WorldWideScience

Sample records for endogenous technical change

  1. An endogenous growth model with embodied energy-saving technical change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, A; Yetkiner, IH

    In this paper, we extend the Romer [Journal of Political Economy 98 (Part 2) (1990) S271] model in two ways. First we include energy consumption of intermediates. Second, intermediates become heterogeneous due to endogenous energy-saving technical change. We show that the resulting model can still

  2. Final Technical Report: "Representing Endogenous Technological Change in Climate Policy Models: General Equilibrium Approaches"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Sue Wing

    2006-04-18

    The research supported by this award pursued three lines of inquiry: (1) The construction of dynamic general equilibrium models to simulate the accumulation and substitution of knowledge, which has resulted in the preparation and submission of several papers: (a) A submitted pedagogic paper which clarifies the structure and operation of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (C.2), and a review article in press which develops a taxonomy for understanding the representation of technical change in economic and engineering models for climate policy analysis (B.3). (b) A paper which models knowledge directly as a homogeneous factor, and demonstrates that inter-sectoral reallocation of knowledge is the key margin of adjustment which enables induced technical change to lower the costs of climate policy (C.1). (c) An empirical paper which estimates the contribution of embodied knowledge to aggregate energy intensity in the U.S. (C.3), followed by a companion article which embeds these results within a CGE model to understand the degree to which autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) is attributable to technical change as opposed to sub-sectoral shifts in industrial composition (C.4) (d) Finally, ongoing theoretical work to characterize the precursors and implications of the response of innovation to emission limits (E.2). (2) Data development and simulation modeling to understand how the characteristics of discrete energy supply technologies determine their succession in response to emission limits when they are embedded within a general equilibrium framework. This work has produced two peer-reviewed articles which are currently in press (B.1 and B.2). (3) Empirical investigation of trade as an avenue for the transmission of technological change to developing countries, and its implications for leakage, which has resulted in an econometric study which is being revised for submission to a journal (E.1). As work commenced on this topic, the U.S. withdrawal

  3. Endogenous change : On cooperation and water in ancient history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    We propose and test the theory of endogenous change based on historical reconstructions of two ancient civilizations, Indus and Hohokam, in two water scarce basins, the Indus basin in the Indian subcontinent and the Lower Colorado basin in Southwestern United States. The endogenous institutional

  4. Endogeneity Corrected Stochastic Production Frontier and Technical Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shee, A.; Stefanou, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    A major econometric issue in estimating production parameters and technical efficiency is the possibility that some forces influencing production are only observed by the firm and not by the econometrician. Not only can this misspecification lead to a biased inference on the output elasticity of

  5. Changing Endogenous Development: the Territorial Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs István Tóth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze territorial capital as a new paradigm to make best use of endogenous assets. The study is dealing with the preconditions, meaning and possible theoretical taxonomies of territorial capital. In this study I emphasize that the cumulative effects of regional potentials are more important than economies of scale and location factors. I present different approaches and interpretations of territorial capital, then make an attempt to create an own model. I try to find answers for questions, such as why territorial capital shows a new perspective of urban and regional development; how cognitive elements of territorial capital provide increasing return; how territorial capital influences competitiveness and what kind of relation it has with cohesion.

  6. climate changes and farmers' endogenous adaptation strategies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Adaptation to climate changes. In Benin, Aho. (2006) reported that farmers are developing both curative and preventive practices to face climate risks in their region. Our choice to explore farmers own new land and crop management practices is motivated by a self innovation and sustainability concern which is key in such ...

  7. Endogenous skilled-biased technological change and matching unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, Manfred; Wapler, Rüdiger

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a general-equilibrium model of endogenous skilled-biased technological change and matching unemployment in a disaggregated economy. We simultaneously endogenise both the direction and pace of technological change as well as the unemployment rates. We show that an increase in the supply of high-skilled labour can explain skilled-biased technological change, a reduction in high-skilled unemployment and a rise in the high-skilled wage differential. In accordance with convinci...

  8. Impact of cell culture process changes on endogenous retrovirus expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorson, Kurt; De Wit, Christina; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Mustafa, Mehnaz; Swann, Patrick G; Kiss, Robert; Taticek, Ron; Polastri, Gian; Stein, Kathryn E; Xu, Yuan

    2002-11-05

    Cell culture process changes (e.g., changes in scale, medium formulation, operational conditions) and cell line changes are common during the development life cycle of a therapeutic protein. To ensure that the impact of such process changes on product quality and safety is minimal, it is standard practice to compare critical product quality and safety attributes before and after the changes. One potential concern introduced by cell culture process improvements is the possibility of increased endogenous retrovirus expression to a level above the clearance capability of the subsequent purification process. To address this, retrovirus expression was measured in scaled down and full production scaled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures of four monoclonal antibodies and one recombinant protein before and after process changes. Two highly sensitive, quantitative (Q)-PCR-based assays were used to measure endogenous retroviruses. It is shown that cell culture process changes that primarily alter media components, nutrient feed volume, seed density, cell bank source (i.e., master cell bank vs. working cell bank), and vial size, or culture scale, singly or in combination, do not impact the rate of retrovirus expression to an extent greater than the variability of the Q-PCR assays (0.2-0.5 log(10)). Cell culture changes that significantly alter the metabolic state of the cells and/or rates of protein expression (e.g., pH and temperature shifts, NaButyrate addition) measurably impact the rate of retrovirus synthesis (up to 2 log(10)). The greatest degree of variation in endogenous retrovirus expression was observed between individual cell lines (up to 3 log(10)). These data support the practice of measuring endogenous retrovirus output for each new cell line introduced into manufacturing or after process changes that significantly increase product-specific productivity or alter the metabolic state, but suggest that reassessment of retrovirus expression after other

  9. Endogenous technological and demographic change under increasing water scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Saket; Ertsen, Maurits; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-05-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  10. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-11-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in overall population under increasing water scarcity. Hydroclimatic change may not be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water scarce regions and many critics of such (perceived) hydroclimatic determinism have suggested that technological change may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. To study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, we develop a simple overlapping-generations model of endogenous technological and demographic change. We model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on factors such as the investments that are (endogenously) made in a society, the (endogenous) diversification of a society into skilled and unskilled workers, a society's patience in terms of its present consumption vs. future consumption, production technology and the (endogenous) interaction of all of these factors. In the model the population growth rate is programmed to decline once consumption per capita crosses a "survival" threshold. This means we do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but instead assume that it results (endogenously) from societal actions. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity but typically it does so only to a certain extent. It is possible that technological change may allow a society to escape the effect of increasing water scarcity, leading to a (super)-exponential rise in technology and population. However, such cases require the rate of success of investment in technological advancement to be high. In other

  11. A comparative assessment of endogenous water institutional change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Saket; Ersten, Maurits

    2013-04-01

    This paper builds the theory of endogenous institutional change, first proposed by Greif and Laitin (2004), for water scarce regions in context of water institutions. The current emphasis on environmental change, including hydrological change, largely ignores the adaptation of human societies to change. Humans have mostly been considered as boundary conditions or parameters of the dynamics of hydrological change and are not considered as conduits of feedbacks. Nonetheless, the dynamical representation of hydrological change with feedbacks between various components of a system is assuring since it is reminiscent of processual ecological anthropology(Orlove, 1980), except that individual decision making is absent. This paper proposes to consider selected dryland basins of the world, to conceptualize proxies of water relevant socio-economic organisation, such as spatial scales of upstream-downstream cooperation in water use, synthesized over time and then proposes a comparative assessment to test regularities predicted by an extension of river game theory (Ambec and Ehlers, 2008; van der Brink et al, 2012) to endogenous institutional change. References: Orlove, B. S. (1980). Ecological Anthropology. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 9 (1980), pp. 235-273. Greif. A. and D. D. Laitin (2004). A Theory of Endogenous Institutional Change. American Political Science Review, Vol. 98, No. 4 November 2004. Ambec, S. and L. Ehlers (2008). Sharing a river amongst satiable agents. Games and Economic Behavior, 64, 35-50. Van der Brink, G. van der Laan and N. Moes (2012). Fair agreements for sharing international rivers with multiple springs and externalities. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 63, 388-403.

  12. Technical efficiency, efficiency change, technical progress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In May 2006, the Ministers of Health of all the countries on the African continent, at a special session of the African Union, undertook to institutionalise efficiency monitoring within their respective national health information management systems. The specific objectives of this study were: (i) to assess the technical efficiency of ...

  13. Technical change during the energy transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, G.C.; Smulders, Sjak

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources has important consequences for technological change and resource extraction. We examine these consequences by incorporating a non-renewable resource and an alternative energy source in a market economy model of endogenous growth

  14. Fat or lean: adjustment of endogenous energy stores to predictable and unpredictable changes in allostatic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultner, Jannik; Kitaysky, Alexander S.; Welcker, Jorg; Hatch, Scott

    2013-01-01

    1. The ability to store energy endogenously is an important ecological mechanism that allows animals to buffer predictable and unpredictable variation in allostatic load. The secretion of glucocorticoids, which reflects changes in allostatic load, is suggested to play a major role in the adjustment of endogenous stores to these varying conditions.

  15. Location, change and income: The changing regional balance in Denmark endogenous and exogenous drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nils Karl; Cornett, Andreas P.

    2017-01-01

    Historical the balance between regions within and between countries has changed for many reasons during the past decades. The drivers behind this process has been various from changes in institutional designs that has changed the geographical division of the regions to internal and external changes...... theory, new economic growth theory and concepts of economic change, i.e. processes of convergence and divergence. The latter is investigated in a regional set-up including exogenous and endogenous factors. Among the findings are, that different types of regions (peripheral vs. central, or urban vs...... in divergence may be a result of the institutional changes resulting from the most recent municipality reform that took place in 2007. Section 5 summarizes the main results with special attention on an evaluation of the spillovers between regional, sectoral and demographic changes on the regional potentials...

  16. Directed Technical Change and Climate Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, V.M.; Löschel, A.; Reilly, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the cost effectiveness of climate policy if there are technology externalities. For this purpose, we develop a forward-looking CGE model that captures empirical links between CO2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We find the

  17. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2014-01-01

    While the proposed model is a rather simple model of a coupled human–water system, it is shown to be capable of replicating patterns of technological, population, production and consumption per capita changes. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of

  18. Innovation policy for directing technical change in the power sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, R.; Shestalova, V.; Kocsis, V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses policy instruments for redirecting technical change within the electricity sector to mitigate climate change. First, we unravel the mechanism behind directed technical change, explaining why markets may underprovide innovations in expensive renewable technologies in comparison

  19. Endogenous change : On cooperation and water availability in two ancient societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and test the theory of endogenous change in societal institutions based on historical reconstructions of two ancient civilizations, the Indus and Hohokam, in two water-scarce basins, the Indus Basin in the Indian subcontinent and the lower Colorado Basin in the southwestern United States.

  20. Arterial blood-pressure change and endogenous circulating substance P in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Kastrup, J; Schaffalitzky De Muckadell, O B

    1985-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is a powerful vasodilator and this peptide is today considered to be a chemical messenger. The potential effects on circulating SP of acute changes in arterial blood-pressure was investigated in nine subjects. An increase in arterial mean blood-pressure (+33%, P less than 0.001, ...... change in plasma SP, this seems to indicate that endogenous circulating SP has no significant role in the vascular tonus controlled by the arterial baroreflex....

  1. 75 FR 13680 - Commutation of Sentence: Technical Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... of Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: This document makes a minor technical change to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... Sentence: Technical Change This document makes a minor technical change to the Bureau regulations on...

  2. Bringing ideas back in to historical institutionalism to explain endogenous institutional change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Martin B.; Schmidt, Vivien

    The problem of how to theorize endogenous institutional change remains the ‘holy grail’ of historical institutionalism. Particularly important advances have been made within scholarship on gradual institutional transformation th at has deployed concepts like institutional ambiguity...... and interpretation to show how actors are able to circumvent and significantly change institutions over the long term or even at crisis moments. Despite the centrality of interpretive processes for this line of argument, historical institutionalists focused on long-term institutional transformation have largely...... shied a way from employing ideas as a central explanatory analytical category. The paper suggests that to endogenize change, historical institutionalists will need to bring ideas back in, and that such engagement with ideational and discursive institutionalist scholarship may be particularly fruitful...

  3. Inference regarding multiple structural changes in linear models with endogenous regressors☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alastair R.; Han, Sanggohn; Boldea, Otilia

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the linear model with endogenous regressors and multiple changes in the parameters at unknown times. It is shown that minimization of a Generalized Method of Moments criterion yields inconsistent estimators of the break fractions, but minimization of the Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS) criterion yields consistent estimators of these parameters. We develop a methodology for estimation and inference of the parameters of the model based on 2SLS. The analysis covers the cases where the reduced form is either stable or unstable. The methodology is illustrated via an application to the New Keynesian Phillips Curve for the US. PMID:23805021

  4. The Climate Change Action Plan: Technical supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This Technical Annex documents the assumptions and parameters used in developing the supporting analysis for the Climate Change Action Plan (the Plan) issued by President Clinton on October 19, 1993. The Annex is intended to meet the needs of independent energy and environmental analysts who wish to better understand the Plan, its analytical underpinnings, and the events that need to transpire for the emissions reductions called for in the Plan to be realized. The Plan documented in this Annex reflects the outcome of a wide-ranging effort by Government agencies and interested members of the public to develop and implement actions that can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions in the year 2000 to their aggregate 1990 level. Based on agency and public input, the Climate Change Mitigation Group, chaired by the White House Office on Environmental Policy, developed the Plan`s content. Many of the actions called for in the Plan are now underway, while others are in advanced planning pending congressional action on the fiscal year 1995 budget. The analysis supporting the Plan represents the results of an interagency effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) was responsible for the integrated analysis of energy-related options, based on the analysis of individual energy-related options by DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Transportation (DOT). EPA led in providing analysis for actions related to methane, hydrofluorocarbons, and perfluorocarbons. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) led the analysis of carbon sequestration actions and cooperated with EPA in the analysis of actions to reduce nitrous oxide emissions.

  5. Models of travel demand with endogenous preference change and heterogeneous agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Kieran P.

    2011-03-01

    In the literatures of regional science, urban economics, and urban development planning, a working assumption is that individuals respond to incentives and regulations, given their preferences. Models for planning and policy analyses are used to consider what might occur if the incentives or regulations were different. In these models, however, preferences are usually assumed to be given and stable, and agents are usually assumed to be homogeneous. This paper focuses on the implications of making preferences in models of policy implementation endogenously determined and time varying heterogeneous agents. We consider first the recent literature on intertemporal choice and preference change, which cuts across many disciplines, and more briefly the literature on norm-regarding behavior. We then elaborate a simple model of transportation demand—from a static to a dynamic orientation, from fixed and exogenously given preferences of strictly self-regarding agents to endogenously determined and policy-induced preferences of heterogeneous agents—and illustrate its characteristics with simple numerical examples.

  6. A MERGE model with endogenous technological change and the cost of carbon stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, Socrates [Laboratory of Energy Systems Analysis, The Energy Departments, Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    Two stylized backstop systems with endogenous technological learning (ETL) are introduced in the ''model for evaluating regional and global effects'' (MERGE): one for the electric and the other for the non-electric markets. Then the model is applied to analyze the impacts of ETL on carbon-mitigation policy, contrasting the resulting impacts with the situation without ETL. We model research and development (R and D) spending and learning subsidies for the demonstration and deployment stage as control variables, and we investigate the ability of this extra spending to create path-dependent experience and knowledge to aid in the implementation of carbon-free technologies. Based on model estimations and sensitivity analyses, we conclude that increased commitments for the development of new technologies to advance along their learning curves has a potential for substantial reductions in the cost of mitigating climate change and thereby helping to reach safe concentrations of carbon in the atmosphere. (author)

  7. JOB DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN AND ENDOGENOUS POPULATION CHANGE IN A GENERALIZED SOLOW GROWTH MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin ZHANG

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines economic growth and population change with discrimination against women in the labor market within the analytical framework of Solow’s neoclassical growth model. The study models dynamic interactions between wealth accumulation, time distribution between work, children caring, and leisure, population change with endogenous birth and mortality rates with gender discrimination. The production technology and markets are built on Solow’s neoclassical growth model. The basic mechanisms for population changes in the Barro-Becker fertility choice model and the Haavelmo population model are integrated to model the population change. This study also takes account of discrimination against woman in the labor market. We synthesize these dynamic forces in a compact framework by applying Zhang’s utility function. The model properties are studied by simulation. We find equilibrium points and illustrate motion of the dynamic system. We also examine the effects of changes in the discrimination against woman, the propensity to save, woman’s propensity to pursue leisure activities, the propensity to have children, woman’s human capital and man’s emotional involvement in children caring.

  8. Changes in cyclic nucleotides, locomotory behavior, and body length produced by novel endogenous neuropeptides in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Catharine A; Pleva, Anthony E; Stretton, Antony O W

    2011-11-01

    Recent technical advances have rapidly advanced the discovery of novel peptides, as well as the transcripts that encode them, in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Here we report that many of these novel peptides produce profound and varied effects on locomotory behavior and levels of cyclic nucleotides in A. suum. We investigated the effects of 31 endogenous neuropeptides encoded by transcripts afp-1, afp-2, afp-4, afp-6, afp-7, and afp-9-14 (afp: Ascaris FMRFamide-like Precursor protein) on cyclic nucleotide levels, body length and locomotory behavior. Worms were induced to generate anteriorly propagating waveforms, peptides were injected into the pseudocoelomic cavity, and changes in the specific activity (nmol/mg protein) of second messengers cAMP (3'5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate) and cGMP (3'5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate) were determined. Many of these neuropeptides changed the levels of cAMP (both increases and decreases were found), whereas few neuropeptides changed the level of cGMP. A subset of the peptides that lowered cAMP was investigated for effects on the locomotory waveform and on body length. Injection of AF19, or AF34 (afp-13), AF9 (afp-14), AF26 or AF41 (afp-11) caused immediate paralysis and cessation of propagating body waveforms. These neuropeptides also significantly increased body length. In contrast, injection of AF15 (afp-9) reduced the body length, and decreased the amplitude of waves in the body waveform. AF30 (afp-10) produced worms with tight ventral coils. Although injection of neuropeptides encoded by afp-1 (AF3, AF4, AF10 or AF13) produced an increased number of exaggerated body waves, there were no effects on either cAMP or cGMP. By injecting peptides into behaving A. suum, we have provided an initial screen of the effects of novel peptides on several behavioral and biochemical parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in dietary macronutrient profile do not appear to affect endogenous urinary oxalate excretion in healthy adult cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The progressive increase in calcium oxalate uroliths reported in cats diagnosed with urolithiasis may partly be due to changes in nutrition. Since cats have a predominant mitochondrial alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) location, high carbohydrate intake may induce endogenous oxalate

  10. 78 FR 13478 - Compassionate Release; Technical Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Bureau... Prisons, Justice. ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: In this interim rule, the Bureau of Prisons (Bureau) makes a minor change to remove an administrative level of review from the processing of a Compassionate...

  11. Technical note: Evaluation of endogenous control gene expression in bovine neutrophils by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR using microfluidics gene expression arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookenden, M A; Walker, C G; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; Murray, A; Dukkipati, V S R; Heiser, A; Roche, J R

    2017-08-01

    Reverse-transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-qPCR) is commonly used for assessing the cellular response to changes in physiologic and pathologic conditions. The selection of stable endogenous control genes is an important step of any RT-qPCR study, as expression can vary depending on the experimental environment. Our objective was to identify endogenous control genes in circulating neutrophils isolated from cows during the peripartum period. To do this, we used microfluidics gene expression arrays (Fluidigm, San Francisco, CA) for RT-qPCR analysis. Selection of the endogenous control genes was based on previous research investigating gene expression in neutrophils. The selected genes included ACTB, B2M, G6PD, GAPDH, GCH1, GOLGA5, OSBPL2, PGK1, RPL13A, RPL19, RPS9, SDHA, SMUG1, SNRPA, TBP, UXT, and YWHAZ. Four genes (GAPDH, GOLGA5, PGK1, and UXT) did not provide satisfactory quantification results using the selected method and were therefore excluded from the analyses. The suitability of the remaining 13 genes for use as endogenous control genes was assessed using geNorm and Normfinder. The gene pair with the greatest stability using geNorm was RPL13A and RPL19, whereas Normfinder ranked RPL19 and YWHAZ as the most stable pair. The 2 genes deemed most suitable for the experimental design were RPL19 and YWHAZ, which were selected for subsequent gene expression analysis. This study highlights that genes used as endogenous controls for relative quantification should be assessed on an experimental basis, even if the genes have been used in previous research. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Library management and technical services the changing role of technical services in library organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Cargill, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This exciting volume explores the role of technical services functions and organizational structure as forces in the library change process. It provides practical information to help administrators make decisions about how their libraries are organized and managed. As libraries change in many ways--organizational structure, design of jobs, managerial philosophy, responsibilities of professionals, and the impact of automation--librarians in technical services, administrators, and personnel officers--need guidance in meeting the new challenges in order to continue providing thorough efficient se

  13. Automated biochemical, morphological, and organizational assessment of precancerous changes from endogenous two-photon fluorescence images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Levitt

    endogenous sources of contrast. They are promising diagnostic parameters for the non-invasive identification of early cancerous changes and could improve significantly diagnosis and treatment for numerous patients.

  14. Automated biochemical, morphological, and organizational assessment of precancerous changes from endogenous two-photon fluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Jonathan M; McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E; Münger, Karl; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-01-01

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation of live samples in their native environment. These methods are particularly appealing for identifying pre-cancers because they are sensitive to the early changes that occur on the microscopic scale and can provide additional information not available using conventional screening techniques. In this study, we developed novel automated approaches, which can be employed for the real-time analysis of two-photon fluorescence images, to non-invasively discriminate between normal and pre-cancerous/HPV-immortalized engineered tissues by concurrently assessing metabolic activity, morphology, organization, and keratin localization. Specifically, we found that the metabolic activity was significantly enhanced and more uniform throughout the depths of the HPV-immortalized epithelia, based on our extraction of the NADH and FAD fluorescence contributions. Furthermore, we were able to separate the keratin contribution from metabolic enzymes to improve the redox estimates and to use the keratin localization as a means to discriminate between tissue types. To assess morphology and organization, Fourier-based, power spectral density (PSD) approaches were employed. The nuclear size distribution throughout the epithelial depths was quantified by evaluating the variance of the corresponding spatial frequencies, which was found to be greater in the normal tissue compared to the HPV-immortalized tissues. The PSD was also used to calculate the Hurst parameter to identify the level of organization in the tissues, assuming a fractal model for the fluorescence intensity fluctuations within a field. We found the range of organization was greater in the normal tissue and closely related to the level of differentiation. A wealth of complementary morphological, biochemical and organizational tissue parameters can be extracted from high resolution images that are acquired based entirely on endogenous sources of

  15. Directed Technical Change and Economic Growth Effects of Environmental Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse-Andersen, Peter Kjær

    2016-01-01

    unambiguously directs research efforts toward pollution abatement technologies and away from production technologies. This directed technical change reduces economic growth and pollution emission growth. Simulation results indicate that even large environmental policy reforms have small economic growth effects....... However, these economic growth effects have relatively large welfare effects which suggest that static models and exogenous growth models leave out an important welfare effect of environmental policy.......A Schumpeterian growth model is developed to investigate how environmental policy affects economic growth when environmental policy also affects the direction of technical change. In contrast to previous models, production and pollution abatement technologies are embodied in separate intermediate...

  16. Time-dependent changes of levels of endogenous epidermal growth factor in submandibular glands, in kidneys, and in urine in rats during systemic treatment with EGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Jørgensen, P E; Thulesen, J

    1998-01-01

    Exogenous EGF influences the levels of endogenous EGF differently in the submandibular glands (SMG) and the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to examine the time-dependent changes in levels of endogenous EGF during 1-4 weeks of EGF treatment.......Exogenous EGF influences the levels of endogenous EGF differently in the submandibular glands (SMG) and the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to examine the time-dependent changes in levels of endogenous EGF during 1-4 weeks of EGF treatment....

  17. Endogenous versus exogenous lithium clearance for evaluation of dopamine-induced changes in renal tubular function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Fogh-Andersen, N; Strandgaard, S

    1996-01-01

    1. The present randomized, double-blind cross-over study compared endogenous and exogenous lithium clearance (CLi) for estimation of the effect of dopamine on tubular sodium reabsorption. Twelve normal, salt-repleted male subjects were investigated on three different occasions with either placebo.......3-31.0)% (P sodium clearance (CNa), but glomerular filtration rate and urine flow rate remained unchanged. 3. Dopamine increased CNa to similar values on the three study days. CLi increased to 40.9 (35.5-46.5) ml/min (endogenous lithium, P

  18. Directed technical change and differentiation of climate policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, V.M.; Löschel, A.; Reilly, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the cost effectiveness of climate policy if there are technology externalities. For this purpose, we develop a forward looking model that captures empirical links between CO2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We find our most cost

  19. [Changes in vectors of endogenously generated ion currents in light-induced germination of turions of Spirodela polyrrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovskiĭ, S G; Appenroth, K J

    2002-01-01

    Nondormant turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden were utilized to investigate endogenous ion currents in light-induced germination and early growing processes of higher plants. A small outward current was detected at the ventral side of the turions near the pocket containing the most developed sprout primordium. After a light pulse, the direction of the endogenous current changed from outward to inward. These ion currents are most likely conditioned by unspecific diffusion of cations (probably H+) inside the cell. Three-day-old sprouts of Spirodela showed the highest inward current near the sprout base which decreases toward its edge. Newly formed sprouts demonstrated a strong gravity effect (bending), which was preceded by a lowering of the Z-component of vectors close to the sprout base after a change of the turion fixation.

  20. Socio-technical networks: how a technology studies approach may help to solve problems related to technical change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen, Boelem; Enserink, Bert; Enserink, B.; Smit, Willem A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a desire to deal with the problematic aspects of technical development. To achieve this, we need a new approach to the analysis of socio-technical change. In this paper we develop such an approach, called the `Socio-Technical Networks' (STN) approach. The basic concepts of

  1. Activation of an endogenous retrotransposon associated with epigenetic changes in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukai, Eigo; Stougaard, Jens; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat retrotransposons occupy a large portion of genomes in flowering plants. In spite of their abundance, the majority are silenced and rarely transpose. One of the examples of a highly active retrotransposon is Lotus Retrotransposon 1(LORE1), of the model legume Lotus japonicus (...... significance of LORE1 as a member of chromovirus, a chromodomain containing clade of the Gypsy superfamily. Then we discuss possibilities and methodologies for using endogenous transposable elements as mutagens to generate gene tagging populations in plants...

  2. Modeling technical change in climate analysis: evidence from agricultural crop damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Adeel; Devadason, Evelyn S; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem

    2017-05-01

    This study accounts for the Hicks neutral technical change in a calibrated model of climate analysis, to identify the optimum level of technical change for addressing climate changes. It demonstrates the reduction to crop damages, the costs to technical change, and the net gains for the adoption of technical change for a climate-sensitive Pakistan economy. The calibrated model assesses the net gains of technical change for the overall economy and at the agriculture-specific level. The study finds that the gains of technical change are overwhelmingly higher than the costs across the agriculture subsectors. The gains and costs following technical change differ substantially for different crops. More importantly, the study finds a cost-effective optimal level of technical change that potentially reduces crop damages to a minimum possible level. The study therefore contends that the climate policy for Pakistan should consider the role of technical change in addressing climate impacts on the agriculture sector.

  3. Changes in endogenous bioactive compounds of Korean native chicken meat at different ages and during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasena, Dinesh D; Jung, Samooel; Bae, Young Sik; Kim, Sun Hyo; Lee, Soo Kee; Lee, Jun Heon; Jo, Cheorun

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of bird age on the contents of endogenous bioactive compounds, including carnosine, anserine, creatine, betaine, and carnitine, in meat from a certified meat-type commercial Korean native chicken strain (KNC; Woorimatdag). Additionally, the effects of the meat type (breast or leg meat) and the state of the meat (raw or cooked) were examined. Cocks of KNC were raised under similar standard commercial conditions at a commercial chicken farm. At various ages (10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 wk), breast and leg meats from a total of 10 birds from each age group were obtained. Raw and cooked meat samples were then prepared separately and analyzed for bioactive compounds. The age of the KNC had a significant effect only on the betaine content. The breast meat of KNC had higher amounts of carnosine and anserine but had lower amounts of betaine and carnitine than the leg meat (P meat lost significant amounts of all bioactive compounds during cooking (P meat had high retention percentages of carnosine and anserine after cooking, whereas breast meat showed almost complete retention of betaine and carnitine. The results of this study provide useful and rare information regarding the presence, amounts, and determinants of endogenous bioactive compounds in KNC meat, which can be useful for selection and breeding programs, and also for popularizing indigenous chicken meat. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Spatial and temporal changes in endogenous cytokinins in developing pea roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirk, W A; Novák, O; Václavíková, K; Tarkowski, P; Strnad, M; van Staden, J

    2008-05-01

    Germination and seedling establishment follows a distinct pattern which is partly controlled by hormones. Roots have high levels of cytokinins. By quantifying the fluctuations in endogenous cytokinins over time, further insight may be gained into the role of cytokinins during germination and seedling establishment. Radicles were excised from sterile Pisum sativum L. seeds after 30 min and 5 h imbibition. Seedlings germinated on agar were harvested after 1, 3, 6 and 9 days. The roots were divided into the root tip, root free zone, secondary root zone and from day 6, the secondary roots. Samples were purified by various chromatographic methods and endogenous cytokinins detected by LC(+)ES-MS. Benzyladenine levels doubled after 5 h imbibition and then gradually decreased over time. Low concentrations of cis-Zeatin (cZ) type cytokinins were detected in the radicle after 30 min imbibition. After 5 h imbibition, cis-zeatin riboside-5'-monophosphate had greatly increased. The total cytokinin content of the roots increased over time with the ribotides being the predominant conjugates. From day 3 onwards, there was a gradual increase in the free bases, O-glucosides and their ribosylated forms. Mainly N ( 6 )-(2-isopentenyl)adenine (iP)-type cytokinins were detected in the root tip, whereas trans-zeatin- (tZ), dihyrozeatin- (DHZ) and iP-type cytokinins were found in the secondary roots and root zone. Cytokinin biosynthesis was only detected after day 6. Biosynthesis of iP and tZ derivatives was quite rapid, whereas biosynthesis of cZ derivatives remained at a low basal level. These fluctuations in cytokinin types and concentrations suggest the cytokinins may be synthesized from various pathways in pea roots.

  5. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  6. Technical energy savings versus changes in human behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Energy savings seems to be the most environmentally benign element in an energy policy. The paper is a reflection on the work on saving energy both by improving technology and by adapting human daily behaviour. A simple model is suggested for the energy chain which converts the primary energy all...... the way into human satisfaction via energy services. Results of various analyses and field experiments show saving potentials for electricity of 50 - 80 per cents. Barriers for implementing these technical saving options are discussed. Also the necessity and potentials for changing behavioural or life...

  7. Home care as change of the technical-assistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kênia Lara; de Sena, Roseni Rosângela; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; Feuerwerker, Laura Camargo Macruz; Merhy, Emerson Elias

    2010-02-01

    To analyze home care practices of outpatient and hospital services and their constitution as a substitute healthcare network. A qualitative study was carried out using tracer methodology to analyze four outpatient home care services from the Municipal Health Department and one service from a philanthropic hospital in the municipality of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, between 2005 and 2007. The following procedures were carried out: interviews with the home care services' managers and teams, analysis of documents and follow-up of cases, holding interviews with patients and caregivers. The analysis was guided by the analytical categories home care integration into the healthcare network and technical-assistance model. Home care implementation was preceded by a political-institutional decision, both with a rationalizing orientation, intending to promote cost reduction, and also with the aim of carrying out the technical-assistance rearrangement of the healthcare networks. These two types of orientation were found to be in conflict, which implies difficulties for conciliating interests of the different players involved in the network, and also the creation of shared management spaces. It was possible to identify technological innovation and families' autonomy in the implementation of the healthcare projects. The teams proved to be cohesive, constructing, in the daily routine, new forms of integrating different perspectives so as to transform the healthcare practices. Challenges were observed in the proposal of integrating the different substitutive healthcare services, as the home care services' capacity to change the technical-assistance model is limited. Home care has potential for constituting a substitutive network by producing new care modalities that cross the projects of users, family members, social network, and home care professionals. Home care as a substitute healthcare modality requires political, conceptual and operational sustainability, as well as

  8. WHAT IS BEHIND BIASED TECHNICAL CHANGE IN PRODUCTION OF CEREAL AND OILSEED CROPS IN SLOVAKIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter FANDEL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the productivity change in the production of cereal and oilseed crops in Slovakia with special emphasis on technical change analysis. It employs a non-parametric distance function approach to measure Malmquist productivity index which is decomposed into technical efficiency change and technical change. Technical change is further decomposed into technical change magnitude and input- and output-bias indices. The productivity change components provide more detailed information about character of productivity change itself and its sources. Our results indicate that productivity in the analysed sector decreased approximately by 20% within the examined period of 1998-2007. The decrease was caused mostly by worsening the technical change (-41,6%. Indices of input- and output bias of technical change were various from unity what suggests that technical change was not Hicks’- neutral. Results of further analysis of the direction of technical change bias indicate that farms in average tend to apply fertilizers-using/seed-saving, seed-using/labour-saving, and fertilizers-using/labour-saving technical change bias over the whole sample period, as well as in the EU pre-accession and EU post-accession periods.

  9. Technical Writing and Translation: Changing with the Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguinot, Candace

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the assumptions underlying the training of technical translators versus technical translation, and their differing notions of quality. Addresses integrating translation and documentation, implications for training, and cross-cultural procedures. (SR)

  10. Arterial blood-pressure change and endogenous circulating substance P in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Kastrup, J; Schaffalitzky De Muckadell, O B

    1985-01-01

    within the reference interval: 3-16 pmol/l (n.s.). Plasma SP remained very constant in each subject during the changes in blood-pressure (mean variation in plasma concentration of SP was 0.97 (SD) pmol/l). The results show that acute changes in arterial blood-pressure do not result in any detectable......Substance P (SP) is a powerful vasodilator and this peptide is today considered to be a chemical messenger. The potential effects on circulating SP of acute changes in arterial blood-pressure was investigated in nine subjects. An increase in arterial mean blood-pressure (+33%, P less than 0.001, n...... = 9) was obtained by infusion of angiotensin II and a decrease in pressure (-10%, P less than 0.005, n = 6) was obtained by ganglionic blockade. The concentration of SP in plasma, from supine subjects in the normotensive condition, ranged from 3 to 13 pmol/l (with a mean of 5.6 pmol/l). SP was thus...

  11. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands where a tight coupling exists between ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, biogeochemical cycles, and water resource availability. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. The issues range from societal aspects such as rapid population growth, the resulting food and water security, and development issues, to natural aspects such as ecohydrological consequences of bush encroachment and the causes of desertification. To improve current understanding and inform upon the needed research efforts to address these critical issues, we identify some recent technical advances in terms of monitoring dryland water dynamics, water budget and vegetation water use, with a focus on the use of stable isotopes and remote sensing. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change.

  12. Technical change in forest sector models: the global forest products model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Buongiorno; Sushuai Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Technical change is developing rapidly in some parts of the forest sector, especially in the pulp and paper industry where wood fiber is being substituted by waste paper. In forest sector models, the processing of wood and other input into products is frequently represented by activity analysis (input–output). In this context, technical change translates in changes...

  13. Efficiency and technical change in the Western Australian wheatbelt

    OpenAIRE

    Cattle, Nathan; White, Benedict

    2007-01-01

    The production performance of wheatbelt farms in Western Australia is analysed to determine whether potential to exploit scale economies and improve technical efficiency has driven the trend towards increased farm size. An input-orientated stochastic frontier model is used to estimate technical efficiency and scale economies using an unbalanced panel dataset provided by BankWest for the period 1995/1996 to 2005/2006. Differences in the relative efficiency of farms are explored by the simultan...

  14. Unemployment and endogenous growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schaik, A.B.T.M.; de Groot, H.L.F.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we develop a two-sector endogenous growth model with a dual labour market, based on efficiency wages. Growth is driven by intentional R&D performed in the high-tech and high-wage sector. It is examined how a change in rivalry among firms affects simultaneously growth and unemployment.

  15. Changes of leaf water potential and endogenous cytokinins in young apple trees treated with or without paclobutrazol under drought conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, L.; Peppel, van de A.C.; Li, X.; Welander, M.

    2004-01-01

    Leaf water potential and endogenous cytokinins in xylem sap of young apple trees treated with or without paclobutrazol (PBZ) under drought stress conditions were investigated. Three drought and rewatering cycles were used in the experiments and leaf water potential was measured every 2-4 days during

  16. Technical change in US industry: A cross-industry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R. R. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the public policies which have influenced the pace and pattern of technical progress in a number of American industries is studied with the view of assessing the broad effects of these policies. The industries studied are agriculture, pharmaceuticals, semiconductors, computers, civil aircraft, automobiles and residential construction. The policies considered include research and development funding as well as government procurement, education, information dissemination, patent protection, licensing, regulations, and anti-trust policies.

  17. Melatonin phase-shifts human circadian rhythms with no evidence of changes in the duration of endogenous melatonin secretion or the 24-hour production of reproductive hormones

    OpenAIRE

    Rajaratnam, SMW; Dijk, D-J; Middleton, B; Stone, BM; Arendt, J

    2003-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin is a popular treatment for sleep and circadian rhythm disruption. Melatonin administered at optimal times of the day for treatment often results in a prolonged melatonin profile. In photoperiodic (day length-dependent) species, changes in melatonin profile duration influence the timing of seasonal rhythms. We investigated the effects of an artificially prolonged melatonin profile on endogenous melatonin and cortisol rhythms, wrist actigraphy, and reproductive horm...

  18. Wisconsin Technical College Presidential Perspectives on Leading Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines leadership perceptions of attributes needed for effectively leading organizations within and through change. Current change forces substantiate the need for higher educational institutions to change in order to fulfill their missions. Creating a culture of organizational change presents a leadership challenge. The…

  19. Balancing the health workforce: breaking down overall technical change into factor technical change for labour-an empirical application to the Dutch hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart L

    2017-02-17

    Well-trained, well-distributed and productive health workers are crucial for access to high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. Because neither a shortage nor a surplus of health workers is wanted, policymakers use workforce planning models to get information on future labour markets and adjust policies accordingly. A neglected topic of workforce planning models is productivity growth, which has an effect on future demand for labour. However, calculating productivity growth for specific types of input is not as straightforward as it seems. This study shows how to calculate factor technical change (FTC) for specific types of input. The paper first theoretically derives FTCs from technical change in a consistent manner. FTC differs from a ratio of output and input, in that it deals with the multi-input, multi-output character of the production process in the health sector. Furthermore, it takes into account substitution effects between different inputs. An application of the calculation of FTCs is given for the Dutch hospital industry for the period 2003-2011. A translog cost function is estimated and used to calculate technical change and FTC for individual inputs, especially specific labour inputs. The results show that technical change increased by 2.8% per year in Dutch hospitals during 2003-2011. FTC differs amongst the various inputs. The FTC of nursing personnel increased by 3.2% per year, implying that fewer nurses were needed to let demand meet supply on the labour market. Sensitivity analyses show consistent results for the FTC of nurses. Productivity growth, especially of individual outputs, is a neglected topic in workforce planning models. FTC is a productivity measure that is consistent with technical change and accounts for substitution effects. An application to the Dutch hospital industry shows that the FTC of nursing personnel outpaced technical change during 2003-2011. The optimal input mix changed, resulting in fewer nurses being needed to let

  20. Governance of Change in Socio-technical and Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edler, Jakob

    diversity in crucial aspects about the role of agents and institutions in those systems, as well as about the dynamics that drive change. Unfortunately most of these approaches have not talked to each other because they belong to different disciplines. Strikingly, while most of the literature...... of the governance of change in these complex systems. These pillars focus on the opportunity structures & capable agents, governance instrumentation, democratic legitimacy, and learning & reflexivity within the system. These pillars are the theoretical foundations from which a set of specific assumptions...... on the analysis of systems change centre around the nature and role of ‘governance’ of that change, the very concept of governance continues to be empirically and normatively indeterminate and ill-defined. This paper aims at developing the building blocks for a theory on the governance of change of socio...

  1. The Changing Role of Vocational and Technical Education and Training (VOTEC). Context, Actors, Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pair, Claude

    Reports analyzing vocational-technical education (VTE) in individual member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation Development (OECD) were reviewed to identify changes in the role of VTE in the context of technological and structural change, economic crisis, and uncertainty. Major transformations in VTE affecting its organization,…

  2. A Comment on the environment and directed technical change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greaker, Mads; Heggedal, Tom-Reiel

    2012-07-01

    The major claim in Acemoglu, Aghion, Bursztyn and Hemous (2012) (AABH) is that subsidies for research and development of clean technologies are more important than carbon taxes when dealing with climate change. However, they – unconventionally – assume that a patent only lasts for one period. In this note we introduce long-lived patents into the AABH model. This makes the role of a research subsidy for clean technologies in AABH far less crucial and reestablishes the role of the carbon tax. This is good news as it is far easier to tax emissions than to pick the right technologies to subsidize.(Author)

  3. A meta-analysis of motivational interviewing process: Technical, relational, and conditional process models of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Molly; Apodaca, Timothy R; Borsari, Brian; Gaume, Jacques; Hoadley, Ariel; Gordon, Rebecca E F; Tonigan, J Scott; Moyers, Theresa

    2018-02-01

    In the present meta-analysis, we test the technical and relational hypotheses of Motivational Interviewing (MI) efficacy. We also propose an a priori conditional process model where heterogeneity of technical path effect sizes should be explained by interpersonal/relational (i.e., empathy, MI Spirit) and intrapersonal (i.e., client treatment seeking status) moderators. A systematic review identified k = 58 reports, describing 36 primary studies and 40 effect sizes (N = 3,025 participants). Statistical methods calculated the inverse variance-weighted pooled correlation coefficient for the therapist to client and the client to outcome paths across multiple target behaviors (i.e., alcohol use, other drug use, other behavior change). Therapist MI-consistent skills were correlated with more client change talk (r = .55, p technical hypothesis was supported. Specifically, proportion MI consistency was related to higher proportion change talk (r = .11, p = .004) and higher proportion change talk was related to reductions in risk behavior at follow up (r = -.16, p technical hypothesis path effect sizes was partially explained by inter- and intrapersonal moderators. This meta-analysis provides additional support for the technical hypothesis of MI efficacy; future research on the relational hypothesis should occur in the field rather than in the context of clinical trials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Modeling Technical Change in Energy System Analysis: Analyzing the Introduction of Learning-by-Doing in Bottom-up Energy Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, Christer; Soederholm, Patrik [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Economics

    2005-02-01

    The main objective of this paper is to provide an overview and a critical analysis of the recent literature on incorporating induced technical change in energy systems models. Special emphasis is put on surveying recent studies aiming at integrating learning-by-doing into bottom-up energy systems models through so-called learning curves, and on analyzing the relevance of learning curve analysis for understanding the process of innovation and technology diffusion in the energy sector. The survey indicates that this model work represents a major advance in energy research, and embeds important policy implications, not the least concerning the cost and the timing of environmental policies (including carbon emission constraints). However, bottom-up energy models with endogenous learning are also limited in their characterization of technology diffusion and innovation. While they provide a detailed account of technical options - which is absent in many top-down models - they also lack important aspects of diffusion behavior that are captured in top-down representations. For instance, they fail in capturing strategic technology diffusion behavior in the energy sector, and they neglect important general equilibrium impacts (such as the opportunity cost of redirecting R and D support to the energy sector). For these reasons bottom-up and top-down models with induced technical change should not be viewed as substitutes but rather as complements.

  5. Impacts of Rural Labor Resource Change on the Technical Efficiency of Crop Production in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper probes effects of the evolvement of labor resources on technical efficiency in crop production in rural China. Based on twelve years of data on crop production of 30 provinces in China, a stochastic frontier production function model is used to measure crop production efficiency in three crop-functional areas—the production area, the consumption area, and the balanced area. Then effects of both quantity and quality change in labor force on technical efficiency in different regions of China are analyzed. Results show that rural China generally has an increasing number of employees shifted to non-agricultural sectors and a decreasing trend of the stock of human capital. However, both these two changes in rural labor force have significantly positive effects on improving crop production efficiency. In addition, China’s technical inefficiency is at an average of 22.2%. Dynamically, the technical efficiencies show a tendency to rise steadily throughout China and in three areas, while the consumption area possesses the highest technical efficiency. Those results may lend some experience for other countries that are currently experiencing rural labor force and economic transition.

  6. Expression Analyses of ABCDE Model Genes and Changes in Levels of Endogenous Hormones in Chinese Cabbage Exhibiting Petal-Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan MENG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal formation of floral organs affects plant reproduction and can directly interfere with the progress of breeding programs. Using PCR amplification, ABCDE model genes BraAP2, BraAP3, BraPI, BraAG, BraSHP, and BraSEP were isolated from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis. We examined six development stages of floral buds collected from Chinese cabbage and compared between a line demonstrating normal flowering (A-8 and two mutated lines that exhibited plants having petal-loss (A-16 and A-17. The expression of ABCDE model genes has been analyzed by qRT-PCR. Compared with flower buds of petal-loss plants and normal plants, the expression of A-class gene BraAP2 was significantly decreased during the first to fourth stages, C-class gene BraAG expression was significantly decreased during the first to fifth stages, and D-class gene BraSHP expression was significantly decreased during the first to third stages. Furthermore, B-class gene BraAP3 and BraPI and E-class gene BraSEP expressions were significantly decreased during all six stages of petal-loss plants compared with normal plants. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays detected nine endogenous phytohormones during all stages examined here. Except for the second-stage and third-stage buds, levels of the auxin IAA and cytokinin dhZR were always higher in the petal-loss plants than the normal plants at corresponding time points. Meanwhile, concentrations of GA1+3 at the first, fourth, and fifth stages were higher in the petal-loss plants than in the normal plants. Our results provide a theoretical basis for future exploration of the molecular mechanism that determines petal loss and the effects that hormones have on such development in Chinese cabbage plants.

  7. Modelling the International Climate Change Negotiations: A Non-Technical Outline of Model Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underdal, Arild

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses in non-technical terms the overall architecture of a model that will be designed to enable the user to (1) explore systematically the political feasibility of alternative policy options and (2) to determine the set of politically feasible solutions in the global climate change negotiations. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Economic and environmental consequences of technical and institutional change in Dutch dairy farming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Renkema, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    A linear programming model of a dairy farm was used to explore the future for different types of Dutch dairy farms under different scenarios. The scenarios are consistent sets of changing factors that are considered external at farm level. The factors included are technical, such as efficiency of

  9. Is technical change directed by the supply of skills? The case of South Korea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, L; Timmer, MP

    In a recent contribution, Acemoglu [Quarterly Journal of Economics 113 (1998) 1055] modelled the effects of an increase in the supply of skills on the skill premium. We estimate a model to disentangle the short-run substitution effects and the effects of skill-biased technical change using industry

  10. Impact of Research and Technical Change in Wildland Recreation: Evaluation Issues and Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; Zhi Xu

    1993-01-01

    The development and diffusion of new technologies have had tremendous impacts on wildland recreation in recent decades. This article examines the potential economic impacts of research and technical change in wildland recreation. Two evaluation models are presented, a cost-price approach and a research intensity model, which are intended to shed some light on the...

  11. Temporal Changes in Technical and Physical Performances During a Small-Sided Game in Elite Youth Soccer Players

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Alexandre; Saldanha Aoki, Marcelo; Carling, Chris; Alan Rodrigues Lopes, Rafael; Felipe Schultz de Arruda, Ademir; Lima, Marcelo; Cesar Correa, Umberto; Bradley, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been claims that small-sided games (SSG) may generate an appropriate environment to develop youth players’ technical performance associated to game-related problem solving. However, the temporal change in technical performance parameters of youth players during SSG is still unknown. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine temporal changes in technical and physical performances during a small-sided gam...

  12. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisna J LeVaillant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-term AAV-mediated secretion of BDNF or CNTF affected endogenous retinal gene expression. One year after the intravitreal injection of AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP, bi-cistronic AAV-BDNF-GFP or AAV-CNTF-GFP, mRNA was extracted and analyzed using custom 96 well polymerase chain reaction arrays. Of 93 test genes, 56% showed significantly altered expression in AAV-BDNF-GFP and/or AAV-CNTF-GFP retinas compared with AAV-GFP controls. Of these genes, 73% showed differential expression in AAV-BDNF versus AAV-CNTF injected eyes. To focus on retinal ganglion cell changes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was undertaken on mRNA (16 genes obtained from fixed retinal sections in which the ganglion cell layer was enriched. The sign and extent of fold changes in ganglion cell layer gene expression differed markedly from whole retinal samples. Sustained and global alteration in endogenous mRNA expression after gene therapy should be factored into any interpretation of experimental/clinical outcomes, particularly when introducing factors into the central nervous system that require secretion to evoke functionality.

  13. A mitochondrial-targeting near-infrared fluorescent probe for bioimaging and evaluating endogenous superoxide anion changes during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoyue; Wang, Rui; Song, Xinyu; Yu, Fabiao; Lv, Changjun; Chen, Lingxin

    2018-02-01

    The outburst of superoxide anion (O2-) in mitochondrial during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) process will cause a series of oxidative damage including polarity loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, overload of secondary cellular calcium, and cascade apoptosis. To monitor the O2- level fluctuations as well as to evaluate the relationship between O2- concentration and the degree of cell apoptosis during I/R process, we propose a ratiometric near-infrared mitochondrial targeting fluorescent probe Mito-Cy-Tfs for the detection of level changes of O2- in cells and in vivo. The probe Mito-Cy-Tfs is composed of three moieties: near-infrared heptamethine cyanine as fluorescence signal transducer, trifluoromethanesulfonamide as fluorescence modulator, and lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation as mitochondrial guider. The probe can well locate in mitochondria and respond the concentration changes of endogenous O2- selectively and sensitively. The probe has been successfully utilized to image the endogenous O2- fluctuations in four kinds of cell I/R models (glucose deprivation/reperfusion, serum deprivation/reperfusion, oxygen deprivation/reperfusion and glucose-serum-oxygen deprivation/reperfusion). The probe also exhibits deep tissue penetration for real-time imaging of O2-concentration in liver of I/R mice model. We confirm that the adoption of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and postconditioning (IPTC) can protect liver from I/R injury. The probe can be employed to accurately indicate and evaluate the mutual relationship between the levels of O2- and the degrees of organ damage during I/R, IPC and IPTC processes. The above applications make our new probe a potential candidate for the clinical surgery assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVaillant, Chrisna J; Sharma, Anil; Muhling, Jill; Wheeler, Lachlan Pg; Cozens, Greg S; Hellström, Mats; Rodger, Jennifer; Harvey, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-term AAV-mediated secretion of BDNF or CNTF affected endogenous retinal gene expression. One year after the intravitreal injection of AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP), bi-cistronic AAV-BDNF-GFP or AAV-CNTF-GFP, mRNA was extracted and analyzed using custom 96 well polymerase chain reaction arrays. Of 93 test genes, 56% showed significantly altered expression in AAV-BDNF-GFP and/or AAV-CNTF-GFP retinas compared with AAV-GFP controls. Of these genes, 73% showed differential expression in AAV-BDNF versus AAV-CNTF injected eyes. To focus on retinal ganglion cell changes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was undertaken on mRNA (16 genes) obtained from fixed retinal sections in which the ganglion cell layer was enriched. The sign and extent of fold changes in ganglion cell layer gene expression differed markedly from whole retinal samples. Sustained and global alteration in endogenous mRNA expression after gene therapy should be factored into any interpretation of experimental/clinical outcomes, particularly when introducing factors into the central nervous system that require secretion to evoke functionality.

  15. Recent productivity developments and technical change in Danish organic farming - stagnation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Johannes; Graversen, Jesper Tranbjerg; Park, Tim

    and even a slightly negative rate of technical change in the period investigated. These empirical results seem not strong enough to support the view of a profound stagnation in organic milk farming over the last years. We found evidence for a positive relationship between subsidy payments and an increase......This paper attempts to quantitatively measure the change in the productivity of Dan-ish organic farming in recent years by using panel data on 56 organic farms mainly engaged in milk production for the period 2002 to 2004. Based on a translog pro-duction frontier framework the technical and scale...... efficiency on farm level is ana-lysed by considering also curvature consistency. The total change in productivity for the reference period is measured by using the Malmquist total factor productivity in-dex approach based on a time trends as well as a general index model specification. Input specific bias...

  16. Explaining technical change in a small country the Finnish national innovation system

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Pentti

    1994-01-01

    Technical change is produced by the interaction of a large number of technical, economic, social and institutional factors. One of the starting points is the concept of national innovation systems. The aim of this book is to take Finland as an example illustrating the challenges faced by small countries. The characteristics and performance of the Finnish national innovation system of the last couple of decades are analyzed. The Finnish experience is put in a broader context by comparing it with a few other countries. The development paths possible in the near future are assessed. According to the results, many problems remain despite favourable developments in several technology indicators. The rigidities of the social institutions created during the 1970s and 1980s seem to have become obstacles for economic and technological development. There are fairly large differences between the countries studied, and even between the culturally and historically close Nordic countries. However,Finland and Sweden seem to...

  17. Changes in endogenous tissue glutathione level in relation to murine ascites tumor growth and the anticancer activity of cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khynriam D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in glutathione levels were determined in tissues of 11- to 12-week-old Swiss albino mice at different stages of Dalton's lymphoma tumor growth and following cisplatin (8 mg/kg body weight, ip treatment for 24-96 h, keeping 4-5 animals in each experimental group. Glutathione levels increased in spleen of tumor-bearing compared to normal mice (9.95 ± 0.14 vs 7.86 ± 1.64 µmol/g wet weight, P<=0.05 but decreased in blood (0.64 ± 0.10 vs 0.85 ± 0.09 mg/ml and testes (9.28 ± 0.15 vs 10.16 ± 0.28 µmol/g wet weight, P<=0.05. Dalton's lymphoma cells showed an increase in glutathione concentration (4.43 ± 0.26 µmol/g wet weight as compared to splenocytes, their normal counterpart (3.62 ± 0.41 µmol/g wet weight. With the progression of tumor in mice, glutathione levels decreased significantly in testes (~10% and bone marrow cells (~13% while they increased in Dalton's lymphoma cells (28-46% and spleen (15-27%. Glutathione levels in kidney, Dalton's lymphoma cells and bone marrow cells (8.50 ± 1.22, 4.43 ± 0.26 and 3.28 ± 0.17 µmol/g wet weight, respectively decreased significantly (6.04 ± 0.42, 3.51 ± 0.32 and 2.17 ± 0.14 µmol/g wet weight, P<=0.05 after in vivo cisplatin treatment for 24 h. Along with a decrease in glutathione level, the glutathione-S-transferase (GST activity also decreased by 60% in tumor cells after cisplatin treatment. The elevated drug uptake by the tumor cells under the conditions of reduced glutathione concentration and GST activity after treatment could be an important contributory factor to cisplatin's anticancer activity leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, lower doses of cisplatin in combination with buthionine sulfoximine (an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis may be useful in cancer chemotherapy with decreased toxicity in the host.

  18. 76 FR 7810 - Notice of Proposed Change to Section I of the South Dakota and North Dakota State Technical Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Proposed Change to Section I of the South Dakota and North Dakota State Technical Guides AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), United States... technical documents to conduct wetland determinations on agriculture land as part of the National Food...

  19. Social media and nursing practice: changing the balance between the social and technical aspects of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Evan; Mills, Jane; Usher, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Modern communication methods are drastically changing the way people interact with each other. Professions such as nursing need to evolve to remain relevant as social infrastructure changes. In the 1960s, researchers developed a sociotechnical theory that stated workers were more motivated and productive if there was a good balance between the social and technical aspects of their work. Today's technology is blurring the boundaries between the social and the technical thereby transforming human contact and communication into a multi-method process. In Australia, people are adept at utilising social media technology to become more efficient, creative and connected; Australian nurses also need to embrace changing technology to capitalise on the professional opportunities offered by social media. This paper imagines a world where nurses integrate social media into assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing and evaluating care. Discussion draws on a combination of real-world examples of best-practice and blue-sky thinking to demonstrate that evidence-based care must be combined with the adoption of future-forward technology.

  20. Confronting Regulatory Cost and Quality Expectations. An Exploration of Technical Change in Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Margaret [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Spurlock, C. Anna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, Hung-Chia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-21

    The dual purpose of this project was to contribute to basic knowledge about the interaction between regulation and innovation and to inform the cost and benefit expectations related to technical change which are embedded in the rulemaking process of an important area of national regulation. The area of regulation focused on here is minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances and other energy-using products. Relevant both to U.S. climate policy and energy policy for buildings, MEPS remove certain product models from the market that do not meet specified efficiency thresholds.

  1. National policies for technical change: where are the increasing returns to economic research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavitt, K

    1996-11-12

    Improvements over the past 30 years in statistical data, analysis, and related theory have strengthened the basis for science and technology policy by confirming the importance of technical change in national economic performance. But two important features of scientific and technological activities in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries are still not addressed adequately in mainstream economics: (i) the justification of public funding for basic research and (ii) persistent international differences in investment in research and development and related activities. In addition, one major gap is now emerging in our systems of empirical measurement-the development of software technology, especially in the service sector. There are therefore dangers of diminishing returns to the usefulness of economic research, which continues to rely completely on established theory and established statistical sources. Alternative propositions that deserve serious consideration are: (i) the economic usefulness of basic research is in the provision of (mainly tacit) skills rather than codified and applicable information; (ii) in developing and exploiting technological opportunities, institutional competencies are just as important as the incentive structures that they face; and (iii) software technology developed in traditional service sectors may now be a more important locus of technical change than software technology developed in "high-tech" manufacturing.

  2. The effect of in vitro mycorrhization on growth characteristics, changes in endogenous hormones and performance of microplants in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro PARVIZI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. plantlets were inoculated in vitro with an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus intraradices and their growth response, performance and endogenous hormonal status evaluated. A factorial experiment based on a completely randomized design consisting of two potato cultivars (Agria and Sante and four culture media was conducted with four replications. The culture media included non-inoculated Murashige and Skoog (MS medium (control, inoculated MS medium, inoculated half-strength MS medium and inoculated MS medium without vitamins and sugar. To do inoculation, germinated spores of fungus were transferred to the root zone of plantlets. Colonization percentage, total chlorophyll content, internodes and stolon length, shoot diameter, shoot and root fresh and dry weight, leaf area and the level of three endogenous hormones (total auxins, gibberellins and cytokinins were determined. In addition, mini-tuber production was assayed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results demonstrated that the effect of two factors on all characteristics including mini-tuber production was different significantly. Interaction between cultivar and inoculation systems was significantly associated with endogen auxins as well as all range of mini-tuber production. The inoculated MS medium showed the better results, but it did not have significant difference to half-strength MS in terms of plantlet performance and growing parameters. Responses of both cultivars to inoculation were very conspicuous in the production of endogen hormones. Higher endogen hormone levels were associated with elevated growth parameters, greater biomass production and better plantlet performance.

  3. Endogenous price leadership

    OpenAIRE

    van Damme, E.E.C.; Hurkens, S.

    2004-01-01

    We consider a linear price setting duopoly game with differentiated products and determine endogenously which of the players will lead and which will follow. While the follower role is most attractive for each firm, we show that waiting is more risky for the low cost firm so that, consequently, risk dominance considerations, as in Harsanyi and Selten (1988), allow the conclusion that only the high cost firm will choose to wait. Hence, the low cost firm will emerge as the endogenous price leader.

  4. Optical redox ratio using endogenous fluorescence to assess the metabolic changes associated with treatment response of bioconjugated gold nanoparticles in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adavallan, K.; Gurushankar, K.; Nazeer, Shaiju S.; Gohulkumar, M.; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have the potential to assess the metabolic changes during disease development and evaluation of treatment response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study aims to evaluate the effect of mulberry-mediated gold nanoparticles (MAuNPs) in comparison with mulberry leaf extract alone (MLE) for monitoring endogenous fluorophores and to quantify the metabolic changes associated with mitochondrial redox states during streptozotocin-induced diabetic liver tissues using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are autofluorescent and are important optical biomarkers to estimate the redox state of a cell. Significant differences in the autofluorescence spectral signatures between the control and the experimental diabetic animals have been noticed under the excitation wavelength at 320 nm with emission ranging from 350-550 nm. A direct correlation between the progression of diabetes and the levels of collagen and optical redox ratio was observed. The results revealed that a significant increase in the emission of collagen in diabetic liver tissues as compared with the control liver tissues. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio (FAD/(FAD  +  NADH)) observed in diabetic control liver tissues, which indicates an increased oxidative stress compared to the liver tissues of control rats. Further, the extent of increased oxidative stress was confirmed by the reduced levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in diabetic liver tissues. On a comparative basis, treatment with MAuNPs was found to be more effective than MLE for reducing the progression of diabetes and improving the optical redox ratio to a near normal range in streptozotocin-induced diabetic liver tissues. Furthermore, principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA) has been used to

  5. Impact of technical and technological changes on energy efficiency of production company - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwedzka, K.; Gruszka, J.; Szafer, P.

    2016-08-01

    Improving energy efficiency is one of the strategic objectives of the European Union for rational energy economy. To make efforts to improve energy efficiency have been obliged both small and large end-users. This article aims to show the possibilities of improving energy efficiency by introducing technical and technological process changes of pine lumber drying. The object of the research is process of drying lumber implemented in a production company, which is a key supplier of large furniture manufacturer. Pine lumber drying chamber consume about 45% of total electricity in sawmill. According to various sources, drying of 1m3 of lumber uses about 3060kWh and is dependent of inter alia: the drying process itself, the factors affecting the processing time and the desired output moisture content of the timber. The article proposals for changes in the process of drying lumber pine have been positively validated in the company, and as a result their energy consumption per 1 m3 of product declined by 18%.

  6. Socio-economic consequences of technical change in palm fruit processing in Osun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Alimi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The traditional palm fruit processing method is basically manual, but is currently undergoing changes. This study identifies the stages that have been mechanised in traditional processing methods and the socio-economic implications of the technical change to assist decision-making on the superiority or otherwise of the mechanised (modern method over the traditional method used by processors in Osun State of Nigeria. Primary data were collected during the 2004 production season with the aid of a structured questionnaire on the production resources and outputs of the two methods. These were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics, budgetary technique dominance and sensitivity analyses, and attitudinal measure. Results indicate that only two (pounding to form paste and cracking of the stages identified in the traditional method were mechanised in the modern method. This resulted in greater efficiency of palm oil extraction, higher labour productivity, more income to stakeholders, greater market orientation, increased volume of operation and unchanged product types and quality. Other consequences are the creation of one additional group of stakeholders (machine owners, dominance, resilience to adverse yield and machine charges by 27 per cent and 150 per cent, respectively; more favourable attitude, less drudgery and health hazards, less labour requirements (female and lower processing time in the modern method than the traditional method. This made the modern method a better choice, which could boost palm oil production at the aggregate level.

  7. Technical aspects of MRI signal change quantification after gadolinium-based contrast agents' administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Ramalho, Miguel; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Semelka, Richard C

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 2years several studies have been published regarding gadolinium deposition in brain structures in patients with normal renal function after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Most of the publications are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based retrospective studies, where gadolinium deposition may be indirectly measured by evaluating changes in T1 signal intensity (SI) in brain tissue, particularly in the dentate nucleus (DN) and/or globus pallidi (GP). The direct correlation between T1 signal changes and gadolinium deposition was validated by human pathology studies. However, the variability of the MR equipment and parameters used across different publications, along with the inherent limitations of MRI to assess gadolinium in human tissues should be acknowledged when interpreting those studies. Nevertheless, MRI studies remain essential regarding gadolinium bio-distribution knowledge. The aim of this paper is to overview current knowledge of technical aspects of T1 signal intensity evaluation by MRI and describe confounding factors, with the intention to achieve higher accuracy and maximize reproducibility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolution of endogenous analgesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesters, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous pain modulation is a complex phenomenon involved in the perception of pain. It consists of top-down inhibitory and facilitatory pathways that originate at higher sites within the central nervous system and converge at dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord, to modulate incoming afferent

  9. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...

  10. Endogenous leadership in teams

    OpenAIRE

    Huck, S; Rey Biel, P.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study the mechanics of ``leading by example'' in teams. Leadership is beneficial for the entire team when agents are conformists, i.e., dislike effort differentials. We also show how leadership can arise endogenously and discuss what type of leader benefits a team most.

  11. Temporal Changes in Technical and Physical Performances During a Small-Sided Game in Elite Youth Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alexandre; Saldanha Aoki, Marcelo; Carling, Chris; Alan Rodrigues Lopes, Rafael; Felipe Schultz de Arruda, Ademir; Lima, Marcelo; Cesar Correa, Umberto; Bradley, Paul S

    2016-12-01

    There have been claims that small-sided games (SSG) may generate an appropriate environment to develop youth players' technical performance associated to game-related problem solving. However, the temporal change in technical performance parameters of youth players during SSG is still unknown. The aim of this study was to examine temporal changes in technical and physical performances during a small-sided game (SSG) in elite soccer players. Sixty elite youth players (age 14.8 ± 0.2 yr; stature 177 ± 5 cm; body mass 66.2 ± 4.7 kg) completed a 5 v 5 SSG using two repetitions of 8 minutes interspersed by 3 minutes of passive recovery. To evaluate temporal changes in performance, the data were analysed across 4 minutes quarters. Physical performance parameters included the total distance covered (TDC), the frequency of sprints (>18 km•h -1 ), accelerations and decelerations (> 2.0 m•s -2 and - 2.0 m•s -2 ), metabolic power (W•kg -1 ), training impulse (TRIMP), TDC: TRIMP, number of impacts, and body load. Technical performance parameters included goal attempts, total number of tackles, tackles and interceptions, total number of passes, and passes effectiveness. All physical performance parameters decreased from the first to the last quarter with notable declines in TDC, metabolic power and the frequency of sprints, accelerations and decelerations (P 0.05; trivial ES for 1st v 4th quarters: 0.15 - 0.33). The data demonstrate that technical performance is maintained despite substantial declines in physical performance during a SSG in elite youth players. This finding may have implications for designing SSG's for elite youth players to ensure physical, technical and tactical capabilities are optimized. Modifications in player number, pitch dimensions, rules, coach encouragement, for instance, should be included taking into account the main aim of a given session and then focused on overloading physical or technical elements.

  12. Temporal Changes in Technical and Physical Performances During a Small-Sided Game in Elite Youth Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Alexandre; Saldanha Aoki, Marcelo; Carling, Chris; Alan Rodrigues Lopes, Rafael; Felipe Schultz de Arruda, Ademir; Lima, Marcelo; Cesar Correa, Umberto; Bradley, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been claims that small-sided games (SSG) may generate an appropriate environment to develop youth players’ technical performance associated to game-related problem solving. However, the temporal change in technical performance parameters of youth players during SSG is still unknown. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine temporal changes in technical and physical performances during a small-sided game (SSG) in elite soccer players. Methods Sixty elite youth players (age 14.8 ± 0.2 yr; stature 177 ± 5 cm; body mass 66.2 ± 4.7 kg) completed a 5 v 5 SSG using two repetitions of 8 minutes interspersed by 3 minutes of passive recovery. To evaluate temporal changes in performance, the data were analysed across 4 minutes quarters. Physical performance parameters included the total distance covered (TDC), the frequency of sprints (>18 km•h-1), accelerations and decelerations (> 2.0 m•s-2 and - 2.0 m•s-2), metabolic power (W•kg-1), training impulse (TRIMP), TDC: TRIMP, number of impacts, and body load. Technical performance parameters included goal attempts, total number of tackles, tackles and interceptions, total number of passes, and passes effectiveness. Results All physical performance parameters decreased from the first to the last quarter with notable declines in TDC, metabolic power and the frequency of sprints, accelerations and decelerations (P 0.05; trivial ES for 1st v 4th quarters: 0.15 - 0.33). Conclusions The data demonstrate that technical performance is maintained despite substantial declines in physical performance during a SSG in elite youth players. This finding may have implications for designing SSG’s for elite youth players to ensure physical, technical and tactical capabilities are optimized. Modifications in player number, pitch dimensions, rules, coach encouragement, for instance, should be included taking into account the main aim of a given session and then focused on overloading physical or technical

  13. Time Talk: On Small Changes That Enact Infrastructural Mentoring for Undergraduate Women in Technical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Patricia; Moore, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    This article brings together the communication needs and positioning of women in technical areas, and asks "how can technical communication classes contribute to the mentoring of young women engineers at a time when many of those women want to be identified as engineers instead of being spotlighted as women in engineering?" Incorporating…

  14. The change in physical and mechanical properties of technical fabric by means of plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyushina, S.; Krasina, I.; Minyazova, A.; Antonova, M.; Parsanov, A.; Eworo, B.

    2017-11-01

    The properties of a technical cushion fabric modified by a low-temperature plasma are studied. It established that the treatment with plasma of low pressure allows us to give anti-adhesive properties of technical fabrics with improvement of physical and mechanical properties.

  15. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  16. Endogenous growth and the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withagen, C.A.A.M.; Vellinga, N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between environmental policy and growth, from the perspective of endogenous growth theory. In particular three standard endogenous growth models are supplemented with environmental issues, such as pollution and exhaustibility of natural resources. It is found

  17. Buyer Search Costs and Endogenous Product Design

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitri Kuksov

    2004-01-01

    Buyer search costs for price are changing in many markets. Through a model of buyer and seller behavior, I consider the effects of changing search costs on prices both when product differentiation is fixed and when it is endogenously determined in equilibrium. If firms cannot change product design, lower buyer search costs for price lead to increased price competition. However, if product design is a decision variable, lower search costs for price may also lead to higher product differentiati...

  18. Immigration, Endogenous Technology Adoption and Wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray Chaudhuri, A.; Pandey, Manish

    2015-01-01

    We document that immigration to U.S. states has increased the mass of workers at the lower range of the skill distribution. We use this change in skill distribution of workers to analyze the effect of immigration on wages. Our model allows firms to endogenously respond to the immigration-induced

  19. Endogenous cannabinoids and appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, T C; Williams, C M

    2001-06-01

    Since pre-history, Cannabis sativa has been exploited for its potent and manifold pharmacological actions. Amongst the most renowned of these actions is a tendency to provoke ravenous eating. The characterization of the psychoactive principals in cannabis (exogenous cannabinoids) and, more recently, the discovery of specific brain cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) has stimulated research into the physiological roles of endocannabinoid systems. In this review, we critically discuss evidence from the literature that describe studies on animals and human subjects to support endocannabinoid involvement in the control of appetite. We describe the hyperphagic actions of the exogenous cannabinoid, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and the endogenous CB1 ligands, anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol, and present evidence to support a specific role of endocannabinoid systems in appetitive processes related to the incentive and reward properties of food. A case is made for more comprehensive and systematic analyses of cannabinoid actions on eating, in the anticipation of improved therapies for disorders of appetite and body weight, and a better understanding of the biopsychological processes underlying hunger.

  20. Reduction in the endogenous arginine decarboxylase transcript levels in rice leads to depletion of the putrescine and spermidine pools with no concomitant changes in the expression of downstream genes in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung-Nghia, Pham; Bassie, Ludovic; Safwat, Gehan; Thu-Hang, Pham; Lepri, Olivia; Rocha, Pedro; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

    2003-11-01

    We investigated whether down-regulation of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity and concomitant changes in polyamine levels result in changes in the expression of downstream genes in the polyamine pathway. We generated transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants in which the rice adc gene was down-regulated by expression of its antisense oat (Avena sativa L.) ortholog. Plants expressed the oat mRNA adc transcript at different levels. The endogenous transcript was down-regulated in five out of eight plant lineages we studied in detail. Reduction in the steady-state rice adc mRNA levels resulted in a concomitant decrease in ADC activity. The putrescine and spermidine pool was significantly reduced in plants with lower ADC activity. Expression of the rice ornithine decarboxylase (odc), S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (samdc) and spermidine synthase (spd syn) transcripts was not affected. We demonstrate that even though levels of the key metabolites in the pathway were compromised, this did not influence steady-state transcription levels of the other genes involved in the pathway. Our results provide an insight into the different regulatory mechanisms that control gene expression in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway in plants by demonstrating that the endogenous pathway is uncoupled from manipulations that modulate polyamine levels by expression of orthologous transgenes.

  1. Technical variability is greater than biological variability in a microarray experiment but both are outweighed by changes induced by stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope A Bryant

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A central issue in the design of microarray-based analysis of global gene expression is that variability resulting from experimental processes may obscure changes resulting from the effect being investigated. This study quantified the variability in gene expression at each level of a typical in vitro stimulation experiment using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The primary objective was to determine the magnitude of biological and technical variability relative to the effect being investigated, namely gene expression changes resulting from stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human PBMC were stimulated in vitro with LPS, with replication at 5 levels: 5 subjects each on 2 separate days with technical replication of LPS stimulation, amplification and hybridisation. RNA from samples stimulated with LPS and unstimulated samples were hybridised against common reference RNA on oligonucleotide microarrays. There was a closer correlation in gene expression between replicate hybridisations (0.86-0.93 than between different subjects (0.66-0.78. Deconstruction of the variability at each level of the experimental process showed that technical variability (standard deviation (SD 0.16 was greater than biological variability (SD 0.06, although both were low (SD<0.1 for all individual components. There was variability in gene expression both at baseline and after stimulation with LPS and proportion of cell subsets in PBMC was likely partly responsible for this. However, gene expression changes after stimulation with LPS were much greater than the variability from any source, either individually or combined. CONCLUSIONS: Variability in gene expression was very low and likely to improve further as technical advances are made. The finding that stimulation with LPS has a markedly greater effect on gene expression than the degree of variability provides confidence that microarray-based studies can be used to

  2. The Sector Bias of Skill-biased Technical Change and the Rising Skill Premium in Transition Economies

    OpenAIRE

    Piero Esposito; Robert Stehrer

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we test the hypothesis that the sector bias of skill-biased technical change is important in explaining the rising relative wage of skilled workers in the manufacturing sector in three Central and Eastern European transition countries. The evidence for Hungary and Poland is consistent with the sector bias being important in explaining the rising wage premium; the hypotheses is however not confirmed for the Czech Republic.

  3. [Change management: An analysis of actors; perceptions about technical assistance in the Democratic Republic of Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribesse, Nathalie; Iyeti, Alain; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Technical assistance (TA) is a common component of health system strengthening interventions. This type of intervention is too often designed and evaluated according to a logic that fails to take into account social complexity. Actors' perceptions are one element of this complexity. This article presents a study conducted in the Democratic Republic of Congo designed to identify perceptions concerning two types of technical support providers for health system strengthening: long-term technical assistants (agents of development agencies) and provincial technical advisors (agents of the Ministry of Health). Interviews were conducted with an innovative tool inspired by the principles of systems thinking. Interviewees were actors involved in a TA intervention in the province of Bandundu. Their expectations regarding TA providers were identified in terms of personal characteristics (knowledge, know-how and interpersonal skills), roles, and styles of interaction for capacity building ("interventionist/ prescriptive axes"). Interviewees emphasized the importance of mutual learning and the quality of interactions, which depends on TA provider's interpersonal skills and mutual willingness. Perceptions of TA provider's characteristics tend to be similar, but several differences were observed concerning the expectations about the roles of TAs, and the style that should be adopted for capacity building. Ignoring these differences in expectations may be a threat to the effectiveness of TA.

  4. Cognitive and Technical Skill Assessment in Surgical Education: a Changing Horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergis, Ashley; Hardy, Krista

    2017-04-01

    Assessment is an integral component of training and credentialing surgeons for practice. Traditional methods of cognitive and technical appraisal are well established but have clear shortcomings. This review outlines the components of the surgical care assessment model, identifies the deficits of current evaluation techniques, and discusses novel and emerging technologies that attempt to ameliorate this educational void.

  5. 75 FR 32858 - Medicare Program; Policy and Technical Changes to the Medicare Advantage and the Medicare...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... ``medical review'' is corrected to read ``medication review''. B. Correction of Errors in the Regulations... Prescription Drug Benefit Programs; Corrections AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Correction of final rule. SUMMARY: This document corrects technical and typographical errors in...

  6. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Liu, Y.; Barnes, J. J.; Boyce, J. W.; Day, J. M. D.; Elardo, S. M.; Hui, H.; Magna, T.; Ni, P.; Tartese, R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The chapter will begin with an introduction that defines magmatic volatiles (e.g., H, F, Cl, S) versus geochemical volatiles (e.g., K, Rb, Zn). We will discuss our approach of understanding both types of volatiles in lunar samples and lay the ground work for how we will determine the overall volatile budget of the Moon. We will then discuss the importance of endogenous volatiles in shaping the "Newer Views of the Moon", specifically how endogenous volatiles feed forward into processes such as the origin of the Moon, magmatic differentiation, volcanism, and secondary processes during surface and crustal interactions. After the introduction, we will include a re-view/synthesis on the current state of 1) apatite compositions (volatile abundances and isotopic compositions); 2) nominally anhydrous mineral phases (moderately to highly volatile); 3) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar pyroclastic glass beads; 4) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar basalts; 5) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of melt inclusions; and finally 6) experimental constraints on mineral-melt partitioning of moderately to highly volatile elements under lunar conditions. We anticipate that each section will summarize results since 2007 and focus on new results published since the 2015 Am Min review paper on lunar volatiles [9]. The next section will discuss how to use sample abundances of volatiles to understand the source region and potential caveats in estimating source abundances of volatiles. The following section will include our best estimates of volatile abundances and isotopic compositions (where permitted by available data) for each volatile element of interest in a number of important lunar reservoirs, including the crust, mantle, KREEP, and bulk Moon. The final section of the chapter will focus upon future work, outstanding questions

  7. Endogenous versus tumor-specific host response to breast carcinoma: a study of stromal response in synchronous breast primaries and biopsy site changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Julie M; Beck, Andrew H; Pate, Lisa L; Witten, Daniela; Zhu, Shirley X; Montgomery, Kelli D; Allison, Kimberly H; van de Rijn, Matt; West, Robert B

    2011-02-01

    We recently described two types of stromal response in breast cancer derived from gene expression studies of tenosynovial giant cell tumors and fibromatosis. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the basis of this stromal response--whether they are elicited by individual tumors or whether they represent an endogenous host reaction produced by the patient. Stromal signatures from patients with synchronous dual primaries were analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray (n = 26 pairs) to evaluate the similarity of stromal responses in different tumors within the same patient. We also characterized the extent to which the stromal signatures were conserved between stromal response to injury compared to the stromal response to carcinoma using gene expression profiling and tissue microarray immunohistochemistry. The two stromal response signatures showed divergent associations in synchronous primaries: the DTF fibroblast response is more likely to be similar in a patient with multiple breast primaries (permutation analysis P = 0.0027), whereas CSF1 macrophage response shows no significant concordance in separate tumors within a given patient. The DTF fibroblast signature showed more concordance across normal, cancer, and biopsy site samples from within a patient, than across normal, cancer, and biopsy site samples from a random group of patients, whereas the CSF1 macrophage response did not. The results suggest that the DTF fibroblast response is host-specific, whereas the CSF1 response may be tumor-elicited. Our findings provide further insight into stromal response and may facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies to target particular stromal subtypes. ©2010 AACR.

  8. Endogenous Fertility and Development Traps with Endogenous Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Fanti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We extend the literature on endogenous lifetime and economic growth by Chakraborty (2004 and Bunzel and Qiao (2005 to endogenous fertility. We show that development traps due to underinvestments in health cannot appear when fertility is an economic decision variable and the costs of children are represented by a constant fraction of the parents' income used for their upbringing.

  9. Dynamics of changes in the structure and morbidity level of technical college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tserkovnaya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct a comparative analysis of the dynamics and structure of morbidity technical college students. Material & Methods: analysis of scientific and methodical literature, the study of statistical reports of the city's 20th student polyclinic in Kharkov. Results: it found that students major morbidity factors for noncommunicable diseases are low locomotors activity in combination with a high traffic load, deterioration of socio-economic conditions, and the growth of chronic fatigue, which leads to a reduction of compensatory-adaptation reactions of the organism. It was revealed that the highest level of prevalence have diseases of the respiratory system, vision and diseases of the nervous system. Conclusion: these data suggest about the maximum growth rate of circulatory diseases, endocrine and urogenital systems, infectious and parasitic diseases in the last 10 years. This problem requires the development and implementation of various activities aimed at counteracting the risk factors of diseases among technical college students.

  10. The identity approach for assessing socio-technical resilience to climate change : Example of flood risk management for the Island of Dordrecht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersonius, B.; Ashley, R.; Zevenbergen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent EU guidance on adaptation calls for the enhancement of socio-technical resilience to climate change. However, socio-technical resilience is relatively poorly defined and this makes it difficult to apply in practice. This paper uses the concept of identity as a vehicle to advance the

  11. Inhibition of the all-trans Retinoic Acid (atRA) Hydroxylases CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 Results in Dynamic, Tissue-Specific Changes in Endogenous atRA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevison, Faith; Hogarth, Cathryn; Tripathy, Sasmita; Kent, Travis; Isoherranen, Nina

    2017-07-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is a ligand for several nuclear receptors and acts as a critical regulator of many physiologic processes. The cytochrome P450 family 26 (CYP26) enzymes are responsible for atRA clearance, and are potential drug targets to increase concentrations of endogenous atRA in a tissue-specific manner. Talarozole is a potent inhibitor of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1, and has shown some success in clinical trials. However, it is not known what magnitude of change is needed in tissue atRA concentrations to promote atRA signaling changes. The aim of this study was to quantify the increase in endogenous atRA concentrations necessary to alter atRA signaling in target organs, and to establish the relationship between CYP26 inhibition and altered atRA concentrations in tissues. Following a single 2.5-mg/kg dose of talarozole to mice, atRA concentrations increased up to 5.7-, 2.7-, and 2.5-fold in serum, liver, and testis, respectively, resulting in induction of Cyp26a1 in the liver and testis and Rar β and Pgc 1β in liver. The increase in atRA concentrations was well predicted from talarozole pharmacokinetics and in vitro data of CYP26 inhibition. After multiple doses of talarozole, a significant increase in atRA concentrations was observed in serum but not in liver or testis. This lack of increase in atRA concentrations correlated with an increase in CYP26A1 expression in the liver. The increased atRA concentrations in serum without a change in liver suggest that CYP26B1 in extrahepatic sites plays a key role in regulating systemic atRA exposure. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Producing Scientific and Strategic Guidance for California's Department of Water Resources: The Climate Change Technical Advisory Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyakum, J. R.; Austin, B. N.; Curtis, D. C.; Anderson, M.; Alpert, H.; Young, S.; Herson, A.; Schwarz, A.; Kavvas, M. L.; Langridge, R.; Lynn, E.; Anderson, J.; Redmond, K. T.; Dettinger, M. D.; Correa, M.; Franco, G.; Cayan, D.; Georgakakos, K.

    2015-12-01

    Diverse areas of expertise are needed to describe and assess a changing climate and provide guidance for the agency that runs the largest state-built, multi-purpose water project in the U.S. California's State Water Project provides: drinking water for more than 25 million people, flood control, power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife protection, and water quality improvements. Hydrologic impacts under a changing climate include rising seas, reduced ratio of snow to rain, earlier snowmelt and higher temperatures; all of which are being detected. To improve the scientific basis for decisions and enhance the consistency of climate change approaches, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) empaneled a Climate Change Technical Advisory Group (CCTAG) for guidance on the scientific aspects of climate change, its impacts on water resources, the use and creation of planning approaches and analytical tools, and the development of adaptation responses. To carry out DWR's mission, incorporation of climate change into DWR's planning, projects, and other activities must be consistent, science-based, and continually improved through an iterative process. Hydrologists, academicians, modelers, planners, lawyers and practitioners convened regularly to tackle these complicated issues in water management policy, including climate change impacts on extreme events. Actions taken in response to the CCTAG recommendations will move California toward more sustainable management of water and related resources. DWR will release a technical report of CCTAG guidance and perspectives in 2015. The process to convene, collaborate and distribute the findings of this CCTAG will be the focus of this presentation. An academician and water resources practitioner will share their perspectives on the processes driving CCTAG's work.

  13. Socio-technical change: Developing narratives for the Danish energy and transport sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken

    The choices of more sustainable technologies for citizens, are highly dependent on political processes (Kern 2015). To secure impact on actual policy making, stakeholder participation from for instance researchers, policy makers and citizen, is crucial (Volkery and Ribeiro 2009). Although Denmark...... from road transports (EU, 2014). Thus it is important to focus on political actors and processes within socio-technical transitions on this area. The paper is based on the COMETS project, which main focus is policy advice in the Danish energy and transport sector to achieve a fossil-fuel free energy...

  14. Moving towards Energy Self-Sufficiency Based on Renewables: Comparative Case Studies on the Emergence of Regional Processes of Socio-Technical Change in Germany

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruppert-Winkel, Chantal; Hauber, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    .... A processual analysis of three case studies from regions in Germany that are moving towards renewable energy self-sufficiency were conducted in order to better understand this process of socio-technical change...

  15. Societal response to chronic environmental change: The role of evolving scientific and technical information in state coastal erosion management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Mark; James, Thomas E.; Deyle, Robert E.

    1992-06-01

    Natural hazards, such as acute storm events, often exacerbate chronic change processes and heighten public awareness of overt and latent risks to society. This paper reports the results of a study of the development of coastal erosion management policies from 1960 to 1990 in Florida, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, all of which have been subject to marked chronic and acute environmental changes. The case studies were guided by a conceptual framework that links acute and chronic environmental changes with state and federal policity initiatives as well as the scientific community. We traced the evolution of policies and programs and the policy innovation process in these states that were designed to mitigate the risks associated with coastal erosion, and documented the role that scientific and technical information played. From information drawn from published and unpublished literature as well as personal interviews, the case studies reveal a wide variation in policy responses to coastal erosion phenomena and exhibit differing degrees of program success. Although the case studies preclude broad generalizations, they illustrate clearly the importance of institution to enable policy enterpreneurs and other key individuals a base for acquiring and using scientific and technical information for policy development and implementation.

  16. Surface Signature Characterization at SPE through Ground-Proximal Methods: Methodology Change and Technical Justification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    A portion of LANL’s FY15 SPE objectives includes initial ground-based or ground-proximal investigations at the SPE Phase 2 site. The area of interest is the U2ez location in Yucca Flat. This collection serves as a baseline for discrimination of surface features and acquisition of topographic signatures prior to any development or pre-shot activities associated with SPE Phase 2. Our team originally intended to perform our field investigations using previously vetted ground-based (GB) LIDAR methodologies. However, the extended proposed time frame of the GB LIDAR data collection, and associated data processing time and delivery date, were unacceptable. After technical consultation and careful literature research, LANL identified an alternative methodology to achieve our technical objectives and fully support critical model parameterization. Very-low-altitude unmanned aerial systems (UAS) photogrammetry appeared to satisfy our objectives in lieu of GB LIDAR. The SPE Phase 2 baseline collection was used as a test of this UAS photogrammetric methodology.

  17. Climate Change Challenges for Extension Educators: Technical Capacity and Cultural Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Terrie A.; Middendorf, Gerad; Campbell, Amber; Tomlinson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We surveyed Extension educators in the southern Great Plains about their attitudes and beliefs regarding climate change, their interactions with constituents surrounding climate change, and challenges they face in engaging constituents on the topic of climate change. Production-oriented and sociocultural challenges in meeting constituents'…

  18. Impacts of climate change on biodiversity, ecosystems, and ecosystem services: technical input to the 2013 National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, Michelle D.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Staudt, Amanda; Carter, Shawn L.; Stuart, F. Stuart; Kareiva, Peter; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Stein, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystems, and the biodiversity and services they support, are intrinsically dependent on climate. During the twentieth century, climate change has had documented impacts on ecological systems, and impacts are expected to increase as climate change continues and perhaps even accelerates. This technical input to the National Climate Assessment synthesizes our scientific understanding of the way climate change is affecting biodiversity, ecosystems, ecosystem services, and what strategies might be employed to decrease current and future risks. Building on past assessments of how climate change and other stressors are affecting ecosystems in the United States and around the world, we approach the subject from several different perspectives. First, we review the observed and projected impacts on biodiversity, with a focus on genes, species, and assemblages of species. Next, we examine how climate change is affecting ecosystem structural elements—such as biomass, architecture, and heterogeneity—and functions—specifically, as related to the fluxes of energy and matter. People experience climate change impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems as changes in ecosystem services; people depend on ecosystems for resources that are harvested, their role in regulating the movement of materials and disturbances, and their recreational, cultural, and aesthetic value. Thus, we review newly emerging research to determine how human activities and a changing climate are likely to alter the delivery of these ecosystem services. This technical input also examines two cross-cutting topics. First, we recognize that climate change is happening against the backdrop of a wide range of other environmental and anthropogenic stressors, many of which have caused dramatic ecosystem degradation already. This broader range of stressors interacts with climate change, and complicates our abilities to predict and manage the impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems, and the services they support. The

  19. Technical progress and its factors in Russia’s economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon György Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper long-term growth in Russia’s economy is viewed in the context of technical progress, based on both neoclassical and endogenous theories. The dynamics of economic growth with some aspects of catch-up development are examined, as well as capital deepening. TFP is quantified in terms of both output and productivity increases to reveal the leading role of embodied technical progress in productivity growth. An endogenous growth model helped to discern three complex factors of technical progress in the Russian economy, to which at the macro level a factor related to natural wealth (oil and gas resources was added. This enabled the author to conclude that the most important macroeconomic factor of Russia’s technical progress in the half century from the early 1960s to the late 2000s was its immobile component. At the manufacturing level the situation was more complicated, as the initial leadership of creative technical progress was superseded by the dominance of the mobile factor. The collapse of the Soviet Union made the Russian economy more service-oriented and radically changed the conditions of economic modernization, in which technology transfer ensured by FDI began to play a more prominent part, particularly after the default of 1998.

  20. Endogenous, Imperfectly Competitive Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitta-Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen

    We investigate how imperfect competition affects the occurrence and the properties of endogenous, rational expectations business cycles in an overlapping generations model with constant returns to scale in production. The model has explicit product and labor markets all characterized...

  1. Economic-environmental modelling of Dutch dairy farms incorporating technical and institutional change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Circumstances in Dutch dairy farming are changing continuously. The general objective in this thesis was to develop and apply a method to enlighten the consequences of these changing circumstances for dairy farms. The research was started with the development of a linear programming model

  2. Analysis of change orders in geotechnical engineering work at INDOT : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    There was a perception at INDOT that the number of change orders connected with geotechnical work was excessive, and that, as a consequence, geotechnical projects were not completed on time or within budget. It was reported that INDOT construction pr...

  3. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Qin, Zhangcai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Mueller, Steffen [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Energy Resources Center; Kwon, Ho-young [International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC (United States); Wander, Michelle M. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources; Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2016-09-01

    The $\\underline{C}$arbon $\\underline{C}$alculator for $\\underline{L}$and $\\underline{U}$se Change from $\\underline{B}$iofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2014 which includes corn and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass.

  4. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) Users’ Manual and Technical Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qin, Zhangcai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mueller, Steffen [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Kwon, Ho-young [International Food Policy Research Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Wander, Michelle M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass, and a soy biodiesel pathway. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2017 which includes five ethanol LUC scenarios and four soy biodiesel LUC scenarios.

  5. A dynamic model of socio-technical change : institutions, actors and technologies in interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Fünfschilling, Lea

    2014-01-01

    Many of today’s societal problems, such as climate change, resource scarcity or environmental degradation call for some sort of radical social and often also technological change. Especially utility sectors like water, energy or transportation are increasingly pressured to transition to a more sustainable mode of operation, as for instance seen in the recent political efforts in Switzerland and Germany to introduce a transition in the energy sector from fossil and nuclear to renewable energy ...

  6. Endogenous growth theory and regional development policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetanović Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerous versions of endogenous explanations of economic growth emphasize the importance of technological change driving forces, as well as the existence of appropriate institutional arrangements. Endogenous growth theory contributes to a better understanding of various experiences with long-term growth of countries and regions. It changes the key assumptions of the Neoclassical growth theory and participates in the modern regional development physiology explanation. Based on these conclusions, the paper: a explicates the most important theoretical postulates of the theory, b explains the most important factors of economic growth in the regions in light of the Endogenous growth theory messages and c emphasizes the key determinants of regional competitiveness which in our view is conceptually between the phenomena of micro- and macro-competitiveness and represents their necessary and unique connection. First of all, micro-competitiveness is transformed into a regional competitiveness; then regional competitiveness is transformed into a macro-competitiveness. In turn, macro - influences the microeconomic competitiveness, and the circle is closed. After that, the process starts over again.

  7. Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy-peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Wennstig, G; Forsgren, S; Danielson, P

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established model for Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in the tendon. Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercised controls. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed. EIA revealed increased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in the controls (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statistically significant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptor was also found on tenocytes. Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This shows that increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise, as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends were observed in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  8. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley, D.; Nowak, Robert S.; Fenstermaker, Lynn, F.; Young, Michael,H.

    2007-11-30

    In order to anticipate the effects of global change on ecosystem function, it is essential that predictive relationships be established linking ecosystem function to global change scenarios. The Mojave Desert is of considerable interest with respect to global change. It contains the driest habitats in North America, and thus most closely approximates the world’s great arid deserts. In order to examine the effects of climate and land use changes, in 2001 we established a long-term manipulative global change experiment, called the Mojave Global Change Facility. Manipulations in this study include the potential effects of (1) increased summer rainfall (75 mm over three discrete 25 mm events), (2) increased nitrogen deposition (10 and 40 kg ha-1), and (3) the disturbance of biological N-fixing crusts . Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypotheses include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production through an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plant production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plant and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most

  9. L'impatto delle nuove tecnologie sulle forme di lavoro: una prospettiva europea (Technical Change and Employment: A European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Corsi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the role of knowledge within the process of growth and job creation in the European Union. Many features of the so-called knowledge-based economy are connected with the increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICT, that radically changes the conditions for the production and distribution of knowledge as well as its coupling to the production system. Technological change not only stimulates investment in physical capital but also brings to knowledge accumulation: human skills are required to implement, maintain, adapt and use technologies embodied in physical capital. Indeed, as new technologies become more widespread, certain skills may be less in demand--because many tasks once carried out manually are now performed by automated equipment--while the demand for workers able to maintain, program, and develop these sophisticated technologies rise. There is therefore concern that technological change may cause unemployment as the result of a mismatch between the demand for labour and the various skills of workers; in this way it may also increase the polarisation of society by widening the gap in income and employment opportunities between those whose skills have been displaced by new technology and those who create and use it.           JEL Codes: O33, J24, D83, J23Keywords: Information, Job Creation, Knowledge, Technical, Technological Change, Technologies

  10. Aerosols: connection between regional climatic change and air quality (Iupac Technical Report)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slanina, J.; Zhang, Y.H.

    2004-01-01

    yAerosols play an important role in all problems connected with air pollution, ranging from very local effects and human health problems to regional problems such as acid deposition and eutrophication up to continental and global questions such as stratospheric ozone loss and climatic change. In

  11. Regional impacts of technical change: the case of structural particleboard in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi Xu; David N. Bengston; Hans M. Gregersen; Allen L. Lundgren

    1992-01-01

    Analyzes the regional impacts of research benefits in the United States due to the introduction of structural particleboard. The distribution of consumer benefits, producer benefits, direct employment impacts, and changes in wood requirements are analyzed for the four census regions. The distribution of benefits is found to differ widely between regions, indicating...

  12. 77 FR 18716 - Transportation Security Administration Postal Zip Code Change; Technical Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... Maryland changed to new zip codes that are unique to TSA to enhance the safety and security of incoming... routing symbol. Since 2008, through other rulemaking actions, TSA revised most sections of TSA regulations..., Maritime security, Motor carriers, Motor vehicle carriers, Ports, Seamen, Security measures, Security...

  13. Learning and the New Workplace: Impacts of Technology Change on Postsecondary Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbon, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    The experience of technology change pervades people's lives. Sometimes it comes in the guise of a new smart phone, e-reader, or patch for a leaky artery. Other times, it appears as a new way to track packages, connect with others through social networks, or find one's way around an unfamiliar place. Or it reveals itself as a new surgical…

  14. Suburban School Districts and Demographic Change: The Technical, Normative, and Political Dimensions of Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Diem, Sarah; Welton, Anjalé

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Suburban school districts have undergone significant demographic shifts over the past several decades. The research literature to date, however, has yet to explore how suburban district leaders are responding to such changes, or examine the factors that shape response. In this article, we apply a "zone of mediation" framework to…

  15. Public Communication of Technical Issues in Today's Changing Visual Language - 12436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Communication regarding the management of radioactive materials is a well-established challenge. Residents and consumers have suspected for years that companies and governments place short-term economic concerns ahead of health and safety. This skepticism is compounded with increased attention to safety issues at nuclear power plants everywhere after Fukushima. Nonetheless, today's environment presents unexpected opportunities to transform public fear into teachable moments that bring knowledge and facts to discussions on nuclear energy. In the weeks following Japan's crisis, the lack of reliable information on radiation levels saw citizens taking to the streets with dosimeters and Geiger counters in crowd-sourced radiation monitoring efforts. Efforts, based mainly online, represent a growing set of examples of how internet and cell-phone technology are being put to use in emergency situations. The maps, graphs and tables created to meet public interest also exemplify some of the psychological priorities of audiences and present learning tools that can improve future education efforts in non-emergency situations. Industry outreach efforts often consist of technical details and quantitative data that are difficult for lay audiences to interpret. The intense attention to nuclear energy issues since last March has produced a wide array of visual samples. Citizen monitors, news organizations, government agencies and others have displayed quantitative information in innovative ways. Their efforts offer new perspective on what charts, maps and info graphics do - or need to do - to illustrate requirements, record assessments and promote understanding of nuclear-waste issues. Surveying the best examples, nuclear communicators can improve their offerings of easy-to-use, evidence-based visuals to inform stakeholders. Familiar to most communications professionals in the nuclear industry, risk communication is a science-based approach with over three decades of

  16. A combined model to assess technical and economic consequences of changing conditions and management options for wastewater utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessler, Mathias; Tränckner, Jens

    2018-02-01

    The paper presents a simplified model that quantifies economic and technical consequences of changing conditions in wastewater systems on utility level. It has been developed based on data from stakeholders and ministries, collected by a survey that determined resulting effects and adapted measures. The model comprises all substantial cost relevant assets and activities of a typical German wastewater utility. It consists of three modules: i) Sewer for describing the state development of sewer systems, ii) WWTP for process parameter consideration of waste water treatment plants (WWTP) and iii) Cost Accounting for calculation of expenses in the cost categories and resulting charges. Validity and accuracy of this model was verified by using historical data from an exemplary wastewater utility. Calculated process as well as economic parameters shows a high accuracy compared to measured parameters and given expenses. Thus, the model is proposed to support strategic, process oriented decision making on utility level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, Cameron [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Capps, Scott [Vertum Partners LP, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  18. Bladder catheter protocol: technical modification for the change of Long-Term bladder catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rueda Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of urinary catheters is a common practice in chronic patients for both outpatients and inpatients. This action involves a large number of nursing interventions either planned or caused by emergency (obstruction, incorrect implantation, etc.... This modification of the catheter technique tries to improve the patient’s quality of life by minimizing the stress produced by urethral catheter replacements and reducing malpractice risks. This change in the urinary catheter technique also intends to alleviate some of the side effects of permanent urethral catheterization. By filling the bladder with saline prior to the change of catheter, it is possible to get a quick and safe implantation, dragging possible sediment and microorganisms and thereby reducing the number of nursing actions related to the process of the urinary catheter replacement (obstruction or incorrect catheter implantations etc.

  19. Workshop on climate change and salmon production, Vancouver, March 26-27, 1998: technical report

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The Workshop on Climate Change and Salmon Production was held in Vancouver, Canada, 26-27 March 1998. The Workshop was organized and sponsored by the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC). Each Party to the Commission designated one scientist to the Workshop Steering Committee. Each member of the Steering Committee chaired one half-day session of the Workshop. All necessary arrangements were made by the NPAFC Secretariat in cooperation with the Steering Committee and the Canadian P...

  20. Endogenous versus exogenous shocks in systems with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Helmstetter, A.

    2003-02-01

    Systems with long-range persistence and memory are shown to exhibit different precursory as well as recovery patterns in response to shocks of exogenous versus endogenous origins. By endogenous, we envision either fluctuations resulting from an underlying chaotic dynamics or from a stochastic forcing origin which may be external or be an effective coarse-grained description of the microscopic fluctuations. In this scenario, endogenous shocks result from a kind of constructive interference of accumulated fluctuations whose impacts survive longer than the large shocks themselves. As a consequence, the recovery after an endogenous shock is in general slower at early times and can be at long times either slower or faster than after an exogenous perturbation. This offers the tantalizing possibility of distinguishing between an endogenous versus exogenous cause of a given shock, even when there is no “smoking gun”. This could help in investigating the exogenous versus self-organized origins in problems such as the causes of major biological extinctions, of change of weather regimes and of the climate, in tracing the source of social upheaval and wars, and so on. Sornette et al., Volatility fingerprints of large stocks: endogenous versus exogenous, cond-mat/0204626 has already shown how this concept can be applied concretely to differentiate the effects on financial markets of the 11 September 2001 attack or of the coup against Gorbachev on 19 August 1991 (exogenous) from financial crashes such as October 1987 (endogenous).

  1. PERSPECTIVE: Technical fixes and climate change: optimizing for risks and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Philip J.

    2010-09-01

    Scientists and society in general are becoming increasingly concerned about the risks of climate change from the emission of greenhouse gases (IPCC 2007). Yet emissions continue to increase (Raupach et al 2007), and achieving reductions soon enough to avoid large and undesirable impacts requires a near-revolutionary global transformation of energy and transportation systems (Hoffert et al 1998). The size of the transformation and lack of an effective societal response have motivated some to explore other quite controversial strategies to mitigate some of the planetary consequences of these emissions. These strategies have come to be known as geoengineering: 'the deliberate manipulation of the planetary environment to counteract anthropogenic climate change' (Keith 2000). Concern about society's inability to reduce emissions has driven a resurgence in interest in geoengineering, particularly following the call for more research in Crutzen (2006). Two classes of geoengineering solutions have developed: (1) methods to draw CO2 out of the atmosphere and sequester it in a relatively benign form; and (2) methods that change the energy flux entering or leaving the planet without modifying CO2 concentrations by, for example, changing the planetary albedo. Only the latter methods are considered here. Summaries of many of the methods, scientific questions, and issues of testing and implementation are discussed in Launder and Thompson (2009) and Royal Society (2009). The increased attention indicates that geoengineering is not a panacea and all strategies considered will have risks and consequences (e.g. Robock 2008, Trenberth and Dai 2007). Recent studies involving comprehensive Earth system models can provide insight into subtle interactions between components of the climate system. For example Rasch et al (2009) found that geoengineering by changing boundary clouds will not simultaneously 'correct' global averaged surface temperature, precipitation, and sea ice to present

  2. National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Final Technical Report 1990-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasios Toulopoulos

    2007-11-01

    Research conducted by the six NIGEC Regional Centers during recent years is reported. An overview of the NIGEC program from its beginnings provides a description and evaluation of the program's vision, strategy and major accomplishments. The program's purpose was to support academic research on environmental change in regions of the country that had historically received relatively little federal funding. The overall vision of NIGEC may be stated as the performance of academic research on the regional interactions between ecosystems and climate. NIGEC's research presents important evidence on the impacts of climate variability and change, and in some cases adaptability, for a broad range of both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, and has thereby documented significant regional issues on the environmental responses to climate change. NIGEC's research has demonstrated large regional differences in the atmospheric carbon exchange budgets of croplands and forests, that there are significant variations of this exchange on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales due to atmospheric variability (including temperature, precipitation and cloudiness), and that management practices and past history have predominant effects in grasslands and croplands. It is the mid-latitude forests, however, that have received more attention in NIGEC than any other specific ecosystem, and NIGEC's initiation of and participation in the AmeriFlux program, network of carbon flux measurement sites in North American old-growth forests, is generally considered to be its most significant single accomplishment. By including appendices with complete listings of NIGEC publications, principal investigators and participating institutions, this report may also serve as a useful comprehensive documentation of NIGEC.

  3. Final Technical Report: Effects of Changing Water and Nitrogen Inputs on a Mojave Desert Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stanley D. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nowak, Robert S. [University of Nevada, Reno

    2007-11-30

    Questions addressed under this grant shared the common hypothesis that plant and ecosystem performance will positively respond to the augmentation of the most limiting resources to plant growth in the Mojave Desert, e.g., water and nitrogen. Specific hypothesis include (1) increased summer rainfall will significantly increase plant production thorugh an alleviation of moisture stress in the dry summer months, (2) N-deposition will increase plan production in this N-limited system, particularly in wet years or in concert with added summer rain, and (3) biological crust disturbance will gradually decrease bio-available N, with concomitant long-term reductions in photosynthesis and ANPP. Individual plan and ecosystem responses to global change may be regulated by biogeochemical processes and natural weather variability, and changes in plant and ecosystem processes may occur rapidly, may occur only after a time lag, or may not occur at all. During the first PER grant period, we observed changes in plant and ecosystem processes that would fall under each of these time-response intervals: plant and ecosystem processes responded rapidly to added summer rain, whereas most processes responded slowly or in a lag fashion to N-deposition and with no significant response to crust disturbance. Therefore, the primary objectives of this renewal grant were to: (1) continue ongoing measurements of soil and plant parameters that assess primary treatment responses; (2) address the potential heterogeneity of soil properties and (3) initiate a new suite of measurements that will provide data necessary for scaling/modeling of whole-plot to ecosystem-level responses. Our experimental approach included soil plan-water interactions using TDR, neutron probe, and miniaturized soil matric potential and moisture sensors, plant ecophysiological and productivity responses to water and nitrogen treatments and remote sensing methodologies deployed on a radio control platform.

  4. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  5. Technical NoteEarthquake dates and water level changes in wells in the Eskisehir region, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yuce

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Although satisfactory results have yet to be obtained in earthquake prediction, one of the most common indicators of an anomalous precursor is a change in groundwater level in existing wells. Further wells should thus be drilled in unconfined aquifers since these are more susceptible to seismic waves. The Eskisehir region lies in the transition zone between the Aegean extensional domain and the compressible northern Anatolian block. Limnigraphs, installed in 19 exploration wells in the Eskisehir region, recorded pre-seismic, co-seismic and post-seismic level changes during the earthquakes of 17 August Izmit (Mw= 7.4 and 12 November Duzce (Mw= 7.2 1999 that occurred along the North Anatolian Fault Zone. The Izmit and Duzce earthquakes affected groundwater levels, especially in confined aquifers. The aquifer characteristics before and after the earthquakes were unchanged so the aquifer is elastic in its behaviour. Further detailed geo-mechanical investigation of the confined aquifer in the Eskisehir region may improve understanding of earthquake prediction. Keywords: earthquake prediction, Eskisehir, hydrological warning, monitoring groundwater levels

  6. Technical Note: A mobile sea-going mesocosm system – new opportunities for ocean change research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the great challenges in ocean change research is to understand and forecast the effects of environmental changes on pelagic communities and the associated impacts on biogeochemical cycling. Mesocosms, experimental enclosures designed to approximate natural conditions, and in which environmental factors can be manipulated and closely monitored, provide a powerful tool to close the gap between small-scale laboratory experiments and observational and correlative approaches applied in field surveys. Existing pelagic mesocosm systems are stationary and/or restricted to well-protected waters. To allow mesocosm experimentation in a range of hydrographic conditions and in areas considered most sensitive to ocean change, we developed a mobile sea-going mesocosm facility, the Kiel Off-Shore Mesocosms for Future Ocean Simulations (KOSMOS. The KOSMOS platform, which can be transported and deployed by mid-sized research vessels, is designed for operation in moored and free-floating mode under low to moderate wave conditions (up to 2.5 m wave heights. It encloses a water column 2 m in diameter and 15 to 25 m deep (∼50–75 m3 in volume without disrupting the vertical structure or disturbing the enclosed plankton community. Several new developments in mesocosm design and operation were implemented to (i minimize differences in starting conditions between mesocosms, (ii allow for extended experimental duration, (iii precisely determine the mesocosm volume, (iv determine air–sea gas exchange, and (v perform mass balance calculations. After multiple test runs in the Baltic Sea, which resulted in continuous improvement of the design and handling, the KOSMOS platform successfully completed its first full-scale experiment in the high Arctic off Svalbard (78°56.2′ N, 11°53.6′ E in June/July 2010. The study, which was conducted in the framework of the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA, focused on the effects of ocean acidification on a

  7. Live imaging of endogenous PSD-95 using ENABLED: a conditional strategy to fluorescently label endogenous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Dale A; Tillo, Shane E; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V; Guo, Caiying; Mao, Tianyi; Zhong, Haining

    2014-12-10

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416698-15$15.00/0.

  8. Carbon Policy and Technical Change: Market Structure, Increasing Returns, and Secondary Benefits. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P.; Smith, V. K.

    2001-11-19

    An economic evaluation of the impact of policies intended to control emissions of CO{sub 2} and other ''greenhouse gases'' (GHGS) depends on the net costs of these controls and their distribution throughout the production sectors of developed and developing economics. The answers derived from appraisals of these net costs, in turn, stem from what is assumed about the timing of the controls, the pace of technological change, and any short-term secondary benefits from their control. There have only been a few serious attempts to estimate the economic benefits from the policies associated with such long run outcomes. All of the approaches to date have made fairly strong assumptions or relied on contingent valuation estimates of hypothetical situations.

  9. Imaging short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) with endogenous contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tain, Rong-Wen; Scotti, Alessandro M; Li, Weiguo; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Cai, Kejia

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the relaxation properties of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for the development of endogenous ROS contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ROS-producing phantoms and animal models were imaged at 9.4T MRI to obtain T 1 and T 2 maps. Egg white samples treated with varied concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were used to evaluate the effect of produced ROS in T 1 and T 2 for up to 4 hours. pH and temperature changes due to H 2 O 2 treatment in egg white were also monitored. The influences from H 2 O 2 itself and oxygen were evaluated in bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution producing no ROS. In addition, dynamic temporal changes of T 1 in H 2 O 2 -treated egg white samples were used to estimate ROS concentration over time and hence the detection sensitivity of relaxation-based endogenous ROS MRI. The relaxivity of ROS was compared with that of Gd-DTPA as a reference. Finally, the feasibility of in vivo ROS MRI with T 1 mapping acquired using an inversion recovery sequence was demonstrated with a well-established rotenone-treated mouse model (n = 6). pH and temperature changes in treated egg white samples were insignificant (10%, P pM. The T 1 relaxivity of ROS was found to be much higher than that of Gd-DTPA (3.4 × 10 7 vs. 0.9 s -1 ·mM -1 ). Finally, significantly reduced T 1 was observed in rotenone-treated mouse brain (5.1 ± 2.5%, P < 0.05). We demonstrated in the study that endogenous ROS MRI based on the paramagnetic effect has sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo applications. 2 Technical Efficacy Stage: 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:222-229. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. The European Water Framework Directive: How Ecological Assumptions Frame Technical and Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Steyaert

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The European Water Framework Directive (WFD is built upon significant cognitive developments in the field of ecological science but also encourages active involvement of all interested parties in its implementation. The coexistence in the same policy text of both substantive and procedural approaches to policy development stimulated this research as did our concerns about the implications of substantive ecological visions within the WFD policy for promoting, or not, social learning processes through participatory designs. We have used a qualitative analysis of the WFD text which shows the ecological dimension of the WFD dedicates its quasi-exclusive attention to a particular current of thought in ecosystems science focusing on ecosystems status and stability and considering human activities as disturbance factors. This particular worldview is juxtaposed within the WFD with a more utilitarian one that gives rise to many policy exemptions without changing the general underlying ecological model. We discuss these policy statements in the light of the tension between substantive and procedural policy developments. We argue that the dominant substantive approach of the WFD, comprising particular ecological assumptions built upon "compositionalism," seems to be contradictory with its espoused intention of involving the public. We discuss that current of thought in regard to more functionalist thinking and adaptive management, which offers greater opportunities for social learning, i.e., place a set of interdependent stakeholders in an intersubjective position in which they operate a "social construction" of water problems through the co-production of knowledge.

  11. Dynamic changes during evacuation of a left temporal abscess in open MRI: technical case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernays, R.L.; Yonekawa, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Kollias, S.S. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-05-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness of ''near real-time'' neuro-navigation by open MRI systems for guidance of stereotactic evacuation of intracranial abscesses. A 70-year-old patient was referred to our institution with an intracranial left temporal abscess. He presented with headache, senso-motor aphasia and mild right hemiparesis. The abscess (35 x 25 mm) was stereotactically evacuated under MRI guidance, and a recurrence of a daughter abscess was again evacuated on the 9th postoperative day. ''Near real-time'' imaging showed an indentation of the abscess wall of 11 mm along the trajectory. A thermosensitive MRI protocol demonstrated a higher temperature around the abscess capsule than in the brain tissue more distant to the capsule, demonstrating the inflammatory process. The patient had 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy for gram-negative bacteria and was discharged with improved clinical symptoms 5 weeks after admission. Follow-up CT 2 months postoperatively showed a complete resolution of the abscess. Open MRI-guided interventions with ''near real-time'' imaging demonstrate the anatomical changes during an ongoing procedure and can be accommodated for enhancing the overall precision of stereotactic procedures. Thermosensitive MRI protocols are capable of revealing temperature gradients around inflammatory processes. (orig.)

  12. A note on endogenous transfers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Brakman (Steven); J.G.M. van Marrewijk (Charles)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn a competitive and Walrasian stable world with two goods transfer paradoxes are very robust to endogenization (relating the size of the transfer to either the donor's or the recipient's GNP). Donor enrichment and/or recipient impoverishment occur in very general formulations of

  13. Monopoly Insurance and Endogenous Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerlöf, Johan N. M.; Schottmüller, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    We study a monopoly insurance model with endogenous information acquisi- tion. Through a continuous effort choice, consumers can determine the precision of a privately observed signal that is informative about their accident risk. The equilibrium effort is, depending on parameter values, either...

  14. Moving towards Energy Self-Sufficiency Based on Renewables: Comparative Case Studies on the Emergence of Regional Processes of Socio-Technical Change in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Ruppert-Winkel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The change of conventional energy systems to a system mainly based on renewable energies is occurring in many parts of the world. A processual analysis of three case studies from regions in Germany that are moving towards renewable energy self-sufficiency were conducted in order to better understand this process of socio-technical change. This paper scrutinizes the role of actors and their activities, which are driving the change of the local energy system. Three discrete distinguishable phases of this change were found: pioneer phase, pivotal network phase, and extended network and emerging market dynamic phase. Each phase can be characterized by the type of actor, their specific activities, artifacts involved, and their underlying motives. We suggest using the phase model as a heuristic instrument to identify the elements which shape socio-technical change.

  15. Modeling the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield in inland China: An autoregressive distributed lag approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Shiyan; Song, Genxin; Qin, Yaochen; Ye, Xinyue; Lee, Jay

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the impacts of climate change and technical progress on the wheat yield per unit area from 1970 to 2014 in Henan, the largest agricultural province in China, using an autoregressive distributed lag approach. The bounded F-test for cointegration among the model variables yielded evidence of a long-run relationship among climate change, technical progress, and the wheat yield per unit area. In the long run, agricultural machinery and fertilizer use both had significantly positive impacts on the per unit area wheat yield. A 1% increase in the aggregate quantity of fertilizer use increased the wheat yield by 0.19%. Additionally, a 1% increase in machine use increased the wheat yield by 0.21%. In contrast, precipitation during the wheat growth period (from emergence to maturity, consisting of the period from last October to June) led to a decrease in the wheat yield per unit area. In the short run, the coefficient of the aggregate quantity of fertilizer used was negative. Land size had a significantly positive impact on the per unit area wheat yield in the short run. There was no significant short-run or long-run impact of temperature on the wheat yield per unit area in Henan Province. The results of our analysis suggest that climate change had a weak impact on the wheat yield, while technical progress played an important role in increasing the wheat yield per unit area. The results of this study have implications for national and local agriculture policies under climate change. To design well-targeted agriculture adaptation policies for the future and to reduce the adverse effects of climate change on the wheat yield, climate change and technical progress factors should be considered simultaneously. In addition, adaptive measures associated with technical progress should be given more attention.

  16. Staggered Price Setting with Endogenous Frequency of Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    David Romer

    1989-01-01

    The classic models of staggered adjustment of Taylor and Blanchard takes the frequency of price or wage adjustment as exogenous. This paper develops a model in which the frequency of price changes in endogenous. It then uses the model to analyze the effects of changes in the parameters of the economy on the frequency of adjustment and the real effects of monetary shocks.

  17. Endogenous scheduling preferences and congestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Small, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    We consider the timing of activities through a dynamic model of commuting with congestion, in which workers care solely about leisure and consumption. Implicit preferences for the timing of the commute form endogenously due to temporal agglomeration economies. Equilibrium exists uniquely and is i......We consider the timing of activities through a dynamic model of commuting with congestion, in which workers care solely about leisure and consumption. Implicit preferences for the timing of the commute form endogenously due to temporal agglomeration economies. Equilibrium exists uniquely...... and is indistinguishable from that of a generalized version of the classical Vickrey bottleneck model, based on exogenous trip-timing preferences, but optimal policies differ: the Vickrey model will misstate the benefits of a capacity increase, it will underpredict the benefits of congestion pricing, and pricing may make...

  18. Exogenous and endogenous cannabimimetic metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Marzo, V.; Bisogno, T.; Melck, D. [CNR, Arco Felice, Naples (Italy). Ist. per la Chimica di Molecole di Interesse Biologico; De Petrocellis, L. [CNR, Arco Felice, Naples (Italy). Ist. di Cibernetica

    1998-04-01

    Only a few discoveries in the fields of pharmacology and physiology have benefited from the work of organic and synthetic chemists like the identification of the existence and possible physiological function of the `endogenous cannabinoid system`. The review emphasizes the key role played by chemists in this area of pharmacological research, and highlights the possible industrial implications of the discovery of cannabimimetic metabolites and of their mechanism of action.

  19. Harnessing Endogenous Systems for Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh

    In the recent decade, two strategies in particular have attracted attention due to the prospect of significantly improving cancer treatment: Gene silencing therapy and immunotherapy. Both strategies work by manipulating endogenous mechanisms and theoretically promise very strong effect on the dis......In the recent decade, two strategies in particular have attracted attention due to the prospect of significantly improving cancer treatment: Gene silencing therapy and immunotherapy. Both strategies work by manipulating endogenous mechanisms and theoretically promise very strong effect...... immunotherapy (Project II). Transfer into the clinic of therapies based on gene silencing by siRNA delivered by synthetic vectors has yet to happen. A major reason is the lack of efficiency in the delivery process, partly due to insufficient understanding of cellular uptake and processing of the si...... to the conventional PEIs. However, lipid conjugation did not sufficiently reduce the inherent toxicity associated with high molecular weight PEI, and lipid conjugation of bPEI did also not change the ability of bPEI to affect lysosomal pH as a function of time. In contrast to gene silencing therapy, cancer...

  20. On the origins of endogenous thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillas, Alexandros

    2017-05-01

    Endogenous thoughts are thoughts that we activate in a top-down manner or in the absence of the appropriate stimuli. We use endogenous thoughts to plan or recall past events. In this sense, endogenous thinking is one of the hallmarks of our cognitive lives. In this paper, I investigate how it is that we come to possess endogenous control over our thoughts. Starting from the close relation between language and thinking, I look into speech production-a process motorically controlled by the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Interestingly, IFG is also closely related to silent talking, as well as volition. The connection between IFG and volition is important given that endogenous thoughts are or at least greatly resemble voluntary actions. Against this background, I argue that IFG is key to understanding the origins of conscious endogenous thoughts. Furthermore, I look into goal-directed thinking and show that IFG plays a key role also in unconscious endogenous thinking.

  1. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  2. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  3. Endogenous Retroviruses in Domestic Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Jugo, Begoña Marina

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements that are present in a wide range of vertebrates. Although the study of ERVs has been carried out mainly in humans and model organisms, recently, domestic animals have become important, and some species have begun to be analyzed to gain further insight into ERVs. Due to the availability of complete genomes and the development of new computer tools, ERVs can now be analyzed from a genome-wide viewpoint. In addition, more experimental work is being carried out to analyze the distribution, expression and interplay of ERVs within a host genome. Cats, cattle, chicken, dogs, horses, pigs and sheep have been scrutinized in this manner, all of which are interesting species in health and economic terms. Furthermore, several studies have noted differences in the number of endogenous retroviruses and in the variability of these elements among different breeds, as well as their expression in different tissues and the effects of their locations, which, in some cases, are near genes. These findings suggest a complex, intriguing relationship between ERVs and host genomes. In this review, we summarize the most important in silico and experimental findings, discuss their implications and attempt to predict future directions for the study of these genomic elements. PMID:25132796

  4. What can we learn from the endogeneization of the technical progress in GEM - E3? The case of the Kyoto protocol; Que pouvons nous apprendre de l'endogeneisation du progres technique dans GEM - E3? le cas du protocole de Kyoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fougeyrollas, A.; Le Mouel, P.; Zagame, P

    2007-07-01

    This project aims to study how the evaluation of the policies of fight against the greenhouse effect gases emission studied at an european scale, in the framework of the Kyoto agreements, is modified when the applied model, of general equilibrium takes into account the behavior of endogenous growth described by the new theories. More specially, the authors calibrated a production module with endogenous growth properties in the model GEM-E3. The new developed module show the costs reduction of policies of greenhouse effect gases emission limitation for France and Europe. (A.L.B.)

  5. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  6. Rate of change in concentration of organic compounds and nutrients in municipal and dairy wastewater treated in full technical SBR scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Struk-Sokolowska Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Municipal WWTP often receive the industrial wastewater, including dairy sewage. The problem of sewage treatment from this sector of economy is not completely solved, especially in plants of medium and small milk processing capacity. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of change in organic compounds and nutrients in municipal wastewater with the participation of dairy products during the processing phases of SBR-type reactor in a technical scale. The study was conducted in WWTP in Sokolka. Rate of changes in the concentrations of organic compounds, nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater during the processing phases of SBR reactor was determined. Presence of dairy sewage (13% volume participation affected the decrease in the rate of changes in organic compounds concentrations defined as BOD5 during all processing phases of SBR reactor. Significant influence of dairy sewage on rates of change in nitrogen and phosphorus compounds concentrations during filling, aeration, stirring, sedimentation and decantation phases, was found.

  7. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  8. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  9. Institutional adaptability to redress electricity infrastructure vulnerability due to climate change: A non-technical summary for policy makers

    OpenAIRE

    John Foster; William Paul Bell; Craig Froome; Phil Wild; Liam Wagner; Deepak Sharma; Suwin Sandu; Suchi Misra; Ravindra Bagia

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to examine the adaptive capacity of existing institutional arrangements in the National Electricity Market (NEM) to existing and predicted climate change conditions. Specifically the project aims to: 1. identify climate change adaptation issues in the NEM; 1. analyse climate change impacts on reliability in the NEM under alternative climate change scenarios to 2030, particularly what adaptation strategies the power generation and supply network infrastructur...

  10. The Effects of Change in Vocational, Technical, and Occupational Education on the Teaching of Culinary Arts in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandingham, Paul G.

    Vocational education and culinary arts have gained a new respect. Since the mid-1970s, the status of culinary artists (cooks and chefs) has changed from domestic to professional. This change and the many changes in food technology have brought about a heightened awareness of the need for better training for culinary professionals. Improved…

  11. The endogenous opioid system: a common substrate in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, José Manuel; Martin-García, Elena; Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits that involve several neurotransmitters. One of the neurochemical systems that plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction is the endogenous opioid system (EOS). Opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within these reward circuits. Chronic exposure to the different prototypical drugs of abuse, including opioids, alcohol, nicotine, psychostimulants and cannabinoids has been reported to produce significant alterations within the EOS, which seem to play an important role in the development of the addictive process. In this review, we will describe the adaptive changes produced by different drugs of abuse on the EOS, and the current knowledge about the contribution of each component of this neurobiological system to their addictive properties.

  12. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  13. Chemometric endogenous fluorescence for tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run; Vasquez, Kevin; Xu, M.

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous fluorescence is a powerful technique for probing both structure and function of tissue. We show that enabling wide-field fluorescence microscopy with chemometrics can significantly enhance the performance of tissue diagnosis with endogenous fluorescence. The spatial distribution and absolute concentration of fluorophores is uncovered with non-negative factorization aided by the spatial diversity from microscopic autofluorescence color images. Fluorescence quantification in terms of its absolute concentration map avoids issues dependent on specific measurement approach or systems and yields biologically meaningful data. The standardization of endogenous fluorescence in terms of absolute concentration will facilitate its translation to the clinics and simplifies the assessment of competing methods relating to tissue fluorescence.

  14. RNAi-mediated suppression of endogenous storage proteins leads to a change in localization of overexpressed cholera toxin B-subunit and the allergen protein RAG2 in rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Mejima, Mio; Nakamura, Rika; Takahashi, Yuko; Sagara, Hiroshi; Takeyama, Natsumi; Satoh, Shigeru; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Masumura, Takehiro; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    RNAi-mediated suppression of the endogenous storage proteins in MucoRice-CTB-RNAi seeds affects not only the levels of overexpressed CTB and RAG2 allergen, but also the localization of CTB and RAG2. A purification-free rice-based oral cholera vaccine (MucoRice-CTB) was previously developed by our laboratories using a cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) overexpression system. Recently, an advanced version of MucoRice-CTB was developed (MucoRice-CTB-RNAi) through the use of RNAi to suppress the production of the endogenous storage proteins 13-kDa prolamin and glutelin, so as to increase CTB expression. The level of the α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor-like protein RAG2 (a major rice allergen) was reduced in MucoRice-CTB-RNAi seeds in comparison with wild-type (WT) rice. To investigate whether RNAi-mediated suppression of storage proteins affects the localization of overexpressed CTB and major rice allergens, we generated an RNAi line without CTB (MucoRice-RNAi) and investigated gene expression, and protein production and localization of two storage proteins, CTB, and five major allergens in MucoRice-CTB, MucoRice-CTB-RNAi, MucoRice-RNAi, and WT rice. In all lines, glyoxalase I was detected in the cytoplasm, and 52- and 63-kDa globulin-like proteins were found in the aleurone particles. In WT, RAG2 and 19-kDa globulin were localized mainly in protein bodies II (PB-II) of the endosperm cells. Knockdown of glutelin A led to a partial destruction of PB-II and was accompanied by RAG2 relocation to the plasma membrane/cell wall and cytoplasm. In MucoRice-CTB, CTB was localized in the cytoplasm and PB-II. In MucoRice-CTB-RNAi, CTB was produced at a level six times that in MucoRice-CTB and was localized, similar to RAG2, in the plasma membrane/cell wall and cytoplasm. Our findings indicate that the relocation of CTB in MucoRice-CTB-RNAi may contribute to down-regulation of RAG2.

  15. Retinal photodamage by endogenous and xenobiotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgus, Albert R; Roberts, Joan E

    2012-01-01

    The human eye is constantly exposed to sunlight and artificial lighting. Light transmission through the eye is fundamental to its unique biological functions of directing vision and circadian rhythm and therefore light absorbed by the eye must be benign. However, exposure to the very intense ambient radiation can pose a hazard particularly if the recipient is over 40 years of age. There are age-related changes in the endogenous (natural) chromophores (lipofuscin, A2E and all-trans-retinal derivatives) in the human retina that makes it more susceptible to visible light damage. Intense visible light sources that do not filter short blue visible light (400-440 nm) used for phototherapy of circadian imbalance (i.e. seasonal affective disorder) increase the risk for age-related light damage to the retina. Moreover, many drugs, dietary supplements, nanoparticles and diagnostic dyes (xenobiotics) absorb ocular light and have the potential to induce photodamage to the retina, leading to transient or permanent blinding disorders. This article will review the underlying reasons why visible light in general and short blue visible light in particular dramatically raises the risk of photodamage to the human retina. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. Endogenous Retroviruses: With Us and Against Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas J.; Rosenkrantz, Jimi L.; Carbone, Lucia; Chavez, Shawn L.

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian genomes are scattered with thousands of copies of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), mobile genetic elements that are relics of ancient retroviral infections. After inserting copies into the germ line of a host, most ERVs accumulate mutations that prevent the normal assembly of infectious viral particles, becoming trapped in host genomes and unable to leave to infect other cells. While most copies of ERVs are inactive, some are transcribed and encode the proteins needed to generate new insertions at novel loci. In some cases, old copies are removed via recombination and other mechanisms. This creates a shifting landscape of ERV copies within host genomes. New insertions can disrupt normal expression of nearby genes via directly inserting into key regulatory elements or by containing regulatory motifs within their sequences. Further, the transcriptional silencing of ERVs via epigenetic modification may result in changes to the epigenetic regulation of adjacent genes. In these ways, ERVs can be potent sources of regulatory disruption as well as genetic innovation. Here, we provide a brief review of the association between ERVs and gene expression, especially as observed in pre-implantation development and placentation. Moreover, we will describe the roles ERVs may play in somatic tissues, mostly in the context of human disease, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and schizophrenia. Lastly, we discuss the recent discovery that some ERVs may have been pressed into the service of their host genomes to aid in the innate immune response to exogenous viral infections.

  17. Endogenous retroviral promoter exaptation in human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artem Babaian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer arises from a series of genetic and epigenetic changes, which result in abnormal expression or mutational activation of oncogenes, as well as suppression/inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Aberrant expression of coding genes or long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs with oncogenic properties can be caused by translocations, gene amplifications, point mutations or other less characterized mechanisms. One such mechanism is the inappropriate usage of normally dormant, tissue-restricted or cryptic enhancers or promoters that serve to drive oncogenic gene expression. Dispersed across the human genome, endogenous retroviruses (ERVs provide an enormous reservoir of autonomous gene regulatory modules, some of which have been co-opted by the host during evolution to play important roles in normal regulation of genes and gene networks. This review focuses on the “dark side” of such ERV regulatory capacity. Specifically, we discuss a growing number of examples of normally dormant or epigenetically repressed ERVs that have been harnessed to drive oncogenes in human cancer, a process we term onco-exaptation, and we propose potential mechanisms that may underlie this phenomenon.

  18. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' Manual and Technical Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qin, Zhangcai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mueller, Steffen [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Kwon, Ho-young [International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC (United States); Wander, Michelle M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released September 30, 2014 which includes corn and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, Miscanthus, and switchgrass.

  19. Projecting climate change in the United States: A technical document supporting the Forest Service RPA 2010 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda A. Joyce; David T. Price; David P. Coulson; Daniel W. McKenney; R. Martin Siltanen; Pia Papadopol; Kevin. Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    A set of climate change projections for the United States was developed for use in the 2010 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment. These climate projections, along with projections for population dynamics, economic growth, and land use change in the United States, comprise the RPA scenarios and are used in the RPA Assessment to project future renewable resource conditions...

  20. Workers' Attitudes to Technical Change: An Integrated Survey of Research. Industrial Relations Aspects of Manpower Policy 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Alain; And Others

    Methods for encouraging positive worker attitude and behavior toward change were examined to provide a basis for re-evaluation of current policies and programs relating to introduction of technological changes. The literature reviewed is presented in sections of: (1) "The Worker and the Occupational System," by Claude Durand, (2)…

  1. Final technical report. Can microbial functional traits predict the response and resilience of decomposition to global change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Steven D. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-09-24

    The role of specific micro-organisms in the carbon cycle, and their responses to environmental change, are unknown in most ecosystems. This knowledge gap limits scientists’ ability to predict how important ecosystem processes, like soil carbon storage and loss, will change with climate and other environmental factors. The investigators addressed this knowledge gap by transplanting microbial communities from different environments into new environments and measuring the response of community composition and carbon cycling over time. Using state-of-the-art sequencing techniques, computational tools, and nanotechnology, the investigators showed that microbial communities on decomposing plant material shift dramatically with natural and experimentally-imposed drought. Microbial communities also shifted in response to added nitrogen, but the effects were smaller. These changes had implications for carbon cycling, with lower rates of carbon loss under drought conditions, and changes in the efficiency of decomposition with nitrogen addition. Even when transplanted into the same conditions, microbial communities from different environments remained distinct in composition and functioning for up to one year. Changes in functioning were related to differences in enzyme gene content across different microbial groups. Computational approaches developed for this project allowed the conclusions to be tested more broadly in other ecosystems, and new computer models will facilitate the prediction of microbial traits and functioning across environments. The data and models resulting from this project benefit the public by improving the ability to predict how microbial communities and carbon cycling functions respond to climate change, nutrient enrichment, and other large-scale environmental changes.

  2. Understanding Systems Change in Early Implementation of Housing First in Canadian Communities: An Examination of Facilitators/Barriers, Training/Technical Assistance, and Points of Leverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worton, S Kathleen; Hasford, Julian; Macnaughton, Eric; Nelson, Geoffrey; MacLeod, Timothy; Tsemberis, Sam; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Goering, Paula; Aubry, Tim; Distasio, Jino; Richter, Tim

    2017-12-18

    We present interim findings of a cross-site case study of an initiative to expand Housing First (HF) in Canada through training and technical assistance (TTA). HF is an evidence-based practice designed to end chronic homelessness for consumers of mental health services. We draw upon concepts from implementation science and systems change theory to examine how early implementation occurs within a system. Case studies examining HF early implementation were conducted in six Canadian communities receiving HF TTA. The primary data are field notes gathered over 1.5 years and evaluations from site-specific training events (k = 5, n = 302) and regional network training events (k = 4, n = 276). We report findings related to: (a) the facilitators of and barriers to early implementation, (b) the influence of TTA on early implementation, and (c) the "levers" used to facilitate broader systems change. Systems change theory enabled us to understand how various "levers" created opportunities for change within the communities, including establishing system boundaries, understanding how systems components can function as causes of or solutions to a problem, and assessing and changing systems interactions. We conclude by arguing that systems theory adds value to existing implementation science frameworks and can be helpful in future research on the implementation of evidence-based practices such as HF which is a complex community intervention. Implications for community psychology are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  3. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  4. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  5. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...

  6. Electroencephalographic changes using virtual reality program: technical note condensed title: a study using a mobile EEG device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Síria Monyelle Silva de; Medeiros, Candice Simões Pimenta de; Pacheco, Thaiana Barbosa Ferreira; Bessa, Nathalia Priscilla Oliveira Silva; Silva, Fernanda Gabrielle Mendonça; Tavares, Nathália Stéphany Araújo; Rego, Isabelle Ananda Oliveira; Campos, Tania Fernandes; Cavalcanti, Fabrícia Azevedo da Costa

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the technique of an electroencephalographic (EEG) assessment using the Emotiv EPOC® during the performance of a virtual reality motor task and compare theta, alpha, beta and gamma power frequencies between left and right hemispheres. This is technical note in which 9 healthy young subjects were submitted to an evaluation with Emotiv EPOC® during the Nintendo® Wii 'Basic Step' virtual game using the Wii Balance Board (WBB) on a support 13 centimeters high. The Wilcoxon statistical test was applied and pairing between the cerebral hemispheres was performed. Participants had a mean age of 22.55 ± 2.78 years, 77.8% were right-handed, and 22.8% had no experience with the selected virtual game. According to dominancy (right handed n = 7; and left handed n = 2), it was observed that the right-handed individuals showed significantly greater difference in the right hemisphere in the EEG in front region (gamma power in channels AF4, p = 0.028 and F4, p = 0.043) and parietal region (theta and beta power in P8 channel, p = 0.043), while alpha power showed a greater activity in the left hemisphere (P7 channel, p = 0.043). Considering the inter-hemispheric analysis, it was observed that the right hemisphere presented a higher activation potential in the frontal lobe for gamma waves (p = 0.038 for AF3-AF4 channels), and in the temporal lobe for beta and alpha waves (p = 0.021). This study showed that the virtual environment can provide distinct cortical activation patterns considering an inter-hemispheric analysis, highlighting greater activation potential in the right hemisphere.

  7. How Stock Markets Development Affect Endogenous Growth Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeb Masoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper can bedescribed as a significant exploratory study that will provide a significantcontribution to knowledge to consider crucial issues which need to be barriersto understanding or a temptation/ requirement to judge some practices as‘better’ than others for stock market development effective approach andimplement successful stock market performance and economic growth. Recentanalysis of the link between financial development and growth, gained frominsights acquired as a result of using the technique of endogenous growthmodels, has illustrated that growth without exogenous technical progress andthat growth rates could be related to technology, income distribution andinstitutional arrangements. This provides the theoretical background thatempirical studies have lacked; illustrating that financial intermediationaffects the level of economic growth. Resulting models have provided newimpetus to empirical research of the effects of financial development. Thebirth of the new endogenous growth theory has facilitated the development ofimproved growth models where the long-term rate could be affected by a numberof elements. These included technology, education and health policies in theprocess of economic development, capital accumulation, government policies andinstitutional activities in the role of financial development in economicgrowth.

  8. Technical Note: Linking climate change and downed woody debris decomposition across forests of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew B.; Woodall, Christopher W.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Fraver, Shawn; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Forest ecosystems play a critical role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Forest carbon (C) is stored through photosynthesis and released via decomposition and combustion. Relative to C fixation in biomass, much less is known about C depletion through decomposition of woody debris, particularly under a changing climate. It is assumed that the increased temperatures and longer growing seasons associated with projected climate change will increase the decomposition rates (i.e., more rapid C cycling) of downed woody debris (DWD); however, the magnitude of this increase has not been previously addressed. Using DWD measurements collected from a national forest inventory of the eastern United States, we show that the residence time of DWD may decrease (i.e., more rapid decomposition) by as much as 13% over the next 200 years, depending on various future climate change scenarios and forest types. Although existing dynamic global vegetation models account for the decomposition process, they typically do not include the effect of a changing climate on DWD decomposition rates. We expect that an increased understanding of decomposition rates, as presented in this current work, will be needed to adequately quantify the fate of woody detritus in future forests. Furthermore, we hope these results will lead to improved models that incorporate climate change scenarios for depicting future dead wood dynamics in addition to a traditional emphasis on live-tree demographics.

  9. Endogenous scheduling preferences and congestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Small, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    . Compared to the predictions of an analyst observing untolled equilibrium and taking scheduling preferences as exogenous, we find that both the optimal capacity and the marginal external cost of congestion have changed. The benefits of tolling are greater, and the optimal time varying toll is different....

  10. 78 FR 17871 - Changes To Implement the Technical Corrections to the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act as to Inter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ...''). Consistent with the statutory changes, this final rule eliminates the nine-month ``dead zone'' for filing an... rule eliminate the nine-month ``dead zone'' for filing a petition challenging a first-to-invent patent... reissue patent, upon issuance, eliminating the nine-month ``dead zone'' as to first-to-invent patents and...

  11. Movement of endogenous calcium in the elongating zone of graviresponding roots of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Cameron, I. L.; Smith, N. K.

    1989-01-01

    Endogenous calcium (Ca) accumulates along the lower side of the elongating zone of horizontally oriented roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent. This accumulation of Ca correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature, and occurs in the cytoplasm, cell walls and mucilage of epidermal cells. Corresponding changes in endogenous Ca do not occur in cortical cells of the elongating zone of intact roots. These results indicate that the calcium asymmetries associated with root gravicurvature occur in the outermost layers of the root.

  12. Evolution and phylogeny of insect endogenous retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzian, C; Pélisson, A; Bucheton, A

    2001-01-01

    The genome of invertebrates is rich in retroelements which are structurally reminiscent of the retroviruses of vertebrates. Those containing three open reading frames (ORFs), including an env-like gene, may well be considered as endogenous retroviruses. Further support to this similarity has been provided by the ability of the env-like gene of DmeGypV (the Gypsy endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster) to promote infection of Drosophila cells by a pseudotyped vertebrate retrovirus vector. To gain insights into their evolutionary story, a sample of thirteen insect endogenous retroviruses, which represents the largest sample analysed until now, was studied by computer-assisted comparison of the translated products of their gag, pol and env genes, as well as their LTR structural features. We found that the three phylogenetic trees based respectively on Gag, Pol and Env common motifs are congruent, which suggest a monophyletic origin for these elements. We showed that most of the insect endogenous retroviruses belong to a major clade group which can be further divided into two main subgroups which also differ by the sequence of their primer binding sites (PBS). We propose to name IERV-K and IERV-S these two major subgroups of Insect Endogenous Retro Viruses (or Insect ERrantiVirus, according to the ICTV nomenclature) which respectively use Lys and Ser tRNAs to prime reverse transcription.

  13. Changing the attitudes and practices of professional developers through a constructivist model: The Technical Assistance Academy for Mathematics and Science Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Karen Jungblut

    For much of this century, mathematics and science have been taught in a didactic manner that is characterized by a passive student and a lecturing teacher. Since the late eighties national standards have encouraged professional developers specializing in mathematics and science education to deliver the messages of inquiry-based learning, active student engagement, and learner-constructed knowledge to the teachers they support. Follow-up studies of professional development programs, however, found that telling teachers was no more effective than telling students. Information transmitted in a passive setting was not transferring into effective classroom practices. This phenomenological case study was conducted to determine the effects of a constructivist-oriented professional development experience, the Technical Assistance Academy, in changing the practices and attitudes of mathematics and science professional developers regarding the use of constructivist strategies in workshop design. This study focused on 45 professional developers who participated in the Technical Assistance Academy. Data from a 2 1/2 year period were collected from session evaluations, journal reflections, a follow-up interview, and site visits that included observations and collaborative planning. Content analysis procedures were used to find common themes among the data. Use of new skills developed as a result of participation in the Technical Assistance Academy was determined using the Concerns-Based Adoption Model Levels of Use framework (Hall & Hord, 1987). Changes in attitude were determined by examining participants' journal reflections related to common constructivist themes such as those discussed by Fosnot (1996c): learning is developmental, disequilibrium and reflection facilitate learning, and the construction of "big ideas" results from the opportunity to struggle with new information. Results verified that all 45 participants demonstrated some level of use, and that most were in

  14. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

    2012-06-07

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

  15. L'impatto delle nuove tecnologie sulle forme di lavoro: una prospettiva europea (Technical Change and Employment: A European Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Corsi

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the role of knowledge within the process of growth and job creation in the European Union. Many features of the so-called knowledge-based economy are connected with the increasing use of information and communication technologies (ICT, that radically changes the conditions for the production and distribution of knowledge as well as its coupling to the production system. Technological change not only stimulates investment in physical capital but also brings to knowledge accumulation: human skills are required to implement, maintain, adapt and use technologies embodied in physical capital. Indeed, as new technologies become more widespread, certain skills may be less in demand--because many tasks once carried out manually are now performed by automated equipment--while the demand for workers able to maintain, program, and develop these sophisticated technologies rise. There is therefore concern that technological change may cause unemployment as the result of a mismatch between the demand for labour and the various skills of workers; in this way it may also increase the polarisation of society by widening the gap in income and employment opportunities between those whose skills have been displaced by new technology and those who create and use it.

  16. Dietary counselling effectively improves lipid levels in patients with endogenous hypertriglyceridemia: emphasis on weight reduction and alcohol limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, F. H.; van der Laarse, A.; Hopman, E. G.; Gevers Leuven, J. A.; Onkenhout, W.; Dallinga-Thie, G. M.; Smelt, A. H.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term effect of dietary counselling in patients with endogenous hypertriglyceridemia and evaluate the effects of advised nutrient changes. A prospective dietary intervention study in patients with endogenous hypertriglyceridemia from January I st 1988 to December 31 st 1996

  17. Carbon monoxide: from toxin to endogenous modulator of cardiovascular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Johnson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a pollutant commonly recognized for its toxicological attributes, including CNS and cardiovascular effects. But CO is also formed endogenously in mammalian tissues. Endogenously formed CO normally arises from heme degradation in a reaction catalyzed by heme oxygenase. While inhibitors of endogenous CO production can raise arterial pressure, heme loading can enhance CO production and lead to vasodepression. Both central and peripheral tissues possess heme oxygenases and generate CO from heme, but the inability of heme substrate to cross the blood brain barrier suggests the CNS heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may be independent of the periphery. In the CNS, CO apparently acts in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS promoting changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission and lowering blood pressure. At the periphery, the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system can affect cardiovascular functions in a two-fold manner; specifically: 1 heme-derived CO generated within vascular smooth muscle (VSM can promote vasodilation, but 2 its actions on the endothelium apparently can promote vasoconstriction. Thus, it seems reasonable that the CNS-, VSM- and endothelial-dependent actions of the heme-heme oxygenase-CO system may all affect cardiac output and vascular resistance, and subsequently blood pressure.

  18. Maintenance, endogeneous, respiration, lysis, decay and predation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    loosdrecht, Marc C. M. Van; Henze, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    mechanism is microbiologically correct. The lysis/decay model mechanism is a strongly simplified representation of reality. This paper tries to review the processes grouped under endogenous respiration in activated sludge models. Mechanisms and processes such as maintenance, lysis, internal and external...... and maintenance processes. This conversion will in general be denoted as endogenous respiration. Based on the literature review the phenomena are discussed and organised, in order to create a working platform for discussing more detailed activated sludge models, one of which is being sketched. (C) 1999 IAWQ......In activated sludge processes an increased sludge age is associated with a decreased sludge production. This phenomenon is generally interpreted as a result of endogenous respiration processes. In the activated sludge models cell lysis (or decay) is incorporated. The lysis is modelled...

  19. Endogeneity in Strategy-Performance Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; B. Folta, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Managers engage in a variety of strategies, not randomly, but having in mind their performance implications. Therefore, strategic choices are endogenous in performance equations. Despite increasing efforts by various scholars in solving endogeneity bias, prior attempts have almost exclusively......, such as employees, strategic partners, customers, or investors, whose choices and preferences also affect the final decision. We discuss how endogeneity can plague the measurement of the performance effects of these two-sided strategic decisions—which are more complex, but more realistic, than prior representations...... of organizational decision making. We provide an empirical demonstration of possible methods to deal with three different sources of bias, by analyzing the performance effects of two human capital choices made by founders at startup: the size and average quality of the initial workforce....

  20. Research on impacts of mechanical vibrations on the production machine to its rate of change of technical state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefánia Salokyová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article observes the amount of vibration on the bearing house of a turning lathe selected in advance through the change of the revolutions per minute and the thickness of the removed material in frontal type of lathe processing. Increase in mechanical vibration values depending on the value of nominal thickness of splinter was observed during changing technological parameters of the drilling process as a consequence of rotation speed of the motor. The vibration acceleration amplitude course changes depending on the frequencies are evaluated together for 400, 800 and 1200 motor r/min. A piezoelectric sensor of the type 4507B-004 from the Brüel & Kjaer Company was used for monitoring the frequency analysis of the vibration, which was attached to the bearing house of the lathe TOS SV 18RB. The vibration signal measured during the processing and during the time period is transformed through the means of a quick Fourier transformation to the frequency spectrum in the range of 3.0–10.0 kHz. Measured values of vibration acceleration amplitude were processed and evaluated by the SignalExpress software. Graphical abstract Unwanted vibration in machine tools like lathe is one of the main problems as it affects the quality of the machined parts and tool life and creates noise during machining operation. Bearings are of paramount importance to almost all forms of rotating machinery and are the most common among machine elements. The article describes in more detail the issue of vibrations created when machining the material by lathe turning. It also includes execution, experiment evaluation in this field, and comparison of measured vibrations’ acceleration amplitude values according to the standards.

  1. Projections for Changes in Natural and Technical Snow Reliability of a Major Turkish Ski Resort by Using RegCM4.3.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Tugba; Cenk Demiroglu, O.; Tufan Turp, M.; Türkeş, Murat; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has been and increasingly will be a major threat to the ski tourism industry whose survival is highly dependent on existence of snow cover of sufficient depth and duration. The common knowledge requires that in order for a ski resort to be viable, it has to perform operations for at least 100 days in seven out of ten winters. For this matter, it is now even more usual for the ski resorts to adapt to this issue by technical snowmaking. In this study, projected future changes for the period of 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100 in air temperature, relative humidity, and snow depth climatology and variability with respect to the control period of 1970-2000 were assessed for the domain of a major ski resort in Turkey. Regional Climate Model (RegCM4.3.5) of ICTP (International Centre for Theoretical Physics) was used for projections of future and present climate conditions. HadGEM2 global climate model of the Met Office Hadley Centre, MPI-ESM-MR of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, GFDL-ESM2M of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory were downscaled to 10 km for the resort and its surrounding region. Both the projections and the downscaling were realized according to the RCP4.5 and the RCP8.5 emission scenarios of the IPCC. The outputs on snow depth were used for a count of the changes on snow cover duration sufficient for skiing actitivies, signaling natural snow-reliability, whereas the outputs on air temperature and relative humidity were utilized for determination of wet-bulb temperatures. The latter measure was used to interpret the changes in the snowmaking capacity, in other words; technical snow-reliability, of the resort. This work was supported by the BU Reasearch Fund under the project number 7362. One of the authors (MLK) was partially supported by Mercator-IPC Fellowship Program.

  2. Endogenous network of firms and systemic risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianting; He, Jianmin; Li, Shouwei

    2018-02-01

    We construct an endogenous network characterized by commercial credit relationships connecting the upstream and downstream firms. Simulation results indicate that the endogenous network model displays a scale-free property which exists in real-world firm systems. In terms of the network structure, with the expansion of the scale of network nodes, the systemic risk increases significantly, while the heterogeneities of network nodes have no effect on systemic risk. As for firm micro-behaviors, including the selection range of trading partners, actual output, labor requirement, price of intermediate products and employee salaries, increase of all these parameters will lead to higher systemic risk.

  3. An endogenous model of the credit network

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianmin; Sui, Xin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an endogenous credit network model of firm-bank agents is constructed. The model describes the endogenous formation of firm-firm, firm-bank and bank-bank credit relationships. By means of simulations, the model is capable of showing some obvious similarities with empirical evidence found by other scholars: the upper-tail of firm size distribution can be well fitted with a power-law; the bank size distribution can be lognormally distributed with a power-law tail; the bank in-degrees of the interbank credit network as well as the firm-bank credit network fall into two-power-law distributions.

  4. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

    2011-04-08

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to

  5. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research. Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Robertson, Andrew W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Smyth, Padhraic J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2011-04-08

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to

  6. Changes in structure and adsorptive behavior of dissolved fulvic acid mediated by ground-water microorganisms. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turco, R.F.

    1990-10-01

    Degradation of a ground water supply can follow the introduction of xenobiotics onto the soil surface overlying the aquifer. It is clear that dissolved organic matter (DOM) or fulvic acid (FA), are present in aquifers and surface waters. The degree to which the DOM can enhance the transport of either organic chemicals or metals is unclear. This altered solubility may be significant enough to allow rapid movement of otherwise low solubility chemicals through soil to ground water or within an aquifer. The microbial population is a remedial force in controlling the fate of pesticides. The size and status of the microbial biomass, or population, in either soil or ground water is a direct reflection of the supply of available nutrients. The authors' efforts are aimed at understanding the significance of the DOM in controlling both the size of the microbial biomass and the type of bacteria making up the biomass. The objectives of the research conducted during the year were the following: isolate a population of bacteria capable of utilizing fulvic acid and measure microbial growth, and define the structural changes in fulvic acid when it serves as a carbon and energy source for microbial growth in flow-through culture systems.

  7. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  8. Place branding, embeddedness and endogenous rural development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donner, Mechthild; Horlings, Lummina; Fort, Fatiha; Vellema, Sietze

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with place branding on the regional scale, in the rural context of food and tourism networks in Europe. Place branding is linked to the concepts of endogenous rural development, territory and embeddedness, by analysing how the valorisation of specific rural assets takes shape.

  9. Leveraging Endogenous Research and Innovation for Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this treatise, a quick look is taken at the spectrum (range) of research from pure basic, strategic basic, applied, experimental development or research and development (R&D) to endogenous research and innovation (ER&I). It also defines development, innovation, food security, poverty; and discusses some contemporary ...

  10. Exogenous and endogenous corticosterone alter feather quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRochers, David W; Reed, J Michael; Awerman, Jessica; Kluge, Jonathan A; Wilkinson, Julia; van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Aman, Joseph; Romero, L Michael

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoids affect feather replacement in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) after approximately 56% of flight feathers were removed. We hypothesized that corticosterone would retard feather regrowth and decrease feather quality. After feather regrowth began, birds were treated with exogenous corticosterone or sham implants, or endogenous corticosterone by applying psychological or physical (food restriction) stressors. Exogenous corticosterone had no impact on feather length and vane area, but rectrices were lighter than controls. Exogenous corticosterone also decreased inter-barb distance for all feathers and increased barbule number for secondaries and rectrices. Although exogenous corticosterone had no affect on rachis tensile strength and stiffness, barbicel hooking strength was reduced. Finally, exogenous corticosterone did not alter the ability of Bacillus licheniformis to degrade feathers or affect the number of feathers that failed to regrow. In contrast, endogenous corticosterone via food restriction resulted in greater inter-barb distances in primaries and secondaries, and acute and chronic stress resulted in greater inter-barb distances in rectrices. Food-restricted birds had significantly fewer barbules in primaries than chronic stress birds and weaker feathers compared to controls. We conclude that, although exogenous and endogenous corticosterone had slightly different effects, some flight feathers grown in the presence of high circulating corticosterone are lighter, potentially weaker, and with altered feather micro-structure.

  11. Optimized Formation of Benzyl Isothiocyanate by Endogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To use endogenous myrosinase in Carica papaya seed to convert benzyl glucosinolate (BG) to benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and then extract it for further studies. Methods: Process variables including seed powder particle size, sample-to-solvent ratio, pH of buffer solution, enzymolysis temperature, enzymolysis ...

  12. endogenous retrovirus sequences expressed in male mammalian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-01-02

    Jan 2, 2002 ... demonstrated in New Zealand Black mice, where the reproductive tract of males were shown to contain C-type retrovirus(35). Also endogenous mouse mammary tumour virus (MMTV) proteins (p28 and gp47) have been identified in the epididymis and seminal vesicles of adult Swiss. Albino mice devoid of ...

  13. Managing spillovers: an endogenous sunk cost approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Senyuta, Olena; Žigić, Krešimir

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, June (2016), s. 45-64 ISSN 0167-6245 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/12/0961 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : endogenous sunk costs * innovations * knowledge spillovers Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.739, year: 2016

  14. Baboon endogenous virus evolution and ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, A. C.; Dekker, J. T.; Goudsmit, J.

    1996-01-01

    Cross-species transmission of retroviruses among primates has recently been recognized as the source of the current epidemics of HIV-1, HIV-2 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The distribution of baboon endogenous virus among non-human primates resembles that of exogenous viruses and

  15. An endogenous policy model of hierarchical government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazza, I.; van Winden, F.

    2008-01-01

    Endogenous policy models usually neglect that government policies are frequently the result of decisions taken at different tiers by different agents, each enjoying some degree of autonomy. In this paper, policies are the outcome of the choices made by two agents within a hierarchy. A legislator

  16. Endogenizing technological progress: The MESEMET model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter); G.H.A. van Hagen; R.A. de Mooij (Ruud); J. van Sinderen (Jarig)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis paper endogenizes technology and human capital formation in the MESEM model that was developed by van Sinderen (Economic Modelling, 1993, 13, 285-300). Tax allowances for private R&D expenditures and public expenditures on both education and R& D are effective instruments to

  17. Endogenous retrovirus sequences expressed in male mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In humans, one ERV family, human endogenous retrovirus- K (HERV-K) is abundantly expressed, and is associated with germ cell tumours, while ERV3 env is expressed in normal human testis. Conclusion: The expression of ERVs in male reproductive tissues suggests a possible role in normal and disease conditions ...

  18. ENDOGENOUS ENERGY. A CAUSE OF BIASET/ TRUE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sufficient feed. In the TME procedure, as publishecl by. Sibbald ( 1976), endogenous energy excretion is deter- mined with fasted animals, a situation which can be re- garded as being physiologically undesirable since birds would be in an energy-deficient state and to an extent also in a protein deficient state. When in a ...

  19. Applying Endogenous Knowledge in the African Context ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This requires not only an understanding of what endogenous knowledge is, but also an alignment of personal values, innovative strategies and an attitude of activism. An integral part of an extensive skills set to implement ... competence of dispute resolution practitioners in Africa. AFRICA INSIGHT Vol 42 (1) – June 2012 ...

  20. Ethnobotany and endogenous conservation of Irvingia gabonensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... systematically gathered for consumption and marketing. Few studies have been done on the ethnobotany and endogenous practices determining its conservation of the species in Benin. This study aims to produce a database on those aspects in Benin. Two hundred and sixty-three people from the six major socio-cultural ...

  1. Endogenous thrombin potential in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, Mubeena; Sidelmann, Johannes J; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to investigate plasma endogenous thrombin generation in four different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) defined by Body Mass Index (BMI) and insulin resistance (IR). PCOS is diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. DESIGN: Multicenter...

  2. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  3. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience Since the closure of the detector in February, the technical operation of CMS has been quite smooth and reliable. Some minor interventions in UXC were required to cure failures of power supplies, fans, readout boards and rack cooling connections, but all these failures were repaired in scheduled technical stops or parasitically during access dedicated to fixing LHC technical problems. The only occasion when CMS had to request an access between fills was to search for the source of an alarm from the leak-detection cables mounted in the DT racks. After a few minutes of diagnostic search, a leaking air-purge was found. Replacement was complete within 2 hours. This incident demonstrated once more the value of these leak detection cables; the system will be further extended (during the end of year technical stop) to cover more racks in UXC and the floor beneath the detector. The magnet has also been operating reliably and reacted correctly to the 14s power cut on 29 May (see below). In or...

  4. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  5. Endogenous magnetic reconnection and associated high energy plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, B.; Basu, B.

    2018-02-01

    An endogenous reconnection process involves a driving factor that lays inside the layer where a drastic change of magnetic field topology occurs. A process of this kind is shown to take place when an electron temperature gradient is present in a magnetically confined plasma and the evolving electron temperature fluctuations are anisotropic. The width of the reconnecting layer remains significant even when large macroscopic distances are considered. In view of the fact that there are plasmas in the Universe with considerable electron thermal energy contents this feature can be relied upon in order to produce generation or conversion of magnetic energy, high energy particle populations and momentum and angular momentum transport.

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0 / June 2003), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-27

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 536 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge. The CAU 536 site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of possible contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 03-44-02. The additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of this field investigation are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3-2004.

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-04-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  8. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

    In this report we will review the main achievements of the Technical Stop and the progress of several centrally-managed projects to support CMS operation and maintenance and prepare the way for upgrades. Overview of the extended Technical Stop  The principal objectives of the extended Technical Stop affecting the detector itself were the installation of the TOTEM T1 telescopes on both ends, the readjustment of the alignment link-disk in YE-2, the replacement of the light-guide sleeves for all PMs of both HFs, and some repairs on TOTEM T2 and CASTOR. The most significant tasks were, however, concentrated on the supporting infrastructure. A detailed line-by-line leak search was performed in the C6F14 cooling system of the Tracker, followed by the installation of variable-frequency drives on the pump motors of the SS1 and SS2 tracker cooling plants to reduce pressure transients during start-up. In the electrical system, larger harmonic filters were installed in ...

  10. Endogenous Market Structures and Labor Market Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Colciago, Andrea; Rossi, Lorenza

    2011-01-01

    We propose a model characterized by strategic interactions among an endogenous number of producers and search and matching frictions in the labor market. In line with U.S. data: (i) new firms account for a relatively small share of overall employment, but they create a relevant fraction of new jobs; (ii) firms’ entry is procyclical; (iii) price mark ups are countercyclical, while aggregate profits are procyclical. In response to a technology shock the labor share decreases on impact and overs...

  11. Unfunded pensions and endogenous labor supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    A classic result in dynamic public economics, dating back to Aaron (1966) and Samuelson (1975), states that there is no welfare rationale for PAYG pensions in a dynamically-efficient neoclassical economy with exogenous labor supply. This paper argues that this result, under the fairly......-mild restriction that the old be no less risk-averse than the young, extends to a neoclassical economy with endogenous labor supply....

  12. Public Procurement of Innovation as Endogenous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolfstam, Max

    Public procurement used as an innovation policy instrument has attracted attention the last decade. It has been argued that public procurement can be used to stimulate innovation from the demand-side. This paper problematizes ‘demand’ understood as a problem defined by a public procurer given...... underlying mechanisms critical for success. Instead the paper views public procurement of innovation as an instrument of endogenous- exogenous knowledge conversion....

  13. Unionised labour market, environment and endogenous growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyya, Chandril; Gupta, Manash Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a model of endogenous economic growth is developed with special focus on the interaction between unionized labour market and environmental pollution. We introduce a trade union; and use both ‘Efficient Bargaining’ model and ‘Right to Manage’ model to solve the negotiation problem. Environmental pollution is the result of production; and the labour union bargains not only for wage and employment but also for the protection of environment. We derive properties of optimum income t...

  14. Neoclassical vs. Endogenous Growth Analysis: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett T. McCallum

    1996-01-01

    This paper begins with an exposition of neoclassical growth theory, including several analytical results such as the distinction between golden-rule and optimal steady states. Next it emphasizes that the neoclassical approach fails to provide any explanation of steady-state growth in per capita values of output and consumption, and also cannot plausibly explain actual growth differences by reference to transitional episodes. Three types of endogenous growth models, which attempt to provide ex...

  15. Prices vs. Quantities with Endogenous Cost Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Storrøsten, Halvor Briseid

    2014-01-01

    Authorities often lack information for efficient regulation of the commons. This paper derives a criterion comparing prices versus tradable quantities in terms of expected welfare, given uncertainty, optimal policy and endogenous cost structure. I show that one cannot determine which regulatory instrument that induces the highest expected welfare based on the relative curvatures of the cost and benefit functions alone. Furthermore, optimal policy involves different production (or price) targe...

  16. Asset Bubbles, Endogenous Growth, and Financial Frictions

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Tomohiro; Yanagawa, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of bubbles in an infinitely-lived agent model of endogenous growth with financial frictions and heterogeneous agents. We provide a complete characterization on the relationship between financial frictions and the existence of bubbles. Our model predicts that if the degree of pledgeability is sufficiently high or sufficiently low, bubbles can not exist. They can only arise at an intermediate degree. This suggests that improving the financial market condition mig...

  17. Endogenous endophthalmitis after severe burn: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Maryam Hosseini

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Burn patients treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics are at risk of candidemia and its complications, including endogenous endophthalmitis. Early diagnosis of endogenous endophthalmitis in high risk patients could prevent visual loss.

  18. Proteolysis controls endogenous substance P levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Mitchell

    Full Text Available Substance P (SP is a prototypical neuropeptide with roles in pain and inflammation. Numerous mechanisms regulate endogenous SP levels, including the differential expression of SP mRNA and the controlled secretion of SP from neurons. Proteolysis has long been suspected to regulate extracellular SP concentrations but data in support of this hypothesis is scarce. Here, we provide evidence that proteolysis controls SP levels in the spinal cord. Using peptidomics to detect and quantify endogenous SP fragments, we identify the primary SP cleavage site as the C-terminal side of the ninth residue of SP. If blocking this pathway increases SP levels, then proteolysis controls SP concentration. We performed a targeted chemical screen using spinal cord lysates as a proxy for the endogenous metabolic environment and identified GM6001 (galardin, ilomastat as a potent inhibitor of the SP(1-9-producing activity present in the tissue. Administration of GM6001 to mice results in a greater-than-three-fold increase in the spinal cord levels of SP, which validates the hypothesis that proteolysis controls physiological SP levels.

  19. Endogenous Generalized Weights under DEA Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    Non-parametric efficiency analysis, such as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) relies so far on endogenous local or exogenous general weights, based on revealed preferences or market prices. However, as DEA is gaining popularity in regulation and normative budgeting, the strategic interest of the ev......-priced out- puts is relevant. The results show that sector wide weighting schemes favor input/output combinations that are less variable than would individual units......Non-parametric efficiency analysis, such as Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) relies so far on endogenous local or exogenous general weights, based on revealed preferences or market prices. However, as DEA is gaining popularity in regulation and normative budgeting, the strategic interest...... of the evaluated industry calls for attention. We offer endogenous general prices based on a reformulation of DEA where the units collectively propose the set of weights that maximize their efficiency. Thus, the sector-wide efficiency is then a result of compromising the scores of more specialized smaller units...

  20. Fanconi anemia proteins and endogenous stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang Qishen [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Andreassen, Paul R., E-mail: Paul.Andreassen@cchmc.org [Division of Experimental Hematology and Cancer Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Each of the thirteen identified Fanconi anemia (FA) genes is required for resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and melphalan. While these agents are excellent tools for understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA repair, it is uncertain whether a defect in the removal of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is the basis for the pathophysiology of FA. For example, DNA interstrand crosslinking agents induce other types of DNA damage, in addition to ICLs. Further, other DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, activate the FA pathway, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI. Also, FA patients display congenital abnormalities, hematologic deficiencies, and a predisposition to cancer in the absence of an environmental source of ICLs that is external to cells. Here we consider potential sources of endogenous DNA damage, or endogenous stresses, to which FA proteins may respond. These include ICLs formed by products of lipid peroxidation, and other forms of oxidative DNA damage. FA proteins may also potentially respond to telomere shortening or replication stress. Defining these endogenous sources of DNA damage or stresses is critical for understanding the pathogenesis of deficiencies for FA proteins. We propose that FA proteins are centrally involved in the response to replication stress, including replication stress arising from oxidative DNA damage.

  1. Endogenous viral elements in animal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Katzourakis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized.

  2. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  3. Selection-endogenous ordered probit and dynamic ordered probit models

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Miranda; Massimiliano Bratti

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation we define two qualitatitive response models: 1) Selection Endogenous Dummy Ordered Probit model (SED-OP); 2) a Selection Endogenous Dummy Dynamic Selection Ordered Probit model (SED- DOP). The SED-OP model is a three-equation model constituted of an endogenous dummy equation, a selection equation, and a main equation which has an ordinal response form. The main feature of the model is that the endogenous dummy enters both the selection equation and the main equation. The ...

  4. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  5. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  6. Endogeneity and Specialization in the European Monetary Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bąk Henryk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been a broad discussion about the viability of the European Monetary Union (EMU in its present and prospective confines. Generally, the EMU, consisting of 19 countries, is not considered an optimal currency area due to low labor market flexibility, autonomous fiscal policies, and structural differences among its members. Considerations about the endogeneity effect of currency unions lead to the question whether the EMU will become more viable over time. According to the endogenity hypothesis formulated by Frankel and Rose [1996, 2000], a common currency area may gradually become an optimal currency area at some future point (ex post unification, despite not having been an optimal currency area (OCA prior to (ex ante currency unification. Currency unification should bring about increased intra-industry trade and greater business cycle synchronization among member states. The most recent literature and analyses presented in this paper suggest that the endogenity effect in the EMU has been frail since its onset. While real convergence between EMU member states has not advanced, divergence in i.a. economic structures, national income and productivity levels is observed. The most important economic mechanisms reinforcing convergence and divergence among monetary union members are presented in this paper. Using recent data and related research results, we show a significant divergence in economic structures, business cycle synchronization and productivity levels among Eurozone members in the last decade. The Krugman sectorial dissimilarity index is applied to measure changes in industrial similarity among member countries and the Hodrick-Prescott filter to estimate business cycle synchronization in the EMU. These divergence tendencies have been strengthened by the global financial crisis of 2008 and persist, calling for reforms and new policies within the EMU.

  7. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Buddle, Stanlee [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Caraher, Joel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Chen, Wei [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Doherty, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Farnum, Rachel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Giammattei, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Hancu, Dan [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miebach, Barbara [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Perry, Robert [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Rubinsztajn, Gosia; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2017-05-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s goal for Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies is the development of technologies available for demonstration by 2025 that can capture 90% of emitted CO2 with at least 95% CO2 purity for less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. In the first budget period of the project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance. In the second budget period of the project, individual bench-scale unit operations were tested to determine the performance of each of each unit. Solids production was demonstrated in dry simulated flue gas across a wide range of absorber operating conditions, with single stage CO2 conversion rates up to 75mol%. Desorber operation was demonstrated in batch mode, resulting in desorption performance consistent with the equilibrium isotherms for GAP-0/CO2 reaction. Important risks associated with gas humidity impact on solids consistency and desorber temperature impact on thermal degradation were explored, and adjustments to the bench-scale process were made to address those effects. Corrosion experiments were conducted to support selection of suitable materials of construction for the major

  8. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2013-01-01

    For the reporting period, the CMS common systems and infrastructure worked well, without failures that caused significant data losses. One more disconnection of the magnet cold box occurred in the shadow of interruptions in data taking, caused by a series of technical faults. The recognition during 2012 that re-connection can only safely be done at around 2 T implies a minimum magnet recovery time of 12 hours and raises serious concerns about the number of ramping cycles of the magnet these incidents cause. This has triggered studies of how to make the cryo-system of the magnet more robust against failures. The proton-proton run ended just before the end-of-year CERN closure, during which CASTOR was installed on the negative end of CMS and both ZDC calorimeters were installed in TAN absorbers the LHC tunnel, in preparation for the heavy-ion run. The installation of CASTOR was an excellent “engineering test” of procedures for working in an activated environment. Despite some technical pr...

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2011-01-01

      Operational experience 2011 CMS is approaching the end of a very successful year of operation. Proton- proton running ended in the late afternoon of 30th October with a stunning 5.73 fb–1 delivered by LHC, of which CMS recorded 5.22 fb–1. During heavy-ion operation, which continues until 7th December, both the accelerator and the CMS detector have also performed very well. Despite the encouraging overall reliability of technical operation, several infrastructure failures which occurred since the last Bulletin are worthy of mention, with one leading for the first time to significant data-loss. On 10th July, a CERN-wide power failure brought down essentially all services including the magnet, due to an MCS setting being left in “manual” after the recent technical stop, but there was no significant damage and the detector was operational before the LHC, despite a slow and tortuous recovery (one of several indications this year that there is room for improve...

  10. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    Summary of progress since last CMS week. Ten years of construction work have been completed. CMS is closed, in very close to the ideal low luminosity configuration, and performed well in the first tests with LHC beam. Behind this encouraging news is the story of a summer of intense commitment by many teams (from the collaboration and 3 CERN departments) working together, against the clock and despite many minor setbacks, to ensure that the experiment was ready to play a leading role in the excitement of September 10. Following beampipe bakeout and refill with pure neon, a magnificent effort by the ECAL group and the pt 5 technical crew made it possible to install and commission all 4 ECAL endcap Dees before the end of August. In the shadow of this activity, the barrel and forward pixel trackers and part of the beam monitoring were installed within the vac tank. The pt 5 technical teams then succeeded in safely removing the 20t installation tables and their support blocks from beneath the already installed ...

  11. Fluttuazioni endogene, deflazione da debiti e instabilità finanziaria (Endogenous fluctuations, debt deflation and financial instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Ferri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Il presente lavoro studia le relazioni che intercorrono fra fluttuazioni endogene e crisi finanziarie facendo riferimento ad alcuni concetti, strumenti e metodologie che si rifanno all’analisi di Minsky. In particolare, l’articolo utilizza una funzione degli investimenti basata sul concetto di “cash flow” e la collega a una particolare struttura del mercato del lavoro in grado di generare una mutevole distribuzione del reddito. Queste equazioni sono arricchite dalla presenza di aspettative da parte dei vari operatori che cercano di “apprendere” (learning la dinamica del sistema facendo riferimento a “rolling regressions”. Le simulazioni del modello non-lineare sono in grado di generare fluttuazioni persistenti che sono accompagnate, a seconda delle ipotesi fatte, da fenomeni inflazionistici o deflazionistici. In questo contesto, l'instabilità finanziaria e la deflazione da debiti rappresentano più l’incapacità del sistema ad avere fluttuazioni contenute che non lo scoppio di bolle finanziarie come in Minsky.   This paper studies the relationships between endogenous fluctuations and financial crises with reference to some of the concepts, tools and methodologies that are based on the analysis of Minsky. In particular, the article uses a function of investment based on the concept of "cash flow" and connects it to a particular structure of the labor market can generate a changing distribution of income. These equations are enriched by the presence of expectations of various actors who seek to "learn" the dynamics of the system by referring to "rolling regressions". The simulations of the non-linear model are able to generate persistent fluctuations that are accompanied, depending on the assumptions made​​, by phenomena inflation or deflation. In this context, financial instability and debt deflation are more the inability of the system to fluctuate given that the bursting of financial bubbles as in Minsky.  JEL Codes: E

  12. Endogenous vs. exogenous regulations in the commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abatayo, Anna Lou; Lynham, John

    2016-01-01

    It is widely believed that there is strong experimental evidence to support the idea that exogenously imposed regulations crowd out the intrinsic motivations of common pool resource (CPR) users to refrain from over-harvesting. We introduce a novel experimental design that attempts to disentangle...... levels among CPR users in a laboratory experiment. We also observe no differences between weak external regulations and no regulations, after controlling for a potential confound. However, when we add communication to our endogenous treatment, we observe significant behavioral differences between...

  13. Endogenous pancreatic polypeptide in different vascular beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Schwartz, Tania; Bülow, J B

    1986-01-01

    The plasma concentration of pancreatic polypeptide (PP-like immunoreactivity) was measured in different vascular beds in order to determine regional kinetics of endogenous PP in fasting, supine subjects with normal or moderately decreased kidney function. Patients with kidney disease (n = 10) had...... concentration (r = 0.70, P less than 0.01). Hepatic venous PP was significantly higher than systemic PP in both controls and patients with kidney disease (P less than 0.001, n = 15). The values were positively correlated (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001; slope = 1.37 +/- 0.05, P less than 0.001), indicating...

  14. Psychological rehabilitation of patients with endogenous disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kryvonis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The rationale for early psychotherapeutic intervention in combination with psychopharmatherapy in patients with endogenous disorders is provided. The mechanisms of psychological defenses to deal with traumatic experience, used by personalities functioning on a psychotic level, are also described here. Characteristic behavior patterns of extended family members in terms of emotional codependence are provided. Individual pathopsychology is considered as a symptom of abnormal functioning of the family. Emphasis is placed on the importance of inclusion of family members in psychotherapeutic interaction in order to correct interpersonal relations.

  15. ENDOGENOUS INTOxICATION AND SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Aleksandrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RELEVANCE. Sepsis is always accompanied by endogenous intoxication (EI. It is very important to study EI in the patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.MATERIAL AND METHODS. Twenty seven patients with severe sepsis and thirteen with septic shock in the postoperative period were enrolled into the study. EI was assessed using the measurements of total and effective albumin concentrations (EAC, middle-molecular-weight proteins (MMWP and EI index (Kei=MMWP/ EACx1000.RESULTS. The use of the EI index in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock leads to improvement of diagnostic and therapy monitoring.

  16. Environmental policy, pollution, unemployment and endogenous growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Haagen; Nielsen, Søren Bo; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    1995-01-01

    The paper develops a model of endogenous economic growth with pollution externalities and a labor market distorted by union monopoly power and by taxes and transfers. We study the optimal second-best pollution tax and abatement policy and find that a shift toward greener preferences will tend...... to reduce unemployment, although it will hamper growth. We also find that greater labor-market distortions call for higher pollution tax rates. Finally, we show that a switch from quantity control of pollution combined with grandfathering of pollution rights to regulation via emission charges has...

  17. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  18. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2010-01-01

    Overview Once again, the bulk of this article reviews the intense activity of a recently completed shutdown, which, although quite unforeseeable until a few weeks before it started, proved by its success that our often advertised capability to conduct major maintenance within a two month period is real. Although safely completed, on-time to remarkable precision, the activity was not without incident, and highlighted our dependence on many experienced, specialist teams and their precise choreography. Even after the yoke was safely closed, magnet re-commissioning and beampipe pumpdown showed new and thought-provoking behaviour. The struggle to maintain adequate technical resources will be a pre-occupation over the coming months, in parallel with the start of truly sustained operation, for which various procedures are still being put in place. Planning for future shutdowns must now become a high priority, with many working groups and task forces already in existence to prepare infrastructure improvements and to...

  19. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  20. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    10 March 2010 DYNEOS 10:00 – 12:00 - Main Building, Room B, 61-1-009 Dyneos AG is active in the fields of photonics, laser and high-precision positioning. Our highly qualified engineer team has more than 30 years of experience in electro-optical solutions sales. The engineers are supported by a technical and administrative team. We are focused on the Swiss market and represent six suppliers (Coherent, PI Physik Instrumente, SIOS, Nanonics Imaging, APE, Ekspla) in order to give a qualified sales and service support to our customers. Our products are dedicated to the research field as well as to industry. In addition to standard catalog products, we offer custom designs to fulfill the specific needs of OEM customers or specific applications.

  1. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Tuesday 3 February 2004 From 09:00 to 13:30 - Training Centre Auditorium - bldg. 593, room 11 USB (Universal Serial Bus) CYPRESS Seminar Claudia Colombini, Field Application Engineer CYPRESS ActiveComp Electronic GmbH D-85077 MANCHING, Germany As a pioneer in USB, CYPRESS sets the standard for cost-effective solutions without sacrificing functionality, performance or reliability. Having shipped over 200 million USB devices, Cypress is the undisputed market leader and demonstrates unmatched USB expertise. With the industry's broadest selection of USB solutions, Cypress has the right silicon, software and support for every USB application, from Low-speed to High-Speed and USB On-The-Go (OTG). 9:00 - 10:30 Overview of USB systems. USB CYPRESS product overview. Peripherals: Low Speed, Full Speed, High Speed (1.1 and 2.0). Hub Solutions, Embedded Host Solutions, On-The-Go (OTG) and wireless USB. USB Development Tools (first part) 10:30 -...

  2. Prospects of application of method endogenously-hypoxic breathing for perfection of functional preparedness of young bicyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrylova N.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article urgent influence is considered endogenously-hypoxic breathing on the function of respiratory vehicle of sportsmen-bicyclists 13-16 years. It is set that non-permanent application endogenously-hypoxic breathings instrumental in the improvement of maximal ventilation of lights and some indexes of the forced vital capacity of lights: to the vital capacity of lights on inhalation, to instantaneous by volume speed in large and in shallow bronchial tubes. Such functional changes of vehicle of the external breathing testify to possibility of application of method endogenously-hypoxic breathing in complex preparation of young bicyclists.

  3. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ancient civilization in the Indus Valley civilization dispersed under extreme dry conditions; there are indications that the same holds for many other ancient societies. Even contemporary societies, such as the one in Murrumbidgee river basin in Australia, have started to witness a decline in

  4. Biological Redundancy of Endogenous GPCR Ligands in the Gut and the Potential for Endogenous Functional Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina eThompson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals.

  5. On Taxation in a Two-Sector Endogenous Growth Model with Endogenous Labor Supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. de Hek (Paul)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the effects of taxation on long-run growth in a two-sector endogenous growth model with (i) physical capital as an input in the education sector and (ii) leisure as an additional argument in the utility function. The analysis of the effects of taxation - including

  6. Energy, backstop endogeneity, and the optimal use of groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    James Roumasset; Christopher Wada

    2014-01-01

    To meet the growing demand for freshwater, many regions have increased groundwater pumping in recent years, resulting in declining groundwater levels worldwide. A promising development to address these declines is technical change regarding groundwater substitutes such as desalination and wastewater recycling. However, because these technologies are energy intensive, optimal implementation also depends on future energy price trends. We provide an operational model for the case of reverse-osmo...

  7. Some aspects of physiology and pharmacology of endogenous opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewłocki, R

    1984-01-01

    The review, based largely on our own results describes the present state of knowledge of some aspects of opioid peptides and their physiological role. Studies on the effect of opioid peptides and opiates on brain function and the changes of brain level of endogenous opioids under various conditions have demonstrated, among others, the role of opioids in stress and stress-induced analgesia, the involvement of various opioid receptors in spinal mechanisms of analgesia, the inhibitory role of dynorphin in seizures in contrast to proconvulsant action of beta-endorphin system and mu receptor, and led to postulation of the role of beta-endorphin interaction with serotonin for ingestive behavior and a possible involvement of beta-endorphin system in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments.

  8. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Austin Ball

    2013-01-01

      Since the last report, much visible progress has been made, as the LS1 programme approaches the halfway point. From early October, technical and safety shift-crew have been present around the clock, allowing detectors to stay switched on overnight, ensuring that safety systems are operational and instructions for non-expert shift-crew are clear. LS1 progress Throughout the summer, whilst the solenoid vacuum tank and YB0 surfaces were accessible, an extensive installation programme took place to prepare for Tracker colder operation and the PLT installation, in 2014, the Phase 1 Pixel Tracker installation, in 2016–’17, and the HCAL Phase 1 upgrade completion, ending in LS2. This included pipework for N2 or dry air to flush the Tracker bulkhead region, many sensors to monitor temperature and dew point in the Tracker and its service channels, heating wires outside the Tracker cooling bundles, supports for the new vacuum-jacketed, concentric, CO2 Pixel cooling lines, the PLT cool...

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball and W. Zeuner

    2012-01-01

      UXC + detectors As explained in detail in the November 2011 bulletin, the bellows unit at −18.5 m from the CMS interaction point was identified as a prime candidate for the regularly occurring pressure spikes which occasionally led to sustained severe background conditions in 2011, affecting dead time and data quality. Similar regions in LHC with vacuum instabilities were observed to be close to bellows, which radiography showed to have distorted RF-fingers — on removal, they proved to have been severely overheated. The plans for the Year-End Technical Stop were adapted to prioritise radiography of the bellows at 16 m to 18 m either end of CMS. Excellent work by the beam pipe, survey and heavy mechanical teams allowed the X-rays to be taken as planned on 20th December, showing that the bellow at −18.5m had an obvious non-conformity. The RF-fingers were found inside the end of the opposing flared pipe instead of outside. In addition, the overlap between fingers and...

  10. Factors influencing effective learning in instructional skill training for vocational instructors : learning for change : a case of Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI), Bhaktapur, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neupane, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    This study was based on Instructional Skills (IS) training module which was imparted by Training Institute for Technical Instruction (TITI) Nepal to improve the performance of vocational instructors. Instructional skill training is a three months training course split in to three modules; each

  11. Technical approach document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law 95-604 (PL95-604), grants the Secretary of Energy the authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards caused by inactive uranium mill sites. This Technical Approach Document (TAD) describes the general technical approaches and design criteria adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement remedial action plans (RAPS) and final designs that comply with EPA standards. It does not address the technical approaches necessary for aquifer restoration at processing sites; a guidance document, currently in preparation, will describe aquifer restoration concerns and technical protocols. This document is a second revision to the original document issued in May 1986; the revision has been made in response to changes to the groundwater standards of 40 CFR 192, Subparts A--C, proposed by EPA as draft standards. New sections were added to define the design approaches and designs necessary to comply with the groundwater standards. These new sections are in addition to changes made throughout the document to reflect current procedures, especially in cover design, water resources protection, and alternate site selection; only minor revisions were made to some of the sections. Sections 3.0 is a new section defining the approach taken in the design of disposal cells; Section 4.0 has been revised to include design of vegetated covers; Section 8.0 discusses design approaches necessary for compliance with the groundwater standards; and Section 9.0 is a new section dealing with nonradiological hazardous constituents. 203 refs., 18 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. Endogenous opioid peptides in uterine fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraglia, F; Facchinetti, F; M'Futa, K; Ruspa, M; Bonavera, J J; Gandolfi, F; Genazzani, A R

    1986-08-01

    The present study demonstrates the presence of the endogenous opioid peptides beta-endorphin (beta-EP) and methionine-enkephalin (MET-ENK), in the uterine fluid of fertile women and normally cycling and superovulated cows. The two peptides are undetectable in the uterine fluid of untreated postmenopausal women, whereas they are present following estrogen-progesterone treatment. Immunoreactive (IR) MET-ENK concentrations were higher in the secretory than in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. IR beta-EP and IR MET-ENK are present also in the follicular, oviductal, and uterine fluid of cows, and in the uterine fluid, concentrations of IR MET-ENK are higher in the superovulated than in the control animals. Because opioids play important roles on endocrine and immune functions, the present data support the potential physiologic role of endometrial secretions.

  13. Endogenous Natural Complement Inhibitor Regulates Cardiac Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Skov, Louise L; Kjaer-Sorensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity, affecting >1% of all live births in the Western world, yet a large fraction of such defects have an unknown etiology. Recent studies demonstrated surprising dual roles for immune-related molecules and their effector...... protease (MASP)-3/collectin-L1/K1 hetero-oligomer, which impacts cardiac neural crest cell migration. We used knockdown and rescue strategies in zebrafish, a model allowing visualization and assessment of heart function, even in the presence of severe functional defects. Knockdown of embryonic expression...... of MAp44 caused impaired cardiogenesis, lowered heart rate, and decreased cardiac output. These defects were associated with aberrant neural crest cell behavior. We found that MAp44 competed with MASP-3 for pattern recognition molecule interaction, and knockdown of endogenous MAp44 expression could...

  14. tirant, a newly discovered active endogenous retrovirus in Drosophila simulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkouche, Abdou; Rebollo, Rita; Burlet, Nelly; Esnault, Caroline; Martinez, Sonia; Viginier, Barbara; Terzian, Christophe; Vieira, Cristina; Fablet, Marie

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have the ability to become permanently integrated into the genomes of their host, and they are generally transmitted vertically from parent to progeny. With the exception of gypsy, few endogenous retroviruses have been identified in insects. In this study, we describe the tirant endogenous retrovirus in a subset of Drosophila simulans natural populations. By focusing on the envelope gene, we show that the entire retroviral cycle (transcription, translation, and retrotransposition) can be completed for tirant within one population of this species.

  15. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Denner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs, which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas technology.

  16. Sucessfull management of bilateral presumed Candida endogenous endophtalmitis following pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare, and frequently devastating, ophthalmic disease. It occurs mostly in immunocompromised patients, or those with diabetes mellitus, cancer or intravenous drugs users. Candida infection is the most common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis. Ocular candidiasis develops within days to weeks of fungemia. The association of treatment for pancreatitis with endophthalmitis is unusual. Treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics and total parenteral nutrition may explain endogenous endophthalmitis. We report the case of a patient with pancreatitis treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and total parenteral nutrition who developed bilateral presumed Candida endogenous endophthalmitis that was successfully treated with vitrectomy and intravitreal amphotericin B.

  17. A Multi-Country Trade and Tourism with Endogenous Capital and Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Wei-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Background: The study models a dynamic interaction among economic growth, structural change, knowledge accumulation, international trade and tourist flows. Objective: The purpose of this study is to introduce endogenous knowledge into a multi-country growth model with trade and tourism proposed by Zhang. The study models a dynamic interaction among economic growth, structural change, knowledge accumulation, international trade and tourist flows. Methods/Approach: The model is based on Arrow’s...

  18. THE PROCESSES OF ENDOGENIZING IN THE ENDOGENOUS GROWTH: THE CASE OF TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSMAN DEMİR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to state how the main inputs of endogenous growth, i.e. knowledge, human capital and technological progress are made endogenous by education, R&D, university-industry cooperation, learning by doing and diffusion within the production process. Competitiveness of firms and countries would increase as educated people enter into workforce; as R&D produces new technologies which are used in the production process; as theoretical knowledge meets with practice by university-industry cooperation; and as workers have more experience by learning by doing. In empirical analysis for Turkey is made by using data of 1970-2001 term it was found that a positive relationship among labour and capital factors and GNP and a negative relationship among education expenditures and foreign trade volume and capital stock.

  19. Endogenous ACh tonically stimulates ANP secretion in rat atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yoom; Cho, Kyung Woo; Xu, Dong Yuan; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2013-10-01

    Exogenous acetylcholine (ACh) is known to stimulate atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion concomitantly with a decrease in atrial pulse pressure. However, the role of intrinsic ACh in the regulation of ANP secretion remains unknown. Recently, it was shown that nonneuronal and neuronal ACh is present in the cardiac atria. From this finding we hypothesize that endogenously released ACh is involved in the regulation of ANP secretion in an autocrine or paracrine manner in the atria. Experiments were performed in isolated beating rat atria. ANP was measured using radioimmunoassay. To increase the availability of the ACh in the extracellular space of the atrium, its degradation was inhibited with an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition with physostigmine increased ANP secretion concomitantly with a decrease in atrial dynamics in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibitors of M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR), methoctramine, and ACh-activated K(+) (KACh(+)) channels, tertiapin-Q, abolished the physostigmine-induced changes. The effects were not observed in the atria from rats treated with pertussis toxin. Furthermore, the physostigmine-induced effects were attenuated by an inhibitor of high-affinity choline transporter, hemicholinium-3, which is a rate-limiting step of ACh synthesis. Inhibitors of the mAChR signaling pathway and ACh synthesis also attenuated the basal levels of ANP secretion and accentuated atrial dynamics. These findings suggest that endogenously released ACh tonically stimulates ANP secretion from atrial cardiomyocytes via activation of M2 mAChR-Gi/o-KACh(+) channel signaling. It is also suggested that the ACh-ANP signaling is implicated in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology.

  20. Crosstalk between endogenous and synthetic components--synthetic signaling meets endogenous components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Kevin J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Barrow, Matt J; Solorzano, Fernando A; Havens, Keira L; Smith, J Jeff; Medford, June

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic biology uses biological components to engineer new functionality in living organisms. We have used the tools of synthetic biology to engineer detector plants that can sense man-made chemicals, such as the explosive trinitrotoluene, and induce a response detectable by eye or instrumentation. A goal of this type of work is to make the designed system orthogonal, that is, able to function independently of systems in the host. In this review, the design and function of two partially synthetic signaling pathways for use in plants is discussed. We describe observed interactions (crosstalk) with endogenous signaling components. This crosstalk can be beneficial, allowing the creation of hybrid synthetic/endogenous signaling pathways, or detrimental, resulting in system noise and/or false positives. Current approaches in the field of synthetic biology applicable to the design of orthogonal signaling systems, including the design of synthetic components, partially synthetic systems that utilize crosstalk to signal through endogenous components, computational redesign of proteins, and the use of heterologous components, are discussed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobecky, Patricia A; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-03-29

    This final technical report describes results and findings from a research project to examine the role of microbial phosphohydrolase enzymes in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of the radionuclide uranium through the production of insoluble uranium phosphate minerals. The research project investigated the microbial mechanisms and the physical and chemical processes promoting uranium biomineralization and sequestration in oxygenated subsurface soils. Uranium biomineralization under aerobic conditions can provide a secondary biobarrier strategy to immobilize radionuclides should the metal precipitates formed by microbial dissimilatory mechanisms remobilize due to a change in redox state.

  2. Endogene opioider og deres terapeutiske anvendelse i smertebehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, A T

    1990-01-01

    Cancer patients with chronic pain and obstetric patients have participated in clinical trials of the analgesic effects of endogenous opioids. It is possible to achieve adequate relief of pain in these patients following epidural or intrathecal administration of endogenous opioids. Further...

  3. Government spending in a New Keynesian Endogenous Growth Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuehn, S.; Veen, van A.P. (Tom); Muysken, J.

    2009-01-01

    Standard New Keynesian models cannot generate the widely observed result that private consumption is crowded in by government spending. We use a New Keynesian endogenous growth model with endogenous labour supply to analyse this phenomenon. The presence of small direct productivity effects of

  4. Do Endogenous and Exogenous Action Control Compete for Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Heinemann, Alexander; Kiesel, Andrea; Thomaschke, Roland; Janczyk, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Human actions are guided either by endogenous action plans or by external stimuli in the environment. These two types of action control seem to be mediated by neurophysiologically and functionally distinct systems that interfere if an endogenously planned action suddenly has to be performed in response to an exogenous stimulus. In this case, the…

  5. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  6. Optimized endogenous post-stratification in forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul L. Patterson

    2012-01-01

    An example of endogenous post-stratification is the use of remote sensing data with a sample of ground data to build a logistic regression model to predict the probability that a plot is forested and using the predicted probabilities to form categories for post-stratification. An optimized endogenous post-stratified estimator of the proportion of forest has been...

  7. The Endogenous-Exogenous Partition in Attribution Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglanski, Arie W.

    1975-01-01

    Within lay explanation of actions, several significant inferences are assumed to follow from the partition between endogenous and exogenous attributions. An endogenous action is judged to constitute an end in itself; an exogenous action is judged to serve as a means to some further end. (Editor/RK)

  8. Enterococcus faecalis Endogenous Endophthalmitis from Valvular Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidnei Barge

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 74-year-old female, with a mitral heart valve, who presented with pain and blurred vision in the right eye for 2 days. Her visual acuity was light perception (LP in the right eye and 20/40 in the left eye. Slit lamp examination showed corneal edema and hypopyon, and a view of the right fundus was impossible. Echography showed vitreous condensation. One day after presentation, the patient developed acute lung edema requiring hospitalization, so she was not submitted to vitreous tap and intravitreal treatment. The cardiac and systemic evaluations revealed a mitral endocarditis secondary to Enterococcus faecalis. The patient improved systemically with treatment with gentamicin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Her visual acuity remained as no LP, and her intraocular pressure (IOP has been controlled with brimonidine bid despite developing a total cataract with 360° posterior synechia. A cardiac source for endogenous endophthalmitis should be considered in the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve. The treatment and followup must be made in cooperation with a cardiologist specialist, but the ophthalmologist can play a key role in the diagnosis.

  9. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C; Meik, J M; Dashevsky, D; Card, D C; Castoe, T A; Schaack, S

    2014-09-22

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Endogenous Agmatine Induced by Ischemic Preconditioning Regulates Ischemic Tolerance Following Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jae Young; Jung, Jin Young; Lee, Yong Woo; Lee, Won Taek; Huh, Seung Kon; Lee, Jong Eun

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is one of the most important endogenous mechanisms that protect the cells against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the exact molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we showed that changes in the level of agmatine were correlated with ischemic tolerance. Changes in brain edema, infarct volume, level of agmatine, and expression of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and nitric oxide synthases (NOS; inducible NOS [iNOS] and neural NOS [nNOS]) were analyzed during I/R injury with or without IP in the rat brain. After cerebral ischemia, brain edema and infarct volume were significantly reduced in the IP group. The level of agmatine was increased before and during ischemic injury and remained elevated in the early reperfusion phase in the IP group compared to the experimental control (EC) group. During IP, the level of plasma agmatine was increased in the early phase of IP, but that of liver agmatine was abruptly decreased. However, the level of agmatine was definitely increased in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere of brain during the IP. IP also increased the expression of ADC-the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of endogenous agmatine-before, during, and after ischemic injury. In addition, ischemic injury increased endogenous ADC expression in the EC group. The expression of nNOS was reduced in the I/R injured brain in the IP group. These results suggest that endogenous increased agmatine may be a component of the ischemic tolerance response that is induced by IP. Agmatine may have a pivotal role in endogenous ischemic tolerance.

  11. Novel endogenous type C retrovirus in baboons: complete sequence, providing evidence for baboon endogenous virus gag-pol ancestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mang, R.; Goudsmit, J.; van der Kuyl, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A complete endogenous type C viral genome has been isolated from a baboon genomic library. The provirus, Papio cynocephalus endogenous retrovirus (PcEV), is 8,572 nucleotides long, and 38 to 59 proviral copies per baboon genome are found. The PcEV provirus possesses the typical simple retroviral

  12. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  13. Evolutionarily Conserved Roles for Blood-Brain Barrier Xenobiotic Transporters in Endogenous Steroid Partitioning and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Samantha J; Munji, Roeben N; Dolghih, Elena; Gaskins, Garrett; Orng, Souvinh; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Soung, Allison; DeSalvo, Michael; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Keiser, Michael J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Daneman, Richard; Bainton, Roland J

    2017-10-31

    Central nervous system (CNS) chemical protection depends upon discrete control of small-molecule access by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Curiously, some drugs cause CNS side-effects despite negligible transit past the BBB. To investigate this phenomenon, we asked whether the highly BBB-enriched drug efflux transporter MDR1 has dual functions in controlling drug and endogenous molecule CNS homeostasis. If this is true, then brain-impermeable drugs could induce behavioral changes by affecting brain levels of endogenous molecules. Using computational, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches across diverse organisms, we demonstrate that BBB-localized efflux transporters are critical for regulating brain levels of endogenous steroids and steroid-regulated behaviors (sleep in Drosophila and anxiety in mice). Furthermore, we show that MDR1-interacting drugs are associated with anxiety-related behaviors in humans. We propose a general mechanism for common behavioral side effects of prescription drugs: pharmacologically challenging BBB efflux transporters disrupts brain levels of endogenous substrates and implicates the BBB in behavioral regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Endogenous bacterial toxins are required for the injurious action of platelet-activating factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X M; MacKendrick, W; Tien, J; Huang, W; Caplan, M S; Hsueh, W

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), an endogenous mediator for experimental sepsis, has been shown to induce shock and intestinal necrosis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether PAF exerts its injurious effects on the intestinal tissue directly or via synergism with other endogenous products. The aim of this study was to examine the role of endogenous bacterial products, such as endotoxin, in PAF-induced intestinal injury. PAF (3 micrograms/kg) was injected intravenously into normally colonized rats, germfree rats, and normal rats pretreated with a combination of antibiotics, and the systemic response and intestinal injury were assessed. PAF did not cause prolonged shock, leukopenia, hemoconcentration, and bowel necrosis in germfree rats. When germfree rats were primed with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg) of endotoxin, the protection was lost. Combined treatment of the normally colonized rats with neomycin, polymyxin B, and metronidazole for 7 days largely protected the animal from PAF-induced shock and intestinal necrosis. PAF does not directly induce prolonged hypotension, hemoconcentration, persistent leukopenia, and gross intestinal necrosis but causes these changes via a synergism with endogenous bacterial toxins, presumably from the gut flora.

  15. Changes in hemp secondary fiber production related to technical fiber variability revealed by light microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Tendero, Eva; Day, Arnaud; Legros, Sandrine; Habrant, Anouck; Hawkins, Simon; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is increasing due to the development of a new range of industrial applications based on bast fibers. However the variability of bast fiber yield and quality represents an important barrier to further exploitation. Primary and secondary fiber content was examined in two commercial hemp varieties (Fedora 17, Santhica 27) grown under contrasted sowing density and irrigation conditions. Both growing conditions and hemp varieties impact stem tissue architecture with a large effect on the proportion of secondary fibers but not primary fibers. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy allowed the discrimination of manually-isolated native primary fibers and secondary fibers but did not reveal any clustering according to growing conditions and variety. Infrared data were confirmed by wet chemistry analyses that revealed slight but significant differences between primary and secondary fiber cell wall composition. Infrared spectroscopy of technical fibers obtained after mechanical defibering revealed differences with native primary, but not secondary fibers and also discriminated samples obtained from plants grown under different conditions. Altogether the results suggested that the observed variability of hemp technical fibers could be partially explained by i) differences in secondary fiber production and ii) differential behavior during mechanical defibering resulting in unequal separation of primary and secondary fibers.

  16. 75 FR 56013 - Technical Amendments to Pesticide Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Technical Amendments to Pesticide Regulations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is issuing this technical amendment to change references.... Background A. What Action is the Agency Taking? EPA is issuing this technical amendment to change references...

  17. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  18. Endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimpei Higo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain synthesis of steroids including sex-steroids is attracting much attention. The endogenous synthesis of corticosteroids in the hippocampus, however, has been doubted because of the inability to detect deoxycorticosterone (DOC synthase, cytochrome P450(c21. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of P450(c21 was demonstrated using mRNA analysis and immmunogold electron microscopic analysis in the adult male rat hippocampus. DOC production from progesterone (PROG was demonstrated by metabolism analysis of (3H-steroids. All the enzymes required for corticosteroid synthesis including P450(c21, P450(2D4, P450(11β1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD were localized in the hippocampal principal neurons as shown via in situ hybridization and immunoelectron microscopic analysis. Accurate corticosteroid concentrations in rat hippocampus were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In adrenalectomized rats, net hippocampus-synthesized corticosterone (CORT and DOC were determined to 6.9 and 5.8 nM, respectively. Enhanced spinogenesis was observed in the hippocampus following application of low nanomolar (10 nM doses of CORT for 1 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply the complete pathway of corticosteroid synthesis of 'pregnenolone →PROG→DOC→CORT' in the hippocampal neurons. Both P450(c21 and P450(2D4 can catalyze conversion of PROG to DOC. The low nanomolar level of CORT synthesized in hippocampal neurons may play a role in modulation of synaptic plasticity, in contrast to the stress effects by micromolar CORT from adrenal glands.

  19. Endogenous opioids: The downside of opposing stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita J. Valentino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our dynamic environment regularly exposes us to potentially life-threatening challenges or stressors. To answer these challenges and maintain homeostasis, the stress response, an innate coordinated engagement of central and peripheral neural systems is initiated. Although essential for survival, the inappropriate initiation of the stress response or its continuation after the stressor is terminated has pathological consequences that have been linked to diverse neuropsychiatric and medical diseases. Substantial individual variability exists in the pathological consequences of stressors. A theme of this Special Issue is that elucidating the basis of individual differences in resilience or its flipside, vulnerability, will greatly advance our ability to prevent and treat stress-related diseases. This can be approached by studying individual differences in “pro-stress” mediators such as corticosteroids or the hypothalamic orchestrator of the stress response, corticotropin-releasing factor. More recently, the recognition of endogenous neuromodulators with “anti-stress” activity that have opposing actions or that restrain stress-response systems suggests additional bases for individual differences in stress pathology. These “anti-stress” neuromodulators offer alternative strategies for manipulating the stress response and its pathological consequences. This review uses the major brain norepinephrine system as a model stress-response system to demonstrate how co-regulation by opposing pro-stress (corticotropin-releasing factor and anti-stress (enkephalin neuromodulators must be fine-tuned to produce an adaptive response to stress. The clinical consequences of tipping this fine-tuned balance in the direction of either the pro- or anti-stress systems are emphasized. Finally, that each system provides multiple points at which individual differences could confer stress vulnerability or resilience is discussed.

  20. Endophytic fungi associated with endogenous Boswellia sacra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAIFELDIN A.F. EL-NAGERABI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available El-Nagerabi SAF, Elshafie AE, AlKhanjari SS. 2014. Endophytic fungi associated with endogenous Boswellia sacra. Biodiversitas 15: 22-28. Endophytic fungi associated with leaves and stem tissues of Boswellia sacra growing in Dhofar Mountains of Oman were investigated from May 2008 through October 2011. The biological diversity, tissue-preference and seasonal variations of fungi were evaluated. Forty-three species and 3 varieties of fungi were recovered as new records from this plant. Of these isolates, 35 species are new reports to the mycoflora of Oman, whereas 12 species were added to the list of fungal flora of the Arabian Peninsula. The genus Alternaria (12 species is the most prevalent genus recovered from 12.5-83.3% of the screened leaves and stem samples, followed by Aspergillus (5 species, 3 varieties, 6.9-86.1%, Mycelia sterilia (76.4%, Rhizopus stolonifer (62.5%, Drechslera (3 species, 40.3-54.2%, Cladosporium (3 species, 20.8-52.8%, Curvularia lunata (38.8%, Chaetomium (2 species, 15.3-26.3%, Penicillim spp. (9.8-27.8%, Fusarium (9 species, 6.9-27.8%, Ulocladium consortiale (27.8%, Mucor hiemalis (19.5%, and the remaining species (Scytalidium thermophilum, Phoma solani, Taeniolella exilis, and Botryodiplodia theobromae exhibited very low levels of incidence (4.2-11.1%. Endophytic colonization of the leaf tissues was greater (43 species, 3 varieties comparable to stem tissues (25 species. This indicates heterogeneity and tissue-preference, with no evidence of seasonal variation. Therefore, the isolation of many fungal species and sterile mycelia supports the biodiversity of the endophytic fungi invading B. sacra and the high possibility of isolating more fungal species using advanced molecular techniques.

  1. Manager's effort and endogenous economic discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Orrillo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Assume a labor supply consisting of two types of workers, 1 and 2. Both workers are equally productive and exhibit supply functions with the same elasticity. We consider a firm (entrepreneur or shareholders that is competitive in the output market and monopsonistic in input markets. The firm uses the services of a manager who has a high human capital and whose wage is given by the market. It is supposed that the manager does not like to work with one type of worker, say type 1. If we allow the manager's effort to be an additional input without any extra (in addition to his salary cost for the firm, then the firm's pricing decision will be different for both workers. That is, there will be a wage differential and therefore endogenous economic discrimination2 in the labor markets.Vamos assumir que a oferta de trabalho consiste de dois tipos de trabalhadores, 1 e 2. Ambos os trabalhadores são igualmente produtivos e exibem funções de oferta com a mesma elasticidade. Consideramos uma firma (empresário ou acionistas, a qual é competitiva no mercado de produtos e monopsonista nos mercados de insumos. A firma usa os serviços de um gerente quem tem um alto capital humano e cujo salário é dado pelo mercado. Suponhamos que o gerente não gosta de trabalhar com um tipo de trabalhador, digamos o tipo 1. Se permitirmos que o esforço do gerente seja um insumo adicional sem nenhum custo extra (além de seu salário, a decisão de salários será diferente para ambos os trabalhadores. Isto é, haverá um diferencial de salários e, em conseqüência, uma discriminação econômica1 endógena nos mercados de trabalho.

  2. Amplification and chromosomal dispersion of human endogenous retroviral sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P.E.; Martin, M.A.; Rabson, A.B.; Bryan, T.; O' Brien, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences have undergone amplification events involving both viral and flanking cellular sequences. The authors cloned members of an amplified family of full-length endogenous retroviral sequences. Genomic blotting, employing a flanking cellular DNA probe derived from a member of this family, revealed a similar array of reactive bands in both humans and chimpanzees, indicating that an amplification event involving retroviral and associated cellular DNA sequences occurred before the evolutionary separation of these two primates. Southern analyses of restricted somatic cell hybrid DNA preparations suggested that endogenous retroviral segments are widely dispersed in the human genome and that amplification and dispersion events may be linked.

  3. Teaching Technical Writing - Towards Technical Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I will present key aspects of the curriculum for the university degree in technical translation that I have designed for and subsequently implemented at the German Department of the Aarhus School of Business, Denmark. My starting point will be a critical discussion of the norm that ...... of technical writing....

  4. Technical note on drainage systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    This technical note will present simple but widely used methods for the design of drainage systems. The note will primarily deal with surface water (rainwater) which on a satisfactorily way should be transport into the drainage system. Traditional two types of sewer systems exist: A combined system......’s not major different than described below - just remember to include this contribution for combined systems where the surface water (rain) and sewage are carried in the same pipes in the system and change some of the parameters for failure allowance (this will be elaborated further later on). The technical...

  5. Dysfunctional endogenous analgesia during exercise in patients with chronic pain: to exercise or not to exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Kosek, Eva; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira

    2012-07-01

    Exercise is an effective treatment for various chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia, chronic neck pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic low back pain. Although the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in these populations are well established (i.e. evidence based), it is currently unclear whether exercise has positive effects on the processes involved in chronic pain (e.g. central pain modulation). Reviewing the available evidence addressing the effects of exercise on central pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Narrative review. Exercise activates endogenous analgesia in healthy individuals. The increased pain threshold following exercise is due to the release of endogenous opioids and activation of (supra)spinal nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms orchestrated by the brain. Exercise triggers the release of beta-endorphins from the pituitary (peripherally) and the hypothalamus (centrally), which in turn enables analgesic effects by activating μ-opioid receptors peripherally and centrally, respectively. The hypothalamus, through its projections on the periaqueductal grey, has the capacity to activate descending nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms. However, several groups have shown dysfunctioning of endogenous analgesia in response to exercise in patients with chronic pain. Muscle contractions activate generalized endogenous analgesia in healthy, pain-free humans and patients with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, but result in increased generalised pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia patients. In patients having local muscular pain (e.g. shoulder myalgia), exercising non-painful muscles activates generalized endogenous analgesia. However, exercising painful muscles does not change pain sensitivity either in the exercising muscle or at distant locations. The reviewed studies examined acute effects of exercise rather than long-term effects of exercise therapy. A dysfunctional response of patients with chronic pain and

  6. Access to credit and determinants of technical inefficiency of specialized smallholder farmers in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan von Cramon-Taubadel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to credit and credit constraint are critical determinants of competitiveness in agriculture; they have an impact on the technical efficiency of farms. The objective of this study was to analyze how credit variables influence the technical efficiency of two groups of specialized smallholder farmers in Chile. The translog stochastic production frontier model was used to predict the level of farm technical efficiency by the maximum likelihood method. Based on 2004 data, production functions and technical inefficiency score were estimated for 109 livestock and 342 crop producers. Results showed that the mean technical efficiency was 89% and 78% for crop and livestock producers, respectively. Technical efficiency increased with the decreasing use of inputs, dependence on on-farm income, farmer education, family size, and age of the head of household. Credit volume had a significant impact by increasing and decreasing efficiency in crop and livestock production, respectively. Correspondingly, credit-constrained farmers were less efficient in crop production and more efficient in livestock production. For livestock producers, credit volume and credit constraints were found to be endogenous to technical efficiency. A possible explanation is the organization of public support for small livestock producers in Chile, which provides lenders with information about individual livestock producers. Correcting for this endogeneity did not lead to qualitatively different results, but it did influence point estimates of parameters in the production function and inefficiency models, suggesting that it is important to test for endogeneity in the variables used to model inefficiency effects.

  7. Hyperspectral imaging of endogenous fluorescent metabolic molecules to identify pain states in central nervous system tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mustafa, Sanam; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence-based bio-imaging methods have been extensively used to identify molecular changes occurring in biological samples in various pathological adaptations. Auto-fluorescence generated by endogenous fluorescent molecules within these samples can interfere with signal to background noise making positive antibody based fluorescent staining difficult to resolve. Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial imaging information for target detection and classification, and can be used to resolve changes in endogenous fluorescent molecules such as flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids that are involved in cell metabolism. Hyperspectral auto-fluorescence imaging of spinal cord slices was used in this study to detect metabolic differences within pain processing regions of non-pain versus sciatic chronic constriction injury (CCI) animals, an established animal model of peripheral neuropathy. By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations were detected between tissue samples, making it possible to distinguish between animals from non-injured and injured groups. Tissue maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant tissue regions with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate central changes of peripheral neuropathic injury and other neurodegenerative disease models, and paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity.

  8. New stimulation regimens: endogenous and exogenous progesterone use to block the LH surge during ovarian stimulation for IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Nathalie

    2017-03-01

    , their medical and economic significance remains to be demonstrated. The use of luteal phase or follicular phase protocols with progestins could rapidly develop in the context of oocyte donation and fertility preservation not related to oncology. Their place could develop even more in the general population of patients in IVF programs. The strategy of total freezing continues to develop, thanks to technical improvements, in particular vitrification and PGS on blastocysts, and thanks to studies showing improvements in embryo implantation when the transfer take place far removed from the hormonal changes caused by ovarian stimulation.

  9. Simulation of effects of climate change on surface water balances of agricultural lands. Final technical report, 30 September 1992-29 September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, J.L.; McFarland, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this project, the authors used the simulation model ENWATBAL and a stochastic weather generator (WXGEN) to evaluate the impact of climatic change on water balances of cotton and sorghum, major crops in Texas that differ in their response to elevated CO2. Specific objectives were: test the accuracy of the ENWATBAL model for the study of climate change; determine the sensitivities of soil water evaporation and transpiration of cotton and sorghum to single and multifactor changes in climate and CO2; and assess effects of gradual climate change on water balances of cotton and sorghum in west Texas.

  10. Preservation media analysis for ex vivo measurements of endogenous UV fluorescence of liver fibrosis in bulk samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Perez-Garcia, Adolfo; Aleman-García, Nathalie; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Sánchez-Pérez, Celia; Franco, Walfre; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín.

    2017-02-01

    Non-subjective, minimally-invasive, and quantifying techniques may support development and evaluation of a fibrosis regression treatment. The build-up of extracellular matrix in liver fibrosis may result on changes of the endogenous fluorescence of tissue. In this work, we evaluate the fluorescence excitation/emission matrix in the UV range for several bulk samples of murine hepatic tissue preserved in different media. Chemical changes on tissue, caused by formaldehyde preservation, alter the endogenous fluorescence spectra. To avoid these drawbacks, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium were used. PBS buffer showed to be the less harmful and cost-effective preservation medium to study the endogenous fluorescence in fibrotic tissue.

  11. Impact of energy conservation policy measures on innovation, investment and long-term development of the Swiss economy. Results from the computable induced technical change and energy (CITE) model - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretschger, L.; Ramer, R.; Schwark, F.

    2010-09-15

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study made on the Computable Induced Technical Change and Energy (CITE) model. The authors note that, in the past two centuries, the Swiss economy experienced an unprecedented increase in living standards. At the same time, the stock of various natural resources declined and the environmental conditions changed substantially. The evaluation of the sustainability of a low energy and low carbon society as well as an optimum transition to this state is discussed. An economic analysis is made and the CITE and GCE (Computable General Equilibrium) numerical simulation models are discussed. The results obtained are presented and discussed.

  12. Selenium suppresses leukemia through the action of endogenous eicosanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Ujjawal H; Kaushal, Naveen; Hegde, Shailaja; Finch, Emily R; Kudva, Avinash K; Kennett, Mary J; Jordan, Craig T; Paulson, Robert F; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2014-07-15

    Eradicating cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be essential to fully eradicate cancer. Metabolic changes in CSC could hold a key to their targeting. Here, we report that the dietary micronutrient selenium can trigger apoptosis of CSC derived from chronic or acute myelogenous leukemias when administered at supraphysiologic but nontoxic doses. In leukemia CSC, selenium treatment activated ATM-p53-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. Importantly, the same treatment did not trigger apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells. Serial transplantation studies with BCR-ABL-expressing CSC revealed that the selenium status in mice was a key determinant of CSC survival. Selenium action relied upon the endogenous production of the cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins Δ(12)-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2. Accordingly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and NADPH oxidase inhibitors abrogated the ability of selenium to trigger apoptosis in leukemia CSC. Our results reveal how selenium-dependent modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism can be directed to trigger apoptosis of primary human and murine CSC in leukemia. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Fine structure of endogenous stages of Eimeria turcicus developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-05-06

    ANDERSEN, A.,. HUTCHINSON, W.M. & SlIM, J. Chr. 1977b. Ultrastructural studies on the endogenous development of. Eimeria brunetti IV. Formation and structure of the oocyst wall. Acta path. microbiol. scand. Sect. B 85: 201-211.

  14. Modulation of macrophage antitumor cytostasis by endogenous leukotrienes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. van Hilten (Jacobus)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractUsing resident peritoneal macrophages, this study was focussed on the activating role of endogenous leukotrienes in the regulation of macrophage antitumor cytostatic activity in response to inflammatory stimuli. Inhibitors and inducers of leukotrienes synthesis were used to modulate

  15. Importance of Endogenous Fibrinolysis in Platelet Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorog, Diana A.

    2017-01-01

    The processes of thrombosis and coagulation are finely regulated by endogenous fibrinolysis maintaining healthy equilibrium. When the balance is altered in favour of platelet activation and/or coagulation, or if endogenous fibrinolysis becomes less efficient, pathological thrombosis can occur. Arterial thrombosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world despite advances in medical therapies. The role endogenous fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis has gained increasing attention in recent years as it presents novel ways to prevent and treat existing diseases. In this review article, we discuss the role of endogenous fibrinolysis in platelet thrombus formation, methods of measurement of fibrinolytic activity, its role in predicting cardiovascular diseases and clinical outcomes and future directions. PMID:28841147

  16. Endogenous cardiac glycosides, a new class of steroid hormones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schoner, Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    The search for endogenous digitalis has led to the isolation of ouabain as well as several additional cardiotonic steroids of the cardenolide and bufadienolide type from blood, adrenals, and hypothalamus...

  17. Detection and distribution of endogenous steroids in human stratum corneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ping Tseng

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The results demonstrate that, with the achievable sensitivity of current analytical technology, physiological concentrations of endogenous steroids, such as hydrocortisone and cortisone, can be found in the SC of some individuals.

  18. Are human endogenous retroviruses triggers of autoimmune diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Villesen, Palle; Nissen, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases encompass a plethora of conditions in which the immune system attacks its own tissue, identifying them as foreign. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the development of immune response to self, including differences in genotypes, hormonal milieu, and environmental...... manner. In this study by means of genetic epidemiology, we have searched for the involvement of endogenous retroviruses in three selected autoimmune diseases: multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. We found that at least one human endogenous retroviral locus...... factors. Viruses including human endogenous retroviruses have long been linked to the occurrence of autoimmunity, but never proven to be causative factors. Endogenous viruses are retroviral sequences embedded in the host germline DNA and transmitted vertically through successive generations in a Mendelian...

  19. Technical Report Writing Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riordan, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Section 1: Technical Communication Basics (8 chapters on tech com, audiences, tech com process, tech com style, researching, designing pages, using visual aids, describing). Section 2: Technical Communication Applications (7 chapters on sets of instructions, informal reports and email, developing...

  20. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  1. Technical training: places available

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  2. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  3. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or have any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Marie Lahchimi, Technical Training Administration (Tel: 74924)

  4. Technical training: places available

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch. Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tél : 74924)  

  5. 2013 Technical Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    On December 9, 2013, EPA reconvened the study’s Technical Roundtable. Subject-matter experts discussed the outcomes of the 2013 Technical Workshops, stakeholder engagement, and plans for draft assessment report.

  6. Transforming an Urban School System: Progress of New Haven School Change and New Haven Promise Education Reforms (2010-2013). Technical Appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Ethan; Ryan, Sarah; Daugherty, Lindsay; Schweig, Jonathan David; Bozick, Robert; Gonzalez, Gabriella C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the City of New Haven and New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) announced a sweeping K-12 educational reform, New Haven School Change. The district had three primary goals for School Change: (1) close the gap between the performance of NHPS students' and Connecticut students' averages on state tests, (2) cut the high school dropout rate in…

  7. Invasive fungal infections in endogenous Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Selbach Scheffel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cushing’s syndrome is a condition characterized by elevated cortisol levels that can result from either augmented endogenous production or exogenous administration of corticosteroids. The predisposition to fungal infections among patients with hypercortisolemia has been noted since Cushing’s original description of the disease. We describe here a patient with endo-genous Cushing’s syndrome secondary to an adrenocortical carcinoma, who developed concomitant disseminated cryptococcosis and candidiasis in the course of his disease.

  8. Endogenous growth, backstop technology adoption and optimal jumps

    OpenAIRE

    Valente, Simone

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes a two-phase endogenous growth model in which the adoption of a backstop technology (e.g., solar) yields a sustained supply of essential energy inputs previously obtained from exhaustible resources (e.g., oil). Growth is knowledge-driven and the optimal timing of technology switching is determined by welfare maximization. The optimal path exhibits discrete jumps in endogenous variables: technology switching implies sudden reductions in consumption and output, an increase in...

  9. In situ tissue regeneration: chemoattractants for endogenous stem cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S

    2014-02-01

    Tissue engineering uses cells, signaling molecules, and/or biomaterials to regenerate injured or diseased tissues. Ex vivo expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have long been a cornerstone of regeneration therapies; however, drawbacks that include altered signaling responses and reduced homing capacity have prompted investigation of regeneration based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Recent successful proof-of-concept studies have further motivated endogenous MSC recruitment-based approaches. Stem cell migration is required for morphogenesis and organogenesis during development and for tissue maintenance and injury repair in adults. A biomimetic approach to in situ tissue regeneration by endogenous MSC requires the orchestration of three main stages: MSC recruitment, MSC differentiation, and neotissue maturation. The first stage must result in recruitment of a sufficient number of MSC, capable of effecting regeneration, to the injured or diseased tissue. One of the challenges for engineering endogenous MSC recruitment is the selection of effective chemoattractant(s). The objective of this review is to synthesize and evaluate evidence of recruitment efficacy by reported chemoattractants, including growth factors, chemokines, and other more recently appreciated MSC chemoattractants. The influence of MSC tissue sources, cell culture methods, and the in vitro and in vivo environments is discussed. This growing body of knowledge will serve as a basis for the rational design of regenerative therapies based on endogenous MSC recruitment. Successful endogenous MSC recruitment is the first step of successful tissue regeneration.

  10. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Tanis

    2005-11-25

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below.

  11. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision No. 0 (with Record of Technical Change No. 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-10-24

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action (CAU) 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the NTS, CAU 5 is comprised of eight corrective action sites (CASs). The corrective action investigation (CAI) of CAU 5 was conducted from October 7, 2002 through January 30, 2003, with geophysical surveys completed from March 6 through May 8, 2002, and topographic surveys conducted from March 11 through April 29, 2003. Contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified only at CAS 12-15-01. Those COCs included total petroleum hydrocarbons and volatile organic compounds. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations in Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following single alternative was developed for consideration. Close in Place with Administrative Controls is the recommended alternative for all of the CASs in CAU 5. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, the alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate inadvertent intrusion into landfills at CAU 5.

  13. State Operations and Technical Assistance (SOTA) Contacts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Operations and Technical Assistance (SOTA) initiative was created to work through policy and operational changes required in Medicaid by the Affordable...

  14. Endogenous Technological Progress with Uncertainty and Carbon Abatement Polices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, G.L. [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    2001-11-01

    Most greenhouse gas abatement policy models tend to neglect a potentially important element that is relevant to the induced technology changes(ITC). These models that incorporate technological change treat such a change as autonomous, that is, unaffected by changes in prices brought about by policy reforms. However, climate change policies can create economic incentives to engage in more extensive R and D oriented toward the discovery of new production techniques that mitigate a reliance on convectional fuels, ultimately resulting in impacts on the policies themselves. In order to investigate the significance of induced technology for the attractiveness of abatement policies, this study develop the multi-sectoral dynamic CGE model by incorporating two characteristics of technological progress: the endogenous growth model with externality of technology in Romer (1986) and Lucas(1988) and the technological changes resulting from profit maximizing investment in R and D in Rebelo(1991) and Jones and Manuelli(1990). Furthermore, technological progress is affected by not only the economical factors but also the political and institutional system that cannot be captured in this model. This study considers such uncertainty in the technological progress as technology shock as in RBC school. This study shows that the presence of ITC implies lower costs of achieving a given abatement target in terms of the reduction cost per ton of carbon and GDP losses. The presence of ITC reduces the GDP losses by 0.9%p{approx}1.5%p compared with the absence of the ITC. As the abatement target is substantially high, R and D is reduced significantly even in the presence of ITC. Therefore, it is necessary to seriously consider the tax recycling for enhancing R and D investment, which minimizes the GDP losses. The reduction cost is highly sensitive to the uncertainty in technological progress. The technology shock leads the reduction cost to widely vary, in terms of standard deviation, 3

  15. Endogenous retroviral promoter exaptation in human cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Babaian, Artem; Mager, Dixie L

    2016-01-01

      Cancer arises from a series of genetic and epigenetic changes, which result in abnormal expression or mutational activation of oncogenes, as well as suppression/inactivation of tumor suppressor genes...

  16. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November 29... addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences. The...

  17. The Role of Endogenous Neurogenesis in Functional Recovery and Motor Map Reorganization Induced by Rehabilitative Therapy after Stroke in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromoto, Takashi; Okabe, Naohiko; Lu, Feng; Maruyama-Nakamura, Emi; Himi, Naoyuki; Narita, Kazuhiko; Yagita, Yoshiki; Kimura, Kazumi; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous neurogenesis is associated with functional recovery after stroke, but the roles it plays in such recovery processes are unknown. This study aims to clarify the roles of endogenous neurogenesis in functional recovery and motor map reorganization induced by rehabilitative therapy after stroke by using a rat model of cerebral ischemia (CI). Ischemia was induced via photothrombosis in the caudal forelimb area of the rat cortex. First, we examined the effect of rehabilitative therapy on functional recovery and motor map reorganization, using the skilled forelimb reaching test and intracortical microstimulation. Next, using the same approaches, we examined how motor map reorganization changed when endogenous neurogenesis after stroke was inhibited by cytosine-β-d-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C). Rehabilitative therapy for 4 weeks after the induction of stroke significantly improved functional recovery and expanded the rostral forelimb area (RFA). Intraventricular Ara-C administration for 4-10 days after stroke significantly suppressed endogenous neurogenesis compared to vehicle, but did not appear to influence non-neural cells (e.g., microglia, astrocytes, and vascular endothelial cells). Suppressing endogenous neurogenesis via Ara-C administration significantly inhibited (~50% less than vehicle) functional recovery and RFA expansion (~33% of vehicle) induced by rehabilitative therapy after CI. After CI, inhibition of endogenous neurogenesis suppressed both the functional and anatomical markers of rehabilitative therapy. These results suggest that endogenous neurogenesis contributes to functional recovery after CI related to rehabilitative therapy, possibly through its promotion of motor map reorganization, although other additional roles cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Saini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307.

  19. Effects of naltrexone on pain sensitivity and mood in fibromyalgia: no evidence for endogenous opioid pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W Younger

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia are still unknown, although some evidence points to endogenous opioid dysfunction. We examined how endogenous opioid antagonism affects pain and mood for women with and without fibromyalgia. Ten women with fibromyalgia and ten age- and gender-matched, healthy controls each attended two laboratory sessions. Each participant received naltrexone (50mg at one session, and placebo at the other session, in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Participants were tested for changes in sensitivity to heat, cold, and mechanical pain. Additionally, we collected measures of mood and opioid withdrawal symptoms during the laboratory sessions and at home the night following each session. At baseline, the fibromyalgia group exhibited more somatic complaints, greater sensory sensitivity, more opioid withdrawal somatic symptoms, and lower mechanical and cold pain-tolerance than did the healthy control group. Neither group experienced changes in pain sensitivity due to naltrexone administration. Naltrexone did not differentially affect self-reported withdrawal symptoms, or mood, in the fibromyalgia and control groups. Consistent with prior research, there was no evidence found for abnormal endogenous opioid activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  20. [The clinical characteristics of endogenous mental diseases with paroxysm-like disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikovani, G O

    1997-01-01

    Paroxysmal-like disorders (PLD) were observed in 11 patients with manic-depressive psychosis and in 34 ones with shift-like progredient schizophrenia. 8 variations of the fits were described by the author earlier and included the states from vegetative fits to complex psychotic ones with manifestations of Kandinsky-Clérambault syndrome. Clinical pattern of endogenous psychoses was characterized by considerable presence of affective disorders (both hypomanic and depressive), moreover depressive disturbances were observed more frequently. Debut of PLD was mentioned either before depressions' or in their structure: The appearance of psychotic symptoms in structure of affective phases does not change the character of paroxysmal-like states. It was supposed that endogenous diseases with PLD are the special variant of psychoses.

  1. Effective Delivery of Endogenous Antioxidants Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo Park

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is thought to be partially due to the injury of renal cells and the renal micro-environment by free radicals. Free radial scavenging agents that inhibit free radical damage may well prevent the development of underlying conditions such as mesangial expansion (by inhibiting extracellular matrix expression in these patients.Using techniques for intra-cellular delivery of peptides, we made metallothionein (MT and superoxide dismutase (SOD, potent endogenous antioxidants, readily transducible into cell membrane and tested their protective effect against the development of DN in OLETF rats. Herein, we study antioxidant peptides for their ability to prevent oxidative damage to primary rat mesangial cells (MCs, which are important constituents of renal glomeruli.Intraperitoneal administration of these antioxidants resulted in delivery to the kidney and decreased ROS and the expression of downstream signals in renal cells and postponed the usual progression to DN. In in vitro experiments, MT and SOD were efficiently transferred to MCs, and the increased removal of ROS by MT and SOD was proportional to the degree of scavenging enzymes delivered. MT and SOD decreased three major oxidative injuries (hyperglycemia, AGE and ROS exposure and also injuries directly mediated by angiotensin II in MCs while changing downstream signal transduction.The protective effects of MT and SOD for the progression of DN in experimental animals may be associated with the scavenging of ROS by MT and SOD and correlated changes in signal transduction downstream. Concomitant administration of these antioxidant peptides may prove to be a new approach for the prevention and therapy of DN.

  2. Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01

    The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat

  3. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to CO{sub 2} and climate change. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1998-04-10

    Objectives can be divided into those for plant modeling and those for ecosystem modeling and experimental work in support of both. The author worked in a variety of ecosystem types, including pine, arctic, desert, and grasslands. Plant modeling objectives are: (1) to construct generic models of leaf, canopy, and whole-plant response to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (2) to validate predictions of whole-plant response against various field studies of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (3) to use these models to test specific hypotheses and to make predictions about primary, secondary and tertiary effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on individual plants for conditions and time frames beyond those used to calibrate the model; and (4) to provide information to higher-level models, such as community models and ecosystem models. Ecosystem level modeling objectives are: (1) to incorporate models of plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} into a generic ecosystem model in order to predict the direct and indirect effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on ecosystems; (2) to validate model predictions of total system-level response (including decomposition) against various ecosystem field studies of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (3) to use the ecosystem model to test specific hypotheses and to make predictions about primary, secondary and tertiary effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on ecosystems for conditions and time frames beyond those used to calibrate the model; and (4) to use the ecosystem model to study effects of change in CO{sub 2} and climate at regional and global scales. Occasionally the author conducted some experimental work that was deemed important to the development of the models. This work was mainly physiological work that could be performed in the Duke University Phytotron, using existing facilities.

  4. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  5. Selling to Consumers with Endogenous Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Shapiro, J.

    2006-01-01

    For many goods (such as experience goods or addictive goods), consumers' preferences may change over time.In this paper, we examine a monopolist's optimal pricing schedule when current consumption can affect a consumer's valuation in the future and valuations are unobservable.We assume that

  6. Endogenous and exogenous factors in national development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian political leaders have a critical role to play in changing the fortune of the nation by leading by example. In addition, .... Àwon Ìyá Wa are teachers whose gifts, lessons, trials and punishments compel their communities to ..... various times such as schools, health services, roads and libraries, etc. These services.

  7. Social security in a general equilibrium model with endogenous government behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissen, E; Van Winden, F

    1991-05-01

    "In this paper attention is focused on the economic and political effects of an aging population. For that purpose, a general equilibrium model is used that allows for an endogenous analysis of decision making on government policies. We concentrate here on the effects of an aging population on expenditures and levels of social security benefits, the provision of public goods and services, the private output and intergenerational conflicts. Special attention will be paid to the effects of changes in the retirement age and in capital endowments. Furthermore, the effects of issues related to aging, as changes in the political influence structure and the motive of other-directedness by others, are investigated." excerpt

  8. [The clinical meaning and academic significance of "endogenous depression" as an ideal type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, Katsufumi

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that a core group of depressive disorders is due to a discontinuous change in the function of the brain system, suggests that the symptoms of the core group of depressive disorders should be discerned from those of non-core depression. Core depression is thought to correspond to depression of an endogenous nature, which has recently been disregarded in diagnosing mood disorders. However, in diagnosing endogenous depression, we can identify its characteristic symptoms by referring to a traditional symptomatology. Therefore, the idea of Verstehen (Jaspers, K) becomes essential, but has been neglected in academic journals in English-speaking countries. The depressive mood in endogenous depression may be an inhibition of various kinds of emotion, which can never be experienced within a normal emotional state. Thus, it is thought to be 'unverstaendlich' (incomprehensible) in nature. The "anhedonia hypothesis" of depression from DSM-IV permits the inclusion of the non-core group of depression into major depressive disorder, because patients with the endogenous type suffer not only from a loss of pleasure but also from a loss of sadness. A new type of depression that has recently been debated in Japan is diagnosed as major depressive disorder in DSM-IV, but many suspected cases are thought to be due to a psychogenic state or neurotic condition, because their symptoms are thought to be 'verstaendlich' (comprehensible). Endogenous depression can manifest as manic-depressive disorder in almost all cases, but psychiatric practitioners have taken the necessary precautions against the risk of a shift to a manic state even when treating pure depression which seemingly appears to have no manic component. According to recent studies on bipolar disorder, pure mania is not empirically found. Thus, the manic pole may not exist, and we may be able to think of endogenous depression as manic-depressive disorder based on its genetic entity. Additionally, from the viewpoint

  9. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  10. Staphylococcal endogenous endophthalmitis in association with pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeples, L R; Jones, N P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis as a rare infection associated with endogenous endophthalmitis.METHODS A retrospective review of three patients with endogenous endophthalmitis and sepsis due to underlying Staphylococcal vertebral osteomyelitis presenting during a 21-month time period. The ophthalmic and systemic features and management and outcomes are presented.RESULTS One patient developed unilateral endophthalmitis with cervical spine osteomyelitis, Staphylococcus aureus being isolated from blood cultures. The second presented with bilateral endophthalmitis with disseminated Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection, with thoracic and lumbar discitis and para-spinal abscesses. MRSA was cultured from vitreous, blood, and synovial fluid. Both patients received prolonged courses of intravenous antibiotics. Intravitreal antibiotic therapy was used in the second patient. Excellent visual and systemic outcomes were achieved in both cases with no ocular complications. The third patient developed lumbar osteomyelitis following spinal surgery and presented with disseminated S. aureus sepsis including unilateral endogenous endophthalmitis. Despite systemic antibiotics and intensive care the patient died.CONCLUSIONS Endogenous endophthalmitis should be suspected in septic patients developing eye symptoms. Endogenous endophthalmitis with staphylococcal bone infection is a rare but serious condition. Osteomyelitis should be considered as an infective source in any such patient reporting bone pain or reduced spinal mobility. Prompt investigation and treatment can achieve favourable visual and systemic outcomes.

  11. Technological Change and Technical Efficiency for Diary Farms in Three Countries of South America Cambio Tecnológico y Eficiencia Técnica en Predios Lecheros de Tres Países de Sudamérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris E Bravo-Ureta

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive liberalization of agricultural markets, along with the threat that imported products can pose to local producers, reveals the importance of productivity growth as a mechanism to improve competitiveness. Technical efficiency measurement is the most studied component of productivity because it can help to generate valuable information for policy formulation and farm level decisions focused on the improvement of farm performance. This study uses unbalanced panel data sets for dairy farms from Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, to estimate stochastic production frontier models. These frontiers are then used to estimate economies of size, technological change and technical efficiency. All estimations are based on the Battese and Coelli (1992 model, which is widely used in empirical productivity studies. The models for all three countries exhibit increasing returns to scale, which suggests that the dairy farms in the samples are operating at a sub-optimal size. The average annual rate of technological change for Argentina was 0.9%, for Chile 2.6% and for Uruguay 6.9%, while average technical efficiency was 87.0%, 84.9% and 81.1%, respectively.La liberalización progresiva de los mercados agrícolas, junto a la amenaza que implica para productores nacionales la competencia de productos importados, dejan en claro la relevancia del incremento en la productividad como un elemento para mejorar la competitividad. La medición de la eficiencia técnica es uno de los componentes de la productividad más estudiados, debido a que proporciona información valiosa al momento de formular políticas y tomar decisiones destinadas a mejorar la administración predial. Este trabajo utiliza datos de panel desbalanceados de predios lecheros provenientes de Argentina, Chile y Uruguay, para estimar fronteras estocásticas de producción. Luego estas fronteras se usaron para analizar economías de tamaño, tasas de cambio tecnológico y eficiencia técnica. En

  12. Selling to consumers with endogenous types

    OpenAIRE

    Boone, J.; Shapiro, J.

    2006-01-01

    For many goods (such as experience goods or addictive goods), consumers' preferences may change over time. In this paper, we examine a monopolist's optimal pricing schedule when current consumption can affect a consumer's valuation in the future and valuations are unobservable. We assume that consumers are anonymous, i.e. the monopolist can't observe a consumer's past consumption history. For myopic consumers, the optimal consumption schedule is distorted upwards, involving substantial discou...

  13. New Perspectives in the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS) I: Endogenous Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagyas, Miklós; Úri, Katalin; Siket, Ivetta M.; Daragó, Andrea; Boczán, Judit; Bányai, Emese; Édes, István; Papp, Zoltán; Tóth, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors represent the fifth most often prescribed drugs. ACE inhibitors decrease 5-year mortality by approximately one-fifth in cardiovascular patients. Surprisingly, there are reports dating back to 1979 suggesting the existence of endogenous ACE inhibitors, which endogenous inhibitory effects are much less characterized than that for the clinically administered ACE inhibitors. Here we aimed to investigate this endogenous ACE inhibition in human sera. It was hypothesized that ACE activity is masked by an endogenous inhibitor, which dissociates from the ACE when its concentration decreases upon dilution. ACE activity was measured by FAPGG hydrolysis first. The specific (dilution corrected) enzyme activities significantly increased by dilution of human serum samples (23.2±0.7 U/L at 4-fold dilution, 51.4±0.3 U/L at 32-fold dilution, n = 3, p = 0.001), suggesting the presence of an endogenous inhibitor. In accordance, specific enzyme activities did not changed by dilution when purified renal ACE was used, where no endogenous inhibitor was present (655±145 U/L, 605±42 U/L, n = 3, p = 0.715, respectively). FAPGG conversion strongly correlated with angiotensin I conversion suggesting that this feature is not related to the artificial substrate. Serum samples were ultra-filtered to separate ACE (MW: 180 kDa) and the hypothesized inhibitor. Filtering through 50 kDa filters was without effect, while filtering through 100 kDa filters eliminated the inhibiting factor (ACE activity after ACE by this endogenous factor. The endogenous inhibitor had higher potency on the C-terminal active site than N-terminal active site of ACE. Finally, this endogenous ACE inhibition was also present in mouse, donkey, goat, bovine sera besides men (increasing of specific ACE activity from 4-fold to 32-fold dilution: 2.8-fold, 1.7-fold, 1.5-fold, 1.8-fold, 2.6-fold, respectively). We report here the existence of an evolutionary conserved

  14. New perspectives in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS I: endogenous angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Fagyas

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors represent the fifth most often prescribed drugs. ACE inhibitors decrease 5-year mortality by approximately one-fifth in cardiovascular patients. Surprisingly, there are reports dating back to 1979 suggesting the existence of endogenous ACE inhibitors, which endogenous inhibitory effects are much less characterized than that for the clinically administered ACE inhibitors. Here we aimed to investigate this endogenous ACE inhibition in human sera. It was hypothesized that ACE activity is masked by an endogenous inhibitor, which dissociates from the ACE when its concentration decreases upon dilution. ACE activity was measured by FAPGG hydrolysis first. The specific (dilution corrected enzyme activities significantly increased by dilution of human serum samples (23.2 ± 0.7 U/L at 4-fold dilution, 51.4 ± 0.3 U/L at 32-fold dilution, n = 3, p = 0.001, suggesting the presence of an endogenous inhibitor. In accordance, specific enzyme activities did not changed by dilution when purified renal ACE was used, where no endogenous inhibitor was present (655 ± 145 U/L, 605 ± 42 U/L, n = 3, p = 0.715, respectively. FAPGG conversion strongly correlated with angiotensin I conversion suggesting that this feature is not related to the artificial substrate. Serum samples were ultra-filtered to separate ACE (MW: 180 kDa and the hypothesized inhibitor. Filtering through 50 kDa filters was without effect, while filtering through 100 kDa filters eliminated the inhibiting factor (ACE activity after <100 kDa filtering: 56.4 ± 2.4 U/L, n = 4, control: 26.4 ± 0.7 U/L, n = 4, p<0.001. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicated non-competitive inhibition of ACE by this endogenous factor. The endogenous inhibitor had higher potency on the C-terminal active site than N-terminal active site of ACE. Finally, this endogenous ACE inhibition was also present in mouse, donkey, goat, bovine sera besides men (increasing of specific ACE activity

  15. Correlation of endogenous hormonal levels, fibroglandular tissue volume and percent density measured using 3D MRI during one menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J H; Chen, W P; Chan, S; Yeh, D C; Su, M Y; McLaren, C E

    2013-09-01

    We measured breast density (BD) on MRI and correlated with endogenous hormonal levels. Twenty-four premenopausal women received four weekly breast MRI. A blood sample was collected on the same day of MRI. BD was measured using a computer-based algorithm. The generalized estimation equation method was applied to model mean fibroglandular tissue volume (FV) and mean percent density (PD) from predictor variables including estradiol, progesterone, and week during a cycle. In week 3, a borderline significant correlation between estradiol and PD (r = 0.43, P = 0.04), estradiol and FV (r = 0.40, P = 0.05) and between progesterone and FV (r = 0.42, P = 0.04) was noted. The FV and PD measured in weeks 4 and 1 were higher than in weeks 2 and 3, adjusted for variation in endogenous estradiol and progesterone, indicating that the hormone change could not account for the changes in density. No lag effect of endogenous hormone on the change of FV or PD was noted (all P-values > 0.05). Our results showed that BD is not strongly associated with the endogenous hormone. Their association with breast cancer risk was likely coming from different mechanisms, and they should be considered as independent risk factors.

  16. Role of Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide in Regulating Vascular Structural Remodeling in Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur dioxide (SO2, an emerging gasotransmitter, was discovered to be endogenously generated in the cardiovascular system. Recently, the physiological effects of endogenous SO2 were confirmed. Vascular structural remodeling (VSR, an important pathological change in many cardiovascular diseases, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Here, the authors reviewed the research progress of endogenous SO2 in regulating VSR by searching the relevant data from PubMed and Medline. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs and pulmonary hypertensive rats, SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT pathway was significantly altered. SO2 inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation, promoted apoptosis, inhibited the synthesis of extracellular collagen but promoted its degradation, and enhanced antioxidative capacity, thereby playing a significant role in attenuating VSR. However, the detailed mechanisms needed to be further explored. Further studies in this field would be important for the better understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension. Also, clinical trials are needed to demonstrate if SO2 would be a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases.

  17. In silico analysis of the endogenous time-keeping mechanism in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous time-keeping mechanism is responsible for organizing plant physiology and metabolism according to periodic environmental changes, such as diurnal cycles of light and dark and seasonal progression throughout the year. In plants, circadian rhythms control gene expression, stomatal opening, and the timing component of the photoperiodic responses, leading to enhanced fitness due to increased photosynthetic rates and biomass production. We have investigated the citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins involved in the endogenous time-keeping mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Approximately 180,000 EST sequences from 53 libraries were investigated and 81 orthologs of clock components were identified. We found that the vast majority of Arabidopsis circadian clock genes are present in citrus species, although some important components are absent such as SRR1 and PRR5. Based on the identified transcripts, a model for the endogenous oscillatory mechanism of citrus is proposed. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  18. Endogenous peripheral oxytocin measures can give insight into the dynamics of social relationships: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eCrockford

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide, oxytocin, receives increasing attention due to its role in stress regulation and promoting affiliative social behavior. Research across mammals points to a complex pattern whereby social context and individual differences moderate the endogenous release of oxytocin as well as moderate the effects that exogenous administration of oxytocin has on social behavior. In addition to measuring central release of oxytocin or exogenous administration of oxytocin on social behavior, for example via inhalation, it is becoming evident that measuring endogenous peripheral oxytocin levels is an additional, informative tool. This is particularly so when oxytocin can be measured from non-invasively collected samples, such as in urine. Although it is still debated as to whether peripheral measures of oxytocin relate to central measures of oxytocin, anatomical and functional evidence indicate a link between the two. We argue that non-invasive measures of peripheral oxytocin hold several research and potential therapeutic advantages. Principally, study subjects can be sampled repeatedly in different social contexts where social history between interaction partners can be taken into account. Several hormones can be measured simultaneously allowing examination of the influence of oxytocin interactions with other hormones on motivational states. Valence of relationships as well as changes in relationship quality over time can be measured through endocrine responses. Also, the approach of identifying natural social contexts that are associated with endogenous oxytocin release offers the potential of behavioral therapy as an addition or alternative to chemical therapy in the field of mental health.

  19. Endogenous infection and hospital's civil liability - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wąsik, D; Wąsik, N; Sygit, B; Dubiel, M

    2014-01-01

    The subject matter of this publication is the legal assessment of endogenous infection - the specific type of hospital infections. The main aim of the publication is to answer the question of whether medical and legal grounds exist for civil liability for endogenous infections and for treating those infections as cases of medical malpractice or medical events. The research method adopted is a case study. The authors have analysed a civil lawsuit for compensation instituted by an infected patient against a Polish hospital, adjudicated in 2013. The main conclusion of the publication is to postulate distinguishing medical malpractice from complications resulting from the reactions of the human body to treatment. The authors argue that endogenous infections should be treated as the latter-mentioned of these two cases.

  20. Public procurement of innovation; endogenous institutions in user producer interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to explore endogenous institutions as the rules that govern the interaction between users and producers in public procurement of innovation in a regional context. It further aims to study how this interaction influences the results of the procurement process by investigating...... possible institutional barriers and what can be done to fence against them. The article addresses the question: How do endogenous institutions in the context of user-producer interaction affect performance in public procurement of innovation? Innovation is an interactive learning process...... and the participants in this interaction need a common code of communication to efficiently work together. The institutions that govern user-producer interaction have therefore been seen as a possible explanation for success or failure in public procurement of innovation. Endogenous institutions were found...

  1. Assessing the bioequivalence of analogues of endogenous substances (‘endogenous drugs’): considerations to optimize study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Sanjeeva

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Assessment of the bioequivalence of generic versions of certain reference drugs is complicated by the presence of endogenous levels of said compounds which cannot be distinguished from externally derived compound levels following drug administration. If unaccounted for, the presence of endogenous compound biases towards equivalence in bioequivalence studies of these drugs. Bioequivalence assessments may be complicated further as disposition of the exogenous analogue can be subject to various endogenous processes resulting in nonlinear pharmacokinetics. To overcome these inherent biases a number of different strategies have been employed. AIMS To critically review methods used to overcome confounding biases in bioequivalence studies of ‘endogenous’ drugs. METHODS A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases was performed. RESULTS The following strategies were identified: ablation/modulation of baseline endogenous substance levels; recruitment of ‘substance-deficient’ populations; restriction of dietary intake of the relevant substance; standardization of conditions with the potential to affect relevant homeostatic mechanisms; correction for baseline substance levels; and administration of supra-therapeutic drug doses. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of this review key study design concepts, intended to optimize the design of future bioequivalence studies of these so-called ‘endogenous drugs’, are described. The dual stable isotope method, which could be used in a specific context, is also discussed. PMID:20233194

  2. Results of a Technical Review of the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's R&D Portfolio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) is a multi-agency planning and coordinating entity, led by the U.S. Department of Energy that aims to accelerate the development and facilitate the adoption of technologies to address climate change. In late 2005, CCTP asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Energetics Incorporated to organize and coordinate a review of the CCTP R&D portfolio using structured workshops. Each workshop focused on one of CCTP's six strategic goals: 1.Reduce emissions from energy end-use and infrastructure 2.Reduce emissions from energy supply 3.Capture and sequester carbon dioxide 4.Reduce emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (GHG) 5.Improve capabilities to measure and monitor GHG emissions 6.Bolster basic science contributions to technology development To promote meaningful dialogue while ensuring broad coverage, a group of broadly experienced professionals with expertise in fields relevant to each CCTP goal were asked to participate in the portfolio reviews and associated workshops. A total of 75 experts participated in the workshops; 60 of these participants represented non-Federal organizations. This report summarizes the findings of the workshops and the results of the Delphi assessment of the CCTP R&D portfolio.

  3. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeman, Tim [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States); O' Neill, Brian [ZeaChem Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    2016-08-17

    from wood breakdown products, resulting in a non-viable process from an economic point of view. Later runs with the Chem Frac unit switched to a configuration that used dilute acid pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. This change improved yield, increased sugar concentrations, and improved fermentability of sugars. The Hydrogenolysis unit met or exceeded all expectations with respect to unit capacity, technical performance, and economic performance. The US DOE funds for the project were provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. In addition to the scientific/technical merit of the project, this project benefited the public through the creation of approximately 75 onsite direct construction-related jobs, 25 direct on-going operations-related jobs, plus numerous indirect jobs, and thus was well aligned with the goals of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  4. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood–brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates. PMID:22300099

  5. Endogenous endophthalmitis as a septic complication postureteroscope candiduria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fam Xeng Inn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ureteroscopy (URS is commonly used by urologists to treat ureteral stones. It is a relatively low-risk procedure. Both urinary tract obstruction and contamination of instrument can cause candiduria post-URS, and this infection can be treated with an antifungal medication. Candidemia is known as hematogenous dissemination, and ocular tissue is a common invasion. However, endogenous endophthalmitis, due to postureteroscope candiduria, has not been reported up to date. This is a devastating complication that may lead to visual loss. Here, we describe a case of endogenous endophthalmitis as a consequence of candiduria after URS.

  6. Endogenous endophthalmitis with an unusual infective agent: Actinomyces neuii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffi, Shmuel; Peretz, Avi; Naftali, Modi

    2012-01-01

    To report an unusual case of a patient with endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Actinomyces neuii. A 69-year-old woman in an immunosuppressed state and who had a previous history of periappendicular abscess presented with bilateral red painful eyes. The diagnosis was confirmed by culture and pan-bacterial polymerase chain reaction drawn from anterior chamber sample. On admission, the patient underwent an intravitreal injection of vancomycin combined with ceftazidime. Following a 3-week treatment of intravenous penicillin and topical sulfacetamide sodium, the patient recovered fully. Actinomyces neuii can cause endogenous endophthalmitis. Intravenous penicillin G is an effective treatment leading to favorable prognosis.

  7. Stress activates pronociceptive endogenous opioid signalling in DRG neurons during chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo E; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lopez-Lopez, Cintya; Jaramillo-Polanco, Josue; Okamoto, Takanobu; Nasser, Yasmin; Bunnett, Nigel W; Lomax, Alan E; Vanner, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Psychological stress accompanies chronic inflammatory diseases such as IBD, and stress hormones can exacerbate pain signalling. In contrast, the endogenous opioid system has an important analgesic action during chronic inflammation. This study examined the interaction of these pathways. Mouse nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were incubated with supernatants from segments of inflamed colon collected from patients with chronic UC and mice with dextran sodium sulfate (cDSS)-induced chronic colitis. Stress effects were studied by adding stress hormones (epinephrine and corticosterone) to dissociated neurons or by exposing cDSS mice to water avoidance stress. Changes in excitability of colonic DRG nociceptors were measured using patch clamp and Ca2+ imaging techniques. Supernatants from patients with chronic UC and from colons of mice with chronic colitis caused a naloxone-sensitive inhibition of neuronal excitability and capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ responses. Stress hormones decreased signalling induced by human and mouse supernatants. This effect resulted from stress hormones signalling directly to DRG neurons and indirectly through signalling to the immune system, leading to decreased opioid levels and increased acute inflammation. The net effect of stress was a change endogenous opioid signalling in DRG neurons from an inhibitory to an excitatory effect. This switch was associated with a change in G protein-coupled receptor excitatory signalling to a pathway sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase A-protein, phospholipase C-protein and G protein βϒ subunits. Stress hormones block the inhibitory actions of endogenous opioids and can change the effect of opioid signalling in DRG neurons to excitation. Targeting these pathways may prevent heavy opioid use in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S., E-mail: magerasg@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  9. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, Padhraic [University of California, Irvine

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  10. RAMP 2005 technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-26

    This technical report provided details of all monitoring activities conducted by the Regional Aquatics Monitoring Program (RAMP), which was initiated in 1997 to examine the impacts of oil sands mining development on aquatic systems in the region. RAMP's objective is to integrate aquatic monitoring activities in order to identify long-term trends and regional issues related to the environment in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. In 2005, RAMP focused on key components of boreal aquatic ecosystems. This report provided full outlines of all climate and hydrology monitoring activities; water and sedimentation analyses; and studies of benthic communities in rivers, lakes, and deltas. Sets of measurements endpoints were used to represent the health and integrity of valued environmental resources. Satellite imager was used to estimate activities related to oil sands developments. The report was divided into subsections which related monitoring activities for various rivers and tributaries in the region. Small and negligible calculated changes were observed in hydrologic conditions in the Athabasca River mainstem. No discernible changes in water and sediment quality were observed that could positively be ascribed to oil sands developments in the region. Very little evidence suggested that fish populations had changed as a result of increased activities in the region. The influence of oil sands development activities on the aquatic resources of the Athabasca River mainstem were minor and mostly undetectable. The results of fish tissue studies from the lower Athabasca River showed that concentrations of mercury in fish tissues occurred at levels that posed a high risk to subsistence fishers. A higher number of metal concentrations in some lakes in the region was attributed to natural causes. The results of a sentinel species monitoring program conducted at the Ells River watershed were also included. Recommendations for further refining RAMP programs were also

  11. Estimating the effect of endogenous dopamine on baseline [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO binding in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Kegeles, Lawrence S; Wilson, Alan A; Remington, Gary; Borlido, Carol; Mamo, David C; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Endogenous dopamine (DA) levels at dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3 R) have been quantified in the living human brain using the agonist radiotracer [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO. As an agonist radiotracer, [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO is more sensitive to endogenous DA levels than antagonist radiotracers. We sought to determine the proportion of the variance in baseline [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO binding to D2/3 Rs which can be accounted for by variation in endogenous DA levels. This was done by computing the Pearson's coefficient for the correlation between baseline binding potential (BPND ) and the change in BPND after acute DA depletion, using previously published data. All correlations were inverse, and the proportion of the variance in baseline [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO BPND that can be accounted for by variation in endogenous DA levels across the striatal subregions ranged from 42-59%. These results indicate that lower baseline values of [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO BPND reflect greater stimulation by endogenous DA. To further validate this interpretation, we sought to examine whether these data could be used to estimate the dissociation constant (Kd) of DA at D2/3 R. In line with previous in vitro work, we estimated the in vivo Kd of DA to be around 20 nM. In summary, the agonist radiotracer [(11) C]-(+)-PHNO can detect the impact of endogenous DA levels at D2/3 R in the living human brain from a single baseline scan, and may be more sensitive to this impact than other commonly employed radiotracers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Estimating the effect of endogenous dopamine on baseline [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Wilson, Alan A.; Remington, Gary; Borlido, Carol; Mamo, David C.; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous dopamine (DA) levels at dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3R) have been quantified in the living human brain using the agonist radiotracer [11C]-(+)-PHNO. As an agonist radiotracer, [11C]-(+)-PHNO is more sensitive to endogenous DA levels than antagonist radiotracers. We sought to determine the proportion of the variance in baseline [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding to D2/3Rs which can be accounted for by variation in endogenous DA levels. This was done by computing the Pearson’s coefficient for the correlation between baseline binding potential (BPND) and the change in BPND after acute DA depletion, using previously published data. All correlations were inverse, and the proportion of the variance in baseline [11C]-(+)-PHNO BPND that can be accounted for by variation in endogenous DA levels across the striatal subregions ranged from 42–59%. These results indicate that lower baseline values of [11C]-(+)-PHNO BPND reflect greater stimulation by endogenous DA. To further validate this interpretation, we sought to examine whether these data could be used to estimate the dissociation constant (Kd) of DA at D2/3R. In line with previous in vitro work, we estimated the in vivo Kd of DA to be around 20 nM. In summary, the agonist radiotracer [11C]-(+)-PHNO can detect the impact of endogenous DA levels at D2/3R in the living human brain from a single baseline scan, and may be more sensitive to this impact than other commonly employed radiotracers. PMID:27341789

  13. Rett syndrome - Stimulation of endogenous biogenic amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelligra, R.; Norton, R. D.; Wilkinson, R.; Leon, H. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient hypercapnic hyperoxemia was induced in two Rett syndrome children by the administration of a gaseous mixture of 80 percent O2 and 20 percent CO2. Time course studies of neurotransmitters and their metabolites showed an immediate and marked increase in central biogenic amine turnover following inhalation of the gas mixture. The increased turnover of biogenic amines was associated with improved clinical changes. This suggests a coupled relationship and provides further support for an etiological role of neurotransmitter dysfunction in Rett syndrome. In a complementary study, elevation of pulmonary CO2 by application of a simple rebreathing device resulted in improvement of abnormal blood gases and elimination of the Cheyne-Stokes-like respiratory pattern of the Rett syndrome. Near normalization of the EEG occurred when a normal respiratory pattern was imposed by means of a respirator. Taken together, these results lead to the preliminary conclusion that cerebral hypoxemia secondary to abnormal respiratory function may contribute to diminished production of biogenic amines in Rett syndrome.

  14. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasser, Alan H. [Fusion Theory and Computation Inc., Kingston, WA (United States)

    2018-02-02

    Final technical report on DE-SC0016106. This is the final technical report for a portion of the multi-institutional CEMM project. This report is centered around 3 publications and a seminar presentation, which have been submitted to E-Link.

  15. Technical Manual. The ACT®

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    This manual contains technical information about the ACT® college readiness assessment. The principal purpose of this manual is to document the technical characteristics of the ACT in light of its intended purposes. ACT regularly conducts research as part of the ongoing formative evaluation of its programs. The research is intended to ensure that…

  16. Scientific and Technical English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaclavik, Jaroslav

    Technical English differs from everyday English because of the specialized contexts in which it is used and because of the specialized interests of scientists and engineers. This text provides exercises in technical and scientific exposition in the following fields: mathematics, physics, temperature effects, mechanics, dynamics, conservation of…

  17. Developing Technical Skill Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2009-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing the career and technical education (CTE) community as it works to implement the 2006 Perkins Act is responding to more rigorous requirements for reporting on CTE students' technical skill attainment. The U.S. Department of Education suggested in non-regulatory guidance that states and locals use the number of…

  18. Summer Technical Students 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    About 100 technical and doctoral students arrive each year, undergraduates and post-graduates who are preparing diploma or doctoral theses in applied science and technology. They spend up to two years at the Laboratory, as technical students as part of their formal training for a recognised degree or its equivalent.

  19. Transformation of technical infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    1998-01-01

    article about the need of new planning forums in order to initiate transformations with in management of large technical systems for energy, waste and water supply.......article about the need of new planning forums in order to initiate transformations with in management of large technical systems for energy, waste and water supply....

  20. Endogenous digoxin-like factor in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagrov, A Y; Kuznetsova, E A; Fedorova, O V

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypotheses that the concentrations of endogenous digoxin-like factor (EDLF) are (i) increased in the initial period after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and (ii) may contribute to the genesis of ventricular arrhythmias. Consecutive sample study. An 800-bed city teaching hospital, primary hospitalized care centre. Fifty-four consecutive patients of both sexes with a first transmural AMI, 16 male patients with unstable angina pectoris and eight healthy subjects. None. Time-course of the changes of plasma concentrations of EDLF (DELFIA digoxin fluoroimmunoassay) in patients during days 1-14 after uncomplicated AMI and AMI complicated with ventricular fibrillation and congestive heart failure. Plasma concentrations of EDLF in patients on the 1st day after AMI were increased (1.25 +/- 0.26 ng ml-1 digoxin equivalents, P < 0.025) as compared with both healthy controls (0.34 +/- 0.06 ng ml-1) and patients with unstable angina pectoris (0.40 +/- 0.08 ng ml-1). On the 1st day after AMI the plasma levels of EDLF in seven patients with primary ventricular fibrillation were higher (2.54 +/- 0.67 ng ml-1, P < 0.05) than in 47 patients without ventricular fibrillation (1.05 +/- 0.27 ng ml-1). In 14 patients with AMI and congestive heart failure (class III, Killip), plasma concentrations of EDLF were significantly lower (0.32 +/- 0.09 ng ml-1, P < 0.01) than in 40 patients with AMI without congestive heart failure (1.51 +/- 0.32 ng ml-1). Starting from the 2nd day of AMI, plasma EDLF decreased to the level of the control values (0.35 +/- 0.04 ng ml-1) and did not change during a 2-week period of observation. The results show an increase of plasma EDLF during the 1st day after AMI, and that higher plasma EDLF may be associated with the development of ventricular arrhythmias.

  1. How paradata can illuminate technical, social and professional role changes between the Poverty in the UK (1967/1968) and Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK (2012) surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rosalind; Phoenix, Ann; Gordon, David; Bell, Karen; Elliott, Heather; Fahmy, Eldin

    2017-01-01

    This article brings together analyses of the micro paradata 'by-products' from the 1967/1968 Poverty in the United Kingdom (PinUK) and 2012 Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK (PSE) surveys to explore changes in the conditions of production over this 45 year period. We highlight technical, social and professional role continuities and changes, shaped by the institutionalisation of survey researchers, the professionalization of the field interviewer, and economisation. While there are similarities between the surveys in that field interviewers were and are at the bottom of the research hierarchy, we demonstrate an increasing segregation between the core research team and field interviewers. In PinUK the field interviewers are visible in the paper survey booklets; through their handwritten notes on codes and in written marginalia they can 'talk' to the central research team. In PSE they are absent from the computer mediated data, and from communication with the central team. We argue that, while there have been other benefits to field interviewers, their relational labour has become less visible in a shift from the exercise of observational judgement to an emphasis on standardisation. Yet, analyses of what field interviewers actually do show that they still need to deploy the same interpersonal skills and resourcefulness to secure and maintain interviews as they did 45 years previously.

  2. Technical Agency in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    ) description of hybrid networks in which human and non-human actants are granted agency without differentiating different kinds of agency, EMCA focuses on the member's perspectives and the situated construction of technical agency that is made relevant within an ongoing interaction. Based on an EMCA analysis......The paper combines the discussion of technical agency and hybrid networks of Actor-Network Theory (ANT) with an ethnomethodological/conversation analytical (EMCA) perspective on situated practices in which participants ascribe agency to technical artefacts. While ANT works with (ethnographic...... of three video recordings of situations in which technical agency is made relevant by the human participants, the paper demonstrates different ways in which agency is granted to technical artefacts. Human participants can treat a technology as communication partner, as an active part (and actant...

  3. Physiological role of endogenous amines in the modulation of ventricular automaticity in the guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, J; Katzung, B G

    1980-12-01

    1. Current-clamp experiments were carried out with guinea-pig papillary muscles to determine the dependence of depolarization-induced automaticity on endogenous catecholamines. 2. Catecholamine depletion was produced by pre-treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine and confirmed by fluorimetric assay of right ventricular tissue. Papillary muscles from depleted animals demonstrated a marked suppression of depolarization-induced automaticity for maximum diastolic potentials less negative than -55 mV. This suppression was completely reversed by noradrenaline but not by tyramine. 3. In normal tissue, noradrenaline and tyramine had much smaller effects on automaticity arising from maximum diastolic potentials negative to -55 mV than on repetitive activity arising positive to this level. 4. L-propranolol in concentrations of 2-3 x 10(-7) M reduced repetitive activity in the less negative range of maximum diastolic potential. No evidence of direct membrane depression was observed at these doses and the effect was reversed by application of noradrenaline. 5. D-propranolol, the isomer with much lower beta-receptor blocking potency, required twentyfold higher concentrations to depress automaticity and this was accompanied by evidence of direct membrane depression, i.e. reduction of upstroke velocity of action potentials. 6. These results show that automaticity induced in guinea-pig papillary muscles by depolarization positive to -55 mV is strongly dependent upon endogenous catecholamines. 7. The hypothesis that endogenous catecholamines facilitate depolarization-induced automaticity through an increase in calcium conductance was modelled using numerical techniques. It was found that changes in calcium conductance caused changes in the model which closely parallelled the experimental effects of catecholamine depletion and beta-blockade. The effects of changes in delayed rectification in the model did not accurately reproduce the experimental results.

  4. Place branding, embeddedness and endogenous rural development : Four European cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donner, Mechthild; Horlings, Lummina; Fort, Fatiha; Vellema, Sietze

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with place branding on the regional scale, in the rural context of food and tourism networks in Europe. Place branding is linked to the concepts of endogenous rural development, territory and embeddedness, by analysing how the valorisation of specific rural assets takes shape. The

  5. Endogenous Losses of Nitrogen and Protein Requirement for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The values obtained enabled calculation of nitrogen requirement of the sheep for maintenance, as well as the value of the experimental rations in the nutrition of the sheep. Values of MFN obtained by two methods were 3.31 and 3.10 g/kg Dry matter (DM) intake. Endogenous urinary nitrogen value was 0.024 g/day per ...

  6. Endogenous factors that relate to the eating habits of adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim in this research was to determine how endogenous factors such as gender, intelligence, self-concept, and personality relate to the eating habits of adolescents. An empirical investigation was conducted using 340 secondary school learners, 162 boys and 178 girls. From the results it appeared that girls tend to have ...

  7. The value of reliability with endogenous meeting time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abegaz, Dereje Fentie; Fosgerau, Mogens

    and congestion. In: Kuhmo Nectar Conference and Summer School on Transportation Economics, 8–9 Jully 2010. Valencia, Spain: ITEA. Fosgerau, Mogens, Engelson, Leonid, & Franklin, Joel. 2012 (Dec.). Endogenous scheduling preferences and random travel time. Unpublished. Lam, Terence C., & Small, Kenneth A. 2001...

  8. Epitope tagging of endogenous genes in diverse human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Bonifant, Challice; Bunz, Fred; Lane, William S; Waldman, Todd

    2008-11-01

    Epitope tagging is a powerful and commonly used approach for studying the physical properties of proteins and their functions and localization in eukaryotic cells. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been possible to exploit the high efficiency of homologous recombination to tag proteins by modifying their endogenous genes, making it possible to tag virtually every endogenous gene and perform genome-wide proteomics experiments. However, due to the relative inefficiency of homologous recombination in cultured human cells, epitope-tagging approaches have been limited to ectopically expressed transgenes, with the attendant limitations of their nonphysiological transcriptional regulation and levels of expression. To overcome this limitation, a modification and extension of adeno-associated virus-mediated human somatic cell gene targeting technology is described that makes it possible to simply and easily create an endogenous epitope tag in the same way that it is possible to knock out a gene. Using this approach, we have created and validated human cell lines with epitope-tagged alleles of two cancer-related genes in a variety of untransformed and transformed human cell lines. This straightforward approach makes it possible to study the physical and biological properties of endogenous proteins in human cells without the need for specialized antibodies for individual proteins of interest.

  9. Antidiabetic and Plasma Endogenous Antioxidant Activity of alstonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alstonia boonei is a well-known plant of medicinal value but its effect on endogenous plasma antioxidant in diabetes remains unknown. Thus, need to investigate the effects of the methanolic extract of the plant on plasma bilirubin and uric acid level in alloxan induced diabetes rabbits. Twenty five rabbits divided into five ...

  10. Occupational Choice and the Endogenous Supply of Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klynge, Alice Heegaard

    I develop a selection model in which the individual’s supply of ability is endogenous and subject to selection along with occupation. Additionally, I identify and estimate the returns to creative and innovative ability, communication ability, and reading and math ability for white-collar and blue...

  11. Endogeneous price leadership in a duopoly: equal products, unequal technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dastidar, K.G.; Furth, D.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper we study endogenous price leadership in the context of a homogeneous product Bertrand duopoly model in which the firms have different, strictly convex cost functions. In such a framework it is well known that a simultaneous move price choice game does not have an equilibrium in

  12. Re-appropriating Matrifocality: Endogeneity and African Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... organising principle of the society that this a distinct venture in endogeneity. 3.1. Ifi Amadiume: An ... Put simply, “gender was not an organizing principle in Yoruba society prior to colonization by the .... The consensus-focused public decision-making process also made disregarding the women's voice near ...

  13. The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The two faces of endogenous DNA editing enzymes: Promoting gene mutations as well as genome repair. Type B lymphocytes are a specific type of white blood cell within our immune system. They produce and export antibodies which seek out, attach to, and neutralize microbes and toxins. A unique way that B ...

  14. The Endogenous Origins of Experience, Routines and Organizational Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Felin, Teppo

    2011-01-01

    several, endogeneity-related concerns, namely: (1) the problem of origins and causation, (2) the problem of extremes, (3) the problem of intentionality, (4) the problem of new knowledge, and (5) the problem of the environment. We introduce the ‘poverty of stimulus’ argument and discuss how an internalist...

  15. International trade and endogenous standards: the case of GMO regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Vigani, Mauro; Raimondi, V; Olper, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper quantifies the effect of GMO regulation on bilateral trade flows of agricultural products. We develop a composite index of GMO regulations and using a gravity model we show that bilateral differences in GMO regulation negatively affect trade flows. This effect is especially driven by labeling, approval process and traceability. Our results are robust to the endogeneity of GMO standards to trade flows.

  16. Augmenting endogenous Wnt signaling improves skin wound healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whyte, Jemima L; Smith, Andrew A; Liu, Bo; Manzano, Wilfred R; Evans, Nick D; Dhamdhere, Girija R; Fang, Mark Y; Chang, Howard Y; Oro, Anthony E; Helms, Jill A

    2013-01-01

    .... Utilizing a biochemical approach that mimics the amplified Wnt response of Axin2(LacZ/LacZ) mice, we show that topical application of liposomal Wnt3a to a non-healing wound enhances endogenous Wnt signaling, and results in better skin wound healing...

  17. Borderline Personality Disorder: A Dysregulation of the Endogenous Opioid System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Schmahl, Christian; Falkai, Peter; Wedekind, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The neurobiology of borderline personality disorder (BPD) remains unclear. Dysfunctions of several neurobiological systems, including serotoninergic, dopaminergic, and other neurotransmitter systems, have been discussed. Here we present a theory that alterations in the sensitivity of opioid receptors or the availability of endogenous opioids…

  18. Endogenous vehicle-type choices in a monocentric city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinwon

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by several empirical studies showing a positive relationship between residential density and vehicle fuel efficiency chosen by the residents, this paper presents a modified monocentric city model with endogenous vehicle-typechoices. Consumers are assumed to explicitly consider driving i...

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Endogenous heparin levels in the controlled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the hypothesis that asthmatic patients have lower levels of circulating endogenous heparin than healthy ... of stimuli in guinea pig and rat models of allergic asthma, as well as in asthmatic patients.3 .... 2008; 585: 375-384. 4. Ceyhan B, Celikel T. Effect of inhaled heparin on methacholine-induced bronchial hyperreactivity.

  20. Endogenous adenosine curtails lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumour necrosis factor synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eigler, A; Greten, T F; Sinha, B; Haslberger, C; Sullivan, G W; Endres, S

    Recent studies have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of exogenous adenosine on TNF production. During inflammation endogenous adenosine levels are elevated and may be one of several anti-inflammatory mediators that reduce TNF synthesis. In the present study the authors investigated this role of

  1. Fiscal Policies and Endogenous Growth in Integrated Capital Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lejour, A.M.; Verbon, H.A.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of policy coordination in a two-country world with endogenous growth and imperfect capital mobility.Public investment and a public consumption good are financed by a source-based capital-income tax. By comparing the cases in which countries do and do not coordinate

  2. The influence of endogenous hormones on the formation of buds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... Scientia Agricultura Sinica, 40(10): 2361-2367. Luo Q, Hu YY, Zhou KD (1998). Role of endogenous hormones in tissue culture of mature rice embryo. Chin. J. Rice Sci. 12(4): 238-240. Murashige T, Skoog F (1962). A revised medium for rapid growth and bioassays with tobacco tissue culture. Physiol. Plant ...

  3. Endogenous party formation in a model of representative democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, Marco

    2000-01-01

    We extend the citizen candidate framework by allowing for endogenous party formation. When a party is formed, any member of that party that wants to be a candidate in the election, first has to run in the primary election of her party. We show that in equilibrium one left-wing and one right-wing

  4. The potential of endogenous learning approaches to gender and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper argues for a middle-inclusive ground within multiple feminist perspectives from which the potential for the endogenous learning approach to gender and development studies can be grounded. There is a challenge of developing context-specific approaches to learn from Rwanda's achievements in gender and ...

  5. Origin of endogenous DNA abasic sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Marie; Boiteux, Serge

    2003-11-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are among the most frequent endogenous lesions in DNA and present a strong block to replication. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant is inviable because of its incapacity to repair AP sites and related 3'-blocked single-strand breaks (M. Guillet and S. Boiteux, EMBO J. 21:2833, 2002). Here, we investigated the origin of endogenous AP sites in yeast. Our results show that the deletion of the UNG1 gene encoding the uracil DNA glycosylase suppresses the lethality of the apn1 apn2 rad1 mutant. In contrast, inactivation of the MAG1, OGG1, or NTG1 and NTG2 genes encoding DNA glycosylases involved in the repair of alkylation or oxidation damages does not suppress lethality. Although viable, the apn1 apn2 rad1 ung1 mutant presents growth delay due to a G(2)/M checkpoint. These results point to uracil as a critical source of the formation of endogenous AP sites in DNA. Uracil can arise in DNA by cytosine deamination or by the incorporation of dUMP during replication. Here, we show that the overexpression of the DUT1 gene encoding the dUTP pyrophosphatase (Dut1) suppresses the lethality of the apn1 apn2 rad1 mutant. Therefore, this result points to the dUTP pool as an important source of the formation of endogenous AP sites in eukaryotes.

  6. Use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry to differentiate between endogenous steroids and synthetic homologues in cattle: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert, E-mail: Geert.janssens@favv.be [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Courtheyn, Dirk [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Mangelinckx, Sven [Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Prévost, Stéphanie; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Monteau, Fabrice [LUNAM Université, Oniris, Laboratoire d’Etude des Résidus et Contaminants dans les Aliments (LABERCA), F-44307 Nantes (France); De Poorter, Geert [Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain, Directorate General Laboratories, Kruidtuinlaan 55, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); De Kimpe, Norbert [Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Le Bizec, Bruno [LUNAM Université, Oniris, Laboratoire d’Etude des Résidus et Contaminants dans les Aliments (LABERCA), F-44307 Nantes (France)

    2013-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Scheme: Representation of the observed isotope ratios and the relation to exogenous and endogenous natural steroids. AS stands for “amount of steroid”. Highlights: ► The difference between endogenous and exogenous steroids is thoroughly laid out. ► Factors influencing the carbon ratio and the use of Δ{sup 13}C-values are explained. ► Implementation of GC/C/IRMS to detect steroid abuse in cattle is reviewed. ► Alternative methods and upcoming techniques are discussed. ► The differences and similarities with sports doping control are highlighted. -- Abstract: Although substantial technical advances have been achieved during the past decades to extend and facilitate the analysis of growth promoters in cattle, the detection of abuse of synthetic analogs of naturally occurring hormones has remained a challenging issue. When it became clear that the exogenous origin of steroid hormones could be traced based on the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotope ratio of the substances, GC/C/IRMS has been successfully implemented to this aim since the end of the past century. However, due to the costly character of the instrumental setup, the susceptibility of the equipment to errors and the complex and time consuming sample preparation, this method is up until now only applied by a limited number of laboratories. In this review, the general principles as well as the practical application of GC/C/IRMS to differentiate between endogenous steroids and exogenously synthesized homologous compounds in cattle will be discussed in detail, and will be placed next to other existing and to be developed methods based on isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Finally, the link will be made with the field of sports doping, where GC/C/IRMS has been established within the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) approved methods as the official technique to differentiate between exogenous and endogenous steroids over the past few years.

  7. A Two-Sector Growth Model with Endogenous Human Capital and Amenities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines issues related to urbanization with labour migration. The main departures from the traditional approaches to dynamics of economic structures are that the paper uses an alternative approach to consumer behaviour and introduces human capital accumulation via learning by doing. The model describes dynamic interactions among agricultural and industrial production, rural and urban amenities, distribution of production factors and preferences with endogenous capital and human capital accumulation. We show that the dynamic system may have either a single or multiple equilibrium points, depending upon returns to scale in the two sectors. We also examined effects of changes in some parameters.

  8. Hypocalcemia reduces endogenous glucose production in hyperketonemic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbohm, C; Harmeyer, J

    2003-06-01

    In previous experiments it has been shown that hyperketonemia lowered plasma glucose concentration in sheep and depressed endogenous glucose production by approximately 30%. This facilitates the onset of pregnancy toxemia. In the last trimester of gestation, hyperketonemia in sheep is often associated with hypocalcemia. There is an indication that hypocalcemia exerts an additional depressive effect on endogenous glucose production. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect in sheep of hypocalcemia on endogenous glucose production in the presence of normo- and hyperketonemia. The experiments were carried out with seven multiparous sheep during three different reproductive states, i.e., during pregnancy (10 +/- 8 d prepartum), during lactation (21 +/- 8 d postpartum), and 4 wk after weaning of the lambs. Concentration of glucose in plasma, turnover of glucose and the rate constant of glucose turnover were measured by isotope dilution during normo- and hypocalcemia and in the presence of normal and elevated beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations. Hypocalcemia was induced by i.v. infusions of Na2EDTA. Hyperketonemia was maintained by i.v. infusion of DL-beta-hydroxybutyrate. The experiments showed that induction of hypocalcemia: 1) induced a decline in plasma glucose concentration in all reproductive states during normo- and hyperketonemia and 2) significantly lowered endogenous production of glucose in nonpregnant hyperketonemic and in lactating normoketonemic ewes. Pregnant normoketonemic ewes were able to compensate for the hypoglycemic effect of hypocalcemia and to keep endogenous production at the normocalcemic level. We concluded that hypocalcemia does not promote the onset of pregnancy toxemia per se but will facilitate the development of the disease when it is present in combination with hyperketonemia.

  9. THE DIMENSIONS OF CREATIVITY IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Franc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this paper engages with the change in the approach to technical education and to its research nature, quantity and quality ratio. The technical education is ordinary education and technical education at the same time. The technical education is a set of activities aimed at the skillful use of technology in deliberately organized process of interacting with an individual, causing permanent changes in their personality. Formation of a learner’s technological culture is made by providing knowledge about the products of technology, experiencing technical situations, raising respect for human technical creativity and products of creativity, developing an ability to use the products of technology. Technical education is aimed at the student’s cognitive realm, providing information and building a system of knowledge about the technical reality, developing cognitive skills needed to receive, understand, interpret and verify technical phenomena. Materials and Methods: the research was based on the analysis of students’ theses enrolled at Organization and Management Faculty of Lodz University of Technology. Results: objective quality indicators were defined for the purposes of analysis. The analysis results are not final, but they form the basis for an in-depth understanding of the academic reality. Generic requirements have been developed to polytechnic education. Discussion and Conclusions: polytechnic education is a specific link in the development of culture and civilization that provides value to the formation of personality. Different areas of the human civilization and the objective socio-cultural world are the basis for development. Polytechnic education forms the elite, providing the stable development of the society in accordance with the rules and principles.

  10. Endogenous laminin is required for human airway smooth muscle cell maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thai

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle (ASM contraction underlies acute bronchospasm in asthma. ASM cells can switch between a synthetic-proliferative phenotype and a contractile phenotype. While the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM components on modulation of ASM cells to a synthetic phenotype have been reported, the role of ECM components on maturation of ASM cells to a contractile phenotype in adult lung is unclear. As both changes in ECM components and accumulation of contractile ASM are features of airway wall remodelling in asthma, we examined the role of the ECM protein, laminin, in the maturation of contractile phenotype in human ASM cells. Methods Human ASM cells were made senescence-resistant by stable expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase. Maturation to a contractile phenotype was induced by 7-day serum deprivation, as assessed by immunoblotting for desmin and calponin. The role of laminin on ASM maturation was investigated by comparing the effects of exogenous laminin coated on culture plates, and of soluble laminin peptide competitors. Endogenous expression of laminin chains during ASM maturation was also measured. Results Myocyte binding to endogenously expressed laminin was required for ASM phenotype maturation, as laminin competing peptides (YIGSR or GRGDSP significantly reduced desmin and calponin protein accumulation that otherwise occurs with prolonged serum deprivation. Coating of plastic cell culture dishes with different purified laminin preparations was not sufficient to further promote accumulation of desmin or calponin during 7-day serum deprivation. Expression of α2, β1 and γ1 laminin chains by ASM cells was specifically up-regulated during myocyte maturation, suggesting a key role for laminin-2 in the development of the contractile phenotype. Conclusion While earlier reports suggest exogenously applied laminin slows the spontaneous modulation of ASM to a synthetic phenotype, we show for the

  11. Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikel, William J.

    1999-01-01

    The author, founding editor of the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHC) Journal, now the Journal of Mental Health Counseling, examines some of the changes that have taken place in the profession over the past 20 years. Special emphasis is given to the visionary excellence that set the "AMHCA Agenda" over 20 years ago.…

  12. Urology technical and non-technical skills development: the emerging role of simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Prem; Gianduzzo, Troy R J

    2016-04-01

    To review the emerging role of technical and non-technical simulation in urological education and training. A review was conducted to examine the current role of simulation in urology training. A PUBMED search of the terms 'urology training', 'urology simulation' and 'urology education' revealed 11,504 titles. Three hundred and fifty-seven abstracts were identified as English language, peer reviewed papers pertaining to the role of simulation in urology and related topics. Key papers were used to explore themes. Some cross-referenced papers were also included. There is an ongoing need to ensure that training time is efficiently utilised while ensuring that optimal technical and non-technical skills are achieved. Changing working conditions and the need to minimise patient harm by inadvertent errors must be taken into account. Simulation models for specific technical aspects have been the mainstay of graduated step-wise low and high fidelity training. Whole scenario environments as well as non-technical aspects can be slowly incorporated into the curriculum. Doing so should also help define what have been challenging competencies to teach and evaluate. Dedicated time, resources and trainer up-skilling are important. Concurrent studies are needed to help evaluate the effectiveness of introducing step-wise simulation for technical and non-technical competencies. Simulation based learning remains the best avenue of progressing surgical education. Technical and non-technical simulation could be used in the selection process. There are good economic, logistic and safety reasons to pursue the process of ongoing development of simulation co-curricula. While the role of simulation is assured, its progress will depend on a structured program that takes advantage of what can be delivered via this medium. Overall, simulation can be developed further for urological training programs to encompass technical and non-technical skill development at all stages, including

  13. Endogenous modification of macronutrient selection pattern in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, V C; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J; Zamora, S; Madrid, J A

    2008-09-03

    The use of a single diet with a well defined composition to feed fish throughout their life cycle is an oversimplification that probably does not respond to their metabolic requirements. For example, the seasonal reproduction that characterizes most fish species demands changes in nutritional requirements. Bearing this in mind, the macronutrient selection pattern was studied from January to August in twelve individually housed sea bass exposed to a constant photoperiod (12L:12D h) and temperature (23+/-0.5 degrees C). The endogenous "seasonal" effect on food and energy intake regulation and macronutrient selection was determined, using protein (P), carbohydrate (CH), and fat (F) packaged separately into gelatine capsules, a method that prevents the diet chemosensory properties at oropharyngeal level from interfering with macronutrient selection. Energy intake changed monthly, the highest values being recorded in May and June and the lowest values in March and April. The preliminary results illustrated "seasonal" changes in the sea bass macronutrient selection pattern with, which showed a predominantly proteinic selection during April (53% P, 21% CH, 25% F) and lipidic in July (35% P, 19% CH, 42% F); the increase in fat selection from May to July being statistically significant. This is the first evidence supporting the existence of an endogenous rhythm in the "seasonal" energy regulation and macronutrient selection in fish through post-ingestive mechanisms and probably involving chemosensory detection in the gut and/or post-absorptive mechanisms, although the exact mechanisms involved have yet to be clarified.

  14. Can Neural Activity Propagate by Endogenous Electrical Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chen; Shivacharan, Rajat S.; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that synaptic transmissions and gap junctions are the major governing mechanisms for signal traveling in the neural system. Yet, a group of neural waves, either physiological or pathological, share the same speed of ∼0.1 m/s without synaptic transmission or gap junctions, and this speed is not consistent with axonal conduction or ionic diffusion. The only explanation left is an electrical field effect. We tested the hypothesis that endogenous electric fields are sufficient to explain the propagation with in silico and in vitro experiments. Simulation results show that field effects alone can indeed mediate propagation across layers of neurons with speeds of 0.12 ± 0.09 m/s with pathological kinetics, and 0.11 ± 0.03 m/s with physiologic kinetics, both generating weak field amplitudes of ∼2–6 mV/mm. Further, the model predicted that propagation speed values are inversely proportional to the cell-to-cell distances, but do not significantly change with extracellular resistivity, membrane capacitance, or membrane resistance. In vitro recordings in mice hippocampi produced similar speeds (0.10 ± 0.03 m/s) and field amplitudes (2.5–5 mV/mm), and by applying a blocking field, the propagation speed was greatly reduced. Finally, osmolarity experiments confirmed the model's prediction that cell-to-cell distance inversely affects propagation speed. Together, these results show that despite their weak amplitude, electric fields can be solely responsible for spike propagation at ∼0.1 m/s. This phenomenon could be important to explain the slow propagation of epileptic activity and other normal propagations at similar speeds. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural activity (waves or spikes) can propagate using well documented mechanisms such as synaptic transmission, gap junctions, or diffusion. However, the purpose of this paper is to provide an explanation for experimental data showing that neural signals can propagate by means other than synaptic

  15. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis: clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhablani J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay Chhablani,1 Aditya Sudhalkar,1 Animesh Jindal,2 Taraprasad Das,1 Swapna R Motukupally,3 Savitri Sharma,3 Avinash Pathengay,2 Harry W Flynn Jr4 1Srimati Kannuri Santhamma Centre for Vitreoretinal Diseases, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kallam Anji Reddy Campus, Hyderabad, India; 2L V Prasad Eye Institute, GMR Varalakshmi Campus, Visakhapatnam, India; 3Jhaveri Microbiology Centre, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Kallam Anji Reddy Campus, Hyderabad, India; 4Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Objective: To describe clinical presentation, antibiotic susceptibility, and outcomes in patients with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis.Design: Retrospective case series.Participants: Four eyes of four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis.Methods: Retrospective chart review of culture-positive S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis treated at L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India, between January 2007 and December 2012, was done. Collected information included demographic, clinical, and microbiology data.Results: These four patients with S. maltophilia endogenous endophthalmitis cases accounted for 0.47% (4/836 of total bacterial endophthalmitis cases treated in this period. All patients were from a rural setting and younger than 40 years. Two of the four patients had a history of immune compromise or hospitalization. The visual acuity at presentation was less than 20/320 in all patients. Common presenting features were severe anterior and posterior segment inflammation and hypopyon. All patients underwent vitrectomy with injection of intravitreal antibiotics and dexamethasone. Direct microscopy of the vitreous sample was positive in all cases. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones and chloramphenicol; sensitivity to aminoglycosides and third-generation cephalosporins was highly variable. The final visual acuity was 20

  16. Endogenous tagging of the murine transcription factor Sox5 with hemaglutinin for functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wenqing Jean; Kraus, Petra; Lufkin, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Gene expression is usually studied at the transcript level rather than at the protein level due to the lack of a specific and sensitive antibody. A way to overcome this is to fuse to the protein of interest an immunoreactive tag that has well-characterized antibodies. This epitope tagging approach is often used for in vitro experiments but for in vivo studies, the success rate of protein tagging has not been extensively analyzed and our study seeks to cover the void. A small epitope, hemaglutinin derived from the influenza virus was used to tag a transcription factor, Sox5 at the N-terminal via homologous recombination in the mouse. Sox5 is part of the Sry-related high-mobility-group box gene family and plays multiple roles in essential biological processes. Understanding of its molecular function in relation to its biological roles remains incomplete. In our study, we show that the longer isoform of Sox5 can be tagged endogenously with hemaglutinin without affecting its biological function in vivo. The tagged protein is easily and specifically detected with an anti-hemaglutinin antibody using immunohistochemistry with its expression matching the endogenous expression of Sox5. Immunoprecipitation of Sox5 was also carried out successfully using an anti-hemaglutinin antibody. The transgenic line generated from this study is predicted to be useful for future experiments such as co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation, allowing the further understanding of Sox5. Lastly, this approach can be easily employed for the investigation of other transcription factors and proteins in vivo to overcome technical limitations such as antibody cross-reactivity and to perform isoform-specific studies.

  17. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  18. Socio-technical Betwixtness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    the intrinsically social and technical interwovenness of design, and the necessity of including affected people and stakeholders in the design process. This betwixtness of socio-technical design is demonstrated by the analysis of two IT systems for healthcare: a foundational model for electronic healthcare records......This chapter focusses on two challenges for socio-technical design: Having to choose between different rationales for design, and the adequate understanding and depiction of the work to be redesigned. These two challenges betwixt the otherwise strong tenets of socio-technical design of pointing out......, and an IT system organizing hospital porters’ work. The conceptual background for the analysis of the cases is provided by a short introduction to different rationales for organizational design, and by pointing to the differences between a linear, rationalistic versus an interactional depiction of work....

  19. Superfund Technical Assistance Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset includes data related to the Superfund Technical Assistance Grant program, including grant number, award amounts, award dates, period of performance,...

  20. NCDC Technical Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCDC Technical Reports is a set of retrospective analyses produced by the Research Customer Service Group and the National Climatic Data Center from 1995 to 2008....

  1. Applying technical versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1970-01-01

    The breadth and depth of the diversified technical programs at Mound Laboratory since its inception are characterized by a record of competence and versatility during the past generation. A spectrum of mission assignments has been completed successfully in such diverse technical areas as process development and manufacturing of explosive components, research on fuels for the Civilian Power Reactor Program, separation of radioactive materials, fabrication of radioisotopic heat sources, stable gaseous isotope separation and purification, and many other areas. Mound Laboratory is one of the key U.S. Atomic Energy Commission sites that has demonstrated its technical competence in both weapons and non-weapons activities. This report has been prepared to complement the AEC’s vigorous program of scientific information dissemination. Three broad areas of technical competence are highlighted here: explosive technology, radionuclide technology, and stable gaseous isotope separation, which encompass a broad variety of techniques and supporting disciplines.

  2. Technical report writing today

    CERN Document Server

    Riordan, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    "Technical Report Writing Today" provides thorough coverage of technical writing basics, techniques, and applications. Through a practical focus with varied examples and exercises, students internalize the skills necessary to produce clear and effective documents and reports. Project worksheets help students organize their thoughts and prepare for assignments, and focus boxes highlight key information and recent developments in technical communication. Extensive individual and collaborative exercises expose students to different kinds of technical writing problems and solutions. Annotated student examples - more than 100 in all - illustrate different writing styles and approaches to problems. Numerous short and long examples throughout the text demonstrate solutions for handling writing assignments in current career situations. The four-color artwork in the chapter on creating visuals keeps pace with contemporary workplace capabilities. The Tenth Edition offers the latest information on using electronic resum...

  3. Technical knowledge creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Peder Veng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of the paper is to amend shortcomings of existing theory concerning organizational learning and knowledge management. Design/methodology/approach – The paper reviews and refines existing theory. Findings - Findings from cognitive neuroscience suggest that technical knowledge...

  4. OSH technical reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    In an evaluation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Occupational Safety and Health programs for government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO) activities, the Department of Labor`s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recommended a technical information exchange program. The intent was to share written safety and health programs, plans, training manuals, and materials within the entire DOE community. The OSH Technical Reference (OTR) helps support the secretary`s response to the OSHA finding by providing a one-stop resource and referral for technical information that relates to safe operations and practice. It also serves as a technical information exchange tool to reference DOE-wide materials pertinent to specific safety topics and, with some modification, as a training aid. The OTR bridges the gap between general safety documents and very specific requirements documents. It is tailored to the DOE community and incorporates DOE field experience.

  5. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-06-25

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

  6. Retention of technical professionals

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Ing. The loss of skills and knowledge of technical professionals experienced by many organizations in South Africa has serious implications on the competitiveness of these organizations in the local and international markets. Organizations should come to realize that they should find creative ways to retain critical skills and knowledge and ensure continuity in terms of succession management. Technical professionals play a crucial role in society. They are responsible for maintaining the...

  7. Endogenous contrast MRI of cardiac fibrosis: beyond late gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Joep W M; Gho, Johannes M I H; van Hout, Gerardus P J; Froeling, Martijn; Jansen Of Lorkeers, Sanne J; Hoefer, Imo E; Doevendans, Pieter A; Luijten, Peter R; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of detection of cardiac fibrosis with MRI using current standards and novel endogenous MRI techniques. Assessment of cardiac fibrosis is important for diagnosis, prediction of prognosis and follow-up after therapy. During the past years, progress has been made in fibrosis detection using MRI. Cardiac infarct size can be assessed noninvasively with late gadolinium enhancement. Several methods for fibrosis detection using endogenous contrast have been developed, such as native T1 -mapping, T1ρ -mapping, Magnetization transfer imaging, and T2 *-mapping. Each of these methods will be described, providing the basic methodology, showing potential applications from applied studies, and discussing the potential and challenges or pitfalls. We will also identify future steps and developments that are needed for bringing these methods to the clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  9. Diurnal trend in EEG interhemispheric asymmetry in endogenous depressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Melnikova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A trend in EEG interhemispheric asymmetry was studied in patients with endogenous depressions in morning and evening hours. In the morning, the spectral power of alpha rhythm particularly in the occipital cortical regions, proved to be higher than that in the evening. In the morning, the interhemispheric differences in the power of occipital alpha rhythm were leveled off while in the evening there was normalization of interhemispheric balance with the higher power of alpha rhythm in the right occipital region. Analysis of the mean coherence (mean Coh of alpha rhythm in individual cortical regions revealed that the patients with endogenous depression had higher readings mainly in the parietal and central regions of both hemispheres and in the right temporal regions in the morning than in the evening. The occipital and posttemporal regions showed an inverse trend in the mean Coh - it was lower in the morning than in the evening

  10. Biology and evolution of the endogenous koala retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlinton, R; Meers, J; Young, P

    2008-11-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are ubiquitous features of all mammalian genomes, the process of initial germ line invasion and subsequent inactivation from a pathogenic element has not yet been observed in a wild species. Koala retrovirus (KoRV) provides a unique opportunity to study this process of endogenisation in action as it still appears to be spreading through the koala population. Ongoing expression of the endogenous sequence and consequent high levels of viraemia have been linked to neoplasia and immunosuppression in koalas. This apparently recent invader of the koala genome shares a remarkably close sequence relationship with the pathogenic exogenous Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV), and comparative analyses of KoRV and GALVare helping to shed light on how retroviruses in general adapt to a relatively benign or at least less pathogenic existence within a new host genome. (Part of a multi-author review).

  11. Long-distance transport of endogenous gibberellins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnault, Thomas; Davière, Jean-Michel; Achard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones controlling major aspects of plant growth and development. Although previous studies suggested the existence of a transport of GAs in plants, the nature and properties associated with this transport were unknown. We recently showed through micrografting and biochemical approaches that the GA12 precursor is the chemical form of GA undergoing long-distance transport across plant organs in Arabidopsis. Endogenous GA12 moves through the plant vascular system from production sites to recipient tissues, in which GA12 can be converted to bioactive forms to support growth via the activation of GA-dependent processes. GAs are also essential to promote seed germination; hence GA biosynthesis mutants do not germinate without exogenous GA treatment. Our results suggest that endogenous GAs are not (or not sufficiently) transmitted to the offspring to successfully complete the germination under permissive conditions.

  12. Endogenous CO dynamics monitoring in breath by tunable diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, Andrian I.; Stepanov, Eugene V.; Shulagin, Yurii A.; Skrupskii, Vladimir A.

    1996-04-01

    High sensitive CO gas analyzer based on tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as a real time monitor of endogenous carbon monoxide in a set of breath physiology experiments. The measurements of the CO content dynamics in exhaled air with 10 ppb sensitivity were attended with detection of carbon dioxide and O2 in breath, lung ventilation parameters, heart rate and blood analysis using conventional techniques. Variations of endogenous CO in human breath caused by hyperoxia, hypoxia, hyperventilation as well as sport loading were studied in real time. Scattering of the CO variation time constants was observed for different tested persons. Possible reasons for this scattering related with the organisms' physiology peculiarities are discussed.

  13. Achievement of high nitrite accumulation via endogenous partial denitrification (EPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jiantao; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2017-01-01

    This study proposed a novel strategy for achievement of partial denitrification driven by endogenous carbon sources in an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system. Results showed that in the steady-stage, the nitrate-to-nitrite transformation ratio (NTR) was kept at around 87% without nitrate in the effluent. During the anaerobic period, exogenous carbon sources was completely taken up, accompanied by the consumption of glycogen and production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). During the anoxic period, nitrate was reduced to nitrite by using PHAs as carbon sources, followed by the replenishment of glycogen. Thus, the phenotype of denitrifying GAOs was clearly observed and endogenous partial denitrification (EPD) occurred. Furthermore, results showed the nitrate reduction was prior to the nitrite reduction in the presence of nitrate, which led to the high nitrite accumulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and analysis of endogenous peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Bijon; Pich, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) has developed as a promising tool to investigate the spatial distribution of biomolecules in intact tissue specimens. Ion densities of various molecules can be displayed as heat maps while preserving anatomical structures. In this short review, an overview of different biomolecules that can be analyzed by MALDI-IMS is given. Many reviews have covered imaging of lipids, small metabolites, whole proteins and enzymatically digested proteins in the past. However, little is known about imaging of endogenous peptides, for example, in the rat brain, and this will therefore be highlighted in this review. Furthermore, sample preparation of frozen or formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is crucial for imaging experiments. Therefore, some aspects of sample preparation will be addressed, including washing and desalting, the choice of MALDI matrix and its deposition. Apart from mapping endogenous peptides, their reliable identification in situ still remains challenging and will be discussed as well.

  15. Using Technical Performance Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Christopher J.; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Rhodes, Russel E.

    2011-01-01

    All programs have requirements. For these requirements to be met, there must be a means of measurement. A Technical Performance Measure (TPM) is defined to produce a measured quantity that can be compared to the requirement. In practice, the TPM is often expressed as a maximum or minimum and a goal. Example TPMs for a rocket program are: vacuum or sea level specific impulse (lsp), weight, reliability (often expressed as a failure rate), schedule, operability (turn-around time), design and development cost, production cost, and operating cost. Program status is evaluated by comparing the TPMs against specified values of the requirements. During the program many design decisions are made and most of them affect some or all of the TPMs. Often, the same design decision changes some TPMs favorably while affecting other TPMs unfavorably. The problem then becomes how to compare the effects of a design decision on different TPMs. How much failure rate is one second of specific impulse worth? How many days of schedule is one pound of weight worth? In other words, how to compare dissimilar quantities in order to trade and manage the TPMs to meet all requirements. One method that has been used successfully and has a mathematical basis is Utility Analysis. Utility Analysis enables quantitative comparison among dissimilar attributes. It uses a mathematical model that maps decision maker preferences over the tradeable range of each attribute. It is capable of modeling both independent and dependent attributes. Utility Analysis is well supported in the literature on Decision Theory. It has been used at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne for internal programs and for contracted work such as the J-2X rocket engine program. This paper describes the construction of TPMs and describes Utility Analysis. It then discusses the use of TPMs in design trades and to manage margin during a program using Utility Analysis.

  16. Features of Load and Wear of Main Propulsion Devices on Sea-Going Ships with Piston Combustion Engines and Their Impact on Changes in Technical States of the Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girtler Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the specificity of operation of propulsion systems of seagoing ships which causes the need to control the load on them, especially on their engines called main engines. The characteristics of the load on the propulsion systems, especially on the main engines as well as on the shaft lines and propellers driven by the engines, along with the process of wear in tribological joints (sliding tribological systems of the machines have been described herein. Using examples of typical types of wear (both linear and volumetric for the tribological systems of this sort, interpretation of states of their wear has been provided with regards to the wear levels defined as acceptable, unacceptable and catastrophic. The following hypotheses have been formulated: 1 hypothesis explaining necessity to consider the loads on the systems under operation as stochastic processes; 2 hypothesis explaining a possibility of considering the processes as stationary; and 3 hypothesis explaining why it can be assumed that a given technical state of any tribological system can be considered as dependent only on the directly preceding state and stochastically independent of the states that existed earlier. Accepting the hypotheses as true, a four-state continuous-time semi-Markov process has been proposed in the form of a model of changes in condition of a propulsion system (PS of any ship. The model includes the most significant states affecting safety of a ship at sea, such as: s0 - PS ability state, s1 - PS disability state due to damage to the main engine (ME, s2 - PS disability state due to damage to the shaft line (SL and s3 - PS disability state due to damage to the propeller (P. Probability of occurrence (changes of the states has also been demonstrated.

  17. Endogenous Protease Nexin-1 Protects against Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Thevenet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The serine protease thrombin plays a role in signalling ischemic neuronal death in the brain. Paradoxically, endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms can be triggered by preconditioning with thrombin (thrombin preconditioning, TPC, leading to tolerance to cerebral ischemia. Here we studied the role of thrombin’s endogenous potent inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1, in ischemia and in tolerance to cerebral ischemia induced by TPC. Cerebral ischemia was modelled in vitro in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from rats or genetically engineered mice lacking PN-1 or with the reporter gene lacZ knocked into the PN-1 locus PN-1HAPN-1-lacZ/HAPN-1-lacZ (PN-1 KI exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD. We observed increased thrombin enzyme activity in culture homogenates 24 h after OGD. Lack of PN-1 increased neuronal death in the CA1, suggesting that endogenous PN-1 inhibits thrombin-induced neuronal damage after ischemia. OGD enhanced β-galactosidase activity, reflecting PN-1 expression, at one and 24 h, most strikingly in the stratum radiatum, a glial cell layer adjacent to the CA1 layer of ischemia sensitive neurons. TPC, 24 h before OGD, additionally increased PN-1 expression 1 h after OGD, compared to OGD alone. TPC failed to induce tolerance in cultures from PN-1−/− mice confirming PN-1 as an important TPC target. PN-1 upregulation after TPC was blocked by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK inhibitor, L-JNKI1, known to block TPC. This work suggests that PN-1 is an endogenous neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia and a potential target for neuroprotection.

  18. Endogenous opioids and smoking: a review of progress and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerleau, O F

    1998-02-01

    The present report examines efforts to elucidate the role of opioid mechanisms in the reinforcement of smoking. A number of approaches have been used to evaluate nicotine-opioid interactions. Opiate agonists such as heroin or methadone have been found to increase cigarette smoking reliably in humans, and morphine has been shown to increase the potency and efficacy of nicotine in rats. There is also an extensive literature documenting the nicotine-stimulated release of endogenous opioids in various brain regions involved in the mediation of opiate reinforcement. Blockade studies using opioid antagonists have not been as conclusive. Although animal models have demonstrated commonalities between nicotine withdrawal and the opiate abstinence syndrome, including reversibility by morphine, and although the impact of nicotine on certain response systems such as respiratory reflexes has clearly been shown to involve opioid mediation, attempts to demonstrate opioid modulation for the key indicators of smoking reinforcement--cigarette consumption and nicotine self-administration--have been fraught with difficulty. Resolution of the apparent contradictions will require taking into account: (a) the biphasic properties of nicotine-opioid effects at higher doses and anti-opioid effects at lower doses; (b) the contributions of the opioid receptor populations--mu, kappa, sigma--stimulated at various dose levels; (c) the possibility that endogenous-opioid activity is entrained primarily during the acquisition or re-acquisition of nicotine self-administration; (d) the possibility that the endogenous opioid response does contribute to nicotine reinforcement but only as a delimited component of the neuroregulatory cascade of nicotine; and (e) the possibility that opioids contribute primarily to nicotine reinforcement under special conditions such as stress. Taking these considerations into account should allow studies on endogenous opioid effects to begin to do justice to the

  19. Nash Equilibrium in Rent-Seeking Games with Endogenous Rent

    OpenAIRE

    Koji, Okuguchi; 岐阜聖徳学園大学経済情報学会

    1999-01-01

    We formulate one-stage and two-stage rent seeking games with endogenously determined rent. Under reasonable assumptions, both games have a unique pure Nash equilibrium. We derive conditions for aggregate efforts to increase and for the total rent to dissipate as the number of agents increase for the two-stage rent-seeking game. JEL Classification Number: D72, L13, D43, C71, C64,

  20. Endogenous timing in private and mixed duopolies with emission taxes

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Xu, Lili

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines an endogenous timing game in product differentiated duopolies under price competition when emission tax is imposed on environmental externality. We show that a simultaneous-move (sequential-move) outcome can be an equilibrium outcome in a private duopoly under significant (insignificant) environmental externality, but this result can be reversed in a mixed duopoly. We also show that when environmental externalities are significant, public leadership yields greater welfare ...

  1. A secreted protein is an endogenous chemorepellant in Dictyostelium discoideum

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan E Phillips; Gomer, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemorepellants may play multiple roles in physiological and pathological processes. However, few endogenous chemorepellants have been identified, and how they function is unclear. We found that the autocrine signal AprA, which is produced by growing Dictyostelium discoideum cells and inhibits their proliferation, also functions as a chemorepellant. Wild-type cells at the edge of a colony show directed movement outward from the colony, whereas cells lacking AprA do not. Cells show directed mo...

  2. Licensing endogenous cost-reduction in a differentiated Stackelberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Flávio; Bode, Oana R.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we consider a differentiated Stackelberg model, when the leader firm engages in an R&D process that gives an endogenous cost-reducing innovation. The aim is to study the licensing of the cost-reduction by a two-part tariff. By using comparative static analysis, we conclude that the degree of the differentiation of the goods plays an important role in the results. We also do a direct comparison between our model and Cournot duopoly model.

  3. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: endogenous stimulation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesser, H E; Geisel, T

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  4. Endogenous Differentiation Strategies, Comparative Advantage and the Volume of Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Erkel-Rousse, Hélène

    1997-01-01

    We present a trade model in which producer differentiation strategies are endogenous. Firms can influence the brand image of their products through a trade-off between cost and product quality. Comparative advantage depends on both variable costs and the ratio of perceived product quality to total costs. Firms sell either a small range of standard varieties or a large range of more expensive high-quality varieties. Empirical trade equations including differentiation variables are derived from...

  5. Fractional response models with endogeneous explanatory variables and heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    In this talk, I will discuss ways of using Stata to fit fractional response models when explanatory variables are not exogenous. Two questions are of primary concern: First, how does one account for endogenous explanatory variables, both continuous and discrete, when the response variable is fractional and may take values at the corners? Second, how can we incorporate unobserved heterogeneity in panel-data fractional models when the panel might be unbalanced? I will draw on Papke and Wooldrid...

  6. Government technology push in agribusiness: a model of endogenous growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Venegas Martínez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a model of endogenous growth where the government acts as a promoting agent to boost technology in agribusiness. In the framework of a monetary economy, the optimal level of government spending to enhance technology in the agricultural industry is characterized. Moreover the impact of such a spending on economic welfare is assessed. Finally, a number of agro-oriented policies to increase growth in the sector are established.

  7. Wage Effects of Trade Reform with Endogenous Worker Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Pravin Krishna; Poole, Jennifer P.; Mine Zeynep Senses

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use a linked employer-employee database from Brazil to evaluate the wage effects of trade reform. With an aggregate (firm-level) analysis of this question, we find that a decline in trade protection is associated with an increase in average wages in exporting firms relative to domestic firms, consistent with earlier studies. However, using disaggregated, employer-employee level data, and allowing for the endogenous assignment of workers to firms due to match-specific product...

  8. Who Benefits from Transshipment? Exogenous vs. Endogenous Wholesale Prices

    OpenAIRE

    Lingxiu Dong; Nils Rudi

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies how transshipments affect manufacturers and retailers, considering both exogenous and endogenous wholesale prices. For a distribution system where a single manufacturer sells to multiple identical-cost retailers, we consider both the manufacturer being a price taker and the manufacturer being a price setter in a single-period setup under multivariate normal demand distribution. In the case of the manufacturer being a price taker, we provide several analytical results regard...

  9. Helping the invisible hand: A theory of endogenous mutual concern

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmar, Martin

    2001-01-01

    This paper develops a theory of endogenous mutual concern. The mutual concern or the morality of economic agents is seen as a means to reduce the inefficiencies of markets in an environment where the enforcement of property rights is castly. We show that rational agents have an incentive to invest resources to create a mutual concern. Furthermore, the strength of the mutual concern depends on the technologies of production and appropriation and defense. People in economies with a high natural...

  10. SORPTION РATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ENDOGENOUS INTOXICATION OF PEDIATRIC CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Fedorova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gut endotoxicosis caused by penetration of bacterial and metabolic toxins from chime on the background of increasing permeability of gut wall is of great importance in pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (nonspecific ulcerative colitis — NUC and Crohn’s disease. It is accompanied by disturbance of regulating homeostasis system with the following disturbances of organs and systems of toxication. Developed endotoxicosis accordingly contributes to maintain and to progress of metabolic and immunological changes. To obtain the precise degree and phase of development of endotoxicosis we estimated quantitative and qualitative changes of metabolic status in accordance with content in erythrocytes, plasma and urine LMMWP (low and medium molecular weight peptides. Taking into concideration the peculiarities of children endotoxicosis with, we suggested patogenetical absorption therapy. Therefore, the therapeutic complex was added enterosorbent ensoral, which absorb eczo and endogenic toxins and, moreover, positive influence for composition of intestinal microflora. Prominent clinical effect was accompanied by positive dynamics of laboratory-instrumental parameters.Key words: endogenous intoxication, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonspecific ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, low and medium molecular weight peptides, enterosorbents, children.

  11. A Multi-Country Trade and Tourism with Endogenous Capital and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei-Bin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study models a dynamic interaction among economic growth, structural change, knowledge accumulation, international trade and tourist flows. Objective: The purpose of this study is to introduce endogenous knowledge into a multi-country growth model with trade and tourism proposed by Zhang. The study models a dynamic interaction among economic growth, structural change, knowledge accumulation, international trade and tourist flows. Methods/Approach: The model is based on Arrow’s learning by doing, the Solow one-sector growth model, the Oniki-Uzawa neoclassical trade model, and the Uzawa two-sector growth model. We first build the multi-country neoclassical growth model of endogenous knowledge with international tourism. Then we show that we can follow the motion of the J - country world economy with J + 1 differential equations. Results: We simulate the motion of the three-country global economy. We carry out a comparative dynamic analysis by simulation with regard to the knowledge utilization efficiency, the efficiency of learning by doing, the propensity to save, the propensity to tour other countries, and the population. Conclusions: The global economy has a unique equilibrium.

  12. Modular fluorescence complementation sensors for live cell detection of epigenetic signals at endogenous genomic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Cristiana; Pinter, Sabine; Broche, Julian; Rathert, Philipp; Jeltsch, Albert

    2017-09-21

    Investigation of the fundamental role of epigenetic processes requires methods for the locus-specific detection of epigenetic modifications in living cells. Here, we address this urgent demand by developing four modular fluorescence complementation-based epigenetic biosensors for live-cell microscopy applications. These tools combine engineered DNA-binding proteins with domains recognizing defined epigenetic marks, both fused to non-fluorescent fragments of a fluorescent protein. The presence of the epigenetic mark at the target DNA sequence leads to the reconstitution of a functional fluorophore. With this approach, we could for the first time directly detect DNA methylation and histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation at endogenous genomic sites in live cells and follow dynamic changes in these marks upon drug treatment, induction of epigenetic enzymes and during the cell cycle. We anticipate that this versatile technology will improve our understanding of how specific epigenetic signatures are set, erased and maintained during embryonic development or disease onset.Tools for imaging epigenetic modifications can shed light on the regulation of epigenetic processes. Here, the authors present a fluorescence complementation approach for detection of DNA and histone methylation at endogenous genomic sites allowing following of dynamic changes of these marks by live-cell microscopy.

  13. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T

    2013-01-01

    expressing increased amounts of human endogenous retrovirus antigens. MS patients also have increased antibody levels to these antigens. The target cells are spontaneously growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of B cell lineage, expressing human endogenous retrovirus HERV epitopes...

  14. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013... to the webcast. The Capitol Connection provides technical support for webcasts and offers the option...

  15. Characterization of Macrophage Endogenous S-Nitrosoproteome Using a Cysteine-Specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag in Combination with TiO2Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Vea, María; Huang, Honggang; Martínez de Morentin, Xabier; Pérez, Estela; Gato, Maria; Zuazo, Miren; Arasanz, Hugo; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquin; Santamaría, Enrique; Fernandez-Hinojal, Gonzalo; Larsen, Martin R; Escors, David; Kochan, Grazyna

    2018-01-25

    Protein S-nitrosylation is a cysteine post-translational modification mediated by nitric oxide. An increasing number of studies highlight S-nitrosylation as an important regulator of signaling involved in numerous cellular processes. Despite the significant progress in the development of redox proteomic methods, identification and quantification of endogeneous S-nitrosylation using high-throughput mass-spectrometry-based methods is a technical challenge because this modification is highly labile. To overcome this drawback, most methods induce S-nitrosylation chemically in proteins using nitrosylating compounds before analysis, with the risk of introducing nonphysiological S-nitrosylation. Here we present a novel method to efficiently identify endogenous S-nitrosopeptides in the macrophage total proteome. Our approach is based on the labeling of S-nitrosopeptides reduced by ascorbate with a cysteine specific phosphonate adaptable tag (CysPAT), followed by titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) chromatography enrichment prior to nLC-MS/MS analysis. To test our procedure, we performed a large-scale analysis of this low-abundant modification in a murine macrophage cell line. We identified 569 endogeneous S-nitrosylated proteins compared with 795 following exogenous chemically induced S-nitrosylation. Importantly, we discovered 579 novel S-nitrosylation sites. The large number of identified endogenous S-nitrosylated peptides allowed the definition of two S-nitrosylation consensus sites, highlighting protein translation and redox processes as key S-nitrosylation targets in macrophages.

  16. The Deacetylase HDAC6 Mediates Endogenous Neuritic Tau Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Heng Tseng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The initiating events that promote tau mislocalization and pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD are not well defined, partly because of the lack of endogenous models that recapitulate tau dysfunction. We exposed wild-type neurons to a neuroinflammatory trigger and examined the effect on endogenous tau. We found that tau re-localized and accumulated within pathological neuritic foci, or beads, comprised of mostly hypo-phosphorylated, acetylated, and oligomeric tau. These structures were detected in aged wild-type mice and were enhanced in response to neuroinflammation in vivo, highlighting a previously undescribed endogenous age-related tau pathology. Strikingly, deletion or inhibition of the cytoplasmic shuttling factor HDAC6 suppressed neuritic tau bead formation in neurons and mice. Using mass spectrometry-based profiling, we identified a single neuroinflammatory factor, the metalloproteinase MMP-9, as a mediator of neuritic tau beading. Thus, our study uncovers a link between neuroinflammation and neuritic tau beading as a potential early-stage pathogenic mechanism in AD.

  17. Circulating Hepcidin-25 Is Reduced by Endogenous Estrogen in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Lehtihet

    Full Text Available Hepcidin reduces iron absorption by binding to the intestinal iron transporter ferroportin, thereby causing its degradation. Although short-term administration of testosterone or growth hormone (GH has been reported to decrease circulating hepcidin levels, little is known about how hepcidin is influenced in human endocrine conditions associated with anemia.We used a sensitive and specific dual-monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay to measure hepcidin-25 in patients (a during initiation of in vitro fertilization when endogenous estrogens were elevated vs. suppressed, (b with GH deficiency before and after 12 months substitution treatment, (c with hyperthyroidism before and after normalization, and (d with hyperprolactinemia before and after six months of treatment with a dopamine agonist.In response to a marked stimulation of endogenous estrogen production, median hepcidin levels decreased from 4.85 to 1.43 ng/mL (p < 0.01. Hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia, or GH substitution to GH-deficient patients did not influence serum hepcidin-25 levels.In humans, gonadotropin-stimulated endogenous estrogen markedly decreases circulating hepcidin-25 levels. No clear and stable correlation between iron biomarkers and hepcidin-25 was seen before or after treatment of hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia or growth hormone deficiency.

  18. Endogenous cardiac stem cells for the treatment of heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes T

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tania Fuentes, Mary Kearns-Jonker Department of Pathology and Human Anatomy, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, USA Abstract: Stem cell-based therapies hold promise for regenerating the myocardium after injury. Recent data obtained from phase I clinical trials using endogenous cardiovascular progenitors isolated directly from the heart suggest that cell-based treatment for heart patients using stem cells that reside in the heart provides significant functional benefit and an improvement in patient outcome. Methods to achieve improved engraftment and regeneration may extend this therapeutic benefit. Endogenous cardiovascular progenitors have been tested extensively in small animals to identify cells that improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the relative lack of large animal models impedes translation into clinical practice. This review will exclusively focus on the latest research pertaining to humans and large animals, including both endogenous and induced sources of cardiovascular progenitors. Keywords: Isl1, iPSC, large animal, c-kit, cardiosphere

  19. The neural component-process architecture of endogenously generated emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Haakon G; Kanske, Philipp; Singer, Tania

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ubiquity of endogenous emotions and their role in both resilience and pathology, the processes supporting their generation are largely unknown. We propose a neural component process model of endogenous generation of emotion (EGE) and test it in two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments (N = 32/293) where participants generated and regulated positive and negative emotions based on internal representations, usin self-chosen generation methods. EGE activated nodes of salience (SN), default mode (DMN) and frontoparietal control (FPCN) networks. Component processes implemented by these networks were established by investigating their functional associations, activation dynamics and integration. SN activation correlated with subjective affect, with midbrain nodes exclusively distinguishing between positive and negative affect intensity, showing dynamics consistent generation of core affect. Dorsomedial DMN, together with ventral anterior insula, formed a pathway supporting multiple generation methods, with activation dynamics suggesting it is involved in the generation of elaborated experiential representations. SN and DMN both coupled to left frontal FPCN which in turn was associated with both subjective affect and representation formation, consistent with FPCN supporting the executive coordination of the generation process. These results provide a foundation for research into endogenous emotion in normal, pathological and optimal function. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Bilateral endogenous Fusarium solani endophthalmitis in a liver-transplanted patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Skovlund; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous Fusarium endophthalmitis is a rare disease predominantly described in immunocompromised patients often due to leukemia. We report a case of bilateral endogenous Fusarium solani endophthalmitis in a liver-transplanted patient.......Endogenous Fusarium endophthalmitis is a rare disease predominantly described in immunocompromised patients often due to leukemia. We report a case of bilateral endogenous Fusarium solani endophthalmitis in a liver-transplanted patient....

  1. Changing without change?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farné Fratini, Chiara; Frantzeskaki, Niki; Elle, Morten

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, due to climate change impacts, increasing urban development, increased stress on natural resource and gradual aging of the technical infrastructure on place, the Danish urban water sector has realized the need to invest more generously on the optimization of technical performa......In the last decade, due to climate change impacts, increasing urban development, increased stress on natural resource and gradual aging of the technical infrastructure on place, the Danish urban water sector has realized the need to invest more generously on the optimization of technical...... green and blue recreational spaces in the city-scape. On the other hand, in a context of economic downturn, national strategies aim at promoting the eco-innovation of the water sectors to support the Danish water industry competitiveness in the international market and create new jobs nationally...... to regulate water prizes by creating a benchmarking system to set precise terms for a national competition on water service efficiency. The expectations were increased capacity for municipality to regulate and water utilities to actuate the necessary investments and lower or more homogenous water taxation...

  2. A two-photon fluorescent probe for ratiometric imaging of endogenous hypochlorous acid in live cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yong Woong; Sarkar, Sourav; Singha, Subhankar; Reo, Ye Jin; Kim, Hye Rim; Kim, Jong-Jin; Chang, Young-Tae; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2017-09-28

    A fluorescent probe that enables ratiometric imaging of endogenous hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy is developed based on a red-emitting acetyl-benzocoumarin (AcBC) dye. An oxathiolane group in the probe reacts with HOCl to generate the AcBC dye, which involves a ratiometric fluorescence change only toward HOCl along with high sensitivity.

  3. Real time micro-fiberoptic monitoring of endogenous fluorescence in the rat conceptus during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsrud, B A; Harris, C

    1993-10-01

    A micro-fiberoptic methodology has been developed for non-invasive, real time measurement of endogenous pyridine nucleotide fluorescence from the surface of the visceral yolk sac (VYS) in intact, viable rat conceptuses. Gestational day (GD) 10-12 conceptuses are maintained in a customized perifusion system, which allows for control of oxygenation, as well as the continuous measurement of pH and oxygen concentration in the effluent perifusate. Miniaturized light guides were constructed by drawing 250 microns ESKA acrylic optical fibers through a stainless steel sheath with a high strength epoxy polymer. A single fiber supplied the excitation signal from a mercury arc lamp at a wavelength of 366 nm. The emission signal was returned via three additional fibers, electronically amplified, processed, and recorded, using a dual channel lamp-compensated fluorometer, optimized for detection of reduced pyridine nucleotides at 455 nm. Endogenous fluorescence in the conceptus was monitored by placing the polished tip of the sensor directly on the surface of the VYS. Oxygen-equilibrated conceptuses, exposed to 100% nitrogen, produced a reproducible biphasic surface fluorescence peak, which returned to baseline levels upon reoxygenation of the perifusate. This biphasic response consisted of an initial rapid rise in fluorescence (phase I), followed by an attenuated rate in fluorescence signal increase (phase II). The hypoxia produced age-dependent rates of fluorescence change during phase I, while phase II remained relatively unchanged throughout GD 10-12. These results demonstrate the ability to monitor endogenous fluorescence, non-invasively and in real time, during the period of organogenesis in the intact rat conceptus and will provide valuable information in studies of embryonic metabolism and response to chemical embryotoxicants.

  4. Endogenous cannabinoids are candidates for lipid mediators of bone cement implantation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobe, Takashi; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Uchimura, Tomonori; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Taniguchi, Noboru; Komiya, Setsuro; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2004-01-01

    Acute hypotension, hypoxemia, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, (or a combination of these), and sudden death are well-recognized complications of the cemented hip arthroplasty procedure. Collectively, these are known as the bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS). The endogenous cannabinoids, anandamide (ANA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are reported to be strong vasodilators and play a role in the hypotension associated with hemorrhagic and septic shock. In the present study, a potential role for the endogenous cannabinoids in influencing hemodynamic variables in BCIS was investigated. Thirty-five patients (35 hips) entered a prospective, randomized clinical trial. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised 16 patients who had the component inserted using a conventional cementing technique, whereas group 2 consisted of 19 patients who had the femoral component inserted without cement. Blood samples were taken at six consecutive time points: before anesthesia, after reaming the femur, 2 min after insertion of stems with or without cement into the femur, and 10 min, 20, and 30 min after stem insertion. In group 1 (with cement), the mean levels of ANA and 2-AG significantly increased after stem insertion. In a comparison of each group after stem insertion, mean ANA and 2-AG levels in group 1 also significantly differed from those in group 2. By contrast, in group 2 (without cement) neither ANA nor 2-AG levels exhibited a significant increase or change at any point in time. In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that endogenous cannabinoids are candidates for lipid mediators of BCIS.

  5. Skeletal muscle differentiation evokes endogenous XIAP to restrict the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle I; Huang, Yolanda Y; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2009-01-01

    Myotube apoptosis occurs normally during muscle development and aging but it can lead to destruction of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, understanding how myotube apoptosis is regulated is important for developing novel strategies for treatment of muscle loss. We investigated the regulation of apoptosis in skeletal muscle and report a striking increase in resistance to apoptosis following differentiation. We find mitotic C2C12 cells (myoblast-like cells) are sensitive to cytosolic cytochrome c microinjection. However, differentiated C2C12 cells (myotube-like cells) and primary myotubes are markedly resistant. This resistance is due to endogenous X-linked inhibitor of apoptotic protein (XIAP). Importantly, the selective difference in the ability of XIAP to block myotube but not myoblast apoptosis is not due to a change in XIAP but rather a decrease in Apaf-1 expression. This decrease in Apaf-1 links XIAP to caspase activation and death. Our findings suggest that in order for myotubes to die, they may degrade XIAP, functionally inactivate XIAP or upregulate Apaf-1. Importantly, we identify a role for endogenous Smac in overcoming XIAP to allow myotube death. However, in postmitotic cardiomyocytes, where XIAP also restricts apoptosis, endogenous Smac was not capable of overcoming XIAP to cause death. These results show that as skeletal muscle differentiate, they become resistant to apoptosis because of the ability of XIAP to regulate caspase activation. The increased restriction of apoptosis in myotubes is presumably important to ensure the long term survival of these postmitotic cells as they play a vital role in the physiology of organisms.

  6. Skeletal muscle differentiation evokes endogenous XIAP to restrict the apoptotic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I Smith

    Full Text Available Myotube apoptosis occurs normally during muscle development and aging but it can lead to destruction of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, understanding how myotube apoptosis is regulated is important for developing novel strategies for treatment of muscle loss. We investigated the regulation of apoptosis in skeletal muscle and report a striking increase in resistance to apoptosis following differentiation. We find mitotic C2C12 cells (myoblast-like cells are sensitive to cytosolic cytochrome c microinjection. However, differentiated C2C12 cells (myotube-like cells and primary myotubes are markedly resistant. This resistance is due to endogenous X-linked inhibitor of apoptotic protein (XIAP. Importantly, the selective difference in the ability of XIAP to block myotube but not myoblast apoptosis is not due to a change in XIAP but rather a decrease in Apaf-1 expression. This decrease in Apaf-1 links XIAP to caspase activation and death. Our findings suggest that in order for myotubes to die, they may degrade XIAP, functionally inactivate XIAP or upregulate Apaf-1. Importantly, we identify a role for endogenous Smac in overcoming XIAP to allow myotube death. However, in postmitotic cardiomyocytes, where XIAP also restricts apoptosis, endogenous Smac was not capable of overcoming XIAP to cause death. These results show that as skeletal muscle differentiate, they become resistant to apoptosis because of the ability of XIAP to regulate caspase activation. The increased restriction of apoptosis in myotubes is presumably important to ensure the long term survival of these postmitotic cells as they play a vital role in the physiology of organisms.

  7. Site-selective azide incorporation into endogenous RNase A via a "chemistry" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Henschke, Lars; Wu, Qianzhen; Muthoosamy, Kasturi; Neumann, Boris; Weil, Tanja

    2013-01-14

    Site-selective labeling of endogenous proteins represents a major challenge in chemical biology, mainly due to the absence of unique reactive groups that can be addressed selectively. Recently, we have shown that surface-exposed lysine residues of two endogenous proteins and a peptide exhibit subtle changes in their individual reactivities. This feature allows the modification of a single residue in a highly site-selective fashion if kinetically controlled labeling conditions are applied. In order to broaden the scope of the "kinetically-controlled protein labeling" (KPL) approach and highlight additional applications, the water-soluble bioorthogonal reagent, biotin-TEO-azido-NHS (11), is developed which enables the site-selective introduction of an azido group onto endogenous proteins/peptides. This bioconjugation reagent features a biotin tag for affinity purification, an azido group for bioorthogonal labeling, a TEO (tetraethylene oxide) linker acting as a spacer and to impart water solubility and an N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) ester group for reacting with the exposed lysine residue. As a proof of concept, the native protein ribonuclease A (RNase A) bearing ten available lysine residues at the surface is furnished with a single azido group at Lys 1 in a highly site-selective fashion yielding azido-(K1)RNase A. The K1 site-selectivity is demonstrated by the combined application and interpretation of high resolution MALDI-ToF mass spectroscopy, tandem mass spectroscopy and extracted ion chromatography (XIC). Finally, the water soluble azide-reactive phosphine probe, rho-TEO-phosphine (21) (rho: rhodamine), has been designed and applied to attach a chromophore to azido-(K1)RNase A via Staudinger ligation at physiological pH indicating that the introduced azido group is accessible and could be addressed by other established azide-reactive bioorthogonal reaction schemes.

  8. Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci with the B (MHC) and C histocompatibility loci in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, J; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Zdĕnková, E

    1985-01-01

    Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci and histocompatibility loci B (MHC) and C has been demonstrated serologically in backcross progeny of inbred lines of chickens. The endogenous viral locus linked to the B complex is the first case of the localization of an endogenous viral gene to the microchromosomes in chickens.

  9. DMPD: Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18388328 Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Kockx ...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. PubmedID 18388...328 Title Regulation of endogenous apolipoprotein E secretion by macrophages. Aut

  10. DMPD: Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18161744 Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Zhang X, Mosser DM. J ...Pathol. 2008 Jan;214(2):161-78. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation by endogenous dange...r signals. PubmedID 18161744 Title Macrophage activation by endogenous danger signals. Authors Zhang X, Moss

  11. DMPD: Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15178705 Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. Tsan MF, Gao B. J Leukoc Biol. ...2004 Sep;76(3):514-9. Epub 2004 Jun 3. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Endogenous ligands of Toll-like re...ceptors. PubmedID 15178705 Title Endogenous ligands of Toll-like receptors. Authors Tsan MF, Gao B. Publicat

  12. Book Review: New Perspectives on Technical Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, A. J. (Ed.); Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-08-01

    New Perspectives on Technical Editing by Avon J. Murphy (ed.) ISBN : 978-0895033949 (2010) Baywood Publishing Company Inc, Hardcover, 210 pages, 35.5 GBP This book presents a collection of 10 chapters dealing with diverse aspects of technical editing (ie, editorial planning, and analysis and structural changes made to other people's technological documents): research in technical editing, trends and teaching of technical editing, copyediting, and technical journal editing. The role and function of the modern journal and book editor is also dealt with in detail. Each chapter is written by an expert in the field: senior editors, university professors in technical communication, technical writers and linguists. The ever-evolving role of the editor is clearly elucidated in several historical reviews, and in the descriptions of the expectations for the future. A very striking aspect of this book is its extensive collection of bibliographic resources: every chapter lists dozens of very useful references, and the closing chapter, and annotated bibliography, contain many not so well known references, and are most useful. All in all, the book is a treasure trove listing more than 400 references, in addition to numerous webpage URLs embedded in the texts. The book is designed to help the reader to understand current practices and norms in technical editing, and to help to take action in editing as well as in teaching and educating would-be editors. The audience for this book thus includes editors and teachers, but also writers, researchers and students. A deep reading of this book will result in a better understanding of the difference between full technical editing and its much narrower component so well known as copyediting, and will convince any prospective editor that editing should not be undertaken if the people involved do not master the art of precision and accuracy in technical (as well as in human) communication, do not possess the technical know how and computer

  13. MysTR: an endogenous retrovirus family in mammals that is undergoing recent amplifications to unprecedented copy numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Michael A; Ederer, Martina M; Erickson, Issac K; Swier, Vicki J; Baker, Robert J; Wichman, Holly A

    2005-12-01

    A large percentage of the repetitive elements in mammalian genomes are retroelements, which have been moved primarily by LINE-1 retrotransposons and endogenous retroviruses. Although LINE-1 elements have remained active throughout the mammalian radiation, specific groups of endogenous retroviruses generally remain active for comparatively shorter periods of time. Identification of an unusual extinction of LINE-1 activity in a group of South American rodents has opened a window for examination of the interplay in mammalian genomes between these ubiquitous retroelements. In the course of a search for any type of repetitive sequences whose copy numbers have substantially changed in Oryzomys palustris, a species that has lost LINE-1 activity, versus Sigmodon hispidus, a closely related species retaining LINE-1 activity, we have identified an endogenous retrovirus family differentially amplified in these two species. Analysis of three full-length, recently transposed copies, called mysTR elements, revealed gag, pro, and pol coding regions containing stop codons which may have accumulated either before or after retrotransposition. Isolation of related sequences in S. hispidus and the LINE-1 active outgroup species, Peromyscus maniculatus, by PCR of a pro-pol region has allowed determination of copy numbers in each species. Unusually high copy numbers of approximately 10,000 in O. palustris versus 1,000 in S. hispidus and 4,500 in the more distantly related P. maniculatus leave open the question of whether there is a connection between endogenous retrovirus activity and LINE-1 inactivity. Nevertheless, these independent expansions of mysTR represent recent amplifications of this endogenous retrovirus family to unprecedented levels.

  14. Technical training - Places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924)   Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) 06-Dec-12 to 06-Dec-12 1 hour English One more place available Compatibilité électromagnetique (CEM): Applications 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3.5 hours English 3 places available Compatibilité électromagnétique (CEM): Introduction 23-Nov-12 to 23-Nov-12 3 hours English 43 places available Effets des Radiations sur les composants et systèmes électroniques 11-Dec-12 to 12-Dec-12 1 day 4 hours French 9 places available LabVIEW for beginners ...

  15. Technical training: places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924)   Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Introduction to VHDL 21-Feb-13 to 22-Feb-13 2 days English Mechanical design Next Session Duration Language ANSYS - Introduction à ANSYS Mechanical APDL 04-Feb-13 to 07-Feb-13 4 days English Applications de la cotation fonctionnelle et du langage ISO 06-Feb-13 to 08-Feb-13 2 days 4 hours French CATIA V5 – Surfacique 14-Jan-13 to 15-Jan-13 2 days French Office software Next Session Duration Language ACCESS 2010 - niveau 2 : ECDL 06-Feb-13 to 07-Feb-13 2 days French Dreamweaver CS3 - Niveau 1 14-Jan-13 to 15-Jan-13 2 d...

  16. Technical training - places available

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    If you would like more information on a course, or for any other inquiry/suggestions, please contact Technical.Training@cern.ch Valeria Perez Reale, Learning Specialist, Technical Programme Coordinator (Tel.: 62424) Eva Stern and Elise Romero, Technical Training Administration (Tel.: 74924) HR Department »Electronics design Next Session Duration Language Availability Comprehensive VHDL for FPGA Design 08-Oct-12 to 12-Oct-12 5 days English 3 places available Foundations of Electromagnetism and Magnet Design (EMAG) 14-Nov-12 to 27-Nov-12 6 days English 20 places available Impacts de la suppression du plomb (RoHS) en électronique 26-Oct-12 to 26-Oct-12 8 hours French 15 places available Introduction to VHDL 10-Oct-12 to 11-Oct-12 2 days English 7 places available LabVIEW Real Time and FPGA 13-Nov-12 to 16-Nov-12 5 days French 5 places available »Mechanical design Next Se...

  17. Fuel Element Technical Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burley, H.H. [ed.

    1956-08-01

    It is the purpose of the Fuel Element Technical Manual to Provide a single document describing the fabrication processes used in the manufacture of the fuel element as well as the technical bases for these processes. The manual will be instrumental in the indoctrination of personnel new to the field and will provide a single data reference for all personnel involved in the design or manufacture of the fuel element. The material contained in this manual was assembled by members of the Engineering Department and the Manufacturing Department at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation between the dates October, 1955 and June, 1956. Arrangement of the manual. The manual is divided into six parts: Part I--introduction; Part II--technical bases; Part III--process; Part IV--plant and equipment; Part V--process control and improvement; and VI--safety.

  18. Program of institutionalism scientific research: «endogenization of institutions» and economic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Ushchapovskyy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the institutionalism scientific research uniform program (the paradigm is hindered by the absence of the unity concerning the source of institutional restrictions for an individual between the supporters of different directions in the institutionalism. They look for the ways of «institutions endogenization» through defining the place of economic culture in forming institutional environment and the uniform paradigm of modern institutionalism. The author emphasizes the imperfection of neoinstitutionalism conception that focuses on exogenous origin of institutional restrictions for an individual. Making distinction between institutions and customs, they explain institutions as different standards and rules of behavior. Directing the explanation from individuals to institutions they recognize the ontological priority of an individual. A certain institutionally unbiased «natural state» is supposed, provided that institutions appear only as a result of interaction between individuals. Since not only institutions restrict the individuals’ interests but individuals form institutional restrictions as well, the author thinks that the conception of «institution» should take into account its exogenous and endogenous nature. The idea of «institutions endogenization» by D.North, also supported by the author of the article, is the closest to this conception realization. Such explanation of «institution» should provide axiological and attitudinal aspects of scientific knowledge; it should make a person not only a blind doer, but also an active participant of evolutionary changes in economic life. A certain institutional structure is always made up of a set of formal rules and informal restrictions, which are indivisible and specific of every culture. The author defines the economy institutional structure as the system of institutions that through organizing everyday life decreases the uncertainty of individuals’ interaction

  19. Interactive Effects of Endogenous and Exogenous Nutrition on Larval Development for Crown-Of-Thorns Starfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciemon Frank Caballes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish are often attributed to step-changes in larval survivorship following anomalous increases in nutrients and food availability. However, larval growth and development is also influenced by the nutritional condition of spawning females, such that maternal provisioning may offset limitations imposed by limited access to exogenous sources of nutrients during the formative stages of larval development. This study examined the individual, additive, and interactive effects of endogenous (maternal diet: Acropora, Porites, mixed, and starved and exogenous (larval diet: high concentration at 104 cells·mL−1, low concentration at 103 algal cells·mL−1, and starved nutrition on the survival, growth, morphology, and development of larvae of the crown-of-thorns starfish. Female starfish on Acropora and mixed diet produced bigger oocytes compared to Porites-fed and starved treatments. Using oocyte size as a proxy for maternal provisioning, endogenous reserves in the oocyte had a strong influence on initial larval survival and development. This suggests that maternal reserves can delay the onset of obligate exogenous food acquisition and allow larvae to endure prolonged periods of poor environmental nutritive conditions or starvation. The influence of exogenous nutrition became more prominent in later stages, whereby none of the starved larvae reached the mid-to-late brachiolaria stage 16 days after the onset of the ability to feed. There was no significant difference in the survival, development, and competency of larvae between high and low food treatments. Under low algal food conditions, larvae compensate by increasing the length of ciliated feeding bands in relation to the maximum length and width, which improve food capture and feeding efficiency. However, the effects of endogenous nutrition persisted in the later developmental stages, as larvae from starved females were unable to develop larger feeding structures

  20. The possible involvement of endogenous opioid peptides and catecholestrogens in provoking menstrual irregularities in women athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crée, C

    1990-10-01

    It is well known that women athletes engaged in strenuous physical exercise and endurance training may develop "athletic menstrual irregularities" (AMI). Although many studies have appeared dealing with the immediate endocrinological and physiological changes in these women, the underlying mechanisms have remained unknown to date. A number of hypotheses have been put forward, the most well-known among them, for example, defending the existence of a critical percent of body fat necessary to trigger or maintain normal menstruation. All these theories have, however, their own, sometimes numerous, methodological inaccuracies and a teleological way of investigation. Spectacular, and perhaps promising new developments concern the possible involvement of endogenous opioid peptides and catecholestrogens in these processes. In basal circumstances beta-endorphin, the most well-known endogenous substance with opiate-like activity, may decrease LH levels by suppressing hypothalamic GnRH. This phenomenon is, however, only observed during the estrogen-dominant late-follicular and mid-luteal phases. As for catecholestrogens, it appears essential to differentiate between, for example, the 2- and 4-hydroxy derivatives of both estrone and estradiol. While some of these catecholestrogens obviously seem to suppress LH levels, others seem to potentiate and induce the LH surge. In any case, similar to beta-endorphin, these activities of catecholestrogens appear to depend upon the essential presence of a sufficiently estrogenic environment. In addition, both endogenous opioid peptides and some of the catecholestrogens appear to be able to suppress prolactin release, probably by interfering with its inhibiting factor dopamine. Other effects of catecholestrogens may include the control of the luteolysis-potent prostaglandin F2 alpha. Although a number of studies have investigated the behaviour of beta-endorphin during and post-exercise, similar studies investigating catecholestrogens as to

  1. Transformation of technical infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    , the evolution of large technological systems and theories about organisational and technological transformationprocesses. The empirical work consist of three analysis at three different levels: socio-technical descriptions of each sector, an envestigation of one municipality and envestigations of one workshop......The scope of the project is to investigate the possibillities of - and the barriers for a transformation of technical infrastructure conserning energy, water and waste. It focus on urban ecology as a transformation strategy. The theoretical background of the project is theories about infrastructure...

  2. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  3. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual session of this course will take place on 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  4. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are you planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at mailto:Technical.Training@cern.ch

  5. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    You are running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced using Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on December 12, 2008 and January 30, 2009. Register using our catalogue : http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  6. CERN Technical Training : Vista !

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Are you running Vista on your new PC – or are planning to install it? The Technical Training service is organizing a half-day training course on the new features of the VISTA operating system. This course introduces the new interfaces and presents the new functionalities for people who are experienced in the use of Windows XP. The next bilingual sessions of this course will take place on 12 December 2008 and 30 January 2009. Register using our catalogue: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9 or contact us with your questions/comments at Technical.Training@cern.ch

  7. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  8. Early social environment affects the endogenous oxytocin system: a review and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eAlves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous oxytocin plays an important role in a wide range of human functions including birth, milk ejection during lactation and facilitation of social interaction. There is increasing evidence that both variations in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR and concentrations of oxytocin are associated with differences in these functions. The causes for the differences that have been observed in tonic and stimulated oxytocin release remain unclear. Previous reviews have suggested that across the life course, these differences may be due to individual factors, e.g. genetic variation (of the OXTR, age or sex, or be the result of early environmental influences such as social experiences, stress or trauma partly by inducing epigenetic changes. This review has three aims. First, we briefly discuss the endogenous oxytocin system, including physiology, development, individual differences and function. Secondly, current models describing the relationship between the early life environment and the development of the oxytocin system in humans and animals are discussed. Finally, we describe research designs that can be used to investigate the effects of the early environment on the oxytocin system, identifying specific areas of research that need further attention.

  9. Role of endogenous PDGF-BB in cultured cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Rong; Wang, You-Cui; Hu, Li-qun; He, Qin-qin; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Ting-hua; Bu, Pei-li

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) plays a critical role in cell proliferation, angiogenesis and fibrosis. However, its exact role in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia is not well known. This study was therefore designed to detect whether PDGF-BB expression was changed in a hypoxic condition, then the possible role of endogenous PDGF-BB in cardiomyocytes was explored, with interference RNA in a lentiviral vector ex vivo. The results showed that cultured cardiomyocytes exhibited an optimal proliferation from 3 to 10 days. However, LDH level was significantly increased but the heart rhythm was not altered in cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia for 24 hours. PDGF-BB expression was substantially upregulated in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. In order to know the role of PDGF-BB, we performed PDGF-BB knockdown in cultured cardiomyocytes. The number of apoptotic cells and the level of LDH were significantly increased but the beat rhythm was reduced in cardiomyocytes with PDGF-BB knockdown. These findings suggest that endogenous PDGF-BB exerts a crucial protective effect to cultured cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic studies on the redistribution of endogenous growth regulators in gravireacting plant organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, R; Weiler, E W

    1983-08-01

    The kinetics of redistribution of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid, cis-abscisic acid and gibberellic acid (+gibberellin A7) in gravistimulated plant organs were followed by immunoassay, during the latent period and the phase of gravitropic curvature. Whereas in maize coleoptile tips, endogenous indole-3-acetic acid accumulated in the lower half of the organ (ratio 65:35, in favour of the lower half) before bending occurred, it was not possible to detect any significant lateral asymmetry of any of the growth regulators assayed in gravitropically reacting root tips of Zea mays L. and Vicia faba L. nor in hypocotyls of Helianthus annus L. Also, no indication was obtained for an exchange of growth regulators between peripheral and central cell layers of the sunflower hypocotyl. Evidence is presented that changes in the properties of the epidermal or subepidermal cell layers located in the lower half of the horizontally placed sunflower hypocotyl are largely responsible for the gravitropic reaction. An alteration in the subcellular compartmentation of IAA may be involved in this process.

  11. Effect of CPPU on Carbohydrate and Endogenous Hormone Levels in Young Macadamia Fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zeng

    Full Text Available N-(2-Chloro-4-pyridyl-N'-phenylurea (CPPU is a highly active cytokinin-like plant growth regulator that promotes chlorophyll biosynthesis, cell division, and cell expansion. It also increases fruit set and accelerates fruit enlargement. However, there has been no report about the effect of CPPU on fruit development and its physiological mechanism in macadamia. In this study, we investigated the effect of CPPU treatment at early fruit development via foliar spray or raceme soaking at 20 mg·L-1 on fruit set and related physiology in macadamia. Changes in carbohydrate contents and endogenous hormones in leaves, bearing shoots and fruit were also examined. Results showed that CPPU significantly reduced young fruit drop and delayed the wave of fruit drop by 1-2 weeks. The treatment significantly decreased the contents of total soluble sugars and starch in the leaves, but increased them in the bearing shoots and total soluble sugars in the husk (pericarp and seeds. These findings suggested that CPPU promoted carbohydrate mobilization from the leaves to the fruit. In addition, CPPU increased the contents of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, gibberellin acid (GA3, and zeatin riboside (ZR and decreased the abscisic acid (ABA in the husk. Therefore, CPPU treatment reduced the early fruit drop by increasing carbohydrate availability and by modifying the balance among endogenous hormones.

  12. Prospective Analysis of Life-Cycle Indicators through Endogenous Integration into a National Power Generation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego García-Gusano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing importance of sustainability aspects in national energy plans, this article deals with the prospective analysis of life-cycle indicators of the power generation sector through the case study of Spain. A technology-rich, optimisation-based model for power generation in Spain is developed and provided with endogenous life-cycle indicators (climate change, resources, and human health to assess their evolution to 2050. Prospective performance indicators are analysed under two energy scenarios: a business-as-usual one, and an alternative scenario favouring the role of carbon dioxide capture in the electricity production mix by 2050. Life-cycle impacts are found to decrease substantially when existing fossil technologies disappear in the mix (especially coal thermal power plants. In the long term, the relatively high presence of natural gas arises as the main source of impact. When the installation of new fossil options without CO2 capture is forbidden by 2030, both renewable technologies and—to a lesser extent—fossil technologies with CO2 capture are found to increase their contribution to electricity production. The endogenous integration of life-cycle indicators into energy models proves to boost the usefulness of both life cycle assessment and energy systems modelling in order to support decision- and policy-making.

  13. The Effects of Spatial Endogenous Pre-cueing across Eccentricities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Frequently, we use expectations about likely locations of a target to guide the allocation of our attention. Despite the importance of this attentional process in everyday tasks, examination of pre-cueing effects on attention, particularly endogenous pre-cueing effects, has been relatively little explored outside an eccentricity of 20°. Given the visual field has functional subdivisions that attentional processes can differ significantly among the foveal, perifoveal, and more peripheral areas, how endogenous pre-cues that carry spatial information of targets influence our allocation of attention across a large visual field (especially in the more peripheral areas remains unclear. We present two experiments examining how the expectation of the location of the target shapes the distribution of attention across eccentricities in the visual field. We measured participants’ ability to pick out a target among distractors in the visual field after the presentation of a highly valid cue indicating the size of the area in which the target was likely to occur, or the likely direction of the target (left or right side of the display. Our first experiment showed that participants had a higher target detection rate with faster responses, particularly at eccentricities of 20° and 30°. There was also a marginal advantage of pre-cueing effects when trials of the same size cue were blocked compared to when trials were mixed. Experiment 2 demonstrated a higher target detection rate when the target occurred at the cued direction. This pre-cueing effect was greater at larger eccentricities and with a longer cue-target interval. Our findings on the endogenous pre-cueing effects across a large visual area were summarized using a simple model to assist in conceptualizing the modifications of the distribution of attention over the visual field. We discuss our finding in light of cognitive penetration of perception, and highlight the importance of examining

  14. Endogenous retroviruses in systemic response to stress signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kiho; Lee, Young-Kwan; Greenhalgh, David G

    2008-08-01

    Infection of germline cells with retroviruses initiates permanent proviral colonization of the germline genome. The germline-integrated proviruses, called endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), are inherited to offspring in a Mendelian order and belong to the transposable element family. Endogenous retroviruses and other long terminal repeat retroelements constitute ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively. It is likely that each individual has a distinct genomic ERV profile. Recent studies have revealed that a substantial fraction of ERVs retains the coding potentials necessary for virion assembly and replication. There are several layers of potential mechanisms controlling ERV expression: intracellular transcription environment (e.g., transcription factor pool, splicing machinery, hormones), epigenetic status of the genome (e.g., proviral methylation, histone acetylation), profile of transcription regulatory elements on each ERV's promoter, and a range of stress signals (e.g., injury, infection, environment). Endogenous retroviruses may exert pathophysiologic effects by infection followed by random reintegration into the genome, by their gene products (e.g., envelope, superantigen), and by altering the expression of neighboring genes. Several studies have provided evidence that ERVs are associated with a range of pathogenic processes involving multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, breast cancer, and the response to burn injury. For instance, the proinflammatory properties of the human ERV-W envelope protein play a central role in demyelination of oligodendrocytes. As reviewed in this article, recent advances in ERV biology and mammalian genomics suggest that ERVs may have a profound influence on various pathogenic processes including the response to injury and infection. Understanding the roles of ERVs in the pathogenesis of injury and infection will broaden insights into the underlying mechanisms of systemic immune disorder and organ

  15. Progressive Taxation, Wage Bargaining, and Endogenous Working Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Claus Thustrup

    This paper analyses the impact of tax reforms that decrease income tax progression in an equilibrium search model with wage bargaining and endogenous individual working time. The working time is either bargained together with the hourly wage (case 1) or determined solely by workers after bargaining...... over the wage (case 2). In both cases reducing tax progression increases working time of employed and, more interestingly, increases unambiguously wages and unemployment. Wages and unemployment rise more and working time and production less in case 1 compared to case 2; probably making case 2 countries...

  16. Cholestasis and endogenous opioids: liver disease and exogenous opioid pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar

    2007-01-01

    A class of endogenous opioids is upregulated in liver disease particular to cholestasis, which contributes to symptoms in liver disease such as pruritus, hypotension and encephalopathy. Symptoms associated with cholestasis are reversed or at least ameliorated by mu opioid receptor antagonists. Palliation of symptoms related to cholestatic liver disease also involves bile acid binding agents. Opioid receptor antagonists, unlike bile acid binding agents, have been reported to relieve multiple symptoms, except for pruritus, and improve liver function as demonstrated in experimental cholestasis. Exogenous opioid pharmacology is altered by liver disease. Dose reduction or prolongation of dose intervals is necessary depending on the severity of liver disease.

  17. Rectification of rabbit cardiac ryanodine receptor current by endogenous polyamines

    OpenAIRE

    Uehara, A.; Fill, M; Vélez, P; Yasukochi, M; Imanaga, I

    1996-01-01

    The actions of three endogenous polyamines (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) were defined on Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyRs) isolated from rabbit cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum. The current-voltage relationship of the RyR channel was N-shaped in the presence of polyamine (1-5 mM). Polyamine blocked conduction near 0 mV, but the blockade was relieved at large potentials. Polyamines acted (blocked) from both sides of the channel. Polyamine efficacy was dependent on curren...

  18. Complex links between dietary lipids, endogenous endotoxins and metabolic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugerette, Fabienne; Vors, Cécile; Peretti, Noël; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity are characterized by a subclinical inflammatory state that contributes to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Recent reports also indicate that (i) there are alterations of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases and (ii) absorption of endogenous endotoxins (namely lipopolysaccharides, LPS) can occur, particularly during the digestion of lipids. The aim of the present review is to highlight recently gained knowledge regarding the links between high fat diets, lipid digestion, intestinal microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia & inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Endogenous H(2)S in Cardiovascular Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Nini; Gouliaev, Anja; Aalling, Mathilde

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that the endogenous gas hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is a signalling molecule of considerable biological potential and has been suggested to be involved in a vast number of physiological processes. In the vascular system, H(2)S is synthesized from cysteine by cystathionine......-γ-lyase (CSE) in smooth muscle cells (SMC) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfuresterase (3MST) and CSE in the endothelial cells. In pulmonary and systemic arteries, H(2)S induces relaxation and/or contraction dependent on the concentration of H(2)S, type of vessel and species. H(2)S relaxes SMC through a direct...

  20. Male germ cells express abundant endogenous siRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Hennig, Grant W.; Wu, Qiuxia; Jose, Charlie; Zheng, Huili; Yan, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) have only been reported in murine oocytes and embryonic stem cells. Here, we show that murine spermatogenic cells express numerous endo-siRNAs, which are likely to be derived from naturally occurring double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors. The biogenesis of these testicular endo-siRNAs is DROSHA independent, but DICER dependent. These male germ cell endo-siRNAs can potentially target hundreds of transcripts or thousands of DNA regions in the genome. Overall, our work has unveiled another hidden layer of regulation imposed by small noncoding RNAs during male germ cell development. PMID:21788498