endoscopic access to the digestive tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, T.E.H.; Jong, D.J. de; Kristinsson, J.O.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Four patients, aged 67, 52, 56 and 64 years, respectively, undergoing percutaneous colostomy or jejunostomy are presented to illustrate current options for percutaneous endoscopic access to the digestive tract. The first patient had Parkinson's disease and required percutaneous jejunostomy for

  11. Feeding Jejunostomy for the Treatment of Severe Hyperemesis Gravidarum: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sumona; Loranger, Donna; Pricolo, Victor; Degli-Esposti, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperemesis gravidarum is severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy leading to dehydration, nutrition deficiency, and fetal morbidity and mortality. Treatment must maintain fluid and electrolyte balance and caloric intake. Parenteral nutrition is often attempted; however, complication rates are high. Nutrition via nasoenteric and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes is limited by poor patient tolerance, tube dislodgement, and altered anatomy in pregnancy. Methods Women with hyperemesis gravidarum who failed standard therapy were offered jejunostomy. All patients underwent surgical jejunostomy in the second trimester. Isotonic tube feeds were administered to a goal caloric factor calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation with a correction added for pregnancy. Patients were monitored until delivery. Results Five women underwent jejunostomy placement at our institution between 1998 and 2005. One patient underwent jejunostomy placement twice for consecutive pregnancies. The mean body weight loss from prepregnancy was 7.9% (range, 4.0%–15.9%). Patients underwent jejunostomy placement between 12 and 26 weeks of gestation (median 14 weeks). Twelve to 16 Fr catheters were placed in the proximal jejunum. Maternal weight gain occured in 5 of 6 pregnancies. The mean duration of tube placement was 19 weeks (range, 8–28 weeks). All pregnancies ended with term deliveries (range, 36–40 weeks of gestation). The mean infant birth weight was 2885 g (range, 2270–4000 g). Tube-related complications were limited to dislodgement in 2 patients in the third trimester. No cases of infection, bleeding, or preterm labor occured. Conclusions Feeding via jejunostomy is a potentially safe, effective, and well-tolerated mode of nutrition support therapy in hyperemesis gravidarum. PMID:19556608

  12. Feeding jejunostomy for the treatment of severe hyperemesis gravidarum: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sumona; Loranger, Donna; Pricolo, Victor; Degli-Esposti, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum is severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy leading to dehydration, nutrition deficiency, and fetal morbidity and mortality. Treatment must maintain fluid and electrolyte balance and caloric intake. Parenteral nutrition is often attempted; however, complication rates are high. Nutrition via nasoenteric and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes is limited by poor patient tolerance, tube dislodgement, and altered anatomy in pregnancy. Women with hyperemesis gravidarum who failed standard therapy were offered jejunostomy. All patients underwent surgical jejunostomy in the second trimester. Isotonic tube feeds were administered to a goal caloric factor calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation with a correction added for pregnancy. Patients were monitored until delivery. Five women underwent jejunostomy placement at our institution between 1998 and 2005. One patient underwent jejunostomy placement twice for consecutive pregnancies. The mean body weight loss from prepregnancy was 7.9% (range, 4.0%-15.9%). Patients underwent jejunostomy placement between 12 and 26 weeks of gestation (median 14 weeks). Twelve to 16 Fr catheters were placed in the proximal jejunum. Maternal weight gain occured in 5 of 6 pregnancies. The mean duration of tube placement was 19 weeks (range, 8-28 weeks). All pregnancies ended with term deliveries (range, 36-40 weeks of gestation). The mean infant birth weight was 2885 g (range, 2270-4000 g). Tube-related complications were limited to dislodgement in 2 patients in the third trimester. No cases of infection, bleeding, or preterm labor occured. Feeding via jejunostomy is a potentially safe, effective, and well-tolerated mode of nutrition support therapy in hyperemesis gravidarum.

  13. Button-loop feeding jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro R; Frischer, Jason S; Cowles, Robert A

    2009-07-01

    Post-pyloric feeding via a surgical jejunostomy allows for enteral nutrition in patients that cannot receive oral or gastric feeding. Regardless of the technique used to create a jejunostomy, complications such as tube dislodgement, jejunostomy closure, or bowel obstruction can occur. We present a simple and efficient jejunostomy technique that does not require a sewn anastomosis and employs an easily exchangeable feeding button.

  14. Jejunojejunal Intussusception Following Jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Hsien Wu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Jejunojejunal intussusception is a rare complication of jejunostomy, and its preoperative diagnosis and surgical treatment have not been reported. A 78-year-old man suffered from vomiting off and on after emergency exploratory laparotomy with omentoplasty for perforated duodenal ulcer. He also received Witzel jejunostomy for early feeding. Ileus developed postoperatively and plain X-ray of the abdomen showed distended small bowel loop with scanty colon gas. Small bowel series performed with water-soluble contrast medium revealed substantial fluid retention in the stomach, duodenum and proximal jejunum. Infusion of contrast medium into the feeding tube revealed normal caliber of the distal small bowel. Abdominal sonogram revealed target sign as well as the feeding tube in a dilated jejunum. Abdominal computed tomography confirmed the sonographic impression of jejunojejunal intussusception. Reduction of intussusception was done during exploratory laparotomy. The jejunostomy feeding was continued and the postoperative course was uneventful. [J Formos Med Assoc 2006;105(4:355-358

  15. In which cases surgical gastrostomy and jejunostomy techniques are inevitable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora Yilmaz, K; Dogan, L; Akinci, M; Atalay, C; Karaman, N; Canoler, O; Ozaslan, C; Kulacoglu, H

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the surgical gastrostomy and jejunostomy procedures in cancer patients who needed nutritional support and endoscopy was unattainable. Operation time and procedure, anesthesia and tube types, procedure-specific and surgical complications, and tube replacement at the follow up period were retrospectively analyzed. 109 patients (44 female, 65 male, mean age 50.9 years, range 14-87) were subjected to surgical gastrostomy/ jejunostomy. Ninety-three (85.4%) patients had head-neck and gastrointestinal cancers. In 94 (86.2%) patients endoscopy was impossible due to obstruction of the esophagus and stomach. Gastrostomy/jejunostomy was combined with other surgical procedures in 12 (11 %) patients. Procedure- related complications occurred in 22 (20.7%) patients. Early 30-day mortality occurred in 12 (11 %) cases. The median follow up period was 3.6 months (range 0-18). Obstructing cancer, obesity or previous laparotomy make the use of endoscopic techniques impossible. For these patients, surgical gastrostomy/jejunostomy is safe with acceptable complication rates and improves the treatment outcomes with nutritional support.

  16. Laparoscopic Roux En Y Esophago-Jejunostomy for Chronic Leak/Fistula After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Maysoon; Maasher, Ahmed; Al Hadad, Mohamed; Salim, Elnazeer; Nimeri, Abdelrahman A

    2016-03-01

    Leak following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is one of the most serious and devastating complications. Endoscopic stents can treat most early LSG leaks, but is not as effective for chronic LSG leaks/fistulae. The surgical options to treat a chronic leak/fistula after LSG are laparoscopic Roux en Y esophago-jejunostomy (LRYEJ) or laparoscopic Roux en Y fistulo-jejunostomy. We reviewed our prospective database for all patients with leak after LSG treated with LRYEJ. We have described our algorithm for managing LSG previously. We prefer to optimize the nutritional status of patients with enteral rather than parenteral nutrition and drain all collections prior to LRYEJ. We have treated four patients utilizing our technique of LRYEJ. Initial endoscopic stent placement was attempted in all four patients (two failed to resolve (50 %) and two had distal stenosis at the incisura not amenable to endoscopic stenting). We utilized enteral feeding through either naso-jejunal (NJ) or jejunostomy tube feeding in 3/4 (75 %) of patients, and in one patient with stenosis, we could not introduce a NJ tube endoscopically due to tight stricture. This patient was placed on total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and went on to develop pulmonary embolism. None of the patient developed leak after LRYEJ. The only patient with stenosis (25 %) had antecolic LRYEJ. In contrast, all patients who had retrocolic LRYGB laparoscopically did not develop stenosis. Laparoscopic Roux en Y esophago-jejunostomy for chronic leak/fistula after is safe and effective. Preoperative enteral nutrition is important.

  17. Is jejunostomy output nutrient or waste in short bowel syndrome? Experience from six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Yi; Tang, Hsiu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Lan; Chang, Sue-Joan

    2016-01-01

    Certain patients who undergo proximal jejunum resection are unable to undergo primary anastomosis and require exteriorization of the proximal jejunum. These patients usually have major problems with short bowel due to the high output of the stoma. The output of a proximal jejunostomy contains abundant amounts of enzymes and electrolytes. Therefore, it is a feasible approach to re-infuse jejunostomy output to regain homeostasis. To evaluate the effects of proximal jejunostomy output reinfusion into the distal small bowel for patients with short bowel syndrome, and to determine whether reinfusion could avoid long-term parenteral nutrition (PN). PN was initiated immediately after surgery. When patients started enteral nutrition, we started the proximal jejunostomy output reinfusion protocol. Proximal jejunostomy output reinfusion was performed by the patients, and continued by them after discharge. When proximal jejunostomy output reinfusion could be performed stably, PN was stopped. The median length of the proximal jejunum was 20 cm and of the distal small bowel was 77.5 cm in patients who could stably receive proximal jejunostomy output reinfusion alone. Three patients did not require home PN; they only required PN during hospitalization. Four patients successfully underwent stoma takedown with intestinal anastomosis after 6-7 months without any nutritional or metabolic complications. Short bowel syndrome patients with an adequate length of small bowel and functional colon could avoid long-term PN by receiving reinfusion of proximal jejunostomy output into the distal small bowel.

  18. Endoscopic solutions to challenging enteral feeding problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paski, Shirley C; Dominitz, Jason A

    2012-09-01

    Enteral nutrition support is often required in patients who are unable to meet their own nutritional requirements. Endoscopists play a key role in the placement of enteral feeding catheters. This review focuses on the recently published solutions to common problems encountered during endoscopic placement of enteral feeding devices. Case reports and case series describe solutions for overcoming common problems encountered during the placement of enteral feeding devices. Transnasal techniques can simplify nasojejunal tube placement, whereas deep enteroscopy techniques provide more reliable jejunostomy placement. Endoscopic ultrasound can help when transillumination is not possible or in the setting of postsurgical anatomy like Roux-en-Y. Laparoscopic-assisted procedures are useful when endoscopic techniques have failed in adults or in select high-risk pediatric patients. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the American Gastroenterology Association both published comprehensive guidelines that outline the indications, contraindications, technical aspects of feeding catheter placement, and complications. Advances in endoscopic techniques, including deep enteroscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, ultra-slim transnasal endoscopes and laparoscopic-assisted procedures, have enabled endoscopists to successfully place enteral feeding tubes in patients who previously required open procedures.

  19. Outcomes of diverting jejunostomy for severe necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyoka, Mandela; Eaton, Simon; Kiely, Edward M; Curry, Joe I; Drake, David P; Cross, Kate M K; Hall, Nigel J; Khoo, A Katy; De Coppi, Paolo; Pierro, Agostino

    2011-06-01

    A diverting jejunostomy without bowel resection is an option for surgical management of extensive necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We aimed to determine outcomes of infants who underwent this operation. We collected clinical and outcome data on infants undergoing a diverting jejunostomy with no bowel resection as a primary procedure for extensive NEC. Data are median (range). Seventeen neonates underwent a diverting jejunostomy. Eleven (65%) had multifocal disease, whereas 6 (35%) had pan-intestinal involvement. Perforation was seen in 7 (41%), all with multifocal disease. The stoma was placed 12 cm (8-45) from the duodenojejunal flexure. Six infants (35%) died, 4 of these within a day of operation, owing to persisting instability. Intestinal continuity was achieved in all survivors after 52 (17-83) days, and only 1 infant (9%) had a colonic stricture. Seven infants recovered without the need for further intestinal resection distal to the jejunostomy. In those that survived, parenteral nutrition was needed for 2.2 months (1.3-18.0). A single patient had short bowel syndrome. A diverting jejunostomy is a useful surgical procedure that allows high survival and enteral autonomy in the treatment of extensive NEC. In most patients, the affected intestine recovers without further intestinal resection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope for tissue characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ji; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    The contrast mechanism of medical endoscopy is mainly based on metrics of optical intensity and wavelength. As another fundamental property of light, polarization can not only reveal tissue scattering and absorption information from a different perspective, but can also provide insight into directional tissue birefringence properties to monitor pathological changes in collagen and elastin. Here we demonstrate a low cost wide field high definition Mueller polarimetric endoscope with minimal alterations to a rigid endoscope. We show that this novel endoscopic imaging modality is able to provide a number of image contrast mechanisms besides traditional unpolarized radiation intensity, including linear depolarization, circular depolarization, cross-polarization, directional birefringence and dichroism. This enhances tissue features of interest, and additionally reveals tissue micro-structure and composition, which is of central importance for tissue diagnosis and image guidance for surgery. The potential applications of the Mueller polarimetric endoscope include wide field early epithelial cancer diagnosis, surgical margin detection and energy-based tissue fusion monitoring, and could further benefit a wide range of endoscopic investigations through intra-operative guidance.

  1. Ultrasound-assisted technique for challenging jejunostomy balloon-tube replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Fernandes, Sónia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Silva, Joana; Rodrigues, Jaime; Carvalho, João

    2016-10-01

    The authors present a case of a 38-year-old man with a 4-hour history of accidental removal of a jejunostomy balloon-tube replacement (PEG-18-BRT-S, Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, USA). The patient had undergone a direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (DPEJ) ten months ago, before chemoradiotherapy treatment for an esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (uT3N2cM0). His past medical condition included alcoholic liver disease and distal gastrectomy from a life-threatening duodenal bleeding ulcer.

  2. Laparoscopic lysis for jejunostomy-related ileus following laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Taisuke; Ikeda, Yoshifumi; Ogawa, Etsushi; Horikawa, Masahiro; Inaba, Tsuyoshi; Fukushima, Ryoji

    2014-05-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. He had had laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction and tube jejunostomy for gastric cancer 2 years earlier. Abdominal CT revealed that the duodenum and upper jejunum were markedly dilated and that the dilated jejunum had collapsed at the jejunostomy site. Emergency laparoscopic surgery with three ports was performed for jejunostomy-related ileus. Abdominal adhesion was very small, and the Roux-en-Y limb was rotated counterclockwise at the jejunostomy site. A magnified laparoscopic view showed that the site of peritoneopexy was the axis of rotation. After the axis was dissected with a Harmonic scalpel, the rotation was released immediately. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was discharged 4 days after the operation. Because the axis of rotation was identified easily by laparoscope, laparoscopic surgery was a safe and useful technique for a patient with jejunostomy-related ileus. © 2014 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. [Use of visiting jejunostomy loop for extracting Ascaris lumbricoides in the common bile ducts in patients with Caroli diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentim, Leonardo Fernandes; de Souza, Ary Pires; Vidal, Edison Iglesias; Menezes, José Geraldo; Valentim, Patrícia Gomes Bittencourt

    2009-10-01

    Grumbach-Auvert disease represents a type of Obstructive Disease of the Intrahepatic Biliary Tree. We presents a case report of a patient with hepatic abscess caused by Ascaris which ascended into hepatic parenquima through hepaticojejunostomy, resolved by endoscopic extraction of it after the jejunostomy of permanent access was opened.

  4. Percutaneous Gastronomy and Jejunostomy: Lessons from the First Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Goff

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous gastrostomies and jejunostomies have increasingly been used for long term enteral feeding in patients with functioning gastrointestinal tracts but who are unable, for a variety of reasons, to use the standard oropharyngeal route. Since these devices can be placed without the use of general anesthesia, the morbidity and mortality generally are less than for placement of a surgical gastrostomy. A permanent gastrostomy tube is easy to manage in most patients who require prolonged tube feeding. There are four basic types of percutaneous gastrostomy techniques; three employ an endoscope and one uses only radiographic or ultrasonic guidance. All gastrostomy tubes may be convened to feeding jejunostomies if the clinical situation warrants. Jejunal feeding tubes are prone to many technical problems and do not always solve the problems of gastric dysfunction and reflux that make gastrostomy tubes less desireable. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomics are technically simple to perform and have become the main method for access to the gastrointestinal tract in many patients. If judiciously used, the percutaneous enterostomy offers many benefits over a nasogastric tube for long term enteral feeding.

  5. [Factors associated with jejunostomy complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Franco, H; Pestaña-Fonseca, C S; Rosales-Murillo, C F; Staufert-Gutiérrez, D L; Velázquez-Dohorn, M E

    2013-01-01

    There are few studies in the literature that analyze jejunostomy complications and their associated factors. To describe the rate of complications and analyze the factors associated with their development in a tertiary reference center in Mexico. A retrospective study was carried out on patients that underwent Witzel jejunostomy within the time frame of January 2002 to December 2011. Patient demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected at the time of hospital admission and during follow-up. The factors associated with the development of complications were analyzed using the chi square test for categorical variables and the Student's t test for the continuous variables. Statistical significance was considered with a pJejunostomy is associated with an elevated medical, as well as surgical, complication frequency. Even though it has been established as a better alternative to parenteral nutrition, its associated morbidity should be taken into consideration before establishing its routine use as a means of nutritional support, especially in patients with factors associated with the development of complications. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. In-Use Evaluation of Peracetic Acid for High-Level Disinfection of Endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenjiao, Wu; Hongyan, Zhang; Qing, Gu; Xiaoqi, Zhong; Liying, Gu; Ying, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Many high-level disinfectants have been used for disinfection of endoscopes such as 2% glutaraldehyde (GA), 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both GA and OPA are widely used in disinfection of endoscopes and have been previously discussed, but there is little research on the practical use of PAA as an endoscope disinfectant. An experimental model of a flexible gastrointestinal endoscope being contaminated with 9 strains of microorganism was designed. After the cleaning and disinfecting procedure was completed, we evaluated the biocidal activity (850 ppm PAA, 2% GA, and 0.55% OPA) on our flexible gastrointestinal endoscope model. We also evaluated sterilization effectiveness of PAA on other bacteria, including some antibiotic-resistant bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile). The residual bacterial colony count number of the PAA-disinfected endoscope was significantly lower than that of the GA- and OPA-disinfected endoscopes. The biocidal effect and efficiency of the endoscope disinfection by PAA appeared to be better than either the GA- or OPA-disinfected endoscope. PAA has demonstrated a good sterilization effect on other bacterial species; of particular note are common antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile. The results of this study demonstrate that PAA is a fast and effective high-level disinfectant for use in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes.

  7. Routine jejunostomy tube feeding following esophagectomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weijs, Teus J; van Eden, Hanneke W.J; Ruurda, Jelle P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/257561021; Luyer, Misha D P; Steenhagen, Elles|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815713; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; van Hillegersberg, Richard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110706242

    2017-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important problem following esophagectomy. A surgically placed jejunostomy secures an enteral feeding route, facilitating discharge with home-tube feeding and long-term nutritional support...

  8. Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy: outcomes in 25 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.Q. [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Shin, J.H. [Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Poongnap-2dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Song, H.-Y.; Kwon, J.H.; Kim, J.-W.; Kim, K.R.; Kim, J.-H. [Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Poongnap-2dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-11-15

    Aim: To assess the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy. Material and methods: Between May 1999 and August 2006 percutaneous jejunostomy was attempted in 25 patients. A 5 F vascular catheter (n = 20) or a 7.5 F multifunctional coil catheter (n = 5) was used to insufflate the jejunum. The distended jejunum was punctured using a 17 G needle (n = 19) or a 21 G Chiba needle (n = 6) with the inserted catheter as a target. A 12 or 14 F loop feeding tube was inserted after serial dilations. The technical success, complications, 30-day mortality, and in-dwelling period of the feeding tube placement were evaluated. Results: The technical success rate was 92% (23/25). Technical failures (n = 2) resulted from the inability to insufflate the jejunum secondary to failure to pass the catheter through a malignant stricture at the oesophagojejunostomy site and thus subsequent puncture of the undistended jejunum failed, or failure to introduce the Neff catheter into the jejunum. Pericatheter leakage with pneumoperitoneum was a complication in three patients (12%) and was treated conservatively. The 30-day mortality was 13% (3/23); however, there was no evidence that these deaths were attributed to the procedure. Except for four patients who were lost to follow-up and two failed cases, 15 of the 19 jejunostomy catheters were removed because of patient death (n = 12) or completion of treatment (n = 3), with a mean and median in-dwelling period of 231 and 87 days, respectively. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy is a feasible procedure with a high technical success and a low complication rate. In addition to a 17 G needle, a 21 G needle can safely be used to puncture the jejunum.

  9. Jejunostomy after oesophagectomy: a review of evidence and current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Graeme

    2011-08-01

    Patients undergoing oesophagectomy often have nutritional needs at the time of diagnosis and in the post-operative period. The aim of this article is to review the current literature and report on the author's experience of routine feeding jejunostomy insertion following oesophagectomy. The records of forty-eight consecutive patients undergoing oesphagectomy under the author's care were reviewed. Although the evidence of benefit of peri-operative feeding in patients undergoing oesophagectomy is limited, there is a clear need to establish a feeding route at the time of surgery. Oesophagectomy is associated with a mortality rate of 5-10% and a morbidity rate of 30-40% even in high-volume specialist centres. Over 50% of patients developing complications will require an alternative to oral feeding beyond 30 d. The enteral route is preferred in terms of safety and cost. A surgical feeding jejunostomy is associated with a low complication rate and a mortality rate of less than 1%. In forty-eight patients undergoing oesophagectomy the average weight loss at 6 months was 8·4 kg with only 8% regaining their pre-operative weight. Large reductions in weight at 6 months post-operatively were recorded irrespective of the development of post-operative complications or early recurrent disease. Routine jejunostomy insertion is recommended to ensure adequate nutrition in patients who develop post-operative complications and for those patients with long-term reduced appetite and poor oral intake.

  10. Jejunostomy tube feeding in patients undergoing esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinathan, Sadeesh K; Hamin, Tamara; Walter, Stephen; Tan, A Lawrence; Unruh, Helmut W; Guyatt, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Surgical jejunostomy tubes are a routine part of elective esophagectomies in patients with carcinomas and provide a route for nutritional support in those who experience complications. We wished to determine how frequently oral intake is delayed and the amount of nutrition delivered via the jejunostomy tube. We reviewed the charts of all adults undergoing esophagectomy for carcinoma between January 2000 and June 2008. We determined the proportion of patients unable to resume oral nutrition after 8 days and the amount of nutrition delivered in each of the 8 days. In all, 111 patients underwent elective esophagectomy for carcinoma, and 103 had a jejunostomy tube placed. The mean age was 67 ± 10.8 years. The median time to oral intake was 7 (interquartile range 7-11) days. Seventy-four (67%) patients resumed oral intake within 8 days. The mean nutrition delivered by jejunostomy within the first 8 days as a percentage of the target was 45.6% (95% confidence interval 41.2%-49.9%). Six (5.4%) patients experienced complications attributable solely to the jejunostomy tube; 3 (2.9%) required surgery. Forty (38.8%) patients had abdominal issues serious enough to warrant delaying the progression of feeding. Two-thirds of patients undergoing elective esophagectomy were tolerating oral intake by the end of the eighth postoperative day, and less than half of the target nutrition was delivered over the first 8 days. We now selectively place surgical jejunostomy tubes in patients undergoing elective esophagectomies.

  11. A novel application for single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS): SIL jejunostomy feeding tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, S Sameer; Anderson, C Erik

    2011-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is rapidly gaining popularity as the practical alternative to natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). Although SILS achieves essentially the same goal as NOTES (a nearly invisible scar in the umbilicus), it does not carry the significant potential risks of a transluminal approach. The SILS approach has been most commonly described for cholecystectomy and appendectomy. The authors describe a novel application for this approach in the placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube. The described application for this technique is the first to be reported. The authors describe use of the technique for two intensive care unit (ICU) patients requiring long-term postpyloric tube feeds. Access was obtained through the umbilicus with the SILS port. The selected loop of the jejunum was exteriorized through this incision, and the feeding tube was placed. The loop was returned into the abdomen, and the SILS port was replaced in the incision. Under laparoscopic visualization and guidance, the feeding tube was brought externally through a predetermined site in the left midabdomen. Two patients underwent SILS jejunostomy tube placement. The average operating time was 42.5 min. No intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications occurred. Tube feedings were started on postoperative day 1 for both patients, with good bowel function. The SILS technique for jejunostomy placement is a promising and feasible alternative to the current methods. It is less invasive than the open approach while providing complete intraabdominal visualization. It is less technically demanding than the direct percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ) approach and avoids the risks and difficulties associated with it. The same benefits of other SILS procedures are evident in this application. The authors believe a series study will further highlight long-term benefits and any potential complications.

  12. Adequacy of Rifampin Absorption after Jejunostomy Tube Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Katharine E; Singh, Bhagteshwar; Beadsworth, Mike B J; Vaudrey, Kate; Khoo, Saye H; Davies, Geraint

    2016-04-01

    It is not always possible to administer antituberculosis pharmacotherapy orally for reasons that may be a direct consequence of tuberculosis itself. To our knowledge, no published literature is available regarding antituberculosis drug absorption via feeding tube. We present the case of a patient with tuberculosis meningitis who required medication administration via percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ) tube. Blood samples were collected during the continuation phase of antituberculosis therapy, immediately before dose administration, and then at 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after dose administration for quantification of serum rifampin concentrations. Assaying these concentrations by high-pressure liquid chromatography demonstrated a peak serum rifampin level (C(max)) of 18 μg/ml and total rifampin exposure (area under the curve from 0-6 hours [AUC(0-6)]) of 50.1 μg/ml. These are high compared with rifampin C(max) and AUC(0-6) values reported in patients after oral rifampin administration; C(max) tends to range between 4.0-10.5 μg/ml and AUC(0-6) 7.0-52.9 μg/ml after oral administration of 600 mg at steady state. Based on our patient's results, therefore, rifampin administered by PEJ tube appears to be well absorbed, with preservation of adequate C(max) and AUC values. It is worth noting that this was in the context of drug administration in the fasted state. In the absence of any published evidence of adequate absorption via jejunal feeding tube in the nonfasted state, it would seem prudent to ensure that patients are fasted when rifampin is administered via PEJ tube, just as patients are when oral rifampin is administered. This report represents the first documented evidence, to our knowledge, of adequate rifampin absorption when administered via PEJ tube and provides important reassurance for health care providers, patients, and families facing similar clinical scenarios. © 2016 The Authors. Pharmacotherapy published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  13. Randomized clinical trial: nasoenteric tube or jejunostomy as a route for nutrition after major upper gastrointestinal operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga; de Vasconcellos Santos, Fernando Augusto; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson

    2014-09-01

    Curative treatment of upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasms is complex and associated with high morbidity and mortality. In general, the patients are already malnourished, and early postoperative enteral nutrition is recommended. However, there is no consensus concerning the best enteral access route in these cases. A prospective randomized trial was performed from 2008 to 2012 with 59 patients who underwent esophagectomy, total gastrectomy, or pancreaticoduodenectomy. In all, 4 patients declined to participate, and 13 did not meet the inclusion criteria and were excluded. Of the 42 included patients, 21 had nasoenteric tubes, and 21 had a jejunostomy. The two groups were similar in demographic and clinical aspects. The nasoenteric (NE) and jejunostomy groups underwent early enteral therapy in 71 and 62 % of cases (p > 0.05), respectively. The median length of enteral therapy use was less in the NE group (5.0 vs. 8.5 days), but the difference was not statistically significant. The NE group required introduction of parenteral therapy more frequently than the jejunostomy group (p 0.05) in the NE and jejunostomy groups, respectively. In the NE group, there were four losses and four tube obstructions. In the jejunostomy group, there were two losses, four obstructions, and two cases of leakage around the tube. In the latter group, patients who underwent therapy for a longer time had tubal complications (p jejunostomy allowed enteral therapy for longer periods, especially in patients with complications, thus avoiding the need for parenteral nutrition.

  14. [Laparoscopic reconstruction of jejunostomy catheter deviations in gastric and esophageal cancer patients who underwent jejunostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Jin; Takeda, Mitsunobu; Toshiyama, Reishi; Naito, Atsushi; Fukuda, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Shinji; Tokuoka, Masayoshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Morimoto, Takashi; Fukushima, Yukio; Nomura, Takashi; Kodama, Ken; Sasaki, Yo

    2012-11-01

    Jejunostomy feeding is useful for maintaining nutrition in patients with gastric cancer and esophageal cancer. Special provisions must be made in cases of occlusion or dislocation of the jejunostomy catheter, and when the catheter is narrow and difficult to approach by endoscopy. Between 2007 and 2011, we encountered 69 cases of jejunostomy: 40 performed for gastric cancer and 29 for esophageal cancer. Catheter occlusion was seen in 7 cases and catheter dislocation in 9. Of these 16 cases, 14 could be recovered using interventional radiology (IVR), and the remaining 2 could not be because of fistel closure.

  15. A new modified technique of laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy: a 2-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Peng Ye, Liping Zeng, Fenghao Sun, Zhou An, Zhoubin Li, Jian Hu Department of Thoracic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: The aim of this study was to establish a modified technique for performing laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy. Methods: From May 2011 to October 2013, laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy was performed in 21 patients with esophageal cancer. During the procedure, jejunal inflation was performed via a percutaneous 20-gauge intravenous catheter to facilitate the subsequent puncture of the jejunal wall by the catheter needle. The success rate, procedure time, complications, and short-term outcomes were evaluated. Results: All laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomies were technically successful, with no perioperative mortality or conversion to a laparotomy. The operation required a mean time of 51.4±14.2 (range 27–80 minutes, and operative bleeding range was 5–20 mL. There was one reoperation required for one patient on postoperative day 5, because the feeding tube was accidentally pulled out during sleep, by patient himself, and the second laparoscopic jejunostomy for this patient was performed successfully. One patient had puncture site pain and was successfully treated with oral analgesics. Other complications, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal perforation, intestinal obstruction, tube dysfunction, pericatheter leakage, and infection at the skin insertion site, were not observed. The 30-day mortality rate was 4.8% (one out of 21, which was not attributed to the procedure. Enteral nutrition was gradually administered 24–48 hours after operation. Conclusion: The novel modified technique of laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy is a technically feasible, with a high technical success rate and low complication rate. Its specific advantage is simplicity and safety, and this modified approach can be

  16. Clinical Burden of Laparoscopic Feeding Jejunostomy Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Emily A; Chow, Simon C; Dunst, Christy M; Shada, Amber L; Halpin, Valerie; Reavis, Kevin M; Cassera, Maria; Swanström, Lee L

    2016-05-01

    Feeding jejunostomies (J tubes) provide enteral nutrition when oral and gastric routes are not options. Despite their prevalence, there is a paucity of literature regarding their efficacy and clinical burden. All laparoscopic J tubes placed over a 5-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical burden was measured by number of clinical contact events (tube-related clinic visits, phone calls, ED visits) and morbidity (dislodgement, clogging, tube fracture, infection, other). Tube replacements were also recorded. One hundred fifty-one patients were included. Fifty-nine percent had associated malignancy, and 35 % were placed for nutritional prophylaxis. Mean time to J tube removal was 146 days. J tubes were expected to be temporary in >90 % but only 50 % had sufficient oral intake for removal. Tubes were removed prematurely due to patient intolerance in 8 %. Mortality was 0 %. Morbidity was 51 % and included clogging (12 %), tube fracture (16 %), dislodgement (25 %), infection (18 %) and "other" (leaking, erosion, etc.) in 17 %. The median number of adverse events per J tube was 2(0-8). Mean number of clinic phone calls was 2.5(0-22), ED visits 0.5(0-7), and clinic visits 1.4(0-13), with 82 % requiring more than one J tube-related clinic visit. Unplanned replacements occurred in 40 %. While necessary for some patients, J tubes are associated with high clinical burden.

  17. High pressure air jet in the endoscopic preparation room: risk of noise exposure on occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Kun

    2015-01-01

    After high-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes, they are hung to dry in order to prevent residual water droplets impact on patient health. To allow for quick drying and clinical reuse, some endoscopic units use a high pressure air jet (HPAJ) to remove the water droplets on the endoscopes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the excessive noise exposure with the use of HPAJ in endoscopic preparation room and to investigate the risk to occupational health. Noise assessment was taken during 7 automatic endoscopic reprocessors (AERs) and combined with/without HPAJ use over an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA). Analytical procedures of the NIOSH and the ISO for noise-induced hearing loss were estimated to develop analytic models. The peak of the noise spectrum of combined HPAJ and 7 AERs was significantly higher than that of the 7 AERs alone (108.3 ± 1.36 versus 69.3 ± 3.93 dBA, P  2.5 dB) was 2.15% at 90 dBA, 11.6% at 95 dBA, and 51.3% at 100 dBA. The odds ratio was 49.1 (95% CI: 11.9 to 203.6). The noise generated by the HPAJ to work over TWA seriously affected the occupational health and safety of those working in an endoscopic preparation room.

  18. Routine jejunostomy tube feeding following esophagectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, Teus J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413993558; van Eden, Hanneke W.J.; Ruurda, Jelle P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/257561021; Luyer, Misha D P; Steenhagen, Elles|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815713; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; van Hillegersberg, Richard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110706242

    2017-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is an important problem following esophagectomy. A surgically placed jejunostomy secures an enteral feeding route, facilitating discharge with home-tube feeding and long-term nutritional support. However, specific complications occur, and data are lacking that support its

  19. Routine jejunostomy tube feeding following esophagectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eden, Hanneke W. J.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Luyer, Misha D. P.; Steenhagen, Elles; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A. P.; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is an important problem following esophagectomy. A surgically placed jejunostomy secures an enteral feeding route, facilitating discharge with home-tube feeding and long-term nutritional support. However, specific complications occur, and data are lacking that support its use over other enteral feeding routes. Therefore routine jejunostomy tube feeding and discharge with home-tube feeding was evaluated, with emphasis on weight loss, length of stay and re-admissions. Methods Consecutive patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer, with gastric tube reconstruction and jejunostomy creation, were analyzed. Two different regimens were compared. Before January 07, 2011 patients were discharged when oral intake was sufficient, without tube feeding. After that discharge with home-tube feeding was routinely performed. Logistic regression analysis corrected for confounders. Results Some 236 patients were included. The median duration of tube feeding was 35 days. Reoperation for a jejunostomy-related complication was needed in 2%. The median body mass index (BMI) remained stable during tube feeding. The BMI decreased significantly after stopping tube feeding: from 25.6 (1st–3rd quartile 23.0–28.6) kg/m2 to 24.4 (22.0–27.1) kg/m2 at 30 days later [median weight loss: 3.0 (1.0–5.3) kg; 3.9% (1.5–6.3%)]. Weight loss was not affected by the duration of tube feeding duration. Routine home-tube feeding did not affect weight loss, admission time or the readmission rate. Conclusions Weight loss following esophagectomy occurs once that tube feeding is stopped, independently from the time interval after esophagectomy. Moreover routine discharge with home-tube feeding does not reduce length of stay or readmissions. These findings question the value of routine jejunostomy placement and emphasize the need for further research. PMID:28815083

  20. Retrospective analyses of complications associated with transcutaneous replacement of percutaneous gastrostomy and jejunostomy feeding devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Shinji; Araki, Hiroshi; Fang, John C; Hayashi, Motoshi; Takada, Jun; Iwashita, Masahide; Tagami, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Hiroo; Hayashi, Takao; Maeda, Teruo; Saito, Koshiro

    2011-10-01

    Feeding device replacement is often required for long-term maintenance after initial percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or jejunostomy placement. Although there are several case reports on serious complications of gastrostomy device replacement, there are few reports of an overall analysis of the complications associated with feeding device replacement. To evaluate the frequency and variety of complications of transcutaneous replacement of feeding devices. A retrospective study. Single center: Nishimino Kosei Hospital. This study involved 363 consecutive patients undergoing a total of 1265 percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy device replacements from March 2000 to September 2010. A new replacement device was inserted through the ostomy tract by using an obturator after traction removal of the previous device. Endoscopic treatments were performed in the cases of fistula disruption or hemorrhage. Complications and their outcomes. Gastrostomy and jejunostomy devices were replaced 1126 and 139 times, respectively. There were 16 complications (1.3% of total replacements) consisting of 10 cases of fistula disruption caused by misplacement of replacement devices into the peritoneal cavity, 4 cases of hemorrhage, and 1 case each of colocutaneous fistula and device breakage. Anticoagulation or antiplatelet medications were continued in all 4 hemorrhage cases but in only 27 of 347 (7.7%) complication-free cases (P < .0001). There were no replacement-related adverse events that required surgical repair. A single center, retrospective analysis. Fistula disruption and hemorrhage were the most common complications associated with device replacement. In patients on anticoagulants, caution is necessary to avoid hemorrhage after replacement. It is also important to verify that the replaced device is located in the GI tract lumen before feeding. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultra-high definition (8K UHD) endoscope: our first clinical success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiromasa; Aoki, Hisae; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We have started clinical application of 8K ultra-high definition (UHD; 7680 × 4320 pixels) imaging technology, which is a 16-fold higher resolution than the current 2K high-definition (HD; 1920 × 1080 pixels) technology, to an endoscope for advanced laparoscopic surgery. Based on preliminary testing experience and with subsequent technical and system improvements, we then proceeded to perform two cases of cholecystectomy and were able to achieve clinical success with an 8K UHD endoscopic system, which consisted of an 8K camera, a 30-degrees angled rigid endoscope with a lens adapter, a pair of 300-W xenon light sources, an 85-inch 8K LCD and an 8K video recorder. These experimental and clinical studies revealed the engineering and clinical feasibility of the 8K UHD endoscope, enabling us to have a positive outlook on its prospective use in clinical practice. The 8K UHD endoscopy promises to open up new possibilities for intricate procedures including anastomoses of thin nerves and blood vessels as well as more confident surgical resections of a diversity of cancer tissues. 8K endoscopic imaging, compared to imaging by the current 2K imaging technology, is very likely to lead to major changes in the future of medical practice.

  2. Modigraf administration through jejunostomy in liver transplant recipient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marente, V Camacho; Gomez, L M Marin; Martinez, J Gracia; Bernal-Bellido, C; Suárez-Artacho, G; Alamo-Martínez, J M; Barrera-Pulido, L; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Padillo-Ruiz, F J; Gómez-Bravo, M A

    2013-01-01

    We report our experience with a 61-year-old patient with alcoholic and hepatitis C cirrhosis who underwent liver transplantation. On the 3rd postoperative day he presented a mediastinitis secondary to esophageal perforation produced by a Linton tube. An esophagectomy with jejunostomy was performed. Tacrolimus granules for oral suspension (Modigraf) were administered through the jejunostomy. This case report highlights the use of Modigraf and the absence of secondary effects. We observed biochemical parameters during the jejunostomy period. We discuss the administration strategy applied and whether tacrolimus granules for oral suspension by jejunostomy affect the bioavailability and its side effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Massive Endoscopic Screening for Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in a High-Risk Area of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Lü, Lingshuang; Peng, Xianzhen; Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Hua, Zhaolai; Wang, Jianping; Xue, Hengchuan; Wang, Jianming; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to describe the findings from a massive endoscopic screening program in a high-risk area of China and to evaluate the prognosis of patients diagnosed through endoscopic screening compared with those diagnosed at usual hospital visits because of illness. Methods In 2006, an early detection and treatment program was initiated in Yangzhong county, China. Local residents aged 40–69 years were eligible for free endoscopic screening. Endoscopic examination was performed with Lugol’s iodine staining, followed by biopsies. Patients diagnosed with esophageal or gastric cancer were referred for treatment and followed to assess their long-term survival status. Results From 2006 through 2012, we screened 12453 participants, including 5334 (42.8%) men and 7119 (57.2%) women. The average age was 52.8±8.0 years. We detected 166 patients with upper digestive tract cancers, including 106 cancers in the esophagus (detection rate: 0.85%) and 60 cancers in the stomach (detection rate: 0.48%). Of these patients, 98.11% with esophageal cancer and 100% with gastric cancer were defined as at the early stage. In the process of follow-up, 17 patients died from cancer-related causes, and the median survival time was greater than 85 months. The overall survival rates for 1, 3 and 5 years were 98.0%, 90.0% and 89.0%, respectively. A significant positive effect was observed for the long-term survival of patients diagnosed through massive endoscopic screening. Conclusions In a high-risk population, massive endoscopic screening can identify early stage carcinoma of esophageal and gastric cancers and improve patients’ prognosis through early detection and treatment. PMID:26699332

  4. A new modified technique of laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy: a 2-year follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Peng; Zeng, Liping; Sun, Fenghao; An, Zhou; Li, Zhoubin; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to establish a modified technique for performing laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy. Methods From May 2011 to October 2013, laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy was performed in 21 patients with esophageal cancer. During the procedure, jejunal inflation was performed via a percutaneous 20-gauge intravenous catheter to facilitate the subsequent puncture of the jejunal wall by the catheter needle. The success rate, procedure time, complications, and short-term outcomes were evaluated. Results All laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomies were technically successful, with no perioperative mortality or conversion to a laparotomy. The operation required a mean time of 51.4±14.2 (range 27–80) minutes, and operative bleeding range was 5–20 mL. There was one reoperation required for one patient on postoperative day 5, because the feeding tube was accidentally pulled out during sleep, by patient himself, and the second laparoscopic jejunostomy for this patient was performed successfully. One patient had puncture site pain and was successfully treated with oral analgesics. Other complications, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal perforation, intestinal obstruction, tube dysfunction, pericatheter leakage, and infection at the skin insertion site, were not observed. The 30-day mortality rate was 4.8% (one out of 21), which was not attributed to the procedure. Enteral nutrition was gradually administered 24–48 hours after operation. Conclusion The novel modified technique of laparoscopic needle catheter jejunostomy is a technically feasible, with a high technical success rate and low complication rate. Its specific advantage is simplicity and safety, and this modified approach can be considered for routine clinical use after long-term outcome evaluation. PMID:26869794

  5. Surgical jejunostomy in aspiration risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltz, C R; Morris, J B; Mullen, J L

    1992-01-01

    One hundred patients underwent laparotomy for independent jejunal feeding tube placement. Neurologic disease was present in 50%, and obtundation (28) and oropharyngeal dysmotility (25) were the most common indications for enteral feeding. The post-pyloric route was chosen because of aspiration risk in almost all (94%) patients. Postoperative (30-day) mortality rate was 21%, because of cardiopulmonary failure in most (18). One death resulted directly from aspiration of tube feeds. Two surgical complications required reoperation: one wound dehiscence and one small bowel obstruction. Four wound infections occurred. Two patients underwent reoperation after tube removal, and four tubes required fluoroscopically guided reinsertion for peritubular drainage (2), removal (1), and occlusion (1). Aspiration pneumonia was present in 18 patients preoperatively and in eight postoperatively. None of the patients with feeding-related preoperative aspiration pneumonia (13) had a recurrence while fed by jejunostomy. Three patients developed postoperative aspiration pneumonia before initiation of jejunostomy feedings. Jejunostomy may be performed with low morbidity rate and substantial reduction of feeding-related aspiration pneumonia, and is the feeding route of choice in aspiration risk patients. PMID:1546899

  6. Successful Conservative Management of Spontaneous Antegrade Migration of Feeding Jejunostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Gautham; Pandit, Narendra; Singh, Rajinder

    2017-01-01

    Successful conservative management of spontaneous antegrade migration of feeding jejunostomy of a patient with dysphagia due to carcinoma of nasopharynx is reported. How to cite this article: Krishnamurthy G, Pandit N, Singh H, Singh R. Successful Conservative Management of Spontaneous Antegrade Migration of Feeding Jejunostomy. Euroasian J Hepato-Gastroenterol 2017;7(1):84-86. PMID:29201780

  7. Jejuno-jejunal intussusception: an unusual complication of feeding jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Sunil; Prabhu, Raghunath; Thangavelu, Siddharth; Shenoy, Rajgopal

    2013-06-27

    The jejuno-jejunal intussusception is a rare complication of jejunostomy tube placement. We are reporting a case of 33-year-old man who was suffering from absolute dysphagia due to carcinoma of cricopharynx with advanced metastatic disease, who underwent Stamms feeding jejunostomy as a part of palliative care. After 1 month he presented with colicky type of pain in the abdomen and vomiting. Sonogram of abdomen revealed a target sign and a feeding tube in a dilated jejunum. Abdominal CT proved the sonographic impression of jejuno-jejunal intussusception. He, therefore, underwent exploratory laparotomy and resection and anastomosis of the intussuscepted bowel. New feeding jejunostomy (FJ) was done distally from the anastomotic site. As per the literature this complication has been reported in Witzels jejunostomy. In our case the patient had undergone Stamms jejunostomy with placement of a Ryle's tube. Intussusception should be considered if a patient comes with abdominal pain and vomiting following FJ.

  8. Percutaneous jejunostomy: repeat access at the healed site of prior surgical jejunostomy with US and fluoroscopic guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James J; McVinnie, David W; Suiter, Paul A; de Quadros, Nishant M

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound (US)- and fluoroscopy-guided jejunostomy tube placement in patients with a history of surgical jejunostomy. Between June 2003 and June 2012, percutaneous US-guided jejunostomy placement was attempted 28 times in 26 patients with a history of surgical jejunostomy (14 men and 12 women). Retrospective chart review was performed to determine procedural success, complications, and interval between original jejunostomy and new tube placement. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with a mean follow-up period of 110 days (range, 3-631 d; median, 68 d). Successful tube placement was achieved in 26 of 28 attempts (92%). The mean time between removal of the original surgical jejunostomy and percutaneous placement of the new tube was 278 days (range, 3 d to 8 y; median, 88 d). A single minor complication involved a tube site infection 4 days after the procedure. There were no major complications. Mean procedure time was 49 minutes (range, 15-125 min; median, 45 min). Percutaneous jejunostomy access can be reliably and safely reestablished with US and fluoroscopic guidance in patients with a history of surgical jejunostomy. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative complications and weight loss following jejunostomy tube feeding after total gastrectomy for advanced adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenkman, Hylke J F; Roelen, Stéphanie V S; Steenhagen, Elles; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Patients undergoing total gastrectomy for cancer are at risk of malnourishment. The aim of this self-controlled study was to examine the effect of jejunostomy tube feeding (JTF) and other factors on postoperative weight and the incidence of jejunostomy-related complications in patients undergoing total gastrectomy for cancer. All consecutive patients who underwent total gastrectomy for gastric cancer with jejunostomy placement were included from a prospective single-center database (2003-2014). Jejunostomy-related complications and postoperative weight changes were evaluated up to 12 months after surgery. Multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with weight loss 12 months after gastrectomy. Of 113 patients operated in the study period, 65 received JTF after total gastrectomy for a median duration of 18 d [interquartile range (IQR), 10-55 d]. Jejunostomy-related complications occurred in 11 (17%) patients, including skin leakage (n=3) and peritoneal leakage (n=2), luxation (n=3), occlusion (n=2), infection (n=1) and torsion (n=1). In 2 (3%) patients, a reoperation was needed due to jejunostomy-related complications. The mean preoperative weight of patients was 71.8 kg (100%), and remained stable during JTF (73.9 kg, 103%, P=0.331). After JTF was stopped, the mean weight of patients decreased to 64.9 kg (90%) at 12 months after surgery (P<0.001). A high preoperative body mass index (BMI) (≥25 kg/m2) was associated with high postoperative weight loss compared to patients with a low BMI (<25 kg/m2) (16.3% vs. 8.6%, P=0.016). JTF can prevent weight loss in the early postoperative phase. However, this is at the prize of possible complications. As weight loss in the long term is not prevented, routine JTF should be re-evaluated and balanced against the selected use in preoperatively malnourished patients. Special attention should be paid to patients with a high preoperative BMI, who are at risk of more postoperative weight

  10. Predictors of Early Rebleeding after Endoscopic Therapy in Patients with Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to High-Risk Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Maggio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In an era of increasingly shortened admissions, data regarding predictors of early rebleeding among patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB exhibiting high-risk stigmata (HRS having undergone endoscopic hemostasis are lacking.

  11. Evaluation of jejunostomy tube feeding after abdominal surgery in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Kaoru; Mann, F A; Backus, Robert C

    2016-07-01

    To describe the use of postoperative intrajejunal feeding and to evaluate the association of preoperative plasma albumin concentrations with intrajejunal feeding-related complications and clinical outcome. Prospective, observational study. University veterinary teaching hospital. Sixty-four dogs. Jejunostomy tube placement during abdominal surgery. Most dogs (81%) survived. The median intrajejunal feeding period was 2.1 days (range: 1-16 days; n = 64). Only 3 (5%) dogs received their estimated resting energy requirement by intrajejunal feeding. Of dogs that were fed intrajejunally (58 out of 64), most (55 out of 58) received intrajejunal feeding within 24 hours after surgery. Energy provision via the jejunal feeding tube did not differ between dogs with and without complications (P = 0.592), or between nonsurvivors and survivors (P = 0.298). Thirty-five dogs ate voluntarily concurrently with intrajejunal feeding. Of dogs that ate voluntarily concurrently with intrajejunal feeding for ≤50% of the postoperative period, most (74%) survived to discharge. Complications were seen in 22% of dogs, and none were life-threatening; gastrointestinal signs were most common. There was no difference in preoperative plasma albumin concentration between dogs with and without complications (P = 0.432) and between nonsurvivors and survivors (P = 0.727). Fecal score was not significantly different between the 2 liquid diets studied (FormulaV Enteral Care HLP and CliniCare Canine/Feline; P = 0.927). A jejunostomy tube placed during abdominal surgery was likely to be used at the study institution. Few complications were seen and none were life-threatening. Intrajejunal feeding was initiated early after surgery and did not interfere with the initiation of voluntary oral intake. Fecal scores were high and were useful for an objective assessment of fecal consistency in dogs with intrajejunal feeding. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  12. Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy during reconstruction of the afferent loop in surgery of radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction following pancreaticoduodenectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouhos, Konstantinos; Boulas, Konstantinos A; Tsiomita, Evridiki; Papageorgiou, Irene; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Hatzigeorgiadis, Anestis

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction is a rare complication following pancreaticoduodenectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. As in the setting of Roux-en-Y reconstruction endoscopic approaches are limited, surgery of this complication becomes inevitable. This study provides a new classification/management system of the radiation-induced obstruction of the afferent loop based on the extent and location of radiation injury, and describes the Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy, a novel technique to avoid revision of the pancreatic anastomosis during reconstruction of the afferent loop. Data were analyzed from nine patients who developed radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction after pancreaticoduodenectomy with single Roux limb reconstruction. One patient had type I obstruction and treated with by-pass surgery, seven patients had type II obstruction and treated with reconstruction including revision of the hepaticojejunostomy and Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy, and one patient had type III obstruction and treated with reconstruction including revision of the hepaticojejunostomy and the pancreatic anastomosis. Reconstruction along with Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy performed in six patients with type II radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction; reconstruction was not feasible for one patient. The median operative time was 149 min. No intraoperative complication was observed. By performing Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy we managed efficiently to convert a pancreatic anastomosis to an enteric anastomosis as one case of Grade B pancreatic fistula and no case of Pancreaticojejuno-jejunostomy stricture were observed, regarding short- and long-term results, respectively. The above technique may have a useful application in the surgical management of the radiation-induced afferent loop obstruction when endoscopy fails and by-pass surgery is inappropriate.

  13. Benefits versus risks: a prospective audit. Feeding jejunostomy during esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this prospectively collected database is to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and utility of postoperative jejunostomy feeding in terms of achieving nutritional goals and evaluating gastrointestinal and mechanical complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy. The study included 204 consecutive patients who underwent esophagectomy for various benign and malignant conditions. All patients underwent Witzel feeding jejunostomy at the time of laparotomy. Patients were followed prospectively to record nutritional intake, type of feed administered, rate progression, tolerance, and complications either mechanical or gastrointestinal. Feeding jejunostomy could be performed in 99.5% patients; 6.0% of the patients had a blocked catheter during the course of feeding. The target calorie requirement could be achieved in 78% of patients by third day. In all, 95% of patients could be successfully fed exclusively by jejunostomy catheter during the postoperative period. Minor gastrointestinal complications developed in 15% of the patients and were managed by slowing the rate of infusion or administering medication. Patients spent a mean of 16.67 +/- 22.00 days (range 0-46 days) on jejunostomy feeding after surgery; however, 13% required prolonged jejunostomy feeding beyond 30 days. Altogether, 64% of the patients with an anastomotic leak and 50% of the patients with postoperative complications required catheter jejunostomy feeding beyond 30 days. The mean duration for which jejunostomy tube feeding was used was significantly higher for patients who developed anastomotic disruptions (33.05 +/- 16.24 vs. 14.69 +/- 19.04 days; p = 0.000) and postoperative complications (26.67 +/- 25.56 vs. 14.52 +/- 18.64 days; p = 0.000) when compared to those without disruption or complications. There were no serious complications related to the feeding catheter that required reintervention. There was no difference in the mean body weight or weight deficit at the end of 10 days and

  14. High resolution microphotonic needle for endoscopic imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin; Mohanty, Aseema; Roberts, Samantha P.; Barbosa, Felippe; Lipson, Michal

    2017-02-01

    GRIN (Graded index) lens have revolutionized micro endoscopy enabling deep tissue imaging with high resolution. The challenges of traditional GRIN lenses are their large size (when compared with the field of view) and their limited resolution. This is because of the relatively weak NA in standard graded index lenses. Here we introduce a novel micro-needle platform for endoscopy with much higher resolution than traditional GRIN lenses and a FOV that corresponds to the whole cross section of the needle. The platform is based on polymeric (SU-8) waveguide integrated with a microlens micro fabricated on a silicon substrate using a unique molding process. Due to the high index of refraction of the material the NA of the needle is much higher than traditional GRIN lenses. We tested the probe in a fluorescent dye solution (19.6 µM Alexa Flour 647 solution) and measured a numerical aperture of 0.25, focal length of about 175 µm and minimal spot size of about 1.6 µm. We show that the platform can image a sample with the field of view corresponding to the cross sectional area of the waveguide (80x100 µm2). The waveguide size can in principle be modified to vary size of the imaging field of view. This demonstration, combined with our previous work demonstrating our ability to implant the high NA needle in a live animal, shows that the proposed system can be used for deep tissue imaging with very high resolution and high field of view.

  15. [A case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the jejunum successfully treated by preoperative induction chemotherapy with imatinib mesylate administered through jejunostomy and subsequent surgical resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideyo; Ohtsuka, Takao; Toma, Hiroki; Ueda, Junji; Mizuuchi, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Takahata, Shunichi; Oda, Yoshinao; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao

    2014-03-01

    A 70 -year-old female patient with a palpable mass in the left upper abdomen suffered from abdominal pain and fever. Abdominal computed tomography showed a jejunal tumor 11 cm in diameter with ascites, suggesting rupture of the tumor. Histological diagnosis via endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration indicated c-kit-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Diagnostic laparoscopy demonstrated a large jejunal tumor possibly invading the stomach and pancreas. The patient then underwent tube jejunostomy. Thereafter, preoperative induction chemotherapy with imatinib mesylate(400mg/ body/day)via jejunostomy was administered for 6 months, resulting in 20%reduction of the tumor diameter and disappearance of any indication of stomach and pancreas invasion. The patient then underwent radical partial resection of the jejunum without combined resection of either the stomach or pancreas. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib mesylate (400mg/body/day)was also indicated. No sign of recurrence has been detected to date after 1 year of follow-up.

  16. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy technique as part of staging laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondona, Pietro; Andreani, Stefano Michele; Barr, Natasha; Singh, Krishna K

    2005-09-01

    Placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube is indicated for patients who need enteral access but where a gastrostomy is not feasible. This paper presents the technique and results of laparoscopic placement of feeding jejunostomy tubes in patients presenting with esophagogastric cancer. From December 2002 to February 2004, patients diagnosed with esophagogastric cancer with a potentially resectable lesion underwent staging laparoscopy. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy was performed on patients who were potential candidates for chemotherapy with palliative intent or neoadjuvant treatment prior to resection surgery. Surgical technique, recovery of bowel function, commencement of feeding jejunostomy, total time tube was in situ, and perioperative complications were analyzed. Of the 22 patients who underwent staging laparoscopy, a feeding jejunostomy tube was placed in 18. The remaining 4 patients were deemed to have advanced disease precluding any therapeutic options and underwent placement of esophageal stents. Feeding tubes remained in situ for a median time period of 76 days. Fourteen patients required enteral support and tubes were used for a median of 30 days. Complications from tube placement included 2 cases of wound infections, 1 of minor leak and 1 tube dislodgment. Patients were followed up for a median time of 112 days. Findings from current series suggest that placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube at the time of staging laparoscopy is a safe and reliable means of providing and maintaining nutrition for patients presenting with esophagogastric cancers.

  17. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique.

  18. [Enteral nutrition through long-term jejunostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, T; Neira, P; Enríquez, C

    2008-01-01

    We present the case of a female patient suffering a peritonitis episode after subtotal gastrectomy due to gastric neoplasm in relation to lesser curvature necrosis extending to the anterior esophageal wall. This an uncommon andsevere complication that made mandatory further aggressive surgery: transection of the abdominal esophagus, transection of the gastric stump, and cervical esophagostomy with creation of a jejunostomy with a needle catheter for feeding. This digestive tube access technique is generally used during major abdominal post-surgery until oral intake is reestablished. Our patient has been 187 days with this therapy since reconstruction of the GI tract was ruled out due to tumoral infiltration of the colon and tumor recurrence at the gastrohepatic omentum. To date, there has been no complication from permanence and/or long-term use of this technique.

  19. Three Dimensional Endoscopic Image of a Blood Vessel Using High Frequency Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Kamada, Kumi; Chihara, Kunihiro; Secomski, Wojciech; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a high frequency ultrasound (US) imaging system for observation of small tissues and a virtual endoscopic image of a blood vessel. This system consists of a US probe with a central frequency of 32 MHz, a microscope table designed to collect some slices of US brightness mode (B-mode) images, a transmitter containing control logic and a receiver circuit and a personal computer (PC) with an analog to digital (AD) converter. First, US B-mode images with high spatial resolution were obtained by shifting a measurement plane at a constant step of 0.075 mm. Second, three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction was performed with linear interpolation and a volume rendering technique. Finally, the point of view of the 3-D image was set in the human body and a virtual endoscopic image was presented. The experimental results present a blood vessel as if an ultrasound probe were inserted in it and reveal the anatomical structure under skin.

  20. Jejunostomy enteral feeding in children: outcome and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnell, Christina; Eksborg, Staffan; Grahnquist, Lena

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the clinical outcome and safety of jejunostomy tube feeding used in our clinical setting for more than 14 years. A retrospective study of all children who underwent a surgical catheter jejunostomy placement between July 1996 and March 2010 was conducted. Data were collected regarding the outcome and complications. Thirty-three children (14 girls) were included. The median age at the time of primary surgery was 1.43 years (range, 0.15-17.7 years), and the median time of follow-up was 2.34 years (range, 0.27-12.6 years). Seventeen children were severely neurologically impaired (NI). Surgical insertion of a jejunostomy tube was performed due to 1 or more of the following indications: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), failure to thrive, recurrent pneumonia, esophageal disease, or oral feeding difficulties. The effect of the indications showed a reduction in GERD and pneumonia. Feeding difficulties also decreased. Weaning was possible in 12 of 16 children without NI but in only 2 of 17 with NI. Major complications requiring surgical reoperation affected 8 children. No mortality was related to the jejunostomy feeding catheter. In selected cases, surgically placed jejunostomy tubes for feeding in children is an effective and safe method to overcome GERD, feeding difficulties, or recurrent pneumonia without major surgery. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Predictors of outcome after reconstructive hepatico-jejunostomy for post cholecystectomy bile duct injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rachel M; Doctor, Nilesh H

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructive hepatico-jejunostomy is recommended for major bile duct injuries (BDIs) during cholecystectomy. Complications of biliary leak, cholangitis, bleeding, anastomotic strictures and biliary cirrhosis remain a major concern affecting a patient's outcome after surgery. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of surgical repair of major BDIs at our institution and identify predictors for the development of major complications. A retrospective study of 57 patients with major BDI after cholecystectomy referred to a tertiary hepato-biliary centre from July 1999 to July 2011 and subsequently managed with reconstructive bilio-enteric anastomosis was performed. Of 57 patents 35 (61.4%) were primary referred. 22 (38.6 %) were secondary referred, of which 17 were for correct reconstructive surgery performed elsewhere and 5 were following attempted endoscopic management. 17 (29.8%) had local and systemic perioperative complications. 13 (22.8%) had major complications (bile leak, bleed, stricture and/or biliary cirrhosis). No association was found between age, type of cholecystectomy, type of injury, vascular injury and occurrence of major complications. Secondarily referred patients after therapeutic interventions (p = 0.010) and reconstructive surgery after repair performed by non-specialists suffered an increased incidence of major complications (p = 0.032). Secondary referral was also an independent predictor of major complications (p = 0.024). Early referral of patients with no previous intervention to a tertiary hepato-biliary center and specialist surgical repair is recommended for improved outcome after reconstructive hepatico-jejunostomy for major BDIs during cholecystectomy.

  2. Early Postoperative 24-Hour Continuous Jejunostomy Feeding in Esophagectomy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Hyun; Ju, Dal Lae; Hwang, Yoohwa

    2014-01-01

    Esophagectomy can result in various postoperative nutrition-related complications that may impair the nutritional status of the patient. In our institution, we usually initiate 16-hour continuous jejunostomy feeding using an enteral feeding pump on postoperative day 2 as a routine protocol after esophagectomy. The target calorie intake was achieved in 6-7 days with this protocol, which is longer than that required with other recently reported feeding protocols. Accordingly, early jejunostomy feeding protocol, which starts on postoperative day 1 and continues for 24 hours was attempted. In the present report, we described 3 cases of early 24-hour continuous jejunostomy feeding after esophagectomy. The use of this new protocol reduced the duration required to achieve the target calorie intake as less than 5 days without any enteral feeding-related complications. PMID:24527423

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided endoscopic transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    OpenAIRE

    César Vivian Lopes; Christian Pesenti; Erwan Bories; Fabrice Caillol; Marc Giovannini

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgery is the traditional treatment for symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts, but the morbidity is still too high. Minimally invasive endoscopic approaches have been encouraged. AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided endoscopic transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts. METHODS: From January, 2003 to August, 2006, 31 consecutive symptomatic patients submitted to 37 procedures at the same endoscopic unit were retrospectively analysed. Chronic and acute pa...

  4. Outcomes of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy tube placement in 299 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Monica T; Troung, Hung; Gebhart, Alana; Shih, Anderson; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2016-01-01

    Jejunostomy catheters for jejunal feeding are an effective method to improve nutritional status in malnourish patients. However, this procedure is commonly being performed using an open approach, which can be associated with more postoperative pain and prolonged recovery. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes of patients who underwent placement of feeding jejunostomy using a laparoscopic approach. A retrospective review was performed of patients who underwent laparoscopic jejunostomy tube placement between 1998 and 2014. Main outcome measures included indication for catheter placement, rate of conversion rate to open surgery, perioperative and late morbidity and in-hospital mortality. Two hundred and ninety-nine consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic jejunostomy during the study period. The mean age was 64 years, and 81% of patients were male. The mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m(2). The most common indications for catheter placement were resectable esophageal cancer (78%), unresectable esophageal cancer (10%) and gastric cancer (6%). There were no conversions to open surgery. The 30-day complication rate was 4.0% and included catheter dislodgement (1%), intraperitoneal catheter displacement (0.7%), catheter blockage (1%) or breakage (0.3%), site infection requiring catheter removal (0.7%) and abdominal wall hematoma (0.3%). The late complication rate was 8.7% and included jejuno-cutaneous fistula (3.7%), jejunostomy tube dislodgement (3.3%), broken or clogged J-tube (1.3%) and small bowel obstruction (0.3%). The 30-day mortality was 0.3% for a patient with stage IV esophageal cancer who died in the postoperative period secondary to respiratory failure. In this large consecutive series of feeding jejunostomy, the laparoscopic approach is feasible and safe and associated with a low rate of small bowel obstruction and no intraabdominal catheter-related infection.

  5. Intussusception: a Rare Complication After Feeding Jejunostomy; a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholaria, Shreyas; Lakhera, Kamal Kishor; Patni, Sanjeev

    2017-06-01

    Feeding jejunostomy (FJ) is a commonly done surgical procedure for enteral nutrition. Intussusception is one of the rare complications of FJ. Clinical presentation may be similar to other causes of small bowel obstruction. Intussusception should be suspected if a patient with jejunostomy tube develops upper gastrointestinal obstructive symptoms, which are relieved by nasogastric tube drainage. CT or ultrasonography (USG) can help to confirm the diagnosis. It can be relieved spontaneously or sometimes requires laparotomy. We have encountered such complication in one patient. The patient developed intestinal obstruction after removal of FJ tube and was diagnosed as having intussusception radiologically. On exploration, intussusception was identified at FJ site for which surgical reduction was done.

  6. Utility of feeding jejunostomy tubes in pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliye, Hussein E; Wright, G Paul; McCarthy, Caitlin; Johnson, Jared; Scales, Alex; Wolf, Andrea; Chung, Mathew

    2017-03-01

    Routine placement of jejunostomy tubes (JT) during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is controversial. A retrospective chart review of patients undergoing PD from 1/1/08 through 12/31/14 was performed. The patients were divided into groups by placement of JT. Outcome measures were 90-day morbidity, 90-day mortality, length of stay, rate of delayed gastric emptying (DGE), and JT-specific complications. 256 patients were included. There were no significant differences in 90-day morbidity (39.9% vs. 37.9%, p = 0.747), 90-day mortality (3.9% vs. 1.0%, p = 0.247) or TPN use (24.8 vs. 25.2%, p = 0.941) between those with and without JT, respectively. Patients with a JT had a higher rate of DGE (p < 0.001), longer hospital stay (14.3 vs. 11.6, p < 0.001), and longer time to solid intake (9.4 vs. 7.3, p < 0.001). Eleven patients (7.2%) with JT had tube-related morbidity. Routine placement of JT at the time of PD should be abandoned with efforts focused on preoperative nutrition optimization and early oral diet trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  8. [Principal characteristics of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis in ulcerative gastroduodenal bleedings in patients with high operational-anesthesiological risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timen, L Ia; Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z

    2013-01-01

    Application of the endoscopic programmed hemostasis for patients with ulcer gastroduodenal bleedings and with high operational-anesthetic risk provided metabolic rehabilitation (5% solutions of glucose and ascorbic acid) for the purpose of prevention of recurrence of the bleedings which have arisen after a hemostasis at 5.5% of patients.

  9. Non-labeled lensless micro-endoscopic approach for cellular imaging through highly scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Omer; Pandya, Aditya; Chemla, Yoav; Pinhas, Hadar; Schelkanova, Irina; Shahmoon, Asaf; Mandel, Yossi; Douplik, Alexandre; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2018-02-28

    We describe an imaging approach based on an optical setup made up of a miniature, lensless, minimally invasive endoscope scanning a sample and matching post processing techniques that enable enhanced imaging capabilities. The two main scopes of this article are that this approach enables imaging beyond highly scattering medium and increases the resolution and signal to noise levels reaching single cell imaging. Our approach has more advantages over ordinary endoscope setups and other imaging techniques. It is not mechanically limited by a lens, the stable but flexible fiber can acquire images over long time periods (unlike current imaging methods such as OCT etc.), and the imaging can be obtained at a certain working distance above the surface, without interference to the imaged object. Fast overlapping scans enlarge the region of interest, enhance signal to noise levels and can also accommodate post-processing, super-resolution algorithms. Here we present that due to the setup properties, the overlapping scans also lead to dramatic enhancement of non-scattered signal to scattered noise. This enables imaging through highly scattering medium. We discuss results obtained from in vitro investigation of weak signals of ARPE cells, rat retina, and scattered signals from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels filled with hemoglobin and covered by intralipids consequently mimicking blood capillaries and the epidermis of human skin. The development of minimally invasive procedures and methodologies for imaging through scattering medium such as tissues can vastly enhance biomedical diagnostic capabilities for imaging internal organs. We thereby propose that our method may be used for such tasks in vivo. © 2018 The Author(s).

  10. Non-Occlusive Small Bowel Necrosis in Association with Feeding Jejunostomy After Elective Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Duncan RC; Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Thompson, Jeremy N; Williamson, Robin CN

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Non-occlusive small bowel necrosis (NOSBN) has been associated with early postoperative enteral feeding. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of this complication in an elective upper gastrointestinal (GI) surgical patient population and the influence of both patient selection and type of feeding jejunostomy (FJ) inserted, based on the experience of two surgical units in affiliated hospitals. PATIENTS AND METHODS The records were reviewed of 524 consecutive patients who underwent elective upper GI operations with insertion of a FJ for benign or malignant disease between 1997 and 2006. One unit routinely inserted needle catheter jejunostomies (NCJ), whilst the other selectively inserted tube jejunostomies (TJ). RESULTS Six cases of NOSBN were identified over 120 months in 524 patients (1.15%), with no difference in incidence between routine NCJ (n = 5; 1.16%) and selective TJ (n = 1; 1.06%). Median rate of feeding at time of diagnosis was 105 ml/h (range, 75–125 ml/h), and diagnosis was made at a median of 6 days (range, 4–18 days) postoperatively. All patients developed abdominal distension, hypotension and tachycardia in the 24 h before re-exploratory laparotomy. Five patients died and one patient survived. CONCLUSIONS The understanding of the pathophysiology of NOSBN is still rudimentary; nevertheless, its 1% incidence in the present study does call into question its routine postoperative use especially in those at high risk with an open abdomen, planned repeat laparotomies or marked bowel oedema. Patients should be fully resuscitated before initiating any enteral feeding, and feeding should be interrupted if there is any evidence of feed intolerance. PMID:19558785

  11. Peritoneal Insufflation Facilitates CT-Guided Percutaneous Jejunostomy Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, David; Lambert, Drew

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine whether peritoneal insufflation can facilitate CT-guided percutaneous jejunostomy replacement. Peritoneal insufflation allowed clear differentiation of the adherent jejunum from adjacent bowel, permitting confident direct puncture into the adherent jejunum without the need for jejunopexy anchors.

  12. Autoadjustable sutures and modified seldinger technique applied to laparoscopic jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, Diego; Ciotola, Franco; Riganti, Juan Martín; Badaloni, Adolfo; Nieponice, Alejandro

    2015-02-01

    This is a simple technique to be applied to those patients requiring an alternative feeding method. This technique has been successfully applied to 25 patients suffering from esophageal carcinoma. The procedure involves laparoscopic approach, suture of the selected intestinal loop to the abdominal wall and jejunostomy using Seldinger technique and autoadjustable sutures. No morbidity or mortality was reported.

  13. High Resolution Sub-MM Fiberoptic Endoscope Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1447-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Gary F. [Univ. of California, Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, John [CML Fiberoptics, Inc., Auburn, NY (United States)

    2018-01-22

    At the time of the CRADA, LLNL needed to develop a sub-mm outer diameter fiberoptic endoscope with 25pm or better resolution at 3-lOmm working distance to support the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) and the Core Surveillance Program for DOE. The commercially available systems did not meet the image resolution requirements and development work was needed to reach three goals. We also needed to perform preliminary investigations into the production of such an endoscope with a steerable-articulated distal end. The goal of such an endoscope was to allow for a 45 degree inspection cone including the lens field of view.

  14. Totally laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy – a technique modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Bobowicz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In oncological patients with upper gastrointestinal tract tumours, dysphagia and cachexy necessitate gastrostomy orjejunostomy as the only options of enteral access for long-term feeding. In this article the authors describe a modifiedtechnique of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy applied during the staging laparoscopy. A 48-year-old male patient withgastroesophageal junction tumour and a 68-year-old male patient with oesophageal tumour were operated on usingthe described technique. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed. Then the feeding jejunostomy was made usinga Cystofix® TUR catheter. The jejunum was fixed to the abdominal wall with four 2.0 Novafil™ transabdominal stitches.Two additional sutures were placed caudally about 4 cm and 8 cm from the jejunostomy, aiming at prevention ofjejunal torsion. Total operating time was 45 min. There was no blood loss. There were no intraoperative complications.The only adverse event was one jejunostomy wound infection that responded well to oral antibiotics. There were nomortalities. The described technique has most of the benefits of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy with some stepsadded from the open operation making the procedure easier to perform as part of a staging operation with a relativelyshort additional operating time. The proposed transabdominal stitches make the technique easier to apply. Two additional‘anti-torsion sutures’ prevent postoperative volvulus. Use of the Cystofix catheter allows easy introduction of thecatheter into the peritoneal cavity and the jejunal lumen, providing a good seal at the same time. Further studies onlarger groups of patients are required to assess long-term outcomes of the proposed modified technique.

  15. Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy with use of a 21-gauge needle: a prospective study in 51 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Tao; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2009-12-01

    To assess the safety and clinical efficacy of fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy with use of a 21-gauge needle and a single anchor technique in 51 patients. From November 2006 to January 2009, 51 consecutive patients (42 men and nine women; mean age, 63.7 years) underwent percutaneous jejunostomy under fluoroscopic guidance. A 7.5-F multifunctional coil catheter was used to insufflate the jejunum. The distended jejunum was punctured with a 21-gauge needle, with the inserted coil catheter as the target. A single anchor was used. The technical success, number of punctures, procedure time, complications, and follow-up data including 30-day mortality rate were evaluated. The technical success rate was 100%, and the single anchor technique was used in all but one patient, in whom three anchors were used. The mean number of punctures was 1.7 (range, 1-4), and the mean procedure time was 14.8 minutes (range, 7-29 min). Peritonitis was a major complication in two patients (3.9%), who were treated by changing the catheters from 14 F to 16 F and performing percutaneous drainage procedures. Three minor complications were encountered: superficial cellulitis (n = 2) and severe puncture site pain (n = 1). The 30-day mortality rate was 5.9% (three of 51), although none of the deaths could be attributed to the jejunostomy procedures. Fluoroscopically guided percutaneous jejunostomy with use of a 21-gauge needle and the single anchor technique seems to be safe and effective, with high technical success and low complication rates.

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasound Does Not Accurately Stage Early Adenocarcinoma or High-Grade Dysplasia of the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    CLINICAL GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY 2010;8:1037-1041 ORIGINAL ARTICLES- ALIMENTARY TRACT Endoscopic Ultrasound Does Not Accurately Stage Early... quality ; 8 had indi- vidual patiem-level data (n = 132). Compared with surgical or EMR pathology staging, EUS had T-stage concordance of 65%, including...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Endoscopic

  17. Single-incision laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Yin; Liao, Chien-Hung; Chen, Chih-Chi; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Liu, Keng-Hao; Wang, Shang-Yu; Fu, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Feeding jejunostomy is an alternative enteral nutritional supplementation method for patients with functional gastrointestinal tracts. In this study, we introduced the novel, safe technique of single-incision laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy (SIL-AJ) tube placement. We conducted a prospective record search and a retrospective review of all patients who received surgical jejunostomy tube placement in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan, from October 2011 to December 2012. SIL-AJ, multiple-incision laparoscopic jejunostomy (MIL-J), and open jejunostomy (O-J) were performed concurrently. We compared the demographic data, operative time, postoperative pain control, and postoperative complications among these groups. Forty patients who received surgical jejunostomy in this period were enrolled in the study. There were 14 patients with SIL-AJ, 10 with MIL-J, and 16 with O-J. There were no differences in age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, body mass index, or malignancy distribution among the SIL-AJ, MIL-J, and O-J groups. The total operative times for the SIL-AJ, MIL-J, and O-J procedures were 53.3±11.5, 117.3±45.8, and 52.9±16.1 minutes, respectively; SIL-AJ and O-J had similar operative times, which were significantly shorter than the operative times in the MIL-J group (P<.001). The proportions of patients who began feeding within 24 hours in the SIL-AJ, MIL-J, and O-J groups were 100%, 70%, and 37%, respectively; the SIL-AJ group had a higher feeding rate at 24 hours than the two other groups (P=.001). The SIL-AJ and MIL-J groups had fewer postoperative complications than the O-J group (P=.011). SIL-AJ is a feasible and safe procedure that can be performed in patients who require alternative enteral feeding. Reduced postoperative pain, acceptable incisions, and quick feeding were observed in patients with SIL-AJ. Transumbilical SIL-AJ uses cost-effective appliances, and it is a relatively simple technique to learn and in which togain

  18. Validation of Fujinon intelligent chromoendoscopy with high definition endoscopes in colonoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Blanco, Adolfo; Jiménez, Alejandro; Rembacken, Björn; González, Nicolás; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Carrillo-Palau, Marta; Matsuda, Takahisa; Quintero, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To validate high definition endoscopes with Fujinon intelligent chromoendoscopy (FICE) in colonoscopy. METHODS: The image quality of normal white light endoscopy (WLE), that of the 10 available FICE filters and that of a gold standard (0.2% indigo carmine dye) were compared. RESULTS: FICE-filter 4 [red, green, and blue (RGB) wavelengths of 520, 500, and 405 nm, respectively] provided the best images for evaluating the vascular pattern compared to white light. The mucosal surface was best assessed using filter 4. However, the views obtained were not rated significantly better than those observed with white light. The “gold standard”, indigo carmine (IC) dye, was found to be superior to both white light and filter 4. Filter 6 (RGB wavelengths of 580, 520, and 460 nm, respectively) allowed for exploration of the IC-stained mucosa. When assessing mucosal polyps, both FICE with magnification, and magnification following dye spraying were superior to the same techniques without magnification and to white light imaging. In the presence of suboptimal bowel preparation, observation with the FICE mode was possible, and endoscopists considered it to be superior to observation with white light. CONCLUSION: FICE-filter 4 with magnification improves the image quality of the colonic vascular patterns obtained with WLE. PMID:19908333

  19. Non-surgical access for enteral nutritional: gastrostomy and jejunostomy, technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, M; Gaudric, M

    2013-06-01

    Gastrostomy is the most efficient and best tolerated method of prolonged nutritional support. Jejunostomy is used more rarely. Indications for both techniques have increased because of progress in insertion techniques under endoscopic or radiologic guidance. The procedure is simple and rapid, performed under simple sedation with a success rate over 95% for gastrostomy, irrespective of the technique. Mortality directly related to the technique is less than 5%, but associated co-morbidity also explains a more variable but often higher 30-day mortality. Local care and maintenance of the catheter should help avoid most of the late complications such as peristomal leaks, local infection or sepsis of the tunneled catheter in the abdominal wall. The main indications are neurologic swallowing disorders, mechanical dysphagia from ENT or esophageal disease, when the expected duration of enteral nutrition is at least longer than 3 weeks. In patients with severe dementia, no benefit for either nutritional status or quality of life has been demonstrated. In all cases, adequate patient information and careful evaluation of the risk/benefit ratio are capital. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Comparison of primary jejunostomy tubes versus gastrojejunostomy tubes for percutaneous enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles Y; Engstrom, Bjorn I; Horvath, Jeffrey J; Lungren, Matthew P; Suhocki, Paul V; Smith, Tony P

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate technical success and long-term outcomes of percutaneous primary jejunostomy tubes for postpyloric enteral feeding compared with percutaneous gastrojejunostomy (GJ) tubes. Over a 25-month interval, 41 consecutive patients (26 male; mean age, 55.9 y) underwent attempted fluoroscopy-guided direct percutaneous jejunostomy tube insertion. Insertions at previous jejunostomy tube sites were excluded. The comparison group consisted of all primary GJ tube insertions performed over a 12-month interval concomitant with the jejunostomy tube interval (N = 169; 105 male; mean age, 59.4 y). Procedural, radiologic, and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Intervention rates were expressed as events per 100 catheter-days. The technical success rate for percutaneous jejunostomy tube insertion was 96%, versus 93% for GJ tubes (P = .47). Mean fluoroscopy times were similar for jejunostomy and GJ tubes (9.8 vs 10.0 min, respectively; P value not significant). Jejunostomy tubes exhibited a lower rate of catheter dysfunction than GJ tubes, with catheter exchange rates of 0.24 versus 0.93, respectively, per 100 catheter-days (P = .045). GJ tube tip retraction into the stomach occurred in 9.5% of cases, at a rate of 0.21 per 100 catheter-days. Intervention rates related to leakage were 0.19 and 0.03 for jejunostomy and GJ tubes, respectively (P Jejunostomy and GJ tubes exhibited similar rates of catheter exchange for occlusion and replacement as a result of inadvertent removal. No major complications were encountered in either group. Percutaneous insertion of primary jejunostomy tubes demonstrated technical success and complication rates similar to those of GJ tubes. Jejunostomy tubes exhibited a lower dysfunction rate but a higher leakage rate compared with GJ tubes. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Gastrostomy/Jejunostomy for Feeding and Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Heinz; Hagel, Alexander F; Schlechtweg, Philipp; Foertsch, Thomas; Neurath, Markus F; Mudter, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    An effective method for long-term enteral feeding or stomach decompression is the use of a percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) or sometimes jejunostomy (PEJ). Under certain circumstances (eg, inadequate transillumination), endoscopic placement of PEG/PEJ tubes is impossible. In these cases, computed tomography (CT)-guided PEG/PEJ may represent an alternative technique. In this study, we evaluate indications, results, and complications of CT-guided PEG/PEJ. A total of 102 consecutive referred patients were enrolled in the study. Patients came to the endoscopy unit of our department to undergo a CT-guided PEG/PEJ for long-term intragastric/intrajejunal feeding (n = 57) or decompression (n = 45). The majority (n = 98) received a pull-through PEG/PEJ with simultaneous gastroscopy/jejunoscopy. Dose length product and the effective dose for every patient were calculated. PEG/PEJ tube placement was successful in 87.3% (89 of 102). Feeding PEG/PEJ tube placement was successfully completed in 91.2% (52 of 57); decompressive PEG/PEJ tube placement was likewise successfully completed in 82.2% (37 of 45). No procedure-related mortality was observed. Minor complications (eg, tube dysfunction, local bleeding, minimal leakage, local skin infection) were observed in 13 patients. The complication rate was similar between the feeding and decompression groups ( P = .9). CT-guided PEG/PEJ is a feasible and safe method with a low procedure-related morbidity rate for patients where endoscopic placement via transillumination is not successful. Thus, the procedure is an attractive alternative to surgical tube placement. Long-term complications, mainly tube disturbances, can be treated easily.

  2. Broadband rotary joint for high-speed ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic OCT imaging at 800  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeon-Cheol; Mavadia-Shukla, Jessica; Yuan, Wu; Alemohammad, Milad; Li, Xingde

    2017-12-01

    We report the development of a broadband rotary joint for high-speed ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging in the 800 nm spectral range. This rotary joint features a pair of achromatic doublets in order to achieve broadband operation for a 3 dB bandwidth over 150 nm. The measured one-way throughput of the rotary joint is greater than 80%, while the fluctuation of the double-pass coupling efficiency during 360 deg rotation is less than ±5% at a near video-rate speed of 20 revolutions/s (rps). The rotary joint is used in conjunction with a diffractive-optics-based endoscope and 800 nm spectral domain OCT system and achieved an ultrahigh axial resolution of ∼2.4  μm in air. The imaging performance is demonstrated by 3D circumferential imaging of a mouse colon in vivo.

  3. Novel cost-effective method of laparoscopic feeding-jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mistry Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A feeding jejunostomy tube placement is required for entral feeding in a variety of clinical scenarios. It offers an advantage over gastrostomies by eliminating the risk of aspiration. Standard described laparoscopic methods require special instrumentation and expensive custom-made tubes. We describe a simple cost-effective method of feeding jejunostomy using regular laparoscopic instruments and an inexpensive readily available tube. The average operating time was 35 min. We had no intra-operative complications and only one post-operative complication in the form of extra-peritoneal leakage of feeds due to a damaged tube. No complications were encountered while pulling out the tubes after an average period of 5-6 weeks.

  4. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; van Dyk, G. E.; Scholten, P. E.; Kort, N. P.

    2001-01-01

    Endoscopic calcaneoplasty offers access to the retrocalcaneal space, thereby making it possible to remove inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa as well as the posterosuperior part of the calcaneus in applicable cases of painful hindfoot. In this study, endoscopic calcaneoplasty was performed in 21

  5. Phlegmonous Esophagitis Treated with Internal Drainage and Feeding Jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Gi Woo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 67-year-old woman presenting with epigastric pain. Computed tomography identified diffuse phlegmonous esophagitis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed multiple perforations in the mucosal layer of the esophagus. A large amount of pus was drained internally through the gut. The patient was treated with antibiotics and early jejunostomy feeding. Although phlegmonous esophagitis is a potentially fatal disease, the patient was successfully treated medically with only a minor complication (esophageal stricture.

  6. Endoscopic tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulvahap Akyigit

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Middle ear surgery is usually performed using a surgical microscope. Initially, in otorhinolaryngology practice, endoscopes were used for paranasal sinus surgeries. It was only later that they were applied in the area of otology. In otologic surgeries, endoscopes were first used to visualize the middle ear, before being used to assist with visualization of instruments during cholesteatoma surgeries, although they are still not used alone in various otologic surgeries. As in other surgical fields, there is also a trend towards minimally invasive intervention in the field of otorhinolaryngology. Smaller incisions performed under the guidance of endoscopes are preferred over conventional large incisions. Using this approach, improved outcomes can be achieved and postoperative morbidities can be reduced. In addition, the outcomes of grafts performed using the endoscopic approach are similar to that achieved by the microscopic approach. Therefore, endoscopic ear surgery implementations are becoming increasingly popular.

  7. Trocar guided laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy: a simple new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Lee, Min R; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2012-10-01

    Several techniques of laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy have been described. Most of them require costly commercial kits. Here we present a novel, simple, low-cost method for laparoscopic jejunostomy tube placement. This technique involves 4 ports. A left lateral "guide" trocar is used as a landmark for tube placement. A jejunal loop is selected and 4 vicryl sutures are placed in a diamond shape on the antimesenteric side of the intestine and left untied. These 4 stitches are extracted using a transabdominal suture grasper inserted through 4 small incisions around the left lateral guide trocar. After an enterotomy is made in the center of these 4 stitches using cautery device, the left lateral trocar is removed and a 12 Fr Foley catheter is inserted in the trocar site and introduced into the bowel. The 4 stitches are pulled toward the abdominal wall and gently tied without additional suturing. Eight patients who underwent this procedure between 2007 and 2009 were reviewed. The procedure was successful in all patients. The median operative time was 70.5 minutes. There were no postoperative complications with respect to infection, bleeding, or bowel obstruction, and no perioperative mortality. Our trocar-guided approach for laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy placement is a simple, cost-effective, safe, and effective method.

  8. Prospective evaluation of the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Q Y; Senokozlieff-Englehart, A L; Siperstein, A E; Pearl, J; Grant, J P; Twomey, P L; Gadacz, T R; Prinz, R A; Wolfe, B M; Soper, N J

    1995-01-01

    We prospectively assessed the safety and efficacy of laparoscopic jejunostomy done by 11 surgeons in 8 medical centers using the T-fastener technique. In all, 23 men and 13 women aged 19 to 84 (mean, 59) years required enteral feeding, but could not undergo gastrostomy and had no contraindication to laparoscopy. Of these patients, 12 had head and neck cancer and 11 had neurologic swallowing dysfunction. The procedure took 25 to 180 minutes (mean, 75). Three (8%) early cases were converted to open jejunostomy because of accidental enterotomies caused by inappropriate techniques that were avoided in later cases. Minor technical problems, such as passing a needle through the back wall of the jejunum, occurred in 7 patients, but they were easily corrected and produced no complications. Feedings were routinely begun within 24 hours of the surgical procedure. All jejunostomy catheters functioned well. This is a safe and effective technique when done by experienced laparoscopic surgeons, and serious complications are rare. Images PMID:7725683

  9. Tacrolimus trough levels before, during and after jejunostomy in a liver transplant patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Juliane; Gazon, Mathieu; Mabrut, Jean-Yves; Duperret, Serge; Mezoughi, Salim; Tod, Michel; Ducerf, Christian; Charpiat, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Although the feasibility of oral tacrolimus administration in the presence of jejunostomy has already been reported, few studies monitoring tacrolimus trough blood levels have been analyzed in detail, either during or after a jejunostomy closure. We report on our experience with a 34-year-old patient who underwent liver transplantations, with a proximal jejunostomy constructed a few days prior to the second transplantation. He was administered tacrolimus by a predominantly oral route, and less frequently received it by jejunostomy. The aim of this paper is to discuss this administration strategy and whether a different method could have been more suitable. This case report highlights that during the jejunostomy period, the tacrolimus doses that were required to maintain trough concentrations within the therapeutic range were four times higher than those administered after the closure of the jejunostomy. We observed an increase in the Dose-Normalized Trough Concentration (DNTC) values when tacrolimus was administered for 4 consecutive days by jejunostomy as compared to oral administration, indicating that the relative bioavailability of tacrolimus increased. Moreover, when returning to oral administration, the subsequent DNTC value was halved, highlighting a reduction in the tacrolimus bioavailability. Thus, in such a case, administration by jejunostomy could be more appropriate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Postoperative complications and weight loss following jejunostomy tube feeding after total gastrectomy for advanced adenocarcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenkman, Hylke J.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413639916; Roelen, Stéphanie V.S.; Steenhagen, Elles|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815713; Ruurda, Jelle P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/257561021; van Hillegersberg, Richard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110706242

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Patients undergoing total gastrectomy for cancer are at risk of malnourishment. The aim of this selfcontrolled study was to examine the effect of jejunostomy tube feeding (JTF) and other factors on postoperative weight and the incidence of jejunostomy-related complications in patients

  11. Integrated pressure and temperature sensor with high immunity against external disturbance for flexible endoscope operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yusaku; Maeda, Kohei; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Takao, Hidekuni

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an integrated pressure and temperature sensor device for a flexible endoscope with long-term stability in in vivo environments was developed and demonstrated. The sensor, which is embedded in the thin wall of the disposable endoscope hood, is intended for use in endoscopic surgery. The device surface is coated with a Cr layer to prevent photoelectronic generation induced by the strong light of the endoscope. The integrated temperature sensor allows compensation for the effect of the temperature drift on a pressure signal. The fabricated device pressure resolution is 0.4 mmHg; the corresponding pressure error is 3.2 mmHg. The packaged device was used in a surgical simulation in an animal experiment. Pressure and temperature monitoring was achieved even in a pH 1 acid solution. The device enables intraluminal pressure and temperature measurements of the stomach, which facilitate the maintenance of internal stomach conditions. The applicability of the sensor was successfully demonstrated in animal experiments.

  12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An approach to suspected gallstone pancreatitis'based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) was adopted in 1976 and was followed in 29 patients. ERCp became the routine method of early biliary tract assessment when gallstone pancreatitis was suspected on ...

  13. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-05

    Jan 5, 1991 ... An approach to suspected gallstone pancreatitis'based on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and e'ndoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) was adopted in 1976 and was followed in 29 patients. ERCp became the routine method of early biliary tract assessment when gallstone pancreatitis.

  14. Epinephrine injection versus epinephrine injection and a second endoscopic method in high-risk bleeding ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Mercedes; Bennett, Cathy; Calvet, Xavier; Gisbert, Javier P

    2014-10-13

    Endoscopic therapy reduces the rebleeding rate and the need for surgery in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. To determine whether a second procedure improves haemostatic efficacy or patient outcomes or both after epinephrine injection in adults with high-risk bleeding ulcers. For our update in 2014, we searched the following versions of these databases, limited from June 2009 to May 2014: Ovid MEDLINE(R) 1946 to May Week 2 2014; Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily Update May 22, 2014; Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations May 22, 2014 (Appendix 1); Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Reviews-the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) April 2014 (Appendix 2); and EMBASE 1980 to Week 20 2014 (Appendix 3). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing epinephrine alone versus epinephrine plus a second method. Populations consisted of patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers, that is, patients with haemorrhage from peptic ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal) with major stigmata of bleeding as defined by Forrest classification Ia (spurting haemorrhage), Ib (oozing haemorrhage), IIa (non-bleeding visible vessel) and IIb (adherent clot) (Forrest Ia-Ib-IIa-IIb). We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Meta-analysis was undertaken using a random-effects model; risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are presented for dichotomous data. Nineteen studies of 2033 initially randomly assigned participants were included, of which 11 used a second injected agent, five used a mechanical method (haemoclips) and three employed thermal methods.The risk of further bleeding after initial haemostasis was lower in the combination therapy groups than in the epinephrine alone group, regardless of which second procedure was applied (RR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.81). Adding any second procedure significantly reduced the overall bleeding rate (persistent and recurrent bleeding) (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0

  15. Surgical mistake causing an high recto-vaginal fistula. A case report with combined surgical and endoscopic approach: therapeutic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectovaginal fistulas (RVFs) have multiple causes, size and location on which the surgical treatment depends. Description The Authors consider different approaches to RVFs and describe a clinical case of recurrent high RVF. Conclusions Most RVFs can be successfully repaired, although many interventions may be necessary. A colostomy with delayed repair may improve RVFs outcome. Moreover, several authors indicate Mucosal Advancement Flap and Babcock-Bacon technique as the treatments of choice respectively for low and high RVFs (complex and recurrent) and emphasize the placement of endoscopic prothesis in cases of difficult healing of the anastomosis. PMID:24266908

  16. Novel developments in endoscopic mucosal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sommen, F; Curvers, W L; Nagengast, W B

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic techniques such as High-definition and optical-chromoendoscopy have had enormous impact on endoscopy practice. Since these techniques allow assessment of most subtle morphological mucosal abnormalities, further improvements in endoscopic practice lay in increasing the detection efficacy

  17. Feeding jejunostomy tube placement during resection of gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhifei; Shenoi, Mithun M; Nussbaum, Daniel P; Keenan, Jeffrey E; Gulack, Brian C; Tyler, Douglas S; Speicher, Paul J; Blazer, Dan G

    2016-01-01

    Feeding tube placement is common among patients undergoing gastrectomy, and national guidelines currently recommend consideration of a feeding jejunostomy tube (FJT) for all patients undergoing resection for gastric cancer. However, data are limited regarding the safety of FJT placement at the time of gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The 2005-2011 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant User Files were queried to identify patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Subjects were classified by the concomitant placement of an FJT. Groups were then propensity matched using a 1:1 nearest neighbor algorithm, and outcomes were compared between groups. The primary outcomes of interest were overall 30-d overall complications and mortality. Secondary end points included major complications, surgical site infection, and early reoperation. In total, 2980 subjects underwent gastrectomy for gastric cancer, among whom 715 (24%) also had an FJT placed. Patients who had an FJT placed were more likely to be male (61.6% versus 56.6%, P = 0.02), have recent weight loss (21.0% versus 14.8%, P < 0.01), and have undergone recent chemotherapy (7.9% versus 4.2%, P < 0.01) and radiation therapy (4.2% versus 1.3%, P < 0.01). They were also more likely to have undergone total (compared with partial) gastrectomy (66.6% versus 28.6%, P < 0.01) and have concomitant resection of an adjacent organ (40.4 versus 24.1%, P < 0.01). After adjustment with propensity matching, however, all baseline characteristics and treatment variables were highly similar. Between groups, there were no statistically significant differences in 30-d overall complications (38.8% versus 36.1%, P = 0.32) or mortality (5.8 versus 3.7%, P = 0.08). There were also no differences in major complications, surgical site infection, or early reoperation. Operative time was slightly longer among patients with feeding tubes placed (median, 248 versus 233 min, P

  18. Jackhammer esophagus: high-resolution manometry and therapeutic approach using peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandulski, A; Fuchs, K-H; Weigt, J; Malfertheiner, P

    2016-08-01

    We present the first report on peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) in the treatment of jackhammer esophagus. A 34-year-old female patient was newly diagnosed with a jackhammer esophagus. After failure of medical treatment, the patient underwent POEM procedure for myotomy of the spastic segment. Postoperatively, a mild emphysema and pneumothorax occurred that required drainage and antibiotic therapy until full recovery. Discharge was possible after 5 days. Six months later, she presented with recurrent but mild pain due to a remnant spastic segment proximal to the myotomy. Endoscopic balloon dilation was performed twice within 6 weeks with full symptomatic relief of pain and mild symptoms of dysphagia. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. [Analysis of results of endoscopic screening of esophageal, gastric cardia and gastric cancers in high risk population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangong; Wang, Furang; Zhang, Yabing; Quan, Peiliang; Liu, Shuzheng; Sun, Xibin; Lu, Jianbang

    2014-02-01

    To summarize the results of endoscopic screening of esophageal, gastric cardiac and gastric cancers in the high-risk population, and analyze the influencing factors such as age, gender and biopsy rate on their detection and early diagnosis rates. Nine high incidence cities and counties of esophageal cancer in Henan province were included in this study. People aged 40-69 years were set to the target population. Excluding contraindications for gastroscopy, in accordance with the national technical scheme of early cancer diagnosis and treatment, gastroscopic screening and biopsy pathology for human esophageal, cardiac and gastric cancers were carried out. During the 3-year period, a total of 40 156 subjects were screened. Among them, 18 459 cases of various precancerous lesions (46.0%) were detected. The cancer detection rate was 2.3% (916 cases), including 763 cases of early cancers. The diagnosis rate of early cancers was 83.3%. Precancerous lesions were detected in 9297 cases (23.2%) for esophagus and 9162 cases (22.8%) for gastric cardia as well as stomach, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that endoscopic screening is feasible for early detection, diagnosis and treatment of esophageal, gastric cardia and gastric cancers among high risk population in high incidence area. Exploration analysis of relevant affecting factors may help to further improve the screening project for early diagnosis and treatment of those cancers.

  20. Impact of jejunostomy during esophagectomy for cancer on health related quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallin, Francesco; Noaro, Giulia; Pinto, Eleonora; Alfieri, Rita; Cagol, Matteo; Castoro, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of jejunostomy during esophagectomy for cancer on postoperative health-related quality of life (HRQL). Methods We evaluate all consecutive patients who underwent esophagectomy for cancer at the surgical oncology unit of the Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) between January 2008 and March 2014. The primary outcome was HRQL, which was assessed using nine scales of EORTC C30 and OES18 questionnaires. General linear models were estimated to evaluate mean score difference (MD) of each selected scale in patients with and without jejunostomy, adjusting for clinically relevant confounders. The secondary outcomes were morbidity, hospital stay, postoperative weight loss and postoperative albumin impairment. Results Jejunostomy was performed in 40 on 109 patients (41.3%) who participated in quality of life investigation. A clinically and statistically significantly worse eating at admission (P=0.009) became not clinically significant at 3 months after surgery (MD =9.1). Jejunostomy was associated to clinically and statistically significantly poorer emotional function (EF) at 3 months after surgery (MD =−15.6; P=0.04). Hospital stay was longer in jejunostomy group (median, 20 vs. 17 days, P=0.02). Conclusions In our series patients who had a jejunostomy during esophagectomy had been selected for their risk for postoperative complication. However, their postoperative outcome was actually similar compared to those without jejunostomy. Nevertheless, jejunostomy was associated to clinically and statistically significantly poorer EF at 3 months after surgery. Therefore, patient candidate to esophagectomy and feeding jejunostomy should receive additional psychological support. PMID:25561765

  1. Spontaneous ante-grade enteral migration of jejunostomy tube: A rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Pattnaik, Bramhadatt; Kudria, Kailash Chand

    2015-01-01

    Ante-grade migration of a feeding jejunostomy tube is a rare occurrence. A 47-year-old lady with hypopharyngeal malignancy underwent surgical placement of jejunostomy tube. Eight months later, she came with disappearance of the tube from skin surface. Clinical examination revealed skin erosion and disappearance of previously placed tube. Abdominal radiograph showed radio.opaque tube in the abdomen in its entirety. The patient underwent reoperation to establish enteral feeding route and at the same time retrograde extraction of the tube (from proposed site for placement of jejunostomy tube). Use of proper fixation, placement of tube with dilated distal ends can potentially prevent these complications.

  2. Percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jae Hyun; Han, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of afferent loop syndrome, jejunostomy or Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy have tended to represent the preferred procedures. In patients who are not good candidates for surgery, palliative treatment-i.e., percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or percutaneous direct transperitoneal jejunostomy techniques-have been applied. Transhepatic biliary drainage confers a risk of ascending cholangitis. Direct percutaneous transperitoneal drainage may be impractical when overlying bowel loops prevent access to deeply located afferent loops. In the present case, percutaneous jejunostomy through the liver parenchyma was performed successfully for palliation of afferent loop syndrome.

  3. Duodenal switch with omentopexy and feeding jejunostomy--a safe and effective revisional operation for failed previous weight loss surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, David F; Wasser, Samuel H; Riley, Tina; Juengert, Tinamarie; Hubler, June; Angel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    gastrogastrostomy leaks required surgical or radiologic intervention. One required revision for malnutrition, but otherwise the nutrition remained good. Revisional surgery to a duodenal switch is a complex operation and carries a high potential for major complications. Nonetheless, it can be accomplished safely with good long-term results. Omentopexy, drainage, and feeding jejunostomy should be considered at surgery to treat the high potential for delayed ischemic leaks. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sterilization of endoscopic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabnis, Ravindra B; Bhattu, Amit; Vijaykumar, Mohankumar

    2014-03-01

    Sterilization of endoscopic instruments is an important but often ignored topic. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the sterilization of endoscopic instruments and elaborate on the appropriate sterilization practices. Autoclaving is an economic and excellent method of sterilizing the instruments that are not heat sensitive. Heat sensitive instruments may get damaged with hot sterilization methods. Several new endoscopic instruments such as flexible ureteroscopes, chip on tip endoscopes, are added in urologists armamentarium. Many of these instruments are heat sensitive and hence alternative efficacious methods of sterilization are necessary. Although ethylene oxide and hydrogen peroxide are excellent methods of sterilization, they have some drawbacks. Gamma irradiation is mainly for disposable items. Various chemical agents are widely used even though they achieve high-level disinfection rather than sterilization. This article reviews various methods of endoscopic instrument sterilization with their advantages and drawbacks. If appropriate sterilization methods are adopted, then it not only will protect patients from procedure-related infections but prevent hypersensitive allergic reactions. It will also protect instruments from damage and increase its longevity.

  5. Rinsability of Orthophthalaldehyde from Endoscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Miner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthophthalaldehyde high level disinfectants are contraindicated for use with urological instruments such as cystoscopes due to anaphylaxis-like allergic reactions during surveillance of bladder cancer patients. Allergic reactions and mucosal injuries have also been reported following colonoscopy, laryngoscopy, and transesophageal echocardiography with devices disinfected using orthophthalaldehyde. Possibly these endoscopes were not adequately rinsed after disinfection by orthophthalaldehyde. We examined this possibility by means of a zone-of-inhibition test, and also a test to extract residues of orthophthalaldehyde with acetonitrile, from sections of endoscope insertion tube materials, to measure the presence of alkaline glutaraldehyde, or glutaraldehyde plus 20% w/w isopropanol, or ortho-phthalaldehyde that remained on the endoscope materials after exposure to these disinfectants followed by a series of rinses in water, or by aeration overnight. Zones of any size indicated the disinfectant had not been rinsed away from the endoscope material. There were no zones of inhibition surrounding endoscope materials soaked in glutaraldehyde or glutaraldehyde plus isopropanol after three serial water rinses according to manufacturers' rinsing directions. The endoscope material soaked in orthophthalaldehyde produced zones of inhibition even after fifteen serial rinses with water. Orthophthalaldehyde was extracted from the rinsed endoscope material by acetonitrile. These data, and other information, indicate that the high level disinfectant orthophthalaldehyde, also known as 1,2-benzene dialdehyde, cannot be rinsed away from flexible endoscope material with any practical number of rinses with water, or by drying overnight.

  6. Endoscopic surveillance strategy after endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsujii, Masahiko; Kato, Motohiko; Hayashi, Yoshito; Akasaka, Tomofumi; Iijima, Hideki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2014-05-15

    Early detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important to improve the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic modalities and treatment devices, such as image-enhanced endoscopy and high-frequency generators, may make endoscopic treatment, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection, a therapeutic option for gastric intraepithelial neoplasia. Consequently, short-term outcomes of endoscopic resection (ER) for EGC have improved. Therefore, surveillance with endoscopy after ER for EGC is becoming more important, but how to perform endoscopic surveillance after ER has not been established, even though the follow-up strategy for more advanced gastric cancer has been outlined. Therefore, a surveillance strategy for patients with EGC after ER is needed.

  7. Feeding jejunostomy during Whipple is associated with increased morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padussis, James C; Zani, Sabino; Blazer, Dan G; Tyler, Douglas S; Pappas, Theodore N; Scarborough, John E

    2014-04-01

    Placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube (FJ) is often performed during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Few studies, however, have sought to determine whether such placement affects postoperative outcomes after PD. This is a retrospective analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database to determine the 30-d-postoperative mortality rate, major complication rate, and overall complication rate of jejunostomy tube placement at the time of PD. Univariate and multivariate comparison of postoperative outcomes between patients with and without FJ placement during PD was performed on a total of 4930 patients. Thirty-day-postoperative mortality did not differ between the two groups (4.0% for patients with FJ versus 2.7% without, P = 0.13), whereas overall morbidity (43.3% with FJ versus 34.6% without, P < 0.0001) and serious morbidity (29.5% with FJ versus 22.8% without, P < 0.0001) were significantly higher in patients undergoing FJ placement during PD. The specific complications that occurred more frequently in FJ patients than patients without FJ included deep space surgical site infection, pneumonia, unplanned reintubation, acute renal failure, and sepsis. Although FJ placement during PD is considered to be routine at many institutions, our analysis of data from NSQIP suggest that FJ placement may be associated with increased postoperative morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopic detection of early esophageal cancer in a high-risk population: does Lugol staining improve videoendoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, V; Burtin, P; Bour, B; Blanchi, A; Cales, P; Oberti, F; Person, B; Croue, A; Dohn, S; Benoit, R; Fabiani, B; Boyer, J

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of videoendoscopy, with and without Lugol staining, for the detection of esophageal cancer in alcoholic or smoking patients older than 40 years. Daily alcohol and tobacco consumption and overt and latent symptoms were noted. The 158 patients included were examined by videoendoscopy and with Lugol dye. The mean consumption of alcohol and tobacco was 86 +/- 49 gm/day for 26 +/- 11 years, and 30 +/- 18 pack-years, respectively. Twenty-five patients had no symptoms. Before Lugol staining, 12 patients had endoscopically identified cancerous lesions. After Lugol staining, 13 patients had 17 esophageal cancers, 3 of which were high-grade dysplasia. The prevalence of esophageal cancer was 8.2%: 95% CI [4,14]. Dye-free surfaces were significantly larger than the endoscopic patterns observed before Lugol staining (11.6 +/- 9.2 cm2 vs 1.4 +/- 1.7 cm2; p Lugol staining only moderately improves the diagnostic accuracy of videoendoscopy; its main advantage is the assessment of the mucosal extension of esophageal cancer.

  9. Olecranon extrabursal endoscopic bursectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chen G; McGuire, Duncan T; Morse, Levi P; Bain, Gregory I

    2013-09-01

    Olecranon bursitis is a common clinical problem. It is often managed conservatively because of the high rates of wound complications with the conventional open surgical technique. Conventional olecranon bursoscopy utilizes an arthroscope and an arthroscopic shaver, removing the bursa from inside-out. We describe an extrabursal endoscopic technique where the bursa is not entered but excised in its entirety under endoscopic vision. A satisfactory view is obtained with less morbidity than the open method, while still avoiding a wound over the sensitive point of the olecranon.

  10. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  11. Ascaris exit through the feeding jejunostomy tract: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Rather, Ajaz Ahmad; Irshad, Ifat; Hakeem, Zubair Ashraf; Bijli, Akram Hussain; Khan, Tahir Saleem; Lone, Reyaz Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    A 65-year-old male was operated for esophageal carcinoma. Transhiatal esophagogastrectomy with jejunostomy feeding tube was done. Orals were started on the 12th postoperative day. The jejunostomy feeding tube was removed on the 20th postoperative day. Immediately after removal of the feeding tube, a 10-12 cm ascaris was seen emerging through the jejunostomy tract. Ascaris lumbricoides can cause a variety of complications like intestinal obstruction, perforation, biliary obstruction, pancreatitis, liver abscess, cholangiohepatitis, volvulus, and gangrene, etc. Although the above-mentioned complications have been frequently reported, ascaris exit through the feeding jejunostomy tract is very rare. This case is reported here to emphasize the importance of this complication of wandering ascariasis.

  12. Preliminary experience with 4K ultra-high definition endoscope: analysis of pros and cons in skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, M; La Rocca, G; Lauretti, L; D'Alessandris, G Q; Mangiola, A; Anile, C; Olivi, A; Paludetti, G

    2017-06-01

    During the last two decades endoscopic skull base surgery observed a continuous technical and technological development 3D endoscopy and ultra High Definition (HD) endoscopy have provided great advances in terms of visualisation and spatial resolution. Ultra-high definition (UHD) 4K systems, recently introduced in the clinical practice, will shape next steps forward especially in skull base surgery field. Patients were operated on through transnasal transsphenoidal endoscopic approaches performed using Olympus NBI 4K UHD endoscope with a 4 mm 0° Ultra Telescope, 300 W xenon lamp (CLV-S400) predisposed for narrow band imaging (NBI) technology connected through a camera head to a high-quality control unit (OTV-S400 - VISERA 4K UHD) (Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Two screens are used, one 31" Monitor - (LMD-X310S) and one main ultra-HD 55" screen optimised for UHD image reproduction (LMD-X550S). In selected cases, we used a navigation system (Stealthstation S7, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, US). We evaluated 22 pituitary adenomas (86.3% macroadenomas; 13.7% microadenomas). 50% were not functional (NF), 22.8% GH, 18.2% ACTH, 9% PRL-secreting. Three of 22 were recurrences. In 91% of cases we achieved total removal, while in 9% near total resection. A mean follow-up of 187 days and average length of hospitalisation was 3.09 ± 0.61 days. Surgical duration was 128.18± 30.74 minutes. We experienced only 1 case of intraoperative low flow fistula with no further complications. None of the cases required any post- or intraoperative blood transfusion. The visualisation and high resolution of the operative field provided a very detailed view of all anatomical structures and pathologies allowing an improvement in safety and efficacy of the surgical procedure. The operative time was similar to the standard 2D HD and 3D procedures and the physical strain was also comparable to others in terms of ergonomics and weight. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia

  13. Endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy

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    Milojević Milanko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Intensive epiphora (lacrimal apparatus disease can make difficult daily routine and cause ocular refraction disturbances. In most cases ethiology is unknown, rarely occurs after nose surgical procedures, face fractures, in Wegener granulomatosis, sarcoidosis and malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of endonasal endoscopic surgical procedure with the conventional surgical instruments in treatment of nasolacrimal obstructions. Methods. This retrospective study included 12 female patients with endonasal endoscopic surgical procedure from Otorhinological and Ophtalmological Departments of Military Medical Academy, Belgrade from September 2007 to April 2009. Preoperative nasal endoscopy was performed in order to reveal concomitant pathological conditions and anatomic anomalies which could make surgical procedure impossible. Computerized tomography was performed only in suspect nose diseases. Surgical endonasal endoscopic procedure was performed by otorhinolaryngologist and ophtalmologist in all patients. The patients had regular controls from 2 to 20 months. Results. A total of 12 female patients, age 34-83 years, were included in our study. Epiphora was a dominant symptom in all patients. In two patients deviation of nasal septum was found, and in other one conha bulosa at the same side as chronic dacryocystitis. All patients were subjected to endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR by endoscopic surgical technique using conventional instruments. Concomitantly with DCR septoplastics in two patients and lateral lamictetomy in one patient were performed. There were no complications intraoperatively as well as in the immediate postoperative course. In two patients the need for reoperation occurred. Conclusion. Endoscopic DCR is minimally invasive and efficacious procedure for nasolacrymal obstructions performed by otorhinolaryngologist and ophtalmologist. Postoperative recovery is very fast.

  14. Feeding jejunostomy: does the benefit overweight the risk (a retrospective study from a single centre).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Abdul Gani; Lone, Gh Nabi; Singh, Shyam; Dar, Ab Majeed; Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Lone, Reyaz Ahmad; Irshad, Ifat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the efficacy and safety of feeding jejunostomy in terms of achieving the nutritional goals in patients undergoing esophagectomy for carcinoma of oesophagus and complications associated hence with. A total of 463 patients underwent esophagogastrectomy for carcinoma oesophagus during this period. All these patients underwent Witzel feeding jejunostomy for post-operative enteral nutrition. Enteral feeding was started after 24 h of surgery and increased gradually till target caloric and protein value was achieved. Nutritional goals achieved were reviewed. All complications related to jejunostomy were recorded. The study comprised of 463 patients who underwent elective esophagogastrectomy. Mean age was 58 +/- 8.4 in male patients and 55 +/- 4.2 years in female patients. Patients spend a mean of 19 +/- 8.4 (range 10-49) days on jejunostomy feed. The targeted calorie requirement was achieved by post-operative day 3 in 408 (88.12%) patients. The catheter blockage was one of the main complications during the course of feeding. Seven patients required relaparotomy for catheter blockage. Feeding jejunostomy is an effective, safe, economic and well tolerated method of providing nutrition to the patients of esophagogastrectomy. Feeding jejunostomy should be done in every patient undergoing esophagectomy at the time of laparotomy. Copyright 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Two port video-assisted gastrostomy and jejunostomy: technical simplification and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Paula; Domene, Carlos Eduardo; Santo, Marco Aurélio; Cecconello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Patients presenting upper gastrointestinal obstruction, difficulty or inability in swallowing, may need nutritional support which can be obtained through gastrostomy and jejunostomy. To describe the methods of gastrostomy and jejunostomy video-assisted, and to compare surgical approaches for video-assisted laparoscopy and laparotomy in patients with advanced cancer of the esophagus and stomach, to establish enteral nutritional access. Were used the video-assisted laparoscopic techniques for jejunostomy and gastrostomy and the same procedures performed by laparotomies. Comparatively, were analyzed the distribution of patients according to demographics, diagnosis and type of procedure. There were 36 jejunostomies (18 by laparotomy and 17 laparoscopy) and 42 gastrostomies (21 on each side). In jejunostomy, relevant data were operating time of 132 min vs. 106 min (p = 0.021); reintroduction of diet: 3.3 days vs 2.1 days (p = 0.009); discharge: 5.8 days vs 4.3 days (p = 0.044). In gastrostomy, relevant data were operative time of 122.6 min vs 86.2 min (p = 0.012 and hospital discharge: 5.1 days vs 3.7 days (p = 0.016). The comparative analysis of laparotomy and video-assisted access to jejunostomies and gastrostomies concluded that video-assisted approach is feasible method, safe, fast, simple and easy, requires shorter operative time compared to laparotomy, enables diet start soon in compared to laparotomy, and also enables lower length of stay compared to laparotomy.

  16. Complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-jejunostomy for levodopa/carbidopa infusion in advanced Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Olivares

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous infusions of levodopa directly into the duodenum-yeyunum is an effective therapy to reduce daily off time in an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease, but it is not without complications, particularly device related problems. We present our experience in three Spanish hospitals with these complications, including a severe case with migration, several decubitus ulcers, and one case of perforation of the bowel and finally death.

  17. Endoscopic case

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a ten-year-old female patient referred to Gastroenterolgy consultation for abdominal pain and cramping, usually worse after eating, recurring diarrhoea, hypochromic and microcytic anaemia with low serum iron and ferritin levels. Moderate to severe Crohn’s disease of the terminal ileum e right colon (L3) was diagnosed, based on endoscopic image and biopsy. The patient was treated with prednisone and azathioprine, but after one year of treatment she was steroids dependent...

  18. A case Report of a Rare Complication in Patients with Jejunostomy Tube (Spontaneous Enteral Migration of Jejunostomy Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Vafaeimanesh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Jejunostomy tube (JT insertion is an approved method for enteral feeding in patients who cannot feed orally. In spite of all advantages of JT placement, some complications may occur, including mechanical and metabolic complications as well as gastrointestinal infections. Spontaneous enteral migration of JT is a rare complication in these patients that only a limited number has been reported. This event predisposes patient to bowel obstruction; therefore, treatment method of this complication is discussed. Case Report: In this article, we will describe a case of spontaneous migration of JT into small intestine, 2 months after placement in a 61 years old woman with the history of esophageal cancer. The patient excreted the tube after 15 days of supportive treatment.

  19. Automated endoscope reprocessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desilets, David; Kaul, Vivek; Tierney, William M; Banerjee, Subhas; Diehl, David L; Farraye, Francis A; Kethu, Sripathi R; Kwon, Richard S; Mamula, Petar; Pedrosa, Marcos C; Rodriguez, Sarah A; Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel

    2010-10-01

    The ASGE Technology Committee provides reviews of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evidence-based methodology is used, with a MEDLINE literature search to identify pertinent clinical studies on the topic and a MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database search to identify the reported complications of a given technology. Both are supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed and by scrutinizing pertinent references cited by the identified studies. Controlled clinical trials are emphasized, but in many cases data from randomized, controlled trials are lacking. In such cases, large case series, preliminary clinical studies, and expert opinions are used. Technical data are gathered from traditional and Web-based publications, proprietary publications, and informal communications with pertinent vendors. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are drafted by 1 or 2 members of the ASGE Technology Committee, reviewed and edited by the committee as a whole, and approved by the Governing Board of the ASGE. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided. For this review, the MEDLINE database was searched through February 2010 for articles related to automated endoscope reprocessors, using the words endoscope reprocessing, endoscope cleaning, automated endoscope reprocessors, and high-level disinfection. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are scientific reviews provided solely for educational and informational purposes. Technology Status Evaluation Reports are not rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment or payment for such treatment. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Occupational hazards associated with endoscope high-level disinfection: case vignettes, review of literature and recommendations for mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobo, B H; Foster, L A; Rabesa, M J

    2014-01-01

    High-level disinfection is crucial in preventing instrument-related infections. However, inadequate process and practice may expose technicians to chemicals and other hazards. The aim of this article is to describe the health effects related to high-level disinfection, the process of identifying hazards and safer practice recommendations. Two endoscope technicians with different clinical presentations were evaluated for workplace exposures. In addition to acute clinical care, corroborative information was obtained through walkthrough and observing patients performing their daily tasks, interview of co-workers, environmental assessment and review of published literature. Recommendations for improvement and clinical follow up were made. Clinical evaluation and workplace assessment identified potential exposures to: denatonium benzoate, ortho-phthalaldehyde, proteinase subtilisin, and isopropyl alcohol. Environmental monitoring showed adequate ventilation but with potential for acute high-level exposure to high-level disinfectants. Ergonomic stressors and noise were addressed. Following work restrictions and work practice changes, both patients were able to return to work without recurrence of symptoms. The occupational hazards of working in an endoscopy disinfection unit include chemicals that are irritants and/or allergenic. In addition to bioengineering controls, administrative controls and proper respiratory and dermal protections may mitigate exposure and allow workers to continue working safely.

  1. Transnasal Snare Technique for Retrograde Primary Jejunostomy Placement After Surgical Gastrojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Rajiv N; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Hage, Anthony N; Shields, James J; Saad, Wael E; Majdalany, Bill S; Srinivasa, Ravi N

    2017-12-01

    To report a transnasal snare technique for retrograde primary jejunostomy placement after surgical gastrojejunostomy. Two patients underwent the transnasal snare technique for retrograde primary jejunostomy placement. Patients included two females, age 58 and 62. In both patients, a gooseneck snare was inserted in a transnasal fashion. After insertion of the snare into the jejunum, the location was confirmed with ultrasound. The snare was then targeted using a Chiba needle through which a 0.018-inch wire was advanced and snared through the nose. The wire was exchanged for a 0.035-inch Amplatz wire over which the tract was serially dilated followed by insertion of the jejunostomy catheter through a peel-away sheath. Technical success, complications, and follow-up were recorded. Primary jejunostomy placement was technically successful in both patients. No minor or major complications occurred. Both patients received enteral nutrition the day following placement. Follow-up was at 54 and 38 days for patients 1 and 2, respectively. The transnasal snare technique provides a novel alternative for primary jejunostomy insertion allowing for targeting of the jejunum with improved procedural success and no complications.

  2. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  3. Pancreatic Transplantation and Subsequent Graft Surveillance by Pancreatic Portal–Enteric Anastomosis and Temporary Venting Jejunostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibari, Gazi B.; Boykin, Kevin N.; Sawaya, David E.; Abreo, Kenneth D.; Gonzalez, Enrique; Gebel, Howard M.; McDonald, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate portal–enteric (PE) pancreas and kidney transplantation with venting jejunostomy (VJ) for its efficacy, safety, and reproducibility. Summary Background Data Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation for patients with long-standing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus that progresses to renal failure has revolutionized their treatment and quality of life. A current clinical focus is to refine the technical aspects of this procedure. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation with PE anastomosis with VJ appears to offer several advantages over bladder drainage. VJ allows initial decompression of the enteric anastomosis, monitoring of pancreatic function by ostomy amylase, and simple access for endoscopic evaluation and biopsy of the allograft. Methods Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation with VJ was performed in 21 patients from December 1996 to October 2000 at Willis Knighton/LSU Regional Transplant Center. All patients had long-standing insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and subsequent renal failure. They were evaluated at the time of surgery by a multidisciplinary transplant team and monitored for numerous factors, including length of hospital stay, immunosuppressive regimen, and ischemia times. All patients had intermittent visual and biochemical evaluation of pancreatic secretions monitored by means of the VJ. Results Of the 21 patients, 10 were women and 11 were men. Four patients were black and 17 were white. The mean age at transplantation was 38 years; average human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match was one; and average cold ischemia time was 12 hours. The median hospital stay was 16 days. Four episodes of postoperative bleeding requiring exploration occurred in four patients. Postoperative wound infections developed in four patients. There were 12 episodes of rejection in nine patients. All patients with suspected acute pancreatic rejection underwent endoscopy by means of the VJ and duodenal biopsy for evaluation

  4. Comparison of Postoperative Pain Following Laparoscopic Versus Open Gastrostomy/Jejunostomy in Patients with Complete Obstruction Caused by Advanced Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Takeshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Fujita, Itsuo; Kanazawa, Yoshikazu; Kakinuma, Daisuke; Kanno, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Akihisa; Ohta, Keiichiro; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    When percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible, a gastrostomy tube may be inserted for enteral access by a laparoscopic or open technique. The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative pain of laparoscopic versus open gastrostomy in patients with complete obstruction caused by advanced esophageal cancer. Fifteen patients who had undergone either a reduced port access laparoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy (LGJ, n=7) or open gastrostomy/jejunostomy (OGJ, n=8) between July 2011 and December 2015 were retrospectively studied. Variables examined comprised age, sex, body mass index (BMI), operative time, blood loss volume, and American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status (ASA-PS) scores. The degree of postoperative pain was also assessed in both groups during the first seven postoperative days. The patients in the two groups were comparable in age, sex, BMI, ASA-PS scores, intraoperative blood loss or postoperative complication rates. Operative time was shorter in the LGJ group than the OGJ group. No patients in the LGJ group required conversion to open laparotomy. Tube feedings were started on postoperative Day 1 in both groups; there were no postoperative complications. The duration of rescue nonopioid analgesic use was significantly shorter in the LGJ than the OGJ group (1.3 versus 3.5 days; P=0.0005). There was a significant difference in frequency of postoperative nonopioid analgesic use: 7.9 times in the LGJ group versus 17.9 times in the OGJ group (P=0.0219). LGJ is associated with less postoperative pain than OGJ in patients with complete obstruction caused by advanced esophageal cancer.

  5. [Surgical jejunostomy as digestive tube access in the long-term].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández López, María Teresa; Rodríguez Vázquez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Home enteral nutrition (HEN) is the choice for patients who can not mantain oral intake but have a functioning gastrointestinal tract when it isn't justify keeping the patient in the hospital. The results of the HEN registry of the NADYA group in 2010 shows information related to the enteral acces route: 51% of the cases used nasogastric tubes, 27% gastrostomies, 10% oral route and 3% jejunostomies. Placement of a needle catheter jejunostomy is recommended for candidates for enteral nutrition undergoing major abdominal surgery, but publications about long-term use of this acces are scarce. We report same cases of patients whom the selected enteral acces was surgical jejunostomy. They represents the 1,14% of our patients with HEN at this moment, with a mean dwelling time of 210 ± 222 days. There has been frequent complications, but they were sligh. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. Mediastinitis complicating a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: a case report

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    Spirou Spiros

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its introduction in the early 1980s, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy has become the most popular method for performing a gastrostomy for long-term enteral feeding. It has been associated, however, with a lot of minor and major complications. Case presentation A case of mediastinitis with concominant sepsis caused by a masked esophageal perforation after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a multi-traumatized, brain-injured patient is presented. Ten – fourteen days after the procedure, the patient became febrile and gradually septic with tenderness of the sternum and upper abdomen. Computerized tomography of the thorax revealed mediastinitis. An urgent left thoracotomy and laparotomy were performed for drainage of the mediastinum, removal of the gastrostomy and insertion of a jejunostomy tube. The patient improved soon after the surgery. He was successfully weaned off the ventilator and was discharged from the Intensive Care Unit. Conclusion Perforating mediastinitis is a rare but potentially lethal complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. When diagnosed and properly treated it may have a favourable outcome.

  7. [Reducing the Feeding-Tube Obstruction Rate in Esophageal Cancer Patients With Jejunostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ying-Chun; Hsieh, Pei-Yin; Chang, Tsyr-Huei

    2015-06-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer experience chronic dysphagia. This condition typically necessitates the use of a jejunal feeding tube to provide the patient with adequate nutrition. Obstruction of the jejunal feeding tube is common in clinical practice and results in malnutrition in most patients and mortality in the most serious cases. An analysis of the status of jejunostomy-tube use in our unit found that these tubes were obstructed in 27.6% of the cases. The causes of this obstruction were: tube bending due to tight suturing, small inner-tube diameter, the absence of adequate jejunal-feeding standards, and failure to implement relevant training strategies. These findings motivated us to attempt to reduce the incidence of jejunostomy-tube obstruction at our center. This project was designed to reduce the incidence of jejunostomy-tube obstruction in esophageal cancer patients from 27.6% to ≤ 3%. Clear strategies, including modification of the stitching method used at the implantation end of the central venous catheter-type jejunostomy tube, establishment of feeding standards, creation of educational guidelines and leaflets, classroom teaching, and technical examinations, were used to reduce the prevalence of obstruction incidents. The jejunostomy-tube obstruction rate was reduced from 27.6% to 6.7%. While the study objective was not achieved, the magnitude of the reduction was still significant at 75.7%. Cross-disciplinary collaboration, continuous education and training, and the promotion of standards of practice were used to significantly reduce the jejunostomy tube obstruction rate in esophageal cancer patients. This result substantially increased the nutrition and quality of care received by this patient population.

  8. Role of jejunostomy feeding catheter as a model for nutritional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgadir, Moneer A; Mahadi, Seif ElDin I; Nasr, Ayman O; Ahmed, Mohamed ElMakki

    2010-01-01

    The advancement in oesophageal cancer care during the last two decades has resulted in a decrease in the use of feeding jejunostomy catheter to maintain adequate nutrition. We aim to examine the validity of feeding jejunostomy catheter in maintaining adequate nutrition for patients with oesophageal cancer. A prospective longitudinal study was conducted on oesophageal cancer patients presenting to Khartoum Teaching Hospital with complete dysphagia between June 2005 and September 2007. Nutritional assessment was performed pre- and post-insertion of the feeding jejunostomy catheter and data were tested for any significant difference. Among 99 patients enrolled in the study, 48 had the feeding catheter inserted during oesophagectomy, 41 prior to neoadjuvant therapy and 10 as a palliative measure. Catheter dislodgement occurred in 3% of patients while blockage occurred in 10% and migration in only 1%. The mean ± SD of patients' weight pre-insertion was 48.08 ± 10.29, while the mean ± SD weight on day 10 post-insertion was 48.41 ± 10.27 and on day 30 was 48.14 ± 10.29. Patients on jejunostomy catheter feeding were considered optimised to receive neoadjuvant therapy based on clinical assessment, mobility and sense of well being. The post-resection mortality rate was 11.5% vs 10% compared to patients on oral feeding. Jejunostomy feeding catheter provided nutritional access to oesophageal cancer patients with complete dysphagia using a locally prepared formula. Patients managed to maintain their weight up to 30 days post-insertion of the feeding catheter. Feeding jejunostomy catheter in combination with a locally prepared feeding formula provided a reliable nutritional option for oesophageal cancer patients in developing countries. Copyright © 2010 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laparo-assisted jejunostomy in neurological patients with chronic malnutrition and GERD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Esposito

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux (GER are major problems in severely neurologically impaired children. Many patients are managed with a simple gastrostomy, with or without fundoplication. Unfortunately, fundoplication and gastrostomy are not devoid of complications, indicating the need for other options in the management of these patients. Methods: Between January 2002 and June 2010, ten patients (age range,18 months–14 years have been treated by creating a jejunostomy with the laparoscopic-assisted procedure. The procedure was performed using 2-3 trocars. The technique consists of identifying the first jeujnal loop, grasping it 20–30 cm away from the Treitz ligament, and exteriorizing it to the trocar orifice under visual guide. The jejunostomy was created outside the abdominal cavity during open surgery. At the end of the jejunostomy, the correct position of the intestinal loops was evaluated via laparoscopy. Results: Surgery lasted 40 min on average, the laparoscopic portion about 10 min. Hospital stay was 3 or 7 days for all patients. At the longest follow-up (8 years, all patients had experienced a significant weight gain. One patient died 1 year after the procedure of unknown causes. As for the other complications: 4/10 patients experienced peristomal heritema, 2/10 device’s dislocation and 1 patient a peristomal granuloma.Conclusions: Laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy is a safe and effective procedure to adopt in neurologically impaired children with feeding problems and GER. We advocate the use of this procedure in neurologically impaired patients with feeding problems and reflux due to its overall practicability and because there is minimal surgical trauma. The improvement in the quality of life of these children after the jejunostomy seems to be the major advantage of this procedure. However the management of jejunostomy can be difficult for parents above all in the first postoperative months.

  10. Endoscopic case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a ten-year-old female patient referred to Gastroenterolgy consultation for abdominal pain and cramping, usually worse after eating, recurring diarrhoea, hypochromic and microcytic anaemia with low serum iron and ferritin levels. Moderate to severe Crohn’s disease of the terminal ileum e right colon (L3 was diagnosed, based on endoscopic image and biopsy. The patient was treated with prednisone and azathioprine, but after one year of treatment she was steroids dependent and treatment was switched to infliximab. One year after beginning this treatment, the patient achieved remission (clinical and laboratorial parameters. A control colonoscopy showed mucosal healing with scars and deformation with stenosis of ileocecal valve (Figures 1-2. Surgical intervention will be probably necessary in near future.

  11. Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction treated with jejunostomy: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato dos Reis Lemos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a very rare condition. CASE REPORT: This study describes a male patient who had presented obstructive symptoms for 24 years. He had been treated clinically and had undergone two previous operations in different services, with no clinical improvement or correct diagnosis. He was diagnosed with intestinal obstruction without mechanical factors in our service and underwent jejunostomy, which had a significant decompressive effect. The patient was able to gain weight and presented improvements in laboratory tests. Jejunostomy is a relatively simple surgical procedure that is considered palliative but, in this case, it was resolutive.

  12. Telemedicine: an important aid to perform high-quality endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in low-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Påhlsson, H I; Groth, K; Permert, J; Swahn, F; Löhr, M; Enochsson, L; Lundell, L; Arnelo, U

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether telemedicine can help to ensure high-quality endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients living in rural areas. The study was conducted by investigators from two centers: the Karolinska University Hospital, a high-volume center which provided the teleguided support, and the Visby District Hospital, a low-volume center. From September 2010 to August 2011, 26 ERCP procedures performed at a district hospital were teleguided by an experienced endoscopist at the Karolinska University Hospital. To ensure patient data protection, all communication went through a network (Sjunet) that was separate from the Internet and open only to accredited users. The indications for ERCP were common bile duct stones (n = 12), malignant strictures (n = 12), and benign biliary strictures (n = 2). In 15 cases, this was the patient's first ERCP procedure. The common bile duct was successfully cannulated in all 26 teleguided procedures. The local endoscopist scored the teleguided support as crucial for the successful outcome in 8 /26 cases, as an important factor in 8, and as being of less importance in the remaining 10. In the eight cases where the teleguided support was judged to be crucial, six subsequent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography procedures and two repeat ERCPs were avoided. The overall cannulation rate at the district hospital improved from 85 % to 99 % after teleguided support was introduced. No procedure-related complications occurred. Distant guidance of advanced ERCP procedures in a low-volume center, through teleguided support from a high-volume center, has the potential to improve the quality of care, as reflected in high cannulation rates and the ability to complete the scheduled interventions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Endoscopic findings in a mass screening program for gastric cancer in a high risk region - Guilan province of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Sokhanvar, Homayoon; Joukar, Farahnaz; Shafaghi, Afshin; Yousefi-Mashhour, Mahmud; Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Fakhrieh, Saba; Aminian, Keyvan; Ghorbani, Kambiz; Taherzadeh, Zahra; Sheykhian, Mohammad Reza; Rajpout, Yaghoub; Mehrvarz, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both sexes in Iran. This study was designed to assess upper GI endoscopic findings among people>50 years targeted in a mass screening program in a hot-point region. Based on the pilot results in Guilan Cancer Registry study(GCRS), one of the high point regions for GC - Lashtenesha - was selected. The target population was called mainly using two methods: in rural regions, by house-house direct referral and in urban areas using public media. Upper GI endoscopy was performed by trained endoscopists. All participants underwent biopsies for rapid urea test (RUT) from the antrum and also further biopsies from five defined points of stomach for detection of precancerous lesions. In cases of visible gross lesions, more diagnostic biopsies were taken and submitted for histopathologic evaluation. Of 1,394 initial participants, finally 1,382 persons (702 women, 680 men) with a mean age of 61.7 ± 9.0 years (range:50-87 years) underwent upper GI endoscopy. H.pylori infection based on the RUT was positive in 66.6%. Gastric adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus were detected in seven (0.5%) and one(0.07%) persons, respectively. A remarkable proportion of studied participants were found to have esophageal hiatal hernia(38.4%). Asymptomatic gastric masses found in 1.1% (15) of cases which were mostly located in antrum (33.3%), cardia (20.0%) and prepyloric area (20.0%). Gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 5.9% (82) and 6.9% (96) of the screened population. Upper endoscopy screening is an effective technique for early detection of GC especially in high risk populations. Further studies are required to evaluate cost effectiveness, cost benefit and mortality and morbidity of this method among high and moderate risk population before recommending this method for GC surveillance program at the national level.

  14. Instrumentation: endoscopes and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaab, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The technology and instrumentation for neuroendoscopy are described: endoscopes (principles, designs, applications), light sources, instruments, accessories, holders, and navigation. Procedures for cleaning, sterilizing, and storing are included. The description is based on the author's own technical development and neuroendoscopic experience, published technology and devices, and publications on endoscopic surgery. The main work horses in neuroendoscopy are rigid glass rod endoscopes (Hopkins optics) due to the optical quality, which allows full high-definition video imaging, different angles of view, and autoclavability, which is especially important in neuroendoscopy due to the risk of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease infection. Applications are endoscopy assistance to microsurgery, stand-alone endoscopy controlled approaches such as transnasal skull base, ventriculoscopy, and cystoscopy in the cranium. Rigid glass rod optics are also applicable in spinal endoscopy and peripheral nerve decompression using special tubes and cannulas. Rigid minifiberoptics with less resolution may be used in less complex procedures (ventriculoscopy, cystoscopy, endoscopy assistance with pen-designs) and have the advantages of smaller diameters and disposable designs. Flexible fiberoptics are usually used in combination with rigid scopes and can be steered, e.g. through the ventricles, in spinal procedures for indications including syringomyelia and multicystic hydrocephalus. Upcoming flexible chip endoscopes ("chip-in-the-tip") may replace flexible fiberoptics in the future, offering higher resolution and cold LED-illumination, and may provide for stereoscopic neuroendoscopy. Various instruments (mechanical, coagulation, laser guides, ultrasonic aspirators) and holders are available. Certified methods for cleaning and sterilization, with special requirements in neuroapplications, are important. Neuroendoscopic instrumentation is now an established technique in neurosurgical practice and

  15. [The use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for provision of the long-term enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belevich, V L; Brednev, A O; Ovchinnikov, D V

    2014-04-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for provision of the long-term enteral nutrition is well established in clinical practice because unlike from traditional gastrostomy and jejunostomy allowed to avoid many complications. The technique is used for enteral tube feeding in the absence of real positive predictive recovery of consciousness and swallowing function. During presented study from 387 patients with a gastrostomy imposed by percutaneous endoscopic technique, observed only 1,8% of suppurative complications and in 1% of cases - uncontrolled removal of the tube by the patient. Our experience allows us to recommend this technique for wide implementation in practice of medical institutions in case when it is necessity in enteral feeding more than 3 weeks of patients with impaired

  16. Short-term effects of supplementary feeding with enteral nutrition via jejunostomy catheter on post-gastrectomy gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Quan; Yu, Jian-Chun; Kang, Wei-Ming; Ma, Zhi-Qiang

    2011-10-01

    Most gastric cancer patients who undergo gastrectomy develop malnutrition. It is, therefore, crucial to establish an effective means to provide nutrition for these patients. To perform home enteral nutrition (EN) to ensure adequate nutritional intake in gastric cancer patients, we placed a jejunostomy catheter during gastric surgery. Most patients showed improved nutritional status. Twenty-nine inpatients at our hospital underwent radical gastrectomy and jejunostomy from December 2002 to December 2007 and were designated as the jejunostomy group, and 32 matched patients without a jejunostomy tube were designated as the tube-free group. The jejunostomy group was treated with EN from 72 hours to 3 months postoperatively. The tube-free group did not receive EN. Data including preoperative and postoperative body weight, body mass index (BMI), nutrition risk screening (NRS) score, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), and laboratory biochemical indicators were documented respectively and compared. Compared with preoperative week 1, both groups showed decreased body weight and BMI at 3 months postoperatively. The weight loss in the jejunostomy group ((7.1 ± 3.3) kg) was significantly less than that in the tube-free group ((9.9 ± 3.1) kg). Similarly, BMI decreased by (2.4 ± 1.0) kg/m(2) in the jejunostomy group, which was significantly less than in the tube-free group ((3.2 ± 0.9) kg/m(2)). The number of patients with postoperative NRS ≥ 3 was decreased in the jejunostomy group, but was increased in the tube-free group, and this difference was significant. There were no significant differences between the two groups in total lymphocyte count, hemoglobin, albumin and prealbumin, and adverse drug effects. Short-term (3 months) EN supplementation via jejunostomy tube can reduce the risk of malnutrition and weight loss, and improve tolerance of chemotherapy. Tube feeding is reliable for achieving these goals because it is not important whether or not the patients have

  17. Radiofrequency ablation for the endoscopic eradication of esophageal squamous high grade intraepithelial neoplasia and mucosal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vilsteren, F. G.; Alvarez Herrero, L.; Pouw, R. E.; ten Kate, F. J.; Visser, M.; Seldenrijk, C. A.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Weusten, B. L.; Bergman, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and study aims: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with or without prior endoscopic resection safely and effectively removes early neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. We speculated that this approach might also be suited for early squamous neoplasia of the esophagus. The aim of the study was to

  18. Endoscopic TEP hernia repair. Experience in a high volume center allows for recommendations concerning still unsolved questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, N.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the endoscopic TEP hernia repair, which is an appealing technique for patients with inguinal hernias. TEP, offering an adequate intraoperative diagnosis and subsequent treatment of all hernia subtypes is in experienced hands associated with low recurrence rates and rates of

  19. Full spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) versus standard forward-viewing endoscope (SFV) in a high-risk population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Søren; Hadi, Sabah Anwar; Rasmussen, Morten

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of Full Spectrum Endoscopy (FUSE) compared to a conventional standard forward-viewing endoscope (SFV). The primary outcome was adenoma detection rate (ADR) and mean adenoma detection. Secondary outcome was feasibility of FUSE opposed to SFV. Consecutive patients participating in the Danish colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme were prospectively included in the study (n = 205). Demographic and health-related characteristics were obtained. Following procedural parameters were recorded: completion rate, caecal intubation time, fentanyl and midazolam sedation, CRC detection, ADR, diverticulosis, bowel preparation, patient discomfort and endoscopist difficulty rating. Participants underwent FUSE colonoscopy on days when the FUSE system was available, while the remaining participants had SFV. All colonoscopies were performed by two trained endoscopists. A total of 109 patients were included in the FUSE group and 106 in the SFV group. Groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Completion rate was 83.5% and 93.4% in the FUSE and SFV groups (p = .040). Caecal intubation time was 11.4 ± 6.7 min versus 9.1 ± 6.2 min in the FUSE and SFV groups (p = .040). ADR was 67.0% and 59.6% (p = .097), while the mean adenoma detection was 1.79 and 1.38 (p = .022) in the FUSE and SFV groups. Endoscopists reported increased difficulty rating with FUSE compared to SFV (p > .001). FUSE colonoscopy provides a higher mean adenoma detection and there is tendency toward higher ADR compared to SFV in a high-risk population. Nonetheless, FUSE colonoscopy has a lower completion rate, longer caecal intubation time and a higher difficulty rating from an endoscopist point of view.

  20. To evaluate the results of endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-04

    Apr 4, 2004 ... Lay, C.S. Tsai, Y.T. Teg, C.Y. et al. Endoscopic variceal ligation in prophylaxis of first variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with high-risk esophageal varices. Hepatology. 1997;. 25:346-350. 24. Stiegmann, G.V. Goff, J.S. Michaletz-Onody, P.A. et al. Endoscopic sclerotherapy as compared with endoscopic.

  1. Some metabolic and haematological effects of oesophago-jejunostomy with by-pass of the stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Sheila T.; Witts, L. J.; Allison, P. R.; Gunning, A.

    1961-01-01

    Twelve subjects have been studied in whom oesophago-jejunostomy had been performed leaving the stomach in situ. All had considerable metabolic disturbance with steatorrhoea and inability to absorb vitamin B12, and the operation has been abandoned in favour of oesophagojejuno-gastrostomy. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:13689999

  2. Roux-en-Y longitudinal Pancreatico Jejunostomy for Pancreatic Calculi in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Zahid Hossain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pancreatic calculi is distinctly uncommon in children and usually present wit recurrent abdominal pain. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of longitudinal pancreatico-jejunostomy in relieving intractable abdominal pain in children with pancreatic calculi. Methods: this prospective study was conducted from 2003-2009 at Paediatric Surgery Department of BSMMU. Ductal decompression by longitudinal pancreatic jejunostomy (LPJ was done in 14 children (10 male, 4 female suffering from intractable abdominal pain due to pancreatic calculi. The operative outcomes were divided in to satisfactory and unsatisfactory according to whether the patients were completely or almost completely relieved of pain or continued to be troubled by pain. The main outcome measures were pain relief, postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results: There was no mortality and no significant postoperative morbidity. 14 patients were followed up till 2009. The mean follow-up period were 22 (range 8-72 months. Operative results was satisfactory (no pain in 12 patients and unsatisfactory (moderate pain in 2 patients. Complete pain relief was seen 12 patients. Conclusion: Longitudianal pancreatico-jejunostomy is a good operative procedure to relieve intractable abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic calculi. Key words: Pancreatic calculi; Pancreatico-jejunostomy; abdominal pain  DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v3i2.7055BSMMU J 2010; 3(2: 72-75

  3. A laparoscopic technique for full thickness intestinal biopsy and feeding jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltringham, W K; Roe, A M; Galloway, S W; Mountford, R A; Espiner, H J

    1993-01-01

    A laparoscopic technique is described, suitable for both full thickness intestinal biopsy and placement of a feeding jejunostomy tube. Its application in three cases is reported. The method is simple, permits full laparoscopic examination of the abdominal contents and being minimally invasive, facilitates early patients recovery. PMID:8432441

  4. Removal of a self-knotted feeding jejunostomy tube in a patient with tongue base cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwo, S-C

    2010-09-01

    The knotting of an intragastric tube is a rare complication, and knotting of a feeding jejunostomy tube is rarer, and the removal or replacement of the tube is difficult. There are many reports on the removal of intragastric knotted tubes, but these methods cannot be applied for the removal of knotted feeding jejunostomy tubes, which do not have a natural orifice as large as the mouth to facilitate the introduction of instruments to correct the complication or remove the knotted tube. This is a stressful situation and doctors have to adopt strategies to resolve this problem safely and effectively in the absence of strong evidence-based knowledge. The author presents the case of a patient with tongue base cancer with a nasogastric feeding jejunostomy tube that knotted during the therapeutic course and describes a simple method to remove the knotted tube using Kelly clamps without additional invasive surgery. A literature review to elucidate methods for the removal of a self-knotted nasogastric tube, especially that occurring in feeding jejunostomy, is also reported. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complications of Feeding Jejunostomy Tubes in Patients with Gastroesophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Audrey H; O'Leary, Michael P; Merchant, Shaila J; Sun, Virginia; Chao, Joseph; Raz, Dan J; Kim, Jae Y; Kim, Joseph

    2017-02-01

    Feeding jejunostomy tubes (FJT) in patients undergoing resection of gastroesophageal cancers facilitate perioperative nutrition. Data regarding FJT use and complications are limited. A single institution review was performed for patients who underwent perioperative FJT placement for gastrectomy or esophagogastrectomy from 2007 to 2015. FJT-related and unrelated complications were evaluated. FJTs were inserted for total/completion gastrectomy (n = 49/117, 41.9 %), proximal gastrectomy (n = 7/117, 6.0 %), or esophagogastrectomy (n = 61/117, 52.1 %). Ninety percent (n = 106/117) of patients used an FJT at some time point. Although the majority of patients (75.2 %) used FJTs after discharge, 8.5 % (n = 10/117) never used the FJT and 10.3 % (n = 12/117) used the FJT only during hospitalization. Overall, 44.4 % (n = 52/117) had FJT-related complications, including dislodgement (n = 22), clogging (n = 13), and leakage (n = 6). The majority of FJT complications were resolved by telephone triage (13.5 %) or bedside/clinic intervention (57.7 %), but 3.4 % required operative intervention for small bowel obstruction (n = 3) and hemorrhage (n = 1). FJT complications were more common with gastrectomy than esophagogastrectomy (53.6 vs. 36.0 %), perhaps related to longer FJT use in gastrectomy patients (71 vs. 38 days). FJT-related complications are common, occurring more frequently after gastrectomy than esophagogastrectomy. In most patients, complications can be managed by simple measures, rarely requiring operative intervention. Nevertheless, the need for FJTs should be carefully considered to balance nutritional benefits with the risks of insertion and usage.

  6. High efficacy with deep nurse-administered propofol sedation for advanced gastroenterologic endoscopic procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Thue; Hornslet, Pernille; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    data from patients sedated with intermittent deep NAPS for ERCP, EUS or double balloon enteroscopy (DBE, since the method was implemented in May 2007 through December 2012 were included for evaluation in a retrospective case-control design. RESULTS: Data from 1899 patients undergoing 1899 procedures...... was requested eight times (0.4 %). One patient was intubated due to suspected aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Intermittent deep NAPS for advanced endoscopies in selected patients provided an almost 100 % success rate. However, the rate of hypoxia, hypotension and respiratory support was high compared with previously...

  7. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is currently being studied as a potential alternative to the conventional, solid-state Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is an ideal candidate to replace the Ho:YAG for laser lithotripsy due to a higher absorption coefficient in water of the emitted wavelength, an ability to operate at high pulse rates, and a near single mode, Gaussian spatial beam profile. The higher absorption of the TFL wavelength by water translates to a decrease in ablation threshold by a factor of four. High pulse rate operation allows higher ablation rates than the Ho:YAG, thus decreasing operation time necessary to ablate the urinary stone. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple higher laser power into smaller optical fibers than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. This decrease in fiber diameter translates into a potential decrease in the size of ureteroscope working channel, higher saline irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety, and may also extend to a decrease in overall ureteroscope diameter. Furthermore, the improved spatial beam profile reduces the risk of damage to the input end of the fiber. Therefore, the trunk fiber, minus the distal fiber tip, may be preserved and re-used, resulting in significant cost savings. This thesis details rapid TFL lithotripsy at high pulse rates up to 500 Hz, both with and without the aid of a stone retrieval basket, in order to demonstrate the TFL's superior ablation rates over the Ho:YAG. Collateral damage testing of the TFL effect on the ureter wall and Nitinol stone baskets were conducted to ensure patient safety for future clinical use. Proximal fiber end damage testing was conducted to demonstrate fiber preservation, critical for permanent fiber integration. Optical fibers were fitted with fabricated hollow steel tips and integrated with stone retrieval baskets for testing. Ball tipped optical fibers were tested to maintain ablation

  8. Endoscopic Injection Therapy in Bleeding Peptic Ulcers. Low Mortality in a High Risk Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaqulm Balanzó

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscoric injection therapy was performed in 341 patients consecutively admitted with a bleeding peptic ulcer at high risk of further hemorrhage, assessed by the presence of active arterial bleeding or a nonbleeding visible vessel at emergency endoscopy. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 111 of 119 actively bleeding patients (93%. Rebleeding ocurred in 75 cases (23%, at a mean interval of 53±52 h. A second emergency injection was a ttempted in 36 therapeutic failures, and was successful in 20 (55%. Emergency surgery was finally required in 52 patients (15%. Overall mortality was 4.9%. Major complications occurred in four patients (1.2% (two perforations and two aspiration pneumonia; therefore, injection therapy is an effective and simple method for treating bleeding ulcers, achieving the initial control of hemorrhage in a majority of cases although the rate of further hemorrhage is not negligible and complications are not irrelevant.

  9. Ulipristal acetate before high complexity endoscopic (hysteroscopic, laparoscopic myomectomy – a mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Baranowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uterine myomas (fibromas, leiomyomas are the most common tumours in women, and their clinical signs and symptoms are presented by 25-40% of patients with these benign tumours. According to current guidelines, the armamentarium for myoma management consists of: medical therapy (GnRH, SPRMs, non-surgical alternatives including uterine artery embolisation (UAE, vaginal temporary occlusion of uterine arteries using clamp-like device or MRgFUS technique, and surgical treatment (including minimally invasive techniques. In cases of submucous myomas STEPW classification correlates very well with the risk of incomplete hysteroscopic myomectomies. According to limited literature data, ulipristal acetate as a pre-treatment seems to be very prudent in high complexity hysteroscopic myomectomy (STEPW II, score 5-6. In patients with large uterine myomas (FIGO type 3, 4, 5 undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy, three-month pre-treatment with ulipristal acetate before laparoscopy is feasible and can be recommended because of shorter time of surgery, lower intraoperative blood loss, lower haemoglobin drop, and low postoperative blood transfusion rate.

  10. Ulipristal acetate before high complexity endoscopic (hysteroscopic, laparoscopic) myomectomy - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Włodzimierz

    2016-12-01

    Uterine myomas (fibromas, leiomyomas) are the most common tumours in women, and their clinical signs and symptoms are presented by 25-40% of patients with these benign tumours. According to current guidelines, the armamentarium for myoma management consists of: medical therapy (GnRH, SPRMs), non-surgical alternatives including uterine artery embolisation (UAE), vaginal temporary occlusion of uterine arteries using clamp-like device or MRgFUS technique, and surgical treatment (including minimally invasive techniques). In cases of submucous myomas STEPW classification correlates very well with the risk of incomplete hysteroscopic myomectomies. According to limited literature data, ulipristal acetate as a pre-treatment seems to be very prudent in high complexity hysteroscopic myomectomy (STEPW II, score 5-6). In patients with large uterine myomas (FIGO type 3, 4, 5) undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy, three-month pre-treatment with ulipristal acetate before laparoscopy is feasible and can be recommended because of shorter time of surgery, lower intraoperative blood loss, lower haemoglobin drop, and low postoperative blood transfusion rate.

  11. Ulipristal acetate before high complexity endoscopic (hysteroscopic, laparoscopic) myomectomy – a mini-review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Uterine myomas (fibromas, leiomyomas) are the most common tumours in women, and their clinical signs and symptoms are presented by 25-40% of patients with these benign tumours. According to current guidelines, the armamentarium for myoma management consists of: medical therapy (GnRH, SPRMs), non-surgical alternatives including uterine artery embolisation (UAE), vaginal temporary occlusion of uterine arteries using clamp-like device or MRgFUS technique, and surgical treatment (including minimally invasive techniques). In cases of submucous myomas STEPW classification correlates very well with the risk of incomplete hysteroscopic myomectomies. According to limited literature data, ulipristal acetate as a pre-treatment seems to be very prudent in high complexity hysteroscopic myomectomy (STEPW II, score 5-6). In patients with large uterine myomas (FIGO type 3, 4, 5) undergoing laparoscopic myomectomy, three-month pre-treatment with ulipristal acetate before laparoscopy is feasible and can be recommended because of shorter time of surgery, lower intraoperative blood loss, lower haemoglobin drop, and low postoperative blood transfusion rate. PMID:28250723

  12. Replacement of a string jejunostomy if the suture is lost: first time a technique with no need to cut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardis, Gaston; Mayr, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to present the first case of replacement of a string jejunostomy with an enteroscopic percutaneous technique after the string was lost. The replaceable string jejunostomy is a well-established method for the enteral feeding in patients where the swallowing process is impaired and gastroesophageal reflux impedes the option of a gastrostomy. In the frequent case of obstruction, rupture or malfunction of the jejunostomy, it is easily replaced in an outpatient setting without anesthesia, with the help of the string that holds the tip of the feeding tube in place. In our case the string was lost. The jejunostomy was replaced with a fully percutaneous technique with the help of a pediatric cystoscope. This technique is well practicable and obviated the need for a laparotomy in a polymorbid patient. The technique seems promising, but we report an anecdotal case description. Further experience is needed to investigate its safety.

  13. Stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy: high risk of complications and no impact on the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mão-de-Ferro, S; Serrano, M; Ferreira, S; Rosa, I; Lage, P; Alexandre, D P; Freire, J; Mirones, L; Casaca, R; Bettencourt, A; Pereira, A D

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, causing persistent deterioration in the nutritional status. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of esophageal double-covered self-expandable metal stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy. The nutritional status and dysphagia were prospectively recorded. Eleven patients were included: eight were moderate and three were severely malnourished. After stent placement, dysphagia improved in all patients. With regard to complications, one patient developed an esophageal perforation that required urgent esophagectomy. Four patients presented stent migration. Three of these patients required enteral nutrition and none was submitted to surgery because of poor nutritional status. Of the other six patients, only four were operated upon. Stent placement presented a high complication rate and did not prevent weight loss or malnutrition. Other alternatives, including naso-gastric tube placement or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy, should be considered.

  14. Total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthe, A; Mainik, F; Flade-Kuthe, R

    2014-04-01

    One can no longer think about modern hernia surgery without mentioning endoscopic techniques. But due to their high technical demands the learning curve is comparatively long. And by technical mistakes and their consequences (pain, recurrence, complications) the benefits of the endoscopic techniques can easily be turned to drawbacks. The following text explains the steps of the total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) technique in detail pointing out alternatives and risks. From preparation, indication and positioning, from trocar placement to extraperitoneal dissection and mesh placement, the principles of TEP are elucidated in respect of local anatomy and possible complications. The text as well as the accompanying video in the Mediathek are based on the authors' 20 years of experience in the TEP technique. Both of them may help in safe TEP application to minimise the complication rate as well as recurrences. Then patients can benefit from the advantages of this technique. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Endoscopic TEP hernia repair. Experience in a high volume center allows for recommendations concerning still unsolved questions

    OpenAIRE

    Schouten, N.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the endoscopic TEP hernia repair, which is an appealing technique for patients with inguinal hernias. TEP, offering an adequate intraoperative diagnosis and subsequent treatment of all hernia subtypes is in experienced hands associated with low recurrence rates and rates of (chronic) postoperative pain. The supposedly substantial learning curve remains its most important disadvantage, emphasizing the need to have TEP performed by experienced surgeons. Limited and con...

  16. Endoscopic findings following retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Alexey V; Dmitriev, Ilya V; Shmarina, Nonna V; Teterin, Yury S; Balkarov, Aslan G; Storozhev, Roman V; Anisimov, Yuri A; Gasanov, Ali M

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation of the efficacy of endoscopic methods for the diagnosis and correction of surgical and immunological complications after retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation. From October 2011 to March 2015, 27 patients underwent simultaneous retroperitoneal pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPKT). Diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with protocol biopsy of the donor and recipient duodenal mucosa and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) were performed to detect possible complications. Endoscopic stenting of the main pancreatic duct with plastic stents and three-stage endoscopic hemostasis were conducted to correct the identified complications. Endoscopic methods showed high efficiency in the timely diagnosis and adequate correction of complications after retroperitoneal pancreas transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pre-therapy laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is safe and effective in patients undergoing minimally invasive esophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Kfir; Kim, Tad; Caban, Angel M; Rossidis, Georgios; Rodriguez, Sara S; Hochwald, Steven N

    2013-08-01

    Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is a safe and effective means of providing enteral nutrition in the preoperative phase to esophageal cancer patients. This research is a retrospective case series. This study was conducted in a university tertiary care center. Between August 2007 and April 2012, 153 laparoscopic feeding jejunostomies were performed in patients 10 weeks prior to their definitive minimally invasive esophagectomy. The outcome is measured based on the technique, safety, and feasibility of a laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy in the preoperative phase of esophageal cancer patients. One hundred fifty-three patients underwent a laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy approximately 1 and 10 week(s) prior to the start of their neoadjuvant therapy and definitive minimally invasive esophagectomy, respectively. Median age was 63 years. Of the patients, 75 % were males and 25 % were females. One hundred twenty-seven patients had gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma and 26 had squamous cell carcinoma. All patients completed their neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. The median operative time was 65 min. We had no intraoperative complications, perforation, postoperative bowel necrosis, bowel torsion, herniation, intraperitoneal leak, or mortality as a result of the laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy. Four patients were noted to have superficial skin infection around the tube, and 11 patients required a tube exchange for dislodgment, clogging, and leaking around the tube. All patients progressed to their definitive surgical esophageal resection. A laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is technically feasible, safe, and can provide appropriate enteral nutrition in the preoperative phase of esophageal cancer patients.

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural stenting for gallbladder drainage in high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis: a systematic review and pooled analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderloni, Andrea; Buda, Andrea; Vieceli, Filippo; Khashab, Mouen A; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided transmural stenting for gallbladder drainage is an emerging alternative for the treatment of acute cholecystitis in high-risk surgical patients. A variety of stents have been described, including plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs), and lumen-apposing metal stents (LAMSs). LAMSs represent the only specifically designed stent for transmural gallbladder drainage. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided drainage (EUS-GBD) in acute cholecystitis using different types of stents. A computer-assisted literature search up to September 2015 was performed using two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Search terms included MeSH and non-MeSH terms relating to acute cholecystitis, gallbladder drainage, endoscopic gallbladder drainage, endoscopic ultrasound gallbladder drainage, alone or in combination. Additional articles were retrieved by hand-searching from references of relevant studies. Pooled technical success, clinical success, and adverse event rates were calculated. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria, and the eligible cases were 166. The overall technical success rate, clinical success rate, and frequency of adverse events were 95.8, 93.4, and 12.0 %, respectively. The technical success rate was 100 % using plastic stents, 98.6 % using SEMSs, and 91.5 % using LAMSs. The clinical success rate was 100, 94.4, and 90.1 % after the deployment of plastic stents, SEMSs, and LAMSs, respectively. The frequency of adverse events was 18.2 % using plastic stents, 12.3 % using SEMSs, and 9.9 % using LAMSs. Among the different drainage approaches in the non-surgical management of acute cholecystitis, EUS-guided transmural stenting for gallbladder drainage appears to be feasible, safe, and effective. LAMSs seem to have high potentials in terms of efficacy and safety, although further prospective studies are needed.

  19. Effect of annual endoscopic screening on clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment modality of gastric cancer in a high-incidence region of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Su Jin; Park, Min Jung; Kang, Seung Joo; Kang, Hae Yeon; Chung, Goh Eun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2012-11-15

    We investigated risk factors for gastric cancer (GC) and effect of annual endoscopic screening on detection and treatment modality of GC. Asymptomatic adults who underwent upper endoscopy during health checkups at Seoul National University Hospital Healthcare System Gangnam Center were enrolled. We compared clinicopathologic characteristics of GC according to screening interval (repeated vs. infrequent, annual vs. biennial). After age- and sex-matching, relative risk was computed by hazard ratio (HR) using Cox proportional regression with multivariate adjustment. Of the 58,849 subjects who received screening endoscopy, 277 (0.47%) were found to have GC. Intestinal type comprised 55.4% (102/184) followed by diffuse type (n = 65, 35.3%). Age ≥ 50 years, family history and smoking independently increased the risk of GC for both types, whereas male gender [HR = 4.81, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.72-8.03] and intestinal metaplasia (IM) (HR = 10.87, 95% CI: 3.36-22.30) were significant predictors for intestinal type only. Proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) was 98.6% (71/72) in annual screening group and 80.7% (46/57) in biennial screening group (p cancer was larger (75.0 vs. 56.1%; p = 0.04). Endoscopic resection was performed more frequently in annual screening group (56.9 vs. 33.3%; p = 0.02). IM along with male gender and older age was a strong risk factor for intestinal type GC. Annual screening group improved detection of early-stage and endoscopically treatable GC suggesting that intensive screening and surveillance may be useful for high-risk subpopulations with epidemiologic risk factors or premalignant lesions such as IM. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  20. Intravenous versus high-dose oral proton pump inhibitor therapy after endoscopic hemostasis of high-risk lesions in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sanjay; Keyvani, Leila; Leeson, Shauna; Targownik, Laura E

    2007-07-01

    Intravenous proton pump inhibitors (IV PPIs) decrease rebleeding following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding peptic ulcers. Oral PPIs may be equally efficacious and may significantly reduce health care costs. This study aimed to compare outcomes in patients receiving oral versus IV PPI therapy following endoscopic hemostasis in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (ANVUGIB). We performed a retrospective review of all patients who received PPI therapy following endoscopic hemostasis for ANVUGIB. The primary outcome was the adverse gastrointestinal event rate. One hundred sixty-two patients met the entry criteria (72 oral PPIs, 90 IV PPIs). The difference in the rate of adverse gastrointestinal events between the two groups was 1% (P = 0.85). Postendoscopic IV PPI use was associated with an odds ratio of 1.01 for developing an adverse outcome versus oral PPIs (95% CI: 0.44-2.33). We conclude that oral PPIs are probably equivalent to IV PPIs for preventing rebleeding in ANVUGIB patients.

  1. Endoscopic high-resolution auto fluorescence imaging and optical coherence tomography of airways in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Hohert, Geoffrey; Schwartz, Carley; Shaipanich, Tawimas; Ritchie, Alexander J.; Zhang, Wei; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Lane, Pierre M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present multimodal imaging of peripheral airways in vivo using an endoscopic imaging system capable of co-registered optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging (OCT-AFI). This system employs a 0.9 mm diameter double-clad fiber optic-based catheter for endoscopic imaging of small peripheral airways. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) can visualize detailed airway morphology in the lung periphery and autofluorescence imaging (AFI) can visualize fluorescent tissue components such as collagen and elastin, improving the detection of airway lesions. Results from in vivo imaging of 40 patients indicate that OCT and AFI offer complementary information that may increase the ability to identify pulmonary nodules in the lung periphery and improve the safety of biopsy collection by identifying large blood vessels. AFI can rapidly visualize in vivo vascular networks using fast scanning parameters resulting in vascular-sensitive imaging with less breathing/cardiac motion artifacts compared to Doppler OCT imaging. By providing complementary information about structure and function of tissue, OCT-AFI may improve site selection during biopsy collection in the lung periphery.

  2. Feasibility and safety of needle catheter jejunostomy for enteral nutrition in surgically treated severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimann, Arved; Braunert, Mario; Müller, Thomas; Bley, Thomas; Wiedemann, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    The role of the gut in the development of septic complications and promising clinical results have led to a shift from the parenteral to the enteral route for nutrition support of patients with acute pancreatitis. In patients undergoing surgery for severe necrotizing pancreatitis, the application of a needle catheter jejunostomy might be useful. However, there is a shortage of clinical data on its feasibility and possible harmful effect. Between January 1999 and December 2002, 13 patients were operated for severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis. At the time of surgery, needle catheter jejunostomy was performed using a standard technique. Enteral nutrition was initiated without a strict protocol by feeding small amounts of a standard diet and carefully monitoring patient tolerance. As long as necessary, patients were also fed parenterally in order to achieve target caloric goals. No major tube- or feeding-related complications were observed. A single case of tube dislodgement caused by manipulation during relaparotomy for lavage occurred and was rectified during the same operation. In patients undergoing surgery for severe acute pancreatitis, needle catheter jejunostomy for long-term enteral nutrition can be applied with no additional risk.

  3. Draining T-Tube Jejunostomy: A Technique to Get Out of Trouble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar K; Solsky, Ian; Sandoval, Eduardo; Berlin, Arnold; Bellemare, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    A perforated viscus in the postpancreaticoduodenectomy setting is a rare phenomenon and a devastating complication. In this situation, adherence to damage-control principles demands minimizing the operative intervention while addressing the intestinal perforation as a way to mitigate the injurious effects on a complex gastrointestinal reconstruction. Herein, we describe our intraoperative decision-making with an unconventional approach in the management of a perforated viscus in the postpancreaticoduodenectomy setting using a draining T-tube jejunostomy. Our patient recovered remarkably well from this and was discharged from the hospital in six days with a controlled draining T-tube jejunostomy, which was subsequently removed on postoperative day 35. Our case illustrates an important option when dealing with a perforated viscus in the complex gastrointestinal surgery patient that has minimal morbidity, adequate source control, and the potential for an excellent clinical outcome. As surgical care continues to be delivered in a specialty-driven manner, a draining T-tube jejunostomy presents the ideal technique to get out of trouble for the general surgeon practicing in the community who may not be as experienced with complex gastrointestinal surgery.

  4. Cut throat zone II neck injury and advantage of a feeding jejunostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlong Laleng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating neck injuries account for 5-10% of trauma cases and are potentially life threatening. We report a case of cut- throat zone II neck injury in a 45-year-old male extending up to posterior pharyngeal wall and exposing the underlying cervical vertebra. Tracheostomy was done and wound repair was started from the posterior aspect in layers using 3-0 Vicryl. Intraoperatively, a conscious decision was taken for a feeding jejunostomy for postoperative feeding, which was likely to be prolonged, in view of sensory-nerve damage along the transected pharynx. Prolonged use of Nasogastric tube for postoperative feeding was thus avoided and the discomfort, risk of aspiration and foreign body at injury site eliminated. One week postoperative, the patient experienced severe bouts of coughing and restlessness on oral intake; during this period enteral nutrition was maintained through feeding jejunostomy. At the time of discharge at 1 month, the patient was accepting normal diet orally and was detubated and vocalizing normally. We conclude that postoperative nutrition is an important area to be considered for deep neck wound with nerve injuries due to delayed tolerance to oral feeding till the regeneration of sensory nerves. A feeding jejunostomy or feeding gastrostomy performed simultaneously in such patients with nerve injuries is far superior over nasogastric-tube feeding when prolonged postoperative feeding is expected.

  5. Duodenum-preserving resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy in benign pancreatic head tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Tao, Ming; Jia, Yi-Mu; Xiong, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Tong-Lin; Xiu, Dian-Rong

    2014-11-28

    This study was conducted to explore the feasibility of partial pancreatic head resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy for the treatment of benign tumors of the pancreatic head (BTPH). From November 2006 to February 2009, four patients (three female and one male) with a mean age of 34.3 years (range: 21-48 years) underwent partial pancreatic head resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy for the treatment of BTPH (diameters of 3.2-4.5 cm) using small incisions (5.1-7.2 cm). Preoperative symptoms include one case of repeated upper abdominal pain, one case of drowsiness and two cases with no obvious preoperative symptoms. All four surgeries were successfully performed. The mean operative time was 196.8 min (range 165-226 min), and average blood loss was 138.0 mL (range: 82-210 mL). The mean postoperative hospital stay was 7.5 d (range: 7-8 d). In one case, the main pancreatic duct was injured. Pathological examination confirmed that one patient suffered from mucinous cystadenoma, one exhibited insulinoma, and two patients had solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. There were no deaths or complications observed during the perioperative period. All patients had no signs of recurrence of the BTPH within a follow-up period of 48-76 mo and had good quality of life without diabetes. Partial pancreatic head resection with Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy is feasible in selected patients with BTPH.

  6. Comparative analysis of the efficacy and complications of nasojejunal and jejunostomy on patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinhua; Wu, Yafu; Qiu, Yudong; Jiang, Chunping; Ding, Yitao

    2014-11-01

    The efficacy and feeding-related complications of a nasojejunal feeding tube and jejunostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) was investigated with a randomized, controlled clinical trial at the Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital. Sixty-eight patients who underwent PD in the Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups: 34 patients received enteral feeding via a nasojejunal tube (NJT group) and 34 patients received enteral feeding via a jejunostomy tube (JT group). The assessment of clinical outcome was based on postoperative investigation of complications. The second part of the assessment included tube related complications and an index on catheter efficiency. There were 15 cases with infectious complications in the JT group and 13 cases in the NJT group, and there was no significant difference in the rate of infectious complications between the 2 groups. The rate of intestinal obstruction and delayed gastric emptying was significantly decreased in the NJT group (P jejunostomy, and it is associated with only minor complications. Nasojejunal feeding can significantly decrease the incidence of delayed gastric emptying and shorten the postoperative hospital stay. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Knot formation in the feeding jejunostomy tube: A case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guo-Shiou; Hsieh, Huan-Fa; Wu, Meng-Hang; Chen, Teng-Wei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Liu, Yao-Chi

    2007-01-01

    Jejunostomy feeding tubes provide surgeons with an excellent method for providing nutritional support, but there are several complications associated with a tube jejunostomy, including complications resulting from placement of the tube, mechanical problems related to the location or function and development of focally thickened small-bowel folds. A 76-year old man who presented with multiple medical diseases was admitted to our hospital due to aspiration pneumonia with acute respiratory failure and septic shock. He underwent exploratory laparotomy with feeding jejunostomy using a 14-French nasogastric tube for nutritional support. However, occlusion of the feeding tube was found 30 d after operation, and a rare complication of knot formation in the tube occurred after a new tube was replaced. On the following day, the tube was removed and replaced with a similar tube, which was placed into the jejunum for only 15 cm. The patient’s feedings were maintained smoothly for two months. Knot formation in the feeding tube seems to be very rare. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the literature review. Its incidence is probably related to the length of the tube inserted into the lumen. PMID:17352035

  8. Potential capacity of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato; Goto, Rei

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Japanese government decided to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer as a national program. To provide endoscopic screening nationwide, we estimated the proportion of increase in the number of endoscopic examinations with the introduction of endoscopic screening, based on a national survey. The total number of endoscopic examinations has increased, particularly in clinics. Based on the national survey, the total number of participants in gastric cancer screening was 3 784 967. If 30% of the participants are switched from radiographic screening to endoscopic screening, approximately 1 million additional endoscopic examinations are needed. In Japan, the participation rates in gastric cancer screening and the number of hospitals and clinics offering upper gastrointestinal endoscopy vary among the 47 prefectures. If the participation rates are high and the numbers of hospitals and clinics are small, the proportion of increase becomes larger. Based on the same assumption, 50% of big cities can provide endoscopic screening with a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. However, 16.7% of the medical districts are available for endoscopic screening within a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. Despite the Japanese government's decision to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, its immediate introduction remains difficult because of insufficient medical resources in rural areas. This implies that endoscopic screening will be initially introduced to big cities. To promote endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, the disparity of medical resources must first be resolved. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. A randomized trial comparing multiband mucosectomy and cap-assisted endoscopic resection for endoscopic piecemeal resection of early squamous neoplasia of the esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yue-Ming; Boerwinkel, David F.; Qin, Xiumin; He, Shun; Xue, Liyan; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fleischer, David E.; Dou, Li-Zhou; Liu, Yong; Lu, Ning; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Wang, Gui-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Piecemeal endoscopic resection for esophageal high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is usually performed by cap-assisted endoscopic resection. This requires submucosal lifting and multiple snares. Multiband mucosectomy (MBM) uses a modified variceal band

  10. Full spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) versus standard forward-viewing endoscope (SFV) in a high-risk population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Søren; Hadi, Sabah Anwar; Rasmussen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diagnostic performance of Full Spectrum Endoscopy (FUSE) compared to a conventional standard forward-viewing endoscope (SFV). The primary outcome was adenoma detection rate (ADR) and mean adenoma detection. Secondary outcome was feasibility of FUSE opposed to SFV...... intubation time, fentanyl and midazolam sedation, CRC detection, ADR, diverticulosis, bowel preparation, patient discomfort and endoscopist difficulty rating. Participants underwent FUSE colonoscopy on days when the FUSE system was available, while the remaining participants had SFV. All colonoscopies were...... performed by two trained endoscopists. RESULTS: A total of 109 patients were included in the FUSE group and 106 in the SFV group. Groups were comparable in baseline characteristics. Completion rate was 83.5% and 93.4% in the FUSE and SFV groups (p = .040). Caecal intubation time was 11.4 ± 6.7 min versus 9...

  11. High-pressure jet injection of viscous solutions for endoscopic submucosal dissection: a study on ex vivo pig stomachs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioche, Mathieu; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Lépilliez, Vincent; Salmon, Damien; Mais, Laetitia; Guillaud, Olivier; Hervieu, Valérie; Petronio, Marco; Lienhart, Isabelle; Adriano, Jean-Luc; Lafon, Cyril; Ponchon, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Long-lasting lifting is a key factor during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and can be obtained by water-jet injection of saline solution or by injection of viscous macromolecular solutions. Combination of the jet injection and the macromolecular viscous solutions has never been used yet. We assessed the ability of a new water-jet system to inject viscous solutions in direct viewing and in retroflexion. We compared jet injection of saline solution and hyaluronate 0.5 % to perform ESD on ex vivo pig stomachs in order to evaluate the benefits of macromolecular solutions when injected by a jet-injector system. This is a prospective comparative study in pig stomachs. Using the jet injector, four viscous solutions were tested: hydroxyethyl starch, glycerol mix, hyaluronate sodic (0.5 %), and poloxamer mix. Ten ESDs larger than 25 mm (five in direct viewing and five in retroflexion) and one larger than 10 cm were performed with each solution. ESD with hyaluronate jet injection was then compared with ESD with saline jet injection by performing 50 ESDs in each group. A single, minimally-experienced operator conducted all the procedures. All 145 resections were complete, including all marking points with two perforations. Eleven jet ESDs per solution were conducted without any injection issue. In the second part of the study, when compared with saline, significant benefit of hyaluronate was observed on dissection speed (0.80 vs. 1.08 cm(2)/min, p < 0.001). This is the first report on a jet-injector system allowing injection of macromolecular viscous solutions even with retroflexed endoscope. Jet injection of macromolecular solutions can speed up dissection in comparison with saline, and should now be tested on humans.

  12. A Comparison of Visual Recognition of the Laryngopharyngeal Structures Between High and Standard Frame Rate Videos of the Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdam, Mehran Alizadeh; Ogawa, Makoto; Iwahashi, Toshihiko; Hosokawa, Kiyohito; Kato, Chieri; Inohara, Hidenori

    2017-04-29

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not high frame rate (HFR) videos recorded using high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) improve the visual recognition of the motions of the laryngopharyngeal structures during pharyngeal swallow in fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). Five healthy subjects were asked to swallow 0.5 ml water under fiberoptic nasolaryngoscopy. The endoscope was connected to a high-speed camera, which recorded the laryngopharyngeal view throughout the swallowing process at 4000 frames/s (fps). Each HFR video was then copied and downsampled into a standard frame rate (SFR) video version (30 fps). Fifteen otorhinolaryngologists observed all of the HFR/SFR videos in random order and rated the four-point ordinal scale reflecting the degree of visual recognition of the rapid laryngopharyngeal structure motions just before the 'white-out' phenomenon. Significantly higher scores, reflecting better visibility, were seen for the HFR videos compared with the SFR videos for the following laryngopharyngeal structures: the posterior pharyngeal wall (p = 0.001), left pharyngeal wall (p = 0.015), right lateral pharyngeal wall (p = 0.035), tongue base (p = 0.005), and epiglottis tilting (p = 0.005). However, when visualized with HFR and SFR, 'certainly clear observation' of the laryngeal structures was achieved in <50% of cases, because all the motions were not necessarily captured in each video. These results demonstrate the use of HSDI in FEES makes the motion perception of the laryngopharyngeal structures during pharyngeal swallow easier in comparison to SFR videos with equivalent image quality due to the ability of HSDI to depict the laryngopharyngeal motions in a continuous manner.

  13. endoscope-i: an innovation in mobile endoscopic technology transforming the delivery of patient care in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, N; Coulson, C; George, A

    2017-11-01

    Digital and mobile device technology in healthcare is a growing market. The introduction of the endoscope-i, the world's first endoscopic mobile imaging system, allows the acquisition of high definition images of the ear, nose and throat (ENT). The system combines the e-i Pro camera app with a bespoke engineered endoscope-i adaptor which fits securely onto the iPhone or iPod touch. Endoscopic examination forms a salient aspect of the ENT work-up. The endoscope-i therefore provides a mobile and compact alternative to the existing bulky endoscopic systems currently in use which often restrict the clinician to the clinic setting. Areas covered: This article gives a detailed overview of the endoscope-i system together with its applications. A review and comparison of alternative devices on the market offering smartphone adapted endoscopic viewing systems is also presented. Expert commentary: The endoscope-i fulfils unmet needs by providing a compact, highly portable, simple to use endoscopic viewing system which is cost-effective and which makes use of smartphone technology most clinicians have in their pocket. The system allows real-time feedback to the patient and has the potential to transform the way that healthcare is delivered in ENT as well as having applications further afield.

  14. Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wook Kim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment is a minimally invasive treatment for managing patients with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR. Although several bulking agents have been used for endoscopic treatment, dextranomer/hyaluronic acid is the only bulking agent currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating VUR. Endoscopic treatment of VUR has gained great popularity owing to several obvious benefits, including short operative time, short hospital stay, minimal invasiveness, high efficacy, low complication rate, and reduced cost. Initially, the success rates of endoscopic treatment have been lower than that of open antireflux surgery. However, because injection techniques have been developed, a recent study showed higher success rates of endoscopic treatment than open surgery in the treatment of patients with intermediate- and high-grade VUR. Despite the controversy surrounding its effectiveness, endoscopic treatment is considered a valuable treatment option and viable alternative to long-term antibiotic prophylaxis.

  15. Roux-en-Y fistulo-jejunostomy as a salvage procedure in patients with post-sleeve gastrectomy fistula: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouillard, Elie; Younan, Antoine; Alkandari, Mubarak; Daher, Ronald; Dejonghe, Bernard; Alsabah, Salman; Biagini, Jean

    2016-10-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is currently the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in France. It achieves both adequate excess weight loss and significant reduction in comorbidities. However, fistula is still the most common complication after SG, occurring in more than 3 % of cases, even in specialized centers (Gagner and Buchwald in Surg Obes Relat Dis 10:713-723. doi: 10.1016/j.soard.2014.01.016 , 2014). Its management is not standardized, long, and challenging. We have already reported the short-term results of Roux-en-Y fistulo-jejunostomy (RYFJ) as a salvage procedure in patients with post-SG fistula (Chouillard et al. in Surg Endosc 28:1954-1960 doi: 10.1007/s00464-014-3424-y , 2014). In this study, we analyzed the mid-term results of the RYFJ emphasizing its endoscopic, radiologic, and safety outcome. Between January 2007 and December 2013, we treated 75 patients with post-SG fistula, mainly referred from other centers. Immediate management principles included computerized tomography (CT) scan-guided drainage of collections or surgical peritoneal lavage, nutritional support, and endoscopic stenting. Ultimately, this approach achieved fistula control in nearly two-thirds of the patients. In the remaining third, RYFJ was proposed, eventually leading to fistula control in all cases. The mid-term results (i.e., more than 1 year after surgery) were assessed using anamnesis, clinical evaluation, biology tests, upper digestive tract endoscopy, and IV-enhanced CT scan with contrast upper series. Thirty patients (22 women and 8 men) had RYFJ for post-SG fistula. Mean age was 40 years (range 22-59). Procedures were performed laparoscopically in all but 3 cases (90 %). Three patients (10 %) were lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up period was 22 months (18-90). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.4 kg/m(2) (22-41). Endoscopic and radiologic assessment revealed no persistent fistula and no residual collections. Despite the lack of long-term follow-up, RYFJ could be

  16. Comparative study of esophageal stent and feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy for tracheoesophageal fistula caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hao; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Lu, Hung-I; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Rau, Kun-Ming; Liu, Chien-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A malignant tracheoesophageal/bronchoesophageal fistula (TEF) is a life-threatening complication of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy had been the most common treatment method for patients with TEF before the era of stenting. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with TEF treated with an esophageal metallic stent to those treated with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 1011 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma between 1996 and 2011 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and 86 patients with TEF (8.5%) were identified. The overall survival and other clinical data were compared between 30 patients treated with an esophageal metallic stent and 35 patients treated with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy. Among the 65 patients receiving either an esophageal metallic stent or a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy, univariate analysis showed that treatment modality with an esophageal metallic stent (P = 0.007) and radiotherapy treatment after fistula diagnosis (P = 0.04) were predictive of superior overall survival. In the multivariate comparison, treatment modality with an esophageal metallic stent (P = 0.026, odds ratio: 1.859) represented the independent predictive factor of superior overall survival. There were no significant differences between groups in mean decrease in serum albumin or mean body weight loss. Compared to the feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy group, a significantly higher proportion of patients in the stenting group (53% versus 14%, P = 0.001) were able to receive chemotherapy within 30 days after fistula diagnosis, indicating better infection control in the stenting group. Compared with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy, an esophageal metallic stent significantly improves overall survival in patients with malignant TEF in our retrospective analysis. Esophageal metallic stent placement may be

  17. [Laparoscopy-assisted jejunostomy in neurological patients with chronic malnutrition and GERD. Technical considerations and analysis of the results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, C; Alicchio, F; Escolino, M; Ascione, G; Settimi, A

    2013-01-01

    Feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) are major problems in severely neurologically impaired children. Many patients are managed with a simple gastrostomy, with or without fundoplication. Unfortunately, fundoplication and gastrostomy are not devoid of complications, indicating the need for other options in the management of these patients. Between January 2002 and June 2010, ten patients (age range, 18 months-14 years) have been treated by creating a jejunostomy with the laparoscopic-assisted procedure. The procedure was performed using 2-3 trocars. The technique consists of identifying the first jeujnal loop, grasping it 20-30 cm away from the Treitz ligament, and exteriorizing it to the trocar orifice under visual guide. The jejunostomy was created outside the abdominal cavity during open surgery. At the end of the jejunostomy, the correct position of the intestinal loops was evaluated via laparoscopy. Surgery lasted 40 min on average, the laparoscopic portion about 10 min. Hospital stay was 3 or 7 days for all patients. At the longest follow-up (8 years), all patients had experienced a significant weight gain. One patient died 1 year after the procedure of unknown causes. As for the other complications: 4/10 patients experienced peristomal heritema, 2/10 device's dislocation and 1 patient a peristomal granuloma. Laparoscopic-assisted jejunostomy is a safe and effective procedure to adopt in neurologically impaired children with feeding problems and GER. We advocate the use of this procedure in neurologically impaired patients with feeding problems and reflux due to its overall practicability and because there is minimal surgical trauma. The improvement in the quality of life of these children after the jejunostomy seems to be the major advantage of this procedure. However the management of jejunostomy can be difficult for parents above all in the first postoperative months.

  18. Comparative study of esophageal stent and feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy for tracheoesophageal fistula caused by esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hao Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A malignant tracheoesophageal/bronchoesophageal fistula (TEF is a life-threatening complication of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy had been the most common treatment method for patients with TEF before the era of stenting. The aim of this retrospective study is to compare the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with TEF treated with an esophageal metallic stent to those treated with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed a total of 1011 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma between 1996 and 2011 at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and 86 patients with TEF (8.5% were identified. The overall survival and other clinical data were compared between 30 patients treated with an esophageal metallic stent and 35 patients treated with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy. RESULTS: Among the 65 patients receiving either an esophageal metallic stent or a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy, univariate analysis showed that treatment modality with an esophageal metallic stent (P = 0.007 and radiotherapy treatment after fistula diagnosis (P = 0.04 were predictive of superior overall survival. In the multivariate comparison, treatment modality with an esophageal metallic stent (P = 0.026, odds ratio: 1.859 represented the independent predictive factor of superior overall survival. There were no significant differences between groups in mean decrease in serum albumin or mean body weight loss. Compared to the feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy group, a significantly higher proportion of patients in the stenting group (53% versus 14%, P = 0.001 were able to receive chemotherapy within 30 days after fistula diagnosis, indicating better infection control in the stenting group. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with a feeding gastrostomy/jejunostomy, an esophageal metallic stent significantly improves overall survival in patients with malignant TEF in our retrospective

  19. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For in...

  20. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: a potential endoscopic alternative to surgical sleeve gastrectomy for treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Rajan, Elizabeth; Gostout, Christopher J

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and its associated conditions, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, have reached epidemic proportions. High-efficacy, high-risk surgical approaches are unlikely to meet the increasing burden of disease. Emerging endoscopic technologies have opened the door for endoscopic approaches to reproduce many of the benefits of GI weight loss surgery and thereby contribute to the effective treatment of obesity and its associated disorders. To demonstrate the technical feasibility of transoral endoscopic gastric volume reduction with an endoscopic suturing device in a fashion similar to sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of obesity. Single-center, pilot feasibility study. Four human subjects with obesity. Transoral sleeve gastroplasty. Technical feasibility. We successfully used an endoscopic free-hand suturing system in 4 subjects, thus demonstrating the technical feasibility of a novel technique to mimic the anatomic manipulations created by surgical sleeve gastrectomy endoscopically. Pilot feasibility study with small number of subjects. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty for treatment of obesity is feasible. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various...... of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role....

  2. Low Zinc Status and Absorption Exist in Infants with Jejunostomies or Ileostomies Which Persists after Intestinal Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Abrams

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is very little data regarding trace mineral nutrition in infants with small intestinal ostomies. Here we evaluated 14 infants with jejunal or ileal ostomies to measure their zinc absorption and retention and biochemical zinc and copper status. Zinc absorption was measured using a dual-tracer stable isotope technique at two different time points when possible. The first study was conducted when the subject was receiving maximal tolerated feeds enterally while the ostomy remained in place. A second study was performed as soon as feasible after full feeds were achieved after intestinal repair. We found biochemical evidence of deficiencies of both zinc and copper in infants with small intestinal ostomies at both time points. Fractional zinc absorption with an ostomy in place was 10.9% ± 5.3%. After reanastamosis, fractional zinc absorption was 9.4% ± 5.7%. Net zinc balance was negative prior to reanastamosis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that infants with a jejunostomy or ileostomy are at high risk for zinc and copper deficiency before and after intestinal reanastamosis. Additional supplementation, especially of zinc, should be considered during this time period.

  3. [Choledocolithiasis predictors in high-risk population subjected to endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography at "Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, V; Vargas Cárdenas, G; Astete Benavides, M; Valdivia Roldán, M; Morán Tisoc, L; Nuñez Calixto, N; Chávez Rossell, M; Mayurí Bravo De Rueda, C

    2007-01-01

    The choledocholithiasis is a frequent complication of gallstone disease. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is suitable for its diagnosis and treatment. That approach has both significative morbility and mortality so others methods of diagnosis have been proposed such as intraoperatorycholangiography (IOC) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC), reserving ERCP only for therapy purpose. Verify the utility of choledocholithiasis predictors described in literature This study is a correlational observational transversal prospective approach. It was performed at the Arzobispo Loayza Hospital from August 2004 to January 2005. Many clinical, biochemical and ecographyc predictors of choledocholithiasis were analyzed in 151 patient underwent to ERCP. In all peopleunder study and analyzing separately patients underwent to cholecystectomy or not previous to ERCP, it was identified some risk factors for choledocholithiasis by means of both univariate and multivariate analysis. The univariate analysis showed a relationships among age, icterus, cholangytis, direct bilirrubin, amylase, lactic deshidrogenasa, ductal dilatation (>8 mm) and choledocholithiasis. In all groups, the multivariate analysis determined that ductal dilatation by ecography was the unique predictor for choledocholithiasis in the group of patients postoperated. None single indicator was able to predict with accuracy the choledocholithiasis. However, the parameters described in the literature are useful in our country.

  4. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrojejunostomy Tube Placement in Healthy Dogs and Cats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jergens, Albert E; Morrison, Jo Ann; Miles, Krisrtina G; Silverman, William B

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis, hepatobiliary disease, and proximal gastrointestinal tract disorders are clinical situations where delivery of nutrients via jejunostomy tube is preferable to a feeding gastrostomy...

  5. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-11-28

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis.

  6. Early Gastric Cancer: Current Advances of Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy is a major method for early gastric cancer screening because of its high detection rate, but its diagnostic accuracy depends heavily on the availability of endoscopic instruments. Many novel endoscopic techniques have been shown to increase the diagnostic yield of early gastric cancer. With the improved detection rate of EGC, the endoscopic treatment has become widespread due to advances in the instruments available and endoscopist’s experience. The aim of this review is to summarize frequently-used endoscopic diagnosis and treatment in early gastric cancer (EGC.

  7. Association Between Number of Endoscopic Resections and Utilization of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy for Patients With High-Grade, Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenis, Andrew T; Donin, Nicholas M; Litwin, Mark S; Saigal, Christopher S; Lai, Julie; Hanley, Jan M; Konety, Badrinath R; Chamie, Karim

    2017-02-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the reference standard treatment for patients with high-grade, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We previously described noncompliance with guidelines for BCG use in patients with high-risk disease. In the current study, we sought to characterize how the number of endoscopic resections of bladder tumors affects BCG utilization using population-level data. We queried a Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database to evaluate claims records of 4776 patients diagnosed with high-grade NMIBC between 1992 and 2002 and followed until 2007, who survived for at least 2 years and who did not undergo definitive treatment with cystectomy, radiotherapy, or systemic chemotherapy. We stratified patients on the basis of the number of endoscopic resections of bladder tumors. We used chi-square analysis to compare number of resections to BCG utilization and multinomial logistic regression analysis to quantify BCG utilization by patient and tumor characteristics. Utilization of BCG increases with increasing endoscopic resections from 40% at diagnosis to 72% after 6 resections. The cumulative rate of at least an induction course of BCG plateaus after 3 resections. Lower BCG utilization was associated with advanced age (≥ 80 years), while increased utilization was associated with being married, higher disease stage (Tis and T1) and grade (undifferentiated), and increasing endoscopic resections. A significant fraction of patients with NMIBC do not receive induction BCG despite its proven benefit in minimizing recurrences. Most patients receive BCG only after multiple endoscopic resections. Strategies focused on earlier adoption of BCG to prevent recurrences instead of reacting to recurrences may limit progression and improve survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [New home enteral nutrition via jejunostomy using semi-solid enteral formula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Mihoko; Makishima, Junko; Maruyama, Makishima Michio

    2014-12-01

    Home enteral nutrition via jejunostomy requires considerable time for infusion to the patients. A new method using semisolid enteral formula dramatically reduces the time of infusion. This method makes use of pectin and liquid enteral formula. The authors applied this method in two patients with total gastrectomy being given enteral nutrition at home. There were no complications such as diarrhea or abdominal pain. This new method of home enteral nutrition could enhance the patients' quality of life (QOL) by reducing the time of infusion of enteral nutrition.

  9. Oral salt supplements to compensate for jejunostomy losses: comparison of sodium chloride capsules, glucose electrolyte solution, and glucose polymer electrolyte solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, J M; Lennard-Jones, J E; Walker, E R; Farthing, M J

    1992-01-01

    Six patients with jejunostomies and residual jejunal lengths of 105 to 250 cm took the same food and water each day for eight study days. In random order, three methods of salt replacement were tested, each over 48 hours, against a period without added salt. During the three test periods the patients took 120 mmol of sodium chloride daily, as salt in gelatine capsules, as an isotonic glucose electrolyte (280 mOsmol/kg; 30 kcal) solution, and as a glucose polymer (Maxijul) solution (280 mOsmol/kg; 200 kcal). The daily stomal output remained constant for each patient during the four test periods but varied between patients from 0.60 to 2.84 kg (daily intestinal fluid balance 0.74-2.61 kg). Without a salt supplement, three patients lost more sodium from the stoma than they took in by mouth (-25, -94, and -101 mmol/day) and the mean sodium balance for all six subjects was -16 mmol (range -101 to 79) daily. Extra salt was absorbed with each form of supplement (p less than 0.05); no patient with the glucose electrolyte solution (mean 96, range 0 to 226 mmol), but one patient with the glucose-polymer solution (mean 96, range -25 to 164 mmol) and two with the salt capsules (mean 66, range -8 to 145 mmol) were in negative balance. Two patients vomited with the salt capsules. There was only a small increase in energy absorption (mean 115 kcal) with the glucose polymer solution compared with the glucose electrolyte solution. A sipped glucose electrolyte solution seems to be the optimal mode of sodium replacement in patients with a high output jejunostomy. PMID:1624155

  10. Endoscopic Management of Nonlifting Colon Polyps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Friedland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Aims. The nonlifting polyp sign of invasive colon cancer is considered highly sensitive and specific for cancer extending beyond the mid-submucosa. However, prior interventions can cause adenomas to become nonlifting due to fibrosis. It is unclear whether nonlifting adenomas can be successfully treated endoscopically. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes in a referral practice incorporating a standardized protocol of attempted endoscopic resection of nonlifting lesions previously treated by biopsy, polypectomy, surgery, or tattoo placement. Patients and Methods. Retrospective review of patients undergoing colonoscopy by one endoscopist at two hospitals found to have nonlifting lesions from prior interventions. Lesions with biopsy proven invasive cancer or definite endoscopic features of invasive cancer were excluded. Lesions ≥ 8 mm were routinely injected with saline prior to attempted endoscopic resection. Polypectomy was performed using a stiff snare, followed by argon plasma coagulation (APC if necessary. Results. 26 patients each had a single nonlifting lesion with a history of prior intervention. Endoscopic resection was completed in 25 (96%. 22 required snare resection and APC. 1 patient had invasive cancer and was referred for surgery. The recurrence rate on follow-up colonoscopy was 26%. All of the recurrences were successfully treated endoscopically. There was 1 postprocedure bleed (4%, no perforations, and no other complications. Conclusions. The majority of adenomas that are nonlifting after prior interventions can be treated successfully and safely by a combination of piecemeal polypectomy and ablation. Although recurrence rates are high at 26%, these too can be successfully treated endoscopically.

  11. Comparison of complication rates, types, and average tube patency between jejunostomy tubes and percutaneous gastrostomy tubes in a regional home enteral nutrition support program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Peter; Sebastianski, Meghan; Selvarajah, Vijeyakumar; Gramlich, Leah

    2015-06-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes are common enteral access devices for long-term enteral nutrition. Jejunostomy tubes (J-tubes) are able to provide postpyloric enteral access in patients who are not PEG tube candidates. There is a scarcity of literature comparing complication rates of J-tubes to PEG tubes. To compare and characterize J-tube and PEG tube complications requiring tube replacement. A retrospective chart review was performed on 560 patients discharged from the Northern Alberta Home Enteral Nutrition Support Program (NAHENSP) from January 2010 to December 2011. Patients were followed for 3 years from initial tube insertion or until discharge from the NAHENSP, whichever was earliest. Comparisons were made in terms of complications requiring tube replacement, tube patency to first replacement, and indications for tube replacement. A total of 64 J-tube patients were identified and compared with 65 PEG tube patients. Tube replacement rates for the J-tube group included 3.2 cases per 1000 patient days compared with 0.86 cases per 1000 patient days in the PEG group (P < .001). The mean ± SEM duration to first tube replacement for J-tube and PEG tube patients was 160 ± 26.3 days and 331 ± 53.6 days, respectively (P = .010). The most common causes for tube replacement in J-tube patients were dislodgement (35.6%) and obstruction (22.2%) compared with routine replacement (54.5%) and dislodgement (27.2%) in the PEG tube group. J-tubes are associated with higher complication rates requiring tube replacement compared with PEG tubes. The main causes of J-tube replacement are dislodgement and obstruction. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. A novel imaging system of optical detection on cancers and tissues in gastrointestinal endoscope using high-color-rendering white and color tunable LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Jun; Taguchi, Tsunemasa; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Yanai, Hideo; Kiyotoki, Shu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Shingo; Sakaida, Isao

    2010-02-01

    The use of white or color tunable LEDs (light-emitting diodes), which can replace a large light source apparatus and light-guiding fiber bundle, enable the miniaturization of the whole endoscope system and remove constraints on the design of its shape. We have developed a novel white LED for a new experimental prototype LED-illuminated gastrointestinal endoscope having the color rendering in the clinically important red range at around 600 nm.­

  13. [Jejunostomy catheter feeding during postoperative chemotherapy for Stage IV gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Jin; Fukushima, Yukio; Toshiyama, Reishi; Takeda, Mitsunobu; Tokuoka, Masayoshi; Ide, Yoshihito; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Morimoto, Takashi; Nomura, Takashi; Kodama, Ken; Sasaki, Yo

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy followed by surgery for Stage IV gastric cancer with passage obstruction poses a problem in terms of poor postoperative nutritional status. By maintaining an adequate postoperative nutrition status with jejunostomy catheter feeding, chemotherapy may possibly be continued. We treated 40 cases of Stage IV gastric cancer with passage obstruction from January 2008 to December 2011. In every case, jejunostomy catheter feeding tubes were placed during gastric cancer surgery. We performed 13 total gastrectomies, 20 distal gastrectomies, and 7 gastrojejunal bypass surgeries. Tube obstruction in 4 cases( 10%) and tube deviation in 1 case( 2.5%) occurred during the tube feeding period. Chemotherapy could be resumed in 37 cases( 92.5%), and the duration of chemotherapy was 330 days( range, 41-721). In cases of Stage IV gastric cancer, patients are obliged to start postoperative chemotherapy at an unstable period. By starting jejunal catheter feeding at an early stage after surgery, improved results could be expected in terms of shortening of the hospital stay or continuation of chemotherapy.

  14. Prevalence and in-hospital mortality of gastrostomy and jejunostomy in Japan: a retrospective study with a national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yanai, Hidekatsu; Uemura, Naomi

    2014-07-01

    PEG is widely used; however, large-scale data for PEG have been lacking. To estimate the prevalence of placement of gastrostomy and jejunostomy tubes and to elucidate the patient background characteristics and their associations with in-hospital mortality. A retrospective analysis of the Japanese administrative claims database. Japanese acute-care hospitals. A total of 64,219 patients who underwent gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube insertion between July and December, 2007 to 2010, were identified among 11.6 million discharge records. Placement of gastrostomy and jejunostomy tubes. In-hospital mortality and the associated risk factors. The mean age was 77.4 years; >90% of patients were aged >60 years. Cerebrovascular disease and pneumonia were the most frequently recorded diagnoses, followed by neuromuscular disease and dementia. The estimated annual number of gastrostomy and jejunostomy placements in Japan ranged from 96,000 to 119,000. The in-hospital mortality was 11.9%, and the significantly associated risk factors were male sex, older age, placement of a jejunostomy tube, urgent admission, hospital with lower bed capacity, the presence of malignancy, miscellaneous diseases, pneumonia, heart failure, renal failure, chronic liver diseases, pressure sores and sepsis, and occurrence of peritonitis and/or GI perforation, GI hemorrhage, and intra-abdominal hemorrhage. Retrospective investigation of administrative database. Our large-scale data revealed the current status of gastrostomy tube placement in Japan. This can contribute to individual decision-making and the public consensus regarding artificial nutritional support in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Endoscopic neck surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowbey P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic surgery in the neck was attempted in 1996 for performing parathyroidectomy. A similar surgical technique was used for performing thyroidectomy the following year. Most commonly reported endoscopic neck surgery studies in literature have been on thyroid and parathyroid glands. The approaches are divided into two types i.e., the total endoscopic approach using CO2 insufflation and the video-assisted approach without CO2 insufflation. The latter approach has been reported more often. The surgical access (port placements may vary-the common sites are the neck, anterior chest wall, axilla, and periareolar region. The limiting factors are the size of the gland and malignancy. Few reports are available on endoscopic resection for early thyroid malignancy and cervical lymph node dissection. Endoscopic neck surgery has primarily evolved due to its cosmetic benefits and it has proved to be safe and feasible in suitable patients with thyroid and parathyroid pathologies. Application of this technique for approaching other cervical organs such as the submandibular gland and carotid artery are still in the early experimental phase.

  16. Endoscopic anatomy of the pediatric middle ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, otologists have aimed to produce a clean, dry, safe ear with the best possible hearing result. More recently, "less invasively" has been added to this list of goals. The development of small-diameter, high-quality rigid endoscopes and high-definition video systems has made totally endoscopic, transcanal surgery a reality in adult otology and a possibility in pediatric otology. This article reviews the anatomy of the pediatric middle ear and its surrounding airspaces and structures based on the work of dozens of researchers over the past 50 years. It will focus on the developmental changes in ear anatomy from birth through the first decade, when structure and function change most rapidly. Understanding the limits and possibilities afforded by new endoscopic technologies, the pediatric otologist can strive for results matching or exceeding those achieved by more invasive surgical approaches.

  17. Endoscopic submucosal dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Ponchon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system 1 2 was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. MAIN...... RECOMMENDATIONS: 1 ESGE recommends endoscopic en bloc resection for superficial esophageal squamous cell cancers (SCCs), excluding those with obvious submucosal involvement (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) may be considered in such lesions when...... they are smaller than 10 mm if en bloc resection can be assured. However, ESGE recommends endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as the first option, mainly to provide an en bloc resection with accurate pathology staging and to avoid missing important histological features (strong recommendation, moderate quality...

  18. High Resolution Ultrasonography of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Before and After Endoscopic Release of the Transverse Carpal Ligament: Correlation of Ultrasonography (US)Findings with Surgical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Im, Soo Bin; Seok, Hyun; Yi, Beom Ha; Choi, Na Mi; Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Wook [East-West Neo Medical Center, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate morphological changes of the medial nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) before and after endoscopic release of the transverse carpal ligament, and to correlate the ultrasonography (US) findings with the use of high resolution US and the surgical outcome for the median nerve. Thirty patients with CTS confirmed by a clinical and electrophysiological study underwent high resolution US. The US instrumentation was equipped with a high frequency linear transducer to measure the cross sectional area, flattening ratio and swelling ratio of the medial nerve at the distal radioulnar joint, proximal and distal carpal tunnel before and three months after surgery. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the distal radioulnar level showed a decrease from 0.13 {+-} 0.03 cm2 before surgery to 0.11 {+-} 0.03 cm2 after surgery, and the CSA of the proximal carpal tunnel showed a decrease from 0.17 {+-} 0.07 cm2 to 0.14 {+-} 0.05 cm2: these differences were statistically significant. There was no statistically significant correlation between the morphological change and symptom improvement. This study confirmed a decreasing CSA of the medial nerve at the distal radioulnar and proximal carpal tunnel in a postoperative patient with CTS, as determined by the use of high resolution US. No association was found between a change in the CSA of the median nerve and symptom improvement. A further study based on multiple measurements of the median nerve with a longer period is necessary to establish the association between a change in the CSA of the median nerve and symptom improvement

  19. [12 years of endoscopic stone removal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysi, B; Schmassmann, A; Scheurer, U; Halter, F

    1993-05-29

    All 583 attempts at endoscopic clearance of biliary calculi, performed in the Gastrointestinal Unit, Inselspital Bern, were retrospectively analyzed from 1980 until 1991. The average age of the patients was 70; 56% were female and 44% male. In 1980, 26 ERCPs for bile duct stone removal were performed, whereas in 1991 the number had increased to 90. The substantial increase in 1991 occurred after introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Over the total period of 12 years all stones were removed endoscopically after papillotomy in 82%, while the success rate in 1991 was 90%. Morbidity was 5.4% and lethality 0.2%. Total morbidity did not change markedly. However, the number of severe complications requiring surgical repair was reduced from 1.7% between 1980 and 1986 to 0% between 1987 and 1991. These results suggest that endoscopic removal of bile duct stones is increasingly performed with high success and low complication rates.

  20. Robust feature tracking for endoscopic pose estimation and structure recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, S.; Krappe, S.; Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Müller-Stich, B.; Dillmann, R.

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline with several difficulties for the surgeon. To alleviate these difficulties, augmented reality can be used for intraoperative assistance. For visualization, the endoscope pose must be known which can be acquired with a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) approach using the endoscopic images. In this paper we focus on feature tracking for SLAM in minimally invasive surgery. Robust feature tracking and minimization of false correspondences is crucial for localizing the endoscope. As sensory input we use a stereo endoscope and evaluate different feature types in a developed SLAM framework. The accuracy of the endoscope pose estimation is validated with synthetic and ex vivo data. Furthermore we test the approach with in vivo image sequences from da Vinci interventions.

  1. Endoscopic naso-gallbladder drainage versus gallbladder stenting before cholecystectomy in patients with acute cholecystitis and a high suspicion of choledocholithiasis: a prospective randomised preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Jae; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong; Hwang, Jae Chul; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Soon Sun; Lim, Sun Gyo; Kim, Ji Hun; Shin, Sung Jae; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lee, Kee Myung; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Wook Hwan; Cho, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage using a nasocystic tube or plastic stent has been attempted as an alternative to percutaneous drainage for patients with acute cholecystitis who are not candidates for urgent cholecystectomy. We aimed to assess the efficacy of single-step endoscopic drainage of the common bile duct and gallbladder, and to evaluate which endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage method is ideal as a bridge before elective cholecystectomy. From July 2011 to December 2014, 35 patients with acute moderate-to-severe cholecystitis and a suspicion of choledocholithiasis were randomly assigned to the endoscopic naso-gallbladder drainage (ENGBD) (n = 17) or endoscopic gallbladder stenting (EGBS) (n = 18) group. Bile duct clearance was performed successfully in all cases. No significant differences were found between the ENGBD and EGBS groups in the technical success rates [82.4% (14/17) vs. 88.9% (16/18), p = 0.658] and clinical success rates [by intention-to-treat analysis: 70.6% (12/17) vs. 83.3% (15/18), p = 0.443; by per protocol analysis of technically feasible cases: 85.7% (12/14) vs. 93.8% (15/16), p = 0.586]. Three ENGBD patients and two EGBS patients experienced adverse events (p = 0.658). No significant differences were found in operation time or rate of conversion to open cholecystectomy. Single-step endoscopic transpapillary drainage of the common bile duct and gallbladder seems to be an acceptable therapeutic modality in patients with acute cholecystitis and a suspicion of choledocholithiasis. There were no significant differences in the technical and clinical outcomes between ENGBD and EGBS as a bridge before cholecystectomy.

  2. Technicalities of endoscopic biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Ignacio, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the wealth of biopsy forceps currently available, it is obvious that there are sufficient drawbacks and shortcomings to reconsider the overall design of the endoscopic biopsy depth, the short lifespan of reusable forceps, damage to the working channel, excessive time consumption, cleaning

  3. Robotic flexible endoscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    In flexible endoscopy a flexible tube with a steerable camera is used to inspect the internal patient tracts and to perform small surgical interventions. In current practice the physician is faced with usability problems. Often assistance is required to manipulate the flexible endoscope and the

  4. Evolving endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Paulo; Faintuch, Joel

    2014-06-01

    Since the days of Albukasim in medieval Spain, natural orifices have been regarded not only as a rather repugnant source of bodily odors, fluids and excreta, but also as a convenient invitation to explore and treat the inner passages of the organism. However, surgical ingenuity needed to be matched by appropriate tools and devices. Lack of technologically advanced instrumentation was a strong deterrent during almost a millennium until recent decades when a quantum jump materialized. Endoscopic surgery is currently a vibrant and growing subspecialty, which successfully handles millions of patients every year. Additional opportunities lie ahead which might benefit millions more, however, requiring even more sophisticated apparatuses, particularly in the field of robotics, artificial intelligence, and tissue repair (surgical suturing). This is a particularly exciting and worthwhile challenge, namely of larger and safer endoscopic interventions, followed by seamless and scarless recovery. In synthesis, the future is widely open for those who use together intelligence and creativity to develop new prototypes, new accessories and new techniques. Yet there are many challenges in the path of endoscopic surgery. In this new era of robotic endoscopy, one will likely need a virtual simulator to train and assess the performance of younger doctors. More evidence will be essential in multiple evolving fields, particularly to elucidate whether more ambitious and complex pathways, such as intrathoracic and intraperitoneal surgery via natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), are superior or not to conventional techniques. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. TRANSNASAL ENDOSCOPIC DACRYOCYSTORHINOSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigita Drnovšek Olup

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. We present our experience with transnasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy.Patients and methods. We treated 95 patients with lacrimal duct insufficiency from June 2000 to February 2003. The most frequent cause of nasolacrimal duct obstruction was chronic inflammation. We inserted a light probe through the inferior canalliculus to transilluminate the area of the lacrimal sac. We anaemized the region over the lacrimal sac and the attachment of the middle nasal concha and corrected nasal septum deviation were indicated. We coagulated and removed the mucosa over the transilluminated area, the bony wall and the medial portion of the lacrimal sac. After haemostasis, we placed silicone tubes through both canalliculi and fixed its ends with metallic clips. We finally introduced a Merocel tampon in the middle nasal meatus for two days. The silicone tubes remained in place for 3 to 4 months.Results. We observed no serious complications. The silicone tubes remained in place for 3 to 4 months. Follow up period ranged from 8 to 40 months. We noticed recurrence of symptoms in seven patients.Conclusions. Transnasal endoscopic DCR is a contribution to the development of endoscopic surgery technique. Its success rate is comparable to or even better than external DCR, according to other and our own study. Transnasal endoscopic DCR is a simple and successful procedure and well tolerated by the patients.

  6. Endoscopic treatment of obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Wróblewski, Eugeniusz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and adolescents will be reflected by the imminent increase in the number of obese patients who require more definitive methods of treatment. There is great interest in new, safe, simple, nonsurgical procedures for weight loss. OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of new endoscopic methods for the treatment of obesity. METHODS: An English-language literature search on endoscopic interventions, endoscopically placed devices and patient safety was performed in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. RESULTS: The literature search yielded the following weight loss methods: space-occupying devices (widely used), gastric capacity reduction, modifying gastric motor function and malabsorptive procedures. A commercially available intragastric balloon was the most commonly used device for weight loss. In specific subgroups of patients, it improved quality of life, decreased comorbidities and served as a bridge to surgery. More evidence regarding the potential benefits and safety of other commercially available intragastric balloons is needed to clarify whether they are superior to the most commonly used one. Moreover, early experiences with transoral gastroplasty, the duodenaljejunal bypass sleeve and an adjustable, totally implantable intragastric prosthesis, indicate that they may be viable options for obesity treatment. Other agents, such as botulinum toxin and a device known as the ‘butterfly’, are currently at the experimental stage. CONCLUSION: New endoscopic methods for weight loss may be valuable in the treatment of obesity; however, more clinical experience and technical improvements are necessary before implementing their widespread use. PMID:22059171

  7. Non-endoscopic removal of radiologically placed percutaneous primary gastrostomy tubes: a new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, A.M.; Kaye, R.D.; Fitz, C.R.; Towbin, R.B. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Radiology, PA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Purpose. To present a new technique for non-endoscopic removal of radiologically inserted primary percutaneous gastrostomy tubes (PGT) and to assess the utility and safety of this technique in the pediatric population. Materials and methods. Over a 9-year period 172 children (80 F, 92 M) mean age 10 years (range 0.29-24 years) underwent removal of radiologically placed PGTs in the Radiology Department. All procedures were performed with conscious sedation. The procedure time ranged from 20 to 45 min (mean 30 min). The procedures were performed electively at {>=} 3 14 months for either gastrostomy button placement (70), balloon gastrostomy and jejunostomy placement (55), or G tube removal at termination of enteral feeding (15). Results. PGT disc retrievals were successful performed in 169 of 173 (98 %). No technical failures occurred, but five procedures failed due to PGT disc lodgement in gastric wall (four), and gastrocolic fistula (one). One child had a repeat procedure due to premature removal of the primary PGT necessitating replacement. No deaths occurred. PGT discs retrieval was performed at a mean time interval of 14 months from initial PGT insertion (range 3-40 months). Conclusion. Non-endoscopic GT disc removal is a quick and safe procedure. It facilitates easy conversion to a gastrostomy button in the radiology setting and avoids the risk of a retained percutaneous gastrostomy tube remnant and intra/transmural migration of discs. (orig.)

  8. Complete Impulsive Migration of Feeding Jejunostomy Tube and Jejunal Intussusception - Sporadic Complications of a Common Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Khalid; Asif, Mariam

    2016-06-01

    Feeding jejunostomy is one of the most widely used procedures for enteral nutrition. It is associated with several complications which can be grouped into mechanical, metabolic, nutritional, and infectious. Amongst mechanical complications, complete impulsive tube migration is rarely seen. We hereby report the case of a 60-year old woman, with advanced esophageal carcinoma, re-admitted in the ward with blocked and stuck Foley's catheter placed in the jejenum for feeding purpose. Within hours of admission, patient developed rapid peristalsis and catheter completely disappeared in the abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy was performed to retrieve the catheter, which revealed jejunal intussception and erosions. Migration of the feeding tube is infrequent complication; however, complete migration is even rarer and needs urgent intervention.

  9. Enteral feeding via jejunostomy as a cause of intestinal perforation and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieiro Medina, María Victoria; Rodríguez Cuéllar, Elias; Ibarra Peláez, Alfredo; Gil-Díez, Dánae; de la Cruz Vigo, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    Jejunostomy for enteral feeding is excellent for patients who cannot manage oral intake, with a low complication rate. A Foley catheter, Ryle tube, Kerh tube or needle-catheter (Jejuno-Cath®) are commonly used. It is a safe procedure but it can lead to severe complications. We present two cases: firstly, an 80 year old male who was admitted to the Emergency Room with a bowel perforation secondary to Jejuno-Cath® for enteral feeding after a subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction; and secondly, a 53 year old male who was admitted to the Emergency Room due to gastric perforation developing multiple complications, including bowel necrosis and enteral feeding impaction. We have reviewed the recent literature with regard to this rare complication.

  10. Enteral feeding via jejunostomy as a cause of intestinal perforation and necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Vieiro-Medina

    Full Text Available Background: Jejunostomy for enteral feeding is excellent for patients who cannot manage oral intake, with a low complication rate. A Foley catheter, Ryle tube, Kerh tube or needle-catheter (Jejuno-Cath® are commonly used. It is a safe procedure but it can lead to severe complications. Case report: We present two cases: firstly, an 80 year old male who was admitted to the Emergency Room with a bowel perforation secondary to Jejuno-Cath® for enteral feeding after a subtotal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction; and secondly, a 53 year old male who was admitted to the Emergency Room due to gastric perforation developing multiple complications, including bowel necrosis and enteral feeding impaction. Discussion: We have reviewed the recent literature with regard to this rare complication.

  11. Safety and efficacy of radiological percutaneous jejunostomy for decompression of malignant small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo; Yoon, Chang Jin; Seong, Nak Jong; Kang, Sung-Gwon; An, Seung-Won; Woo, Young-Nam

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous radiological jejunostomy (PRJ) and stent placement in patients with malignant small bowel obstructions (MSBO). A total of 21 patients (mean age 60 years) with single (n = 4) or multiple (n = 17) MSBO underwent PRJ following jejunopexy. The medical records and imaging studies were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the technical/clinical success and complications. Clinical success was determined by symptomatic relief and radiologic bowel decompression. PRJ using a 12- or 14-F drainage catheter was technically successful in all patients. Eleven patients required placement of an 18-F nasogastric tube across one (n = 3), two (n = 6) and three (n = 2) obstructions to achieve clinical success. Subsequently, self-expandable stents were placed through the PRJ tracts to recanalise MSBO in four patients. Clinical success was achieved in 18 patients (85.7 %). The median food intake capacity score improved from 4.0 to 2.0 (P = 0.001). There were one major (peritonitis, 4.8 %) and six minor complications (28.6 %) PRJ using a nasogastric tube across the obstructions is an effective palliative treatment for MSBO. The PRJ tract can be used as an approach route for stent placement to recanalise MSBO. However, dedicated devices should be developed to reduce frequent procedure-related complications. • Bowel decompression provides palliative treatment in malignant small bowel obstruction • Percutaneous radiological jejunostomy (PRJ) is a safe and effective palliative treatment. • Long tube placement across obstructions facilitates adequate drainage of multiple bowel obstructions. • PRJ tract can be used for stent placement to approach MSBO recanalisation.

  12. The prevalence of high dysplastic colonic adenomatous polyps in a 3 year endoscopic retrospective study from a single clinical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru C. Septimiu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many colon neoplastic tumors come from the malignancy of adenomatous polyps (70%-90% that were not timely diagnosed in order to be resected. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study regarding the incidence of adenomatous polyps during 1.000 consecutive colonoscopies performed in our Upper and Lower Digestive Endoscopy Laboratory during a three-year period. Results: During these colonoscopies, some targeted polyps were biopsied or completely removed and the samples had been sent to a complete anatomopathological examination. Taking into consideration the results, the polyps were classified after the histological type and the form of dysplasia, in order to determine the polyp forms that present a high risk of malignancy. Conclusion: Given the rather high frequency of malignant polyps discovered during our study, we highly recommend colonoscopy as a method of choice for routine monitoring of selected cases.

  13. Evaluation of the 3-dimensional endoscope in transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhoudarian, Garni; Del Carmen Becerra Romero, Alicia; Laws, Edward R

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) endoscopy is a recent addition to augment the transsphenoidal surgical approach for anterior skull-base and parasellar lesions. We describe our experience implementing this technology into regular surgical practice. Retrospective review of clinical factors and outcomes. All patients were analyzed who had endoscopic endonasal parasellar operations since the introduction of the 3-D endoscope to our practice. Over an 18-month period, 160 operations were performed using solely endoscopic techniques. Sixty-five of these were with the Visionsense VSII 3-D endoscope and 95 utilized 2-dimensional (2-D) high-definition (HD) Storz endoscopes. Intraoperative and postoperative findings were analyzed in a retrospective fashion. Comparing both groups, there was no significant difference in total or surgical operating room times comparing the 2-D HD and 3-D endoscopes (239 minutes vs 229 minutes, P = .47). Within disease-specific comparison, pituitary adenoma resection was significantly shorter utilizing the 3-D endoscope (surgical time 174 minutes vs 147 minutes, P = .03). These findings were independent of resident or fellow experience. There was no significant difference in the rate of complication, reoperation, tumor resection, or intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Subjectively, the 3-D endoscope offered increased agility with 3-D techniques such as exposing the sphenoid rostrum, drilling sphenoidal septations, and identifying bony landmarks and suprasellar structures. The 3-D endoscope is a useful alternative to the 2-D HD endoscope for transnasal anterior skull-base surgery. Preliminary results suggest it is more efficient surgically and has a shorter learning curve. As 3-D technology and resolution improve, it should serve to be an invaluable tool for neuroendoscopy.

  14. Successful Management of Perforated Duodenal Diverticulitis With Intra-abdominal Drainage and Feeding Jejunostomy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Fan Chen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical experience of one patient with perforated duodenal diverticulitis who was successfully treated by intra-abdominal drainage and feeding jejunostomy. A 53-year-old male patient visited our hospital due to acute onset of abdominal pain and distension. Physical examination revealed tenderness over the epigastric area and right-lower quadrant of the abdomen without obvious rebound tenderness or muscle guarding. Duodenal diverticulitis with a retroperitoneal abscess was identified by abdominal computed tomography scan. Surgical intervention was performed after the failure of conservative treatment. The operative findings were compatible with perforated duodenal diverticulitis, and intra-abdominal drainage of retroperitoneal abscess with simultaneous feeding jejunostomy was undertaken. The patient was doing well at the 4-month postoperative follow-up visit. We suggest the use of a conservative operative method, as opposed to conventional diverticulectomy and duodenorrhaphy, as an alternative approach for the management of this disorder, especially when conservative treatment has failed.

  15. Free jejunal graft for esophageal reconstruction using end-to-side vascular anastomosis and extended pharyngo-jejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Sung; Park, Seong Yong; Jang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Moon Soo; Lee, Jong Mog; Zo, Jae Ill

    2012-06-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction using free jejunal grafts (FJGs) has been widely used, but the procedure is technically demanding and requires the involvement of multiple departments. We performed simplified reconstruction with FJGs using end-to-side vascular anastomosis and extended pharyngo-jejunostomy. The jejunal artery and vein were anastomosed to the neck vessels in an end-to-side fashion without microvascular anastomosis. Pharyngo-jejunostomy with extended end-to-end anastomosis was performed to reduce size mismatch. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 32 patients diagnosed with pharyngeal, esophageal, or pyriform sinus cancer who received a FJG. The mean age was 61.5±9.4 years, and there were 25 male patients. Jejunal vessels were commonly anastomosed to the right common carotid artery and the right internal jugular vein (22, 68.8%). The mean ischemic times of the FJG and carotid artery clamping time were 46.5±8.1 and 15.8±4.4 minutes, respectively. During the procedure, 3 patients suffered from inadequate reperfusion of the FJG requiring removal of the initial graft and replacement with another FJG. There were no neurologic complications, postoperative deaths, or adverse events directly related to FJG except for leakage of the pharyngo-jejunostomy site in 1 patient, which was primarily repaired. During the follow-up period, 5 patients (15.6%) suffered from dysphagia, but only 3 patients had evidence of anastomotic strictures at the jejuno-esophagostomy site. Thirteen patients (40.6%) received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy. Our technique of FJG with end-to-side vascular anastomosis and extended pharyngo-jejunostomy is simple and safe. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary placement technique of jejunostomy using the entristar™ skin-level gastrostomy tube in patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We developed a skin-level jejunostomy tube (SLJT procedure for patients undergoing esophagectomy using a skin-level gastrostomy tube (G-tube (Entristar™; Tyco Healthcare, Mansfield, Mass, in order to improve their nutrition status and quality of life (QOL. We describe the procedure and the adverse effects of SLJT in patients with esophageal cancer (EC. Methods Over a 24-month period (March 2008 to March 2010, there were 16 patients (mean age: 61.8 years; age range: 49-75 years; 15 men, 1 woman who had Stage II or III EC. Primary jejunostomy was performed under general anesthesia during esophagectomy. The technical success and the immediate and delayed complications of the procedure were recorded. Jejunostomy techniques SLJT placement using the G-tube (20Fr was performed 20 cm from the Treitz ligament on the side opposing the jejunal mesenterium. The internal retention bolster was exteriorized through an incision in the abdominal wall. A single purse string suture using a 4-0 absorbable suture was performed. The internal retention bolster was then inserted into the jejunal lumen via the small incision. The intestine adjacent to the tube was anchored to the peritoneum using a single stitch. Results The SLJT was successfully inserted in all 16 patients. No early complications were documented. Follow-up for a median of 107 days (range, 26-320 days revealed leakage to the skin in four patients, including superficial wound infections in two patients. There were no cases of obstruction of the tube or procedure-related death. Conclusions This SLJT placement technique using the G-tube is a safe procedure in patients with EC and allows the creation of a long-term feeding jejunostomy.

  17. Primary placement technique of jejunostomy using the entristar™ skin-level gastrostomy tube in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rino, Yasushi; Yukawa, Norio; Murakami, Hitoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takata, Ken; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Oshima, Takashi; Wada, Nobuyuki; Masuda, Munetaka; Imada, Toshio

    2011-01-31

    We developed a skin-level jejunostomy tube (SLJT) procedure for patients undergoing esophagectomy using a skin-level gastrostomy tube (G-tube) (Entristar™; Tyco Healthcare, Mansfield, Mass), in order to improve their nutrition status and quality of life (QOL). We describe the procedure and the adverse effects of SLJT in patients with esophageal cancer (EC). Over a 24-month period (March 2008 to March 2010), there were 16 patients (mean age: 61.8 years; age range: 49-75 years; 15 men, 1 woman) who had Stage II or III EC. Primary jejunostomy was performed under general anesthesia during esophagectomy. The technical success and the immediate and delayed complications of the procedure were recorded. JEJUNOSTOMY TECHNIQUES: SLJT placement using the G-tube (20Fr) was performed 20 cm from the Treitz ligament on the side opposing the jejunal mesenterium. The internal retention bolster was exteriorized through an incision in the abdominal wall. A single purse string suture using a 4-0 absorbable suture was performed. The internal retention bolster was then inserted into the jejunal lumen via the small incision. The intestine adjacent to the tube was anchored to the peritoneum using a single stitch. The SLJT was successfully inserted in all 16 patients. No early complications were documented. Follow-up for a median of 107 days (range, 26-320 days) revealed leakage to the skin in four patients, including superficial wound infections in two patients. There were no cases of obstruction of the tube or procedure-related death. This SLJT placement technique using the G-tube is a safe procedure in patients with EC and allows the creation of a long-term feeding jejunostomy.

  18. [Effect of enteral nutrition via jejunostomy catheter on quality of life in gastric cancer patients who have undergone gastrectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-bin; Yu, Jian-chun; Kang, Wei-ming; Ma, Zhi-qiang; Ye, Xin; Peng, Jing-jing; Cao, Zhang-jiang; Tian, Shu-bo

    2013-06-01

    To study the effect of enteral nutrition via jejunostomy catheter on the quality of life in gastric cancer patients who have undergone gastrectomy. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone curative resection for gastric cancer in Peking Union Medical College Hospital in 2011.All data were obtained from a prospectively maintained database of gastric cancer.The quality of life was compared between jejunostomy tube group(n=49)and tube-free group(n=55). The two groups were matched in gender,age,tumor size,tumor location,histological type,pTNM stage,type of surgery,body mass index(BMI),quality of life scales,and cycles of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy(all P>0.05).Also,the global health status(P=0.154),physical function score(P=0.321),role function score(P=0.492),and fatigue symptom score(P=0.845)were not significantly different between these two groups one month after surgery.Three and 6 months after the surgery,patients in the jejunostomy tube group had significantly higher overall health status scores( Pjejunostomy catheter can improve the quality of life of gastric cancer patients who have undergone gastrectomy.

  19. Transaxillary Endoscopic Breast Augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Bo Sim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The axillary technique is the most popular approach to breast augmentation among Korean women. Transaxillary breast augmentation is now conducted with sharp electrocautery dissection under direct endoscopic vision throughout the entire process. The aims of this method are clear: both a bloodless pocket and a sharp non-traumatic dissection. Round textured or anatomical cohesive gel implants have been used to make predictable well-defined inframammary creases because textured surface implants demonstrated a better stability attributable to tissue adherence compared with smooth surface implants. The axillary endoscopic technique has greatly evolved, and now the surgical results are comparable to those with the inframammary approach. The author feels that this technique is an excellent choice for young patients with an indistinct or absent inframammary fold, who do not want a scar in the aesthetic unit of their chest.

  20. A multiscale product approach for an automatic classification of voice disorders from endoscopic high-speed videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Jakob; Schuster, Maria; Hecker, Dietmar J; Schick, Bernhard; Lohscheller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Direct observation of vocal fold vibration is indispensable for a clinical diagnosis of voice disorders. Among current imaging techniques, high-speed videoendoscopy constitutes a state-of-the-art method capturing several thousand frames per second of the vocal folds during phonation. Recently, a method for extracting descriptive features from phonovibrograms, a two-dimensional image containing the spatio-temporal pattern of vocal fold dynamics, was presented. The derived features are closely related to a clinically established protocol for functional assessment of pathologic voices. The discriminative power of these features for different pathologic findings and configurations has not been assessed yet. In the current study, a collective of 220 subjects is considered for two- and multi-class problems of healthy and pathologic findings. The performance of the proposed feature set is compared to conventional feature reduction routines and was found to clearly outperform these. As such, the proposed procedure shows great potential for diagnostical issues of vocal fold disorders.

  1. Endoscopic tissue diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2008-09-01

    The extremely poor outcome in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, in large part, reflects the late presentation of these tumors and the challenging nature of establishing a tissue diagnosis. Establishing a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma requires obtaining evidence of malignancy from sampling of the epithelium of the biliary tract, which has proven to be challenging. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration performs slightly better than endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in diagnosing cholangiocarcinoma, both endoscopic approaches demonstrate disappointing performance characteristics.

  2. Successful Endoscopic Therapy of Traumatic Bile Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Spinn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic bile leaks often result in high morbidity and prolonged hospital stay that requires multimodality management. Data on endoscopic management of traumatic bile leaks are scarce. Our study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic management of a traumatic bile leak. We performed a retrospective case review of patients who were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP after traumatic bile duct injury secondary to blunt (motor vehicle accident or penetrating (gunshot trauma for management of bile leaks at our tertiary academic referral center. Fourteen patients underwent ERCP for the management of a traumatic bile leak over a 5-year period. The etiology included blunt trauma from motor vehicle accident in 8 patients, motorcycle accident in 3 patients and penetrating injury from a gunshot wound in 3 patients. Liver injuries were grade III in 1 patient, grade IV in 10 patients, and grade V in 3 patients. All patients were treated by biliary stent placement, and the outcome was successful in 14 of 14 cases (100%. The mean duration of follow-up was 85.6 days (range 54-175 days. There were no ERCP-related complications. In our case review, endoscopic management with endobiliary stent placement was found to be successful and resulted in resolution of the bile leak in all 14 patients. Based on our study results, ERCP should be considered as first-line therapy in the management of traumatic bile leaks.

  3. Novel endoscopic management of buried bumper syndrome in percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: The Olympus HookKnife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, Laura E; Summers, Dominic M; Tsang, Andrew

    2017-09-21

    Buried bumper syndrome (BBS) is an uncommon but serious complication of percutaneous endoscopic ga-strostomy. It involves the internal fixation device, or "bumper", migrating into the gastric wall and subsequent mucosal overgrowth. We described a case series of four patients with BBS treated with a novel endoscopic technique using a HookKnife between June 2016 and February 2017. The HookKnife is a rotating L-shaped cutting wire designed for hooking tissue and pulling it away from the gastric wall towards the lumen. The technique was successful in all four cases with no complications. Each patient was discharged on the day of treatment. The HookKnife is a manoeuvrable, safe and effective device for endoscopic removal of buried bumpers and could avoid surgery in a high risk group of patients. To our knowledge this technique has not been described previously. We suggest that this technique should be added to the treatment algorithms for managing BBS.

  4. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized...

  5. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalea Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%; one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%; four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates.

  6. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, James M; Bochicchio, Grant V; Scalea, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%); one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%); four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates. PMID:17615081

  7. Endoscopic capacity in West Africa.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Background: Levels of endoscopic demand and capacity in West Africa are unclear. Objectives: This paper aims to: 1. describe the current labor and endoscopic capacity, 2. quantify the impact of a mixed-meth- ods endoscopy course on healthcare professionals in West Africa, and 3. quantify the types of diagnoses ...

  8. Robot-assisted endoscopic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruurda, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    During the last three years, robot-assisted surgery systems are increasingly being applied in endoscopic surgery. They were introduced with the objective to overcome the challenges of standard endoscopic surgery. With the improvements in manipulation and visualisation that robotic-assistance offers,

  9. Endoscopic capacity in West Africa.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    edge among participants after didactics, objective data paired with subjective responses was more useful than either alone. Of 23 patients who received endoscopy, 7 required endoscopic intervention with 6 having gastric or esophageal varices. Currently the endoscopic capacity in West Africa is not sufficient. A formal GI ...

  10. Postoperative complications following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy are common in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvard Hansen, Erik Sören; Qvist, N.; Rasmussen, L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Inserting a feeding tube using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy may be necessary to ensure that children with eating problems receive sufficient enteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to investigate the perioperative and postoperative complications of percutaneous endoscopic...... were grade 3b complications. No gastrostomy-related deaths were observed, and no single preoperative risk factor was identified. Perioperative complications were experienced by 2.6% of the patients. Conclusion: Gastrostomy feeding tube placement was associated with a high rate of postoperative...

  11. Efficacy and complications of nasojejunal, jejunostomy and parenteral feeding after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Arja; Besselink, Marc G; Cieslak, Kasia P; Vriens, Menno R; Steenhagen, Elles; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Borel Rinkes, Inne H; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2012-06-01

    European nutritional guidelines recommend routine use of enteral feeding after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) whereas American guidelines do not. Data on the efficacy and, especially, complications of the various feeding strategies after PD are scarce. Retrospective monocenter cohort study in 144 consecutive patients who underwent PD during a period wherein the routine post-PD feeding strategy changed twice. Patients not receiving nutritional support (n=15) were excluded. Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) definitions. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Primary endpoint was the time to resumption of normal oral intake. 129 patients undergoing PD (111 pylorus preserving) were included. 44 patients (34%) received enteral nutrition via nasojejunal tube (NJT), 48 patients (37%) via jejunostomy tube (JT) and 37 patients (29%) received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Groups were comparable with respect to baseline characteristics, Clavien ≥II complications (P=0.99), in-hospital stay (P=0.83) and mortality (P=0.21). There were no differences in time to resumption of normal oral intake (primary endpoint; NJT/JT/TPN: median 13, 16 and 14 days, P=0.15) and incidence of delayed gastric emptying (P=0.30). Duration of enteral nutrition was shorter in the NJT- compared to the JT- group (median 8 vs. 12 days, P=0.02). Tube related complications occurred mainly in the NJT-group (34% dislodgement). In the JT-group, relaparotomy was performed in three patients (6%) because of JT-leakage or strangulation leading to death in one patient (2%). Wound infections were most common in the TPN group (NJT/JT/TPN: 16%, 6% and 30%, P=0.02). None of the analysed feeding strategies was found superior with respect to time to resumption of normal oral intake, morbidity and mortality. Each strategy was associated with specific complications. Nasojejunal tubes dislodged in a third of patients

  12. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescarus, Radu; Shlomovitz, Eran; Swanstrom, Lee L

    2014-01-01

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a new minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for achalasia. Since the first modern human cases were published in 2008, around 2,000 cases have been performed worldwide. This technique requires advanced endoscopic skills and a learning curve of at least 20 cases. POEM is highly successful with over 90 % improvement in dysphagia while offering patients the advantage of a low impact endoscopic access. The main long-term complication is gastroesophageal reflux (GER) with an estimated incidence of 35 %, similar to the incidence of GER post-laparoscopic Heller with fundoplication. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of achalasia, more long-term data are clearly needed to further define its role in the treatment algorithm of this rare disease.

  13. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  14. Endoscopic egomotion computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Tobias; Ruthotto, Steffen; Rupp, Stephan; Winter, Christian; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Computer assistance in Minimally Invasive Surgery is a very active field of research. Many systems designed for Computer Assisted Surgery require information about the instruments' positions and orientations. Our main focus lies on tracking a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to generate 3D ultrasound volumes. State-of-the-art tracking methods such as optical or electromagnetic tracking systems measure pose with respect to a fixed extra-body coordinate system. This causes inaccuracies of the reconstructed ultrasound volume in the case of patient motion, e.g. due to respiration. We propose attaching an endoscopic camera to the ultrasound probe and calculating the camera motion from the video sequence with respect to the organ surface. We adapt algorithms developed for solving the relative pose problem to recreate the camera path during the ultrasound sweep over the organ. By this image-based motion estimation camera motion can only be determined up to an unknown scale factor, known as the depth-speed-ambiguity. We show, how this problem can be overcome in the given scenario, exploiting the fact, that the distance of the camera to the organ surface is fixed and known. Preprocessing steps are applied to compensate for endoscopic image quality deficiencies.

  15. Effect of a long acting somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 on jejunostomy effluents in patients with severe short bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, K; Christensen, K C; Hegnhøj, J; Jarnum, S

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a long acting somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 on stomal effluents in patients with severe short bowel syndrome was investigated in a double blind placebo controlled balance study. Six patients, five with Crohn's disease and one with radiation enteropathy were studied. Five patients had a jejunostomy and one an ileostomy. The patients had a normal food intake, but because of severe malabsorption had received home parenteral nutrition for several years. Faecal mass was reduced (p less than 0.005) and intestinal net sodium absorption was increased (p less than 0.005) by intravenous infusion of SMS 25 micrograms/h. Net absorption of potassium, calcium, magnesium phosphate, zinc, nitrogen and fat was not influenced. Subcutaneous injections of 50 micrograms SMS every 12 hours had a similar effect on net intestinal absorption of sodium and water. Four patients continued with a five to six months open follow up study when subcutaneous SMS in the same dose was administered by the patients at home. The effect on faecal sodium loss persisted, but in one patient faecal mass gradually increased and finally exceeded pretreatment values. SMS may decrease net absorption of water and sodium following reduced secretion of digestive juices rather than by increasing absorptive capacity. SMS may be useful as an antidiarrhoeal drug in patients with high output jejuno- or ileostomies, but in patients who need permanent parenteral nutrition the effect is too small to significantly alter management. PMID:2668129

  16. Method for radiometric calibration of an endoscope's camera and light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2008-03-01

    An endoscope is a commonly used instrument for performing minimally invasive visual examination of the tissues inside the body. A physician uses the endoscopic video images to identify tissue abnormalities. The images, however, are highly dependent on the optical properties of the endoscope and its orientation and location with respect to the tissue structure. The analysis of endoscopic video images is, therefore, purely subjective. Studies suggest that the fusion of endoscopic video images (providing color and texture information) with virtual endoscopic views (providing structural information) can be useful for assessing various pathologies for several applications: (1) surgical simulation, training, and pedagogy; (2) the creation of a database for pathologies; and (3) the building of patient-specific models. Such fusion requires both geometric and radiometric alignment of endoscopic video images in the texture space. Inconsistent estimates of texture/color of the tissue surface result in seams when multiple endoscopic video images are combined together. This paper (1) identifies the endoscope-dependent variables to be calibrated for objective and consistent estimation of surface texture/color and (2) presents an integrated set of methods to measure them. Results show that the calibration method can be successfully used to estimate objective color/texture values for simple planar scenes, whereas uncalibrated endoscopes performed very poorly for the same tests.

  17. The "omega" jejunostomy tube: A preferred alternative for postpyloric feeding access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Avraham; Arps, Kelly; Siddharthan, Ragavan; Rajdev, Priya; Heiss, Kurt F

    2016-02-01

    We present our technique for construction of the "Omega Jejunostomy" (OJ), a novel method of postpyloric feeding using a pouched-jejunal loop capable of accommodating a balloon gastrostomy button. We describe potential indications for the procedure and outcomes in a complex patient population. We retrospectively reviewed records of patients who underwent an OJ at our institution between 2005 and 2014. Primary outcomes include operating time, length of hospital stay, time to feeding goals, and postoperative complications. We identified 12 children (6 males) with multiple comorbidities who underwent OJ procedures. The median age at surgery was 11years (range 3months-23years). Eleven patients had failed previous alternative feeding access or antireflux procedures. All patients eventually reached their feeding goals. Eight were at goal feeds in <10days. Two achieved goal feeds <1month, one <4months, and one within 7months. There was one OJ failure because of fistula formation requiring surgical revision, and one child was treated successfully but died of unrelated causes. Four children eventually transitioned to PO or G-tube feeds, and six were tolerating feeds via OJ at last follow-up (8-74months). OJ provides a durable alternative to gastrojejunostomy tube for patients who are poor candidates for or have failed Nissen fundoplication. It is technically easier to perform than a gastroesophageal disconnect procedure, has minimal surgical comorbidities, and can provide durable feeding access and achievement of goal feeds in a complex and refractory patient subset. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscopic Therapeutic Approach for Dysplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-09-01

    Long-standing intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) induces dysplastic change in the intestinal mucosa and increases the risk of subsequent colorectal cancer. The evolving endoscopic techniques and technologies, including dye spraying methods and high-definition images, have been replacing random biopsies and have been revealed as more practical and efficient for detection of dysplasia in IBD patients. In addition, they have potential usefulness in detailed characterization of lesions and in the assessment of endoscopic resectability. Most dysplastic lesions without an unclear margin, definite ulceration, non-lifting sign, and high index of malignant change with suspicion for lymph node or distant metastases can be removed endoscopically. However, endoscopic resection of dysplasia in chronic IBD patients is usually difficult because it is often complicated by submucosal fibrosis. In patients with dysplasias that demonstrate submucosa fibrosis or a large size (≥20 mm), endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) or ESD with snaring (simplified or hybrid ESD) is an alternative option and may avoid a colectomy. However, a standardized endoscopic therapeutic approach for dysplasia in IBD has not been established yet, and dedicated specialized endoscopists with interest in IBD are needed to fully investigate recent emerging techniques and technologies.

  19. Endoscopic treatment of extrahepatic bile duct strictures in patients with portal biliopathy carries a high risk of haemobilia: report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutignani, M; Shah, S K; Bruni, A; Perri, V; Costamagna, G

    2002-08-01

    Extrahepatic portal venous obstruction can be associated with bile duct abnormalities, the entity being called portal biliopathy. Three cases are reported of extrahepatic bile duct strictures in patients with portal biliopathy who developed haemobilia during endotherapy. Although endoscopic therapy with stent placement can be successful in patients with portal biliopathy and could also lead to permanent stricture resolution, procedure-related haemobilia is not as uncommon as previously held. Shunt surgery could be a better option in fit patients, since it could provide definitive treatment in a young patient with an otherwise normal life expectancy.

  20. In vitro evaluation of bursting pressure and intestinal luminal area of three jejunostomy tube placement techniques in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risselada, Marije; Ellison, Gary W; Winter, Matthew D; Giglio, Robson F; Shih, Andre; Hernandez, Jorge A; Griffith, Emily

    2015-05-01

    To compare pursestring, Witzel (seromuscular inversion), and seromuscular incision jejunostomy tube placement techniques in vitro. Jejunal specimens from 10 dogs. Jejunal segments (50 cm) were harvested immediately prior to euthanasia from 10 mixed-breed dogs Specimens were harvested with the orad and aborad ends clamped and stored in saline (0.9% NaCl) solution-soaked towels during instrumentation. Three jejunostomy tubes were placed via 3 techniques (pursestring, Witzel, and seromuscular incision), and 2 double lumen central venous catheters were placed at each intestinal end for luminal filling and leak testing. Intestinal luminal area was measured ultrasonographically with specimens suspended in a warm undyed saline solution bath with the intestinal lumen filled with dyed saline solution (intraluminal pressure, 6 mm Hg). Leak testing was performed by means of infusion of dyed saline solution (4 mL/min) until each jejunostomy site failed. Intestinal luminal area and leakage pressure were compared between the 3 tube placement techniques. The Witzel and seromuscular incision techniques decreased the intestinal luminal area measured at the tube insertion site, albeit nonsignificantly. For the seromuscular incision technique, a significant decrease in intestinal luminal area at the intraluminal site of measurement was found. For 2/30 specimens (1/10 pursestring and 1/10 seromuscular incision), failure occurred at pressures within the range of previously reported peak peristaltic pressure for dogs. Failure occurred at supraphysiologic peristaltic pressures for the remaining 28 specimens, including all 10 specimens for the Witzel technique. In this in vitro study, all specimens for the Witzel technique withstood physiologic peristaltic pressures during leak testing. Both tunneling techniques (Witzel and seromuscular incision) created a decrease in intestinal luminal area. Further investigation, including in vivo testing, is indicated to evaluate the clinical relevance

  1. Fundus imaging with a nasal endoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mahesh Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide field fundus imaging is needed to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients with retinal pathology. This is more applicable for pediatric patients as repeated evaluation is a challenge. The presently available imaging machines though provide high definition images, but carry the obvious disadvantages of either being costly or bulky or sometimes both, which limits its usage only to large centers. We hereby report a technique of fundus imaging using a nasal endoscope coupled with viscoelastic. A regular nasal endoscope with viscoelastic coupling was placed on the cornea to image the fundus of infants under general anesthesia. Wide angle fundus images of various fundus pathologies in infants could be obtained easily with readily available instruments and without the much financial investment for the institutes.

  2. Evaluation of a System for High-Accuracy 3D Image-Based Registration of Endoscopic Video to C-Arm Cone-Beam CT for Image-Guided Skull Base Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirota, Daniel J.; Uneri, Ali; Schafer, Sebastian; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Reh, Douglas D.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.; Taylor, Russell H.; Hager, Gregory D.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) or, more recently, intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT). The ability to register real-time endoscopic video with CBCT offers an additional advantage by rendering information directly within the visual scene to account for intraoperative anatomical change. However, tracker localization error (~ 1–2 mm) limits the accuracy with which video and tomographic images can be registered. This paper reports the first implementation of image-based video-CBCT registration, conducts a detailed quantitation of the dependence of registration accuracy on system parameters, and demonstrates improvement in registration accuracy achieved by the image-based approach. Performance was evaluated as a function of parameters intrinsic to the image-based approach, including system geometry, CBCT image quality, and computational runtime. Overall system performance was evaluated in a cadaver study simulating transsphenoidal skull base tumor excision. Results demonstrated significant improvement (p < 0.001)in registration accuracy with a mean reprojection distance error of 1.28 mm for the image-based approach versus 1.82 mm for the conventional tracker-based method. Image-based registration was highly robust against CBCT image quality factors of noise and resolution, permitting integration with low-dose intraoperative CBCT. PMID:23372078

  3. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yad Ram Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound and pancreas divisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Surinder S; Gonen, Can; Vilmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    cholangiopancreatography is the gold standard for its diagnosis, but is invasive and associated with significant adverse effects. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allows the detailed evaluation of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system without injecting contrast in these ducts. Moreover, it provides detailed images...

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 stimulates mucosal microcirculation measured by laser Doppler flowmetry in end-jejunostomy short bowel syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyerup, P; Hellström, P M; Schmidt, P T

    2013-01-01

    In animal and human studies glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) has been shown to increase blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein. This study describes the effect of GLP-2 measured directly on the intestinal mucosal blood flow by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) in end-jejunostomy...

  6. Outcome of Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery for Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hee; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Jung Hyun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Se, Young-Bem; Kim, Hey In; Lee, Seung Hoon; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Seong Yeon; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kong, Doo-Sik; Kim, Yong Hwy

    2017-08-01

    Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery has recently been introduced in pituitary surgery. We investigated outcomes and complications of endoscopic surgery in 2 referral centers in Korea. We enrolled 134 patients with acromegaly (microadenomas, n = 15; macroadenomas, n = 119) who underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery at Seoul National University Hospital (n = 74) and Samsung Medical Center (n = 60) between January 2009 and March 2016. Remission was defined as having a normal insulin-like growth factor-1 and a suppressed growth hormone (GH) <1 ng/mL during an oral glucose tolerance test. Remission was achieved in 73.1% of patients, including 13 of 15 microadenoma patients (86.7%) and 86 of 119 macroadenoma patients (72.3%). A multivariate analysis to determine a predictor of biochemical remission demonstrated that absence of cavernous sinus invasion and immediate postoperative GH levels <2.5 ng/dL were significant predictors of remission (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 5.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52-17.3 and OR, 9.60; 95% CI, 3.41-26.9, respectively). After surgery, normal pituitary function was maintained in 34 patients (25.4%). Sixty-four patients (47.7%) presented complete (n = 59, 44.0%) or incomplete (n = 5, 3.7%) recovery of pituitary function. Hypopituitarism persisted in 20 patients (14.9%) and worsened in 16 patients (11.9%). Postoperatively, transient diabetes insipidus was reported in 52 patients (38.8%) but only persisted in 2 patients (1.5%). Other postoperative complications were epistaxis (n = 2), cerebral fluid leakage (n = 4), infection (n = 1), and intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 1). Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery for acromegaly presented high remission rates and a low incidence of endocrine deficits and complications. Regardless of surgical techniques, invasive pituitary tumors were associated with poor outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Feeding jejunostomy tube placement in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy: an ongoing dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Daniel P; Zani, Sabino; Penne, Kara; Speicher, Paul J; Stinnett, Sandra S; Clary, Bryan M; White, Rebekah R; Tyler, Douglas S; Blazer, Dan G

    2014-10-01

    Concomitant placement of feeding jejunostomy tubes (FJT) during pancreaticoduodenectomy is common, yet there are limited data regarding catheter-specific morbidity and associated outcomes. This information is crucial to appropriately select patients for feeding tube placement and to optimize perioperative nutrition strategies. A review of all patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy with FJT placement was completed. Patients were grouped by the occurrence of FJT-related morbidity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of FJT morbidity; these complications were then further defined. Finally, associated postoperative outcomes were compared between groups. In total, 126 patients were included, of which 18 (14 %) had complications directly related to their FJT, including pericatheter infection (n = 6), pneumatosis intestinalis (n = 4), severe tube feed intolerance (n = 3), and primary catheter malfunction (n = 7). Following adjustment with logistic regression, preoperative hypoalbuminemia was identified as the only independent predictor of FJT complications (OR 2.23, p = 0.035). Patients with FJT complications were more likely to be initiated on total parenteral nutrition (TPN; 55.6 vs. 7.4 %, p -0.035) and to require TPN at discharge (16.7 vs. 0%, p = 0.003). Correspondingly, these patients resumed an oral diet later (14 vs. 8 days, p = 0.06). Both reoperation (50.0 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001) and readmission (50.0 vs. 22.4%, p = 0.041) rates were higher among patients with FJT complications. FJT-related morbidity is common among patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy and is associated with inferior outcomes and other performance metrics. Preoperative malnutrition appears to predict FJT complications, creating an ongoing dilemma regarding FJT placement. In the future, it will be important to better define criteria for FJT placement during pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  8. The comparison of different medical electronic endoscope systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wei; Wang, Liqiang; Duan, Huilong

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a miniaturized CMOS camera for high-definition (HD) medical electronic endoscope system with resolution of 1.3 MegaPixel. LVDS technology is used for image data stream transmission between the sensor and the HD image workstation to realize a long distance, high speed, high signal integrity and low noise system. Considering the real-time video image processing and the complexity of the design of HD image workstation, four solutions for medical electronic endoscope systems, namely USB based image acquisition system, PCIe acquisition data board based method, ARM embedded system based solution and DSP based electronic endoscope system have been proposed, analyzed and compared with each other. We found that the four solutions have their own advantages and disadvantages. Taking into account the strong control capacity of ARM, powerful data processing ability and high operating speed of DSP, good portability and other factors, we decided to use ARM + DSP embedded based system.

  9. Early jejunostomy creation in cases of isolated hypoganglionosis: verification of our own experience based on a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Sumida, Wataru; Takasu, Hidemi; Oshima, Kazuo; Kanamori, Yutaka; Uchida, Keiichi; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-01

    Isolated hypoganglionosis (IH) is a rare disease, with few well-established therapeutic strategies. This study aims to verify our preliminary therapeutic strategies developed to date in a comparison with data obtained from a nationwide survey of congenital-type IH. Of the 90 registered IH cases assessed in a survey of Japanese pediatric surgical departments, 40 patients who had initially undergone jejunostomy (JE) and 41 treated with ileostomy (IL) were analyzed. Thirteen patients with JE sites located less than 50 cm from the ligament of Treitz were defined as having undergone upper jejunostomy (UJE). Postsurgical plain abdominal X-ray findings and survival rates, estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, were used to evaluate improvements following stoma creation. Improvements in bowel obstruction were observed in significantly more UJE patients (9/13) than non-UJE patients [20/63 (22 JE and 41 IL cases); p = 0.01]. Furthermore, the JE patients demonstrated a significantly higher survival rate than the IL patients (p = 0.01). Following the completion of the 10-year follow-up period, three JE patients died after undergoing massive bowel resection. To manage IH successfully, patients should undergo JE less than 50 cm from the ligament of Treitz during the neonatal period. Properly managing the distal intestines is important for achieving long-term survival.

  10. Endoscopic therapy of rectal carcinoid: a report of 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-feng ZHAO

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the effect of treatment of rectal carcinoid tumors through endoscopy.Methods Endoscopic dissection was performed for patients during Jun.2005 to Dec.2009,in whom an elevated lesion in rectal mucosa as seen through colonoscopy,and highly suspected to be rectal carcinoid by endoscopic ultrasound(EUS,with the diameter of the lesion smaller than 1.0cm,was excised through endoscope.After being proved to be totally excised,endoscopic biopsy was performed at 4 to 6 sites along borderline of the tumor.Accurate rate of EUS was evaluated by postoperative pathology.Invasion and entirety of excised tumor were analyzed by pathological examination.Colonoscopy and liver ultrasound were carried out one time every half a year during the follow-up.Results 27 patients with elevated lesion in rectal mucosa were investigated.Rectal carcinoid was highly suspected in these patients and met the indication for endoscopic excision.The elevated lesion in rectal mucosa was excised successfully by endoscopy in all cases.Postoperative pathology confirmed that corvect diagnosis of rectal carcinoid was 92.6%(25/27.Interstitialoma was found in 1 patient,and granular cell tumor in another patient.All the 25 patients with rectal carcinoid were followed up with an average follow-up time of 33.7±12.5 months.Metastases and recurrence had not been found.Conclusions EUS has a good diagnostic specificity in the elevated lesion of rectal mucosa,and can accurately assess the indication of endoscopic excision.Endoscopic excision is a safe and effective method for rectal carcinoid which is smaller than 1.0 cm.

  11. Laparoscopic T-tube feeding jejunostomy as an adjunct to staging laparoscopy for upper gastrointestinal malignancies: the technique and review of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Sze Li; Mahendran, Hans Alexander; Wong, Chee Ming; Milaksh, Nirumal Kumar; Nyunt, Myo

    2017-03-20

    In recent years, staging laparoscopy has gained acceptance as part of the assessment of resectability of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) malignancies. Not infrequently, we encounter tumours that are either locally advanced; requiring neoadjuvant therapy or occult peritoneal disease that requires palliation. In all these cases, the establishment of enteral feeding during staging laparoscopy is important for patients' nutrition. This review describes our technique of performing laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy and the clinical outcomes. The medical records of all patients who underwent laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy following staging laparoscopy for UGI malignancies between January 2010 and July 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The data included patient demographics, operative technique and clinical outcomes. Fifteen patients (11 males) had feeding jejunostomy done when staging laparoscopy showed unresectable UGI maligancy. Eight (53.3%) had gastric carcinoma, four (26.7%) had oesophageal carcinoma and three (20%) had cardio-oesophageal junction carcinoma. The mean age was 63.3 ± 7.3 years. Mean operative time was 66.0 ± 7.4 min. Mean postoperative stay was 5.6 ± 2.2 days. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy was performed without intra-operative complications. There were no major complications requiring reoperation but four patients had excoriation at the T-tube site and three patients had tube dislodgement which required bedside replacement of the feeding tube. The mean duration of feeding tube was 127.3 ± 99.6 days. Laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy is an important adjunct to staging laparoscopy that can be performed safely with low morbidity. Meticulous attention to surgical techniques is the cornerstone of success.

  12. Endoscopic Trimodal Imaging Detects Colonic Neoplasia as Well as Standard Video Endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Teaco; van den Broek, Frank J. C.; Naber, Anton H.; van Soest, Ellert J.; Scholten, Pieter; Mallant-Hent, Rosalie Ch; van den Brande, Jan; Jansen, Jeroen M.; van Oijen, Arnoud H. A. M.; Marsman, Willem A.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Fockens, Paul; Dekker, Evelien

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Endoscopic trimodal imaging (ETMI) is a novel endoscopic technique that combines high-resolution endoscopy (HRE), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and narrow-band imaging (NBI) that has only been studied in academic settings. We performed a randomized, controlled trial in a

  13. Advances in imaging and endoscopic therapy in Barrett’s esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Herrero, L.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis evaluated the role of advanced imaging around endoscopic therapy as well as explored the further possibilities of endoscopic therapy of early neoplasia (i.e. high-grade dysplasia and early cancer) in Barrett's esophagus. Advanced imaging techniques such as autofluorescence and

  14. Design of the new rigid endoscope distortion measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaohao; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Ming; Hui, Mei; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Wang, Yakun; Li, Yonghui; Zhou, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic imaging quality affects industrial safety and medical security. Rigid endoscope distortion is of great signification as one of optical parameters to evaluate the imaging quality. This paper introduces a new method of rigid endoscope distortion measurement, which is different from the common methods with low accuracy and fussy operation. It contains a Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) to display the target, a CCD to obtain the images with distortion, and a computer to process the images. The LCD is employed instead of common white screen. The autonomous control system of LCD makes it showing the test target designed for distortion, and its parameter is known. LCD control system can change the test target to satisfy the different demand for accuracy, which avoids replacing target frequently. The test system also contains a CCD to acquire images in the exit pupil position of rigid endoscope. Rigid endoscope distortion is regarded as centrosymmetric, and the MATLAB software automatically measures it by processing the images from CCD. The MATLAB software compares target images with that without distortion on LCD and calculates the results. Relative distortion is obtained at different field of view (FOV) radius. The computer plots the curve of relative distortion, abscissa means radius of FOV, ordinate means relative distortion. The industry standard shows that, the distortion at 70% field of view is pointed on the curve, which can be taken as an evaluation standard. This new measuring method achieves advantages of high precision, high degree of intelligence, excellent repeatability and gets calculation results quickly.

  15. Endoscopic Transaxillary Near Total Thyroidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejeh, Ijeoma Acholonu; Speights, Fredne; Rashid, Qammar N.; Ideis, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Background: Since first reported in 1996, endoscopic minimally invasive surgery of the cervical region has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of benign thyroid and parathyroid disease. The endoscopic transaxillary technique uses a remote lateral approach to the thyroid gland. Because of the perceived difficulty in accessing the contralateral anatomy of the thyroid gland, this technique has typically been reserved for patients with unilateral disease. Objectives: The present study examines the safety and feasibility of the transaxillary technique in dissecting and assessment of both thyroid lobes in performing near total thyroidectomy. Methods: Prior to this study we successfully performed endoscopic transaxillary thyroid lobectomy in 32 patients between August 2003 and August 2005. Technical feasibility in performing total thyroidectomy using this approach was accomplished first utilizing a porcine model followed by three human cadaver models prior to proceeding to human surgery. After IRB approval three female patients with histories of enlarging multinodular goiter were selected to undergo endoscopic near total thyroidectomy. Results: The average operative time for all models was 142 minutes (range 57–327 min). The three patients in this study had clinically enlarging multinodular goiters with an average size of 4 cm. The contralateral recurrent laryngeal nerve and parathyroid glands were identified in all cases. There was no post-operative bleeding, hoarseness or subcutaneous emphysema. Conclusion: Endoscopic transaxillary near total thyroidectomy is feasible and can be performed safely in human patients with bilateral thyroid disease. PMID:16882421

  16. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Beau A.; Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2010-02-01

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H&E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  17. Endoscopic Treatment for Early Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic resection has been accepted as a curative modality for early gastric cancer (EGC). Since conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) has been introduced, many improvements in endoscopic accessories and techniques have been achieved. Recently, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using various electrosurgical knives has been performed for complete resection of EGC and enables complete resection of EGC, which is difficult to completely resect in the era of conventional EMR. Cur...

  18. Endoscopic treatment of lumbar arachnoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, J P; Mourgela, S

    2007-02-01

    The diagnosis of lumbar arachnoiditis remains complex and often inconclusive. Using the technique of lumbar subarachnoidal endoscopy (thecaloscopy), the pathology can be identified and the patient treated with long-term effects on the symptoms. Endoscopic operations were performed on 23 patients suffering from varying symptoms with an enlarged lumbar subarachnoidal space. Having confirmed the diagnosis of lumbar arachnoiditis, a number of endoscopic operations ranging from adhesiolysis to subarachno-epidurostomy were carried out. Radicular symptoms in lumbar arachnoiditis were successfully relieved by various endoscopic dissection techniques, such as restoration of the improved CSF flow by subarachno-epidurostomy along the rootlet. This has been identified as one of the causal factors of the clinical symptoms. In cases where lumbar pain persists in spite of a previous thecaloscopy, further treatment with a lumboperitoneal shunt device has proved most successful.

  19. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  20. Colorectal endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Pujan; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-08-01

    Colonoscopy has the benefit of detecting and treating precancerous adenomatous polyps and thus reduces mortality associated with CRC. Screening colonoscopy is the keystone for prevention of colorectal cancer. Over the last 20 years there has been increased in the management of large colorectal polyps from surgery to endoscopic removal techniques which is less invasive. Traditionally surgical resection was the treatment of choice for many years for larger polyps but colectomy poses significant morbidity of 14-46% and mortality of up to 7%. There are several advantages of endoscopic resection technique over surgery; it is less invasive, less expensive, has rapid recovery, and preserves the normal gut functions. In addition patient satisfaction and efficacy of EMR is higher with minor complications. Thus, this has facilitated the development of advanced resection technique for the treatment of large colorectal polyps called as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  2. An assessment of feeding jejunostomy tube placement at the time of resection for gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sameer H; Kooby, David A; Staley, Charles A; Maithel, Shishir K

    2013-06-01

    Feeding jejunostomy tubes (J-tube) are often placed during gastrectomy for cancer to decrease malnutrition and promote delivery of adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that J-tubes actually are associated with increased complications and do not improve nutritional status nor increase rates of adjuvant therapy. One hundred thirty-two patients were identified from a prospectively maintained database that underwent gastric resection for gastric adenocarcinoma between 1/00 and 3/11 at one institution. Pre- and postoperative nutritional status and relevant intraoperative and postoperative parameters were examined. Median age was 64 years (range 23-85). Forty-six (35%) underwent a total and 86 (65%) a subtotal gastrectomy. J-tubes were placed in 66 (50%) patients, 34 of whom underwent a subtotal and 32 a total gastrectomy. Preoperative nutritional status was similar between J-tube and no J-tube groups as measured by serum albumin (3.5 vs. 3.4 g/dL). Tumor grade, T, N, and overall stage were similar between groups. J-tube placement was associated with increased postop complications (59% vs. 41%, P = 0.04) and infectious complications (36% vs. 17%, P = 0.01), of which majority were surgical site infections. J-tubes were associated with prolonged length of stay (13 vs. 11 days; P = 0.05). There was no difference in postoperative nutritional status as measured by 30, 60, and 90-day albumin levels and the rate of receiving adjuvant therapy was similar between groups (J-tube: 61%, no J-tube: 53%, P = 0.38). Multivariate analyses revealed J-tubes to be associated with increased postop complications (HR: 4.8; 95% CI: 1.3-17.7; P = 0.02), even when accounting for tumor stage and operative difficulty and extent. Subset analysis revealed J-tubes to have less associated morbidity after total gastrectomy. J-tube placement after gastrectomy for gastric cancer may be associated with increased postoperative complications with no demonstrable advantage in receiving adjuvant therapy. Routine

  3. Miniature endoscope for a combined OCT-LIF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumlinson, Alex; Hariri, Lida; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2003-07-01

    An endoscopic system that provides simultaneous cross-sectional imaging and fluorescence spectroscopy is described. The first application of this device was the investigation of mouse colon cancer in vivo. This system combined optical coherence tomography (OCT), which provided high-resolution cross-sectional structural information in the form of a two-dimensional image, and laser induced fluorescence (LIF), which yielded histochemical information about the tissue. The design challenge and solution of packaging these two systems with widely different optical requirements are described in detail. The illumination geometry of the endoscope was similar to earlier published OCT and LIF catheter endoscope designs. However, several unique design challenges encountered in combining these two systems have been addressed. The use of a rodprism to reduce the asymmetry in the OCT beam caused by a cylindrical window is presented. Materials selection for use with wavelengths from 325nm - 1310nm presented a challenge usually avoided in OCT endoscopes. Preliminary mouse colon data collected with this endoscopic device is compared with previous experiments performed by researchers in our lab working with an earlier bulk-optic, combined OCT-LIF system.

  4. Benefits and harms of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2016-07-28

    Gastric cancer has remained a serious burden worldwide, particularly in East Asian countries. However, nationwide prevention and screening programs for gastric cancer have not yet been established in most countries except in South Korea and Japan. Although evidence regarding the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has been increasingly accumulated, such evidence remains weak because it is based on results from studies other than randomized controlled trials. Specifically, evidence was mostly based on the results of cohort and case-control studies mainly conducted in South Korea and Japan. However, the consistent positive results from these studies suggest promising evidence of mortality reduction from gastric cancer by endoscopic screening. The major harms of endoscopic screening include infection, adverse effects, false-positive results, and overdiagnosis. Despite the possible harms of endoscopic screening, information regarding these harms remains insufficient. To provide appropriate cancer screening, a balance of benefits and harms should always be considered when cancer screening is introduced as a public policy. Quality assurance is very important for the implementation of cancer screening to provide high-quality and safe screening and minimize harms. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further evaluation to reliably establish its effectiveness and optimal use.

  5. Evaluation of Supporting Role of Early Enteral Feeding Via Tube Jejunostomy Following Resection of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhamak Khorgami

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, early diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal (GI tract malignancies and their surgical resection is becoming more feasible. One of the important side effects in upper GI tract malignancies is malnutrition which has direct relationship with postoperative complications. Nonetheless, there is no easy regimen of nutrition for these patients especially for the first week after operation. Accordingly we present a simple method for improving feeding such patients via tube jejunostomy. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early enteral feeding (EEF on postoperative course after complete resection of upper gastrointestinal tract malignancy and reconstruction. Methods: Between September 2005 to September 2008, 60 consecutive patients (22 female, 38 male with upper GI tract malignancies who had undergone complete resection and reconstruction enrolled in this study. The patients randomly divided equally in two groups of control and EEF. Control group was treated with traditional management of nil by mouth and intravenous fluids for the first five postoperative days and then with liquids and enteral regular diet when tolerated. In EEF group the patients were fed by tube jejunostomy from 1st postoperative day and assessed for nutritional status before surgery and 5 days after surgery. Both groups were monitored on the basis of weight gain, clinical and paraclinical parameters and postoperative complications. Results: Sixty patients were randomly divided to two equal groups. Surgical procedures were similar in two groups and no significant difference in demographic and basic nutritional status were found. On 5th postoperative day serum albumin was 4.2±0.4 g/dl in EEF and 3.6±0.3 g/dl in control group (p= 0.041. Also serum transferrin was 260.8±2.5 mg/dl and 208±1.8 mg/dl in EEF and control group respectively (p<0.001. Moreover, hospital stay was shorter in EEF group (7.7±3.1 vs. 14±2.5 days, p=0.009.There were four (13

  6. Duodeno-duodenostomy or duodeno-jejunostomy for duodenal atresia: is one repair better than the other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Augusto; Yeh, Jung-Pin Benjamin; King, Sebastian K; Chiu, Priscilla P L; Wales, Paul W

    2017-02-01

    The surgical management of neonates with duodenal atresia (DA) involves re-establishment of intestinal continuity, either by duodeno-duodenostomy (DD) or by duodeno-jejunostomy (DJ). Although the majority of pediatric surgeons perform DD repair preferentially, we aimed to analyze the outcome of DA neonates treated with either surgical technique. Following ethical approval (REB:1000047737), we retrospectively reviewed the charts of all patients who underwent DA repair between 2004 and 2014. Patients with associated esophageal/intestinal atresias and/or anorectal malformations were excluded. Outcome measures included demographics (gender, gestational age, and birth weight), length of mechanical ventilation, time to first and full feed, length of hospital admission, weight at discharge (z-scores), and postoperative complications (anastomotic stricture/leak, adhesive obstruction, and need for re-laparotomy). Both DD and DJ groups were compared using parametric or non-parametric tests, with data presented as mean ± SD or median (interquartile range). During the study period, 92 neonates met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 47 (51%) had DD and 45 (49%) DJ repair. All procedures were performed open, apart from one laparoscopic DJ. Overall, DD and DJ groups had similar demographics. Likewise, we found no differences between the two groups for length of ventilation (p = 0.6), time to first feed (p = 0.5), time to full feed (p = 0.4), length of admission (p = 0.6), prokinetic use (p = 0.5), nor weight at discharge (p = 0.1). When the 30/92 (33%) patients with trisomy-21 (DD = 16, DJ = 14) were excluded from analysis, the groups still had similar weight at discharge (p = 0.2). Postoperative complication rate was not different between the two groups. One patient per group died, due to respiratory failure (DD) and sepsis (DJ). This study demonstrates that in neonates with duodenal atresia, duodeno-duodenostomy and duodeno-jejunostomy have similar outcomes. These findings are

  7. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  8. Endoscopic Treatment of Studer's Orthotopic Neobladder Lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Sousa, Diogo; Oliveira-Reis, Daniel; Cavadas, Vitor; Oliveira, Manuel; Soares, José; Fraga, Avelino

    2015-05-01

    Studer's neobladder lithiasis is a rare but important long term complication of this orthotopic bladder substitute technique. We report a case of a 45 year-old male patient, submitted to a radical cystoprostatectomy with a Studer's orthotopic neobladder 4 years before, presenting bad compliance to recommended urinary habits, increased production of mucus and high post voiding residue. CT scan and urethrocystography showed a distended pouch with 2 major sacculations with narrow communication and a stone in each sacculation. A minimally invasive endoscopic technique was successfully used in the treatment of the 2 small calculus.

  9. Endoscopic Treatment of Studer's Orthotopic Neobladder Lithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Gil-Sousa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Studer's neobladder lithiasis is a rare but important long term complication of this orthotopic bladder substitute technique. We report a case of a 45 year-old male patient, submitted to a radical cystoprostatectomy with a Studer's orthotopic neobladder 4 years before, presenting bad compliance to recommended urinary habits, increased production of mucus and high post voiding residue. CT scan and urethrocystography showed a distended pouch with 2 major sacculations with narrow communication and a stone in each sacculation. A minimally invasive endoscopic technique was successfully used in the treatment of the 2 small calculus.

  10. 3D endoscopic imaging using structured illumination technique (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Nguyen, Hieu; Wang, Zhaoyang; Kang, Jin U.

    2017-02-01

    Surgeons have been increasingly relying on minimally invasive surgical guidance techniques not only to reduce surgical trauma but also to achieve accurate and objective surgical risk evaluations. A typical minimally invasive surgical guidance system provides visual assistance in two-dimensional anatomy and pathology of internal organ within a limited field of view. In this work, we propose and implement a structure illumination endoscope to provide a simple, inexpensive 3D endoscopic imaging to conduct high resolution 3D imagery for use in surgical guidance system. The system is calibrated and validated for quantitative depth measurement in both calibrated target and human subject. The system exhibits a depth of field of 20 mm, depth resolution of 0.2mm and a relative accuracy of 0.1%. The demonstrated setup affirms the feasibility of using the structured illumination endoscope for depth quantization and assisting medical diagnostic assessments

  11. Endoscopic management of posttraumatic supraglottic stenosis in the pediatric population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Oosthuizen, Johannes Christiaan

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pediatric blunt laryngeal trauma is a rare and potentially life-threatening entity. External injuries can be misleading, and a high index of suspicion, as well as early intervention, is essential to achieve the best possible outcome. The authors of this report review the management of blunt laryngeal trauma in the pediatric population and describe the endoscopic management of posttraumatic supraglottic stenosis. METHODS: Methods used were case report from a tertiary referral institution and review of the literature. RESULTS: We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl whom developed supraglottic stenosis following blunt laryngeal trauma. Innovative endoscopic techniques were used in the successful management of this exceedingly rare entity. CONCLUSION: Early recognition and intervention are of paramount importance if successful endoscopic management of blunt laryngeal trauma is to be considered.

  12. Correcting the Chromatic Aberration in Barrel Distortion of Endoscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Harry Ng

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern endoscopes offer physicians a wide-angle field of view (FOV for minimally invasive therapies. However, the high level of barrel distortion may prevent accurate perception of image. Fortunately, this kind of distortion may be corrected by digital image processing. In this paper we investigate the chromatic aberrations in the barrel distortion of endoscopic images. In the past, chromatic aberration in endoscopes is corrected by achromatic lenses or active lens control. In contrast, we take a computational approach by modifying the concept of image warping and the existing barrel distortion correction algorithm to tackle the chromatic aberration problem. In addition, an error function for the determination of the level of centroid coincidence is proposed. Simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  13. FUNCTIONAL RESULTS OF ENDOSCOPIC EXTRAPERITONEAL RADICAL INTRAFASCIAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endoscopic radical prostatectomy is a highly effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Intrafascial prostate dissection ensures early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. This article sums up our own experience of performing intrafascial endoscopic prostatectomy.Materials and methods. 25 patients have undergone this procedure. 12 months after surgery 88.2 % of the patients were fully continent, 11.7 % had symptoms of minimal stress urinary incontinence. We encountered no cases of positive surgical margins and one case of bio-chemical recurrence of the disease.Conclusion. Oncologically, intrafascial endoscopic radical prostatectomy is as effective as other modifications of radical prostatectomy and has the benefits of early recovery of urine continence function and erectile function. 

  14. [Endoscopic nucleotomy - Renaissance of a procedure. State of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, H

    2011-02-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous nucleotomy two lines of development have been followed. On the one hand the blindly driven intradiscal tissue active methods and on the other hand endoscopically controlled minimally invasive tissue methods. The first group diminished the acceptance of intradiscal applications due to few reproducible results. Due to high resolution endoscopy with coaxial endoscopes, the second group developed into effective minimally invasive forms of surgery with well defined indications and reproducible results and challenges conventional techniques in the range of intradiscal and extradiscal indications.

  15. Percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J): a retrospective analysis on its utility in maintaining enteral nutrition after unsuccessful gastric feeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoon, Ezekiel Wong Toh; Yoneda, Kaori; Nakamura, Shinya; Nishihara, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    ... (12 males and 8 females) who received PEG-J after unsuccessful PEG feeding during a 6-year period in our institution were analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of large-bore jejunal feeding tubes in maintaining enteral nutrition...

  16. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Finally, gratitude goes to my supervisors Prof. Dele, Prof. Ngoma and Dr. Nkandu for guidance and Dr. Ben. Andrews for helping with the editing of the document. REFERENCES. 1. Warf BC. Hydrocephalus in Uganda: the predominance of infectious origin and primary management with endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

  17. Complications of endoscopic variceal therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    endoscopic treatment of oesophageal and gastric varices, and consequently the incidence varies widely in reported .... and pleuritic chest pain, fever, an exudative pleural effusion and worsening encephalopathy.21,82 .... contrast, Ogle et al. found no instance of acid reflux into the oesophagus but patients who received ...

  18. Colonic perforation following endoscopic retrograde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case report. A 41-year-old woman with HIV infection who had not had anti- retroviral drugs presented with jaundice secondary to choledo- cholithiasis. Multiple common bile duct stones were extracted at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). She failed to keep appointments for laparoscopic ...

  19. Endoscopic treatment of orbital tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorelli, Francesco; Anile, Carmelo; Rigante, Mario; Paludetti, Gaetano; Pompucci, Angelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2015-03-16

    Different orbital and transcranial approaches are performed in order to manage orbital tumors, depending on the location and size of the lesion within the orbit. These approaches provide a satisfactory view of the superior and lateral aspects of the orbit and the optic canal but involve risks associated with their invasiveness because they require significant displacement of orbital structures. In addition, external approaches to intraconal lesions may also require deinsertion of extraocular muscles, with subsequent impact on extraocular mobility. Recently, minimally invasive techniques have been proposed as valid alternative to external approaches for selected orbital lesions. Among them, transnasal endoscopic approaches, "pure" or combined with external approaches, have been reported, especially for intraconal lesions located inferiorly and medially to the optic nerve. The avoidance of muscle detachment and the shortness of the surgical intraorbital trajectory makes endoscopic approach less invasive, thus minimizing tissue damage. Endoscopic surgery decreases the recovery time and improves the cosmetic outcome not requiring skin incisions. The purpose of this study is to review and discuss the current surgical techniques for orbital tumors removal, focusing on endoscopic approaches to the orbit and outlining the key anatomic principles to follow for safe tumor resection.

  20. Colonic perforation following endoscopic retrograde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We highlight a potentially lethal complication of acute severe pancreatitis that may not be suspected in severely ill patients. A 41-year-old woman developed acute severe pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for suspected choledocholithiasis. When her condition deteriorated ...

  1. ENDOSCOPIC TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF BILHARZIAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 1 10-5 704. African Journal of Urology. V0/. 9, NO. 1, 2003. 36-40. ENDOSCOPIC TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF BILHARZIAL. ULCERS OF THE URINARY BLADDER. SINGLE-CENTER ... ulcers (78% de novo and 22% recurrent ul- cers after previous open partial .... tion cf its tip is used for resection. However, it.

  2. ENDOSCOPIC TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF BILHARZIAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 1 10-5 704. African Journal of Urology. Vol. 9, NO. 1, 2003. 36-40. ENDOSCOPIC TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION OF BILHARZIAL. ULCERS OF THE URINARY BLADDER. SINGLE-CENTER ... ulcers (78% de novo and 22% recurrent ul- cers after previous open partial .... tion of its tip is used for resection. HoWever, it.

  3. ENDOSCOPIC MACROPLASTIQUETM INJECTION FOR THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives To evaluate the role, safety and efficacy of endoscopic MacroplastiqueTM implants in the management of female stress incontinence. Material and Methods Between 1995 and 1999, transurethral submucosal injection of MacroplastiqueTM was performed in 68 women (mean age 58 years, range 32 — 85 years) ...

  4. Decompressive percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in advanced cancer patients with small-bowel obstruction is feasible and effective: a large prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchi, Elena; Fornasarig, Mara; Martella, Luca; Maiero, Stefania; Lucia, Emilio; Borsatti, Eugenio; Balestreri, Luca; Giorda, Giorgio; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-centered outcomes of decompressive percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (dPEG) in patients with malignant bowel obstruction due to advanced gynecological and gastroenteric malignancies. This is a prospective analysis of 158 consecutive patients with small-bowel obstruction from advanced gynecological and gastroenteric cancer who underwent PEG or percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (PEJ) positioning for decompressive purposes from 2002 to 2012. All of them had previous abdominal surgery and were unfit for any other surgical procedures. Symptom relief, procedural complications, and post dPEG palliation were assessed. Global Quality of Life (QoL) was evaluated in the last 2 years (25 consecutive patients) before and 7 days after dPEG placement using the Symptom Distress Scale (SDS). dPEG was successfully performed in 142 out of 158 patients (89.8 %). Failure of tube placement occurred in 16 patients (10.1 %). In 8/142 (5.6 %) patients, dPEG was guided by abdominal ultrasound. In 3/142 patients, dPEG was CT-guided. In 14 (9.8 %) patients, who had previously undergone total or subtotal gastrectomy, decompressive percutaneous endoscopic jejunostomy (dPEJ) was performed. In 1/14 patients, dPEJ was CT-guided. Out of 142 patients, 110 (77.4 %) experienced relief from nausea and vomiting 2 days after PEG. Out of 142 patients, 116 (81.6 %) were discharged. The median postoperative hospital stay was 9 days (range 3-60). Peristomal infection (14 %) and intermittent obstruction (8.4 %) were the most frequent complications associated with PEG. Median survival time was 57 days (range 4-472) after PEG placement. Twenty-five patients had QoL properly evaluated with SDS score before and 7 days after dPEG. Sixteen patients (64 %) out of 25 exhibited an improvement of QoL (p < 0.05), 7 (28 %) patients exhibited a non-significant worsening of QoL (p = 0.18), and in 2 (8 %) patients, it remained unmodified. dPEG is

  5. Outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Kondreddi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior heel pain due to retrocalcaneal bursitis, is a disabling condition that responds well to the conventional methods of treatment. Patients who do not respond to conservative treatment may require surgical intervention. This study evaluates the outcome of endoscopic decompression of retrocalcaneal bursitis, with resection of posterosuperior eminence of the calcaneum. Materials and Methods: This present study included 25 heels from 23 consecutive patients with posterior heel pain, who did not respond to conservative treatment and underwent endoscopic decompression of the retrocalcaneal bursae and excision of bony spurs. The functional outcome was evaluated by comparing the pre and postoperative American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS scores. The Maryland ankle and foot score was used postoperatively to assess the patient′s satisfaction at the one-year followup. Results: The University of Maryland scores of 25 heels were categorized as the nonparametric categories, and it was observed that 16 patients had an excellent outcome, six good, three fair and there were no poor results. The AOFAS scores averaged 57.92 ± 6.224 points preoperatively and 89.08 ± 5.267 points postoperatively (P < 0.001, at an average followup of 16.4 months. The 12 heels having noninsertional tendinosis on ultrasound had low AOFAS scores compared to 13 heels having retrocalcaneal bursitis alone. At one year followup, correlation for preoperative ultrasound assessment of tendoachilles degeneration versus postoperative Maryland score (Spearman correlation had shown a strong negative correlation. Conclusion: Endoscopic calcaneal resection is highly effective in patients with mild or no degeneration and yields cosmetically better results with fewer complications. Patients with degenerative changes in Achilles tendon had poorer outcomes in terms of subjective satisfaction.

  6. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: Benefit of injection tract embolisation. ... In a previous study at our institution, sclerotherapy was associated with a high re-bleeding rate and oesophageal ulceration. Embolisation of the injection ...

  7. Role of Rigid Endoscopic Detorsion in the Management of Sigmoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mesenteric attachment secondary to chronic constipation, irregular bowel habits or a bulky, high fiber diet ... no features of bowel ischemia noted, a rectal tube was inserted and secured using a 1.0 non-absorbable ... SV, after unsuccessful endoscopic detortion, or when features suggestive of bowel ischemia (dark mucosa.

  8. MINOP: development of a miniaturized endoscopic operation system for neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, Andreas E.; Wieneke, Paul

    1996-04-01

    Within the framework of R&D activities in the field of microsystems technology, the Institute for Microstructure Technology of Karlsruhe Research Center among others has started to improve the functionality of existing medicotechnical instruments by increased integration of microtechnical components. On the basis of microsystems fabrication techniques, completely novel medical endoscope systems have become feasible. In cooperation with clinical, technical and industrial partners, a novel endoscopic operation system based on microsystems technology is being developed by the Institute for Microstructure Technology and the Aesculap AG company, Tuttlingen within the framework of the MINOP joint project. This new system shall be applied above all in the field of neurosurgery. This newly conceived endosystem is characterized by a multitude of novelties. It can perform a number of both sensor and actor functions. Due to its extremely small outer diameter, it can be applied through minute openings. As a result of the integrated microfluidic control system, the flexible endoscope can be moved to the actual site of operation on a previously specified path. This will allow future bi- and triportal neuro-endoscopic interventions for critical operations in the brain area. The different lumina of the flexible endoscope fulfill various functions. Via the optical fibers, laser radiation may be led to the distal end of the endoscope. Using microtechnical fabrication methods, special plastic microlenses have been produced. The working channel can be applied for rinsing and removal. Furthermore, the cleaning of the optics or the taking of tissue samples are possible. If required, another laser fiber can be driven forward through the working channel for selective therapy. For the first time, high-performance microinstruments have been developed on the basis of novel materials. These instruments can be applied either through the working channel or through an additional trocar.

  9. [Endoscopic treatment of vesicoureteral reflux in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkin, A G; Iatsyk, S P; Sharkov, S M; Rusakov, A A; Tin, I F

    2014-01-01

    The one of the most common defects of the ureter-vesical segment in children is the condition, leading to a disorder of obturative function of this segment. Complications of vesicoureteral reflux include continuously recurrent pyelonephritis, reflux nephropathy. In this regard, the choice of the optimal treatment strategy based on minimal invasion is considered as one of the priorities of pediatric urology. The article presents the data obtained during the treatment of VUR in children of different ages in the Clinic of Reproductive Health FSBSI SCCH. A comparative evaluation of the results of endoscopic correction of vesicoureteral reflux depending on the kind of the bulking agent was performed. It was found that the use of endocorrection of reflux is highly effective surgical procedure, with the high number of positive results against the background of use of bulking agent "vantris". The study discriminates a group of patients with vesicoureteral reflux, intractable for endoscopic correction with cystoscopically normal structure of the orifices that allows to refer this method to the initial stage of treatment of the disease.

  10. The effect of Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 on mesenteric blood flow and cardiac parameters in end-jejunostomy short bowel patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Lasse; Hornum, Mads; Andersen, Ulrik B

    2011-01-01

    Exogenous Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 (GLP-2) treatment improves intestinal wet weight absorption in short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. In healthy subjects, administration of GLP-2 increases small intestinal blood flow. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of GLP-2 on mesenteric blood fl...... and dynamic changes in cardiac parameters in SBS patients with jejunostomy and varying length of remnant small intestine....

  11. Endoscopic and keyhole endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches: a qualitative survey on technical challenges and technological solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Hani J; Cundy, Thomas P; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    The literature reflects a resurgence of interest in endoscopic and keyhole endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches as alternatives to conventional microsurgical approaches in carefully selected cases. The aim of this study was to assess the technical challenges of neuroendoscopy, and the scope for technological innovations to overcome these barriers. All full members of the Society of British Neurosurgeons (SBNS) were electronically invited to participate in an online survey. The open-ended structured survey asked three questions; firstly, whether the surgeon presently utilises or has experience with endoscopic or endoscope-assisted approaches; secondly, what they consider to be the major technical barriers to adopting such approaches; and thirdly, what technological advances they foresee improving safety and efficacy in the field. Responses were subjected to a qualitative research method of multi-rater emergent theme analysis. Three clear themes emerged: 1) surgical approach and better integration with image-guidance systems (20%), 2) intra-operative visualisation and improvements in neuroendoscopy (49%), and 3) surgical manipulation and improvements in instruments (74%). The analysis of responses to our open-ended survey revealed that although opinion was varied three major themes could be identified. Emerging technological advances such as augmented reality, high-definition stereo-endoscopy, and robotic joint-wristed instruments may help overcome the technical difficulties associated with neuroendoscopic approaches. Results of this qualitative survey provide consensus amongst the technology end-user community such that unambiguous goals and priorities may be defined. Systems integrating these advances could improve the safety and efficacy of endoscopic and endoscope-assisted neurosurgical approaches.

  12. Endoscopic Management of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Jodie A; Levy, Cynthia; Souto, Enrico O

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a rare but potentially devastating chronic, cholestatic liver disease. PSC causes obstruction of intra- and/or extra-hepatic bile ducts by inflammation and fibrosis, leading to biliary obstruction, cirrhosis and portal hypertension with all associated sequelae. The most dreaded consequence of PSC is cholangiocarcinoma, occurring in 10-20% of patients with PSC, and with population-based estimates of a 398-fold increased risk of cholangiocarcinoma in patients with PSC compared to the general population. We use the 4-D approach to endoscopic evaluation and management of PSC based on currently available evidence. After laboratory testing with liver chemistries and high-quality cross-sectional imaging with MRCP, the first D is Dominant stricture diagnosis and evaluation. Second, Dilation of strictures found during ERCP is performed using balloon dilation to as many segments as possible. Third, Dysplasia and cholangiocarcinoma diagnosis is performed by separated brushings for conventional cytology and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and consideration for direct cholangioscopy with SpyGlass™. Fourt and finally, Dosing of antibiotics is critical to prevent peri-procedural cholangitis. The aim of this review article is to explore endoscopic tools and techniques for the diagnosis and management of PSC and provide a practical approach for clinicians.

  13. Non-endoscopic Mechanical Endonasal Dacryocystorhinostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Etezad Razavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To circumvent the disadvantages of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy such as small rhinostomy size, high failure rate and expensive equipment, we hereby introduce a modified technique of non-endoscopic mechanical endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (NE-MEDCR. Surgery is performed under general anesthesia with local decongestion of the nasal mucosa. A 20-gauge vitrectomy light probe is introduced through the upper canaliculus until it touches the bony medial wall of the lacrimal sac. While directly viewing the transilluminated target area, a nasal speculum with a fiber optic light carrier is inserted. An incision is made vertically or in a curvilinear fashion on the nasal mucosa in the lacrimal sac down to the bone using a Freer periosteum elevator. Approximately 1 to 1.5 cm of nasal mucosa is removed with Blakesley forceps. Using a lacrimal punch, the thick bone of the frontal process of the maxilla is removed and the inferior half of the sac is uncovered. The lacrimal sac is tented into the surgical site with the light probe and its medial wall is incised using a 3.2 mm keratome and then excised using the Blakesley forceps. The procedure is completed by silicone intubation. The NE-MEDCR technique does not require expensive instrumentation and is feasible in any standard ophthalmic surgical setting.

  14. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  15. Endoscopic approach to subepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Laila; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) play a critical role in the detection and management of subepithelial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common subepithelial lesions detected by endoscopists are gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), leiomyomas, lipomas, granular cell tumors (GCTs), pancreatic rests and carcinoid tumors. These lesions can be classified based on unique histochemical staining and the gastrointestinal layer of origin. While the majority of the lesions are considered benign, some tumors such as GISTs and carcinoids have a strong propensity for malignant transformation. Therefore, appropriate endoscopic versus surgical management based on size and location is crucial in the prevention of malignant transformation and metastasis. In this review, we provide a systematic approach to the diagnosis, management and treatment of commonly encountered subepithelial lesions.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound and pancreas divisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Surinder S; Gonen, Can; Vilmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pancreas divisum is the most common congenital anatomic variation of the pancreatic ductal anatomy and in most of the individuals it is asymptomatic. However, in minority of individuals it is presumed to cause recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiop......Pancreas divisum is the most common congenital anatomic variation of the pancreatic ductal anatomy and in most of the individuals it is asymptomatic. However, in minority of individuals it is presumed to cause recurrent acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde...... of the parenchyma also. Therefore EUS, both radial and linear, has potential for being a minimally invasive diagnostic modality for pancreas divisum. A number of EUS criteria have been suggested for the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. These criteria have varying sensitivity and specificity and hence there is a need...

  17. Endoscopic cubital tunnel recurrence rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Tyson K; Sterbank, Patrick T; Lemke, Jon H

    2010-06-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is the second most common nerve entrapment in the upper extremity. There are no current publications concerning the recurrence rates after endoscopic cubital tunnel release. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the recurrence rate of endoscopic cubital tunnel release compared to published reports of recurrence following open cubital tunnel procedures. We reviewed 134 consecutive cases of endoscopic cubital tunnel release in 117 patients. There were 104 cases in 94 patients with greater than 3 months follow-up. The mean follow-up time was 736 days. They were grouped using Dellon's classification. Two literature control groups were used from published reports of recurrence rate following open cubital tunnel release. A recurrence was identified if the patient was symptom-free following surgery but had symptoms reappear 3 months or more after surgery as defined in the literature. Of the 104 cases, 92.31% had more than a 4-month follow-up. One case (0.96%) met the criteria for recurrence at 4 months postprocedure. Data were then compared to the literature control groups used from published reports of recurrence rates following open cubital tunnel release. Pooled, the combined controls had 22 of 180 cases (12.22%) with recurrences. The percentage of procedure recurrence varied significantly with p value equal to 0.0004. It is recognized that there is a lack of common classification and comparative analysis of these studies, but they do classify preoperative grading and recurrence similarly. We are 95% confident that our true recurrence rate is between 0.02% and 5.24% and that endoscopic cubital tunnel release has a recurrence rate, which is not higher than open cubital tunnel release literature controls.

  18. Endoscopic versus microscopic stapes surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmelioglu, Ozgur; Ozdemir, Suleyman; Tarkan, Ozgur; Tuncer, Ulku; Dagkiran, Muhammed; Cetik, Fikret

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study to compare the outcomes and complications of endoscopic stapes surgery versus microscopic stapes surgery. This study involved patients who underwent stapedotomy at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Cukurova University between January 2012 and July 2014. The patients were divided into two groups. Patients in group I were operated with endoscope and patients in group II were operated with microscope. Pure tone audiometry was carried out in all patients preoperatively. Peroperative surgical findings, complications, and duration of surgery were noted and compared between the two groups. Air conduction and bone conduction thresholds were measured at frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000Hz, and the mean (±SD) air-bone gap was noted. Mean preoperative air-bone gap was 36.9±6.8dB (23.3-50dB) in group I and 35.1±6dB (26.6-50dB) in group II. Mean postoperative air-bone gap was 9.3±7.1dB (0-30dB) in group I and 13.5±9.7dB (1.6-35dB) in group II. The difference in preoperative and postoperative air-bone gap between the two groups was statistically significant (p=0.023). Patients in group I did not complain of postoperative pain but this was felt in four patients in group II. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.045). Endoscopic stapes surgery has many benefits such as good visualization, and easy accessibility to the stapes, oval window niche, and facial nerve. Removal of the scutum and manipulation of the chorda tympani nerve are less frequent with the endoscopic technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoscopic Aspects of Gastric Syphilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Souza Varella Frazão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Considered as a rare event, gastric syphilis (GS is reported as an organic form of involvement. Low incidence of GS emphasizes the importance of histopathological analysis. Objective. We aim to characterize GS endoscopic aspects in an immunocompetent patient. Case Report. A 23-year-old man presented with epigastric pain associated with nausea, anorexia, generalized malaise and 11 kg weight loss that started 1 month prior to his clinical consultation. Physical examination was normal except for mild abdominal tenderness in epigastrium. Endoscopy observed diminished gastric expandability and diffuse mucosal lesions, from cardia to pylorus. Gastric mucosa was thickened, friable, with nodular aspect, and associated with ulcers lesions. Gastric biopsies were performed, and histopathological analysis resulted in dense inflammatory infiltration rich in plasmocytes. Syphilis serologies were positive for VDRL and Treponema pallidum reagents. Immunohistochemical tests were positive for Treponema pallidum and CD138. The patient was treated with penicillin, leading to resolution of his clinical complaints and endoscopic findings. Conclusion. Diagnosis suspicion of GS is important in view of its nonspecific presentation. Patients with gastric symptoms that mimic neoplastic disease should be investigated thoroughly based on the fact that clinical, endoscopic, and histological findings can easily be mistaken for lymphoma or plastic linitis.

  20. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  1. Case Report Endoscopic Diagnosis of Jejuno-Gastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KIGZ

    Summary. Jejunogastric intussusception is a rare complication of gastric surgery that is potentially life threatening if it is not diagnosed early. This condition is a surgical emergency and is most commonly seen after gastro-jejunostomy. The authors report a case of an elderly female patient who presented with hematemesis ...

  2. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Jejuno-Gastric Intussusception | Mwachiro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jejunogastric intussusception is a rare complication of gastric surgery that is potentially life threatening if it is not diagnosed early. This condition is a surgical emergency and is most commonly seen after gastro-jejunostomy. The authors report a case of an elderly female patient who presented with hematemesis and ...

  3. A non-rigid map fusion-based direct SLAM method for endoscopic capsule robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Mehmet; Almalioglu, Yasin; Araujo, Helder; Konukoglu, Ender; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of capsule endoscopy technology, medical device companies and research groups have made significant progress to turn passive capsule endoscopes into robotic active capsule endoscopes. However, the use of robotic capsules in endoscopy still has some challenges. One such challenge is the precise localization of the actively controlled robot in real-time. In this paper, we propose a non-rigid map fusion based direct simultaneous localization and mapping method for endoscopic capsule robots. The proposed method achieves high accuracy for extensive evaluations of pose estimation and map reconstruction performed on a non-rigid, realistic surgical EsophagoGastroDuodenoscopy Simulator and outperforms state-of-the art methods.

  4. An Effective Technique for Endoscopic Resection of Advanced Stage Angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohammadi Ardehali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, the surgical management of angiofibroma has been greatly influenced by the use of endoscopic techniques. However, large tumors that extend into difficult anatomic sites present major challenges for management by either endoscopy or an open-surgery approach which needs new technique for the complete en block resection.   Materials and Methods: In a prospective observational study we developed an endoscopic transnasal technique for the resection of angiofibroma via pushing and pulling the mass with 1/100000 soaked adrenalin tampons. Thirty two patients were treated using this endoscopic technique over 7 years. The mean follow-up period was 36 months. The main outcomes measured were tumor staging, average blood loss, complications, length of hospitalization, and residual and/or recurrence rate of the tumor.   Results: According to the Radkowski staging, 23,5, and 4 patients were at stage IIC, IIIA, and IIIB, respectively. Twenty five patients were operated on exclusively via transnasal endoscopy while 7 patients were managed using endoscopy-assisted open-surgery techniques. Mean blood loss in patients was 1261± 893 cc. The recurrence rate was 21.88% (7 cases at two years following surgery. Mean hospitalization time was 3.56 ± 0.6 days.   Conclusion:  Using this effective technique, endoscopic removal of more highly advanced angiofibroma is possible. Better visualization, less intraoperative blood loss, lower rates of complication and recurrence, and shorter hospitalization time are some of the advantages.

  5. Minimally invasive percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and drainage for infectious spondylodiscitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Sheng Fu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary goals for treating infectious spondylodiscitis are to make an accurate diagnosis, isolate the causative organism, and prescribe effective antibiotic therapy based on the culture data. A positive culture of the responsible organism is not required for diagnosis, although it is extremely important for successful treatment and prevention of further morbidity. Surgical intervention is usually reserved for cases that are unresponsive to antibiotic therapy and for patients who have developed progressive spinal deformity or instability, epidural abscesses, or neurological impairment. However, the incidence of perioperative morbidity is particularly increased in elderly patients or in those with poor general condition. With improved endoscopic instruments and techniques, our clinical experiences demonstrate that spinal infections can be successfully treated by minimally invasive percutaneous endoscopic debridement. Direct endoscopic observation and collection of sufficient quantities of samples for microbiological examinations from the infected region are usually possible. This article summarizes the diagnostic and therapeutic values of percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and drainage (PEDD used to treat patients with spondylodiscitis. Our clinical evidence-based survey suggests that PEDD can provide adequate retrieval of specimens and has high diagnostic efficacy, thereby enabling prompt and sensitive antibiotic therapy to the offending pathogens. We propose that PEDD is an effective alternative for treating infectious spondylodiscitis and should be considered prior to extensive anterior surgery in selected cases. This method is particularly suitable for patients with early-stage spinal infection or serious medical conditions.

  6. Endoscopic bronchial valve treatment: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhardt R

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ralf Eberhardt,1,2 Daniela Gompelmann,1,2 Felix JF Herth,1,2 Maren Schuhmann1 1Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik at the University of Heidelberg, 2Translational Lung Research Center, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: As well as lung volume reduction surgery, different minimally invasive endoscopic techniques are available to achieve lung volume reduction in patients with severe emphysema and significant hyperinflation. Lung function parameters and comorbidities of the patient, as well as the extent and distribution of the emphysema are factors to be considered when choosing the patient and the intervention. Endoscopic bronchial valve placement with complete occlusion of one lobe in patients with heterogeneous emphysema is the preferred technique because of its reversibility. The presence of high interlobar collateral ventilation will hinder successful treatment; therefore, endoscopic coil placement, polymeric lung volume reduction, or bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation as well as lung volume reduction surgery can be used for treating patients with incomplete fissures. The effect of endoscopic lung volume reduction in patients with a homogeneous distribution of emphysema is still unclear and this subgroup should be treated only in clinical trials. Precise patient selection is necessary for interventions and to improve the outcome and reduce the risk and possible complications. Therefore, the patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary approach prior to determining the most appropriate treatment for lung volume reduction. Keywords: lung emphysema, valve treatment, collateral ventilation, patient selection, outcome

  7. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ren; Wu, Jin-Hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-Xing; Qi, Jian-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (Pgas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes.

  8. Preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumors, including magnifying endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Doyama, Hisashi; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Tsuyama, Sho; Tominaga, Kei; Yoshida, Naohiro; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Niwa, Hideki; Katayanagi, Kazuyoshi; Kurumaya, Hiroshi; Okada, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Superficial non-ampullary duodenal epithelial tumor (SNADET) is defined as a sporadic tumor that is confined to the mucosa or submucosa that does not arise from Vater’s papilla, and it includes adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Recent developments in endoscopic technology, such as high-resolution endoscopy and image-enhanced endoscopy, may increase the chances of detecting SNADET lesions. However, because SNADET is rare, little is known about its preoperative endoscopic diagnosis. The use of endoscopic resection for SNADET, which has no risk of metastasis, is increasing, but the incidence of complications, such as perforation, is significantly higher than in any other part of the digestive tract. A preoperative diagnosis is required to distinguish between lesions that should be followed up and those that require treatment. Retrospective studies have revealed certain endoscopic findings that suggest malignancy. In recent years, several new imaging modalities have been developed and explored for real-time diagnosis of these lesion types. Establishing an endoscopic diagnostic tool to differentiate between adenoma and adenocarcinoma in SNADET lesions is required to select the most appropriate treatment. This review describes the current state of knowledge about preoperative endoscopic diagnosis of SNADETs, such as duodenal adenoma and duodenal adenocarcinoma. Newer endoscopic techniques, including magnifying endoscopy, may help to guide these diagnostics, but their additional advantages remain unclear, and further studies are required to clarify these issues. PMID:26557007

  9. A Modified Translaminar Osseous Channel-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Highly Migrated and Sequestrated Disc Herniations of the Upper Lumbar: Clinical Outcomes, Surgical Indications, and Technical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to describe a safe and effective percutaneous endoscopic approach for removal of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine and to report the results, surgical indications, and technical considerations of the new technique. Eleven patients who had highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations in the upper lumbar were included in this study. A retrospective study was performed for all patients after translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD was performed. Radiologic findings were investigated, and pre-and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS assessments for back and leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI evaluations were performed. Surgical outcomes were evaluated under modified MacNab criteria. All of the patients were followed for more than 1 year. The preoperative and postoperative radiologic findings revealed that the decompression of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP was complete. After surgery, the mean VAS scores for back and leg pain immediately improved from 8.64 (range, 7–10 and 8.00 (range, 6–10 to 2.91 (range, 2–4 and 2.27 (range, 1–3, respectively. The mean preoperative ODI was 65.58 (range, 52.2–86, which decreased to 7.51 (range, 1.8–18 at the 12-month postoperative follow-up. The MacNab scores at the final follow-up included nine excellent, one good, and one fair. The modified translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD could be a safe and effective option for the treatment of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar.

  10. A Modified Translaminar Osseous Channel-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Highly Migrated and Sequestrated Disc Herniations of the Upper Lumbar: Clinical Outcomes, Surgical Indications, and Technical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhijun; Ao, Jun; Qin, Jianpu; Chen, Fang; Ye, Zhiyuan; Cai, Yuqiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective is to describe a safe and effective percutaneous endoscopic approach for removal of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine and to report the results, surgical indications, and technical considerations of the new technique. Eleven patients who had highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations in the upper lumbar were included in this study. A retrospective study was performed for all patients after translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD was performed. Radiologic findings were investigated, and pre-and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) assessments for back and leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) evaluations were performed. Surgical outcomes were evaluated under modified MacNab criteria. All of the patients were followed for more than 1 year. The preoperative and postoperative radiologic findings revealed that the decompression of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) was complete. After surgery, the mean VAS scores for back and leg pain immediately improved from 8.64 (range, 7–10) and 8.00 (range, 6–10) to 2.91 (range, 2–4) and 2.27 (range, 1–3), respectively. The mean preoperative ODI was 65.58 (range, 52.2–86), which decreased to 7.51 (range, 1.8–18) at the 12-month postoperative follow-up. The MacNab scores at the final follow-up included nine excellent, one good, and one fair. The modified translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD could be a safe and effective option for the treatment of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar. PMID:28466008

  11. Ex-vivo endoscopic laryngeal cancer imaging using two forward-looking fiber optic scanning endoscope probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernat, R.; Tatla, T.; Pang, J.-Y.; Tadrous, P. J.; Gelikonov, G.; Gelikonov, V.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Bradu, A.; Li, X. D.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    Larynx cancer is one of the most common primary head and neck cancers. For early-stage laryngeal cancer, both surgery and radiotherapy are effective treatment modalities, offering a high rate of local control and cure. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an established non-invasive optical biopsy method, capable of imaging ranges of 2- 3 mm into tissue. By using the principles of low coherence light interferometry, OCT can be used to distinguish normal from unhealthy laryngeal mucosa in patients. Two forward-looking endoscope OCT probes of different sizes in a sweeping frequency OCT (SS-OCT) configuration were compared in terms of their performances for ex-vivo laryngeal cancer imaging. The setup configuration of the first OCT probe unit was designed and constructed at the Institute of Applied Physics RAS, Russia (diameter of 1.9 mm and the rigid part at the distal end is 13 mm long). The second OCT endoscope probe was constructed at the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, USA, using a tubular piezoelectric actuator with quartered electrodes in combination with a resonant fiber cantilever (diameter of 2.4 mm, and rigid part of 45 mm). Cross-sectional images of laryngeal lesions using the two OCT configurations were aquired and compared with OCT images obtained in a 1310 nm SS-OCT classical non-endoscopic system. The work presented here is an intermediate step in our research towards in-vivo endoscopic laryngeal cancer imaging.

  12. Molecular Diagnosis for Nodal Metastasis in Endoscopically Managed Cervical Cancer: The Accuracy of the APTIMA Test to Detect High-risk Human Papillomavirus Messenger RNA in Sentinel Lymph Nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Christhardt; Le, Xin; Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Pfiffer, Tatiana; Schneider, Achim; Marnitz, Simone; Bertolini, Julia; Favero, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of a commercially available test to detect E6/E7 mRNA of 14 subtypes of high-risk HPVs (APTIMA; Hologic, Bedford, MA) in the sentinel lymph nodes of CC patients laparoscopically operated. Prospective pilot study. The study was conducted in the Department of Advanced Operative and Oncologic Gynecology, Asklepios Hospital, Hamburg, Germany. 54 women with HPV-positive CC submitted to laparoscopic sentinel node biopsy alone or sentinel node biopsy followed by systematic pelvic and/or para-aortic endoscopic lymphadenectomy. All removed sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) underwent sample collection by cytobrush for the APTIMA assay before frozen section. Results obtained with the HPV mRNA test were compared with the definitive histopathological analysis of the SLNs and additional lymph nodes removed. A total of 125 SLNs (119 pelvic and 6 paraaortic) were excised with a mean number of 2.3 SLNs per patient. Final histopathologic analysis confirmed nodal metastases in 10 SLNs from 10 different patients (18%). All the histologically confirmed metastatic lymph nodes were also HPV E6/E7 mRNA positive, resulting in a sensitivity of 100%. Four histologically free sentinel nodes were positive for HPV E6/E7 mRNA, resulting in a specificity of 96.4%. The HPV E6/E7 mRNA assay in the SLNs of patients with CC is feasible and highly accurate. The detection of HPV mRNA in 4 women with negative SLNs might denote a shift from microscopic identification of metastasis to the molecular level. The prognostic value of this findings awaits further verification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage as an alternative to percutaneous drainage and surgical bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2015-01-16

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had been a treatment modality of choice for both benign and malignant biliary tract obstruction for more than half century, with a very high clinical success rate and low complications. But in certain circumstances, such as advanced and locally advanced pancreatobiliary malignancies (pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, ampullary tumor) and tight benign strictures, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) fails. Up to this point, the only alternative interventions for these conditions were percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgery. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventions was introduced for a couple decades with the better visualization and achievement of the pancreatobiliary tract. And it's still in the process of ongoing development. The inventions of new techniques and accessories lead to more feasibility of high-ended procedures. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary drainage was a novel treatment modality for the patient who failed ERCP with the less invasive technique comparing to surgical bypass. The technical and clinical success was high with acceptable complications. Regarded the ability to drain the biliary tract internally without an exploratory laparotomy, this treatment modality became a very interesting procedures for many endosonographers, worldwide, in a short period. We have reviewed the literature and suggest that endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage is also an option, and one with a high probability of success, for biliary drainage in the patients who failed conventional endoscopic drainage.

  14. A randomised trial of endoscopic submucosal dissection versus endoscopic mucosal resection for early Barrett's neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terheggen, Grischa; Horn, Eva Maria; Vieth, Michael; Gabbert, Helmut; Enderle, Markus; Neugebauer, Alexander; Schumacher, Brigitte; Neuhaus, Horst

    2017-05-01

    For endoscopic resection of early GI neoplasia, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) achieves higher rates of complete resection (R0) than endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). However, ESD is technically more difficult and evidence from randomised trial is missing. We compared the efficacy and safety of ESD and EMR in patients with neoplastic Barrett's oesophagus (BO). BO patients with a focal lesion of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early adenocarcinoma (EAC) ≤3 cm were randomised to either ESD or EMR. Primary outcome was R0 resection; secondary outcomes were complete remission from neoplasia, recurrences and adverse events (AEs). There were no significant differences in patient and lesion characteristics between the groups randomised to ESD (n=20) or EMR (n=20). Histology of the resected specimen showed HGIN or EAC in all but six cases. Although R0 resection defined as margins free of HGIN/EAC was achieved more frequently with ESD (10/17 vs 2/17, p=0.01), there was no difference in complete remission from neoplasia at 3 months (ESD 15/16 vs EMR 16/17, p=1.0). During a mean follow-up period of 23.1±6.4 months, recurrent EAC was observed in one case in the ESD group. Elective surgery was performed in four and three cases after ESD and EMR, respectively (p=1.0). Two severe AEs were recorded for ESD and none for EMR (p=0.49). In terms of need for surgery, neoplasia remission and recurrence, ESD and EMR are both highly effective for endoscopic resection of early BO neoplasia. ESD achieves a higher R0 resection rate, but for most BO patients this bears little clinical relevance. ESD is, however, more time consuming and may cause severe AE. NCT1871636. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Endoscopic versus external approach dacryocystorhinostomy: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.609). Conclusion: Intranasal endoscopic DCR is a simple, minimally invasive, day care procedure and had comparable result with conventional external DCR. Keywords: Dacryocystorhinostomy, endoscopic, external. Nigerian Medical Journal | Vol. 54 | Issue 3 | May-June ...

  16. Transgastric endoscopic splenectomy: is it possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsevoy, S V; Hu, B; Jagannath, S B; Vaughn, C A; Beitler, D M; Chung, S S C; Cotton, P B; Gostout, C J; Hawes, R H; Pasricha, P J; Magee, C A; Pipitone, L J; Talamini, M A; Kalloo, A N

    2006-03-01

    We have previously reported the feasibility of diagnostic and therapeutic peritoneoscopy including liver biopsy, gastrojejunostomy, and tubal ligation by an oral transgastric approach. We present results of per-oral transgastric splenectomy in a porcine model. The goal of this study was to determine the technical feasibility of per-oral transgastric splenectomy using a flexible endoscope. We performed acute experiments on 50-kg pigs. All animals were fed liquids for 3 days prior to procedure. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. The flexible endoscope was passed per orally into the stomach and puncture of the gastric wall was performed with a needle knife. The puncture was extended to create a 1.5-cm incision using a pull-type sphincterotome, and a double-channel endoscope was advanced into the peritoneal cavity. The peritoneal cavity was insufflated with air through the endoscope. The spleen was visualized. The splenic vessels were ligated with endoscopic loops and clips, and then mesentery was dissected using electrocautery. Endoscopic splenectomy was performed on six pigs. There were no complications during gastric incision and entrance into the peritoneal cavity. Visualization of the spleen and other intraperitoneal organs was very good. Ligation of the splenic vessels and mobilization of the spleen were achieved using commercially available devices and endoscopic accessories. Transgastric endoscopic splenectomy in a porcine model appears technically feasible. Additional long-term survival experiments are planned.

  17. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Francesco; Del Buono, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical advantages of endoscopic cubital tunnel release are the short incision, lower risk of nerve damage, reduced manipulation of the nerve and possible faster recovery. We systematically searched Medline (PubMed), Web of Science and Scopus databases using the following keywords: 'endoscopic ulnar nerve', 'endoscopic cubital nerve', 'endoscopic ulnar compression' and 'endoscopic ulnar neuropathy'. Twenty-one studies were included in this review. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Coleman Methodological Score. Endoscopic release is effective for cubital tunnel entrapment and allows adequate visualization of the site of entrapment. There is a negative association between the severity of the compression and reported outcomes. Injury to the medial branch of the antebrachial cutaneous nerve is less frequent thanks to the limited dissection. The most frequent complication is the development of a hematoma. It is unclear whether ulnar nerve instability is a contraindication to simple decompression. The shorter time to return to work and the cosmetic appearance of the scar can be considered advantages of the endoscopic technique. There is a need to perform randomized clinical trials with common and validated scoring system with a longer duration of follow-up. The literature pertinent to endoscopic cubital tunnel release is lacking in the evaluation of the learning curve. Further investigations are necessary to assess the role of ulnar nerve instability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy in idiopathic normal pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration of the third ventricle in the treatment of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus. Methods: 16 patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus were treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy. This study lasted three years. All patients were over 50 ...

  19. ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CHYLURIA USING POVIDONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective:-To evaluate the safety and efficacy of povidone iodine with contrast agent as a sclerosant for the endoscopic treatment of chylurla. -. Patients and Methods: From December 1999 to October 2003, a total of 22 patients having chylurla were treated. After their baseline evaluation they were subjected to endoscopic ...

  20. Duodenal diverticular bleeding: an endoscopic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Valdivielso-Cortázar

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticula are an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Until recently, it was primarily managed with surgery, but advances in the field of endoscopy have made management increasingly less invasive. We report a case of duodenal diverticular bleeding that was endoscopically managed, and review the literature about the various endoscopic therapies thus far described.

  1. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy in idiopathic normal pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed Ahmed Eshra

    2013-12-22

    Dec 22, 2013 ... Abstract Objective: To determine the efficacy of endoscopic fenestration of the third ventricle in the treatment of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus. Methods: 16 patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus were treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy. This study lasted three years.

  2. Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy: a useful technique when surgery is not an option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun, Gloria; Bullas, Dominic; Bannaga, Ayman; Said, Elmuhtady M.

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic colostomy (PEC) is a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure that offers an alternative treatment for high-risk patients with sigmoid volvulus or intestinal pseudo-obstruction who have tried conventional treatment options without success or those who are unfit for surgery. The procedure acts as an irrigation or decompressing channel and provides colonic ‘fixation’ to the anterior abdominal wall. The risk of complications highlights the importance of informed consent for patients and relatives. PMID:27708513

  3. A Case of a Retained Surgical Sponge after Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Depicted on CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Song Mee; Kim, Byung Guk [Catholic University St. Paul' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    A retained surgical sponge is an uncommon complication in endoscopic sinus surgery. A 53-year-old woman who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery two years prior presented with nasal stuffiness and posterior nasal dripping that had persisted for one year. On CT images, a soft-tissue mass with mixed high and low attenuation was noted in the posterior air cells of the right ethmoid sinus. CT imaging features of the surgical sponge granuloma are described.

  4. [Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery: current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Salvadora; Ibarzábal, Ainitze; Fernández-Esparrach, Glòria

    2008-10-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is the paradigm of the evolution of minimally invasive surgery. The laparoscopic revolution> has introduced new ideas in general surgery, one of them being that modern surgery is the work of multidisciplinary teams. A clear example of this is provided by NOTES. The aim of this type of surgery is to perform conventional laparoscopic procedures without incision, using flexible endoscopic technology usually employed in the diagnosis and treatment of intraluminal lesions and reaching the inside of the abdominal cavity through natural orifices (mouth, anus, vagina and even urethra). This type of access opens a highly interesting field for certain types of patients, such as those with high surgical risk, the morbidly obese, and those with multiple prior abdominal interventions or surgical wound infections. Animal models have shown that a wide variety of interventions (cholecystectomy, appendicectomy, splenectomy, hysterectomy, tubal ligations, gastroenteroanastomosis, peritoneoscopy, liver biopsy and herniorrhaphy, among others) can be performed. However, before use in humans, this new technique must be shown to be safe and to provide real advantages for patients. To do this, a series of issues, including safe methods for closure of the gastric incision and the avoidance of infections, among others, must be solved. Another critical element for the development of this new type of surgery is the creation of appropriate instrumentation, requiring input not only from medical professionals but also from engineers and industry. The present article describes the major advances made in NOTES since this technique was first described and analyzes the risks and potential benefits associated with this novel procedure.

  5. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  6. Endoscopic Thyroidectomy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic thyroidectomy is a relatively new approach in treating differentiated thyroid cancer. Since last decades, more and more endoscopic thyroidectomies have been performed. We review the indications and contraindications, methods, and postoperational complications of this surgical procedure. Lots of surgical approaches have been developed in endoscopic thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer. Compared to conventional thyroidectomy, scarless endoscopic thyroidectomy has a superior cosmetic result. And it also reduces the incidence of hypesthesia, paresthesia, or feelings of self-consciousness. However, the outcome depends, to a large extent, on the skill of the operator and the learning curve being relatively long. With the development of surgical equipments and skills, operation time and complications will be reduced. Indications of endoscopic thyroidectomy will be widened and it will be more and more performed.

  7. Endoscopic thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Gu, Xiaodong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Xiang, Jianbin; Chen, Zongyou

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic thyroidectomy is a relatively new approach in treating differentiated thyroid cancer. Since last decades, more and more endoscopic thyroidectomies have been performed. We review the indications and contraindications, methods, and postoperational complications of this surgical procedure. Lots of surgical approaches have been developed in endoscopic thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer. Compared to conventional thyroidectomy, scarless endoscopic thyroidectomy has a superior cosmetic result. And it also reduces the incidence of hypesthesia, paresthesia, or feelings of self-consciousness. However, the outcome depends, to a large extent, on the skill of the operator and the learning curve being relatively long. With the development of surgical equipments and skills, operation time and complications will be reduced. Indications of endoscopic thyroidectomy will be widened and it will be more and more performed.

  8. Nasoenteric tube versus jejunostomy for enteral nutrition feeding following major upper gastrointestinal operations: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Tian, Zhong; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Following major upper gastrointestinal surgical procedures, early enteral nutrition to the jejunum is strongly recommended, either through a nasoenteric tube or a percutaneous transperitoneal jejunal feeding tube (jejunostomy). However, to date there has been no consensus as to the best enteral feeding strategy. Our aim was to determine the safest and most efficacious early enteral nutrition supplement strategy following major upper gastrointestinal operations. PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched for comparison of trials. The primary outcome analyzed was length of postoperative hospital stay, and secondary outcomes were: duration of enteral nutrition, time to resumption of normal oral intake, and tube dislodgement, tube leakage and tube obstruction complications. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) and risk ratios (RRs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 5 studies were included with 420 patients in all. The length of hospital stay, duration of enteral nutrition and the time to resumption of normal oral intake were all significantly shorter in the nasoenteric group (pjejunostomy groups (p=0.5). The RR of tube dislodgement was increased in the nasoenteric group (pjejunostomy group (p<0.05). A nasoenteric tube is more likely to be effective in early postoperative enteral feeding following major upper gastrointestinal operations.

  9. Endoscopic tri-modal imaging for surveillance in ulcerative colitis: randomised comparison of high-resolution endoscopy and autofluorescence imaging for neoplasia detection; and evaluation of narrow-band imaging for classification of lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, F. J. C.; Fockens, P.; van Eeden, S.; Reitsma, J. B.; Hardwick, J. C. H.; Stokkers, P. C. F.; Dekker, E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic tri-modal imaging (ETMI) incorporates white light endoscopy (WLE), autofluorescence imaging (AFI) and narrow-band imaging (NBI). Aims: To assess the value of ETMI for the detection and classification of neoplasia in patients with longstanding ulcerative colitis. Design:

  10. Endoscopic treatment of bile duct post-traumatic and post-operative lesions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Radan; Drabek, Jiri; Lochmannova, Jindra; Stovicek, Jan; Rygl, Michal; Snajdauf, Jiri; Hlava, Stepan

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the significance and safety of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in diagnosing and treating bile duct injuries in children. Fourteen pediatric patients, with traumatic or postoperative bile duct injury, in which ERCP was performed, were retrospectively evaluated. We performed 46 ERCP and 12 endoscopic papillotomies in children with suspected bile duct injuries. A bile stent was primarily inserted in 13 patients and there were 20 replacements. Endoscopic treatment of bile leakage without need for bile duct sutures or reconstruction was successful in 85.7%. Post ERCP complications included cholangitis and recurrent bleeding, which occurred only in two patients each. ERCP and endoscopic bile stent insertion is a highly effective, minimally-invasive treatment for bile duct injury and should be included as part of the therapeutic procedures in pediatric patients with suspected bile duct injury.

  11. Diagnostic performance comparison of the Chartis System and high-resolution computerized tomography fissure analysis for planning endoscopic lung volume reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gompelmann, Daniela; Eberhardt, Ralf; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Brown, Matthew S.; Abtin, Fereidoun; Kim, Hyun J.; Holmes-Higgin, Debby; Radhakrishnan, Sri; Herth, Felix J. F.; Goldin, Jonathan

    Background and objective Endobronchial valve (EBV) therapy is optimized in patients who demonstrate little or no collateral ventilation (CV). The accuracy of the Chartis System and visual assessment of high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT) fissure completeness by a core radiology laboratory

  12. In vivo endoscopic multi-beam optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standish, Beau A; Mariampillai, Adrian; Munce, Nigel R; Leung, Michael K K; Vitkin, I Alex [Deptartment of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Kenneth K C; Yang, Victor X D [Ontario Cancer Institute/University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)], E-mail: standish@ee.ryerson.ca

    2010-02-07

    A multichannel optical coherence tomography (multi-beam OCT) system and an in vivo endoscopic imaging probe were developed using a swept-source OCT system. The distal optics were micro-machined to produce a high numerical aperture, multi-focus fibre optic array. This combination resulted in a transverse design resolution of <10 {mu}m full width half maximum (FWHM) throughout the entire imaging range, while also increasing the signal intensity within the focus of the individual channels. The system was used in a pre-clinical rabbit study to acquire in vivo structural images of the colon and ex vivo images of the oesophagus and trachea. A good correlation between the structural multi-beam OCT images and H and E histology was achieved, demonstrating the feasibility of this high-resolution system and its potential for in vivo human endoscopic imaging.

  13. Novel Endoscopic Management of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargent, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic procedures have been well-documented in the obesity field, but have not yet reached a sufficient level of evidence as stand-alone methods for treating obesity. It is unclear if they should take over. Although expanding, the array of bariatric surgical techniques does not fully meet the current needs, and there are not enough resources for increasing surgery. Surgery is avoided by a majority of patients, so that less aggressive procedures are necessary. For the time being, relevant endoscopic methods include intra-gastric balloons, gastric partitioning (Endo-plication), and the metabolic field (Endo-barrier). Surgical novelties and basic research are also important contributors owing to their potential combination with endoscopy. Conditions have been listed for implementation of bariatric endoscopy, because innovation is risky, expensive, and faces ethical challenges. A scientific background is being built (e.g., hormonal studies). Some techniques require additional study, while others are not ready but should be priorities. Steps and goals include the search for conceptual similarities and the respect of an ethical frame. Minimally invasive bariatric techniques are not ready for prime time, but they are already being successful as re-do procedures. A time-frame for step-strategies can be defined, and more investments from the industry are mandatory. PMID:26855921

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of mediastinal lymph nodes: experience from region with high prevalence of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Varsha; Kaur, Gagandeep; Verma, Kusum

    2013-12-01

    Utility of EUS-FNA in diagnosing granulomatous lesions of mediastinum in regions with high prevalence of tuberculosis has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, utility and limitations of EUS-FNA of mediastinal lesions from a tertiary care center with high prevalence of tuberculosis were studied. All cases where EUS-FNA had been performed to diagnose mediastinal lymphadenopathy from January 2006 to December 2008 were retrieved from the files of cytopathology laboratory. These were reviewed by the cytopathologist. Two hundred and eighty one EUS-FNA aspirates from 269 patients were evaluated. Satisfactory aspirates were available in 259 cases. A cytological diagnosis of granulomatous lymphadenitis was rendered in 206 cases. Of these, tuberculosis could be established as an etiology in 76 cases and sarcoidosis in 7 cases only. In remaining 123 cases the etiology of granulomatous lymphadenitis could not be established and clinical correlation was suggested. Malignancies were diagnosed or suspected in 24 and 5 cases, respectively. The study highlights that the dilemma of tuberculosis versus sarcoidosis persists in regions with high prevalence of tuberculosis. However, EUS-FNA is useful in diagnosing unsuspected malignancies and confirming the presence of granulomatous lymphadenitis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. Advanced endoscopic imaging: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, James E; Vleugels, Jasper L; Roelandt, Philip; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Dekker, Evelien; Hassan, Cesare; Horgan, Gareth; Kiesslich, Ralf; Longcroft-Wheaton, Gaius; Wilson, Ana; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Background and aim: This technical review is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the utilization of advanced endoscopic imaging in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Methods: This technical review is based on a systematic literature search to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of advanced endoscopic imaging throughout the GI tract. Technologies considered include narrowed-spectrum endoscopy (narrow band imaging [NBI]; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement [FICE]; i-Scan digital contrast [I-SCAN]), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendation and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations:1. We suggest advanced endoscopic imaging technologies improve mucosal visualization and enhance fine structural and microvascular detail. Expert endoscopic diagnosis may be improved by advanced imaging, but as yet in community-based practice no technology has been shown consistently to be diagnostically superior to current practice with high definition white light. (Low quality evidence.) 2. We recommend the use of validated classification systems to support the use of optical diagnosis with advanced endoscopic imaging in the upper and lower GI tracts (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3. We suggest that training improves performance in the use of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and that it is a prerequisite for use in clinical practice. A learning curve exists and training alone does not guarantee sustained high performances in clinical practice. (Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.) Conclusion: Advanced endoscopic imaging can improve mucosal visualization and endoscopic diagnosis; however it requires training and the use of validated classification systems. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Jejunal adaptation in a pre-pubertal boy after total ileal resection and jejunostomy placement: a 4 year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sam X.; Gathungu, Grace; Pashankar, Dinesh; Jain, Dhanpat; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal adaptation is the process that attempts to restore total gut absorption after intestinal resection. In humans, the ileum as well as the colon can undergo adaptation without the jejunum. However, there is little evidence for the jejunum to undergo adaptation in the absence of the ileum. Here, we report the unusual case of a pre-pubertal boy who underwent total ileal resection, right hemicolectomy and jejunostomy after a motor vehicle accident. Despite ileal resection, he demonstrated evidence of successful structural and functional jejunal adaptation. PMID:21552141

  17. Successes rate of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy at KMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Kafle, P K; Pokhrel, S; Maharjan, M; Toran, K C

    2010-01-01

    Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a common problem which can be corrected by dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). The gold standard treatment for this is DCR operation through an external approach. Development of endoscopic sinus surgery and endoscopic DCR performed through intranasal route is a major recent development in this field. The aim of this study is to find out the success rate of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy without silicon stent intubation within the period of six month following surgery. A prospective study was done on 26 patients with obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct referred from eye out-patient department to ENT OPD during one year period from 2008 to 2009. All the cases had undergone endoscopic DCR operation which was regularly followed up for a period of six months. Postoperative patency of ostium was checked by sac syringing and endoscopic visualisation of ostium in the nasal cavity. The success of surgery was categorised as: complete cure, partial cure and no improvement depending upon symptomatic relief and clinical examination such as sac syringing and endoscopic examination following surgery. In six months' follow-up, 22 (84.5%) out of 26 patients had achieved the complete cure and 4 patients (15.5%) continued to have persistent epiphora. Endoscopic DCR is a beneficial procedure for nasolacrimal duct obstruction with no external scar on face and less bleeding. The success rate is as good as external DCR.

  18. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thosani, Nirav; Banerjee, Subhas

    2014-11-01

    Although there are no randomized, controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC) in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients, substantial indirect evidence supports the effectiveness of ERC in symptomatic PSC patients with a dominant stricture. Currently, cumulative evidence supports the role of ERC with endoscopic dilation with or without additional short-term stent placement for symptomatic PSC patients with a dominant stricture. Differentiating benign dominant strictures from cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) remains difficult; however, newer endoscopic techniques and advanced cytologic techniques are likely to improve sensitivity for the diagnosis of CCA over that achieved by traditional cytology brushing alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endoscopic intervention in obstructive renal papillary necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Chandrashekar Rao

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography, endoscopic retrieval, and the outcome of patients with diabetes mellitus presenting with ureteric obstruction caused by necrosed renal papillae. Material And Methods: Eleven seriously ill patients with diabetes mellitus, admitted into medical wards, were found to have ureteric obstruction complicated by urinary infection. The diagnosis was made by ultrasonography alone. Prompt relief followed endoscopic extraction of the offending necrosed papillae. Results: Ten patients improved dramatically. One patient died from septicemia. Conclusions: Ultrasonography appears to be a useful diagnostic method to diagnose ureteric obstruction. It is cheap, fast, and extremely reliable. Endoscopic extraction of the obstructing papilla offers the best chance for successful outcome.

  20. Endoscopic Management of Eroded Bands Following Banded-Gastric Bypass (with Video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Hany; Gawdat, Khaled

    2017-07-01

    Banded-gastric bypass is a highly effective bariatric procedure, yet the possibility of band erosion remains a significant drawback. Surgical removal of eroded bands may be associated with significant morbidity. In this study, we assess the efficacy and safety of a solely peroral endoscopic approach for the management of eroded bands in patients with a banded-gastric bypass. Starting January 2012, all patients with banded-gastric bypass and an eroded band were subjected to an attempt at peroral endoscopic removal using endoscopic scissors and/or argon plasma coagulation (APC), regardless of the circumference of band eroding inside the lumen. Sixteen patients presented with eroded bands, 2 were deemed not amenable to endoscopic removal as only part of the thickness was eroded. Of the 14 patients where endoscopic attempts were performed, 12 (86%) were completely removed successfully, while 2 (14%) were cut but could not be extracted and only the intraluminal portion was trimmed. Complete resolution of symptoms occurred in 13 (93%) while in 1 patient (7%) there was partial improvement. Only one endoscopic session was performed per patient with a median time of 37.5 min per session (22-55 min). No complications were encountered. Endoscopic removal of eroded gastric bands in patients with banded-gastric bypass is effective and safe in the majority of patients. When bands are adherent to the gastric wall, removal of the intraluminal portion of the band may lead to full or partial improvement of symptoms. Endoscopic band removal can be attempted even when a small part of band circumference has eroded.

  1. Clinical endoscopic management and outcome of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chen Lin

    Full Text Available Post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding is a common complication of biliary sphincterotomy, and the incidence varies from 1% to 48%. It can be challenging to localize the bleeder or to administer various interventions through a side-viewing endoscope. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors of post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding and the outcome of endoscopic intervention therapies. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 513 patients who underwent biliary sphincterotomy in Mackay Memorial Hospital between 2011 and 2016. The blood biochemistry, comorbidities, indication for sphincterotomy, severity of bleeding, endoscopic features of bleeder, and type of endoscopic therapy were analyzed. Post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding occurred in 65 (12.6% patients. Forty-five patients had immediate bleeding and 20 patients had delayed bleeding. The multivariate analysis of risk factors associated with post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding were liver cirrhosis (P = 0.029, end-stage renal disease (P = 0.038, previous antiplatelet drug use (P<0.001, and duodenal ulcer (P = 0.023. The complications of pancreatitis and cholangitis were higher in the bleeding group, with statistical significance. Delayed bleeding occurred within 1 to 7 days (mean, 2.5 days, and 60% (12/20 of the patients received endoscopic evaluation. In the delayed bleeding group, the successful hemostasis rate was 71.4% (5/7, and 65% (13/20 of the patients had ceased bleeding without endoscopic hemostasis therapy. Comparison of different therapeutic modalities showed that cholangitis was higher in patients who received epinephrine spray (P = 0.042 and pancreatitis was higher in patients who received epinephrine injection and electrocoagulation (P = 0.041 and P = 0.039 respectively. Clinically, post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding and further endoscopic hemostasis therapy increase the complication rate of pancreatitis and cholangitis. Realizing the effectiveness of each

  2. Markerless tracking for augmented reality for image-guided Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh T; Jung, Hoeryong; Lee, Doo Yong

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a markerless tracking method with adaptive pose estimation for augmenting 3D organ models on top of the endoscopic image for Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). While many applications of augmented reality (AR) to surgeries need special markers to track the camera's position and orientation in the live video, our method employs the feature detection techniques to track the endoscopic camera. One of the most difficult problems when applying feature-based method to AR for ERCP is the lack of texture & highly specular reflection surface of duodenum in the endoscopic images, which does not provide a stable number of keypoints to track in the endoscopic video sequence. By introducing an adaptive weight function in the combination of reference-current frame tracking with previous-current frame tracking, we enhance the tracking performance remarkably. The proposed method is evaluated using an endoscopic video of a real ERCP and 3D duodenum model reconstructed from CT data of the patient. The result shows real-time performance and robustness of the method.

  3. Novel Endoscopic Approaches to Treating Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompelmann, D; Eberhardt, R; Herth, F J F

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a widespread disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. The principal aim of therapy is preventing disease progression. Besides rehabilitation and pharmacological treatment, different endoscopic approaches were developed in the past decade extending the therapeutic spectrum. Various endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) techniques are available that differ in the implementation, mechanism of action, complication spectrum, and reversibility. So far, the data on efficacy and safety are variable and still very limited. The most comprehensive data are available for endoscopic valve therapy. This reversible technique leads to lobar atelectasis and thus significant lobar volume reduction in patients with severe emphysema and low collateral ventilation. Implantation of coils leading to parenchymal compression and bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation inducing an inflammatory reaction are nonblocking ELVR techniques and thus independent of collateral ventilation. Besides ELVR techniques, targeted lung denervation has evolved as the latest development in the field of endoscopic therapy in COPD. The aim of this endoscopic method is sustainable bronchodilation by minimizing the influence of parasympathetic pulmonary nerves on smooth muscles of the airways. This review summarizes the different endoscopic procedures, their mechanism of action, and the results of the clinical trials including efficacy and safety. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. [Intraluminal/endoscopic procedures in the treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ortega, Antonio Jesús; Aliaga-Verdugo, Alberto; Pereira-Cunill, José Luis; Jiménez-Varo, Ignacio; Romero-Lluch, Ana R; Sobrino-Rodríguez, Salvador; Belda-Laguna, Ovidio; García-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-05-01

    Few effective therapeutic tools are currently available to fight the increasing prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities. Bariatric surgery is the only treatment with proven long-term effectiveness, but is associated to a high surgical risk and significant economic costs because of its technical complexity and the characteristics of patients. This is leading to development of new endoscopic procedures with less clinical risks and economic costs, while maintaining the benefits in terms of morbidity and mortality, which could even serve as a bridging element before surgery in cases where this is unavoidable, allowing for preoperative weight loss and control of comorbidities in order to improve anesthetic risks and possible complications. The purpose of this review was to analyze the most relevant and promising endoscopic techniques currently available. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early ( 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  6. Three-dimensional photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Mo Yang

    Full Text Available We report photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopic images of two intact rabbit esophagi. To investigate the esophageal lumen structure and microvasculature, we performed in vivo and ex vivo imaging studies using a 3.8-mm diameter photoacoustic endoscope and correlated the images with histology. Several interesting anatomic structures were newly found in both the in vivo and ex vivo images, which demonstrates the potential clinical utility of this endoscopic imaging modality. In the ex vivo imaging experiment, we acquired high-resolution motion-artifact-free three-dimensional photoacoustic images of the vasculatures distributed in the walls of the esophagi and extending to the neighboring mediastinal regions. Blood vessels with apparent diameters as small as 190 μm were resolved. Moreover, by taking advantage of the dual-mode high-resolution photoacoustic and ultrasound endoscopy, we could better identify and characterize the anatomic structures of the esophageal lumen, such as the mucosal and submucosal layers in the esophageal wall, and an esophageal branch of the thoracic aorta. In this paper, we present the first photoacoustic images showing the vasculature of a vertebrate esophagus and discuss the potential clinical applications and future development of photoacoustic endoscopy.

  7. Ensuring the Safety of Your Endoscopic Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been a major advance in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. For example, the use of endoscopes allows the detection of ulcers, cancers, polyps, and sites of internal bleeding. Through endoscopy, tissue ...

  8. Endoscopic appearance of irradiated gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sagher, L.I.; Van den Heule, B.; Van Houtte, P.; Engelholm, L.; Balikdjan, D.; Bleiberg, H.

    1979-09-01

    Irradiation of the epigastric area for gastric cancer may induce actinic lesions of the stomach characterized on endoscopic examination by ulcerations, haemorrhagic gastritis, fragility of the mucosa, thickening and congestion of the gastric folds.

  9. An illumination system for endoscopic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to an illumination system for endoscopic applications comprising at least one substantially monochromatic light source having a predefined central wavelength between 400 and 500 nm or between 500 and 550 nm, an optical transmission path adapted to guide light...... emanating from the light source to an endoscopic region of examination, and an optical band-rejection filter, wherein the illumination system is adapted to illuminate at least a part of the region of examination by generating autofluorescence in surrounding tissue, and the band-rejection filter is adapted...... to attenuate at least said light source wavelength to a viewer and wherein said light source is the single light source in the illumination system. A further embodiment relates to an endoscope for examining a body cavity comprising tissue, the endoscope comprising a source of light consisting...

  10. Endoscopic discovery and capture of Taenia saginata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descombes, P; Dupas, J L; Capron, J P

    1981-01-01

    The authors report the first case of endoscopic finding and removal of a beef tapeworm (Taenia saginata). The parasite was discovered in the duodenal bulb of a 72-year-old woman, who complained of epigastric pain.

  11. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Minimizing Bile Duct Injuries: Adopting a Universal Culture of Safety in Cholecystectomy https://www.youtube.com/ ... Surgeons: The New SAGES Course Endorsement System The Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) recognizes that ...

  12. Endoscopic and Radiologic Findings in Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was first described by Landis in 1978. The disease is characterized by esophageal symptoms, primarily dysphagia in adult patients, and esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. The disease is associated with characteristic endoscopic findings, including edema, rings, furrows, exudates, and strictures. The typical radiographic findings of this disorder are rings, strictures, and small-caliber esophagus. The endoscopic and radiographic findings of EoE are the topic of this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tracking camera control in endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, J R; Smith, P; Tang, L; Hoare, T; Caputo, S; Siddiqui, A A; Tsatsos, M; Saleh, G M

    2015-12-01

    Poor camera control during endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EnDCR) surgery can cause inadequate visualisation of the anatomy and suboptimal surgical outcomes. This study investigates the feasibility of using computer vision tracking in EnDCR surgery as a potential formative feedback tool for the quality of endoscope control. A prospective cohort analysis was undertaken comparing junior versus senior surgeons performing routine EnDCR surgery. Computer vision tracking was applied to endoscopic video footage of the surgery: Total number of movements, camera path length in pixels and surgical time were determined for each procedure. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to test for a significant difference between juniors and seniors (P theatre. Ten junior surgeons (100 completed procedures). Total number of movements of the endoscope per procedure. Path length of the endoscope per procedure. Twenty videos, 10 from junior surgeons and 10 from senior surgeons were analysed. Feasibility of our tracking system was demonstrated. Mean camera path lengths were significantly different at 119,329px (juniors) versus 43,697px (seniors), P ≪ 0.05. The mean number of movements was significantly different at 9134 (juniors) versus 3690 (seniors), P ≪ 0.05. These quantifiable differences demonstrate construct validity for computer vision endoscope tracking as a measure of surgical experience. Computer vision tracking is a potentially useful structured and objective feedback tool to assist trainees in improving endoscope control. It enables juniors to examine how their pattern of endoscope control differs from that of seniors, focusing in particular on sections where they are most divergent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery for Chronic Sinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    篠, 昭男; 吉原, 俊雄; Akio, SHINO; Toshio, YOSHIHARA

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) has became basic surgical treatment for chronic sinusitis instead of the Caldwell-Luc procedure. This technique is aimed at improvement of ventilation and excretion with endoscopic approach between nasal cavity and each sinus. The mucosa preservation of sinus is recognized to important as the surgery for inflammatory disease. The ostiomeatal complex (OMC) plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of sinusitis. Obstruction here predisposes to chronic sinusitis...

  15. Endoscopic intervention in obstructive renal papillary necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    V Chandrashekar Rao; Bhat, Soumya S; Padmanabha Vijayan; Shankar Ramamurthy

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonography, endoscopic retrieval, and the outcome of patients with diabetes mellitus presenting with ureteric obstruction caused by necrosed renal papillae. Material And Methods: Eleven seriously ill patients with diabetes mellitus, admitted into medical wards, were found to have ureteric obstruction complicated by urinary infection. The diagnosis was made by ultrasonography alone. Prompt relief followed endoscopic extraction of the offending necrosed pa...

  16. A randomised trial of endoscopic submucosal dissection versus endoscopic mucosal resection for early Barrett’s neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terheggen, Grischa; Horn, Eva Maria; Vieth, Michael; Gabbert, Helmut; Enderle, Markus; Neugebauer, Alexander; Schumacher, Brigitte; Neuhaus, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Background For endoscopic resection of early GI neoplasia, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) achieves higher rates of complete resection (R0) than endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). However, ESD is technically more difficult and evidence from randomised trial is missing. Objective We compared the efficacy and safety of ESD and EMR in patients with neoplastic Barrett's oesophagus (BO). Design BO patients with a focal lesion of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early adenocarcinoma (EAC) ≤3 cm were randomised to either ESD or EMR. Primary outcome was R0 resection; secondary outcomes were complete remission from neoplasia, recurrences and adverse events (AEs). Results There were no significant differences in patient and lesion characteristics between the groups randomised to ESD (n=20) or EMR (n=20). Histology of the resected specimen showed HGIN or EAC in all but six cases. Although R0 resection defined as margins free of HGIN/EAC was achieved more frequently with ESD (10/17 vs 2/17, p=0.01), there was no difference in complete remission from neoplasia at 3 months (ESD 15/16 vs EMR 16/17, p=1.0). During a mean follow-up period of 23.1±6.4 months, recurrent EAC was observed in one case in the ESD group. Elective surgery was performed in four and three cases after ESD and EMR, respectively (p=1.0). Two severe AEs were recorded for ESD and none for EMR (p=0.49). Conclusions In terms of need for surgery, neoplasia remission and recurrence, ESD and EMR are both highly effective for endoscopic resection of early BO neoplasia. ESD achieves a higher R0 resection rate, but for most BO patients this bears little clinical relevance. ESD is, however, more time consuming and may cause severe AE. Trial registration number NCT1871636 PMID:26801885

  17. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Fistulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Field F; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae can be serious acute complications or chronic morbid conditions resulting from inflammatory, malignant, or postsurgical states. Endoscopic closure of gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae represents major progress in the treatment of patients with these complex presentations. The main goal of endoscopic therapy is the interruption of the flow of luminal contents across a gastrointestinal defect. In consideration of the proper endoscopic approach to luminal closure, several basic principles must be considered. Undrained cavities and fluid collections must often first be drained percutaneously, and the percutaneous drain provides an important measure of safety for subsequent endoscopic luminal manipulations. The size and exact location of the leak/fistula, as well as the viability of the surrounding tissue, must be defined. Almost all complex leaks and fistulae must be approached in a multidisciplinary manner, collaborating with colleagues in nutrition, radiology, and surgery. Currently, gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae may be managed endoscopically by using 1 or more of the following modalities: stent placement, clip closure (including through-the-scope clips and over-the-scope devices), endoscopic suturing, and the injection of tissue sealants. In this article, we discuss these modalities and review the published outcomes data regarding each approach as well as practical considerations for successful closure of luminal defects. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscopic skills training in a simulated clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Leon; Ormonde, Donald G; Riley, Richard H; Laurence, Bernard H

    2010-08-01

    We describe a simulation and scenario-based model of training in gastrointestinal endoscopic hemostasis, which combines acquisition of procedural and problem-solving skills in a close to reality simulated clinical setting. Two day courses in endoscopic hemostasis were conducted at the Clinical Training and Education Centre, the University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. In total, 23 trainees were enrolled. The Erlangen Endo-Trainer simulator, porcine specimens of esophagus, stomach, and duodenum with a range of simulated bleeding sources, a separate catheter and a pump to simulate massive bleeding, and a full arm model with injectable veins were used. The SimMan monitor and software package were used to simulate hemodynamic parameters and electrocardiogram. Faculty members adjusted the rate of bleeding and vital parameters. The exercise was video recorded. On the first day, the group underwent simulator training in techniques of endoscopic hemostasis. On the second day, participants were scenario-based trained in full management of a "bleeding patient," which included resuscitation, sedation, endoscopy, and hemostasis, acting as leaders in teams of three. The course was evaluated by participants using a standardized questionnaire. A complex clinical setting of acute gastrointestinal bleeding was recreated with a high degree of realism. All participants reported that the simulated clinical scenario was a positive learning experience, helpful in managing complications and performing complex problem-solving tasks in a dynamic environment. Scenario and simulation-based training in endoscopic hemostasis may provide an opportunity to improve procedural skills and acquire practical experience in managing this medical emergency, which requires the ability to process, integrate, and adequately and quickly respond to complex information in unexpected conditions working as a team leader.

  19. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, Michael P; Mawn, Louise A; Galloway, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z=-2.044, p=0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z=2.456, p=0.014) when augmentation was used. Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize complication risk and enhance surgeon comfort and

  20. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y R Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma.

  1. Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery of pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Yr; Sachdev, S; Parihar, V; Namdev, H; Bhatele, Pr

    2012-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoid surgery (EETS) is increasingly used for pituitary lesions. Pre-operative CT and MRI scans and peroperative endoscopic visualization can provide useful anatomical information. EETS is indicated in sellar, suprasellar, intraventricular, retro-infundibular, and invasive tumors. Recurrent and residual lesions, pituitary apoplexy and empty sella syndrome can be managed by EETS. Modern neuronavigation techniques, ultrasonic aspirators, ultrasonic bone curette can add to the safety. The binostril approach provides a wider working area. High definition camera is much superior to three-chip camera. Most of the recent reports favor EETS in terms of safety, quality of life and tumor resection, hospital stay, better endocrinological, and visual outcome as compared to the microscopic technique. Nasal symptoms, blood loss, operating time are less in EETS. Various naso-septal flaps and other techniques of CSF leak repair could help reduce complications. Complications can be further reduced after achieving the learning curve, good understanding of limitations with proper patient selection. Use of neuronavigation, proper post-operative care of endocrine function, establishing pituitary center of excellence and more focused residency and endoscopic fellowship training could improve results. The faster and safe transition from microscopic to EETS can be done by the team concept of neurosurgeon/otolaryngologist, attending hands on cadaveric dissection, practice on models, and observation of live surgeries. Conversion to a microscopic or endoscopic-assisted approach may be required in selected patients. Multi-modality treatment could be required in giant and invasive tumors. EETS appears to be a better surgical option in most pituitary adenoma.

  2. [Endoscopic hemostasis in patients with portal hypertension tumor genesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubutia, M Sh; Pinchuk, T P; Sogreshilin, S S; Bugaev, S A; Lutsyk, K N; Chugunov, A O

    2012-01-01

    to assess the results of using endoscopic techniques to achieve hemostasis for the control of bleeding and the prevention of recurrent bleeding from esophageal and gastric varices in the patients with primary liver cancer and metastatic liver lesions. in the period of 2009-2011,7 patients with primary liver cancer or metastatic liver lesions complicated by gastro-esophageal bleeding were treated in the Sklifosovsky Clinical and Research Institute for Emergency Medicine. The sources of bleeding were esophageal varices in 6 patients, gastric varices in 1. a diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) revealed, besides the varices, an erosive hemorrhagic gastritis in 4 patients, a ruptured mucosa of cardio-esophageal transition in 1, an erosive hemorrhagic gastritis and a liver tumour invasion in the stomach antrum in 1. The hemostasis achieved by means of paravasal injections with a 20% glucose solution was efficient in 2 of 3 patients. The endoscopic ligations of esophageal varices were performed in 3 patients. Five patients died from the underlying disease progressing. In one of them, the cause of death was a recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices. in the patients with primary liver cancer and metastatic liver lesions, the use of mini-invasive endoscopic techniques is more appropriate, because the surgical treatment of this patient population carries a very high risk.

  3. Crowdsourcing for reference correspondence generation in endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier-Hein, Lena; Mersmann, Sven; Kondermann, Daniel; Stock, Christian; Kenngott, Hannes Gotz; Sanchez, Alexandro; Wagner, Martin; Preukschas, Anas; Wekerle, Anna-Laura; Helfert, Stefanie; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; Speidel, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Computer-assisted minimally-invasive surgery (MIS) is often based on algorithms that require establishing correspondences between endoscopic images. However, reference annotations frequently required to train or validate a method are extremely difficult to obtain because they are typically made by a medical expert with very limited resources, and publicly available data sets are still far too small to capture the wide range of anatomical/scene variance. Crowdsourcing is a new trend that is based on outsourcing cognitive tasks to many anonymous untrained individuals from an online community. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to investigate the concept of crowdsourcing in the context of endoscopic video image annotation for computer-assisted MIS. According to our study on publicly available in vivo data with manual reference annotations, anonymous non-experts obtain a median annotation error of 2 px (n = 10,000). By applying cluster analysis to multiple annotations per correspondence, this error can be reduced to about 1 px, which is comparable to that obtained by medical experts (n = 500). We conclude that crowdsourcing is a viable method for generating high quality reference correspondences in endoscopic video images.

  4. A novel endoscopic fluorescent band ligation method for tumor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Jong Hee; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Kwang Gi; Kim, Hong Rae; Lee, Hyun Min; Park, Sunup; Kim, Sung Chun; Choi, Yongdoo; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2016-10-01

    Accurate tumor localization is essential for minimally invasive surgery. This study describes the development of a novel endoscopic fluorescent band ligation method for the rapid and accurate identification of tumor sites during surgery. The method utilized a fluorescent rubber band, made of indocyanine green (ICG) and a liquid rubber solution mixture, as well as a near-infrared fluorescence laparoscopic system with a dual light source using a high-powered light-emitting diode (LED) and a 785-nm laser diode. The fluorescent rubber bands were endoscopically placed on the mucosae of porcine stomachs and colons. During subsequent conventional laparoscopic stomach and colon surgery, the fluorescent bands were assayed using the near-infrared fluorescence laparoscopy system. The locations of the fluorescent clips were clearly identified on the fluorescence images in real time. The system was able to distinguish the two or three bands marked on the mucosal surfaces of the stomach and colon. Resection margins around the fluorescent bands were sufficient in the resected specimens obtained during stomach and colon surgery. These novel endoscopic fluorescent bands could be rapidly and accurately localized during stomach and colon surgery. Use of these bands may make possible the excision of exact target sites during minimally invasive gastrointestinal surgery.

  5. Role of endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic resection for the treatment of gastric schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinlong; Liu, Xiang; Ge, Nan; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Jintao; Wang, Guoxin; Sun, Siyu

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and endoscopic resection play an important role in gastric submucosal tumor. However, there were few articles regarding EUS and endoscopic resection of gastric schwannomas. Our aim was to evaluate the role of EUS and endoscopic resection in treating gastric schwannomas.We retrospectively reviewed 14 patients between March 2012 and April 2016 with gastric schwannomas and who received EUS and endoscopic resection. EUS characteristics, endoscopic resection, tumor features, and follow-up were evaluated in all the patients.Fourteen patients were enrolled in the present study. The patients' ages ranged from 25 to 72 years (mean age, 52.6 years). On EUS, all tumors were originating from muscularis propria and hypoechoic. Ten tumors have the extraluminal growth patterns and 4 tumors have the intraluminal growth patterns. Marginal halos were observed in 7 lesions. No cystic change and calcification were found inside the lesions. Complete endoscopic resection was performed in all the patients with no complications occurring in any patients. No recurrence or metastases was found in all patients during the follow-up period.Gastric schwannoma has some characteristics on EUS, but it is difficult to differentiate gastric schwannoma from gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Endoscopic resection is an effective and safe treatment for gastric schwannoma with an excellent follow-up outcome.

  6. [Identification of insulinomas by endoscopic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardengh, José Celso; Valiati, Loana Heuko; Geocze, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare EUS and the others diagnostics tests in the correct localization of insulinomas. We prospectively investigated 30 patients with endoscopic ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of insulinomas prior to surgical exploration. They were submitted to abdominal ultrasonography, spiral computed tomography and four patients were submitted to magnetic ressonance before EUS. Surgery was the gold standard for tumor localization. Twenty-six tumors were benign (86.6%) and four were malign (13.4%). The median size tumors detected by EUS was 1.5 cm. The overall sensitivity of EUS in identifying insulinomas was 86.6% compared to 33% for CT, 40% to MRI and 90.9% to IUS. In 12 patients we were able to perform EUS-guided fine needle aspiration. Insulinoma was diagnosed in ten cytological specimens (83.3%). Tumors located in the head and body of the pancreas were seen by EUS in all patients, respectively but those located in the tail were diagnosed only in 55.5% of the cases. EUS has a high sensibility in the identification and localization of pancreatic insulinomas and should replace traditional methods of image when clinical suspicion is high.

  7. Endoscopic management of gastric varices using a detachable snare and simultaneous endoscopic sclerotherapy and O-ring ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T; Harada, T; Shigemitsu, T; Takeo, Y; Miyazaki, S; Okita, K

    1999-07-01

    Cyanoacrylate injection is highly effective and is regarded as the treatment of choice in bleeding gastric varices in Europe, but intravenous injection of cyanoacrylate is not allowed in the USA and Japan because it may cause embolisms in other organs. Accordingly, we developed a new endoscopic combined treatment of endoscopic management of gastric varices using a detachable snare (EVLs) and simultaneous endoscopic sclerotherapy and O-ring ligation (EISL) (i.e. EVLs + EISL), and we prospectively evaluated its efficacy and safety. Gastric varices were ligated with the loop of a detachable snare that opened to a diameter of 4 cm (EVLs). Then the residual varices around the ligated portion were sclerosed by ethanolamine oleate and the injected vessel was ligated using a pneumo-activated EVL device (EISL). The EVLs + EISL was performed in 35 patients: on an emergency basis in eight patients, on an elective basis in six patients and as primary prophylaxis in 21 patients. Liver function was classified as Child-Pugh class A in 12 patients, class B in 12 patients and class C in 11 patients. Endoscopic disappearance of gastric varices was obtained in 97.1% of the patients and they regressed in all patients. Haemostasis was achieved in all eight emergency cases. The 2-year cumulative non-recurrence rate was 85%, the 2-year cumulative non-bleeding rate was 92% and the 2-year cumulative survival was 80%. No patients died of bleeding from gastric varices. There were no serious short-term complications, such as haemorrhage, gastro-oesophageal perforation, ileus, or renal impairment. Combined EVLs + EISL appears to be a useful treatment for gastric varices due to its safety and good clinical outcome.

  8. Significance of telemedicine for video image transmission of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Shuji; Itaba, Soichi; Yada, Shinichiro; Takahata, Shunichi; Nakashima, Naoki; Okamura, Koji; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Akaraviputh, Thawatchai; Lu, Xinghua; Tanaka, Masao

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid and marked progress in gastrointestinal endoscopy, the education of doctors in many new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures is of increasing importance. Telecommunications (telemedicine) is very useful and cost-effective for doctors' continuing exposure to advanced skills, including those needed for hepato-pancreato-biliary diseases. Nevertheless, telemedicine in endoscopy has not yet gained much popularity. We have successfully established a new system which solves the problems of conventional ones, namely poor streaming images and the need for special expensive teleconferencing equipment. The digital video transport system, free software that transforms digital video signals directly into Internet Protocol without any analog conversion, was installed on a personal computer using a network with as much as 30 Mbps per channel, thereby providing more than 200 times greater information volume than the conventional system. Kyushu University Hospital in Japan was linked internationally to worldwide academic networks, using security software to protect patients' privacy. Of the 188 telecommunications link-ups involving 108 institutions in 23 countries performed between February 2003 and August 2009, 55 events were endoscopy-related, 19 were live demonstrations, and 36 were gastrointestinal teleconferences with interactive discussions. The frame rate of the transmitted pictures was 30/s, thus preserving smooth high-quality streaming. This paper documents the first time that an advanced tele-endoscopy system has been established over such a wide area using academic high-volume networks, funded by the various governments, and which is now available all over the world. The benefits of a network dedicated to research and education have barely been recognized in the medical community. We believe our cutting-edge system will be a milestone in endoscopy and will improve the quality of gastrointestinal education, especially with respect to endoscopic retrograde

  9. Towards automated visual flexible endoscope navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stap, Nanda; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2013-10-01

    The design of flexible endoscopes has not changed significantly in the past 50 years. A trend is observed towards a wider application of flexible endoscopes with an increasing role in complex intraluminal therapeutic procedures. The nonintuitive and nonergonomical steering mechanism now forms a barrier in the extension of flexible endoscope applications. Automating the navigation of endoscopes could be a solution for this problem. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in image-based navigation algorithms. The objectives are to find the most promising navigation system(s) to date and to indicate fields for further research. A systematic literature search was performed using three general search terms in two medical-technological literature databases. Papers were included according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 135 papers were analyzed. Ultimately, 26 were included. Navigation often is based on visual information, which means steering the endoscope using the images that the endoscope produces. Two main techniques are described: lumen centralization and visual odometry. Although the research results are promising, no successful, commercially available automated flexible endoscopy system exists to date. Automated systems that employ conventional flexible endoscopes show the most promising prospects in terms of cost and applicability. To produce such a system, the research focus should lie on finding low-cost mechatronics and technologically robust steering algorithms. Additional functionality and increased efficiency can be obtained through software development. The first priority is to find real-time, robust steering algorithms. These algorithms need to handle bubbles, motion blur, and other image artifacts without disrupting the steering process.

  10. Patient and staff exposure to glutaraldehyde from KeyMed Auto-Disinfector endoscope washing machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, D A; Parnell, P; Porter, C; Axon, A T

    1994-05-01

    Activated glutaraldehyde (2%) is the recommended agent for disinfection of endoscopic equipment. Exposure to the disinfectant is associated with side-effects and guidelines have been set to avoid these complications. Endoscope washing machines are used to provide automated high level disinfection of endoscopes as well as reduce exposure to the irritant aldehyde. We report a design fault in an endoscope washing machine which results in patients and staff being exposed to activated glutaraldehyde. The Auto-Disinfector (KeyMed) comprises a washing chamber supplied by three separate reservoirs (detergent, disinfectant, and rinse water) via a common channel. After the first cycle endoscopes are processed using previously used detergent and rinse water. Rinse water glutaraldehyde concentrations were measured in four machines during routine endoscopy lists on at least two occasions and showed a progressive rise in glutaraldehyde concentration up to 0.1% after two to six cycles. This results in staff being exposed to glutaraldehyde present on the processed instrument and the disinfectant being pumped from the internal channels of the endoscope into direct contact with the gastrointestinal mucosa during endoscopy at concentrations of 200-1000 ppm. The present atmospheric limit for glutaraldehyde is 0.2 ppm. Skin and mucosal irritation occur at concentrations of 0.3 ppm and severe synovitis in experimental animals at 100 pm. Tongue swelling and bloody diarrhoea with characteristic mucosal histological changes have been reported in patients exposed to activated glutaraldehyde on inadequately rinsed equipment. To reduce this problem the rinse water should be changed after every cycle and the endoscope should be dried thoroughly before use.

  11. What is the evidence for endoscopic thyroidectomy in the management of benign thyroid disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotema, E Th; Sebag, F; Henry, J F

    2008-07-01

    Endoscopic thyroidectomy (ET) is a demanding surgical technique in which dissection of the gland is entirely performed with an endoscope, in a closed area maintained by insufflation or mechanical retraction. ET by direct cervical approach (anterior or lateral) is minimally invasive, but ET using an extracervical access (chest wall, breast, or axillary) is not. No technique seems to be universally accepted yet. This review was designed to clarify the existing evidence for performing endoscopic thyroid resections in the management of benign thyroid nodules. A database search was conducted in PubMed and Embase from which summaries and abstracts were screened for relevant data, matching our definition. Publications were further assessed and assigned their respective levels of evidence. Additional data derived from our own unit's experience with endoscopic thyroidectomy were included. Thirty mainly retrospective cohort studies have been published in which morbidity, such as unilateral vocal cord palsy, is poorly evaluated. ET takes from 90 to 280 minutes for lobectomy by cervical access and total thyroidectomy by chest wall approach, respectively. Cosmetic outcome in extracervical approach is less troubled by size of the resected specimen compared with direct cervical approach. Extracervical approach avoids a neck scar but implies invasiveness in terms of dissection and postoperative discomfort. Long-term cosmetic outcome comparisons with conventional thyroidectomy have not been published. Currently it is not possible to recommend the application of ET based on evidence. Reported complications stress the importance of advanced endoscopic skills. ET should only be offered to carefully selected patients and, therefore, a high volume of patients requiring thyroid surgery is needed. Superiority of endoscopic to conventional thyroidectomy has yet to be demonstrated. Possible advantages of endoscopic thyroid techniques and our patient's desire for the highest cosmetic outcome

  12. Double-scope per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM): a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Kevin L; Inoue, Haruhiro; Onimaru, Manabu; Ikeda, Haruo; Tansawet, Amarit; Bechara, Robert; Tanaka, Shinwa

    2016-04-01

    Since its introduction in 2010, per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has offered an alternative to laparoscopic Heller myotomy for the treatment of achalasia. A gastric myotomy length of 3 cm has been recommended; however, it can be difficult to ensure that adequate submucosal dissection has been performed during the procedure. Commonly accepted endoscopic markers of the gastric side can be inaccurate, particularly in patients with prior endoscopic treatments, such as balloon dilation or Botox injection of the lower esophageal sphincter. We hypothesized that the use of a second endoscope would result in a more complete gastric myotomy. One hundred consecutive achalasia patients were randomized into single- and double-scope POEM groups. In the treatment group, a second endoscope was used to obtain a retroflexed view of the gastric cardia, while the dissecting scope transilluminated from the end of the submucosal tunnel. Prospectively collected data were analyzed, including myotomy lengths, procedure times, adverse events, and clinical outcomes. POEM was completed with high rates of technical (98-100%) and clinical success (93-97%) in both groups, with a low rate of serious adverse events (2%). The second endoscope resulted in a 17 min increase in procedure time (94 vs. 77 min), myotomy extension in 34% of cases, and an increase in the average gastric myotomy length from 2.6 to 3.2 cm (p = 0.01). A second endoscope is useful for ensuring a complete gastric myotomy during POEM. With minimal increase in procedure time and no increase in morbidity, it may be particularly useful in cases of sigmoid esophagus or otherwise altered anatomy that makes identification of the gastroesophageal junction difficult.

  13. Sensitivity of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer by the incidence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato; Okamoto, Mikizo; Shabana, Michiko; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2013-08-01

    Although radiographic screening for gastric cancer has been conducted in Japan, it is anticipated that endoscopy will become a new screening method because of its high detection rate. The sensitivities of endoscopic and radiographic screening were calculated by the detection method and the incidence method based on the results of community-based screening in Japan. There were 56,676 screenings for gastric cancer using endoscopy and radiography from April 2002 to March 2007 in Yonago, Japan. The target age group was from 40 to 79 years. Screen-detected and interval cancers were investigated based on a screening database linked to the Tottori Cancer Registry. All gastric cancers diagnosed within 1 year after a negative screen were considered interval cancers. Based on the screening history, these were divided into prevalence screening and incidence screening. Prevalence screenings included 7,388 for endoscopic screening and 5,410 for radiographic screening, whereas incidence screenings included 18,021 for endoscopic screening and 11,417 for radiographic screening. The sensitivity of prevalence screening calculated by the incidence method was 0.886 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.698-0.976) for endoscopic screening and 0.831 (95% CI = 0.586-0.964) for radiographic screening; however, the difference was not significant (p = 0.626). The sensitivity of incidence screening calculated by the incidence method was 0.954 (95% CI = 0.842-0.994) for endoscopic screening and 0.855 (95% CI = 0.637-0.970) for radiographic screening (p = 0.177). Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer had a higher sensitivity than radiographic screening by the incidence method in both screening rounds. However, further study is needed to evaluate mortality reduction and to estimate overdiagnosis with endoscopic screening for gastric cancer. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  14. Extension of indications for transcanal endoscopic ear surgery using an ultrasonic bone curette for cholesteatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehata, Seiji; Watanabe, Tomoo; Ito, Tsukasa; Kubota, Toshinori; Furukawa, Takatoshi

    2014-01-01

    One-handed endoscopic procedures have, up until now, limited the indications for transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (TEES) in cholesteatoma surgery. However, the development of electrically powered instruments has opened the door to such one-handed endoscopic procedures in restricted surgical spaces. We examined the feasibility of using one such powered instrument, the ultrasonic bone curette (UBC) in TEES for cholesteatoma surgery. The UBC offers several advantages, including nonrotational motion and the combination of both suction and irrigation in a single handpiece. A prospective case series. Tertiary referral center. TEES was performed on 43 cases of primary cholesteatoma between September 2011 and December 2012, including 14 cases extending to the antrum. Zero-, 30-, or 70-degree angled rigid endoscopes with an outer diameter of 2.7 mm (Karl Storz) were used together with a high-definition video system. A Sonopet UBC (Stryker) was used to cut bony tissue. The nonrotational motion of the UBC prevents injury to the tympanomeatal flap and other soft tissue, which may result with standard drills. Transcanal endoscopic retrograde mastoidectomy on demand was performed to access the pathologies in the attic and antrum. A minimum attico-antrotomy was performed using the UBC, removing only the bony tissue necessary to visualize the pathology. The cholesteatoma was completely removed from the antral mucosa under clear endoscopic visualization in 13 of 14 cases. After removal of the cholesteatoma, the canal wall was reconstructed using cartilage taken from the tragus. This procedure resulted in greater mastoid preservation. The transcanal endoscopic approach to the antrum using the UBC proved to be less invasive and more functional. The UBC contains both a suction and irrigation system in a single handpiece, and this UBC is an appropriate cutting tool that extends the indications for TEES.

  15. Design and performance of optical endoscopes for the early detection of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Maureen Molly

    Cancer is a multistage, heterogeneous disease that develops through a series of genetic mutations. Early stage cancer is most responsive to treatment but can be the hardest to detect due to its small size, lack of definitive symptoms and potential location deep in the body. Whole body imaging methods, MRI/CT/PET, lack the necessary resolution to detect cellular level abnormalities. Optical methods, which have sufficient resolution, can be miniaturized into endoscopes, which are necessary to overcome limited penetration of light into tissue. By combining optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence imaging methods it is possible to create endoscopes sensitive to molecular and structural changes. I applied a dual-modality 2mm diameter rigid endoscope to the study of the natural history of colon cancer in a mouse model, and later applied this knowledge to the design and characterization of a 0.8 mm dual-modality flexible probe for use in human fallopian tubes. By using this endoscope, which is introduced through the natural orifice and is compatible with existing hysteroscopes, high-risk women could be screened in a procedure at a similar level of invasiveness as a colonoscopy. Therefore, the endoscope fills this gap in clinical care for women at high-risk for ovarian cancer.

  16. Sequelae of Endoscopic Inguinal Hernia Repair : Incidence, evaluation and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgmans, J.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic preperitoneal technique (TEP) is an appealing inguinal hernia repair technique, theoretically superior to other approaches. In practice some problems remain unsolved. Real incidences of chronic postoperative inguinal pain (CPIP) and other important sequelae of endoscopic hernia repair

  17. Endoscopic Radial Artery Harvest for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ming Chiu

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Endoscopic harvest of the radial artery is technically demanding, but excellent results can be achieved. The endoscopic approach can provide suitable conduits in a less invasive way than the open harvest technique.

  18. Is bacteriologic surveillance in endoscope reprocessing stringent enough?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovaleva, J.; Meessen, N. E. L.; Peters, F. T. M.; Been, M. H.; Arends, J. P.; Borgers, R. P.; Degener, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Endoscopes, including duodenoscopes, are medical devices that are frequently associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infections. We investigated an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonos aeruginosa sepsis affecting three patients after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP).

  19. Transforaminal endoscopic surgery for lumbar stenosis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, J.M.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Bartels, R.; Peul, W.; van Royen, B.J.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Transforaminal endoscopic techniques have become increasingly popular in surgery of patients with lumbar stenosis. The literature has not yet been systematically reviewed. A comprehensive systematic literature review up to November 2009 to assess the effectiveness of transforaminal endoscopic

  20. Automatic and robust segmentation of endoscopic OCT images and optical staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianlin; Yuan, Wu; Liang, Wenxuan; Yu, Shanyong; Liang, Yanmei; Xu, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuxing; Li, Xingde

    2017-05-01

    We report a generic method for automatic segmentation of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. In this method, OCT images are first processed with L1 -L0 norm minimization based de-noising and smoothing algorithms to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and enhance the contrast between adjacent layers. The smoothed images are then formulated into cost graphs based on their vertical gradients. After that, tissue-layer segmentation is performed with the shortest path search algorithm. The efficacy and capability of this method are demonstrated by automatically and robustly identifying all five interested layers of guinea pig esophagus from in vivo endoscopic OCT images. Furthermore, thanks to the ultrahigh resolution, high SNR of endoscopic OCT images and the high segmentation accuracy, this method permits in vivo optical staining histology and facilitates quantitative analysis of tissue geometric properties, which can be very useful for studying tissue pathologies and potentially aiding clinical diagnosis in real time.

  1. Postoperative seizure following transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kertmen, Hayri; G?rer, Bora; YILMAZ, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery for lumbar disc herniation has been available for more than 30 years. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a well-known, safe, and effective method used for the treatment of the lumbar disc herniation. The published complications of the transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy consist of infections, thrombophlebitis, dysesthesia, dural tear, vascular injury, and death. Seizure after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discect...

  2. Diazepam during endoscopic submucosal dissection of gastric epithelial neoplasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Yosuke; Enomoto, Shotaro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Niwa, Toru; Maekita, Takao; Yoshida, Takeichi; Moribata, Kosaku; Shingaki, Naoki; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Ueda, Kazuki; Inoue, Izumi; Tamai, Hideyuki; Kato, Jun; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate risk factors and adverse events related to high-dose diazepam administration during endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric neoplasias. METHODS: Between February 2002 and December 2009, a total of 286 patients with gastric epithelial neoplasia underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection in our hospital. To achieve moderate sedation, 5-7.5 mg of diazepam was administered intravenously by non-anesthesiologists. Intermittent additional administration of 2.5-5 mg diazepam was performed if uncontrollable body movement of the patient was observed. All patients were classified into groups based on the required diazepam dose: low-dose (≤ 17.5 mg, n = 252) and high-dose (> 17.5 mg, n = 79). RESULTS: Differences between the low- and high-dose diazepam groups were observed in lifetime alcohol consumption (0.30 ± 0.48 vs 0.44 ± 0.52 tons, P = 0.032), body weight (58.4 ± 10.3 vs 62.0 ± 9.9 kg, P = 0.006), tumor size (15 ± 10 vs 23 ± 18 mm, P < 0.001), lesion location (P < 0.001) and the presence of ulcerative findings (14/238 vs 18/61, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis identified all five variables as independently related to required diazepam dosage. In terms of adverse reactions to diazepam administration, paradoxical excitement was significantly more frequent in the high-dose diazepam group (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Intermittent administration of diazepam enabled safe completion of gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection except in patients who were alcohol abusers or obese, or who showed complicated lesions. PMID:22442745

  3. Accurate cut-offs for predicting endoscopic activity and mucosal healing in Crohn's disease with fecal calprotectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan María Vázquez-Morón

    Full Text Available Background: Fecal biomarkers, especially fecal calprotectin, are useful for predicting endoscopic activity in Crohn's disease; however, the cut-off point remains unclear. The aim of this paper was to analyze whether faecal calprotectin and M2 pyruvate kinase are good tools for generating highly accurate scores for the prediction of the state of endoscopic activity and mucosal healing. Methods: The simple endoscopic score for Crohn's disease and the Crohn's disease activity index was calculated for 71 patients diagnosed with Crohn's. Fecal calprotectin and M2-PK were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Results: A fecal calprotectin cut-off concentration of ≥ 170 µg/g (sensitivity 77.6%, specificity 95.5% and likelihood ratio +17.06 predicts a high probability of endoscopic activity, and a fecal calprotectin cut-off of ≤ 71 µg/g (sensitivity 95.9%, specificity 52.3% and likelihood ratio -0.08 predicts a high probability of mucosal healing. Three clinical groups were identified according to the data obtained: endoscopic activity (calprotectin ≥ 170, mucosal healing (calprotectin ≤ 71 and uncertainty (71 > calprotectin < 170, with significant differences in endoscopic values (F = 26.407, p < 0.01. Clinical activity or remission modified the probabilities of presenting endoscopic activity (100% vs 89% or mucosal healing (75% vs 87% in the diagnostic scores generated. M2-PK was insufficiently accurate to determine scores. Conclusions: The highly accurate scores for fecal calprotectin provide a useful tool for interpreting the probabilities of presenting endoscopic activity or mucosal healing, and are valuable in the specific clinical context.

  4. Pose Reconstruction of Flexible Instruments from Endoscopic Images using Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    A system is developed that can reconstruct the pose of flexible endoscopic instruments that are used in ad- vanced flexible endoscopes using solely the endoscopic images. Four markers are placed on the instrument, whose positions are measured in the image. These measurements are compared to a

  5. Post-endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy bleeding: an interventional radiology approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, Ruth

    2013-12-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy is an integral component of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Post-sphincterotomy hemorrhage is a recognized complication. First line treatment involves a variety of endoscopic techniques performed at the time of sphincterotomy. If these are not successful, transcatheter arterial embolization or open surgical vessel ligation are therapeutic considerations.

  6. Transanal submucosal endoscopic resection (TASER) by TEO system®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz de Nova, José Luis; Viamontes Ugalde, Francisco Eduardo; Mendoza Jiménez-Ridruejo, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    Given the higher incidence of non-invasive colorectal tumors due to the further implementation of screening techniques, multiple endoscopic techniques have emerged for its resection. Recently described, transanal submucosal endoscopic resection (TASER) pools the concepts of endoscopic resection with the transanal surgery. We report our initial experience and reflections on this new technique.

  7. Coccidioides immitis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Veena G; Tammineni, Anil K; Biscopink, Ronald J; Davis, Terry L; Veerabagu, Manjakkollai P

    2009-02-01

    The use of endoscopic ultrasound in staging non-small cell lung cancer is well known. Its role in diagnosing non-malignant conditions that cause mediastinal adenopathy is still not well established. We diagnosed Coccidioides immitis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients using endoscopic ultrasound. To our knowledge this is the first case of Coccidioidomycosis to be diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound.

  8. Endoscopic management of pancreatic pseudocysts and necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ryan; Baron, Todd H

    2015-02-01

    Over the last several years, there have been refinements in the understanding and nomenclature regarding the natural history of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis frequently develop acute pancreatic collections that, over time, may evolve into pancreatic pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Endoscopic management of these local complications of acute pancreatitis continues to evolve. Treatment strategies range from simple drainage of liquefied contents to repeated direct endoscopic necrosectomy of a complex necrotic collection. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocysts may arise as a consequence of pancreatic ductal obstruction that then leads to pancreatic ductal disruption. In this review, we focus on the indications, techniques and outcomes for endoscopic therapy of pancreatic pseudocysts and walled-off necrosis.

  9. Endoscopic release for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Haris S; Georgoulas, Petros; Shrier, Ian; Salanti, Georgia; Scholten, Rob J P M

    2014-01-31

    (95% CI 62% to 19%). ECTR more frequently resulted in transient nerve problems (ie, neurapraxia, numbness, and paraesthesiae), while OCTR had more wound problems (ie, infection, hypertrophic scarring, and scar tenderness). ECTR was safer than OCTR when the total number of complications were assessed (20 studies, RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 90) representing a relative drop in the probability by 40% (95% CI 60% to 10%).Rates of recurrence of symptoms and the need for repeated surgery were comparable between ECTR and OCTR groups.The overall risk of bias in studies that contribute data to these results is rather high; fewer than 25% of the included studies had adequate allocation concealment, generation of allocation sequence or blinding of the outcome assessor.The quality of evidence in this review may be considered as generally low. Five of the studies were presented only as abstracts, with insufficient information to judge their risk of bias. In selection bias, attrition bias or other bias (baseline differences and financial conflict of interest) we could not reach a safe judgement regarding a high or low risk of bias. Blinding of participants is impossible due to the nature of interventions.We identified three further potentially eligible studies upon updating searches just prior to publication. These compared ECTR with OCTR (two studies) or mini-open carpal tunnel release (one study) and will be fully assessed when we update the review. In this review, with support from low quality evidence only, OCTR and ECTR for carpal tunnel release are about as effective as each other in relieving symptoms and improving functional status, although there may be a functionally significant benefit of ECTR over OCTR in improvement in grip strength. ECTR appears to be associated with fewer minor complications compared to OCTR, but we found no difference in the rates of major complications. Return to work is faster after endoscopic release, by eight days on average. Conclusions from this

  10. Comparison of Endoscopic and Open Resection for Small Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommends conservative follow-up for gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs less than 2 cm. We have previously reported that the mitotic index of 22.22% of small gastric GISTs exceeded 5 per 50 high-power fields and recommended that all small gastric GISTs should be resected once diagnosed. The aim of the present study is to compare the safety and outcomes of endoscopic and open resection of small gastric GISTs. From May 2010 to March 2014, a total of 90 small gastric GIST patients were enrolled in the present study, including 40 patients who underwent surgical resection and 50 patients who underwent endoscopic resection. The clinicopathological characteristics, resection-related factors, and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. The clinicopathological characteristics were comparable between the two groups except for tumor location and DOG-1 expression. Compared with the surgical resection group, the operation time was shorter (P = .000, blood loss was less (P = .000, pain intensity was lower (P < .05, duration of first flatus and defecation was shorter (P < .05, and medical cost of hospitalization was lower (P = .027 in the endoscopic resection group. The complications and postoperative hospital stay were comparable between the two groups. No in situ recurrence or liver metastasis was observed during follow-up. Endoscopic resection of small gastric GISTs is safe and feasible compared with surgical resection, although perforation could not be totally avoided during and after resection. The clinical outcome of endoscopic resection is also favorable.

  11. [Histopathological Study of the Relationship between Lymphoid Follicles and Different Endoscopic Types of Nodular Gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takuo; Ishitake, Hisahito; Shimamoto, Fumio; Tamura, Tadamasa; Matsumura, Kazunori; Sumii, Masaharu; Nakai, Shirou

    2014-11-01

    Nodular gastritis is characterized histologically by hyperplasia and enlargement of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria. With the objective of elucidating the relationship between different endoscopic types of nodular gastritis and lymphoid follicles, distributions of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria were investigated in young gastric cancer patients with nodular gastritis. For the study, whole-mucosal step sectioning of each resected stomach was performed, the densities of lymphoid follicles of all specimens were measured microscopically, and the horizontal and depth distributions were calculated. For assessment in the horizontal direction, density distribution diagrams of lymphoid follicles were created. For assessment in the depth direction, the different endoscopic types of nodular gastritis were compared in the five different analysis sites. In the assessment of the horizontal distribution, no characteristic distribution tendencies were observed in either the granular type group or the scattered type group; however, it was found that areas with relatively high densities of lymphoid follicles generally coincided with the areas where nodular gastritis was observed endoscopically. These results suggested that hyperplasia and aggregation of lymphoid follicles in the lamina propria are involved at the sites where nodular gastritis is observed endoscopically. In the assessment of the depth distribution, lymphoid follicles tended to be more unevenly distributed in the upper lamina propria in the granular type group than in the scattered type at the three different analysis sites where nodular gastritis was observed endoscopically. These results suggested the possibility of a granular type characteristic.

  12. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation: an alternative option for the treatment of pancreatic insulinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Sepp, Krisztián; Tiszlavicz, László; Hamar, Sándor; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-10-12

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle injection has already been used for palliative interventions. Surgical resection is currently the standard treatment for pancreatic insulinoma. Medical treatment may be necessary for symptomatic patients with unresectable disease. Case reports have been published about the success of endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation, but it has not been reported previously in Hungarian literature. The authors present the history of an 83-year-old woman who was evaluated because of repeated hypoglycemic coma occurring during the night. Endosonographic image and laboratory findings (elevated serum insulin and chromogranin A) revealed pancreatic insulinoma. Because of severe comorbidities and high risk of surgical resection, the decision was made to ablate the insulinoma by endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcohol injection. A total of 3 mL 95% ethanol was injected into the tumor. Despite the discontinuation of the diazoxide therapy the hypoglycemic episodes disappeared. This case history confirms that endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation is a novel, minimal invasive alternative treatment for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in whom surgery is not feasible.

  13. Interventional endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis including temporary stenting: a definitive treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnbacher, Michael J; Mühldorfer, Steffen; Wehler, Markus; Fischer, Bernhard; Hahn, Eckhart G; Schneider, H Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In the past 15 years there have been tremendous advances in endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, the value of endoscopic pancreatic stenting is still debatable. In 98 patients suffering from symptomatic CP (84 M, 14 F, 49+/-12, age range 23-83 years) endotherapy including temporary stenting of the pancreatic duct was performed. After final stent removal, indicating the primary end-point of endotherapy, 96 patients were followed for 35+/-28 (8 days-111) months. All data were assessed retrospectively. As well as other endoscopic procedures, a total of 358 prostheses were inserted in the pancreatic duct and left in place for 3+/-1 (1 day-11) months. Total stent treatment time was 10+/-10 (6 days-49) months. At 46+/-27 (4-111) months after limited endotherapy, 57 patients had no need for secondary intervention, two-thirds were even without further pain sensations. In 22 patients, surgical treatment and in 17 patients further endoscopic therapy became necessary, which was significantly correlated with continued alcohol consumption. Temporary stent placement as a part of interventional endoscopic therapy in CP shows a high rate of technical and long-term clinical success, with no need for secondary treatment in a remarkable number of patients. Continued cessation of alcohol consumption supports the treatment benefit significantly.

  14. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    perforation, ESGE recommends that the endoscopist reports: its size and location with a picture; endoscopic treatment that might have been possible; whether carbon dioxide or air was used for insufflation; and the standard report information. 3 ESGE recommends that symptoms or signs suggestive of iatrogenic......This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that each...

  15. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Endoscopic Management of Recurrent Tracheoesophageal Fistula with Fibringlue and Electrocautery

    OpenAIRE

    Ospina, Juan Camilo; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Wuesthoff, Carolina; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent Tracheoesophageal Fistulas (RTEF) remains a therapeutic challenge, cause of the high rates of morbidity and mortality associated with open surgical closure and their frequent recurrence. Endoscopic techniques provide an alternative approach with the potential for improved surgical outcomes. We present a case of successful repair of recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula using bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, as well as a combined technique with electrocautery and fibrin glue. We believe...

  17. 4-mm-diameter three-dimensional imaging endoscope with steerable camera for minimally invasive surgery (3-D-MARVEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sam Y; Korniski, Ronald J; Shearn, Michael; Manohara, Harish M; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) imaging (stereo imaging) by endoscopes in minimally invasive surgery, especially in space-constrained applications such as brain surgery, is one of the most desired capabilities. Such capability exists at larger than 4-mm overall diameters. We report the development of a stereo imaging endoscope of 4-mm maximum diameter, called Multiangle, Rear-Viewing Endoscopic Tool (MARVEL) that uses a single-lens system with complementary multibandpass filter (CMBF) technology to achieve 3-D imaging. In addition, the system is endowed with the capability to pan from side-to-side over an angle of [Formula: see text], which is another unique aspect of MARVEL for such a class of endoscopes. The design and construction of a single-lens, CMBF aperture camera with integrated illumination to generate 3-D images, and the actuation mechanism built into it is summarized.

  18. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  19. Endoscopic swept-source optical coherence tomography based on a two-axis microelectromechanical system mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donglin; Fu, Linlai; Wang, Xin; Gong, Zhongjian; Samuelson, Sean; Duan, Can; Jia, Hongzhi; Ma, Jun Shan; Xie, Huikai

    2013-08-01

    A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror based endoscopic swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system that can perform three-dimensional (3-D) imaging at high speed is reported. The key component enabling 3-D endoscopic imaging is a two-axis MEMS scanning mirror which has a 0.8×0.8 mm2 mirror plate and a 1.6×1.4 mm2 device footprint. The diameter of the endoscopic probe is only 3.5 mm. The imaging rate of the SS-OCT system is 50 frames/s. OCT images of both human suspicious oral leukoplakia tissue and normal buccal mucosa were taken in vivo and compared. The OCT imaging result agrees well with the histopathological analysis.

  20. [Endoscopic hernia repair within the scope of a total management concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenrott, C; Menzel, D; Marquardt, B

    1999-01-01

    From 1991 until 1998 there were 1832 hernioplasties in 1696 patients. Endoscopic procedures as there were the Trans Abdominal Hernioplasty (TAPP) and the Totaly Extraperitoneal Hernioplasty (TEP) are increasing as the Lichtenstein procedure. This is in opposite to the Shouldice operation. Endoscopic treatment is highly accepted and the results are as good as with other operations. The analysis of our patients shows that there is an indication for all the different procedures. We clame to use the optimal operation for each individual patient depending on clear criteria. Principally there are still the Shouldice operation without a net for the youngers and the Lichtenstein operation in local anaesthesia for elder and risk patients recommended. All others, especially those with bilateral and recurrent hernia profit from endoscopic procedures. Advantages and disadvantages for TAPP and TEP are demonstrated.

  1. Development of automated endoscopes for dimensional micro-measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrebabetzky, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Increasing demands for product quality and outsourcing of production in the automobile industry lead to in­ creasingly tight tolerances for the components. In the area of metal-mechanics these are largely dimensional and require frequently uncertainties in the micron region. For optical instruments this means microscopical resolu­ tion. Dimensional measurement with uncertainties of some microns is nothing new, state of the art equipment in fact goes far below. The task becomes difficult if the measurements have to be carried out in an industrial production environment - and deep inside a bore hole. This paper describes the development of an automatic measurement system for internal dimensions of brake master cylinders, specifically the development of endoscopes, illuminations for edge detection, and integration with other sensors, actuators and controllers. The most demanding part was the endoscope development, because, surprisingly, no commercial product for microscopic view and precision measurements was found on the market. As the market for such measurement machines is very small, and as the requirements were different for each endoscope, the budget allowed only the development of prototypes, using readily available optical components. Borders between faces with different orientation of metallic structures can be difficult do detect. A satisfactory metrological performance can be achieved only with carefully shaped illumination, even if the source is a simple LED (light emitting diode). The automation was responsible for the largest part of the overall cost, coming from the desire for a high throughput of the measurement machine, even when operated by not highly qualified personnel. With the safety requirements satisfied, such a device ends up as a pretty complex equipment. Nevertheless, these aspects will be mentioned only for completeness, because standard components and methods were applied.

  2. [A novel miniature robotic endoscope design for intestinal inspection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Dong-xiang; Yan, Guo-zheng; Lin, Liang-ming

    2002-03-01

    This paper makes a comparison between the traditional endoscope system and the active robotic endoscope system, discusses the human intestine-working conditions of the robotic endoscope system in detail and its design requirements. An active robotic endoscope system based on earthworn-locomotion principles is proposed here and besides, its structure and locomotion mechanism are analyzed. A new method of human intestinal intervention is brought out and it can prevent the robotic endoscope guided by a cone-shaped guide pipe from being jammed or damaged.

  3. Dehiscence following successful endoscopic closure of gastric perforation during endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Masau; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Oda, Ichiro; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Nonaka, Satoru; Saka, Makoto; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Gastric perforation is one of the most serious complications that can occur during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In terms of the treatment of such perforations, we previously reported that perforations immediately observed and successfully closed with endoclips during endoscopic resection could be managed conservatively. We now report the first case in our medical facility of a gastric perforation during ESD that was ineffectively treated conservatively even after successful endoscopic closure. In December 2006, we performed ESD on a recurrent early gastric cancer in an 81-year-old man with a medical history of laparotomy for cholelithiasis. A perforation occurred during ESD that was immediately observed and successfully closed with endoclips so that ESD could be continued resulting in an en-bloc resection. Intensive conservative management was conducted following ESD, however, an endoscopic examination five days after ESD revealed dehiscence of the perforation requiring an emergency laparotomy. PMID:22919258

  4. A New Irrigation System (Endosplash) for a Rigid Endoscope in Trans-sphenoidal Endoscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Rintarou; Nakajima, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Eiju

    2016-07-15

    Obstruction of the visual field by blood is a major hindrance during endonasal endoscopic surgery, and a rapid and effective method for cleaning the lens is needed. We developed a new lens-cleaning system that does not employ a sheath or an irrigation-suction system. It is a 20-mm long cylinder with side holes that is attached to the barrel of the endoscope and is connected to a syringe containing saline. When the syringe is pressed, saline flows down to the tip along the barrel and washes the lens without requiring a sheath. We report the use of the system in six cases of endonasal endoscopic surgery. The lens was wiped significantly less often than during similar surgery performed without the use of this system. The Endosplash is simple and enables the surgeon to clean the lens with a single press of a syringe, thereby greatly enhancing the efficacy of endoscopic surgery.

  5. Same site submucosal tunneling for a repeat per oral endoscopic myotomy: A safe and feasible option

    OpenAIRE

    Wehbeh, Antonios N; Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Cai, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel endoscopic procedure for achalasia treatment. Due to its novelty and high success rates, a repeat procedure is usually not warranted, making the feasibility and safety of such approach unknown. We report the first case of a successful repeat POEM done at the same site of a previously uncompleted POEM. An 84-year-old female with type 2 achalasia presented for a POEM procedure. The procedure was aborted at the end of tunneling and before myotomy due...

  6. Papillary Ependymoma WHO Grade II of the Aqueduct Treated by Endoscopic Tumor Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M. Stark

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillary ependymoma is a rare tumor that may be located along the ventricular walls or within the spinal cord. We report the case of a 54-year-old patient with a papillary ependymoma WHO grade II arising at the entrance of the aqueduct. The tumor caused hydrocephalus. The tumor was completely removed via a right-sided endoscopic approach with restoration of the aqueduct. The free cerebrospinal fluid passage through the aqueduct was not only visualized by endoscopy but also controlled by intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore, an additional endoscopic third ventriculostomy was unneccessary.

  7. Endoscopic repair of an abdominal intercostal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Antonio; Ampollini, Luca; Prinzi, Gabriele; Sarli, Leopoldo

    2008-10-01

    Abdominal viscera herniation through the chest wall is a rare condition. A case is presented of an abdominal intercostal hernia of the seventh right intercostal space; its pathogenesis and clinical features are described, and also the combined endoscopic and percutaneous surgical approach employed for its repair.

  8. ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CHYLURIA USING POVIDONE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solapur Kidney Care and Research Center, Maharashtra, India. Objectivez-To evaluate the safety and efficacy ... Conclusion: Povidone iodine is a very safe and efficacious agent for the endoscopic treatment of chyluria by ..... ment of tilarial chyluria in Japan. J Uroi 1983,. 129:64. 10. Chang CY, Lue YB, Lapides J. Surgical ...

  9. Ethical challenges of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, L; Laquer, M; Treyzon, L

    2005-03-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a widely used procedure for patients who cannot swallow. Although it is mostly performed for valid indications, its use in terminally ill patients is questionable. In this study, more than 30% of patients died in hospital after PEG placement and 16% died less than 30 days after placement. Strict guidelines and oversight or PEG placement are recommended.

  10. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and Choroid Plexus Cauterization (CPC) have been recommended as reliable surgical options in developing countries for childhood hydrocephalus owing to reported shunt failures in shunt dependency. Objective: To evaluate outcomes of the ETV and ETV-CPC ...

  11. Oesophageal cancer and experience with endoscopic stent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oesophageal cancer often presents in advanced stages not amenable to surgical resection. In such patients, palliation of dysphagia remains the mainstay of management. Objectives: To determine the burden of advanced oesophageal cancer and to document the experience with endoscopic metal stent ...

  12. Esophageal Stricture Post Endoscopic Injection Sclerotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Post endoscopic sclerotherapy esophageal stricture is usually not fatal but may requires several sessions of esophageal dilation as an effective palliative treatment yet has its own complications. Aim: The purpose of this study is to find out the predictors of sclerotherapy esophageal stricture. Methods: This is a ...

  13. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic intervention is widely accepted as the treatment of choice. This study assessed ... Seven patients had one or more complications related to the ERCP: 3 acute pancreatitis, 2 cholangitis, 2 sphincterotomy bleeds, 1 duodenal perforation and 1 impacted Dormia basket, the latter 2 requiring operative intervention.

  14. Real-time endoscopic optical properties imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Joseph P.; van de Giessen, Martijn; Gioux, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    With almost 50% of all surgeries in the U.S. being performed as minimally invasive procedures, there is a need to develop quantitative endoscopic imaging techniques to aid surgical guidance. Recent developments in widefield optical imaging make endoscopic implementations of real-time measurement possible. In this work, we introduce a proof-of-concept endoscopic implementation of a functional widefield imaging technique called 3D single snapshot of optical properties (3D-SSOP) that provides quantitative maps of absorption and reduced scattering optical properties as well as surface topography with simple instrumentation added to a commercial endoscope. The system’s precision and accuracy is validated using tissue-mimicking phantoms, showing a max error of 0.004 mm−1, 0.05 mm−1, and 1.1 mm for absorption, reduced scattering, and sample topography, respectively. This study further demonstrates video acquisition of a moving phantom and an in vivo sample with a framerate of approximately 11 frames per second. PMID:29188107

  15. An observational study on oesophageal variceal endoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Sciences ... The study site was the Centre for Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI). ... All the patients with portal hypertension and previous history of acute variceal blood who underwent endoscopic injection sclerotherapy between August 1998 and May 2001 in the ...

  16. Shaft-Guidance for Flexible Endoscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeve, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Flexible endoscopes (long, slender, flexible instruments with a camera and light at the distal end, having working channels to introduce flexible instruments) are used for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions inside the human digestive system and inside the abdomen. Though used for their

  17. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... abscesses, interloop and intra-abdominal sepsis and cholangitis, or the later secondary sequelae of biliary cirrhosis, portal hypertension and end-stage liver disease. There is consensus that optimal management of a bile duct injury requires multidisciplinary. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after.

  18. [Extended endoscopic endonasal approach to skull base].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Arbolay, Omar; González-González, Justo; Rojas-Manresa, Jorge Luis

    2012-11-01

    Different approaches to the skull base have been developed through the sphenoidal sinus. Traditional boundaries of the trans-sphenoidal approach can be extended in antero-posterior and lateral plane. We review our experience with extended endoscopic endonasal approach in 127 cases. We used the extended endoscopic endonasal approach in 127 patients with different lesions of the skull base. This study specifically focuses on: type of lesions, surgical approach, outcome and surgical complications. Extended endoscopic endonasal approach was used in 127 patients with following lesions: 61 invasive adenomas to cavernous sinus, 10 clival chordomas, 21 craniopharyngiomas, 26 meningiomas, 4 cerebrospinal fluid leakages, one meningoencephalocele, 2 malignan lesions and 2 thyroid ophthalmopathy. In tumoral lesions gross total resection was achieved in 82.5%, with better results in craniopharyngiomas 90.5%, followed by invasive adenomas with 85.2%, and meningiomas with 84.6%. The most frequent complications were the insipid (8.6%) diabetes, meningoencefalitis (3.9%) and the hydrocephalic (3.9%). Mortality was 3.9%. The extended endoscopic endonasal approach is a promising minimally invasive alternative for selective cases with skull base lesions. As techniques and technology advance this approach may become the procedure of choice for most lesions and should be considered an option in the management of the patients with these complex pathologies by skull base surgeon. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Oesophageal cancer and experience with endoscopic stent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Oesophageal cancer often presents in advanced stages not amenable to surgical resection. In such patients, palliation of dysphagia remains the mainstay of management. oBjectives: To determine the burden of advanced oesophageal cancer and to document the experience with endoscopic metal stent.

  20. ENDOSCOPIC TREATMENT OF CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo K. Fokter

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a frequent cause of hand pain, numbness and paresthesias. Clinical outcome studies have been shown that endoscopic transverse carpal ligament release is an effective operation for treating idiopathic CTS. This retrospective study was designed to determine the one- to five-year outcome of endoscopic surgery for this disease.Methods. Single portal endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR was performed on 68 hands in 48 patients who had clinical signs and symptoms consistent with CTS confirmed with electrodiagnostic studies. Charts were reviewed and the following data were obtained: age, duration of symptoms, time of hospitalization and complications. 57 cases (40 patients responded to a questionnaire and follow-up nerve conduction studies were available in 44 cases (65% of the entire cohort. The data of electrodiagnostic studies before treatment and at follow-up were statistically compared.Results. In two cases symptoms persisted and open surgery was performed two months after endoscopic procedure. Majority of hands (49 out of 57; 86% were pain-free at the final follow-up. Electrodiagnostic studies confirmed significant difference in nerve conduction latencies, action potentials (p < 0.01 and sensory conduction velocities (p < 0.05.Conclusions. ECTR offers safe decompression of the median nerve. The resumption of activities of daily living is short and many patients are allowed to return to work soon.

  1. Endoscopic treatments for Barrett's esophagus: a systematic review of safety and effectiveness compared to esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Darren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, several new endoscopic treatments have been used to treat patients with Barrett's esophagus with high grade dysplasia. This systematic review aimed to determine the safety and effectiveness of these treatments compared with esophagectomy. Methods A comprehensive literature search was undertaken to identify studies of endoscopic treatments for Barrett's esophagus or early stage esophageal cancer. Information from the selected studies was extracted by two independent reviewers. Study quality was assessed and information was tabulated to identify trends or patterns. Results were pooled across studies for each outcome. Safety (occurrence of adverse events and effectiveness (complete eradication of dysplasia were compared across different treatments. Results The 101 studies that met the selection criteria included 8 endoscopic techniques and esophagectomy; only 12 were comparative studies. The quality of evidence was generally low. Methods and outcomes were inconsistently reported. Protocols, outcomes measured, follow-up times and numbers of treatment sessions varied, making it difficult to calculate pooled estimates. The surgical mortality rate was 1.2%, compared to 0.04% in 2831 patients treated endoscopically (1 death. Adverse events were more severe and frequent with esophagectomy, and included anastomotic leaks (9.4%, wound infections (4.1% and pulmonary complications (4.1%. Four patients (0.1% treated endoscopically experienced bleeding requiring transfusions. The stricture rate with esophagectomy (5.3% was lower than with porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (18.5%, but higher than aminolevulinic acid (ALA 60 mg/kg PDT (1.4%. Dysphagia and odynophagia varied in frequency across modalities, with the highest rates reported for multipolar electrocoagulation (MPEC. Photosensitivity, an adverse event that occurs only with photodynamic therapy, was experienced by 26.4% of patients who received porfimer sodium. Some

  2. Occult hernias and bilateral endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: is there a need for prophylactic repair? : Results of endoscopic extraperitoneal repair over a period of 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, V R; Sarangi, R

    2007-02-01

    An advantage of the endoscopic total extraperitoneal approach over the conventional hernia repair is detection of an unsuspected, asymptomatic hernia on the contralateral side. A high incidence of occult contralateral hernias has been reported in the literature. However, few studies have examined the incidence of development of a hernia on the healthy side evaluated previously during an endoscopic unilateral hernia repair. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of development of a contralateral hernia after a previous bilateral exploration. The need for a prophylactic contralateral repair is also addressed. We retrospectively reviewed the results of 822 endoscopic total extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs done in 634 patients over a period of 10 years from May 1993 to 2003. Incidence of hernia undetected clinically and during previous contralateral repair was assessed over a follow up period ranging from 10 to 82 months. About 7.97% of bilateral hernias were clinically occult hernias. Only 1.12% of unilateral hernia repairs (who had undergone a contralateral evaluation at surgery) subsequently developed a hernia on the other side. The endoscopic approach to inguinal hernia repair is an excellent tool to detect and treat occult contralateral hernias. The incidence of hernia occurring at the contralateral side after a previous bilateral exploration is low, hence a prophylactic repair on the contralateral side is not recommended on a routine basis.

  3. [Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis. Endoscopic subarachnoepidurostomy as a new treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, J-P; Mourgela, S

    2007-10-01

    Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis is essentially an unknown, unreported, and unrecognised disease. It was better known at a time when oil-based dye was used for myelography. The factors causing this pathogenesis remain unknown. In addition, diagnosis is hard to achieve and frequently attained only by an exclusion process. Only in severe cases, using high-resolution MRI, is evidence for the diagnosis obtainable. Modern neuroendoscopic techniques allow diagnosis at a reasonable risk (comparable with lumbar tap) and enable us substantially to treat the pain. Taken together, this means a radical new method of treatment for adhesive arachnoiditis. The treatment of a 23-patient research group suffering from adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis is monitored and described. Various endoscopic manoeuvres were carried out. Endoscopic reduction of adhesions and internal shunting for CSF flow between subarachnoidal and epidural space improved both the biomechanical abilities of rootlets and restoration of blocked CSF pathways. Its main result is the significant reduction of long-term pain registered by a visual analogue pain scale. No bad side effect other than temporary headache was found. No CSF leak syndrome was observed. The success of the method was directly influenced by the interventional procedure on the disturbed CSF circulation and its partial restoration (subarachnoepidurostomy). In cases of severe lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis, it was found very beneficial to implant special gravity-controlled valve systems for subarachnoid-peritoneal shunts. Adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis is no longer a devastating diagnosis. Due to a novel endoscopic treatment of the local CSF disturbances that restores physiologic pathways, the chance exists for long-lasting improvement of the clinical condition.

  4. Endoscopic mucosal resection of colorectal tumors: Our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagorni Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR or mucosectomy is an interventional procedure for minimal invasive endoscopic removal of benign and malignant digestive tract tumors. Mucosectomy removes flat and sessile neoplasms, early colorectal cancer (CRC confined to mucosa or submucosa and lateral spreading tumors. The aim of the study was to show our first experience in application of this procedure in everyday practice in regarding completeness and efficacy of the procedure, complication rate and incidence of recurrent adenomas. Methods. In the prospective study 51 colorectal adenomas were removed in 44 patients by EMR. Results. Single mucosectomy was done in 43 patients, while multiple (8 in one patient. Complete resection was obtained in all procedures. In 36 (68.62% procedures „en block“ resection was done, but in 15 (31.37% procedures „piece meal“ resection was performed. Synchronous colorectal tumors (benign or malignant were detected in 20 (45.45% patients. Moderate dysplasia was found in 30 (58.82% adenomas, but high grade dysplasia in 9 (17.64% of adenomas. Intramucosal CRC was detected in 11.77% of adenomas. A total of 37 (72.54% advanced adenomas were removed. There were 3 (5.88% of recurrent adenomas, 6-30 months after the EMR. Only one (2.2% case of post procedure bleeding was observed. Conclusion: EMR is a safe and efficious method for removal of flat, sessile adenomas, as well as early CRC. EMR is a routine endoscopic procedure in everyday practice of interventional endoscopist.

  5. Endoscopic suturing versus endoscopic clip closure of the mucosotomy during a per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM): a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescarus, Radu; Shlomovitz, Eran; Sharata, Ahmed M; Cassera, Maria A; Reavis, Kevin M; Dunst, Christy M; Swanström, Lee L

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining an adequate mucosal closure is one of the crucial steps in per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). Thus far, there have been no objective data comparing the various available closure techniques. This case-controlled study attempts to compare the application of endoscopic clips versus endoscopic suturing for mucosotomy closure during POEM cases. A retrospective review of our prospective POEM database was performed. All cases in which endoscopic suturing was used to close the mucosotomy were matched to cases in which standard endoclips were used. Overall complication rate, closure time and mucosal closure costs between the two groups were compared. Both techniques offer good clinical results with good mucosal closure and the absence of postoperative leak. Closure time was significantly shorter (p = 0.044) with endoscopic clips (16 ± 12 min) when compared to endoscopic suturing (33 ± 11 min). Overall, the total closure cost analysis showed a trend toward lower cost with clips (1502 ± 849 USD) versus endoscopic suturing (2521 ± 575 USD) without reaching statistical significance (p = 0.073). The use of endoscopic suturing seems to be a safe method for mucosal closure in POEM cases. Closure time is longer with suturing than conventional closure with clips, and there is a trend toward higher overall cost. Endoscopic suturing is likely most cost-effective for difficult cases where conventional closure methods fail.

  6. Total Endoscopic Approach in Glomus Tympanicum Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Daneshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glomus tympanicum (GT is a benign primary tumor of the middle ear. The evolution of endoscopic ear surgery has allowed for an alternative approach to managing this vascular tumor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an endoscopic approach in GT surgery, and also to investigate its applicability and feasibility.   Materials and Methods: Prospectively, 13 class I and II patients, according to the Glasscock-Jackson glomus classification, were candidates for management via a transcanal endoscopic approach. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the location of the tumor in the middle ear. Group A consisted of patients with tumors located anteriorly while occupying the Eustachian tube. Group B were patients with tumors located on the promontory with entirely visible tumor borders. Patients in Group C had tumors that occupied the entire middle ear. Under specially designed flap elevation and hemostasis, the tumors were completely removed using an endoscopic technique.   Results: Based on the classification criteria, three patients fell into Group A (30%, six into Group B (46%, and three into Group C (23%. The principal chief complaint was pulsatile tinnitus that disappeared after surgery in most cases. Hearing status was mostly mixed hearing loss. No change was detected in bone conduction after surgery, but air conduction was improved in nine cases. No major complication or recurrence was observed over 30 months of follow up.   Conclusion: Improved exposure and access in the endoscopic transcanal approach to GT leads to safe, rapid, and reliable tumor removal, as well as allowing comfortable surgery for both the surgeon and most patients.

  7. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christine; El Zein, Mohamad; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Dunlap, Margo; Chang, Angela; Agrawal, Alison; Barola, Sindhu; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Chen, Yen-I; Kalloo, Anthony N; Khashab, Mouen A; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2017-09-01

    Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) is gaining traction as a minimally invasive bariatric treatment. Concern that the learning curve may be slow, even among those proficient in endoscopic suturing, is a barrier to widespread implementation of the procedure. Therefore, we aimed to define the learning curve for ESG in a single endoscopist experienced in endoscopic suturing who participated in a 1-day ESG training program.  Consecutive patients who underwent ESG between February 2016 and November 2016 were included. The performing endoscopist, who is proficient in endoscopic suturing for non-ESG procedures, participated in a 1-day ESG training session before offering ESG to patients. The outcome measurements were length of procedure (LOP) and number of plications per procedure. Nonlinear regression was used to determine the learning plateau and calculate the learning rate.  Twenty-one consecutive patients (8 males), with mean age 47.7 ± 11.2 years and mean body mass index 41.8 ± 8.5 kg/m 2 underwent ESG. LOP decreased significantly across consecutive procedures, with a learning plateau at 101.5 minutes and a learning rate of 7 cases ( P  = 0.04). The number of plications per procedure also decreased significantly across consecutive procedures, with a plateau at 8 sutures and a learning rate of 9 cases ( P  < 0.001). Further, the average time per plication decreased significantly with consecutive procedures, reaching a plateau at 9 procedures ( P  < 0.001).  Endoscopists experienced in endoscopic suturing are expected to achieve a reduction in LOP and number of plications per procedure in successive cases, with progress plateauing at 7 and 9 cases, respectively.

  8. Radiological findings after endoscopic incision of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Kim, In One; Seok, Eul Hye; Cha, Joo Hee; Choi, Gook Myung; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Kwang Myung; Choi, Hwang [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Jung Eun [Chungmu General Hospital, Chungmu (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Eul Hye [Seran General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Joo Hee [Green General Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Choi, Guk Myung [Halla General Hospital, Cheju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-01

    Endoscopic incision of ureterocele is considered a simple and safe method for decompression of urinary tract obstruction above ureterocele. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiological findings after endoscopic incision of ureterocele. We retrospectively reviewed the radiological findings (ultrasonography (US), intravenous urography, and voiding cystourethrography(VCU)) in 16 patients with ureterocele who underwent endoscopic incision (mean age at surgery, 15 months; M:F 3:13; 18 ureteroceles). According to the postoperative results, treatment was classified as successful when medical treatment was still required, and second operation when additional surgical treatment was required. Postoperative US (n=10) showed that in all patients, urinary tract obstruction was relieved: the kidney parenchima was thicker and the ureterocele was smaller. Intravenous urography (n=8), demonstrated that in all patients, urinary tract obstruction and the excretory function of the kidney had improved. Postoperative VCU indicated that in 92% of patients (12 of 13), endoscopic incision of the ureterocele led to vesicoureteral reflux(VUR). Of these twelve, seven (58%) showed VUR of more than grade 3, while newly developed VUR was seen in five of eight patients (63%) who had preoperative VCU. Surgery was successful in four patients (25%), partially successful in three (19%), and a second operation-on account of recurrent urinary tract infection and VUR of more than grase 3 during the follow-up period-was required by nine (56%). Although endoscopic incision of a ureterocele is a useful way of relieving urinary tract obstruction, an ensuing complication may be VUR. Postoperative US and intravenous urography should be used to evaluate parenchymal change in the kidney and improvement of uronary tract obstructon, while to assess the extend of VUR during the follow-up period , postoperative VCU is required.

  9. Endoscopic Sleeve Gastroplasty: How I Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Nava, G; Galvão, M P; Bautista-Castaño, I; Jimenez-Baños, A; Fernandez-Corbelle, J P

    2015-08-01

    Primary endoscopic weight loss therapies are of interest for access, simplicity, and economy. The objective of this manuscript is to describe the endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty used in 50 patients. The goal of this procedure is to reduce the gastric lumen into a tubular configuration, with the greater curvature modified by a line of sutured plications. General anesthesia with endotracheal intubation is needed. An endoscopic suturing system requiring a specific double-channel endoscope delivers full-thickness sets of running sutures from the antrum to the fundus. Patients are admitted and observed, with discharge planned within 24 h. Post-procedure outpatient care includes diet instruction with intensive follow-up by a multidisciplinary team. Voluntary oral contrast and endoscopy studies are scheduled to assess the gastroplasty at 3, 6, and 12 months. The technique was applied in 50 patients (13 men) with an average body mass index (BMI) of 37.7 kg/m(2) (range 30-47) with 13 having reached 1 year. Procedure duration averaged 66 min during which six to eight sutures on average were placed. All patients were discharged in less than 24 h. There were no major intra-procedural, early, or delayed adverse events. Weight loss parameters were satisfactory, mean BMI changes from 37.7 ± 4.6 to 30.9 ± 5.1 kg/m(2) at 1 year, and mean %TBWL was 19.0 ± 10.8. Oral contrast studies and endoscopy revealed sleeve gastroplasty configuration at least until 1 year of follow-up. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty is a safe, effective, and reproducible primary weight loss technique.

  10. Endoscopic treatment of congenital H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula with electrocautery and histoacryl glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzifa, K T; Maxwell, E L; Chait, P; James, A L; Forte, V; Ein, S H; Friedburg, J

    2006-05-01

    Congenital H-Type tracheoesophageal fistulae (H-Type TEF) and recurrent fistulae after primary repair of esophageal atresia represent a difficult problem in diagnosis and management. The treatment traditionally involved an open technique via a cervical or thoracic route, approaches with high morbidity and mortality rates of up to 50%. Endoscopic closure of fistulae has been reported with various techniques such as tissue adhesives, electrocautery, sclerosants and laser. However, the published case series contain a small number of patients with usually short-term follow-up. The aim of this paper is to present the experience of a decade at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, using diathermy and histoacryl tissue adhesive and discuss the indications and limitations of this technique. Since 1995, 192 patients have been managed in this institution with tracheoesophageal fistulae of which 10 patients have been treated endoscopically. The fistulae were both of H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistulae following surgery for esophageal atresia and fistula division. One fistula occurred following trauma. The procedure was undertaken under general anesthesia in the image guided therapy suite under fluoroscopic control. Flexible ball electrocautery and injection of histoacryl glue were used either on their own or in combination. Fistula closure was achieved in 9 out of 10 fistulae. Four patients had a second endoscopic procedure. No major respiratory or other complications were encountered in association with the procedure. Follow-up has been between 3 months and 9 years. We conclude, endoscopic treatment of tracheoesophageal fistulae with electrocautery and histoacryl glue has been a safe and successful technique of managing H-Type and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistulae. In this paper, we discuss the indications and the surgical steps of the procedure. We highlight that diathermy should be carefully controlled and applied preferably in the small non

  11. Mapping of microsatellite instability in endoscopic normal colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tug, Esra; Balaban, Yasemin H; Sahin, Ebru Kaplan

    2012-05-01

    Genomic instability in colorectal cancer (CRC) occurs as either microsatellite instability (MSI) or chromosomal instability. The present study was aimed at examining the MSI for the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in normal colon and polyps, if detected. Four segments of the colon were sampled in 102 subjects during colonoscopy. DNA samples were analyzed for the MSI status according to the Bethesda consensus panel. Family history of any type of cancer or for colon cancer was present in 44.8% and 9.4% of the individuals, respectively. Forty-eight percent of individuals were microsatellite stable for all five markers at all locations, 20% had low MSI status (MSI-L), and 32% had high MSI status (MSI-H). The frequencies of MSI markers differed significantly from each other (p=0.003). The most frequent positive marker was D17S250. This is the first study which revealed that MSI is present in endoscopically normal-looking colon of normal individuals and, more frequently, in individuals with family histories of CRC. The detection of very early-stage CRC is possible by MSI analysis of DNA mismatch repair genes in colon tissues. This study has revealed crucial information for the use of molecular tests in CRC screening, such as high frequencies of MSI in endoscopically normal colon, which might cause false positivity.

  12. Endoscopic management of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: practice, principles and strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Vivek A; Rai, Praveer; Kumar, Tarun; Mohindra, Samir; Dhiman, Radha K

    2014-02-01

    Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) is the presence of typical cholangiographic changes in patients with a portal cavernoma due to chronic portal vein thrombosis, in the absence of other biliary tract diseases. Probably due to biliary stasis related to the cavernoma, there is a high incidence of biliary sludge and calculi in PCC, which trigger symptoms that resolve with appropriate interventions. Persistent and troublesome symptoms are usually due to biliary stenoses or strictures, which may occur with or without biliary calculi and may be short or long, solitary or multifocal, extrahepatic or intrahepatic. Experience with endoscopic interventions in PCC over the last twenty years has shown that it is the procedure of choice for bile duct calculi. Plastic stenting with repeated, timely, stent exchanges is the first line intervention for jaundice or cholangitis due to biliary strictures. If biliary obstruction does not resolve, portosystemic shunt surgery (PSS) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) is performed to decompress the portal cavernoma. However, for patients with non-shuntable veins or blocked shunts, repeated plastic stent exchanges are the only option though there are reports of the use of biliary self-expandable metal stents in this situation. If symptomatic biliary obstruction persists after successful PSS or TIPS, second stage biliary surgery may be necessary. Recent experience suggests that treating biliary strictures in PCC on the lines of postoperative benign biliary strictures with balloon dilatation and repeated exchanges of plastic stent bundles may be effective therapy. Endoscopic management appears to be associated with an increased frequency of hemobilia, which usually responds to standard management. Recurrent cholangitis with formation of sludge and concretions may be a problem with repeated stent exchanges, especially if patient compliance is poor. In conclusion, the current understanding is that symptomatic PCC

  13. Endoscopic treatment of sporadic small duodenal and ampullary neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gincul, Rodica; Ponchon, Thierry; Napoleon, Bertrand; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Guillaud, Olivier; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Lepilliez, Vincent; Pioche, Mathieu; Lefort, Christine; Adham, Mustapha; Pialat, Jean; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain; Walter, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Background and study aim: As duodenal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare, their optimal management has not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of endoscopic treatment of duodenal NETs. Patients and methods: We reviewed the files of all patients who underwent endoscopic resection of a sporadic duodenal or ampullary NET between 1996 and 2014 at two centers. Results: A total of 29 patients with 32 uT1N0M0 NETs < 20 mm were included. Treatment consisted of endoscopic mucosal resection in 19 cases, and cap aspiration in 13 cases. Prior submucosal saline injection was used in 15 cases. Mortality was 3 % (one severe bleeding). Morbidity was 38 % (11/29). At post-resection analysis, mean tumor size was 8.9 mm (range 3 - 17 mm), 29 lesions were stage pT1, one was pT2, and 2 were pTx because of piecemeal resection. All NETs were well differentiated. A total of 27 lesions were classified as grade 1 and 5 were grade 2. The resection was R0, R1, and Rx for 16, 14, and 2 lesions, respectively. Three R1 patients underwent additional surgical treatment, with no residual tumor on the surgical specimen but with positive metastatic lymph nodes in two cases. One patient was lost to follow-up. Finally, 24 patients were included in the follow-up analysis. The median follow-up period was 56 months (range 6 - 175 months). Two patients presented a tumor recurrence during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Endoscopic treatment of small duodenal NETs was associated with significant morbidity, a difficulty in obtaining an R0 specimen, and the risk of lymph node metastasis. Nevertheless, it represents an interesting alternative in small grade 1 duodenal lesions and in patients at high surgical risk. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Minimal form factor digital-image sensor for endoscopic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäny, Martin; Voltz, Stephan; Gaspar, Fabio; Chen, Lei

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a digital image sensor SOC featuring a total chip area (including dicing tolerances) of 0.34mm2 for endoscopic applications. Due to this extremely small form factor the sensor enables integration in endoscopes, guide wires and locater devices of less than 1mm outer diameter. The sensor embeds a pixel matrix of 10'000 pixels with a pitch of 3um x 3um covered with RGB filters in Bayer pattern. The sensor operates fully autonomous, controlled by an on chip ring oscillator and readout state machine, which controls integration AD conversion and data transmission, thus the sensor only requires 4 pin's for power supply and data communication. The sensor provides a frame rate of 40Frames per second over a LVDS serial data link. The endoscopic application requires that the sensor must work without any local power decoupling capacitances at the end of up to 2m cabling and be able to sustain data communication over the same wire length without deteriorating image quality. This has been achieved by implementation of a current mode successive approximation ADC and current steering LVDS data transmission. An band gap circuit with -40dB PSRR at the data frequency was implemented as on chip reference to improve robustness against power supply ringing due to the high series inductance of the long cables. The B&W versions of the sensor provides a conversion gain of 30DN/nJ/cm2 at 550nm with a read noise in dark of 1.2DN when operated at 2m cable. Using the photon transfer method according to EMVA1288 standard the full well capacity was determined to be 18ke-. According to our knowledge the presented work is the currently world smallest fully digital image sensor. The chip was designed along with a aspheric single surface lens to assemble on the chip without increasing the form factor. The extremely small form factor of the resulting camera permit's to provide visualization with much higher than state of the art spatial resolution in sub 1mm endoscopic

  15. Design of wormlike automated robotic endoscope: dynamic interaction between endoscopic balloon and surrounding tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Carmen C Y; Leung, Billy; Chan, Cecilia K W; Lau, James Y W; Chiu, Philip W Y

    2016-02-01

    The current design of capsule endoscope is limited by the inability to control the motion within gastrointestinal tract. The rising incidence of gastrointestinal cancers urged improvement in the method of screening endoscopy. This preclinical study aimed to design and develop a novel locomotive module for capsule endoscope. We investigated the feasibility and physical properties of this newly designed caterpillar-like capsule endoscope with a view to enhancing screening endoscopy. This study consisted of preclinical design and experimental testing on the feasibility of automated locomotion for a prototype caterpillar endoscope. The movement was examined first in the PVC tube and then in porcine intestine. The image captured was transmitted to handheld device to confirm the control of movement. The balloon pressure and volume as well as the contact force between the balloon and surroundings were measured when the balloon was inflated inside (1) a hard PVC tube, (2) a soft PVC tube, (3) muscular sites of porcine colons and (4) less muscular sites of porcine colons. The prototype caterpillar endoscope was able to move inward and backward within the PVC tubing and porcine intestine. Images were able to be captured from the capsule endoscope attached and being observed with a handheld device. Using the onset of a contact force as indication of the buildup of the gripping force between the balloon and the lumen walls, it is concluded from the results of this study that the rate of change in balloon pressure and volume is two good estimators to optimize the inflation of the balloon. The results of this study will facilitate further refinement in the design of caterpillar robotic endoscope to move inside the GI tract.

  16. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Hee; Jeon, Seong Soo

    2013-07-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) is relatively uncommon. Radical nephroureterectomy with an ipsilateral bladder cuff excision has been the gold standard treatment for UTUC. However, recent advances in technology have made possible the increased use of endoscopic management for the treatment of UTUC. The definitive goal of endoscopic management of UTUC is cancer control while maintaining renal function and the integrity of the urinary tract. Endoscopic management includes both the retrograde ureteroscopic and antegrade percutaneous approaches. The endoscopic management of UTUC is a reasonable alternative for patients with renal insufficiency or a solitary functional kidney, bilateral disease, or a significant comorbidity that precludes radical surgery. Select patients with a functional contralateral kidney who have low-grade, low-stage tumors may also be candidates for endoscopic management. The careful selection of patients is the most important point for the successful endoscopic management of UTUC. It is crucial that patients are compliant and motivated, because a lifetime protocol of strict surveillance is necessary. Adjuvant topical therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin or mitomycin C can be used after endoscopic management of UTUC in an attempt to reduce recurrence. In this article, we review current endoscopic techniques, indications for endoscopic treatment, clinical outcomes of endoscopic management, adjuvant topical therapy, and surveillance in patients with UTUC.

  17. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin for redness, odor, pain, puss, or swelling. Make sure the stitches are still in place. Use the clean towel or Q-tip to clean the skin around the J-tube 1 to 3 times a day with mild soap and water. Try to remove any drainage or crusting on ...

  18. Endoscopic diode laser therapy for chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Lino; Marini, Lucia; Rizzato, Roberto; Picardi, Edgardo; Merigliano, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of endoscopic diode laser therapy in patients presenting rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis (CRP). A retrospective analysis of CRP patients who underwent diode laser therapy in a single institution between 2010 and 2016 was carried out. The patients were treated by non-contact fibers without sedation in an outpatient setting. Fourteen patients (median age 77, range 73-87 years) diagnosed with CRP who had undergone high-dose radiotherapy for prostatic cancer and who presented with rectal bleeding were included. Six required blood transfusions. Antiplatelet (three patients) and anticoagulant (two patients) therapy was not suspended during the treatments. The patients underwent a median of two sessions; overall, a mean of 1684 J of laser energy per session was used. Bleeding was resolved in 10/14 (71%) patients, and other two patients showed improvement (93%). Only one patient, who did not complete the treatment, required blood transfusions after laser therapy; no complications were noted during or after the procedures. Study findings demonstrated that endoscopic non-contact diode laser treatment is safe and effective in CRP patients, even in those receiving antiplatelet and/or anticoagulant therapy.

  19. Endoscopic approach for a laryngeal neoplasm in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal and tracheal tumors are rare in pets; some piece of information on their disease behavior, therapy and evolution are limited. Neoplasms in this area are a diagnostic challenge. In many cases, they can be biopsied and excised using endoscopic instruments, but there is no report of this in canines. The goal of this study is to report a successful case of a laryngeal neoplasm removal through endoscopy. A head and neck radiogram revealed a mass in the laryngeal lumen protruding into the trachea. The patient then underwent an endoscopy to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and to surgically remove the tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated carcinoma. The most appropriate treatment for laryngeal tumors is the resection of the submucosa or a partial laryngectomy however, partial and total laryngectomies are associated with many postoperative complications. In contrast, the endoscopic approach allows for highly magnified visualization of the lesion in situ, which facilitates the surgical removal of the mass through videosurgery. With little manipulation of the affected area, the chances of postoperative complications are reduced, leading to a more rapid recovery.

  20. Endoscopic Assessment of Early Neoplasia in the Gastrointestinal Tract

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    P. Didden

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic detection and evaluation of early neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract should be carried out by systematic assessment of a standard set of lesional characteristics. First of all, attention should be given to the microvasculature and pit pattern of the mucosal surface. These features can distinguish neoplastic from non-neoplastic lesions and are used to assess the presence of dysplasia or malignancy. High resolution endoscopy combined with narrow band imaging usually provides sufficient detailed visualisation for characterisation. Secondly, estimating the risk of invasion beyond the mucosal layer is important, because the depth of invasion corresponds to the risk of lymph node metastasis. This prediction can be based on the gross morphology according to the Paris classification, but also size, the presence of converging folds with clubbing, ulceration and discoloration are considered predictive characteristics. This editorial provides a practical approach to assessing early neoplasia in the gastrointestinal tract. We would encourage endoscopists to appreciate these features systematically before proceeding to endoscopic or even surgical resection.

  1. Endoscope-assisted facelift thyroid surgery: an initial experience using a new endoscopic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Ook; Kim, Sang-Yeon; Chun, Byung-Joon; Joo, Young-Hoon; Cho, Kwang-Jae; Park, Young Hak; Kim, Min-Sik; Sun, Dong-Il

    2015-06-01

    A new approach to modifying facelift incision was recently developed for robotic thyroid surgery that seemed to be advantageous over other existing approaches. In this study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of the facelift approach not only for robotic thyroid surgery, but also for endoscope-assisted thyroid surgery. Endoscope-assisted facelift thyroid lobectomy was performed for 11 patients with papillary microcarcinoma. All 11 operations were successfully performed endoscopically. This approach through a modified facelift incision provided safe dissection of the laryngeal nerves and exposed an adequate working space. We identified and preserved all neighboring critical structures (parathyroid gland and superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves) during surgery. The operative duration for simple thyroid lobectomy with central lymph node dissection in 11 patients was 120-180 min (average duration: 140 min). Sensory change around the earlobe occurred in three patients and was recovered within 2 months after surgery in all patients. No patient displayed laryngeal nerve palsy or a low-pitched voice. The facelift approach seems to provide a shorter and more direct route to the thyroid, requiring minimal dissection, and an adequate workspace not only for robotic surgery but also for endoscopic surgery. It is worthwhile to develop and refine the surgical techniques of endoscopic facelift thyroid surgery.

  2. Surface mosaics of the bladder reconstructed from endoscopic video for automated surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Timothy D; Porter, Michael P; Seibel, Eric J

    2012-06-01

    Flexible cystoscopy is frequently performed for recurrent bladder cancer surveillance, making it the most expensive cancer to treat over the patient's lifetime. An automated bladder surveillance system is being developed to robotically scan the bladder surface using an ultrathin and highly flexible endoscope. Such a system would allow cystoscopic procedures to be overseen by technical staff while urologists could review cystoscopic video postoperatively. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for reconstructing the surface of the whole bladder from endoscopic video using structure from motion. Video is acquired from a custom ultrathin and highly flexible endoscope that can retroflex to image the entire internal surface of the bladder. Selected frames are subsequently stitched into a mosaic and mapped to a reconstructed surface, creating a 3-D surface model of the bladder that can be expediently reviewed. Our software was tested on endoscopic video of an excised pig bladder. The resulting reconstruction possessed a projection error of 1.66 pixels on average and covered 99.6% of the bladder surface area.

  3. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jin Jeon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures.

  4. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-03-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures.

  5. Endoscopic release of the cubital tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, Horst; Momeni, Arash

    2014-02-01

    It is safe to say that in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve in cubital tunnel syndrome has been demonstrated to achieve equivalent functional results when compared with more elaborate techniques, such as decompression with nerve transposition. The evolution toward procedures associated with less patient morbidity is reflected by the introduction of endoscopic techniques for the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. The authors have incorporated the endoscopic approach as proposed by Hoffmann and Siemionow into their practice and have obtained favorable results. Although the skin incision can frequently be kept to a minimum (<2 cm), superior visualization associated with this approach allows for in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve along a distance of up to 30 cm. Despite the extent of decompression performed, operative morbidity is minimal, with return to full duty being the rule even in manual laborers within 10 to 14 days postoperatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Percutaneus Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Intensive Care Unit

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    Demet Tok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the early 1980s, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG technique has been used to create a reliable route for long term enteral feeding in cri0,0tically ill patients. Our goals were to determine the complications of PEG in ICU patients.We evaluated the data of 13 intensive care unit patients undergoing bedside PEG for gastric tube placement using the “pull” technique. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was completed and gastric tube was placed successfully in all patients. Tubes remained in stomach from 13 to 831 days (mean 146 days. Six patients died because of the reasons unrelated to the PEG tube and seven patients were discharged from the hospital while being fed via the PEG. Nutritional intolerance (in 4 patients and bleeding (in 3 patients were observed and could be eradicated by appropriate maintenance. Bleeding was the main PEG complication observed in critically ill patients.

  7. Comprehensive review on endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rainer K.; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Endonasal endoscopic sinus surgery is the standard procedure for surgery of most paranasal sinus diseases. Appropriate frame conditions provided, the respective procedures are safe and successful. These prerequisites encompass appropriate technical equipment, anatomical oriented surgical technique, proper patient selection, and individually adapted extent of surgery. The range of endonasal sinus operations has dramatically increased during the last 20 years and reaches from partial uncinectomy to pansinus surgery with extended surgery of the frontal (Draf type III), maxillary (grade 3–4, medial maxillectomy, prelacrimal approach) and sphenoid sinus. In addition there are operations outside and beyond the paranasal sinuses. The development of surgical technique is still constantly evolving. This article gives a comprehensive review on the most recent state of the art in endoscopic sinus surgery according to the literature with the following aspects: principles and fundamentals, surgical techniques, indications, outcome, postoperative care, nasal packing and stents, technical equipment. PMID:26770282

  8. [Endoscopic ureterolithotripsy with the holmium laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Mazo, E B; Chepurov, A K; Dondukov, Ts V; Safarov, R M; Dreval', A A

    1997-01-01

    One of the clinical and experimental investigations performed in the urological clinic of the Moscow Medical University and Research Institute of Urology aimed at elucidation of Ho-YAG-laser potential in endoscopic lithotripsy (EL). Russian Ho-YAG laser surgical units CTH-10 and LLT-3 with wave length 2.09 mu were employed. The studies showed that the developed laser units satisfied relevant medical and technical requirements. Low depth of laser impulse penetration (0.4 mm) obtained at EL warrants safety of the adjacent tissues which is essential in crushing fixed ureteroliths in the presence of severe inflammation in the ureteral wall. The conclusion is made that Ho-YAG laser EL is an effective treatment of ureteroliths. Further tests for EL efficacy in affections of the upper urinary tracts are advocated to define a proper place of EL in endoscopic urology.

  9. Current endoscopic approach to indeterminate biliary strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, David W; Sherman, Stuart; Karakan, Tarkan; Khashab, Mouen A

    2012-01-01

    Biliary strictures are considered indeterminate when basic work-up, including transabdominal imaging and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with routine cytologic brushing, are non-diagnostic. Indeterminate biliary strictures can easily be mischaracterized which may dramatically affect patient’s outcome. Early and accurate diagnosis of malignancy impacts not only a patient’s candidacy for surgery, but also potential timely targeted chemotherapies. A significant portion of patients with indeterminate biliary strictures have benign disease and accurate diagnosis is, thus, paramount to avoid unnecessary surgery. Current sampling strategies have suboptimal accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy. Emerging data on other diagnostic modalities, such as ancillary cytology techniques, single operator cholangioscopy, and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration, revealed promising results with much improved sensitivity. PMID:23180939

  10. Endoscopic Versus Open Cubital Tunnel Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldekhayel, Salah; Govshievich, Alexander; Lee, James; Tahiri, Youssef; Luc, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several surgical techniques exist for treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release (ECTuR) has been recently reported as a promising minimally invasive technique. This study aims to compare outcomes and complications of open cubital tunnel release (OCTuR) and ECTuR in the treatment of idiopathic cubital tunnel syndrome. Methods: A systematic review of the literature (1980-2014) identified 118 citations. Studies including adults with idiopathic cubital tunnel treated exclusively by ECTuR or OCTuR were included. Outcomes of interest were postoperative grading, complications, number of reoperations, and the need for intraoperative conversion to another technique. Postoperative outcomes were combined into a uniform scale with 4 categories: “excellent,” “good,” “fair,” and “poor.” Results: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria (17 observational and 3 comparative), representing 425 open and 556 endoscopic decompressions. In the open group, 79.8% experienced “good” or “excellent” results with 12% complication rate and 2.8% reoperation rate. In the endoscopic group, 81.8% experienced “good” or “excellent” results with 9% complication rate and 1.6% reoperation rate. Meta-analysis of 3 comparative studies demonstrated a significantly lower overall complication rate with ECTuR. Subgroup analysis of complications revealed a significantly higher incidence of scar tenderness and elbow pain with OCTuR. Conclusions: The current study demonstrates similar effectiveness between the endoscopic (ECTuR) and open (OCTuR) techniques for treatment of idiopathic cubital tunnel syndrome with similar outcomes, complication profiles, and reoperation rates. PMID:27418887

  11. BIODEGRADABLE NASAL TAMPONADE DURING ENDONASAL ENDOSCOPIC DACRYOCYSTORHINOSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Shlyakhtov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the efficacy of novel biodegradable Nasopore® nasal dressing for bleeding prevention in postoperative period after endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy.Patients and methods. Two cohorts of patients who underwent endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy were analyzed. In these patients, the area of rhinostoma was plugged with biodegradable Nasopore® or non-biodegradable Merocel® nasal dressing to prevent bleeding. 37 women and 9 men (mean age 56 years underwent the surgery which was performed under anesthetic using standard technology and endoscopic instruments. Nasopore® and Merocel® were used in 20 and 26 cases, respectively. Re-bleeding rate and the presence of post-operative discomfort were assessed. Specifics of nasal mucosa regeneration, formation of granulations, synechiae, and membranes in the area of nasolacrimal anastamosis were noted.Results. Efficacy of nasal dressing was assessed in the first week after the surgery. In group 1 (Nasopore®, no nasal bleeding was observed and no re-tamponade was required. In group 2 (Merocel®, nasal bleeding occurred in 10 cases (38.4% after nasal dressing removal, and re-tamponade was performed in 8 patients (30.8%. Main disadvantage of Merocel® is the «sawing» effect due to the pore texture of its surface. This property resulted in the bleeding after nasal dressing removal. None of group 1 patients complained of severe discomfort while 19% of group 2 patients experienced significant discomfort.Conclusions. Biodegradable Nasopore® nasal dressing use in endonasal endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy prevents recurrent post-operative nasal bleedings, decreases patient discomfort, provides better anatomical and functional outcomes and improves quality of life and medical social rehabilitation. 

  12. Quantum-Non-Demolition Endoscopic Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Fortunato, Mauro; Tombesi, Paolo; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    1998-01-01

    We present a new indirect method to measure the quantum state of a single mode of the electromagnetic field in a cavity. Our proposal combines the idea of (endoscopic) probing and that of tomography in the sense that the signal field is coupled via a quantum-non-demolition Hamiltonian to a meter field on which then quantum state tomography is performed using balanced homodyne detection. This technique provides full information about the signal state. We also discuss the influence of the measu...

  13. Endoscopic variceal ligation-induced ulcer bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of endoscopic variceal ligation-(EVL) induced ulcer bleeding. The prevalence of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding is reported to be 3.6%. However, there are only limited reports of this serious complication, and the risk factors and the treatment methods are not well established. A total of 430 patients who had undergone EVL in Chonnam National University Hospital from January 2014 to October 2016 were studied. EVL was performed for prophylaxis or acute hemorrhage. The patients were classified into 2 groups: a bleeding group (n = 33) and a non-bleeding group (n = 397). The patients who had endoscopically confirmed EVL-induced ulcer bleeding were included in the bleeding group. EVL-induced ulcer bleeding occurred in 7.7% (n = 33) of the patients. In a multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >10 (odds ratio [OR]: 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10–10.64), concomitant GV F3 (OR: 14.1, 95% CI: 2.84–71.43), and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy (OR: 8.06, 95% CI: 2.55–25.64) were independent predictive factors of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. Various endoscopic modalities were attempted for hemostasis (EVL in 8 cases [24.2%], endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in 6 cases [18.2%], argon plasma coagulation [APC] in 1 case (3%), Sengstaken–Blakemore (SB) tube in 3 cases [9.1%]), and proton pump inhibitor therapy only in 15 cases (45.5%). MELD score >10, concomitant GV F3, and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy are risk factors for EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. PMID:28614248

  14. Endoscopic Evaluation of the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Shields

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological achievements in the area of endoscope design and development have resulted in instruments capable of advancing beyond the reach of simple gastroscopes. Such instruments, known as enteroscopes, form the bases of small bowel endoscopy. Recent widespread use of enteroscopes have contributed significantly to the understanding of small intestinal pathology and improved the ability to diagnose and treat patients with intestinal bleeding sources.

  15. Endoscopic vs microscopic myringoplasty: a different perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lade, Himani; Choudhary, Santosha Ram; Vashishth, Ashish

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to ascertain the feasibility of transcanal endoscopic underlay myringoplasty using temporalis fascia and compare the results with microscopic myringoplasty. This prospective randomized trial included 60 patients with mucosal chronic otitis media with tympanic membrane perforations of all sizes and locations apart from posteriorly based small or moderate sized perforations. In the endoscopy group, 30 patients underwent exclusive transcanal myringoplasty using tympanomeatal flap elevation with underlay graft placement. In the microscopy group, 30 patients underwent myringoplasty using the postaural approach. Intra-operative variables compared were canalplasty and canal wall curettage for assessment of ossicular status. Graft uptake, hearing outcomes using pure tone audiometry and subjective cosmetic outcomes were assessed 24 weeks post-operatively and compared in the two groups. Resident feedback on the feasibility of endoscopic myringoplasty was obtained using a questionnaire. In the microscopy group, 5/30 patients required canalplasty due to canal overhangs and 4/30 required canal wall curettage for ossicular assessment, whereas none of the patients in the endoscopy group required these procedures. A graft uptake rate of 83.3% was observed in both groups post-operatively after 24 weeks. Mean air-bone gap pre- and post-operatively in the endoscopy group was 28.5 and 18.13 dB, respectively, whereas these values were 32.4 and 16.9 dB, respectively, in the microscopy group. Subjective cosmetic outcomes were better in the endoscopy group. Resident feedback on endoscopic myringoplasty was positive. Endoscopic myringoplasty appears to be an effective alternative to microscopic myringoplasty and results in excellent hearing with good cosmetic outcomes.

  16. [Endoscopic implantation of endoprostheses in incurable esophageal and cardia cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenhaken, U; Rogos, R

    1990-03-01

    The palliative treatment of tumorous stenosis of the esophagus and cardio-esophageal region by intubation with an endoprosthesis leads to an improved quality of life. The used endoscopic positioning provides better results than the surgical procedure. This method is easy in handling and has only few complications. The endoscopic positioning of endoprosthesis is also a really alternative of alimentary fistula. The positioning of plastic prosthesis under endoscopic control should be given preference in the palliative treatment of obstructing cardio-esophageal malignancy.

  17. Rectal laterally spreading tumors successfully treated in two steps by endoscopic submucosal dissection and endoscopic mucosal resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Giovanni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy alternative to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms >2 cm. ESD allows for the direct dissection of the submucosa and large lesions can be resected en bloc. ESD is not limited by resection size, increases histologically complete resection rates and may reduce the local recurrence. Nevertheless, the technique is time-consuming, technically demanding and associated with a high complication rate. To reduce the risk of complications, different devices and technical advances have been proposed with conflicting results and, still, ESD en bloc resections of huge lesions are associated with increased complications. Case Presentation We successfully used a combined ESD/EMR technique for huge rectal laterally spreading tumors (LSTs. ESD was used for circumferential resection of 2/3 of the lesion followed by piecemeal resection (2-3 pieces of the central part of the tumour. In all three patients we obtained the complete dissection of the polyp and the complete histological evaluation in absence of complications and recurrence at 6 months' follow up. Conclusions In the treatment of rectal LSTs, the combined treatment - ESD/EMR resection may be considered a suitable therapeutic option, indicated in selected cases as an alternative to surgery, in which the two techniques are neither reliable nor safe separately. However, to confirm our results, larger trials with longer follow up are required together with improvement of the technique and of the technical devices.

  18. Treatment of nonseptic bursitis with endoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Yıldırım

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to show that endoscopic surgery is a simple and acceptable method for various problems associated with wounds, range of motion and that such surgery ensures an early return to work after treatment of nonresponding nonseptic bursitis. Methods: Thirty-two patients with nonseptic bursitis caused by repeated minor trauma that did not respond to medical treatment from 2008 to 2012 were included in this study. Radiographic [anteroposterior and lateral], ultrasound, macro and microscopic analyses of drainage liquid and aerobic and anaerobic cultures were obtained from the patients for the diagnosis. Results: The mean age was 40.8 years. Fifteen patients had prepatellar bursitis, 13 had olecranon bursitis and 4 had ankle bursitis. Two patients had a history of falling on their knee. The other patients had a history of repetitive stimulation .The mean follow up period was 2.6 years [range. 2-5 years] and no medical complications occurred after the endoscopic surgery; such as scarring, loss of sensation and infection. One recurrence in response to medical treatment was observed. Conclusion: Endoscopic bursectomy is a short and acceptable procedure with excellent results in terms of returning to work early and minimal wound related problems. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 220-223

  19. Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, H; Minami, H; Kobayashi, Y; Sato, Y; Kaga, M; Suzuki, M; Satodate, H; Odaka, N; Itoh, H; Kudo, S

    2010-04-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was developed by our group to provide a less invasive permanent treatment for esophageal achalasia. POEM was performed in 17 consecutive patients with achalasia (10 men, 7 women; mean age 41.4 years). A long submucosal tunnel was created (mean length 12.4 cm), followed by endoscopic myotomy of circular muscle bundles of a mean total length of 8.1 cm (6.1 cm in distal esophagus and 2.0 cm in cardia). Smooth passage of an endoscope through the gastroesophageal junction was confirmed at the end of the procedure. In all cases POEM significantly reduced the dysphagia symptom score (from mean 10 to 1.3; P = 0.0003) and the resting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure (from mean 52.4 mmHg to 19.9 mmHg; P = 0.0001). No serious complications related to POEM were encountered. During follow-up (mean 5 months), additional treatment or medication was necessary in only one patient (case 17) who developed reflux esophagitis (Los Angeles classification B); this was well controlled with regular intake of protein pump inhibitors (PPIs). The short-term outcome of POEM for achalasia was excellent; further studies on long-term efficacy and on comparison of POEM with other interventional therapies are awaited. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  20. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis: A Rare Endoscopic Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lopes de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old woman, presenting with a 4-year history of progressive dysphagia, was submitted to endoscopic examination. The upper endoscopy revealed a proximal esophageal stricture and inflammatory mucosa associated with multiples small orifices in the esophageal wall, some of them fulfilled with white spots suggestive of fungal infection. This was a typical endoscopic finding of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a benign and rare condition, related to chronic esophagitis and others comorbid states, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease or infectious esophagitis, diabetes mellitus, alcohol consumption, and achalasia. Dysphagia is the predominant symptom and can be accompanied by esophageal stricture in 80% to 90% of patients. The pathogenesis is unknown, and as the pseudodiverticulosis is an intramural finding, endoscopy biopsies are inconclusive. The main histological finding is dilation of the submucosal glands excretory ducts, probably obstructed by inflammatory cells. The treatment consists in management of the underlying diseases and symptoms relief. In this particular case, the patient was submitted to antifungal drugs followed by endoscopic dilation with thermoplastic bougies, with satisfactory improvement of dysphagia.

  1. Frontiers of robotic endoscopic capsules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuti, Gastone; Caliò, R; Camboni, D; Neri, L; Bianchi, F; Arezzo, A; Koulaouzidis, A; Schostek, S; Stoyanov, D; Oddo, C M; Magnani, B; Menciassi, A; Morino, M; Schurr, M O; Dario, P

    2016-01-01

    Digestive diseases are a major burden for society and healthcare systems, and with an aging population, the importance of their effective management will become critical. Healthcare systems worldwide already struggle to insure quality and affordability of healthcare delivery and this will be a significant challenge in the midterm future. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE), introduced in 2000 by Given Imaging Ltd., is an example of disruptive technology and represents an attractive alternative to traditional diagnostic techniques. WCE overcomes conventional endoscopy enabling inspection of the digestive system without discomfort or the need for sedation. Thus, it has the advantage of encouraging patients to undergo gastrointestinal (GI) tract examinations and of facilitating mass screening programmes. With the integration of further capabilities based on microrobotics, e.g. active locomotion and embedded therapeutic modules, WCE could become the key-technology for GI diagnosis and treatment. This review presents a research update on WCE and describes the state-of-the-art of current endoscopic devices with a focus on research-oriented robotic capsule endoscopes enabled by microsystem technologies. The article also presents a visionary perspective on WCE potential for screening, diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures.

  2. Endoscopic transnasal approach for removing pituitary tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Cabral Moreira de Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To describe a series of 129 consecutive patients submitted to the resection of pituitary tumors using the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach in a public medical center. Method: Retrospective analysis based on the records of patients submitted to the resection of a pituitary tumor through the endoscopic transsphenoidal approach between 2004 and 2009. Results: One hundred and twenty-nine records were analyzed. The tumor was non-secreting in 96 (74.42% and secreting in 33 patients (22.58%. Out of the secretory tumors, the most prevalent was the growth hormone producer (7.65%, followed by the prolactinoma, (6.98%. Eleven patients developed cerebral spinal fluid (CSF fistulas, and four of them developed meningitis. One patient died due to intracerebral hemorrhage in the postoperative period. Conclusion: The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to sellar tumors proved to be safe when the majority of the tumors were non-secreting. The most frequent complication was CSF. This technique can be done even in a public hospital with financial limits, since the health professionals are integrated.

  3. Endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate glue versus other endoscopic procedures for acute bleeding gastric varices in people with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Castellanos, Eddy; Seron, Pamela; Gisbert, Javier P; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2015-05-12

    trial sequential analyses to evaluate the robustness of the overall results, risk of bias, sources of intertrial heterogeneity, and risk of random errors. We included six randomised clinical trials with three different comparisons: one trial compared two different doses of cyanoacrylate in 91 adults, bleeding actively from all types of gastric varices; one trial compared cyanoacrylate versus alcohol-based compounds in 37 adults with active or acute bleeding from isolated gastric varices only; and four trials compared cyanoacrylate versus endoscopic band ligation in 365 adults, with active or acute bleeding from all types of gastric varices. Main outcomes in the included trials were bleeding-related mortality, failure of intervention, re-bleeding, adverse events, and control of bleeding. Follow-up varied from six to 26 months. The participants included in these trials had chronic liver disease of different severities, were predominantly men, and most were from Eastern countries. We judged all trials at high risk of bias. Application of quality criteria for all outcomes yielded very low quality grade of the evidence in the three analyses, except for the low quality evidence rated for the re-bleeding outcome in the cyanoacrylate versus endoscopic band ligation comparison. Two different doses of cyanoacrylate: we found very low quality evidence from one trial for the effect of 0.5 mL compared with 1.0 mL of cyanoacrylate on all-cause mortality (20/44 (45.5%) with 0.5 mL versus 21/47 (45%) with 1.0 mL; RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.60), 30-day mortality (RR 1.07; 95% CI 0.41 to 2.80), failure of intervention (RR 1.07; 95% CI 0.56 to 2.05), prevention of re-bleeding (RR 1.30; 95% CI 0.73 to 2.31), adverse events reported as fever (RR 0.56; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.98), and control of bleeding (RR 1.04; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.38). Cyanoacrylate versus alcohol-based compounds: we found very low quality evidence from one trial for the effect of cyanoacrylate versus alcohol-based compounds on 30

  4. Endoscopic removal of a dislocated tumour prothesis from the stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueckauer, K.; Dinkel, E.

    1985-09-01

    Endoscopic pertubation of oesophagogustric neoplasms is an established method of palliative treatment. The dislocated plastic prosthesis may be removed with difficulties from the stomach endoscopically. A simple technique for endoscopic removal of the prosthesis is described. The tube can be precisely centred within the oesophageal lumen by use of an intestinal decompression tube and additional guidance by the endoscopic retraction forceps. Thus gross damge of the exophytic tumor tissue with bleeding or perforation sequelae can be avoided. Injury to the patient does not exceed that caused by an ordinary gastroscopy.

  5. Nefopam Reduces Dysesthesia after Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ok, Young Min; Cheon, Ji Hyun; Choi, Eun Ji; Chang, Eun Jung; Lee, Ho Myung; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain, including paresthesia/dysesthesia in the lower extremities, always develops and remains for at least one month, to variable degrees, after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD...

  6. Supercontinuum as a light source for miniaturized endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, M K; Lin, H Y; Hsieh, C C; Kao, F J

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we have successfully implemented supercontinuum based illumination through single fiber coupling. The integration of a single fiber illumination with a miniature CMOS sensor forms a very slim and powerful camera module for endoscopic imaging. A set of tests and in vivo animal experiments are conducted accordingly to characterize the corresponding illuminance, spectral profile, intensity distribution, and image quality. The key illumination parameters of the supercontinuum, including color rendering index (CRI: 72%~97%) and correlated color temperature (CCT: 3,100K~5,200K), are modified with external filters and compared with those from a LED light source (CRI~76% & CCT~6,500K). The very high spatial coherence of the supercontinuum allows high luminosity conduction through a single multimode fiber (core size~400μm), whose distal end tip is attached with a diffussion tip to broaden the solid angle of illumination (from less than 10° to more than 80°).

  7. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal......The development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has had a significant impact for patients with digestive diseases, enabling enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with most of the available evidence focusing on upper gastrointestinal (GI) and pancreatico-biliary diseases. For the lower GI...... developments other EUS applications for colorectal diseases have been also envisaged and are currently under investigation, including beyond-rectum tumour staging by means of the newly developed forward-viewing radial array echoendoscope. Due to its high resolution, EUS might be also regarded as an ideal...

  8. Endoscopic ulcers as a surrogate marker of NSAID-induced mucosal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The characteristic of a biomarker that makes it a useful surrogate is the ability to identify a high risk of clinically important benefits or harms occurring in the future. A number of definitions or descriptions of surrogate definition have been put forward. Most recently the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in the USA has put forward an evaluation scheme for biomarkers, looking at validation (assay performance), qualification (assessment of evidence), and utilisation (the context in which the surrogate is to be used). This paper examines the example of endoscopy as a surrogate marker of NSAID-induced mucosal damage using the Institute of Medicine criteria. The article finds extensive evidence that the detection of endoscopic ulcers is a valid marker. The process of qualification documents abundant evidence showing that endoscopic ulcers and serious upper gastrointestinal damage are influenced in the same direction and much the same magnitude by a variety of risk factors and interventions. Criticisms of validation and qualification for endoscopic ulcers have been examined, and dismissed. Context is the key, and in the context of serious NSAID-induced upper gastrointestinal harm, endoscopic ulcers represent a useful surrogate. Generalisability beyond this context is not considered. PMID:24267380

  9. No significant association between halitosis and upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Adnan; Köklü, Seyfettin; Yüksel, Ilhami; Başar, Omer; Akbal, Erdem; Cimbek, Ahmet

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have focused on the relationship between halitosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori. In this study we aimed to investigate the interaction between halitosis and upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings. Patients who previously had dyspepsia and had undergone endoscopic examination were included in the study. Symptoms of dyspepsia were investigated by means of a questionnaire that investigated halitosis. Patients who suffered from objective halitosis (confirmed by questions both to the patient and their relatives) were further investigated. Patients with known local or systemic causes of halitosis or structural disorders at endoscopy were excluded. The study included 358 patients (121 men and 237 women) with dyspeptic symptoms. The patients with and without halitosis had mean ages of (39.4 ± 13.5) and (43.1 ± 14.9) years, respectively. Patients without halitosis were significantly older than those in the halitosis group (P halitosis group had significantly higher frequencies of regurgitation, bloating and nausea (P halitosis. Endoscopic findings, including esophagitis, open cardia, hiatal hernia, gastritis and duodenitis, were comparable in the two groups. The frequency of halitosis was high in patients with dyspepsia who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Halitosis had a close relationship with several upper gastrointestinal symptoms, including regurgitation, nausea and bloating. There was no significant association between upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings and halitosis.

  10. Clinical analysis of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation for lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Yang Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect and safety of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation for lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion, in order to guide the clinical application.METHODS:Retrospective clinical study. Sixty-six patients(70 eyeswith lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion were selected as the research subjects. All patients were treated by endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation. The post-operation follow-up lasted for 3~24mo. Subjective feelings of patients were recorded through the collection of clinical data, out-patient follow-up and telephone follow-up. The operation effect and complications were observed, as well as the effect of treatment on complications. Meanwhile, the data was analyzed for evaluating the clinical efficacy of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation.RESULTS:Epiphora was disappeared or obviously improved in 68 eyes(97%, with lacrimal irrigating fluently and no obstacle. The post-operative complications included:51 eyes(73%with foreign body sensation in inner canthus, 22 eyes(31%with foreign body sensation in the nose occasionally, 4 eyes(6%with granulation tissue proliferation at the opening of common canaliculus, 16 eyes(23%with localized congestion of the bulbar conjunctiva, and 3 eyes(4%with lacrimal drainage tube out.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation can treat the lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion. This operation is characterized by high success rate, less complications, safe and efficient, and it is worth clinical promotion.

  11. Risk factors for synchronous or metachronous tumor development after endoscopic resection of gastric neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Sang Gyun; Choi, Jeongmin; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-10-01

    Despite many advantages, the development of synchronous or metachronous neoplasm is one of the main concerns with endoscopic resection. We aimed to clarify the independent risk factors for synchronous or metachronous gastric neoplasm. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who had undergone endoscopic resection for gastric high-grade dysplasia or early gastric cancer between April 2001 and February 2011. Among 971 subjects, 56 synchronous neoplasms and 42 metachronous neoplasms developed during 12-131 months of follow-up. In univariate analysis, age over 65 years, male gender, absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, lower third location, mucosal atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia were related to multiple gastric neoplasms. In multivariate analysis, absence of H. pylori infection [odds ratio (OR) 1.610, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.038-2.497)], lower third location (OR 1.704, 95 % CI 1.070-2.713), and intestinal metaplasia (OR 4.461, 95 % CI 1.382-14.401) were independent risk factors for multiple gastric neoplasms. For synchronous neoplasm, primary tumor size less than 1 cm was the only independent risk factor. For metachronous neoplasm, absence of H. pylori infection (OR 2.416, 95 % CI 1.214-4.810) was found to be the only independent risk factor. H. pylori eradication was found to be unrelated to the development of metachronous gastric neoplasms. For tumors located in the antrum and accompanied by intestinal metaplasia, meticulous endoscopic evaluation with close follow-up after endoscopic resection is recommended.

  12. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection.

  13. Assessing the risk of irrigation bottle and fluid contamination after endoscopic sinus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John M; Nayak, Jayakar V; Doghramji, Laurie L; Welch, Kevin C; Chiu, Alexander G

    2010-01-01

    Saline nasal irrigation has become an important aspect of post-operative care following endoscopic sinus surgery. The objective of this study was to identify the risks of contamination of both the nasal irrigation bottle and fluid following endoscopic sinus surgery. This was a prospective study of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic sinusitis. All patients were given nasal irrigation bottles with detailed cleaning instructions preoperatively. Nasal irrigation bottles were collected and cultured at 1 and 2 weeks postoperatively. During the same visit, 5-ml of sterile normal saline was mixed into the irrigation bottle and then cultured separately. A total of 20 patients agreed to participate in the study. At 1 week postoperatively, 50% of the bottles had positive cultures with 40% of the irrigation samples testing positive for bacteria. At two weeks, the contamination in the irrigation bottle and fluid decreased to 26.7% and 20%, respectively. The most common bacteria cultured was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There were no cases of postoperative infection. Despite detailed cleaning instructions, there is a relatively high risk of bacterial contamination in nasal irrigation bottles and fluid following endoscopic sinus surgery. Although these risks did not translate into higher infection rates postsurgery, it may be important for physicians to emphasize regular cleaning techniques to minimize a potential source of bacterial contaminant exposure.

  14. Have we Comprehensively Evaluated the Effectiveness of Endoscopic Screening for Gastric Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy has been increasingly used in clinical practice and as a standardized examination procedure for gastrointestinal diseases. However, only a few studies on endoscopic screening for evaluating mortality reduction from gastric cancer have been carried out. Even if a high detection rate is obtained in clinical practice, such a rate cannot be directly accepted as evidence providing the effectiveness of cancer screening. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer is not an exception of possibility to detect overdiagnosis. If detection rate is used for the evaluation of the effectiveness of cancer screening, the possibility of overestimating the effectiveness of cancer screening cannot be ruled out. To avoid the effect of overdiagnosis and confirm the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, mortality reduction from gastric cancer must be carefully evaluated by conducting reliable studies. The burden of gastric cancer remains real and this cannot be ignored in Eastern Asian countries. To determine the best available method for gastric cancer screening, evaluation of its effectiveness is a must. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further comprehensive evaluation to reliably confirm its effectiveness and how its optimal use can be strategically promoted.

  15. [Efficacy and safety of the endoscopic management of Zenker diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Laura; Palacios, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the endoscopic management of Zenker Diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 device. prospective and multicenter study (Edgardo Rebagliati Martins National Hospital and Golf Clinic). We included all patients with sintomatic Zenker Diverticulum that were treated with endoscopic cricopharyngeal miotomy from september 2013 until august 2016. the diverticulum septum was faced with a cap, and then it was cut by the IT-Knife 2 (ENDOCUT Q, effect 3-2-5) until its baseline. Disphagia score was compared before and 1 and 3 months after the procedure. 20 patients were included (11 men; average age: 71 years). The median size of Zenker Diverticulum was 40.5 mm. The median duration of the cricopharyngeal miotomy was 13.75 minutes. Clinical success was 100%. There was a significative decrease (pdisphagia score from 2+/-0.86 before the procedure to 0.05+/-0.22 one month after it. Recurrence after 3 months was 15% and it was completely solved after a second endoscopic treatment. Niether perforation nor bleeding was reported. Two patients had pneumonia. the endoscopic management of Zenker Diverticulum with IT-Knife 2 is highly effective, safe and less complex than previous technique experience.

  16. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  17. Clinical study of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging in endoscopic mucosal resection tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Liang; Streutker, Catherine J.; Marcon, Norman; Cirocco, Maria; Lakovlev, Vladimir V.; DaCosta, Ralph; Foster, F. S.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate endoscopic detection and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) remains a major unmet clinical need. Current diagnosis use multiple biopsies under endoscopic image guidance, where up to 99% of the tissue remains unsampled, leading to significant risk of missing dysplasia. We conducted an ex vivo clinical trial using photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in patients undergoing endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) with known high-grade dysplasia for the purpose of characterizing the esophageal microvascular pattern, with the long-term goal of performing in vivo endoscopic PAI for dysplasia detection and therapeutic guidance. EMR tissues were mounted immediately on an agar layer and covered with ultrasound gel. Digital photography guided the placement of the PAI transducer (40 MHz center frequency). The luminal side of the specimen was scanned over a field of view of 14 mm (width) by 15 mm (depth) at 680, 750, 824, 850 and 970 nm. Acoustic images were simultaneously acquired. Tissues were then sliced and fixed in formalin for histopathology with H and E staining. Analysis consisted of co-registration and correlation between the intrinsic PAI features and the histological images. The initial PAI + ultrasound images from 8 BE patients have demonstrated the technical feasibility of this approach and point to the potential of PAI to reveal the microvascular pattern within EMR specimens. There are several technical factors to be considered in rigorous interpretation of the PAI characteristics, including the loss of blood from the ex vivo specimens and the limited depth penetration of the photoacoustic signal.

  18. Quality of life and fear of cancer recurrence after endoscopic treatment for early Barrett's neoplasia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmolen, Wilda D; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T; Pouw, Roos E; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Bergman, Jacques J G H M; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopic therapy is the treatment of choice for high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) or early cancer (≤T1sm1) in Barrett's esophagus (BE). We prospectively evaluated the effect of endoscopic treatment on quality of life (QOL) and fear of cancer (recurrence) and compared this with the effect of Barrett's surveillance or surgery. Patients treated endoscopically for early Barrett's neoplasia (n = 42, HGIN - T1sm1N0M0) were compared with three groups: patients with non-dysplastic BE undergoing surveillance (n = 44); patients treated surgically for early BE neoplasia (HGIN - T2N0M0, n = 21); patients treated surgically for advanced BE cancer (T1N1M0 - T3N1M0, n = 19). QOL (SF-36; EORTC-QLQ-C30; EORTC-QLQ-OES18) and fear of cancer recurrence (Worry of Cancer Scale [WOCS] and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]) were measured at baseline, 2 and 6 months after treatment. The endoscopic treatment group reported significantly better QOL in both physical and mental scales of SF-36 and EORTC-QLQ-C30 and less esophageal cancer related symptoms compared to both surgical groups. The endoscopic treatment group reported significant more worry for cancer recurrence (WOCS) compared to the early surgical group. Their scores on the WOCS were comparable with the scores of the advanced surgical group. Endoscopic treatment of early esophageal cancer has less negative impact on QOL and esophageal cancer symptoms than surgery. However, endoscopically treated patients worry as much about cancer recurrence as patients treated surgically for advanced cancer. © 2017 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. Decreased Absorption of Dolutegravir and Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate, But Not Emtricitabine, in an HIV-Infected Patient Following Oral and Jejunostomy-Tube Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kristina M; Garrett, Katy L; Kuriakose, Safia S; George, Jomy M; Balba, Gayle; Bailey, Bria; Anderson, Megan; Lane, H Clifford; Maldarelli, Frank; Pau, Alice K

    2017-08-01

    The use of enteral feeding tubes to administer antiretroviral medications is necessary in certain patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, adequacy of drug exposures after these administration routes are largely unknown, making dosing recommendations and the attainment of viral suppression challenging in this patient population. This report describes a patient with advanced HIV infection and a complicated medical history including long-term intractable nausea/vomiting necessitating antiretroviral medication administration via a Roux-en-Y jejunostomy (J)-tube. Pharmacokinetic assessments were performed to compare differences in antiretroviral drug absorption and plasma exposure following oral and J-tube administration of dolutegravir, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, and emtricitabine. Results were also compared with published pharmacokinetic data in HIV-infected individuals. Exposure to dolutegravir and tenofovir were similar between J-tube and oral administration routes, whereas emtricitabine exposure was 38% lower when administered via J-tube. However, in comparison with reference data in HIV-infected individuals taking these medications orally, exposure to dolutegravir and tenofovir was 75-76% and 55-61% lower, respectively, following both routes of administration. Emtricitabine exposure was similar to and 71% higher than reference data following J-tube and oral administration, respectively. This report highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic assessments in patients with the potential for impaired drug absorption to ensure antiretroviral treatment success. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  20. Endoscopic mucosal resection with a multiband ligator for the treatment of Barrett's high-grade dysplasia and early gastric cancer Resección endoscópica de la mucosa con un ligador multibanda para el tratamiento de la displasia de Barret de alto grado y el cáncer gástrico precoz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Espinel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: due to surgery's high mortality and morbidity, local therapeutic techniques are required for Barrett's high-grade dysplasia (BHGD and early gastric cancer (EGC. Various techniques are available for endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR in the GI tract. The "suck and cut" technique, which uses a transparent cap or modified multiband variceal ligator, is usually the most practiced method. A multiband ligator (ML allows sequential resection without the need for submucosal injection and endoscope withdrawal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of EMR with a ML device in the treatment of Barrett's high-grade dysplasia and early gastric cancer. Patients and methods: prospective study. Eight consecutive patients (4 men; median age, 62 years; range 38-89 years with BHGD (4 or EGC (4 were treated. EMR was performed with a multiband ligator in order to create a pseudopolyp and then permit snare polypectomy of flat mucosal lesions. The pseudopolyp was resected by using pure coagulating current. No submucosal saline injection was administered before resection. Results: a total of 8 consecutive patients were treated with the multiband ligator (ML technique. Barrett's esophagus (BE: one patient with long BE received 3 EMR sessions. Three patients presented with short BE and received 1 EMR session each. The histology of the EMR specimens confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with submucosal infiltration (1 patient and BHGD (3 patients. Early gastric cancer (EGC: 3 patients had EGC (type IIa and 1 patient had high-grade dysplasia. EMR was accomplished in 1 session for each patient. The histology of EMR specimens confirmed a mucinous adenocarcinoma with submucosal infiltration (1 patient, EGC (2 patients, and HGD (1 patient. Complications (mild esophageal stenosis, minor bleeding occurred in 2 patients. Conclusions: EMR has diagnostic and therapeutic implications, and represents a superior diagnostic modality as