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Sample records for endodontic polymicrobial infection

  1. Polymicrobial infective endocarditis caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoloz Koshkelashvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis is a common clinical problem in industrialized countries. Risk factors include abnormal cardiac valves, a history of endocarditis, intracardiac devices, prosthetic valves and intravenous drug use. We report a case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis in a 33 year-old female with a history chronic heroin use caused by Neisseria sicca and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. We believe the patient was exposed to these microbes by cleansing her skin with saliva prior to injection. Pairing a detailed history with the consideration of atypical agents is crucial in the proper diagnosis and management of endocarditis in patients with high-risk injection behaviors.

  2. Enterococcus faecalis demonstrates pathogenicity through increased attachment in an ex vivo polymicrobial pulpal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio Ayre, Wayne; Melling, Genevieve; Cuveillier, Camille; Natarajan, Madhan; Roberts, Jessica L; Marsh, Lucy L; Lynch, Christopher D; Maillard, Jean-Yves; Denyer, Stephen P; Sloan, Alastair J

    2018-02-26

    This study investigated the host response to a polymicrobial pulpal infection consisting of Streptococcus anginosus and Enterococcus faecalis , bacteria commonly implicated in dental abscesses and endodontic failure, using a validated ex vivo rat tooth model. Tooth slices were inoculated with planktonic cultures of S. anginosus or E. faecalis alone or in co-culture at ratios of 50:50 and 90:10 S. anginosus to E. faecalis Attachment was semi-quantified by measuring area covered by fluorescently labelled bacteria. Host response was established by viable histological cell counts and inflammatory response using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. A significant reduction in cell viability was observed for single and polymicrobial infections, with no significant differences between infection types (≈2000cells/mm 2 for infected pulps compared to ≈4000cells/mm 2 for uninfected pulps). E. faecalis demonstrated significantly higher levels of attachment (6.5%) compared to S. anginosus alone (2.3%) and mixed species infections (3.4% for 50:50 and 2.3% for 90:10), with a remarkable affinity to the pulpal vasculature. Infections with E. faecalis demonstrated the greatest increase in TNF-α (47.1 fold for E. faecalis , 14.6 fold for S. anginosus , 60.1 fold for 50:50 and 25.0 fold for 90:10) and IL-1β expression (54.8 fold for E. faecalis , 8.8 fold for S. anginosus , 54.5 fold for 50:50 and 39.9 fold for 90:10) when compared to uninfected samples. Immunohistochemistry confirmed this with the majority of inflammation localised to the pulpal vasculature and odontoblast regions. Interestingly, E. faecalis supernatant and heat killed E. faecalis treatment was unable to induce the same inflammatory response, suggesting E. faecalis pathogenicity in pulpitis is linked to its greater ability to attach to the pulpal vasculature. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Interaction networks, ecological stability, and collective antibiotic tolerance in polymicrobial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de Marjon G.J.; Zagorski, Marcin; McNally, Alan; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections constitute small ecosystems that accommodate several bacterial species. Commonly, these bacteria are investigated in isolation. However, it is unknown to what extent the isolates interact and whether their interactions alter bacterial growth and ecosystem resilience in

  4. Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter Baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsukayama, Dean T

    2008-01-01

    .... This model could then be used to assess the combined therapy of an osteogenic agent to stimulate bone formation while local and system antibiotic therapy was being applied to control the polymicrobial infection...

  5. Metabolite cross-feeding enhances virulence in a model polymicrobial infection.

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    Matthew M Ramsey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbes within polymicrobial infections often display synergistic interactions resulting in enhanced pathogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms governing these interactions are not well understood. Development of model systems that allow detailed mechanistic studies of polymicrobial synergy is a critical step towards a comprehensive understanding of these infections in vivo. In this study, we used a model polymicrobial infection including the opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and the commensal Streptococcus gordonii to examine the importance of metabolite cross-feeding for establishing co-culture infections. Our results reveal that co-culture with S. gordonii enhances the pathogenesis of A. actinomycetemcomitans in a murine abscess model of infection. Interestingly, the ability of A. actinomycetemcomitans to utilize L-lactate as an energy source is essential for these co-culture benefits. Surprisingly, inactivation of L-lactate catabolism had no impact on mono-culture growth in vitro and in vivo suggesting that A. actinomycetemcomitans L-lactate catabolism is only critical for establishing co-culture infections. These results demonstrate that metabolite cross-feeding is critical for A. actinomycetemcomitans to persist in a polymicrobial infection with S. gordonii supporting the idea that the metabolic properties of commensal bacteria alter the course of pathogenesis in polymicrobial communities.

  6. Combinations of bacterial species in endodontic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, LB; Wesselink, P.R.; van Winkelhoff, AJ

    Aim This study was undertaken to investigate combinations of bacteria found in root-canal infections of teeth with periapical bone destruction without clinical signs and symptoms. Methodology Endodontic samples from 58 root canals were cultured anaerobically and microorganisms were counted and

  7. Direct sequencing and RipSeq interpretation as a tool for identification of polymicrobial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Tine Yding; Eickhardt, Steffen; Björnsdottir, Maria K

    2013-01-01

    In this study, RipSeq Mixed, a software resolving uninterpretable mixed DNA sequencing chromatograms, revealed the bacterial content of 15 polymicrobial samples. Direct sequencing combined with RipSeq Mixed constitutes a valuable supplement to cultivation, particularly when cultivation is negativ...... and direct sequencing is inconclusive despite continued clinical indications of infection....

  8. Isolation of microrganisms involved in endodontic infection

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello Gatti; Maria Sofia Rini; Pasqua Schiavone; Tatiana Giulia Rizzati; Francesca Scandurra; Giovanna Costa

    2010-01-01

    In endodontic infections a lot of different microrganisms can be time inside dentinal tubules to support such infections. Most of these are Gram negative anaerobes bacteria able to induce an immune response that is the apparent cause of periapical lesion, but also Gram positive facultative aerobic species and fungi of the genus Candida.They play an important role in pain but also in bone periapical resorption. Therefore, the exact knowledge and the subsequent elimination of the microrganisms ...

  9. In vivo efficacy of humanized ceftaroline fosamil-avibactam exposures in a polymicrobial infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalodi, Amira A; Crandon, Jared L; Williams, Gregory; Nicolau, David P

    2013-11-01

    Although Gram-positive cocci are the most common pathogens in diabetic foot infections, these infections often are polymicrobial. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of a simulated human dose of 600 mg ceftaroline fosamil-600 mg avibactam every 8 h as a 1-h infusion in a polymicrobial in vivo murine model. Seven isolates were used (3 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] isolates, 1 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] isolate, 1 Escherichia coli isolate, 1 Enterobacter cloacae isolate, and 1 Bacteroides fragilis isolate) in various combinations in an immunocompromised polymicrobial tissue infection to assess the efficacy of the simulated regimen. Each infection was comprised of at least one S. aureus isolate with a MIC of 0.25 to 1 μg/ml and one Enterobacteriaceae isolate with a MIC of 1 or 4 μg/ml. Eight of 16 infections also included B. fragilis, with a MIC of 0.5 μg/ml, as a third organism. Efficacy was evaluated after 24 h as the change in log10 CFU from the level of 0-h controls. Efficacy was seen against all isolate combinations, with at least a 1-log kill against Enterobacteriaceae and a minimum of a 2-log kill against S. aureus and B. fragilis isolates. These bacterial reductions correlate with free drug concentration above the MIC (fT>MIC) produced by the humanized regimen of 100, 86, and 56% at MICs of 1, 2, and 4 μg/ml, respectively. The humanized regimen of 600 mg ceftaroline fosamil-600 mg avibactam every 8 h as a 1-h infusion showed predictable efficacy against all infections tested in this model. These data support further clinical investigation of ceftaroline fosamil-avibactam for the treatment of polymicrobial tissue infections.

  10. A polymicrobial perspective of pulmonary infections exposes an enigmatic pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Christopher D; Parkins, Michael D; Rabin, Harvey R; Duan, Kangmin; Norgaard, Jens C; Surette, Michael G

    2008-09-30

    Lung disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. A modest number of bacterial pathogens have been correlated with pulmonary function decline; however, microbiological and molecular evidence suggests that CF airway infection is polymicrobial. To obtain a more complete assessment of the microbial community composition and dynamics, we undertook a longitudinal study by using culture-independent and microbiological approaches. In the process, we demonstrated that within complex and dynamic communities, the Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) can establish chronic pulmonary infections and at the onset of 39% of acute pulmonary exacerbations, SMG is the numerically dominant pathogen. We report the comprehensive polymicrobial community dynamics of a CF lung infection in a clinically relevant context. If a given organism, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, becomes resistant to antibiotic therapy, an alternative treatment avenue may mediate the desired clinical response by effectively managing the composition of the microbial community.

  11. Polymicrobial Infection of the Cornea Due to Contact Lens Wear

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    Selçuk Sızmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old male presented with pain and redness in his left eye. He had a history of wearing contact lenses. His ophthalmic examination revealed a large corneal ulcer with surrounding infiltrate. Cultures were isolated from the contact lenses, lens solutions, storage cases, and conjunctivae of both eyes and also corneal scrapings of the left eye. Fortified vancomycin and amikacin drops were started hourly. Culture results of conjunctivae of each eye and left cornea were positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; cultures from the contact lenses, lens solution and storage case of both eyes revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans. Polymerase chain reaction of the corneal scraping was positive for Acanthameoba. The topical antibiotics were changed with ones that both bacteria were sensitive to and anti-amoebic therapy was added. The patient had two recurrences following initial presentation despite intensive therapy. Keratitis occurred due to multiple pathogens; the relapsing course despite adequate therapy is potentially associated with this polymicrobial etiology.

  12. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

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    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  13. Isolation of microrganisms involved in endodontic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Gatti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In endodontic infections a lot of different microrganisms can be time inside dentinal tubules to support such infections. Most of these are Gram negative anaerobes bacteria able to induce an immune response that is the apparent cause of periapical lesion, but also Gram positive facultative aerobic species and fungi of the genus Candida.They play an important role in pain but also in bone periapical resorption. Therefore, the exact knowledge and the subsequent elimination of the microrganisms involved by the system of root canals, although difficult to achieve completely, is essential for the resolution of apical periodontitis.

  14. Interaction networks, ecological stability, and collective antibiotic tolerance in polymicrobial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Marjon G. J.; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections constitute small ecosystems that accommodate several bacterial species. Commonly, these bacteria are investigated in isolation. However, it is unknown to what extent the isolates interact and whether their interactions alter bacterial growth and ecosystem resilience in the presence and absence of antibiotics. We quantified the complete ecological interaction network for 72 bacterial isolates collected from 23 individuals diagnosed with polymicrobial urinary tract infections and found that most interactions cluster based on evolutionary relatedness. Statistical network analysis revealed that competitive and cooperative reciprocal interactions are enriched in the global network, while cooperative interactions are depleted in the individual host community networks. A population dynamics model parameterized by our measurements suggests that interactions restrict community stability, explaining the observed species diversity of these communities. We further show that the clinical isolates frequently protect each other from clinically relevant antibiotics. Together, these results highlight that ecological interactions are crucial for the growth and survival of bacteria in polymicrobial infection communities and affect their assembly and resilience. PMID:28923953

  15. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

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    Wenzel Richard P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77 and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21 were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa. Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64. Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5 than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally, patients with PPa BSI were not more acutely ill, as judged by APACHE II

  16. DIAGNOdent laser fluorescence assessment of endodontic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Andrew L; Bird, Philip S; Walsh, Laurence J

    2009-10-01

    Real-time assessment of the microbial status of the root canal system would be useful in clinical endodontic practice for determining endpoints of biomechanical treatment. This laboratory study used an existing laser fluorescence device, the DIAGNOdent (KaVo, Biberach, Germany), in a proof-of-concept study. Visible laser red light (wavelength 655 nm) was used to elicit fluorescence emissions in the near-infrared range from infected and uninfected root canals. A prototype sapphire tip designed for periodontal assessment was used to analyze the pulp chamber and coronal third of the root canal system in extracted teeth. The fluorescence properties of bacterial cultures, monospecies biofilms in root canals, pulpal soft tissues, and sound dentin were also evaluated, together with 50 extracted teeth with known endodontic pathology. Sound dentin and healthy pulpal soft tissue gave an average fluorescence reading of 5 (on a scale of 100), whereas biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans established in root canals showed a progressive increase in fluorescence over time. Fluorescence readings reduced to the "healthy" threshold reading of 5 when root canals were endodontically treated, and the experimentally created bacterial biofilms were removed completely. High fluorescence readings were recorded in the root canals and pulp chambers of extracted teeth with radiographic evidence of periapical pathology and scanning electron microscopy evidence of bacterial infection. The use of the DIAGNOdent fluorescence approach for the assessment of the status of the pulp chamber and root canal system holds promise for clinical application; once more, flexible tips can be developed for gaining greater penetration into middle and apical thirds of the root canal.

  17. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection.

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    Apollo Stacy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community.

  18. [Colonization of Porphyromonas endodontalis in primary and secondary endodontic infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Li; Hai, Ji; Yan-Yan, He; Shenghui, Yang; Benxiang, Hou

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to assess and compare the prevalence of Porphyromonas endodontalis (P. endodontalis) in root canals associated with primary and secondary endodontic infections by using 16s rDNA PCR and real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTFQ-PCR). A total of 120 adult patients with one radiographically documented periapical lesion were included. Sixty teeth presented with primary endodontic infections and 60 with secondary endodontic infections requiring retreatment. P. endodontalis was identified by using 16s rDNA PCR techniques. The positive DNA expression of P. endodontalis in two types of infected root canals were quantitatively compared by using SYBR GREEN I RTFQ-PCR. The prevalence of P. endodontalis in the root canals with primary endodontic infections was significantly higher than that in root canals with secondary endodontic infections (P = 0.001). However, RTFQ-PCR results showed no significant difference in DNA expression quantities between the primary and secondary endodontic infections root canals (P = 0.303). P. endodontalis is more highly associated with root canals having primary endodontic infections, although P. endodontalis colonize in both root canals with primary and secondary chronic apical periodontitis.

  19. Dentine tubule infection and endodontic therapy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntebi, B R

    1994-07-01

    A critical review of the literature suggests that the microenvironment of dentinal tubules appears to favour the selection of relatively few bacterial types irrespective of the aetiology of the infection process; coronal dental caries or pulpar necrosis. These bacteria may constitute an important reservoir from which root canal infection and reinfection may occur following pulp necrosis or during and after endodontic treatment. Previous studies of this microflora have utilized microbiological culture techniques which need to be supplemented by those that allow in situ demonstration as well as identification of the bacteria. Newer treatment strategies that are designed to eliminate this microflora must include agents that can penetrate the dentinal tubules and destroy these microorganisms, since they are located in an area beyond the host defence mechanisms where they cannot be reached by systemically administered antimicrobial agents.

  20. Cedecea davisae’s Role in a Polymicrobial Lung Infection in a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

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    Thayer G. Ismaael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic airway colonization and infection are the hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia are well-documented bacterial culprits in this chronic suppurative airway disease. Advanced molecular diagnostics have uncovered a possible role of a larger group of microorganisms in CF. Cedecea is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is an emerging pathogen. We present a case of a polymicrobial healthcare-associated pneumonia in a CF patient caused by Cedecea davisae, among other bacteria.

  1. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Polymicrobial infection with major periodontal pathogens induced periodontal disease and aortic atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null mice.

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    Mercedes F Rivera

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD and atherosclerosis are both polymicrobial and multifactorial and although observational studies supported the association, the causative relationship between these two diseases is not yet established. Polymicrobial infection-induced periodontal disease is postulated to accelerate atherosclerotic plaque growth by enhancing atherosclerotic risk factors of orally infected Apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(null mice. At 16 weeks of infection, samples of blood, mandible, maxilla, aorta, heart, spleen, and liver were collected, analyzed for bacterial genomic DNA, immune response, inflammation, alveolar bone loss, serum inflammatory marker, atherosclerosis risk factors, and aortic atherosclerosis. PCR analysis of polymicrobial-infected (Porphyromonas gingivalis [P. gingivalis], Treponema denticola [T. denticola], and Tannerella forsythia [T. forsythia] mice resulted in detection of bacterial genomic DNA in oral plaque samples indicating colonization of the oral cavity by all three species. Fluorescent in situ hybridization detected P. gingivalis and T. denticola within gingival tissues of infected mice and morphometric analysis showed an increase in palatal alveolar bone loss (p<0.0001 and intrabony defects suggesting development of periodontal disease in this model. Polymicrobial-infected mice also showed an increase in aortic plaque area (p<0.05 with macrophage accumulation, enhanced serum amyloid A, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides. A systemic infection was indicated by the detection of bacterial genomic DNA in the aorta and liver of infected mice and elevated levels of bacterial specific IgG antibodies (p<0.0001. This study was a unique effort to understand the effects of a polymicrobial infection with P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia on periodontal disease and associated atherosclerosis in ApoE(null mice.

  3. Preferential use of central metabolism in vivo reveals a nutritional basis for polymicrobial infection.

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    Christopher J Alteri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human genitourinary tract is a common anatomical niche for polymicrobial infection and a leading site for the development of bacteremia and sepsis. Most uncomplicated, community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI are caused by Escherichia coli, while another bacterium, Proteus mirabilis, is more often associated with complicated UTI. Here, we report that uropathogenic E. coli and P. mirabilis have divergent requirements for specific central pathways in vivo despite colonizing and occupying the same host environment. Using mutants of specific central metabolism enzymes, we determined glycolysis mutants lacking pgi, tpiA, pfkA, or pykA all have fitness defects in vivo for P. mirabilis but do not affect colonization of E. coli during UTI. Similarly, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway is required only for P. mirabilis in vivo. In contrast, gluconeogenesis is required only for E. coli fitness in vivo. The remarkable difference in central pathway utilization between E. coli and P. mirabilis during experimental UTI was also observed for TCA cycle mutants in sdhB, fumC, and frdA. The distinct in vivo requirements between these pathogens suggest E. coli and P. mirabilis are not direct competitors within host urinary tract nutritional niche. In support of this, we found that co-infection with E. coli and P. mirabilis wild-type strains enhanced bacterial colonization and persistence of both pathogens during UTI. Our results reveal that complementary utilization of central carbon metabolism facilitates polymicrobial disease and suggests microbial activity in vivo alters the host urinary tract nutritional niche.

  4. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI.

  5. The Pathogenic Potential of Proteus mirabilis Is Enhanced by Other Uropathogens during Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Johnson, Alexandra O; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Eaton, Kathryn A; Yep, Alejandra; Mody, Lona; Wu, Weisheng; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-02-01

    Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two species exhibited higher urine pH values, urolithiasis, bacteremia, and more pronounced tissue damage and inflammation compared to the findings for mice infected with a single species, despite having a similar bacterial burden within the urinary tract. The presence of P. stuartii, regardless of urease production by this organism, was sufficient to enhance P. mirabilis urease activity and increase disease severity, and enhanced urease activity was the predominant factor driving tissue damage and the dissemination of both organisms to the bloodstream during coinfection. These findings were largely recapitulated in the CAUTI model. Other uropathogens also enhanced P. mirabilis urease activity in vitro, including recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa We therefore conclude that the underlying mechanism of enhanced urease activity may represent a widespread target for limiting the detrimental consequences of polymicrobial catheter colonization, particularly by P. mirabilis and other urease-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  7. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C; Jayaprakash, C; Vieland, Veronica J; Das, Jayajit; Weimer, Kristin E; Swords, W Edward

    2015-01-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host–microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species. (paper)

  8. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C; Jayaprakash, C; Vieland, Veronica J; Swords, W Edward; Das, Jayajit

    2014-12-04

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species.

  9. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward; Das, Jayajit

    2015-02-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species.

  10. Polymicrobial infections reduce the cure rate in prosthetic joint infections: outcome analysis with two-stage exchange and follow-up ≥two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Matthias D; Friedrich, Max J; Randau, Thomas M; Ploeger, Milena M; Schmolders, Jan; Strauss, Andreas A; Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Pennekamp, Peter H; Vavken, Patrick; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJI) are a serious and challenging complication after total joint arthroplasty. According to the literature, most PJI are monomicrobial infections caused by gram-positive cocci. The number of polymicrobial PJI might be underrepresented in the literature and only limited data are available regarding the outcome of polymicrobial PJI. Our hypothesis was that polymicrobial PJI are associated with a reduced cure rate compared with monomicrobial PJI. Routine clinical data were collected and analysed retrospectively as anonymised, aggregated data. A total of 77 consecutive patients with 77 confirmed PJI and proven infectious organism of the hip and knee joint treated within a two-stage exchange concept and a follow-up ≥ two years were investigated. Detection of the infectious organism was based on multiple microbiological cultures taken intra-operatively. Superficial wound swabs or swabs from sinus tracts were not taken into account. Data were grouped into polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJI. The main outcome variable was "definitively free of infection after two years" as published. Second, we considered several variables as potential confounders or as risk factors. A total of 42 men and 35 women with 46 infected total hip arthroplasties and 31 infected total knee arthroplasties were evaluated. In 37 (46.6 %) of our 77 patients a polymicrobial PJI could be detected. We found a significant association between polymicrobial PJI and the outcome parameter definitively free of infection after two years with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.3 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.1-1.0]. The rate of patients graded as definitively free of infection after two years was 67.6 % for polymicrobial infections vs. 87.5 % for monomicrobial infections. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (OR 0.4, 95 % CI 0.2-1.0, p = 0.062) was identified as a borderline significant covariable. Our data suggest that polymicrobial PJI might be

  11. CALCIUM HYDROXIDE IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT OF PERIAPICALLY INFECTED TEETH

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    Rahmi Alma Farah Adang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available An inadequate endodontic treatment may affect the root canal system and spread beyond its apical foramina that elicit periodontal tissue developing into abscess, granuloma and radicular cyst. Periodical lesions can be treated with non surgical endodontic treatment using calcium hydroxide dressing. This case study is reporting teeth 11 with periodical lesions and infection. Evidence of a clinical healing and radiographic assessments were followed by a non surgical endodontic therapy. Successful treatment outcome is related to the elimination of infection agents from the root canal. This can activate a stimulation zone to promote regeneration. Calcium hydroxide used as a root canal dressing may promote alkalinity at the adjacent tissue , create favourable environmental condition in which hard tissue formation can occur, interfere the bactericidal activity, increase mineralization, and induce healing.

  12. A novel approach to probe host-pathogen interactions of bovine digital dermatitis, a model of a complex polymicrobial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections represent a great challenge for the clarification of disease etiology and the development of comprehensive diagnostic or therapeutic tools, particularly for fastidious and difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. Using bovine digital dermatitis (DD) as a disease model, we introduce...... a novel strategy to study the pathogenesis of complex infections. The strategy combines meta-transcriptomics with high-density peptide-microarray technology to screen for in vivo-expressed microbial genes and the host antibody response at the site of infection. Bacterial expression patterns supported...

  13. Aspergillus in endodontic infection near the maxillary sinus

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    Cinthya Cristina Gomes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Diseases of the maxillary sinus have been associated with dental roots near the maxillary sinus that have undergone endodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence of filamentous fungi in patients with dental roots near the maxillary sinus who had apical periodontitis treated endodontically, and to alert practitioners that this could be a possible avenue of contamination of the sinus in patients who develop maxillary sinus infection. METHODS: Cross-sectional study in 60 palatal roots of the first maxillary molars near the maxillary sinus, that underwent endodontic treatment for apical periodontitis. After removal of the filling material, dentin shavings were collected and placed in test tubes containing Sabouraud dextrose agar and chloramphenicol. The phenotype was determined by macroscopic and microscopic examination of the colonies. For polymerase chain reaction, the primers ITS-5 and ITS-4 were used. The sequences obtained were compared with those deposited at GenBank using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program. RESULTS: Filamentous fungi were isolated from 6 of 60 canals (10%:Aspergillus niger (6.7%, Aspergillus versicolor (1.6%, and Aspergillus fumigatus(1.6%. CONCLUSION: Root canals near the maxillary sinus with endodontic treatment and apical periodontitis may exhibit positive cultures for filamentous fungi. Interested professionals should be alert, because these microorganisms have pathogenic characteristics that can cause disease of odontogenic origin in the maxillary sinus.

  14. Infection and microleakage the caused of endodontic failure

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    Kurniasri Amas Achiar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The success of endodontic treatment depends on the quality of endodontic treatment and the final restoration. The mean reason for endodontic treatment failure is usually microleakage. That is why it becomes one of the priorities for dental research to prevent microleakage. Infection during the root canal treatment can be prevented. First, by employing strict aseptic clinical techniques follows by cleaning all bacteria and preoperative necrotic pulp-tissue remnants from the root canal. Irrigants are essential in this phase. The shaping of the canal is also an important prerequisite for endodontic success. Removal of the smear layer can enhance seal ability. Second, obturation of the root canal should leave the tooth in the most biological inert condition possible, and it must prevent reinfection as well as the growth of any microorganisms remaining in the canal. The application of an antibacterial dressing between appointments is absolutely necessary or the root canal has to be obturated at the first appointment in order to deprive the microorganisms of nutrients and space to multiply. The temporary filling must be at least 3.5 mm thick. Failure occurs because of missed canals, iatrogenic events and radicular fractures have to be avoided. At the end, clinicians have to confirm that the root canal is cleaned and hermetically obturated because hermetic root canal filling will prevent the leakage of an irritant to the apical area.

  15. Postextraction implant in sites with endodontic infection as an alternative to endodontic retreatment: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbella, Stefano; Taschieri, Silvio; Tsesis, Igor; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this literature review is to evaluate the outcomes of implants placed after extraction of teeth with infections of endodontic origin. An electronic search was performed through electronic databases (Medline and Embase) using the terms "immediate implant," "post-extractive implants," "endodontic infection," "infected site," and "extraction socket" combined with the use of Boolean operators ("AND" and "OR"). Only articles on human subjects were considered. At least 12 month of mean follow-up was required for inclusion. No restriction was placed regarding study design. Ten studies were included in this review. Survival rates ranged from 92% to 100%. A total of 497 implants were placed in sites with endodontic infection. In nine studies the use of bone substitutes was associated with immediate implant placement. Because of the low number of included studies and the heterogeneity of study design, more well-designed studies are required to assess the relevance of this treatment alternative.

  16. An in vivo evaluation of microbial diversity before and after the photo-activated disinfection in primary endodontic infections: traditional phenotypic and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Bahador, Abbas

    2018-02-24

    It is essential to identify the root canal microbial diversity and count due to the polymicrobial nature of the primary endodontic infection that is associated with the microbial diversity and increased resistance to the antimicrobial agents. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD), also known as antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, is a new promising non-antibiotic approach, studied to prevent microbial resistance and treatment failure. In this study, we investigated the effect of PAD on reduction of microbial diversity and count, related with primary endodontic infections. Microbial specimens were collected before PAD from patients infected with the primary endodontic infection. PAD with toluidine blue O (TBO), in combination with diode laser, was performed on infected root canals. Resampling was carried out on the root canal after PAD, and microorganisms were identified by classical microbiological tests using biochemical and analytical profile index (API ® 20A) assays and nucleic acid approaches. From the 36 subjects studied before TBO-PAD, 187 cultivable isolates from 14 different genera and 19 various microbial species were retrieved. Of the bacterial isolates, 45.4% were strict anaerobes including Veillonella parvula, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Propionibacterium acnes, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Campylobacter rectus, and Slackia exigua, in order of their frequency; 45.4% were facultative anaerobes; and 9.2% were microaerophilic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans). This in vivo study revealed significant decrease in the microbial diversity and count of the infected root canal after TBO-PAD (P  0.05). TBO-mediated PAD is an effective in exhibiting efficient antimicrobial activity due to the substantial reduction of the microbial diversity and count in the primary endodontic infections. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pyrosequencing Analysis of Cryogenically Ground Samples from Primary and Secondary/Persistent Endodontic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Demiryürek, Ebru Özsezer; Onuk, Ertan Emek

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize the microbial communities of primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections using high-throughput pyrosequencing from the pulverized samples. The roots of 20 extracted human teeth with primary endodontic infection and 20 teeth with secondary/persistent endodontic infection were collected. The outer surfaces of the roots were disinfected, and whole roots were cryopulverized. 16S amplicon pyrosequencing data from the DNA extracted from the pulverized root powders were obtained, and microorganism abundance and diversity were calculated. Data were analyzed using statistical and bioinformatic methods. Pyrosequencing analysis resulted a total of 2,606,128 sequences from 40 samples. A total of 15 phyla, 160 genera, and 368 species were detected. No significant difference between primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections was found regarding the diversity and richness of operational taxonomic units at the phyla, genera, and species levels (P > .005). The present study revealed that the microbial diversity of secondary/persistent endodontic infections did not differ than those of primary endodontic infections. A new archaeal species, Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum limnia, was detected in root canals of 1 patient with primary endodontic infection for the first time. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Culture-dependent approaches to explore the prevalence of root canal pathogens from endodontic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Pourhajibagher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Endodontic infections are considered to be caused by the presence of various microorganisms within the root canal system. Recognition of this microbiota contributes to the successful treatment of infected root canals. This study investigated the microorganisms associated with primary and secondary endodontic infections via culture methods, biochemical tests, and molecular approaches in an Iranian population. Microbial specimens were collected from 36 patients with primary endodontic infection and 14 patients with a history of root canal therapy. Advanced microbiological culture techniques were used to isolate microbiota; subsequently, biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing were performed to identify the microorganisms. Within the total 218 cultivable isolates, Veillonella parvula (20.6% was found to occur with the highest frequency in primary endodontic infection, followed by Porphyromonas gingivalis (14.1%, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (9.2%. Enterococcus faecalis (36.6% was the most predominant microorganism in secondary endodontic infections, followed by Candida albicans, Propionibacterium acnes, and V. parvula with frequencies of 20%, 2%, and 2%, respectively. It was concluded that V. parvula and E. faecalis was most frequently found in primary and secondary endodontic infections, respectively.

  19. Polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic foot ulcer biofilm infections determined using bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP.

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    Scot E Dowd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. CONCLUSIONS: In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP. Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections

  20. Bacterial diversity of symptomatic primary endodontic infection by clonal analysis

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    Letícia Maria Menezes NÓBREGA

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the bacterial diversity of 10 root canals with acute apical abscess using clonal analysis. Samples were collected from 10 patients and submitted to bacterial DNA isolation, 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning, and sequencing. A bacterial genomic library was constructed and bacterial diversity was estimated. The mean number of taxa per canal was 15, ranging from 11 to 21. A total of 689 clones were analyzed and 76 phylotypes identified, of which 47 (61.84% were different species and 29 (38.15% were taxa reported as yet-uncultivable or as yet-uncharacterized species. Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Filifactor alocis, and Peptostreptococcus stomatis were the most frequently detected species, followed by Dialister invisus, Phocaeicola abscessus, the uncharacterized Lachnospiraceae oral clone, Porphyromonas spp., and Parvimonas micra. Eight phyla were detected and the most frequently identified taxa belonged to the phylum Firmicutes (43.5%, followed by Bacteroidetes (22.5% and Proteobacteria (13.2%. No species was detected in all studied samples and some species were identified in only one case. It was concluded that acute primary endodontic infection is characterized by wide bacterial diversity and a high intersubject variability was observed. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, followed by Bacteroidetes, were the most frequently detected microorganisms.

  1. Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating a Polymicrobial Wound Infection Following a Dog Bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Dalila; Chapin, Kimberly; Binns, Linda; Tashima, Karen

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of cutaneous mucormycosis and Enterobacter infection developing in a 50-year-old diabetic woman following a dog bite that showed delayed development and diagnosis in comparison with typical zygomycotic cutaneous lesions. PMID:22567468

  2. Isolation of a variant Porphyromonas sp. from polymicrobial infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, David A; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Bryant, Mary Jean; Jones, Rebekah D; Kania, Stephen A

    2011-01-01

    Isolates of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria from reptiles have only occasionally been identified to the genus and species level in the veterinary medical literature. In particular, reports identifying Porphyromonas spp. from infections in reptiles are scarce. The present report describes unique Porphyromonas isolates obtained from necrosuppurative infections in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps). The isolates grew in the presence of oxygen, were strongly hemolytic, and did not produce detectable black, iron porphyrin pigment. Biochemical identification kit numeric biocodes gave high but unreliable probabilities (>99.9%) for identification as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences of the isolates were identical to each other and shared 91% identity with those of Porphyromonas gulae. The isolates may represent a new reptile-associated Porphyromonas species.

  3. Interim endodontic therapy for alveolar socket bone regeneration of infected hopeless teeth prior to implant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rass, Marwan Abou

    2010-01-01

    The immediate placement of implants in the fresh extraction sockets of infected teeth with periradicular and periapical lesions is contraindicated because of both the infection and the loss of architecture required for proper implant placement. There are 4 approaches for implant replacement of a hopeless tooth with lesions: (1) extraction and delayed implant placement; (2) extraction, debridement, guided bone regeneration (GBR), guided tissue regeneration (GTR), and delayed implant placement; (3) extraction, intrasocket debridement, and immediate implant placement; or (4) extraction, debridement, GBR, GTR, and simultaneous implant placement. The extraction of such hopeless teeth often results in large bone and soft tissue defects that are difficult to repair. This article introduces an alternative approach: interim endodontic implant site preparation, defined as a transitional, surgical, or nonsurgical endodontic treatment to regenerate the hopeless tooth bone defects and prepare the site for proper implant placement. This article describes 3 distinct interim endodontic protocols used to manage 5 patients, all of whom had severely infected hopeless teeth with large lesions and were treatment planned for implant replacement: the first, interim nonsurgical endodontic treatment to restore the normal anatomy of the infected hopeless tooth; the second, interim surgical endodontics on the hopeless tooth with preexisting endodontic treatment to regenerate apical bone for primary implant stability, thus avoiding the involvement of the maxillary sinus and other critical anatomic structures; and the third, interim surgical endodontics on the hopeless tooth with preexisting endodontic treatment to confine the size of the osseous defect and simplify the GBR and GTR procedures. The outcome of interim endodontic treatment on these 5 patients demonstrated that tooth extraction would have been a less predictable approach. The interim treatment changed the overall direction of the

  4. Treponema spp. Shown to be Important Pathogens in Primary Endodontic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Ashraf F

    2016-03-01

    Prevalence of Treponema species detected in endodontic infections: systematic review and meta-regression analysis. Leite FRM, Nascimento GG, Demarco FF, Gomes BPFA, Pucci CR, Martinho FC. J Endod 2015;41(5):579-87. No sources of funding are listed for this study This study was a systematic review and meta-regression analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Critical Review on Eliminating Endodontic Dental Infections Using Herbal Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineet; Kapoor, Sonali; Agrawal, Isha

    2017-03-04

    The main purpose of a root canal treatment is to eliminate the bacteria and their products from the pulp space. Chemomechanical preparation (chemical-refers to irrigating solutions, i.e., either synthetic chemicals or herbal solutions and mechanical-refers to instrumentation of a root canals with endodontic files) of a root canal system plays a major role in obtaining the rationale of root canal treatment. Various synthetic chemicals known as endodontic irrigants play a major role in disinfection, but also have undesirable properties like allergic potential, toxicity, unacceptable taste, etc. Today there is a major change in trend towards the use of natural herbal medicines as a part of dental treatment due to its easy availability, less toxicity, and cost effectiveness. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of various herbal endodontic irrigants evaluated for their effectiveness in the disinfection of a root canal system. This literature review is conducted using electronic databases "PubMed," "Google Scholar," and "Scopus," and articles were limited to those in the English language and published between 1980 and 2014.

  6. Combinations of bacterial species associated with symptomatic endodontic infections in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Z; Cao, H; Jiang, H; Zhao, J; Tang, Z

    2016-01-01

    To use microarrays to detect 11 selected bacteria in infected root canals, revealing bacterial combinations that are associated with clinical symptoms and signs of primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. DNA was extracted from 90 samples collected from the root canals of teeth with primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population, and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were hybridized to microarrays containing specific oligonucleotide probes targeting 11 species, and the arrays were screened with a confocal laser scanner. Pearson's chi-squared test and cluster analysis were performed to investigate the associations between the bacterial combinations and clinical symptoms and signs using SAS 8.02. Seventy-seven samples (86%) yielded at least one of the 11 target species. Parvimonas micra (56%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (51%), Tannerella forsythia (48%), Prevotella intermedia (44%) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (37%) were the most prevalent taxa and were often concomitant. The following positive associations were found between the bacterial combinations and clinical features: P. endodontalis and T. forsythia with abscess; P. gingivalis and P. micra with sinus tract; P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis or P. micra and P. endodontalis with abscess and sinus tract; and the combination of P. endodontalis, P. micra, T. forsythia and P. gingivalis with sinus tract (P endodontic origin with bacterial synergism in a Chinese population. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Combined With Conventional Endodontic Treatment to Eliminate Root Canal Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Tegos, George P.; Núñez, Silvia C.; Jorge, Antonio O.C.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. Study Design/Materials and Methods Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-µ fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. Results Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (Pendodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy. PMID:17066481

  8. Antimicrobial activity of Arctium lappa constituents against microorganisms commonly found in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Juliana Vianna; Bergamo, Débora Cristina Baldoqui; Pereira, José Odair; França, Suzelei de Castro; Pietro, Rosemeire Cristina Linhares Rodrigues; Silva-Sousa, Yara T Corrêa

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial activity of rough extracts from leaves of Arctium lappa and their phases. The following microorganisms, commonly found in the oral cavity, specifically in endodontic infections, were used: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The agar-diffusion method allowed detection of the hexanic phase as an inhibitor of microbial growth. Bioautographic assays identified antimicrobial substances in the extract. The results showed the existence, in the rough hexanic phase and in its fractions, of constituents that have retention factors (Rf) in three distinct zones, thereby suggesting the presence of active constituents with chemical structures of different polarities that exhibited specificity against the target microorganisms. It may be concluded that the Arctium lappa constituents exhibited a great microbial inhibition potential against the tested endodontic pathogens.

  9. Rapid 16S rRNA next-generation sequencing of polymicrobial clinical samples for diagnosis of complex bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Salipante

    Full Text Available Classifying individual bacterial species comprising complex, polymicrobial patient specimens remains a challenge for culture-based and molecular microbiology techniques in common clinical use. We therefore adapted practices from metagenomics research to rapidly catalog the bacterial composition of clinical specimens directly from patients, without need for prior culture. We have combined a semiconductor deep sequencing protocol that produces reads spanning 16S ribosomal RNA gene variable regions 1 and 2 (∼360 bp with a de-noising pipeline that significantly improves the fraction of error-free sequences. The resulting sequences can be used to perform accurate genus- or species-level taxonomic assignment. We explore the microbial composition of challenging, heterogeneous clinical specimens by deep sequencing, culture-based strain typing, and Sanger sequencing of bulk PCR product. We report that deep sequencing can catalog bacterial species in mixed specimens from which usable data cannot be obtained by conventional clinical methods. Deep sequencing a collection of sputum samples from cystic fibrosis (CF patients reveals well-described CF pathogens in specimens where they were not detected by standard clinical culture methods, especially for low-prevalence or fastidious bacteria. We also found that sputa submitted for CF diagnostic workup can be divided into a limited number of groups based on the phylogenetic composition of the airway microbiota, suggesting that metagenomic profiling may prove useful as a clinical diagnostic strategy in the future. The described method is sufficiently rapid (theoretically compatible with same-day turnaround times and inexpensive for routine clinical use.

  10. Beta-lactamic resistance profiles in Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Parvimonas species isolated from acute endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, Francisco; Jacinto, Rogério Castilho; Correa Signoretti, Fernanda Graziela; Scheffer de Mattos, Vanessa; Grecca, Fabiana Soares; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2014-03-01

    Susceptibility to beta-lactamic agents has changed among anaerobic isolates from acute endodontic infections. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene in Prevotella spp., Porphyromonas spp., and Parviomonas micra strains and show its phenotypic expression. Root canal samples from teeth with acute endodontic infections were collected and Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Parvimonas micra strains were isolated and microbiologically identified with conventional culture techniques. The susceptibility of the isolates was determined by the minimum inhibitory concentration of benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and amoxicillin + clavulanate using the E-test method (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden). The presence of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene was determined through primer-specific polymerase chain reaction. The nitrocefin test was used to determine the expression of the lactamase enzyme. Prevotella disiens, Prevotella oralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and P. micra strains were susceptible to benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, and amoxicillin + clavulanate. The cfxA/cfxA2 gene was detected in 2 of 29 isolates (6.9%). Simultaneous detection of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene and lactamase production was observed for 1 Prevotella buccalis strain. The gene was in 1 P. micra strain but was not expressed. Three strains were positive for lactamase production, but the cfxA/cfxA2 gene was not detected through polymerase chain reaction. There is a low prevalence of the cfxA/cfxA2 gene and its expression in Porphyromonas spp., Prevotella spp., and P. micra strains isolated from acute endodontic infections. Genetic and phenotypic screening must be performed simultaneously to best describe additional mechanisms involved in lactamic resistance for strict anaerobes. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The treatment of the large periradicular endodontic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, F; Stabile, P; Amato, M; Rengo, S; D'Ambrosio, C

    2011-09-01

    Periradicular lesions of endodontic origin are characterized by polymicrobial infections, part of which appear to play a crucial role in the facultative anaerobic bacterical species. In literature there is a strong disagreement about the choice of treatment in large periradicular lesions of endodontic origin: some authors propose the orthograde root canal therapy, others surgical therapy with apicectomia, retrograde filling of the cavity and review instrument. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of orthograde endodontic treatment in case of periapical lesions of endodontic origin of dimensions larger than 20 mm. It was evaluated a sample of 60 cases, ages between 18 and 70 years, 32 men and 28 women. The cases have been treated by orthograde endodontic. Were included mono and pluriradicular teeth with periapical lesion of endodontic origin primary or secondary at endodontic incongruous treatment, with dimensions larger than 20 mm. The sample was divided into Group A: 19 cases in which was possible to complete the root canal therapy in the same event; Group B: 41 cases in which there was drainage. Dressing was applied with pure calcium hydroxide, which was renewed every 10 days for a maximum of 30, was eventually completed the endodontic therapy. Group A: 13 out of 19 cases showed healing at 5 years. Of the remaining 6, there were three failures, a crown-root fracture, missed two follow-up. At 10 years of the 13 successes, 2 cases showed relapse. Group B: 41 cases, later reduced to 30 we had 19 successes in 5 years. Of the remaining 11: 3 crown-root fractures, 2 missed the follow-up, 6 failures. At 10 years of the 19 successes, two were lost because of fracture, one for a relapse. Discussion. The results show the importance of drainage, which can affect the apical seal and therefore the success of endodontic therapy, but allows decompression of the periradicular lesion and symptoms regression. The use of calcium hydroxide in the

  12. Polymicrobial Oral Infection with Four Periodontal Bacteria Orchestrates a Distinct Inflammatory Response and Atherosclerosis in ApoE null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Velsko, Irina M; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Zheng, Donghang; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) develops from a synergy of complex subgingival oral microbiome, and is linked to systemic inflammatory atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). To investigate how a polybacterial microbiome infection influences atherosclerotic plaque progression, we infected the oral cavity of ApoE null mice with a polybacterial consortium of 4 well-characterized periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerealla forsythia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, that have been identified in human atherosclerotic plaque by DNA screening. We assessed periodontal disease characteristics, hematogenous dissemination of bacteria, peripheral T cell response, serum inflammatory cytokines, atherosclerosis risk factors, atherosclerotic plaque development, and alteration of aortic gene expression. Polybacterial infections have established gingival colonization in ApoE null hyperlipidemic mice and displayed invasive characteristics with hematogenous dissemination into cardiovascular tissues such as the heart and aorta. Polybacterial infection induced significantly higher levels of serum risk factors oxidized LDL (p Periodontal microbiome infection is associated with significant decreases in Apoa1, Apob, Birc3, Fga, FgB genes that are associated with atherosclerosis. Periodontal infection for 12 weeks had modified levels of inflammatory molecules, with decreased Fas ligand, IL-13, SDF-1 and increased chemokine RANTES. In contrast, 24 weeks of infection induced new changes in other inflammatory molecules with reduced KC, MCSF, enhancing GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-13, IL-4, IL-13, lymphotactin, RANTES, and also an increase in select inflammatory molecules. This study demonstrates unique differences in the host immune response to a polybacterial periodontal infection with atherosclerotic lesion progression in a mouse model.

  13. Polymicrobial Oral Infection with Four Periodontal Bacteria Orchestrates a Distinct Inflammatory Response and Atherosclerosis in ApoE null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasanka S Chukkapalli

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD develops from a synergy of complex subgingival oral microbiome, and is linked to systemic inflammatory atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD. To investigate how a polybacterial microbiome infection influences atherosclerotic plaque progression, we infected the oral cavity of ApoE null mice with a polybacterial consortium of 4 well-characterized periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerealla forsythia and Fusobacterium nucleatum, that have been identified in human atherosclerotic plaque by DNA screening. We assessed periodontal disease characteristics, hematogenous dissemination of bacteria, peripheral T cell response, serum inflammatory cytokines, atherosclerosis risk factors, atherosclerotic plaque development, and alteration of aortic gene expression. Polybacterial infections have established gingival colonization in ApoE null hyperlipidemic mice and displayed invasive characteristics with hematogenous dissemination into cardiovascular tissues such as the heart and aorta. Polybacterial infection induced significantly higher levels of serum risk factors oxidized LDL (p < 0.05, nitric oxide (p < 0.01, altered lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, Chylomicrons, VLDL (p < 0.05 as well as accelerated aortic plaque formation in ApoE null mice (p < 0.05. Periodontal microbiome infection is associated with significant decreases in Apoa1, Apob, Birc3, Fga, FgB genes that are associated with atherosclerosis. Periodontal infection for 12 weeks had modified levels of inflammatory molecules, with decreased Fas ligand, IL-13, SDF-1 and increased chemokine RANTES. In contrast, 24 weeks of infection induced new changes in other inflammatory molecules with reduced KC, MCSF, enhancing GM-CSF, IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-13, IL-4, IL-13, lymphotactin, RANTES, and also an increase in select inflammatory molecules. This study demonstrates unique differences in the host immune response to a polybacterial

  14. CNS recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes specific for a peripheral virus infection triggers neuropathogenesis during polymicrobial challenge.

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    Christine M Matullo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although viruses have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS diseases of unknown etiology, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the reproducible identification of viral triggers in such diseases has been largely unsuccessful. Here, we explore the hypothesis that viruses need not replicate in the tissue in which they cause disease; specifically, that a peripheral infection might trigger CNS pathology. To test this idea, we utilized a transgenic mouse model in which we found that immune cells responding to a peripheral infection are recruited to the CNS, where they trigger neurological damage. In this model, mice are infected with both CNS-restricted measles virus (MV and peripherally restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. While infection with either virus alone resulted in no illness, infection with both viruses caused disease in all mice, with ∼50% dying following seizures. Co-infection resulted in a 12-fold increase in the number of CD8+ T cells in the brain as compared to MV infection alone. Tetramer analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (>35% of these infiltrating CD8+ lymphocytes were LCMV-specific, despite no detectable LCMV in CNS tissues. Mechanistically, CNS disease was due to edema, induced in a CD8-dependent but perforin-independent manner, and brain herniation, similar to that observed in mice challenged intracerebrally with LCMV. These results indicate that T cell trafficking can be influenced by other ongoing immune challenges, and that CD8+ T cell recruitment to the brain can trigger CNS disease in the apparent absence of cognate antigen. By extrapolation, human CNS diseases of unknown etiology need not be associated with infection with any particular agent; rather, a condition that compromises and activates the blood-brain barrier and adjacent brain parenchyma can render the CNS susceptible to pathogen-independent immune attack.

  15. Clinical Approach of High Technology Techniques for Control and Elimination of Endodontic Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiniforush, Nasim; Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Shahabi, Sima; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    The main goal in endodontic treatment is to eradicate or at least reduce intraradicular microbial population to levels that are more compatible with periapical lesions healing process. Since endodontic infections are polymicrobial in nature, intraradicular survival of endodontic microbiota and their pathogenic properties are influenced by a combination of their virulence factors. The purpose of this article is to review the endodontic microbiota and their respective virulence attributes, as well as perform a literature review of the effects of disinfection procedures in the treatment of endodontic infections to gain best practices. Conventional technique for root canal preparation includes mechanical debridement and application of antimicrobial irrigants. Recently, laser irradiation has been used to enhance the results of root canal treatment through its thermal effect. To reduce thermal side effects, laser activated irrigation (LAI) and photon induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) were introduced. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) by photochemical reaction uses light at a specific wavelength to activate a nontoxic photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to produce cytotoxic products. Different PSs are used in dentistry including methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue O (TBO), indocyanine green (ICG) and curcumin. Among different options, ICG could be the best choice due to its peak absorption at wavelength of 808 nm, which coincides with the commercial diode laser devices. Also, this wavelength has more penetration depth compared to other wavelengths used in aPDT.

  16. Intestinal Enterococcus faecium Colonization Improves Host Defense during Polymicrobial Peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leendertse, Masja; Willems, Rob J. L.; Oei, G. Anneke; Florquin, Sandrine; Bonten, Marc J. M.; van der Poll, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background. Vancomycin-resistant (VR) Enterococcus faecium is increasingly found to colonize and infect hospitalized patients. Enterococci are frequently isolated from polymicrobial infections originating from the intestines. The impact of VR E. faecium on these infections and vice versa is not

  17. The evaluation of cultivable microbiota profile in patients with secondary endodontic infection before and after photo-activated disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Parker, Steven; Chiniforush, Nasim; Bahador, Abbas

    2017-06-01

    Secondary/persistent endodontic infection can be the outcome of failure of endodontic treatment. Photo-activated disinfection (PAD) can be a useful adjunct to mechanical and antimicrobial agents in eliminating endopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the effect of PAD on diversity and count of microbiota related to secondary/persistent endodontic infections. Root canal samples were taken using sterile paper points from the root canals of 14 patients with secondary/persistent endodontic infections after removing the root-canal filling materials. PAD was performed on teeth with toluidine blue O (TBO) in combination with diode laser. Then re-sampling was conducted from the canal root using sterile paper points and transferred to transport medium. The samples were plated and pure cultures of the target microorganisms were then isolated and identified by analytical profile index (API ® 20A) assays and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Before TBO-PAD, a total of 31 cultivable isolates could be retrieved; 25.8% of the isolated species were obligate anaerobic or microphilics including Veillonella parvula, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Propionibacterium acnes, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and 74.2% of the isolated species were facultative anaerobic such as Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, L. rhamnosus, L. casei, Streptococcus sanguinis, S. mitis, and Candida albicans. According to this in vivo study, the diversity and count of microbiota in root canal-treated teeth were decreased after TBO-PAD, so that E. faecalis, V. parvula, and C. albicans were the microorganisms that recovered after PAD. TBO-PAD is an effective approach that exhibited anti-microbial potential activity against microbiota involved in secondary/persistent endodontic infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Regenerative endodontic procedure of an infected immature permanent human tooth: an immunohistological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschi, Nastaran; Hilkens, Petra; Lambrichts, Ivo; Van den Eynde, Kathleen; Mavridou, Athina; Strijbos, Olaf; De Ketelaere, Marieke; Van Gorp, Gertrude; Lambrechts, Paul

    2016-05-01

    An immunohistological study of an infected immature permanent human tooth after a regenerative endodontic procedure (REP) was conducted in order to determine the histologic outcome of this procedure. Besides observed signs of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, repair and/or regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex was also investigated. A REP was performed on tooth 45 of a 10-year-old girl. Eleven months post-treatment, the tooth had to be removed for orthodontic reasons. The following investigations were performed: immunohistology and radiographic quantification of root development. After hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, the following immunomarkers were selected: neurofilament (NF), pan cytokeratin (PK), osteocalcin (OC), and CD34. The REP resulted in clinical and radiographic healing of the periradicular lesion and quantifiable root development. The HE staining matches with the medical imaging post-REP: underneath the mineral trioxide aggregate a calcified bridge with cell inclusions, connective pulp-like tissue (PLT) with blood vessels, osteodentin against the root canal walls, on the root surface cementum (Ce), and periodontal ligament (PDL). The PDL was PK(+). The blood vessels in the PLT and PDL were CD34(+). The Ce, osteodentin, and stromal cells in the PLT were OC(+). The neurovascular bundles in the PLT were NF(+). Immunohistologically, REP of this infected immature permanent tooth resulted in an intracanalar connective tissue with a regulated physiology, but not pulp tissue. REP of an immature permanent infected tooth may heal the periapical infection and may result in a combination of regeneration and repair of the pulp-dentin complex.

  19. Detection of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H; Qi, Z; Jiang, H; Zhao, J; Liu, Z; Tang, Z

    2012-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of three black-pigmented bacterial species (Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia) using microarray technology in root canals of teeth associated with primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. Microbial samples were taken from root canals of 80 teeth with pulp necrosis and primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. DNA extracted from the samples was amplified by PCR with universal bacterial primers based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, and the products hybridized with the microarrays in which the specific oligonucleotide probes were added. The results of hybridization were screened by a confocal laser scanner. Pearson chi-square test and the two-sided Fisher exact test were used to analyse whether a significant association existed between the species and symptoms as well as in co-existence of two target organisms by a statistical software package (SAS 8.02). The 16S rRNA gene microarray detected at least one of the three test species in 76% of the study teeth. P. endodontalis, P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were found in 50%, 33% and 45%, respectively. A significant association was found in the presence of the pair P. endodontalis / P. gingivalis (P < 0.005). Both P. endodontalis (P <0.05) and P. gingivalis (P <0.005) had a statistically significant association with the presence of a sinus tract. The simultaneous presence of P. endodontalis and P. gingivalis was also associated with the presence of a sinus tract (P<0.005) and abscess formation (P<0.05). The three black-pigmented bacteria were prevalent in teeth with pulp necrosis and primary endodontic infections in a Chinese population. P. gingivalis and P. endodontalis were associated with the presence of sinus tract and abscess formation. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  20. Diverticular Pylephlebitis and Polymicrobial Septicemia

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    Pradhum Ram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverticulitis primarily affects the sigmoid colon and is often complicated by intra-abdominal abscesses and fistulas. Rarely, however, mesenteric venous thrombosis has been known to occur. Optimal management is still unclear. We report the first case of polymicrobial sepsis resulting from diverticular pylephlebitis, managed successfully with bowel rest, antibiotics, and anticoagulation.

  1. Sterilizing Endodontic Files by four different sterilization methods to prevent cross-infection - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T B V G; Garapati, Satish; Agrawal, Rupika; Reddy, Sridhara; Razdan, Ankur; Kumar, S Kishore

    2013-12-01

    Aim of the study was to compare 4 different methods of sterilizing endodontic files in dental practice. The present study was performed on 100 K-files, 21 mm long and of size 25. Of these, 20 files were taken as control group, and the remaining 80 files were divided into 4 groups of 20 files each and they were tested for the efficacy of sterilization with different methods: Autoclave, glass bead, glutaraldehyde and CO2 laser. The study showed that the files sterilized by autoclave and lasers were completely sterile. Those sterilized by glass bead were 90% sterile and those with glutaraldehyde were 80% sterile. The study concluded that autoclave or laser could be used as a method of sterilization in clinical practice and in advanced clinics; laser can be used also as a chair side method of sterilization. How to cite this article: Raju TB, Garapati S, Agrawal R, Reddy S, Razdan A, Kumar SK. Sterilizing Endodontic Files by four different sterilization methods to prevent cross-infection - An In-vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):108-12 .

  2. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of microorganisms in root-filled teeth with persistent infection: Monitoring of the endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Marcos S; Ferraz, Caio C R; Zaia, Alexandre A; Almeida, Jose F A; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo microorganisms detected in root-filled teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis and quantify colony-forming units (CFU) during endodontic retreatment. Fifteen root-filled teeth had their previous gutta-percha removed and were randomly instrumented before being divided into three groups and medicated with either [Ca(OH)2 + 2% CHX gel], [Ca(OH)2 + 0.9% NaCl] or 2% CHX gel. Samples were taken after removal of gutta-percha (S1), after chemomechanical preparation using 2% CHX gel (S2), and after inter-appointment dressing (S3) for 7 or 14 days later. Cultivable bacteria recovered from infected root canals at the three stages were counted and identified by means of culture and PCR assay (16S rDNA). Quantitative data were statistically analyzed by using Mann-Whitney test in which pairs of groups were compared (P endodontic retreatment. The great majority of taxa found in post-treatment samples were Gram-positive bacteria, although Gram-negative bacteria were found by molecular methods. Moreover, our results showed that gutta-percha removal and chemomechanical preparation are effective for root canal disinfection, whereas additional intra-canal dressing did not improve disinfection.

  3. Resistance profiles to antimicrobial agents in bacteria isolated from acute endodontic infections: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pauline M; Jacinto, Rogério C; Dal Pizzol, Tatiane S; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz C; Montagner, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Infected root canal or acute apical abscess exudates can harbour several species, including Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Parvimonas, Streptococcus, Treponema, Olsenella and not-yet cultivable species. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to assess resistance rates to antimicrobial agents in clinical studies that isolated bacteria from acute endodontic infections. Electronic databases and the grey literature were searched up to May 2015. Clinical studies in humans evaluating the antimicrobial resistance of primary acute endodontic infection isolates were included. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A random-effect meta-analysis was employed. The outcome was described as the pooled resistance rates for each antimicrobial agent. Heterogeneity and sensitivity analyses were performed. Subgroup analyses were conducted based upon report or not of the use of antibiotics prior to sampling as an exclusion factor (subgroups A and B, respectively). Data from seven studies were extracted. Resistance rates for 15 different antimicrobial agents were evaluated (range, 3.5-40.0%). Lower resistance rates were observed for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and amoxicillin; higher resistance rates were detected for tetracycline. Resistance rates varied according to previous use of an antimicrobial agent as demonstrated by the subgroup analyses. Heterogeneity was observed for the resistance profiles of penicillin G in subgroup A and for amoxicillin, clindamycin, metronidazole and tetracycline in subgroup B. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that resistance rates changed for metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and amoxicillin. These findings suggest that clinical isolates had low resistance to β-lactams. Further well-designed studies are needed to clarify whether the differences in susceptibility among the antimicrobial agents may influence clinical responses to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights

  4. An experimental study for rapid detection and quantification of endodontic microbiota following photo-activated disinfection via new multiplex real-time PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Raoofian, Reza; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Bahador, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    The infected root canal system harbors one of the highest accumulations of polymicrobial infections. Since the eradication of endopathogenic microbiota is a major goal in endodontic infection therapy, photo-activated disinfection (PAD) can be used as an alternative therapeutic method in endodontic treatment. Compared to cultivation-based approaches, molecular techniques are more reliable for identifying microbial agents associated with endodontic infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of designed multiplex real-time PCR protocol for the rapid detection and quantification of six common microorganisms involved in endodontic infection before and after the PAD. Samples were taken from the root canals of 50 patients with primary and secondary/persistent endodontic infections using sterile paper points. PAD with toluidine blue O (TBO) plus diode laser was performed on root canals. Resampling was then performed, and the samples were transferred to transport medium. Then, six target microorganisms were detected using multiplex real-time PCR before and after the PAD. Veillonella parvula was found using multiplex real-time PCR to have the highest frequency among samples collected before the PAD (29.4%), followed by Porphyromonas gingivalis (23.1%), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (13.6%), Actinomyces naeslundii (13.0%), Enterococcus faecalis (11.5%), and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (9.4%). After TBO-mediated PAD, P. gingivalis strains, the most resistance microorganisms, were recovered in 41.7% of the samples using molecular approach (P > 0.05). As the results shown, multiplex real-time PCR as an accurate detection approach with high-throughput and TBO-mediated PAD as an efficient antimicrobial strategy due to the significant reduction of the endopathogenic count can be used for detection and treatment of microbiota involved in infected root canals, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rare Case of Polymicrobial Keratitis With Balantidium coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Manali; Pai H, Vijaya; Khanna, Vinay; Reddy, Harish; Tilak, Kriti; Chawla, Kiran

    2016-12-01

    To report a rare case of polymicrobial keratitis due to Balantidium coli and gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, in a soft contact lens (CL) wearer. We report a case of CL-related keratitis due to B. coli, P. aeruginosa, and K. pneumoniae. The culture of the corneal scrapings, the CL cleaning solution, and the CL revealed the growth of a rare ciliated parasite, B. coli, along with gram-negative bacteria, namely, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. The patient was successfully treated with topical broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous metronidazole. Polymicrobial keratitis has seldom been reported with B. coli as the causative agent. CL wear can be a risk factor for this infection. Treatment with topical antibiotics may not suffice, and the intravenous route of antiprotozoal drugs may be a useful adjunct. Increasing awareness, early diagnosis, and treatment may improve the final visual outcome.

  6. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B Danahy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly 'sense' infection in non-lymphoid tissues and 'alarm' the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their 'sensing and alarming' functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9 on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  7. Polymicrobial sepsis impairs bystander recruitment of effector cells to infected skin despite optimal sensing and alarming function of skin resident memory CD8 T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qiang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic infection that enhances host vulnerability to secondary infections normally controlled by T cells. Using CLP sepsis model, we observed that sepsis induces apoptosis of circulating memory CD8 T-cells (TCIRCM) and diminishes their effector functions, leading to impaired CD8 T-cell mediated protection to systemic pathogen re-infection. In the context of localized re-infections, tissue resident memory CD8 T-cells (TRM) provide robust protection in a variety of infectious models. TRM rapidly ‘sense’ infection in non-lymphoid tissues and ‘alarm’ the host by enhancing immune cell recruitment to the site of the infection to accelerate pathogen clearance. Here, we show that compared to pathogen-specific TCIRCM, sepsis does not invoke significant numerical decline of Vaccinia virus induced skin-TRM keeping their effector functions (e.g., Ag-dependent IFN-γ production) intact. IFN-γ-mediated recruitment of immune cells to the site of localized infection was, however, reduced in CLP hosts despite TRM maintaining their ‘sensing and alarming’ functions. The capacity of memory CD8 T-cells in the septic environment to respond to inflammatory cues and arrive to the site of secondary infection/antigen exposure remained normal suggesting T-cell-extrinsic factors contributed to the observed lesion. Mechanistically, we showed that IFN-γ produced rapidly during sepsis-induced cytokine storm leads to reduced IFN-γR1 expression on vascular endothelium. As a consequence, decreased expression of adhesion molecules and/or chemokines (VCAM1 and CXCL9) on skin endothelial cells in response to TRM-derived IFN-γ was observed, leading to sub-optimal bystander-recruitment of effector cells and increased susceptibility to pathogen re-encounter. Importantly, as visualized by intravital 2-photon microscopy, exogenous administration of CXCL9/10 was sufficient to correct sepsis-induced impairments in recruitment of effector cells at the localized site of TRM

  8. Pattern Of Polymicrobial Isolates And Antimicrobial Susceptibility From Blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabbir, S.; Jamil, S.; Hafiz, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pattern of polymicrobial isolates in blood cultures and antimicrobial susceptibility in a tertiary care hospital of Karachi. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT), Karachi, Pakistan, from September to November 2014. Methodology: Blood culture samples were received from patients, which were processed by BACTEC 9240 system (Becton Dickinson). All positive blood samples were further analyzed. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria of the year. Identification of growth was based on Gram staining, colony morphology and appropriate biochemical tests. Antibiotic susceptibility was done as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations. Results: Out of the 7251 samples submitted, 2931 (40.42 percent) were positive for growth, 2389 (81.5 percent) samples were monomicrobial, whereas 542 (18.5 percent) samples were polymicrobial. Among the polymicrobial isolates, 468 (86.34 percent) blood culture samples yielded two, 66 (12.17 percent) yielded three, and 8 (1.47 percent) yielded four organisms. Gram positive isolates were 281 (51.84 percent) and Gram negative were 261 (48.15 percent). The most frequent isolates in polymicrobial blood stream infection were Acinetobacterspp. (51/542, 9.4 percent) and Coagulase negative Staphylococcus(84/542, 15.5 percent), respectively. Staphylococcus aureus isolates, which were resistant to Methicillin, accounted for 24.65 percent. Third generation Cephalosporins resistance in Klebsiella spp. and Eschericia (E.) coli was found to be 63.6 percent and 58 percent, respectively. Carbapenem resistance was seen in 5.9 percent of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 17.6 percent Acinetobacter spp. Conclusion: Gram positive bacteria were more commonly involved in polymicrobial blood stream infections with Coagulase negative Staphylococcus

  9. Role of extracellular polymeric substances in polymicrobial biofilm infections of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans modelled in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jillian E; Houston, Asia; Adams, Clare; Edwards, Sarah; Kjellerup, Birthe V

    2017-07-31

    Biofilms are formed by communities of microorganisms living in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix attached to a surface. When living in a biofilm microorganisms change phenotype and thus are less susceptible to antibiotic treatment and biofilm infections can become severe. The aim of this study was to determine if the presence of multikingdom microorganisms alters the virulence of a biofilm infection in a host organism. The coexistence of Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis in biofilm was examined in the nematode model Caenorhabditis elegans. It was evaluated if the hyphal form of C. albicans and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed by S. epidermidis increases biofilm virulence. Survival assays were performed, where C. elegans nematodes were exposed to S. epidermidis and C. albicans. Single inoculation assays showed a decreased survival rate after 2 days following exposure, while dual inoculation assays showed that a clinical S. epidermidis strain together with C. albicans significantly increased the virulence and decreased nematode survival. EPS seem to interfere with the bacterial attachment to hyphae, since the EPS overproducing S. epidermidis strain was most virulent. The clinical S. epidermidis paired with C. albicans led to a severe infection in the nematodes resulting in reduced survival. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. What can we learn from the microbial ecological interactions associated with polymicrobial diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiabong, J F; Boardman, W; Ball, A S

    2014-03-15

    Periodontal diseases in humans and animals are model polymicrobial diseases which are associated with a shift in the microbial community structure and function; there is therefore a need to investigate these diseases from a microbial ecological perspective. This review highlights three important areas of microbial ecological investigation of polymicrobial diseases and the lessons that could be learnt: (1) identification of disease-associated microbes and the implications for choice of anti-infective treatment; (2) the implications associated with vaccine design and development and (3) application of the dynamics of microbial interaction in the discovery of novel anti-infective agents. This review emphasises the need to invigorate microbial ecological approaches to the study of periodontal diseases and other polymicrobial diseases for greater understanding of the ecological interactions between and within the biotic and abiotic factors of the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of photo-activated disinfection effectiveness with methylene blue against Porphyromonas gingivalis involved in endodontic infection: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhajibagher, Maryam; Chiniforush, Nasim; Raoofian, Reza; Pourakbari, Babak; Ghorbanzadeh, Roghayeh; Bazarjani, Farzaneh; Bahador, Abbas

    2016-12-01

    Eradication or suppression of microbial pathogens is a major goal in endodontic infection therapy. Sub-lethal doses of photo-activated disinfection (sPAD) as a new treatment method might be able to control the microorganisms involved in endodontic infections normally treated with PAD. This study evaluated the effect of sPAD using methylene blue (MB) in combination with diode laser irradiation on the growth and biofilm formation ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis as an endodontic pathogen. The anti-microbial and anti-biofilm potential of sPAD against P. gingivalis were assessed at sub-lethal doses of MB and irradiation by diode laser on colony forming unit and crystal violet assays, respectively. MB-sPAD using 25μg/mL at a fluency of 117.18J/cm 2 and 50-100μg/mL at a fluency of 93.75J/cm 2 significantly P. gingivalis growth when compared to the control. MB at 100μg/mL at a fluency of 117.18J/cm 2 in MB-mediated PAD showed a significant inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in P. gingivalis compared with MB-sPAD. High doses of MB-mediated sPAD exhibited anti-microbial and anti-biofilm potential activity, whereas lower doses of MB-mediated sPAD did not display this ability. Therefore, the dose of PAD used in vivo should be taken into account for endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Regenerative endodontics: A way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogenes, Anibal; Ruparel, Nikita B; Shiloah, Yoav; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2016-05-01

    Immature teeth are susceptible to infections due to trauma, anatomic anomalies, and caries. Traditional endodontic therapies for immature teeth, such as apexification procedures, promote resolution of the disease and prevent future infections. However, these procedures fail to promote continued root development, leaving teeth susceptible to fractures. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs) have evolved in the past decade, being incorporated into endodontic practice and becoming a viable treatment alternative for immature teeth. The authors have summarized the status of regenerative endodontics on the basis of the available published studies and provide insight into the different levels of clinical outcomes expected from these procedures. Substantial advances in regenerative endodontics are allowing a better understanding of a multitude of factors that govern stem cell-mediated regeneration and repair of the damaged pulp-dentin complex. REPs promote healing of apical periodontitis, continued radiographic root development, and, in certain cases, vitality responses. Despite the clinical success of these procedures, they appear to promote a guided endodontic repair process rather than a true regeneration of physiological-like tissue. Immature teeth with pulpal necrosis with otherwise poor prognosis can be treated with REPs. These procedures do not preclude the possibility of apexification procedures if attempts are unsuccessful. Therefore, REPs may be considered first treatment options for immature teeth with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clonal diversity and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from endodontic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhakim Suliman Al-Badah

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: E. faecalis demonstrated the highest prevalence in the tested dental root canal specimens collected from Saudi patients and were grouped into five to six different genotypes. Different levels of antimicrobial susceptibility were observed in the tested E. faecalis strains, which clearly indicated that although bacterial strains may be similar, point mutations can result in extreme susceptibility or resistance to various antibiotics. This phenomenon is a cause for concern for clinicians in the treatment of dental infections caused by E. faecalis.

  14. Lasers in endodontics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas; Koort, Hans J.

    2002-06-01

    The interest in endodontic use of dental laser systems is increasing. Developing laser technology and a better understanding of laser effects widened the spectrum of possible endodontic indications. Various laser systems including excimer-, argon+-, diode-, Nd:YAG-, Er:YAG- and CO2-lasers are used in pulp diagnosis, treatment of hypersensitivity, pulp capping, sterilization of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation or apicoectomy. With the development of new delivery systems - thin and flexible fibers - for many different wavelengths laser applications in endodontics may increase. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. Most of the clinical applications are laser assisted procedures such as the removing of pulp remnants and debris or disinfection of infected root canals. The essential question is whether a laser can provide improved treatment over conventional care. To perform laser therapy in endodontics today different laser types with adopted wavelengths and pulse widths are needed, each specific to a particular application. Looking into the future we will need endodontic laser equipment providing optimal laser parameters for different treatment modalities. Nevertheless, the quantity of research reports from the last decade promises a genuine future for lasers in endodontics.

  15. Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S; Smith, A J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  16. Micro-surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Vere, J; Ali, Z; Harris, I

    2014-02-01

    Non-surgical endodontic retreatment is the treatment of choice for endodontically treated teeth with recurrent or residual disease in the majority of cases. In some cases, surgical endodontic treatment is indicated. Successful micro-surgical endodontic treatment depends on the accuracy of diagnosis, appropriate case selection, the quality of the surgical skills, and the application of the most appropriate haemostatic agents and biomaterials. This article describes the armamentarium and technical procedures involved in performing micro-surgical endodontics to a high standard.

  17. Argon laser application to endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenau, Richard J.; Ludlow, Marvin; Anderson, David

    1993-07-01

    The application of laser technology to endodontics has been studied for some time. At the present time several major problems are being investigated: (1) removal of infected tissues, (2) sterilization of canals, (3) obturation of canals, and (4) preservation of the vitality of supporting tissues. This list is not intended to imply other problems do not exist or have been solved, but it is a starting point. This paper reviews some of the literature that relates to laser applications to endodontics and concludes with some of the findings from our investigation.

  18. Endodontic treatment in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milly Armilya Andang

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available With the increased number of geriatric population, it is predicted that the need for dental treatment also increases. The needs for esthetic factors and function of geriatric patient are maybe similar to young patient. The number of geriatric patients who refuse dental extraction is increasing if there are still other alternative. They can be more convinced when the clinician said that the dental disease experienced is a focal infection so that the loss of the tooth can be accepted as the best option. But if it is possible, they will prefer endodontic treatment, because they want to keep their teeth according to the treatment plan or based on patient's request, as a less traumatic alternative compared to extraction.Endodontic treatment consideration for geriatric patient is quite similar to younger patients. The technique is also the same, although the problem may be bigger. The problem or obstacle that may arise in endodontic treatment for geriatric patient relates to the visit duration, problems during x-ray, problems in defining root canal location, vertical root fracture, and in some cases, decreased pulp tissue recovery ability. Due to the fact that the challenge is quite big, the success of endodontic treatment in geriatric patients needs to be considered. This paper will explain the endodontic treatment prognosis for geriatric patients.

  19. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals and their susceptibility to endodontic treatment procedures: A molecular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Because apical periodontitis is recognizably an infectious disease, elimination or reduction of intracanal bacteria is of utmost importance for optimum treatment outcome. Objective. The prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis in infected root canals was studied Also, the effect of endodontic therapy by using intracanal medicaments, calcium hydroxide paste (CH or gutta-percha points containing calcium hydroxide (CH-GP or chlorhexidine (CHX-GP on these microorganisms was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Methods. Fifty-one patients with chronic apical periodontitis were randomly allocated in one of the following groups according to the intracanal medicament used: CH, CH-GP and CHX-GP group. Bacterial samples were taken upon access (S1, after chemomechanical instrumentation (S2 and after 15-day medication (S3. PCR assay was used to detect the presence of selected bacteria. Results. E. faecalis was detected in 49% (25/51 and P. gingivalis in 17.6% (9/51 of the samples. Samples which showed no bacterial presence at S1 were excluded from further analysis. Overall analysis of all 29 samples revealed significant differences between S1 and S2 (p<0.001, S2 and S3 (p<0.05, and S1 and S3 (p<0.001. When distinction was made between the intracanal medications, there was a significant difference in the number of PCR positive samples between S1 and S2, S1 and S3, but not between S2 and S3 samples. Conclusion. E. faecalis is more prevalent than P. gingivalis in primary endodontic infection. Intracanal medication in conduction with instrumentation and irrigation efficiently eliminates E. faecalis and P. gingivalis from infected root canals.

  20. Contemporary endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Richard; Torabinejad, Mahmoud

    2004-06-01

    During the past decade, endodontics has seen a dramatic shift in the application of periradicular surgery and the role it plays in endodontic treatment. With the introduction of enhanced magnification, periradicular ultrasonics and other associative technologies, teeth that might otherwise be extracted now have a chance for retention. This article describes the role of these advances in contemporary endodontic surgery.

  1. A case of polymicrobial anaerobic spondylodiscitis due to Parvimonas micra and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivel, Shara; Mack, Damien; Warren, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Here, we present a case of polymicrobial anaerobic spondylodiscitis. Case Presentation. A forty-five year-old female patient was referred to a specialist orthopaedic hospital with an eight week history of back pain without fevers. X-ray imaging and magnetic resonance imaging showed acute osteomyelitis of the twelfth thoracic and first lumbar vertebrae. Prolonged enrichment cultures grew Parvimonas micra and Fusobacterium nucleatum, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry (MS). The patient was successfully treated with six weeks of intravenous ertapenem and oral clindamycin. Conclusion. Anaerobic discitis is rare, and polymicrobial discitis is rarer still. A PubMed literature review revealed only seven cases of F. nucleatum discitis and only twelve cases of P. micra discitis; this includes only one other reported case of a polymicrobial discitis due to infection with both anaerobes. We emphasise the importance of prolonging enrichment culture and the use of fast yet accurate identification of anaerobes using MALDI-ToF MS in these infections. PMID:29026618

  2. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of an Infected Immature Dens Invaginatus with the Aid of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Işıl Kaya-Büyükbayram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. This report presents regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic immature tooth with Oehler’s type III dens invaginatus of a nine-year-old female patient. A diagnosis of dens invaginatus (Oehler’s type III and a large periapical lesion was established with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. In the presented case contrary to the classic revascularization protocol, mechanical instrumentation was performed which apparently did not interfere with the regeneration process. After mechanical instrumentation of the invaginated canal by manual K-files, the invaginated canal space was disinfected by triple antibiotic paste followed by blood clot induction from the periapical tissues and the placement of mineral trioxide aggregate. At one-year follow-up, the tooth remained clinically asymptomatic. Radiographic examination revealed complete healing of the periapical lesion. At the 20-month follow-up, the radiographic examination also showed that the open apex was closed and the walls of the root canal were thickened.

  3. Regenerative endodontic treatment of an infected immature dens invaginatus with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya-Büyükbayram, Işıl; Özalp, Şerife; Aytugar, Emre; Aydemir, Seda

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly that results in an enamel-lined cavity intruding into the crown or root before the mineralization phase. This report presents regenerative endodontic treatment of a necrotic immature tooth with Oehler's type III dens invaginatus of a nine-year-old female patient. A diagnosis of dens invaginatus (Oehler's type III) and a large periapical lesion was established with the aid of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In the presented case contrary to the classic revascularization protocol, mechanical instrumentation was performed which apparently did not interfere with the regeneration process. After mechanical instrumentation of the invaginated canal by manual K-files, the invaginated canal space was disinfected by triple antibiotic paste followed by blood clot induction from the periapical tissues and the placement of mineral trioxide aggregate. At one-year follow-up, the tooth remained clinically asymptomatic. Radiographic examination revealed complete healing of the periapical lesion. At the 20-month follow-up, the radiographic examination also showed that the open apex was closed and the walls of the root canal were thickened.

  4. Radiography in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, J B; Campbell, D J

    1995-06-01

    In endodontics, the paralleling technique has a geometrical advantage over the bisecting angle technique and results in radiographs with less distortion. Distortion is undesirable for endodontic radiography as it can significantly alter the apparent position of an endodontic instrument relative to the root apex. However, there are instances where the bisecting angle is preferable, and consideration should be given to this technique to improve the image quality when it is used.

  5. Endodontics and the irradiated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, F.L.

    1976-11-01

    With increasingly larger numbers of irradiated patients in our population, it seems likely that all dentists will eventually be called upon to manage the difficult problems that these patients present. Of utmost concern should be the patient's home care program and the avoidance of osteroradionecrosis. Endodontics and periodontics are the primary areas for preventing or eliminating the infection that threatens osteoradionecrosis. Endodontic treatment must be accomplished with the utmost care and maximum regard for the fragility of the periapical tissues. Pulpally involved teeth should never be left open in an irradiated patient, and extreme care must be taken with the between-visits seal. If one is called upon for preradiation evaluation, routine removal of all molar as well as other compromised teeth should be considered. Attention should be directed to the literature for further advances in the management of irradiated patients.

  6. [Presence of yeasts in primary endodontic infections and study of their susceptibility to disinfection with sodium hypochlorite at 2.5].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, D; Diongue, K; Bane, K; Niang, S O; Ndiaye, D; Touré, B

    2016-06-01

    Endodontic infections are characterized by their microbial polymorphism with the presence of pathogenic agents such as bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of yeast in the root canals of teeth with pulp necrotic with or without apical periodontitis and to study the sensibility of these at disinfection at sodium hypochlorite to 2.5 %. Root canal samples, taken with paper points before and after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite dosed at 2.5 % on 50 single rooted teeth in 38 patients, were seeded in petri dishes containing Sabouraud Chloramphenicol (SC) (Conda Laboratories, Madrid). These stains were incubated in an incubator at 37°C for 48hours. The presence of yeast was confirmed by white colonies on the entire circumference of the tip paper. The identification of species was done by macroscopic and microscopic examinations associated with Blastese test. The yeast colonies were isolated from 7 teeth (14 %) out of 50. All positive samples were from teeth with an open necrotic pulp (Pteeth with or without apical periodontitis may shelter yeasts even after immediate disinfection with sodium hypochlorite 2.5 %. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 Immunoexpression in Periapical Lesions from Primary Endodontic Infection: Possible Relationship with the Histopathological Diagnosis and the Presence of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Faustino, Isabel Schausltz; Azevedo, Rebeca Souza; Takahama, Ademar

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible associations among the histopathological diagnosis, the inflammatory infiltrate profile, the presence of pain, and the immunoexpression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in periapical lesions from primary endodontic infection. Fifty-one primary periapical lesions obtained from extracted teeth were selected for this study. Patients were previously evaluated for the presence of pain and sinus tract related to the tooth to be extracted. Tissues were processed for microscopic examination and MMP-2 and MMP-9 immunoexpression. Microscopically, samples were classified as periapical granulomas or periapical cysts and the inflammatory infiltrate as chronic or mixed. The percentage of immunopositive cells for MMP-2 and MMP-9 of each case was performed based on 10 consecutive microscopic fields. The Student t or chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. Of the total, 28 cases were classified as periapical granulomas (54.90%) and 23 cases as periapical cysts (45.10%). Seventeen patients (33.33%) reported pain associated with the extracted tooth, with 12 cases of periapical granulomas (70.58%) and 5 cases of periapical cysts (29.42%). All cases showed immunopositivity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 in a high percentage of cells, mainly in the cytoplasm of the leukocytes. MMP-2 was expressed more in periapical granulomas than periapical cysts (P pain. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola synergistic polymicrobial biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    Full Text Available Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology and interactions between key bacterial species are strongly implicated as contributing to disease progression. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia have all been implicated as playing roles in disease progression. P. gingivalis cell-surface-located protease/adhesins, the gingipains, have been suggested to be involved in its interactions with several other bacterial species. The aims of this study were to determine polymicrobial biofilm formation by P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia, as well as the role of P. gingivalis gingipains in biofilm formation by using a gingipain null triple mutant. To determine homotypic and polymicrobial biofilm formation a flow cell system was employed and the biofilms imaged and quantified by fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA species-specific probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging. Of the three species, only P. gingivalis and T. denticola formed mature, homotypic biofilms, and a strong synergy was observed between P. gingivalis and T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilm formation. This synergy was demonstrated by significant increases in biovolume, average biofilm thickness and maximum biofilm thickness of both species. In addition there was a morphological change of T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilms when compared with homotypic biofilms, suggesting reduced motility in homotypic biofilms. P. gingivalis gingipains were shown to play an essential role in synergistic polymicrobial biofilm formation with T. denticola.

  9. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Treponema denticola synergistic polymicrobial biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Dashper, Stuart G; Chen, Yu-Yen; Crawford, Simon; Slakeski, Nada; Reynolds, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology and interactions between key bacterial species are strongly implicated as contributing to disease progression. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia have all been implicated as playing roles in disease progression. P. gingivalis cell-surface-located protease/adhesins, the gingipains, have been suggested to be involved in its interactions with several other bacterial species. The aims of this study were to determine polymicrobial biofilm formation by P. gingivalis, T. denticola and T. forsythia, as well as the role of P. gingivalis gingipains in biofilm formation by using a gingipain null triple mutant. To determine homotypic and polymicrobial biofilm formation a flow cell system was employed and the biofilms imaged and quantified by fluorescent in situ hybridization using DNA species-specific probes and confocal scanning laser microscopy imaging. Of the three species, only P. gingivalis and T. denticola formed mature, homotypic biofilms, and a strong synergy was observed between P. gingivalis and T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilm formation. This synergy was demonstrated by significant increases in biovolume, average biofilm thickness and maximum biofilm thickness of both species. In addition there was a morphological change of T. denticola in polymicrobial biofilms when compared with homotypic biofilms, suggesting reduced motility in homotypic biofilms. P. gingivalis gingipains were shown to play an essential role in synergistic polymicrobial biofilm formation with T. denticola.

  10. Surgical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrotte, P

    2005-01-22

    Root canal treatment usually fails because infection remains within the root canal. An orthograde attempt at re-treatment should always be considered first. However, when surgery is indicated, modern microtechniques coupled with surgical magnification will lead to a better prognosis. Careful management of the hard and soft tissues is essential, specially designed ultrasonic tips should be used for root end preparation which should ideally be sealed with MTA. All cases should be followed up until healing is seen, or failure accepted, and should form a part of clinical audit.

  11. Curricular Guidelines for Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Endodontics of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. Endodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions that arise as a result of pathoses of dental pulp. (MLW)

  12. Endodontic treatment completion following emergency pulpectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2010-06-01

    Emergency pulpectomy is frequently performed to relieve pain experienced by patients following acute episodes of endodontic pain, or to limit the risks of infection or possible root resorption following traumatic pulpal exposures. The aim of this study was to examine subsequent patient attendance for completion of root canal treatment following pulpectomy procedures in a dental emergency unit.

  13. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Beatty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s. Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation.

  14. Coronal microleakage assessed by polymicrobial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Leandro Rodrigues; Grimaudo, Nicholas J; Vertucci, Frank J

    2003-08-15

    Studies have shown significant bacterial leakage following exposure of sealed root canals to artificial and natural saliva. The objective of this study was to determine contamination via bacterial migration in artificial saliva in endodontically treated teeth using different obturation techniques and sealers. A total of 144 extracted, human mandibular anterior teeth were cleaned and shaped to a #40 master apical file using hand and rotary instrumentation. One hundred and twenty teeth were divided into two experimental groups. The teeth in Group 1 were obturated with gutta-percha using lateral compaction and five different sealers, and the teeth in Group 2 were obturated with gutta-percha using thermomechanical compaction and five different sealers. The remaining 24 teeth were prepared as positive and negative controls. All specimens, except the negative controls, were inoculated every five days with Anaerobic streptococci (NCTC 9891) related to Peptostreptococcus micros and Prevotella intermedia (ATCC 25611). The contamination onset time was continuously recorded and turbid broths cultured for bacteria identification. The controls behaved as expected. Regardless of the combination between obturation techniques and different sealers, all broths became turbid during this experiment. The correlation between the obturation techniques and the sealers revealed statistical significance using ANOVA (psealer allowed a slower rate of coronal-apical bacterial migration.

  15. Tolerability and efficacy of long-term treatment with daptomycin, ceftazidime and colistin in a patient with a polymicrobial, multidrug-resistant prosthetic joint reinfection: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pasticci, Maria Bruna; Di Filippo, Paolo; Pasqualini, Leonella; Mencacci, Antonella; Pallotto, Carlo; Malincarne, Lisa; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic joint infections are severe complications of joint implants. Further complications arise when polymicrobial and/or multidrug-resistant microorganisms are involved. Currently, there are limited data on the management of these infections and on the tolerability of long-term treatment with daptomycin, ceftazidime and colistin. Case presentation A 55-year-old Caucasian woman who had a right hip prosthesis removed 1 year prior because of infection was admitted for prosthesi...

  16. Epinecidin-1 protects mice from LPS-induced endotoxemia and cecal ligation and puncture-induced polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bor-Chyuan; Huang, Han-Ning; Lin, Tai-Wen; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2017-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide, epinecidin-1 (Epi), was identified from Epinephelus coioides and may have clinical application for treating sepsis. Epi has been shown to ameliorate antibiotic-resistant bacteria-induced sepsis in mice, but further evaluation in mixed-flora models and a description of the protective mechanisms are essential to establish this peptide as a potential therapeutic. Therefore, we first tested the protective effects of Epi against polymicrobial sepsis-induced bactericidal infection, inflammation and lung injury that result from cecal ligation and puncture in mice. Furthermore, since lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key inducer of inflammation during bacterial infection and sepsis, we also tested the LPS-antagonizing activity and related mechanisms of Epi-mediated protection in mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia and LPS-treated Raw264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Epi rescued mice from both polymicrobial sepsis and endotoxemia after delayed administration and suppressed both lung and systemic inflammatory responses, while attenuating lung injury and diminishing bacterial load. In vitro studies revealed that Epi suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production. Mechanistically, Epi disrupted the interaction between LPS and LPS binding protein, competed with LPS for binding on the cell surface, and inhibited Toll-like receptor 4 endocytosis, resulting in inhibition of LPS-induced reactive oxygen species/p38/Akt/NF-κB signaling and subsequent cytokine production. Overall, our results demonstrate that Epi is a promising therapeutic agent for endotoxemia and polymicrobial sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Endodontic treatment of a tiger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, J.; Kortegaard, H.; Grøndahl, C.

    The 84th Annual Meeting of NoF 2001, veterinary dentistry, endodontics, dental materials, animal case report......The 84th Annual Meeting of NoF 2001, veterinary dentistry, endodontics, dental materials, animal case report...

  18. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics-A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics-A New Era in Clinical Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Louis M; Gaengler, Peter

    2016-02-27

    Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of 'regenerative endodontics' emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists' Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals in the former therapy are

  19. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  20. Implant failure and history of failed endodontic treatment: A retrospective case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios S.; Wolff, Larry F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Residual bacterial biofilm and/or bacteria in planktonic form may be survived in the bone following an extraction of an infected tooth that was endodontically treated unsuccessfully Failed endodontic treatment may be associated with failure of implants to osseointegrate in the same sites. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective case-control study is to examine the risk of implant failure in previous failed endodontic sites. Material and Methods This retrospective case-control stud...

  1. [Possibilities of endodontic therapy of endodonic-periodontal lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesković, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2009-01-01

    Endoperiodontal lesions are frequent in clinical practice and may require complex therapy. It is very important to determine differential diagnosis and the origin of the lesion, because the treatment plan is based on aetiology and stadium of the development of the lesion. The aim of this clinical study was to analyze the efficacy of endodontic treatment in different types of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Thirty patients and 42 teeth with diagnosed endoperiodontal lesions were included in the study and divided in two groups. Vital pulp therapy was applied to 18 vital teeth where the diagnosis was perio-endodontic lesions. The therapy of infected canal system was applied to 24 teeth with endodontic-periodontal or combined lesions. Standard endodontic procedure consisted of cleaning and shaping of the root canal system and between sessions filling with calcium-hydroxide paste. Obturation was made by lateral compact of the guttapercha and Apexit paste. Efficiency was evaluated clinically and radiographically three, six and twelve months later. Radiographic and clinical follow-up showed a significant radiographic improvement and absence of subjective symptoms in a very high percentage of the treated vital and avital teeth. The results of this study showed that in the observation period of 12 months endodontic therapy was successful in 88.89% of vital teeth, and in the group of avital teeth the percentage was 91.67%. Endodontic treatment of the endoperiodontal lesions was sufficient and it was the basic condition to achieve a complete healing of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Such therapy ensures significant improvement or even complete healing of both types of lesions, of endodontic and periodontal origin.

  2. Possibilities of endodontic therapy of endodonic-periodontal lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešković Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intoduction. Endoperiodontal lesions are frequent in clinical practice and may require complex therapy. It is very important to determine differential diagnosis and the origin of the lesion, because the treatment plan is based on aetiology and stadium of the development of the lesion. Objective. The aim of this clinical study was to analyze the efficacy of endodontic treatment in different types of endodontic- periodontal lesions. Methods. Thirty patients and 42 teeth with diagnosed endoperiodontal lesions were included in the study and divided in two groups. Vital pulp therapy was applied to 18 vital teeth where the diagnosis was perio-endodontic lesions. The therapy of infected canal system was applied to 24 teeth with endodontic- periodontal or combined lesions. Standard endodontic procedure consisted of cleaning and shaping of the root canal system and between sessions filling with calcium-hydroxide paste. Obturation was made by lateral compact of the guttapercha and Apexit paste. Efficiency was evaluated clinically and radiographically three, six and twelve months later. Results. Radiographic and clinical follow-up showed a significant radiographic improvement and absence of subjective symptoms in a very high percentage of the treated vital and avital teeth. The results of this study showed that in the observation period of 12 months endodontic therapy was successful in 88.89% of vital teeth, and in the group of avital teeth the percentage was 91.67%. Conclusion. Endodontic treatment of the endoperiodontal lesions was sufficient and it was the basic condition to achieve a complete healing of endodontic-periodontal lesions. Such therapy ensures significant improvement or even complete healing of both types of lesions, of endodontic and periodontal origin.

  3. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

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    Jambai Sampathkumar Sivakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment.

  4. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy.

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    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampathkumar; Suresh Kumar, Beri Narasimiah; Shyamala, Palaniyandi Vadivel

    2013-06-01

    Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment.

  5. Efficacy of dental unit waterlines disinfectants on a polymicrobial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Damien; Girardot, Marion; Bertaux, Joanne; Verdon, Julien; Imbert, Christine

    2016-03-15

    Due to their high surface-volume ratio, their laminar flow and frequent stagnation periods, dental unit waterlines (DUWL) foster the attachment of microorganisms and the development of biofilm, resulting in the continuous contamination of the outlet water from dental units; this contamination may be responsible for a potential risk of infection due to the exposure of patients and medical staff to droplet inhalation or splashed water. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of three disinfectants recommended by dental unit manufacturers -Calbenium(©), Oxygenal 6(©) and Sterispray(©) - was evaluated. A dynamic model simulating DUWL conditions was developed and polymicrobial biofilms containing bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), fungi (Candida albicans) and Free Living Amoeba (FLA: Vermamoeba vermiformis) were allowed to form. The ability of disinfectants to reduce biofilm formation or to eradicate an already formed biofilm was evaluated. Results showed the various effects of the tested disinfectants according to their composition, concentration and the targeted species. V. vermiformis was resistant to disinfectants, regardless of the tested concentrations and the concentrations recommended by manufacturers were not the most appropriate. Results also showed that Calbenium(©) was the most effective disinfectant to reduce already formed biofilms; its maximum efficiency was observed from 0.5% on both P. aeruginosa and C. albicans compared to 2 and 3% respectively for Sterispray(©). The maximum efficiency of Oxygenal(©) was observed from 3% on P. aeruginosa but Oxygenal(©) was unable to totally eliminate C. albicans in the tested conditions, contrary to other disinfectants. Calbenium(©) was able to prevent biofilm formation efficiently even if it displayed no prophylactic activity against V. vermiformis. Overall, the FLA survival may contribute to maintaining other species. Finally the tested disinfectants were partially active against sessile microorganisms

  6. Polymicrobial anaerobic bacteremia due to Atopobium rimae and Parvimonas micra in a patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Fernando; Borrego, Jaime; Rojo, Mª Dolores; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2018-02-06

    Atopobium rimae and Parvimonas micra are both Gram-positive anaerobes involved infrequently in human infections. We report a polymicrobial anaerobic bacteremia caused by these microorganisms. A 43-year-old woman receiving coadjuvant chemotherapy due to a retroperitoneal leiomiosarcoma presented with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever (38 °C). The two blood cultures resulted in isolation of A. rimae and P. micra, being identified at species level by matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technology with high log scores. The microorganisms were susceptible to penicilllin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, clindamycin, metronidazole, imipenem, and moxifloxacin. Treatment with levofloxacin was started and subsequently it was changed to piperacillin/tazobactam plus metronidazole and completed for 10 days, but the patient died days later due to her underlying disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aerococcus christensenii as Part of Severe Polymicrobial Chorioamnionitis in a Pregnant Woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstein, Catrine; Marie Søes, Lillian; Jørgen Christensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a potentially life threatening infection of the fetal membranes, commonly caused by ascending bacteria from the vagina and cervix. In our case, a healthy nullipara with a term pregnancy presented clinical signs of infection after induced labour with an intracervical balloon. Thick green and foul smelling amniotic fluid was observed and culture showed massive growth of Aerococcus christensenii, a facultative anaerob species found in the human vagina, previously only rarely alleged to cause invasive infection. Additional testing with 16S rRNA gene analysis also identified the presence of Gemella asaccharolytica, Snethia sanguinegens, Parvimonas micra and Streptobacillus moniliformis. The patient was treated with cefuroxime and metronidazole and recovered quickly. The newborn showed no signs of infection. This case points at the possible role of these pathogens in female genital tract infections. The case also underlines the importance of the combination of culture and culture independent diagnostic approaches to reveal possible polymicrobial natures of selected infections, in this case chorioamnionitis. PMID:27014376

  8. Regenerative endodontics: A state of the art

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    Rashmi Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex and apexification (for immature root apex, or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  9. Management pain and anxiety in endodontic treatment

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    Andi Sumidarti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental pain is a common symptom that most often causes patient to seek dentist. A survey conducted by the American Association of Endodontics revealed that more than half patients who come to dentist have experienced pain, which originate from the teeth or of the surrounding tissue, can causes difficulties in handling, also the anxiety of the patient. Understanding the pain experienced by patient will help dentist to determine when to make an action. Most patient being fear with pain, so they delay to getting treatment from dentist, and led to the development of further infection and inflammation. Aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of pharmacology and procedures for pain and anxiety management in endodontic treatment. So, it was importance of determining accurate diagnosis, management and drug administration.

  10. Integrating molecular and ecological approaches to identify potential polymicrobial pathogens over a shrimp disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenfang; Yu, Weina; Xuan, Lixia; Tao, Zhen; Xiong, Jinbo

    2018-04-01

    It is now recognized that some gut diseases attribute to polymicrobial pathogens infections. Thus, traditional isolation of single pathogen from disease subjects could bias the identification of causal agents. To fill this gap, using Illumina sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, we explored the dynamics of gut bacterial communities over a shrimp disease progression. The results showed significant differences in the gut bacterial communities between healthy and diseased shrimp. Potential pathogens were inferred by a local pathogens database, of which two OTUs (affiliated with Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio harveyi) exhibited significantly higher abundances in diseased shrimp as compared to healthy subjects. The two OTUs cumulatively contributed 64.5% dissimilarity in the gut microbiotas between shrimp health status. Notably, the random Forest model depicted that profiles of the two OTUs contributed 78.5% predicted accuracy of shrimp health status. Removal of the two OTUs from co-occurrence networks led to network fragmentation, suggesting their gatekeeper features. For these evidences, the two OTUs were inferred as candidate pathogens. Three virulence genes (bca, tlpA, and fdeC) that were coded by the two candidate pathogens were inferred by a virulence factor database, which were enriched significantly (P < 0.05 in the three cases, as validated by qPCR) in diseased shrimp as compared to healthy ones. The two candidate pathogens were repressed by Flavobacteriaceae, Garvieae, and Photobacrerium species in healthy shrimp, while these interactions shifted into synergy in disease cohorts. Collectively, our findings offer a frame to identify potential polymicrobial pathogen infections from an ecological perspective.

  11. ENDODONTIC RETREATMENT (A CASE REPORT

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    Estina Sisthaningsih

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The failure of endodontic treatment is commonly caused by errors in preoperative, operative, and postoperative endodontic treatment. Inadequate final restoration of post-endodontic treatment would impact the success of the treatment. Loose restoration is an example of restoration failure caused by inadequate retention, which leads to penetration of saliva along the root canal. This could dissolve the luting cement and cause microleakage to constantly reach the periradicular areas. If neglected, this situation will result in a periradicular lesion. Endodontic treatment was performed to resolve the failing restorarion. The restoration failed due to inadequate retention. The treatment was needed to prevent more problems to occur sometime in the future.

  12. Endoscopy in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonov, Joshua; Nahlieli, Oded

    2011-01-01

    A successful outcome of endodontic treatment depends to a large extent on accurate intraoperative findings. Conventionally, micromirrors and microprobes have been used for this purpose. The dental operating microscope (DOM) has been implemented to enhance visibility during dental procedures. However, the microscope, a sizable tool, remains between operating field and the dental practitioner, making his ability to manipulate more complicated. Also, the interference of the hands and the handpiece with the visualization of the surgical field and inaccurate observation of the endodontic instruments during the procedure. Endoscopy reportedly provides the dentist with excellent vision and ease of use. It also provides a better intraoperative visualization in comparison with micromirrors. Further development of endoscopy made it possible to combine magnification, light, irrigation/suction and surgical microinstruments in one device. This combination could lead to an advanced root canal treatment technique.

  13. Summary of: Regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Significant advances in our understanding of the biological processes involved in tooth development and repair at the cellular and molecular levels have underpinned the newly emerging area of regenerative endodontics. Development of treatment protocols based on exploiting the natural wound healing properties of the dental pulp and applying tissue engineering principles has allowed reporting of case series showing preservation of tissue vitality and apexogenesis. To review current case series reporting regenerative endodontics. Current treatment approaches tend to stimulate more reparative than regenerative responses in respect of the new tissue generated, which often does not closely resemble the physiological structure of dentine-pulp. However, despite these biological limitations, such techniques appear to offer significant promise for improved treatment outcomes. Improved biological outcomes will likely emerge from the many experimental studies being reported and will further contribute to improvements in clinical treatment protocols.

  14. Could Externalized St. Jude Medical Riata® Lead Be a Culture Medium of a Polymicrobial Endocarditis? A Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zefferino Palamà

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a man affected by polymicrobial endocarditis developed on a St. Jude Medical Riata lead with a malfunction because of the outsourcing of conductors. The patient was treated with antibiotic targeted therapy and showed different bacteria at the blood cultures and then underwent transvenous leads extraction. Vegetations were highlighted on the caval, atrial, and ventricular tracts of the Riata lead, but the cultures were all negative. The externalization of Riata lead may cause the malfunction but it could also promote bacterial colonies and vegetations. In conclusion, looking for early signs of infection is mandatory during Riata leads follow-up checks.

  15. [Today's trends in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagnino, V A; Gatto, R

    2003-01-01

    Some new means and innovative operative techniques in the field of endodontics are presented that have been developed and perfected over time. Instruments such as the operative microscope, ultrasonography, miniaturised tools for surgery, new materials such as mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) should become part of the daily routine of the endodontist. For example, the operative microscope plays a role in diagnosing pulp damage after removal of deep caries; in orthograde endodontics in diagnosing perforations; alongside ultrasonography in the search for calcified canals, removal of pins (screw-type, fibre, etc.) and also in positioning MTA. In all these cases, the operative microscope is used discontinuously, alternating working and observation phases. In endodontic surgery, the operative microscope is on the contrary used continuously, enabling the surgeon to observe details of anatomy of the root apex at high magnification, and above all enabling positioning of canal obturation with perfect seal. It is clear that the operative microscope used in all surgical phases will enable complete management of the operation and facilitate the endodontist in observing the operative field, otherwise very difficult to control.

  16. Chlorhexidine in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Brenda P F A; Vianna, Morgana E; Zaia, Alexandre A; Almeida, José Flávio A; Souza-Filho, Francisco J; Ferraz, Caio C R

    2013-01-01

    Chemical auxiliary substances (CAS) are essential for a successful disinfection and cleanness of the root canals, being used during the instrumentation and if necessary, as antimicrobial intracanal medicaments. Different CAS have been proposed and used, among which sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), 17% EDTA, citric acid, MTAD and 37% phosphoric acid solution. CHX has been used in Endodontics as an irrigating substance or intracanal medicament, as it possesses a wide range of antimicrobial activity, substantivity (residual antimicrobial activity), lower cytotoxicity than NaOCl whilst demonstrating efficient clinical performance, lubricating properties, rheological action (present in the gel presentation, keeping the debris in suspension); it inhibits metalloproteinase, is chemically stable, does not stain cloths, it is odorless, water soluble, among other properties. CHX has been recommended as an alternative to NaOCl, especially in cases of open apex, root resorption, foramen enlargement and root perforation, due to its biocompatibility, or in cases of allergy related to bleaching solutions. The aim of this paper is to review CHX's general use in the medical field and in dentistry; its chemical structure, presentation form and storage; mechanism of action; antimicrobial activity including substantivity, effects on biofilms and endotoxins, effects on coronal and apical microbial microleakage; tissue dissolution ability; interaction with endodontic irrigants; effects on dentin bonding, metalloproteinases and collagen fibrils; its use as intracanal medicament and diffusion into the dentinal tubules; its use as disinfectant agent of obturation cones; other uses in the endodontic therapy; and possible adverse effects, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  17. Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Prevents Experimental Otitis Media in a Polymicrobial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2017-06-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a common pediatric disease, and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) is the predominant pathogen in chronic OM, recurrent OM, and OM associated with treatment failure. OM is also a polymicrobial disease, wherein an upper respiratory tract viral infection predisposes to ascension of NTHI from the nasopharynx, the site of colonization, to the normally sterile middle ear, resulting in disease. Using a clinically relevant viral-bacterial coinfection model of NTHI-induced OM, we performed transcutaneous immunization (TCI) via a band-aid delivery system to administer each of three promising NTHI vaccine candidates derived from bacterial adhesive proteins and biofilm mediators: recombinant soluble PilA (rsPilA), chimV4, and integration host factor. Each immunogen was admixed with the adjuvant LT(R192G/L211A), a double mutant of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin, and assessed for relative ability to prevent the onset of experimental OM. For each cohort, the presence of circulating immunogen-specific antibody-secreting cells and serum antibody was confirmed prior to intranasal NTHI challenge. After bacterial challenge, blinded video otoscopy and tympanometry revealed a significant reduction in the proportion of animals with signs of OM compared to levels in animals receiving adjuvant only, with an overall vaccine efficacy of 64 to 77%. These data are the first to demonstrate the efficacy afforded by TCI with a band-aid vaccine delivery system in a clinically relevant polymicrobial model of OM. The simplicity of TCI with a band-aid and the significant efficacy observed here hold great promise for reducing the global burden of OM in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Association of endodontic signs and symptoms with root canal pathogens: A clinical comparative study

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    R V Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of the common root canal pathogens namely; Streptococcus mitis and Enterococcus faecalis with specific endodontic signs and symptoms. Materials and Methods: Sixty subjects scheduled for endodontic treatment were divided into two groups comprising of 30 subjects with primary endodontic infections and 30 subjects with failed endodontic treatment. The endodontic signs and symptoms of the subjects were assessed using clinical and radiographic methods. Root canal samples were collected using sterile paper point. Advanced microbiological culture techniques were used to isolate S. mitis and E. faecalis from the root canal samples. The presence of root canal pathogens was then correlated with the corresponding endodontic signs and symptoms. Statistical analysis was done using Student′s t-test and Fisher′s exact test. Results: S. mitis was significantly associated with pain and periapical lesions in primary and retreatment cases (P = 0.04. E. faecalis had a strong correlation with tenderness on percussion in retreatment cases (P = 0.016. Conclusion: Association of S. mitis with pain and periapical lesion, as well as E. faecalis with tenderness on percussion, suggests a correlation between endodontic signs and symptoms with specific root canal bacterial species. Knowledge regarding the association of root canal pathogens and specific endodontic signs and symptoms could help in better understanding and a predictable therapeutic management of root canal infections.

  19. Magnification in modern endodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taschieri, S; Del Fabbro, M; Weinstein, T; Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2010-07-01

    The use of magnification devices in endodontics is becoming more and more common, with the aim of improving the quality of treatment. The common magnification systems used in modern endodontics are the surgical operation microscope, fiber-optic endoscope, and surgical loupes. The benefits of using magnification devices for conventional endodontic treatment include the increased visualization of the treatment field, enhanced possibilities in locating canals, aid in the removal of separated instruments, diagnosis of root and tooth fractures, perforation repair, and case documentation. In endodontic surgery, the use of magnification improves the ability to locate, clean, and fill the root canal system, thus achieving a predictable outcome. Further evidence-based research might better clarify the advantages and limitations of using magnification in endodontic practice.

  20. Analysis of the secondary endodontic lesions focusing on the extraradicular microorganisms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Lolato, Alessandra; Weinstein, Tommaso; Taschieri, Silvio

    2014-11-01

    The present study aimed at reviewing the literature on extraradicular infections of endodontically treated teeth, summarizing the main hypotheses on etiopathogenesis and describing the most suitable techniques to identify the composition of pathogenic extraradicular microorganisms. Medline database was searched using the keywords "Apical biofilm," "extraradicular infection," "secondary endodontic lesion," "endodontic retreatment," "biofilm" either alone or combined with AND. A further hand search was performed on the main endodontic journals. The most frequent bacterial species identified in different studies and with different techniques may vary considerably. Although the presence of some species of microorganisms seems to be determinant, the true origin of extraradicular infection is still undetermined. The literature analysis showed marked differences in methodology, materials, aims, and techniques adopted, which led to highly heterogeneous outcomes. The picture emerging from this review is that extraradicular infection is likely a multifactorial disease that requires further systematic investigation using standardized techniques. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  2. Efficacy of ozonated water, 2% chlorhexidine and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite on five microorganisms of endodontic infection: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Savitri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial efficacy of ozonated water (4 mg/l, 2% chlorhexidine solution, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution on five common endodontic microorganisms. Methods: The organisms chosen in the study were Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans, Kocuria rhizophila. Agar well diffusion test direct contact test were used as methods to assess antimicrobial effectiveness. In agar well diffusion test, the maximum zone of inhibition formed around the well in an agar plate after incubation of test materials against each microorganism for 24 h and 48 h were measured. In direct contact test, the colonies of E. faecalis formed on agar plates with each test material were calculated. Results: The results showed that 2% chlorhexidine showed highest zone size and minimum colony forming units indicating its highest potency and ozonated water was showed the least efficacy with a significant difference between both groups. The colony forming units showed an increase in number when ozonated water was used against E. faecalis

  3. The 'E' factor -- evolving endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, M J

    2013-03-01

    Endodontics is a constantly developing field, with new instruments, preparation techniques and sealants competing with trusted and traditional approaches to tooth restoration. Thus general dental practitioners must question and understand the significance of these developments before adopting new practices. In view of this, the aim of this article, and the associated presentation at the 2013 British Dental Conference & Exhibition, is to provide an overview of endodontic methods and constantly evolving best practice. The presentation will review current preparation techniques, comparing rotary versus reciprocation, and question current trends in restoration of the endodontically treated tooth.

  4. Endodontic and post-endodontic management of a fused molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of fused teeth needs special care and attention to the bizarre anatomy. This paper describes root canal treatment of a fused carious tooth presenting with apical periodontitis. It is a rare case of fusion of the mandibular second molar with a paramolar. There is no literature regarding placement of crown over endodontically treated fused teeth. In this case, the fused teeth were endodontically treated and restored by a porcelain fused to metal crown.

  5. Endodontic and post-endodontic management of a fused molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchi; Prakash, Vijay; Sharma, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of fused teeth needs special care and attention to the bizarre anatomy. This paper describes root canal treatment of a fused carious tooth presenting with apical periodontitis. It is a rare case of fusion of the mandibular second molar with a paramolar. There is no literature regarding placement of crown over endodontically treated fused teeth. In this case, the fused teeth were endodontically treated and restored by a porcelain fused to metal crown.

  6. Odontogenic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E

    2017-04-01

    The pathogenesis of odontogenic infection is polymicrobial, consisting of various facultative and strict anaerobes. The dominant isolates are strictly anaerobic gram-negative rods and gram-positive cocci. The periapical infection is the most common form of odontogenic infection. Although odontogenic infections are usually confined to the alveolar ridge vicinity, they can spread into deep fascial spaces. Cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, airway obstruction, and mediastinitis are possible complications of dental infections. The most important element in treating odontogenic infections is elimination of the primary source of the infection with antibiotics as adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymicrobial chronic endophthalmitis diagnosed by culture and molecular technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, A; Pramanik, S; Das, D; Roy, R; Therese, K L

    2014-01-01

    Accurate etiological diagnosis is the key to prevention of ocular morbidity in endophthalmitis cases. A 66 year old male was suffering from chronic endophthalmitis post-cataract surgery. Polymerase chain reaction examination on anterior chamber fluid was positive for Propionibacterium acnes but negative for the panfungal genome. He was advised vitrectomy with intravitreal injections. Polymerase chain reaction of vitreous aspirate was positive for P.acnes as well as panfungal genome. The vitreous sample also grew yeast in culture which was identified as Candida pseudotropicalis. Patient was treated on an alternate day regimen of intravitreal Vancomycin and Amphotericin B in the post-operative period. There was improvement in vision at final follow up. Chronic endophthalmitis can have polymicrobial etiology which will require appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The role of molecular testing is vital in these cases as growth in culture is often negative.

  8. Immediate Early and Delayed Implants: A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study of 131 Transmucosal Flapless Implants Placed in Sites With Different Pre-extractive Endodontic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Carlo; Zamparini, Fausto; Pirani, Chiara; Gatto, Maria Rosaria; Piattelli, Adriano; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate clinical outcome of early, immediate, and delayed transmucosal implants placed in patients affected by acute/chronic endodontic lesions. Eighty-five consecutive patients received 131 titanium implants with zirconium-oxide blasted surface. Pre-extractive diagnosis represented the main criteria for implant placement timing, following "best treatment" criteria. Implants were placed with flapless transmucosal technique. Hopeless teeth with chronic periapical lesions received atraumatic extraction, and an implant was immediately placed (Immediate Group, n = 29). Teeth with acute periapical lesion/abscess were extracted and implants placed after 8 to 12 weeks (Early Group, n = 29). Implants placed 10- to 12-month after extraction constituted the control group (delayed group, n = 73). Implants were loaded 3 months after insertion with provisional resin crowns and after approximately 15 days with definitive ceramic crowns. Marginal bone loss (MBL) was measured in a single-blind manner on periapical radiographs at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Multilevel analysis described exploring factors associated with MBL. Survival rate was 100%. MBL after 24 months was 0.78 ± 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.20 to -1.37) at immediate, 0.48 ± 0.70 at early (95% CI: -0.006 to -0.961), and 1.02 ± 1.01 (95% CI: 0.61 to -1.43) at delayed groups. Implant groups (immediate/early/delayed) and location (maxillary/mandibular) showed statistically significant results. Early group showed the lowest MBL values. The immediate group demonstrated less MBL than the delayed group. Early implant placement technique preserves periimplant marginal bone level more than immediate and delayed techniques.

  9. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik, Sagar N.; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M. Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J.; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various ap...

  10. Natural products in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadi, Ebtissam M; Almohaimede, Amal A

    2018-02-01

    Herbal remedies are used throughout the world, either in earlier or in recent times. The number of studies on this alternative therapeutic system increased in the last decades. In this paper, the relevant literature on the use of natural products in root canal therapy is revised from a MEDLINE database search. The uses of medicinal plants in endodontics include cleaning and disinfection of root canals, intracanal medicaments between appointments, sealer cements, and for removal of obturation material. Other studies showed the effect of natural products in pulpal and dentin repair. Their use is anecdotal, and their effectiveness showed to be variable and is always compared to the chemical standards currently being used. Alkaloids, coumarins, saponins, and flavonoids are aromatic substances that are produced by plants and evaluated for their therapeutic potential. Further investigation into benefits of natural products is warranted.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be detected in a polymicrobial competition model using impedance spectroscopy with a novel biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Ward

    Full Text Available Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS is a powerful technique that can be used to elicit information about an electrode interface. In this article, we highlight six principal processes by which the presence of microorganisms can affect impedance and show how one of these--the production of electroactive metabolites--changes the impedance signature of culture media containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EIS, was used in conjunction with a low cost screen printed carbon sensor to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa when grown in isolation or as part of a polymicrobial infection with Staphylococcus aureus. By comparing the electrode to a starting measurement, we were able to identify an impedance signature characteristic of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, we are able to show that one of the changes in the impedance signature is due to pyocyanin and associated phenazine compounds. The findings of this study indicate that it might be possible to develop a low cost sensor for the detection of P. aeruginosa in important point of care diagnostic applications. In particular, we suggest that a development of the device described here could be used in a polymicrobial clinical sample such as sputum from a CF patient to detect P. aeruginosa.

  12. Surgical management of an endodontic retreatment failure of a mandibular first molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal M Gathani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the common endodontic iatrogenic mishaps is the extrusion of obturation material which has a negative effect on the long-term prognosis of the tooth. Surgical endodontics has enabled us to save teeth with persistent infections and extrusions when orthograde treatment has been unsuccessful. Apicoectomy of the molars is not frequently performed even though its success rate can reach that of anteriors and premolars. This case report describes the orthograde and surgical management of a mandibular first molar with external root resorption, instrument separation in the canal, and extruded obturation material, which had been unresponsive to endodontic retreatment.

  13. Endodontic microsurgery, presentation of a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeledon Mayorga, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    A literature review is conducted on endodontic surgery. The report of a clinical case is facilitated. The technique chosen according to the clinical and radiographic examination was endodontic microsurgery, the case has presented a positive evolution of four years [es

  14. Endodontic management of patient with established chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is associated with progressive deterioration of renal function resulting in reduced glomerular filtration rate. Multiple drugs used for its management invariably alter the common oral manifestations associated with the disease. The patients require special considerations for endodontic management because of increased tendency towards bleeding episodes, odontogenic infections and drug interactions. The present case report describes the comprehensive endodontic management in a patient of chronic renal disease taking plethora of medications.

  15. CETP Lowers TLR4 Expression Which Attenuates the Inflammatory Response Induced by LPS and Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Martins Venancio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection eliciting high mortality rate which is a serious health problem. Despite numerous studies seeking for therapeutic alternatives, the mechanisms involved in this disease remain elusive. In this study we evaluated the influence of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, a glycoprotein that promotes the transfer of lipids between lipoproteins, on the inflammatory response in mice. Human CETP transgenic mice were compared to control mice (wild type, WT after polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, aiming at investigating their survival rate and inflammatory profiles. Macrophages from the peritoneal cavity were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of recombinant CETP for phenotypic and functional studies. In comparison to WT mice, CETP mice showed higher survival rate, lower IL-6 plasma concentration, and decreased liver toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and acyloxyacyl hydrolase (AOAH protein. Moreover, macrophages from WT mice to which recombinant human CETP was added decreased LPS uptake, TLR4 expression, NF-κB activation and IL-6 secretion. This raises the possibility for new therapeutic tools in sepsis while suggesting that lowering CETP by pharmacological inhibitors should be inconvenient in the context of sepsis and infectious diseases.

  16. Saving an Integrating Implant Involved with Endodontic Implant Pathology Using Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shin Hye; Park, Young-Seok; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Lee, Woocheol; Shon, Won-Jun

    Endodontic implant pathology (EIP) refers to cases in which endodontic infections cause infections in adjacent implants, and vice versa. This case report demonstrates the successful resolution of two types of EIPs, implant endodontitis and endodontic implantitis, by endodontic intervention with surgical treatment. In case 1, the patient complained of tooth discomfort after implant placement in the adjacent tooth. The tooth was sensitive to percussion and showed slight mobility with a negative reaction to an electric pulp test. The symptoms persisted despite conventional root canal treatment, and surgical treatment of the symptomatic tooth and implant lesion was performed. In case 2, the patient suffered from repeated infection around a newly installed implant. The adjacent devitalized tooth exhibited a periapical lesion that was contiguous with the implant. Conventional root canal treatment and retreatment did not successfully resolve the symptoms. Surgical root canal therapy was then performed with regenerative biomaterials as needed. Neither case showed radiographic or clinical evidence of failure after 4 and 5 years of follow-up, respectively, after the surgery and the adjacent implants were successfully osseointegrated. Endodontic intervention combined with surgical treatment resolved both types of EIPs and led to tooth preservation and successful osseointegration of adjacent implants.

  17. Antibacterial Nanoparticles in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Annie; Kishen, Anil

    2016-10-01

    A major challenge in root canal treatment is the inability of the current cleaning and shaping procedures to eliminate bacterial biofilms surviving within the anatomic complexities and uninstrumented portions of the root canal system. Nanoparticles with their enhanced and unique physicochemical properties, such as ultrasmall sizes, large surface area/mass ratio, and increased chemical reactivity, have led research toward new prospects of treating and preventing dental infections. This article presents a comprehensive review on the scientific knowledge that is available on the application of antibacterial nanoparticles in endodontics. The application of nanoparticles in the form of solutions for irrigation, medication, and as an additive within sealers/restorative materials has been evaluated to primarily improve the antibiofilm efficacy in root canal and restorative treatments. In addition, antibiotic or photosensitizer functionalized nanoparticles have been proposed recently to provide more potent antibacterial efficacy. The increasing interest in this field warrants sound research based on scientific and clinical collaborations to emphasize the near future potential of nanoparticles in clinical endodontics. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New vistas in endodontic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prabha Tyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent times no other field has shown so much growth in Endodontics as much as that of diagnosis. The human element in diagnosis is enriched by newer technologies available as adjuncts to the process of endodontic diagnosis. The trend of this development has been toward increasing objectivity sensitivity and reproducibility of the pulp tests while decreasing the patient discomfort. Methods like Pulse Oximetry, Laser Doppler Flowmetry, Ultrasound Doppler, Dual Wavelength Spectroscopy, Photoplethysmography besides the thermographic imaging and calorimetric pulp tests are being developed and evolved to suit the current clinical setting for the modern endodontist. A necessity arises here to keep abreast of all the new methods in order to be able to choose the best tools for the successful diagnostician. The aim of this review therefore was to assess the usefulness of some devices and techniques used in endodontic therapy to make the correct pulpal diagnosis.

  19. Interaction between endodontics and periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Ilan

    2017-06-01

    Endodontic-periodontal lesions present challenges to the clinician regarding diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. Etiologic factors, such as bacteria and viruses, as well as contributing factors, such as trauma, root resorptions, perforations, cracks and dental malformations, play an important role in the development and progression of such lesions. Treatment and prognosis of endodontic-periodontal lesions vary, depending on the etiology, pathogenesis and correct diagnosis of each specific condition. This chapter will appraise the interrelationship between endodontic and periodontal lesions and provide biological and clinical evidence for diagnosis, prognosis and decision-making in the treatment of these conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Endodontics and the ageing patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, M; Parashos, P

    2015-03-01

    Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall health and longevity of ageing patients. Also, teeth that might be otherwise extracted may be strategically valuable to retain a prosthesis, and elderly patients are more likely to have medical complications that may prevent dental extractions from being safely performed. The technical goals of endodontic treatment in the elderly are the same as those for younger patients. However, the pulpo-dentinal complex undergoes calcific changes over time, which may pose challenges for the clinician. The purposes of this review are to discuss age changes in the pulp and the challenges posed by diagnosing, treatment planning and treating the elderly endodontic patient. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Non-invasive endodontic treatment of large periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Huiz Peeters

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In most cases of large periapical radiolucent lesions of pulpal origin, we often encounter a dilemmatic situation, such as whether to either treat these cases endodontically or surgically. Development of techniques, instruments and root medicaments as well as the tendency toward minimally invasive treatment, all support dentists to treat those cases using the minimal invasive principle (i.e. endodontically instead of surgically. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the managing of periapical lesions by endodontic no invasive treatment. Case management: The patient with large periapical lesions were treated with noninvasive endodontic treatment. After 6 months, patients in this report were asymptomatic and radiolucencies had disappeared. When the root canal treatment is done according to accepted clinical principles and under aseptic condition, including cleaning, shaping, abturating as well as proper diagnosis, the healing process of the infected area will occur. Conclusion: Some lesions, however, may not be treated conservatively and may require surgical treatment for total elimination of the lesions.

  2. Learning experience in endodontics: Brazilian students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seijo, Marilia O S; Ferreira, Efigênia F; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio P; Paiva, Saul M; Martins, Renata C

    2013-05-01

    Including students' perceptions in the educational process is considered a key component in monitoring the quality of academic programs. This study aimed to evaluate the concept of one's learning experience in endodontic teaching from the perspective of a group of Brazilian students. A total of 126 self-administered, structured questionnaires were distributed to undergraduate dental students enrolled in endodontics courses during the second semester of the 2009 academic year. The questionnaires were administered during final examinations and focused on students' opinions concerning learning during endodontic treatments, time spent during endodontic treatments, difficulties found during endodontic treatments, quality of endodontic treatments performed, characteristics of the technique employed, and suggestions to improve endodontic teaching. Ninety-one percent of the questionnaires were returned for evaluation. The obtained answers were discussed and analyzed, thereby generating quantitative and qualitative data showing students' perceptions of their experiences in endodontics courses. The main points that can affect the teaching of endodontics, according to the undergraduate students, included patients' absences and delays, selection of patients, preclinical and clinical training, difficulties found, type of technique employed, and teachers' orientation during endodontic treatment. The students' perceptions provided valuable information about the development of the course and the teacher-student relationship, together with the added intention of enhancing the teaching of endodontics as well as other courses.

  3. Implant failure and history of failed endodontic treatment: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios S; Wolff, Larry F

    2017-11-01

    Residual bacterial biofilm and/or bacteria in planktonic form may be survived in the bone following an extraction of an infected tooth that was endodontically treated unsuccessfully Failed endodontic treatment may be associated with failure of implants to osseointegrate in the same sites. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective case-control study is to examine the risk of implant failure in previous failed endodontic sites. This retrospective case-control study is based on 94 dental records of implants placed at the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry. Dental records of patients who received an implant in sites with previously failed endodontic therapy in the dental school were identified from the electronic database, while control subjects were obtained from the same pool of patients with the requirement to have received an implant in a site that was not endodontically treated. The mean age of the population was 62.89±14.17 years with 57.4% of the sample being females and 42.6% of them being males. In regards to the socio-economic status and dental insurance, 84.0% of this population was classified as low socio-economic status and 68.1% had dental insurance. Tobacco use was self-reported by 9.6% and hypercholesterolemia was the most prevalent systemic medical condition. Dental implant failure was identified in two of the included records (2.1%), both of which were placed in sites with a history of failed endodontic treatment. Within the limitations of this retrospective case-control study, further investigation with a larger population group into implant failure of sites that previously had unsuccessful endodontic treatment would be warranted. Implant failure may be associated with a history of failed endodontic treatment. Key words: Implantology, endodontics, osseointegration, treatment outcome, case-control study.

  4. Quorum sensing signal production and microbial interactions in a polymicrobial disease of corals and the coral surface mucopolysaccharide layer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Zimmer

    Full Text Available Black band disease (BBD of corals is a complex polymicrobial disease considered to be a threat to coral reef health, as it can lead to mortality of massive reef-building corals. The BBD community is dominated by gliding, filamentous cyanobacteria with a highly diverse population of heterotrophic bacteria. Microbial interactions such as quorum sensing (QS and antimicrobial production may be involved in BBD disease pathogenesis. In this study, BBD (whole community samples, as well as 199 bacterial isolates from BBD, the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML of apparently healthy corals, and SML of apparently healthy areas of BBD-infected corals were screened for the production of acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs and for autoinducer-2 (AI-2 activity using three bacterial reporter strains. AHLs were detected in all BBD (intact community samples tested and in cultures of 5.5% of BBD bacterial isolates. Over half of a subset (153 of the isolates were positive for AI-2 activity. AHL-producing isolates were further analyzed using LC-MS/MS to determine AHL chemical structure and the concentration of (S-4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD, the biosynthetic precursor of AI-2. C6-HSL was the most common AHL variant detected, followed by 3OC4-HSL. In addition to QS assays, 342 growth challenges were conducted among a subset of the isolates, with 27% of isolates eliciting growth inhibition and 2% growth stimulation. 24% of BBD isolates elicited growth inhibition as compared to 26% and 32% of the bacteria from the two SML sources. With one exception, only isolates that exhibited AI-2 activity or produced DPD inhibited growth of test strains. These findings demonstrate for the first time that AHLs are present in an active coral disease. It is possible that AI-2 production among BBD and coral SML bacteria may structure the microbial communities of both a polymicrobial infection and the healthy coral microbiome.

  5. [Developmental radicular groove as a cause of endodontic failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabra Campos, H; Millet Part, J

    1989-01-01

    A clinical case of apical injury on an upper lateral incisor with endodontical and surgical failures in its treatment is presented. Extraction of the incisor and its study at the stereoscopic microscope showed the existence of a developmental groove running from the cingulum to the end of the root, establishing a communication between the crevice and the apical part of the tooth. Bacterial infection through the groove could provide an explanation for treatment failure.

  6. Exploring preterm birth as a polymicrobial disease: An overview of the uterine microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Payne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection is the leading cause of preterm birth. A focus of many studies over the past decade has been to characterise microorganisms present in the uterine cavity and document any association with negative pregnancy outcome. A range of techniques have been used to achieve this, including microbiological culture and targeted polymerase chain reaction assays, and more recently, microbiome-level analyses involving either conserved, phylogenetically informative genes such as the bacterial 16S rRNA gene or whole shotgun metagenomic sequencing. These studies have contributed vast amounts of data towards characterisation of the uterine microbiome, specifically that present in the amniotic fluid, fetal membranes and placenta. However, an overwhelming emphasis has been placed on the bacterial microbiome, with far less data produced on the viral and fungal/yeast microbiomes. With numerous studies now referring to preterm birth as a polymicrobial condition, there is the need to investigate the role of viruses and fungi in more detail and in particular, look for associations between colonisation with these microorganisms and bacteria in the same samples. Although the major pathway by which microorganisms are believed to colonise the uterine cavity is vertical ascension from the vagina, numerous studies are now emerging suggesting haematogenous transfer of oral microbiota to the uterine cavity. Evidence of this has been produced in mouse models and although DNA-based evidence in humans appears convincing in some aspects, use of methodologies that only detect viable cells as opposed to lysed cells and extracellular DNA are needed to clarify this. Such techniques as RNA analyses and viability PCR are likely to play key roles in the clinical translation of future microbiome-based data, particularly in confined environments such as the uterus, as detection of viable cells plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment of infection.

  7. Bighorn sheep pneumonia: sorting out the cause of a polymicrobial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, Thomas E; Frances Cassirer, E; Highland, Margaret A; Wolff, Peregrine; Justice-Allen, Anne; Mansfield, Kristin; Davis, Margaret A; Foreyt, William

    2013-02-01

    Pneumonia of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) is a dramatic disease of high morbidity and mortality first described more than 80 years ago. The etiology of the disease has been debated since its initial discovery, and at various times lungworms, Mannheimia haemolytica and other Pasteurellaceae, and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae have been proposed as primary causal agents. A multi-factorial "respiratory disease complex" has also been proposed as confirmation of causation has eluded investigators. In this paper we review the evidence for each of the candidate primary agents with regard to causal criteria including strength of association, temporality, plausibility, experimental evidence, and analogy. While we find some degree of biological plausibility for all agents and strong experimental evidence for M. haemolytica, we demonstrate that of the alternatives considered, M. ovipneumoniae is the best supported by all criteria and is therefore the most parsimonious explanation for the disease. The strong but somewhat controversial experimental evidence implicating disease transmission from domestic sheep is consistent with this finding. Based on epidemiologic and microbiologic data, we propose that healthy bighorn sheep populations are naïve to M. ovipneumoniae, and that its introduction to susceptible bighorn sheep populations results in epizootic polymicrobial bacterial pneumonia often followed by chronic infection in recovered adults. If this hypothesized model is correct, efforts to control this disease by development or application of vectored vaccines to Pasteurellaceae are unlikely to provide significant benefits, whereas efforts to ensure segregation of healthy bighorn sheep populations from M. ovipneumoniae-infected reservoir hosts are crucial to prevention of new disease epizootics. It may also be possible to develop M. ovipneumoniae vaccines or other management strategies that could reduce the impact of this devastating disease in bighorn sheep. Copyright © 2012

  8. Magnification devices for endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio; Lodi, Giovanni; Banfi, Giuseppe; Weinstein, Roberto L

    2015-12-09

    After the introduction of microsurgical principles in endodontics involving new techniques for root canal treatment, there has been a drive to enhance the visualisation of the surgical field. It is important to know if the technical advantages for the operator brought in by magnification devices such as surgical microscopes, endoscopes and magnifying loupes, are also associated with advantages for the patient in terms of improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. This version updates the review published in 2009. To evaluate and compare the effects of endodontic treatment performed with the aid of magnification devices versus endodontic treatment without magnification devices. We also aimed to compare the different magnification devices used in endodontics with one another. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 13 October 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 9), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 13 October 2015) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 13 October 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We considered all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with versus without one or more magnification devices, as well as randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing two or more magnification devices used as an adjunct to endodontic therapy. We conducted screening of search results independently and in duplicate. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. The Cochrane Collaboration statistical guidelines were to be followed for data synthesis. No trials met the inclusion criteria for this review. No article was identified in the

  9. [Irrigants and intracanal medicaments in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Matthias; Lehnert, Birgit; Schönenberger, Kathrin; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2003-01-01

    Modern, biologic root canal therapy should be performed with suitable irrigating solutions and intracanal medicaments. The goal of endodontic treatment is to free the treated tooth from infection and prevent reinfection as thoroughly as possible by means which do not put the organism at risk. In this review of the literature, an evidence-based concept for irrigation and medication of root canal systems is presented. Irrigants and medicaments are discussed with respect to their antimicrobial, tissue-dissolving and endotoxin-decontaminating capacity in relation to their systemic toxicity. Recent findings pertaining to interactions of root canal medicaments and irrigating solutions and their impact on a sound irrigating and medicating concept are discussed.

  10. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve patients’ quality of life. This review article offers a detailed overview of present regenerative endodontic approaches aiming to revitalize teeth and also outlines the problems to be dealt before this emerging field contributes to clinical treatment protocols. It conjointly covers the basic trilogy elements of tissue engineering. PMID:25478476

  11. Endodontic applications of 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Wealleans, J; Ray, J

    2018-02-27

    Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technologies can leverage cone beam computed tomography data for production of objects used in surgical and nonsurgical endodontics and in educational settings. The aim of this article was to review all current applications of 3D printing in endodontics and to speculate upon future directions for research and clinical use within the specialty. A literature search of PubMed, Ovid and Scopus was conducted using the following terms: stereolithography, 3D printing, computer aided rapid prototyping, surgical guide, guided endodontic surgery, guided endodontic access, additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, autotransplantation rapid prototyping, CAD, CAM. Inclusion criteria were articles in the English language documenting endodontic applications of 3D printing. Fifty-one articles met inclusion criteria and were utilized. The endodontic literature on 3D printing is generally limited to case reports and pre-clinical studies. Documented solutions to endodontic challenges include: guided access with pulp canal obliteration, applications in autotransplantation, pre-surgical planning and educational modelling and accurate location of osteotomy perforation sites. Acquisition of technical expertise and equipment within endodontic practices present formidable obstacles to widespread deployment within the endodontic specialty. As knowledge advances, endodontic postgraduate programmes should consider implementing 3D printing into their curriculums. Future research directions should include clinical outcomes assessments of treatments employing 3D printed objects. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Potential errors and misuse of statistics in studies on leakage in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, C; Lopez, J M; Pulgar, R; Abalos, C; Valderrama, M J

    2013-04-01

    To assess the quality of the statistical methodology used in studies of leakage in Endodontics, and to compare the results found using appropriate versus inappropriate inferential statistical methods. The search strategy used the descriptors 'root filling' 'microleakage', 'dye penetration', 'dye leakage', 'polymicrobial leakage' and 'fluid filtration' for the time interval 2001-2010 in journals within the categories 'Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Medicine' and 'Materials Science, Biomaterials' of the Journal Citation Report. All retrieved articles were reviewed to find potential pitfalls in statistical methodology that may be encountered during study design, data management or data analysis. The database included 209 papers. In all the studies reviewed, the statistical methods used were appropriate for the category attributed to the outcome variable, but in 41% of the cases, the chi-square test or parametric methods were inappropriately selected subsequently. In 2% of the papers, no statistical test was used. In 99% of cases, a statistically 'significant' or 'not significant' effect was reported as a main finding, whilst only 1% also presented an estimation of the magnitude of the effect. When the appropriate statistical methods were applied in the studies with originally inappropriate data analysis, the conclusions changed in 19% of the cases. Statistical deficiencies in leakage studies may affect their results and interpretation and might be one of the reasons for the poor agreement amongst the reported findings. Therefore, more effort should be made to standardize statistical methodology. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  13. The effectiveness of endodontic solvents to remove endodontic sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae I; Chuang, Augustine H; Sidow, Stephanie J; McNally, Kathleen; Goodin, Jeremy L; McPherson, James C

    2015-03-01

    Dental emergencies negatively affect troop readiness, especially during combat. Endodontic retreatment, when required, is especially challenging when the removal of endodontic sealer is required. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of synthetic endodontic solvents to remove endodontic sealers. Fifty capillary tubes (2.7 mm ID×22 mm L), each filled to 15 mm with either Roth 801, AH Plus, MetaSEAL, or gutta-percha, were stored at 75% humidity for 14 days at 37°C. Ten capillary tubes containing each sealer were treated with either chloroform, xylene, EndoSolv R, EndoSolv E, or no solvent, and then penetrated with D3 ProTaper Universal Retreatment file on the same day. The time for the file to penetrate the length of each sealer was recorded, and the data statistically analyzed. Roth 801 failed to set and was not tested. The file took 3.4±0.1, 4.8±0.3, 5.7±0.4, 4.5±0.2, and 10.6±1.0 seconds (mean±SD) to penetrate gutta-percha using chloroform, xylene, EndoSolv R, EndoSolv E, or no solvent, respectively, and was performed by one endodontic resident at one sitting. The time for penetration of gutta-percha with any solvent was significantly faster (p≤0.05) than for AH Plus or MetaSEAL.The time for AH Plus ranged from 23.1±1.0 to 81.5±4.5 seconds. The time for MetaSEAL ranged from 97.2±6.1 to >180 seconds. EndoSolv E was the most effective solvent for AH Plus. It took significantly more time to remove MetaSEAL than AH Plus, regardless of the solvent used. Our study indicated that the use of the proper endodontic solvent makes complete removal of a sealer much more effective during retreatment. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Comparative evaluation of root canal disinfection by conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-25

    Mar 25, 2013 ... were reduced wherever found but not totally eradicated. Discussion. Endodontic infections are polymicrobial in nature. Microorganisms such as Streptococci, staphyllococi, eubacterium, peptococcus, peptostreptococcus, pervotella, porphyromonas, and fusobacterium predominate the infected root canal.[4].

  15. Bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei: a case report and an updated literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldau, Niels Christian; Brorson, Stig; Jensen, Poul Einar

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis.......We present a case of bilateral polymicrobial osteomyelitis with Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei, and review the literature on Candida osteomyelitis....

  16. Journey of a survivor of near drowning, polymicrobial pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, Margaret M; Wahl, Gary; Yamshchikov, Alexandra V; Smith, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    This article discusses a woman who collapsed and landed in a puddle of water in a park near a horse trail. Her rescue and resuscitation started an extraordinary effort by her body to heal from multiple insults. This case study highlights the diagnosis and support of polymicrobial pneumonia secondary to near drowning and the multisystem complications throughout the 3-month hospitalization. It highlights the evidence for treatment of the polymicrobial nature of submersion injury, acute lung injury, and benefits of progressive mobility. Social media as a tool for the family's communication and coping are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endodontic treatment of the pregnant patient: Knowledge, attitude and practices of dental residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibhawoh, Louis; Enabulele, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In order to control serious pulpal pain following odontogenic infections in pregnant women, endodontic treatment may become necessary. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of dentists about rendering endodontic treatment to pregnant women. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of resident doctors in the different dental specialties in Nigeria preparing for the various levels of the fellowship examinations of the West Africa College of Surgeons and the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria. Data were collected by the means of a 17-itemed questionnaire which sought information on respondents' demography, their considerations while rendering endodontic treatment to the pregnant patients and their perceptions of the safety of endodontic treatment in pregnancy. The data collected were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science version 21.0. Results: With regards to the safety of endodontic treatment during pregnancy, 91.8% considered it safe, and this was not statistically significant in relation to the specialty or status of the respondent. Majority (77.0%) agreed they would undertake a root canal treatment on a pregnant patient with all respondents in restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, periodontics, and pedodontics in the affirmative while all in oral pathology would refuse to do such (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Dental residents are aware of the safety of endodontic treatment in pregnant women. However, gaps exist in their knowledge, bringing to the fore, the need for inclusion of pregnancy-specific training in the dental postgraduate curriculum. PMID:26778880

  18. Chlorhexidine gluconate, its properties and applications in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2008-01-01

    The major objective in endodontic therapy is to disinfect the entire root canal system. This requires that the pulpal content be eliminated as sources of infection. This goal may be accomplished by mechanical instrumentation and chemical irrigation, in conjunction with medication of the root canal between treatment sessions. Microorganisms and their by-products are considered to be the major cause of pulpal and periradicular pathosis. In order to reduce or eliminate bacteria from the root canal system, various irrigants have been used during treatment. Chlorhexidine is a cationic solution which can be used during treatment. It has a wide range of antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, because of its cationic structure, chlorhexidine has a unique property named substantivity. The purpose of this paper is to review different aspects of chlorhexidine in endodontics. PMID:24265633

  19. Comparative evaluation of four different sterilization methods on contaminated endodontic files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malathi Yenni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The reuse of instruments in the field of endodontics leads to cross infection due to contamination with microbes as the instruments come into direct contact with saliva, blood, and infected tissues. Since microbes are considered to be the major cause of endodontic failures, sterilization of endodontic instruments is mandatory for maintaining asepsis to prevent cross-contamination from one person to other. Hence, the present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of four different methods of sterilizing contaminated endodontic files. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 stainless steel K files were divided into four groups based on the sterilization method followed – Group A: Autoclave, Group B: Glass bead sterilization, Group C: Glutaraldehyde, and Group D: Quitanet Plus (aldehyde-free solution. In all the tested groups, half of the files were contaminated with Escherichia coli and remaining with Enterococcus faecalis. Then, presterilization colony counts were recorded, followed by sterilization through respective methods. Later, the sterilized files were rinsed with distilled water and 100 ul of the diluted concentration was transferred and cultured onto the respective agar plates to determine the total microbial reduction. Results: Autoclave showed complete effectiveness in reducing the microbial count followed by Quitanet Plus, glass bead sterilizer, and glutaraldehyde. Conclusion: Autoclave is considered to be the best sterilization technique to prevent cross infection in endodontic therapy.

  20. Modern Endodontic Microsurgery Concepts: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floratos, Spyros; Kim, Syngcuk

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of the surgical operating microscope in endodontic surgery has elucidated many shortcomings of previous techniques and along with microsurgical instruments and new more biologically acceptable root-end filling materials has started the new microsurgical era in surgical endodontics. Endodontic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that results in less postoperative pain and edema and faster wound healing. It offers a significantly higher success rate than traditional apical surgery technique. The components, key concepts and procedural steps of endodontic microsurgery as well as the prognosis and predictability of modern root-end procedures are presented in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of herbs in endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Tewari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and herbs have attracted a lot of attention since the past few years. The market for drugs extracted from these plants and made from herbal extracts has seen a significant rise. India is known for its rich stock of medicinal plants. Among many, some herbs are rich in phytochemical content. These phytochemicals are useful in generating phytomedicines which have effects on the human body. In the field of endodontics, phytomedicines are a boon. They have been popularly used as analgesic, anti-inflammatory, sedatives, and antibiotics. They are most significantly used as endodontic irrigants. Phytotherapy has been a grand entrant in the drug market. The reason why herbal extracts have the potential to be highly popular is due to the side effects of synthetic medicines which alter microbiota.

  2. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible.

  3. Advanced Diagnostic Aids in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay S Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiographs used for the management of endodontic problems yield limited information because of the two-dimensional nature of images produced, geometric distortion and anatomical noise. This newer review paper seeks to clarify three-dimensional imaging techniques that have been suggested as adjuncts to conventional radiographs. These include tuned aperture computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT.

  4. Successful nonsurgical management of periapical lesions of endodontic origin: A conservative orthograde approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J V Karunakaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periapical lesions of endodontic origin are common pathological conditions affecting periradicular tissues. Microbial infection of pulpal tissues is primarily responsible for initiation and progression of apical periodontitis. The primary objective of endodontic therapy should be to restore involved teeth to a state of normalcy nonsurgically. Different nonsurgical management techniques, namely, conservative root canal therapy, decompression technique, method using calcium hydroxide, aspiration-irrigation technique, lesion sterilization and tissue repair therapy, active nonsurgical decompression technique, and the apexum procedure have been advocated. New techniques which use drug-loaded injectable scaffolds, simvastatin, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate have been tried. Surgical option should be considered when intra- or extra-radicular infections are persistent. Incidence of nonendodontic periapical lesions has also been reported. An accurate diagnosis of the periapical lesion whether it is of endodontic or nonendodontic origin has to be made. Surgical methods have many disadvantages, and hence should be considered as an option only in the case of failure of nonsurgical techniques. Assessment of healing of periapical lesions has to be done periodically which necessitates a long-term follow-up. Even large periapical lesions and retreatment cases where the lesion is of endodontic origin have been successfully managed nonsurgically with orthograde endodontic therapy.

  5. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  6. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  7. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of endodontic intracanal medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    TONEA, ANDRADA; BADEA, MANDRA; OANA, LIVIU; SAVA, SORINA; VODNAR, DAN

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The sterilization of the entire root canal system represents the main goal of every endodontist, given the fact that the control of the microbial flora is the key point of every root canal treatment. The diversity of microorganisms found inside the root canal and also the resistance of some bacterial species to intracanal medications led to a continuous development of new endodontic products. The present study focuses on the comparison of the antibacterial and antifungal properties of different endodontic products, two commercially available, one experimental plant based extract, and two control substances. Methods The disc diffusion assay was used to determine the antibacterial and antifungal properties of chlorhexidine, calcium hydroxide, a mix extract between Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe barbadensis Miller gel, Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid and Fluconazole (as control substances). Two of the most common microorganisms found in endodontic infections were chosen: Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 29212) and Candida albicans ATCC(10231). Results All tested substances showed inhibition zones around the discs, for Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, including the experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder with Aloe vera gel. Conclusion The experimental mix extract of Arctium lappa root powder and Aloe vera gel is able to inhibit very resistant microorganisms, like Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. PMID:28781531

  8. Healing of apical periodontitis through modern endodontic retreatment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jarom J; Kirkpatrick, Timothy C

    2013-01-01

    The presence of apical periodontitis in teeth which have undergone initial root canal treatment is largely attributed to bacteria residing in or invading from the apical root canal space. Bacteria-associated apical periodontitis will not heal spontaneously, nor will systemic antibiotics eradicate the infection. Only endodontic retreatment, endodontic surgery, or extraction will control the bacterial etiology. Modern retreatment is an effective means of addressing apical periodontitis. A mandibular premolar with apical periodontitis, apical root resorption, and overfilled gutta percha was retreated with post removal, retrieval of gutta percha from beyond the apex, ultrasonic irrigation and disinfection, and placement of a collagen internal matrix to facilitate a well-controlled MTA apical fill. The magnification and illumination imparted by the operating microscope was integral to achievement of treatment objectives. The patient's symptoms were resolved and complete osseous healing occurred. During treatment planning, clinicians should consider the capability of modern endodontic techniques to overcome technical challenges, often allowing the natural dentition to be preserved and restored to function days after retreatment.

  9. Endodontic management of mandibular canine with two canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Shrivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatment may sometimes fail because morphological features of the tooth adversely affect the treatment procedures. Many investigators have reported the anatomical variations associated with mandibular canines. Mandibular canines are recognized as usually having one root and one root canal in most cases. This case report describes a clinical case of mandibular canine with two canals. Human mandibular canines do not present internal anatomy as simple as could be expected; there are such canines with a single root and two canals, two roots or fused roots. The existence of mandibular canines with more than one root canal is a fact that clinicians ought to keep in mind, in order to avoid failure during endodontic treatment. In spite of the low incidence of lower canines with one root and two canals, this possibility cannot be forgotten, inasmuch as the presence of a second canal in these teeth leads to difficulties in endodontic treatment. The precise knowledge of the dental endocanalicular system′s anatomy is essential in the success of the root canal therapy, because the failure to detect the accessories canals and the incomplete radicular obturation leads to the infection of the periapical space, which will ultimately result in the loss of the tooth.

  10. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome

  11. Laser applications in endodontics: an update review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed

    2009-02-01

    The search for new devices and technologies for endodontic procedures always has been challenging. Since the development of the ruby laser by Maiman in 1960 and the application of the laser for endodontics by Weichman in 1971, a variety of potential applications for lasers in endodontics have been proposed. With the development of thinner, more flexible and durable laser fibres, laser applications in endodontics have increased. Since laser devices are still relatively costly, access to them is limited. The purpose of this paper is to summarise laser applications in endodontics, including their use in pulp diagnosis, dentinal hypersensitivity, pulp capping and pulpotomy, sterilisation of root canals, root canal shaping and obturation and apicectomy. The effects of lasers on root canal walls and periodontal tissues are also reviewed.

  12. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Teresa; Neelakantan, Prasanna [Dept. of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospitals, Saveetha University, Chennai (India)

    2014-09-15

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging modalities in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in endodontics has highlighted the need for three-dimensional imaging in the clinical arena as well as in research. Three-dimensional imaging using computed tomography (CT) has been used in endodontics over the past decade. Three types of CT scans have been studied in endodontics, namely cone-beam CT, spiral CT, and peripheral quantitative CT. Contemporary endodontics places an emphasis on the use of cone-beam CT for an accurate diagnosis of parameters that cannot be visualized on a two-dimensional image. This review discusses the role of CT in endodontics, pertaining to its importance in the diagnosis of root canal anatomy, detection of peri-radicular lesions, diagnosis of trauma and resorption, presurgical assessment, and evaluation of the treatment outcome. PMID:25279337

  14. Pattern of Endodontic Treatment in Children in a Nigerian Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other infrequent reasons for endodontic treatment were trauma (5.3%) and failed root canal treatment (1.3%). Conclusion: The primary lower second molar was the most frequently (26%) treated endodontically and the major reason (93.3%) for endodontic treatment was caries. Only 5.3% of the endodontically treated teeth ...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3830 - Endodontic paper point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic paper point. 872.3830 Section 872.3830...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3830 Endodontic paper point. (a) Identification. An endodontic paper point is a device made of paper intended for use during endodontic therapy to dry...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3840 - Endodontic silver point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endodontic silver point. 872.3840 Section 872.3840...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3840 Endodontic silver point. (a) Identification. An endodontic silver point is a device made of silver intended for use during endodontic therapy to...

  17. A rationale for the use of Erbium.YAG lasers in endodontic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convissar, Robert A.

    2004-09-01

    Since the introduction of lasers to dentistry, dentists have been intrigued with the idea of placing laser energy into an infected root canal with the goal of removing the bacteria and infected tissue, and sterilizing the root canal system. This paper will discuss the bacterial origin of endodontic infections, and describe the use of the Er.YAG laser to remove bacteria, prepare the canal walls, and aid in the creation of a superior seal of the root canal system.

  18. Stem cells in endodontic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Rama Kumar M, Madhu Varma K, Kalyan Satish R, Manikya kumar Nanduri.R, Murali Krishnam Raju S, Mohan rao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body. Serving as a sort of repair system for the body, they can theoretically divide without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. However, progress in stem cell biology and tissue engineering may present new options for replacing heavily damaged or lost teeth, or even individual tooth structures. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells on regenerative endodontics.

  19. Histologic Evaluation of Apical Early Cellular Activity Utilizing Variable Endodontic Regeneration Treatment Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    Words: Pulpal regeneration, Endodontic regeneration, Porcine model, MTA, Biodentine Corresponding Author: Dr. Kimberly Lindsey, U.S. Army Dental...coronal barrier and bleeding: Blood clot with MTA or Biodentine , no bioceramic, or no induced bleeding (negative controls). Continuously erupting canines...preventing bacterial infection and coronal microleakage. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine ™ are two bioceramic sealing materials with

  20. Comparison Between Polymicrobial and Fungal Keratitis: Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Merle; Vira, Divya; Dey, Mrinmoy; Tanzin, Tanuja; Kumar, Nagendra; Sharma, Savitri

    2015-11-01

    To compare the clinical features, risk factors, and outcome of polymicrobial keratitis with monomicrobial keratitis due to fungus. Retrospective, comparative interventional case series. Consecutive cases of microbial keratitis with significant growth of more than 1 organism in culture and culture-proven fungal keratitis treated with natamycin alone were retrieved from the microbiology department. Complete success was defined as resolution of the infiltrate with scar formation on medical treatment, partial success as resolution following tissue adhesive application, and failure as inadequate response to medical therapy with increasing infiltrate size, corneal melting, and/or perforation necessitating therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) or evisceration. There were 34 eyes of 34 patients with polymicrobial keratitis and 60 cases of fungal keratitis. Compared to patients with fungal keratitis, patients with polymicrobial keratitis were significantly older (50.03 ± 9.81 years vs 42.79 ± 12.15 years, P = .0038), with larger infiltrates at presentation (61.8% vs 24.1%, P = .0007), a higher association with endophthalmitis (11.8% vs 0%, P = .03), previous history of corneal graft (20.6% vs 0%, P = .0012), and prior topical corticosteroid use (23.5% vs 5%, P = .019). In the polymicrobial group, a combination of bacteria and fungus was more frequently isolated (23, 67.6%), among which filamentous fungi (25, 39.1%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (14, 21.9%) comprised a majority. Complete success was significantly lower in the polymicrobial group compared to the fungal keratitis group (39.3% vs 73.7%, P = .0045). In multivariate logistic regression analysis comparing factors affecting the outcome between the 2 groups, older age (P = .027) and ulcers larger than 6 mm (P = .001) at presentation adversely affected outcome. Polymicrobial keratitis with fungus and bacteria was more common and more challenging to treat, with a poorer outcome than fungal

  1. Different response to amine fluoride by Streptococcus mutans and polymicrobial biofilms in a novel high-throughput active attachment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, R.A.M.; Crielaard, W.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: The antimicrobial resistance of microorganismsin biofilms and the polymicrobial interactions inthese biofilms that modulate resistance require novel strategies to evaluate the efficacy of caries-preventive compounds.The current study aimed to evaluate the effects of

  2. Effect of endodontic sealers on tooth color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meincke, Débora Könzgen; Prado, Maíra; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo; Bona, Alvaro Della; Sousa, Ezilmara Leonor Rolim

    2013-08-01

    One of the goals of endodontic treatment is the adequate filling of the root canal,which is often done using gutta-percha and sealer. It has been reported that sealer remnants in the coronary pulp chamber cause tooth color changes. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, testing the hypothesis that sealers cause coronal color changes. Forty single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated leaving excess sealer material in the coronary pulp chamber. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10) according to the endodontic sealer used (AH, AH Plus; EF, Endofill; EN,endome´ thasoneN; and S26, Sealer 26). Teeth were stored at 37 8C moist environment.Color coordinates (L*a*b*) were measured with a spectrophotometer before endodontic treatment(baseline-control), 24 h and 6 months after treatment. L*a*b* values were used to calculate color changes (DE). Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney-U tests. Color changes were observed for all groups with S26 and EN producing the greatest mean DE values after 6 months. Endodontic sealer remnants affect tooth color confirming the experimental hypothesis. This study examined the effect of endodontic sealer remnants on tooth color, and observed that after 6 months, the sealers produced unacceptable color changes. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Endodontic retreatment decisions: no consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P; D'Hoore, W

    2000-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were to: (i) evaluate the consensus, if any, amongst dental schools, students and their instructors managing the same clinical cases, all of which involved endodontically treated teeth; and (ii) determine the predominant proposed treatment option. Final year students, endodontic staff members and instructors of 10 European dental schools were surveyed as decision makers. Fourteen different radiographic cases of root canal treated teeth accompanied by a short clinical history were presented to them in a uniform format. For each case the decision makers were requested to: (i) choose only one out of nine treatment alternatives proposed, from 'no treatment' to 'extraction' via 'retreatment' and 'surgery' (ii) assess on two 5-point scales: the difficulty of making a decision, and the technical complexity of the retreatment procedure. The results indicate wide inter- and also intra-school disagreements in the clinical management of root canal treated teeth. Analysis of variance showed that the main source of variation was the 'school effect', explaining 1.8% (NS) to 18.6% (P < 0.0001) of the treatment variations. No other factor explained as much variance. Decision difficulty was moderately correlated to technical complexity (Pearsons' r ranging from 0.19 to 0.35, P < 0.0001). No clear consensus occurred amongst and within dental schools concerning the clinical management of the 14 cases. The lack of consensus amongst schools seems to be due mainly to chance or uncertainty, but can be partly explained by the 'school effect'.

  4. The Sensitivity of Endodontic Enterococcus spp. Strains to Geranium Essential Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łysakowska, Monika E; Sienkiewicz, Monika; Banaszek, Katarzyna; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2015-12-21

    Enterococci are able to survive endodontic procedures and contribute to the failure of endodontic therapy. Thus, it is essential to identify novel ways of eradicating them from infected root canals. One such approach may be the use of antimicrobials such as plant essential oils. Enterococcal strains were isolated from endodontically treated teeth by standard microbiological methods. Susceptibility to antibiotics was evaluated by the disc-diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of geranium essential oil was investigated by microdilution in 96-well microplates in Mueller Hinton Broth II. Biofilm eradication concentrations were checked in dentin tests. Geranium essential oil inhibited enterococcal strains at concentrations ranging from 1.8-4.5 mg/mL. No correlation was shown between resistance to antibiotics and the MICs of the test antimicrobials. The MICs of the test oil were lower than those found to show cytotoxic effects on the HMEC-1 cell line. Geranium essential oil eradicated enterococcal biofilm at concentrations of 150 mg/mL. Geranium essential oil inhibits the growth of endodontic enterococcal species at lower concentrations than those required to reach IC50 against the HMEC-1 cell line, and is effective against bacteria protected in biofilm at higher concentrations. In addition, bacteria do not develop resistance to essential oils. Hence, geranium essential oil represents a possible alternative to other antimicrobials during endodontic procedures.

  5. Regenerative endodontics: a true paradigm shift or a bandwagon about to be derailed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, H; Duggal, M S

    2017-02-01

    Regenerative endodontic techniques (RETs) have been hailed as a paradigm shift for the management of traumatised non-vital immature permanent anterior teeth. In this article the aim was to critically appraise the literature with regards to the outcome of regenerative endodontics on root development. Critical review of the literature where regenerative endodontic techniques have been used in the management of immature non-vital teeth with continuation of root development as the main outcome reported. Most studies published were in the form of case reports and series with very few randomised controlled trials with a high risk of bias. Continuation of root development following the use of RET has been shown to be unpredictable at best with lower success in those teeth losing vitality as a result of dental trauma. Despite the high success of regenerative endodontics in terms of periodontal healing including resolution of clinical and radiographic signs and symptoms of infection, continuation of root development remains an unpredictable outcome. The use of a blood clot as a scaffold in regenerative endodontics should be reviewed carefully as that might offer an environment for repair rather than regeneration. In addition, preservation of structures, such as Hertwig's epithelial root sheath, may have an important bearing on the success of this approach and should be further investigated.

  6. Endodontic retreatment: an online study guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover retreatment rationale, corrosion of silver points, retreatment techniques, removal of posts, and possible complications during retreatment.

  7. [Nonsurgical micro-endodontics and its outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jun-qi; Wei, Xi

    2006-02-01

    The introduction of dental operating microscope and microscopic instruments including ultrasonic tips has revealed the endodontic therapy. Dental operating microscope provides magnification and illumination for the operational area. Cases which should be treated by surgical approach in the past can be managed predictably by nonsurgical micro-endodontics. The use of dental operating microscope and ultrasonics in non-surgical endodontics includes location of missed canal, removal of intracanal post and separated instruments, negotiation of ledged canals, management of apical transportation and perforation repair.

  8. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tammami, Musaed Fahad; Al-Nazhan, Saad A

    2017-02-01

    A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation.

  9. The Application of Microencapsulation Techniques in the Treatment of Endodontic and Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Blanco Méndez

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. Microparticles made from biodegradable polymers have been reported to be an effective means of delivering antibacterial drugs in endodontic and periodontal therapy. The aim of this review article is to assess recent therapeutic strategies in which biocompatible microparticles are used for effective management of periodontal and endodontic diseases. In vitro and in vivo studies that have investigated the biocompatibility or efficacy of certain microparticle formulations and devices are presented. Future directions in the application of microencapsulation techniques in endodontic and periodontal therapies are discussed.

  10. Retreatment of failed regenerative endodontic of orthodontically treated immature permanent maxillary central incisor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaed Fahad Al-Tammami

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A revascularization procedure was shown to be the best alternative therapy for immature teeth with necrotic pulp and apical infection. A 12 year old female with a history of trauma to her upper central incisor and a sinus tract was referred for endodontic treatment. She was an active orthodontic patient and had undergone regenerative endodontic treatment for the past 2 years. Clinical examination revealed no response to sensibility, percussion, and palpation tests. The preoperative radiograph showed an open apex and apical rarefaction. The case was diagnosed as previously treated tooth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Regenerative endodontic retreatment was performed, and the case was followed for 3 years. Clinical, radiographic, and cone-beam computed tomography follow-up examination revealed an asymptomatic tooth, with evidence of periapical healing and root maturation.

  11. CXCR4 blockade decreases CD4+ T cell exhaustion and improves survival in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonell, Kimberly M; Zhang, Wenxiao; Hadley, Annette; Chen, Ching-Wen; Fay, Katherine T; Lyons, John D; Klingensmith, Nathan J; McConnell, Kevin W; Coopersmith, Craig M; Ford, Mandy L

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a dysregulated systemic response to infection involving many inflammatory pathways and the induction of counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory processes that results in a state of immune incompetence and can lead to multi-organ failure. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that, following ligation by CXCL12, directs cells to bone marrow niches and also plays an important role in T cell cosignaling and formation of the immunological synapse. Here, we investigated the expression and function of CXCR4 in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Results indicate that CXCR4 is selectively upregulated on naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD4+ central memory T cells following the induction of sepsis, and that CXCR4 antagonism resulted in a significant decrease in sepsis-induced mortality. We probed the mechanistic basis for these findings and found that CXCR4 antagonism significantly increased the number of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following sepsis. Moreover, mice treated with the CXCR4 antagonist contained fewer PD-1+ LAG-3+ 2B4+ cells, suggesting that blockade of CXCR4 mitigates CD4+ T cell exhaustion during sepsis. Taken together, these results characterize CXCR4 as an important pathway that modulates immune dysfunction and mortality following sepsis, which may hold promise as a target for future therapeutic intervention in septic patients.

  12. CXCR4 blockade decreases CD4+ T cell exhaustion and improves survival in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M Ramonell

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a dysregulated systemic response to infection involving many inflammatory pathways and the induction of counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory processes that results in a state of immune incompetence and can lead to multi-organ failure. CXCR4 is a chemokine receptor that, following ligation by CXCL12, directs cells to bone marrow niches and also plays an important role in T cell cosignaling and formation of the immunological synapse. Here, we investigated the expression and function of CXCR4 in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Results indicate that CXCR4 is selectively upregulated on naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and CD4+ central memory T cells following the induction of sepsis, and that CXCR4 antagonism resulted in a significant decrease in sepsis-induced mortality. We probed the mechanistic basis for these findings and found that CXCR4 antagonism significantly increased the number of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following sepsis. Moreover, mice treated with the CXCR4 antagonist contained fewer PD-1+ LAG-3+ 2B4+ cells, suggesting that blockade of CXCR4 mitigates CD4+ T cell exhaustion during sepsis. Taken together, these results characterize CXCR4 as an important pathway that modulates immune dysfunction and mortality following sepsis, which may hold promise as a target for future therapeutic intervention in septic patients.

  13. BIOCERAMICS IN ENDODONTICS – A REVIEW

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    Srinidhi Surya RAGHAVENDRA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioceramics are materials which include Alumina, Zirconia, Bioactive glass, Glass ceramics, Hydroxyapatite, resorbable Calcium phosphates, among others. They have been used in dentistry for filling up bony defects, root repair materials, apical fill materials, perforation sealing, as endodontic sealers and as aids in regeneration. They have certain advantages like biocompatibility, non toxicity, dimensional stability and most importantly in endodontic applications, being bio-inert. They have a similarity to Hydroxyapatite, an intrinsic osteo conductive activity and have an ability to induce regenerative responses in the human body. In Endodontics, they can be broadly classified into Calcium Phosphate/ Tricalcium/ Hydroxyapatite based, Calcium Silicate based or mixtures of Calcium Silicate and Phosphates. This review focuses on an overview of Bioceramics, classification and their advantages. It also gives a detailed insight into individual bioceramic materials currently used in the fields of Endodontics along with their properties and applications.

  14. Photodynamic therapy in endodontics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; De Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Steier, Liviu; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated promising results about the use of photodynamic therapy during root canal system disinfection. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol for its incorporation during root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize the results of research on photodynamic therapy in endodontics published in peer-reviewed journals. A review of pertinent literature was conducted using the PubMed database, and data obtained were categorized into sections in terms of relevant topics. Studies conducted in recent years highlighted the antimicrobial potential of photodynamic therapy in endodontics. However, most of these studies were not able to confirm a significant improvement in root canal disinfection for photodynamic therapy as a substitute for current disinfection methods. Its indication as an excellent adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy is well documented, however. Data suggest the need for protocol adjustments or new photosensitizer formulations to enhance photodynamic therapy predictability in endodontics.

  15. Ceramic onlay for endodontically treated mandibular molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopadevi Garlapati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of endodontically treated teeth is important for the success of endodontic treatment. In full coverage restorations, maximum amount of tooth structure is compromised, so as to conserve the amount of tooth structure partial coverage restorations, can be preferred. This case report is on fabrication of a conservative tooth colored restoration for an endodontically treated posterior tooth. A 22-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular left first molar. After endodontic treatment, composite material was used as postendodontic restoration. The tooth was then prepared to receive a ceramic onlay and bonded with self-adhesive universal resin cement. Ceramic onlay restoration was periodically examined up to 2 years.

  16. Pre-endodontic Post and Core Technique for Endodontic and Prosthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Keita; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Ikawa, Tomoko; Shigeta, Yuko; Shigemoto, Shuji; Ando, Eriko; Ogawa, Takumi; Ihara, Keisuke

    2018-01-01

    Displacement of provisional fixed prostheses may result in undesirable and embarrassing outcomes in dental treatments, especially in endodontic treatment. Development of certain counter measures has been necessary to avoid such discomforts. The aim of this report was to propose a pre-endodontic post and core technique to achieve smooth progress of the treatment. The patient was a 59-year-old male diagnosed with an infraocclusion caused by wear of his teeth. He received full mouth provisional fixed restorations for a complete oral rehabilitation. Displacement and fracture of the restorations frequently occurred during the observation period for the function of the restorations. Therefore, the pre-endodontic post and core technique was applied to the abutment teeth before their endodontic treatments were started. The technique consisted of three steps as follows: Step 1: Caries removal and dowel preparation were performed for the abutment teeth having apical periodontitis. Composite cores were indirectly fabricated, which had access holes for endodontic treatment. Step 2: The cores were bonded to the teeth. In endodontic treatment, rubber dam appliances were easily placed owing to the core, and proper tooth isolation was accomplished. Step 3: Fiberposts were bonded to the dowel holes through the access holes after the root canal filling. During endodontic treatment, displacement and/or fracture of the provisional restorations did not occur. The pre-endodontic post and core technique was effective in obtaining improved retention of provisional restoration, appropriate isolation for endodontic treatment, and sufficient retention of the post and core. The pre-endodontic post and core technique is useful for avoiding the discomforts in dental treatments, namely, a smooth transition from endodontic to prosthodontic treatment can be achieved.

  17. Chloroform in the endodontic operatory

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    McDonald, M.N.; Vire, D.E. (U.S. Army Dental Corps, Fort Sill, OK (United States))

    1992-06-01

    This article reviews the role chloroform has played in dentistry and describes an occupational health clinical investigation into the possible hazards of chloroform use in the operatory. Due to a Food and Drug Administration ban on drugs and cosmetics containing chloroform, there has been some confusion as to whether the use of chloroform in the practice of dentistry is considered unsafe or has been prohibited. Utilizing common endodontic treatment methods employing chloroform, this study reports no negative health effects to the dentist or assistant and air vapor levels well below Occupational Health and Safety Administration mandated maximum levels. The report concludes that, with careful and controlled use, chloroform can be a useful adjunct in the practice of dentistry. The Food and Drug Administration has no jurisdiction over a dentist's use of chloroform in clinical practice and has not proven that chloroform is a human carcinogen.

  18. Introduction to magnification in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Donald E

    2003-01-01

    Dentistry has recently recognized the practicality and benefits of treating damaged and diseased oral tissues under high magnification levels. Initially, enhanced vision was more-or-less restricted to the use of prescription bifocals, awkward magnifying loops, and heavy cumbersome telephoto glasses; the microscope drew little interest and was quickly viewed as another useless and expensive dental gadget. However, owing to the very nature and demands of the therapy, endodontists were quick to accept and adopt this technology, and the manufacturers were quick to adapt and market their surgical microscopes to the endodontic office. Since acceptance leads to progression, we are currently witnessing manufacturers adapting the microscopic and other magnifying lenses to other areas of dentistry. However, choosing and purchasing a microscope involves a great number of issues, including the adequacy of one's present vision, the type of practice conducted, the demands one places on the quality of his or her dentistry, and the amount of time and expense one wishes to devote to becoming competent in using magnification. In addition, one must become familiar with what the different levels of magnification offer, what different depths and widths of field meet their normal practice needs, the amount of space required for the equipment, and whether the investment is cost effective. This article details all of the benefits as well as the difficulties encountered when embarking on a magnification journey. The art of dentistry is based on precision. The human naked eye is capable of distinguishing fine detail, but it is no match for what can be accomplished when an image is sharpened and enlarged. The microscope and other forms of magnification fill that need, especially for accomplishing endodontic procedures.

  19. Identifying murder victims with endodontic radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rhonan Ferreira; Franco, Ademir; Mendes, Solon Diego Santos Carvalho; Picoli, Fernando Fortes; Nunes, Fernando Gomes; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Endodontics is a special branch of dentistry constantly guided by imaging examinations. From a forensic scope, endodontics plays a valuable role providing solid antemortem (AM) radiographic evidence for comparison with postmortem findings in human identifications. This study illustrates the interface between endodontics and forensic odontology describing three cases of human identification based on radiographic endodontic records. From 2009 to 2012, three unknown male victims of murder were examined in a local Brazilian medico-legal institute to retrieve identity and potential cause of death. Specifically, when asked for AM data, a relative of the three victims provided periapical radiographs of endodontic treatments. Based on that, forensic dentists reproduced the same imaging acquisition techniques obtaining similar periapical radiographs, enabling a comparative dental identification. All the victims were positively identified based on patterns of dental morphology and treatment intervention. This study draws the attention of general and forensic dentists highlight the importance of properly recording dental treatments and searching for evidence in AM endodontic data, respectively. PMID:28123272

  20. Photodynamic therapy associated with conventional endodontic treatment in patients with antibiotic-resistant microflora: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Nuñez, Silvia C; Hamblim, Michael R; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2010-09-01

    This study reports the antimicrobial effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) combined with endodontic treatment in patients with necrotic pulp infected with microflora resistant to a previous antibiotic therapy. Thirty anterior teeth from 21 patients with periapical lesions that had been treated with conventional endodontic treatment and antibiotic therapy were selected. Microbiological samples were taken (1) after accessing the root canal, (2) after endodontic therapy, and (3) after PDT. All the patients had at least 1 microorganism resistant to antibiotics. PDT used polyethylenimine chlorin(e6) as a photosensitizer and a diode laser as a light source (P = 40 mW, t = 4 minutes, E = 9.6 J). Endodontic therapy alone produced a significant reduction in numbers of microbial species but only 3 teeth were free of bacteria, whereas the combination of endodontic therapy with PDT eliminated all drug-resistant species and all teeth were bacteria-free. The use of PDT added to conventional endodontic treatment leads to a further major reduction of microbial load. PDT is an efficient treatment to kill multi-drug resistant microorganisms. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A survey of attitude and opinions of endodontic residents towards regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utneja, Shivani; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Ansari, Mohammed Irfan; Talwar, Sangeeta; Verma, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this survey was to study the level of awareness, current state of knowledge and opinions towards regenerative endodontic treatments amongst the endodontic residents of India. Settings and Design: Questionnaire based survey was designed. Materials and Methods: After approval from the organizing committee of 26th Federation of Operative Dentistry of India and 19th Indian Endodontic Society National conference 2011, 200 copies of the questionnaire were circulated amongst the endodontic residents in conservative dentistry and endodontics at various colleges across the country about regenerative endodontic procedures. The survey included profile of the respondents and consisted of 23 questions about their knowledge, attitude and opinions regarding use of these procedures as part of future dental treatment. Results: The survey showed that half the participants (50.6%) had received continued education in stem cells and/or regenerative dental treatments. The majority of participants were of the opinion (86.6%) that regenerative therapy should be incorporated into dentistry, and most of them (88%) were willing to acquire training in learning this new treatment strategy. The results indicated that half of the participants (52.6%) were already using some type of regenerative therapy in their clinical practice; however, with a majority of these limited to use of membranes, scaffolds or bioactive materials. Conclusions: These results reflect that endodontic residents are optimistic about the use of regenerative endodontic procedures; however, a need for more research and training was felt. PMID:23956532

  2. Factors affecting the periapical healing process of endodontically treated teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Holland

    Full Text Available Abstract Tissue repair is an essential process that reestablishes tissue integrity and regular function. Nevertheless, different therapeutic factors and clinical conditions may interfere in this process of periapical healing. This review aims to discuss the important therapeutic factors associated with the clinical protocol used during root canal treatment and to highlight the systemic conditions associated with the periapical healing process of endodontically treated teeth. The antibacterial strategies indicated in the conventional treatment of an inflamed and infected pulp and the modulation of the host's immune response may assist in tissue repair, if wound healing has been hindered by infection. Systemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, can also inhibit wound healing. The success of root canal treatment is affected by the correct choice of clinical protocol. These factors are dependent on the sanitization process (instrumentation, irrigant solution, irrigating strategies, and intracanal dressing, the apical limit of the root canal preparation and obturation, and the quality of the sealer. The challenges affecting the healing process of endodontically treated teeth include control of the inflammation of pulp or infectious processes and simultaneous neutralization of unpredictable provocations to the periapical tissue. Along with these factors, one must understand the local and general clinical conditions (systemic health of the patient that affect the outcome of root canal treatment prediction.

  3. The Force Required to Fracture Endodontically Roots Restored with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-12

    Mar 12, 2016 ... based materials, reduced cuspal deflection[7] and good marginal integrity[8] have been reported. Endodontically treated roots are more susceptible to fracture because of weakened structure. Endodontic treatment procedures, including access cavity preparation, root canal instrumentation, irrigation,.

  4. Endodontic emergencies: Your medication may be the cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Promila; Chandra, Anil; Yadav, Rakesh

    2009-01-01

    An endodontic clinician may face unwanted situations during root canal treatment. We present here an unusual case of soft tissue and gingival necrosis of the oral cavity following the use of formocresol® during endodontic treatment. PMID:20617072

  5. Top-cited articles in endodontic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardi, Anastasia; Kodonas, Konstantinos; Gogos, Christos; Economides, Nikolaos

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the 100 top-cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontology and analyze their characteristics to describe the quality and evolution of research in the field of endodontology. The Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge Database and the Journal Citation Report Science Editions were used to retrieve the 100 most cited articles published in journals dedicated to endodontics. The top-cited articles were selected and analyzed with regard to journals, authors, institution, country of origin, publication title and year, number of citations, article type, study design, level of evidence, and field of study. The top 100 articles were cited between 87 and 554 times. These articles appeared in 4 different journals, with more than half in the Journal of Endodontics, followed by the journals Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontology, the International Endodontic Journal, and Endodontics & Dental Traumatology. Forty-eight articles were published between 1990 and 1999. All articles were published in English and primarily originated from the United States (n = 52). The majority of articles were basic science articles (n = 55), followed by clinical research studies (n = 28) and nonsystematic reviews (n = 17). Uncontrolled case series with level IV of evidence and narrative reviews with level V of evidence were the most frequent types of study design. The main topics covered by the top-cited articles were microleakage and endodontic microbiology. This analysis of citation rates reveals useful and interesting information about scientific progress in the field of endodontics. Basic research and observational studies published in high-impact endodontic journals had the highest citation rates. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial Contamination of Endodontic Materials before and after Clinical Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Media; Koller, Garrit; Niazi, Sadia; Patel, Shanon; Mannocci, Francesco; Bruce, Kenneth; Foschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial contamination in endodontic consumables (gutta-percha points, rubber dams, paper mixing pads, caulking agents, and endodontic instrument sponges [EISs]) before and after clinical use and storage. Materials were randomly sampled in triplicates at 3 time points (t 0 , at package opening; t 1 , at 7 days; and t 2 , at 14 days) during their clinical usage. The gutta-percha points and caulking agent (25 mg) were added to 1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The rubber dam, paper mixing pad, and EIS were added to 25 mL PBS. After vortexing, centrifuging, and removing the supernatant, the pellet was resuspended in 1 mL PBS, plated on fastidious anaerobic agar, and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. The grown colonies were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The total bacterial load was calculated in the remaining volume (800 μL) from each sample by quantitative polymerase chain reaction after DNA extraction. All tested materials showed a varied number of contaminated samples at the 3 time points (except EIS at t 0 ) using MALDI-TOF MS. The most isolated genera were Propionibacterium (42%) and Staphylococcus (32%). By using non-culture-based approaches, all tested materials at the 3 time points (except gutta-percha at t 0 and the caulking agent at t 0, t 1, and t 2 ) carried bacterial DNA. The majority of the tested materials harbored bacteria in their samples before and after clinical storage. Nosocomial infection derived from commonly used consumables could have an impact on the outcome of endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymicrobial Gardnerella biofilm resists repeated intravaginal antiseptic treatment in a subset of women with bacterial vaginosis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swidsinski, Alexander; Loening-Baucke, Vera; Swidsinski, Sonja; Verstraelen, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a recalcitrant polymicrobial biofilm infection that often resists standard antibiotic treatment. We therefore considered repeated treatment with octenidine, a local antiseptic that has previously been shown to be highly effective in several biofilm-associated infections. Twenty-four patients with recurrent BV were treated with a 7-day course of octenidine (octenidine dihydrochloride spray application with the commercial product Octenisept). In case of treatment failure or relapse within 6 months, patients were re-treated with a 28-day course of octenidine. In case of recurrence within 6 months after the second treatment course, patients were treated again with a 28-day course followed by weekly applications for 2 months. Treatment effect was evaluated by assessment of the presence of the biofilm on voided vaginal epithelial cells through fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The initial cure rate following a 7-day course of octenidine was as high as 87.5%. The 6-month relapse rate was, however, as high as 66.6%. Repeated treatment for 28 days led to an overall cure rate of 75.0%; however, it was also associated with emergence of complete resistance to octenidine in a subset of women. The overall cure rate after three treatment courses with 1-year follow-up was 62.5 %, with 37.5 % of the patients showing complete resistance to octenidine. Our preliminary results showed that octenidine dihydrochloride was initially highly effective, but the efficacy of repeated and prolonged treatment dropped quickly as challenge with the antiseptic rapidly led to bacterial resistance in a considerable subset of women.

  8. [Theory and practice of minimally invasive endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H W

    2016-08-01

    The primary goal of modern endodontic therapy is to achieve the long-term retention of a functional tooth by preventing or treating pulpitis or apical periodontitis is. The long-term retention of endodontically treated tooth is correlated with the remaining amount of tooth tissue and the quality of the restoration after root canal filling. In recent years, there has been rapid progress and development in the basic research of endodontic biology, instrument and applied materials, making treatment procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Thus, minimally invasive endodontics(MIE)has received increasing attention at present. MIE aims to preserve the maximum of tooth structure during root canal therapy, and the concept covers the whole process of diagnosis and treatment of teeth. This review article focuses on describing the minimally invasive concepts and operating essentials in endodontics, from diagnosis and treatment planning to the access opening, pulp cavity finishing, root canal cleaning and shaping, 3-dimensional root canal filling and restoration after root canal treatment.

  9. Regenerative endodontics--Creating new horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review article is to discuss major priorities that ought to be dealt before applications of regenerative endodontics flourish the clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using filter terms Review, published in the last 10 years and Dental journals. Keywords used for research were “regenerative endodontics,” “dental stem cells,” “growth factor regeneration,” “scaffolds,” and “challenges in regeneration.” This review article screened about 150 articles and then the relevant information was compiled. Results: Inspite of the impressive growth in regenerative endodontic field, there are certain loopholes in the existing treatment protocols that might sometimes result in undesired and unpredictable outcomes. Conclusion: Considerable research and development efforts are required to improve and update existing regenerative endodontic strategies to make it an effective, safe, and biological mode to save teeth. PMID:25657518

  11. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs. The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3 puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM. 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  12. Evidence for polymicrobial communities in explanted vascular filters and atheroma debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jeremy E; Heuser, Richard; Missan, Dara S; Martinez, Delyn; Heningburg, Avory; Shabilla, Matthew; Schwartz, Renata; Fry, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    Microbial communities have been implicated in a variety of disease processes and have been intermittently observed in arterial disease; however, no comprehensive unbiased community analysis has been performed. We hypothesize that complex microbial communities may be involved in chronic vascular diseases as well and may be effectively characterized by molecular assays. The main objective is to survey vascular debris, atheroma, and vascular filters for polymicrobial communities consisting of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, specifically eukaryotic microbes. We examined vascular aspirates of atheromatous debris or embolic protection filters in addition to matched peripheral blood samples, from fifteen patients, as well as three cadaveric coronary arteries from two separate patients, for microbial communities. General fluorescence microscopy by Höechst and ethidium bromide DNA stains, prokaryotic and eukaryotic community analysis by Next Generation DNA Sequencing (NGS), and a eukaryotic microbial 9 probe multiplexed quantitative PCR were used to detect and characterize the presence of putative polymicrobial communities. No prokaryotes were detected in peripheral blood; however, in 4 of 9 sequenced filters and in 2 of 7 sequenced atheroma debris samples, prokaryotic populations were identified. By DNA sequencing, eukaryotic microbes were detected in 4 of 15 blood samples, 5 of the 9 sequenced filters, and 3 of the 7 atheroma debris samples. The quantitative multiplex PCR detected sequences consistent with eukaryotic microbes in all 9 analyzed filter samples as well as 5 of the 7 atheroma debris samples. Microscopy reveals putative polymicrobial communities within filters and atheroma debris. The main contributing prokaryotic species in atheroma debris suggest a diverse and novel composition. Additionally, Funneliformis mosseae, an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the Glomeraceae family, was detected in the coronary hard plaque from two patients. Well studied

  13. Effects of dentin on the antimicrobial properties of endodontic medicaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, Markus; Qian, Wei; Portenier, Isabelle; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2007-08-01

    Successful treatment of apical periodontitis is dependent on the elimination of the infective microflora from the necrotic root canal system. Antimicrobial irrigating solutions and other locally used disinfecting agents and medicaments have a key role in the eradication of the microbes. While most if not all presently used disinfecting agents rapidly kill even the resistant microbes when tested in vitro in a test tube, the effectiveness of the same agents is clearly weaker in the in vivo conditions. Recent studies have given valuable information about the interaction of endodontic disinfecting agents with dentin and other compounds present in the necrotic root canal. As a result of such interactions the antimicrobial effectiveness of several of our key disinfectants may be weakened, or even eliminated under certain circumstances. Different disinfectants show different sensitivity to the action by the various potential inactivators, such as dentin, serum proteins, hydroxyapatite, collagen derived from different sources, and microbial biomass. This review is a summary of our present knowledge of the mostly negative interactions between endodontic disinfecting agents and the various compounds present in the root canal environment.

  14. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  15. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  16. [Endodontics in horses. An experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, F; Sanromán, F; Llorens, M P

    1990-04-01

    A total of 44 experimental endodontic treatments were performed in incisors of eight horses of different ages. Four different endodontic pastes were used: Cloropercha, AH26 De Trey, Eugenol-Endometasone, and Universal N2. Gutta-percha points were also included in the last two treatments. Access to the pulp cavity of incisors was gained through their vestibular and occlusal faces. Holes drilled in vestibular faces were sealed with composite and those drilled in occlusal faces were sealed with Amalgama. Animals were observed during eighteen months at least after endodontics. Radiographic controls were done just after surgery and before slaughtering. Treated incisors and alveoli were studied histopathologically. During the experiment all animals were in good condition. They ate apparently without trouble, and neither clinical nor radiological signs were present.

  17. Proposal of a "Checklist" for endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Flores-García, Víctor; Perea-Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo-González, Elena; Santiago-Sáez, Andrés; Cisneros-Cabello, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    On the basis of the "Surgical Checklist" proposed by the WHO, we propose a new Checklist model adapted to the procedures of endodontic treatment. The proposed document contains 21 items which are broken down into two groups: those which must be verified before beginning the treatment, and those which must be verified after completing it, but before the patient leaves the dentist's office. The Checklist is an easy-to-use tool that requires little time but provides, order, logic and systematization by taking into account certain basic concepts to increase patient safety. We believe that the result is a Checklist that is easy to complete and which ensure the fulfillment of the key points on patient safety in the field of endodontics. Key words:Checklist, endodontics, patient safety, adverse event.

  18. Active Trachoma Cases in the Solomon Islands Have Varied Polymicrobial Community Structures but Do Not Associate with Individual Non-Chlamydial Pathogens of the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. R. Butcher

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral non-chlamydial microbial pathogens are associated with clinical signs of active trachoma in trachoma-endemic communities with a low prevalence of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct infection. In the Solomon Islands, the prevalence of Ct among children is low despite the prevalence of active trachoma being moderate. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether active trachoma was associated with a common non-chlamydial infection or with a dominant polymicrobial community dysbiosis in the Solomon Islands.MethodsWe studied DNA from conjunctival swabs collected from 257 Solomon Islanders with active trachoma and matched controls. Droplet digital PCR was used to test for pathogens suspected to be able to induce follicular conjunctivitis. Polymicrobial community diversity and composition were studied by sequencing of hypervariable regions of the 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene in a subset of 54 cases and 53 controls.ResultsAlthough Ct was associated with active trachoma, the number of infections was low (cases, 3.9%; controls, 0.4%. Estimated prevalence (cases and controls, respectively of each non-chlamydial infection was as follows: Staphylococcus aureus: 1.9 and 1.9%, Adenoviridae: 1.2 and 1.2%, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus: 5.8 and 4.3%, Haemophilus influenzae: 7.4 and 11.7%, Moraxella catarrhalis: 2.3 and 4.7%, and Streptococcus pneumoniae: 7.0 and 6.2%. There was no statistically significant association between the clinical signs of trachoma and the presence or load of any of the non-Ct infections that were assayed. Interindividual variations in the conjunctival microbiome were characterized by differences in the levels of Corynebacterium, Propionibacterium, Helicobacter, and Paracoccus, but diversity and relative abundance of these specific genera did not differ significantly between cases and controls.DiscussionIt is unlikely that the prevalent trachoma-like follicular conjunctivitis in this region of the Solomon

  19. Regenerative therapy: a periodontal-endodontic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Chogle, Sami M A; Kinaia, Atheel M; Goodis, Harold E

    2012-07-01

    Periodontal and endodontic diseases are inflammatory responses leading to periodontal and pulpal tissue loss. Regenerative therapies aim to restore the lost structures to vitality and function. Various materials and treatments methods have been used such as bone grafts, guided tissue regeneration, enamel matrix derivatives, growth and differentiation factors, and stem cells. Although the current materials and methods demonstrated adequate clinical results, true and complete biological tissue regeneration is not yet attainable. The current article reviews chronologically the materials and methods used in periodontal and endodontic regeneration highlighting their clinical success and shortcomings, and discussing future directions in regenerative therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O.; Jacob, Pulikkotil S.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer. PMID:27386007

  1. Clinical considerations for regenerative endodontic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Todd M

    2012-07-01

    The management of a tooth with incomplete root maturation and a necrotic pulp is an endodontic and a restorative challenge. Apexification procedures alone leave the tooth in a weakened state and at risk for reinfection. Regenerative endodontic procedures potentially offer advantages, including the possibility of hard tissue deposition and continued root development. Case studies have reported regeneration of human pulplike tissues in vivo, but there is no protocol that reliably regenerates pulplike tissue. This article summarizes historical, current, and future regenerative treatment approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O; Jacob, Pulikkotil S; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products that have been used as an irrigants and intracanal medicaments in the field of Endodontics to eradicate the biofilm and remove smear layer.

  3. From metabolism to ecology: cross-feeding interactions shape the balance between polymicrobial conflict and mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Sylvie; Trisos, Christopher H; Brown, Sam P

    2012-11-01

    Polymicrobial interactions are widespread in nature and play a major role in maintaining human health and ecosystems. Whenever one organism uses metabolites produced by another organism as energy or nutrient sources, it is called cross-feeding. The ecological outcomes of cross-feeding interactions are poorly understood and potentially diverse: mutualism, competition, exploitation, or commensalism. A major reason for this uncertainty is the lack of theoretical approaches linking microbial metabolism to microbial ecology. To address this issue, we explore the dynamics of a one-way interspecific cross-feeding interaction in which food can be traded for a service (detoxification). Our results show that diverse ecological interactions (competition, mutualism, exploitation) can emerge from this simple cross-feeding interaction and can be predicted by the metabolic, demographic, and environmental parameters that govern the balance of the costs and benefits of association. In particular, our model predicts stronger mutualism for intermediate by-product toxicity because the resource-service exchange is constrained to the service being neither too vital (high toxicity impairs resource provision) nor dispensable (low toxicity reduces need for service). These results support the idea that bridging microbial ecology and metabolism is a critical step toward a better understanding of the factors governing the emergence and dynamics of polymicrobial interactions.

  4. Cyanide toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia is modulated by polymicrobial communities and environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Bernier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behaviour of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e. culture medium, long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM, that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community.

  5. Combining ANOVA-PCA with POCHEMON to analyse micro-organism development in a polymicrobial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Brigitte P; Neerincx, Anne H; Bertrand, Samuel; Leemans, Manja A A P; Postma, Geert J; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cristescu, Simona M; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Jansen, Jeroen J

    2017-04-22

    Revealing the biochemistry associated to micro-organismal interspecies interactions is highly relevant for many purposes. Each pathogen has a characteristic metabolic fingerprint that allows identification based on their unique multivariate biochemistry. When pathogen species come into mutual contact, their co-culture will display a chemistry that may be attributed both to mixing of the characteristic chemistries of the mono-cultures and to competition between the pathogens. Therefore, investigating pathogen development in a polymicrobial environment requires dedicated chemometric methods to untangle and focus upon these sources of variation. The multivariate data analysis method Projected Orthogonalised Chemical Encounter Monitoring (POCHEMON) is dedicated to highlight metabolites characteristic for the interaction of two micro-organisms in co-culture. However, this approach is currently limited to a single time-point, while development of polymicrobial interactions may be highly dynamic. A well-known multivariate implementation of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) uses Principal Component Analysis (ANOVA-PCA). This allows the overall dynamics to be separated from the pathogen-specific chemistry to analyse the contributions of both aspects separately. For this reason, we propose to integrate ANOVA-PCA with the POCHEMON approach to disentangle the pathogen dynamics and the specific biochemistry in interspecies interactions. Two complementary case studies show great potential for both liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry to reveal novel information on chemistry specific to interspecies interaction during pathogen development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Promotes Cardiac Inflammation and Heart Failure during Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lohner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aim was to elucidate the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced via colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT and TLR9-deficient (TLR9-D mice. Bacterial load in the peritoneal cavity and cardiac expression of inflammatory mediators were determined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h. Eighteen hours after CASP cardiac function was monitored in vivo. Sarcomere length of isolated cardiomyocytes was measured at 0.5 to 10 Hz after incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria. Results. CASP led to continuous release of bacteria into the peritoneal cavity, an increase of cytokines, and differential regulation of receptors of innate immunity in the heart. Eighteen hours after CASP WT mice developed septic heart failure characterised by reduction of end-systolic pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and parameters of contractility. This coincided with reduced cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening. TLR9 deficiency resulted in significant reduction of cardiac inflammation and a sustained heart function. This was consistent with reduced mortality in TLR9-D compared to WT mice. Conclusions. In polymicrobial sepsis TLR9 signalling is pivotal to cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure.

  7. Endodontic retreatment - unusual anatomy of a maxillary second and mandibular first premolar: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarnath Shenoy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate diagnosis of the morphology of the root canal system is a prerequisite for successful root canal treatment. A major cause of endodontic treatment failure in missed (or untreated root canals is that they still harbor infection. Careful radiographic interpretation and examination of pulp chamber floors are helpful in locating root canal entrances. These case reports present anatomical variations in upper and lower premolars.

  8. Endodontic treatment enhances the regenerative potential of teeth with advanced periodontal disease with secondary endodontic involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eun-Young; Cho, Yunjung; Lee, Ju-Youn; Kim, Sung-Jo; Choi, Jeomil

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a role for endodontic intervention in enhancing the regenerative potential of the periodontal ligament when combined with periodontal treatment in seriously involved teeth with a secondary endodontic component. Patients who exhibited radiolucency extending to the periapical region, abnormal electric pulp testing values, and deep probing depth derived from primary periodontal disease with secondary endodontic involvement were included. Intentional root canal treatment was applied to those teeth in which the apical lesions were presumed to communicate with those of the periodontal lesion of the teeth that remained vital. In all three selected cases, regenerative periodontal therapy incorporating either bone graft or guided tissue regeneration was instituted 3 months after the endodontic intervention. Remarkable enhancement in radiographic density was noticeable around the affected teeth as evidenced by changes in radiopacity. There was a significant reduction in the probing pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level. Chewing discomfort gradually disappeared from the commencement of the combined treatment. An intentional endodontic intervention may be a worthwhile approach for the sophisticated management of teeth suffering from serious attachment loss and alveolar bone destruction with concomitant secondary endodontic involvement.

  9. Exposure to pairs of Aeromonas strains enhances virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeromonad virulence remains poorly understood, and is difficult to predict from strain characteristics. In addition, infections are often polymicrobial (i.e., are mixed infections), and 5 -10% of such infections include two distinct aeromonads, which has an unknown impact on virulence. In this work,...

  10. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial...... communities depends, to a large extent, on our knowledge of these interactions. This review highlights the recent advances regarding molecular characterization of microbe-microbe interactions that modulate community structure, activity, and stability, and aims to illustrate how these findings have helped us...

  11. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte; Sternberg, Claus; Jelsbak, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial communities depends, to a large extent, on our knowledge of these interactions. This review highlights the recent advances regarding molecular characterization of microbe-microbe interactions that modulate community structure, activity, and stability, and aims to illustrate how these findings have helped us reach an engineering-level understanding of microbial communities in relation to both human health and industrial biotechnology.

  12. Utilization and control of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections and community-based microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Microbial activities are most often shaped by interactions between co-existing microbes within mixed-species communities. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms of species interactions within communities is a central issue in microbial ecology, and our ability to engineer and control microbial co...

  13. Endodontic Treatment of Unusually Long Discolored Maxillary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough biomechanical preparation followed by complete obturation of the canal system together with prompt and adequate restoration. Therefore, the endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external anatomy, and its ...

  14. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Endodontic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. G. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14,15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14,15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures.

  16. The effects of propidium monoazide treatment on the measured composition of polymicrobial biofilms after treatment with chlorhexidine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, R.A.M.; Zaura, E.; Buijs, M.J.; Koopman, J.; Crielaard, W.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The treatment of polymicrobial biofilms with antimicrobial compounds results in not only an overall loss of viability, but also compositional shifts. While DNA-based technologies may be more appropriate for the assessment of bacterial composition than culturing, these techniques amplify

  17. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of polymicrobial culture-negative samples with analysis of mixed chromatograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2010-01-01

    Two cases involving polymicrobial culture-negative samples were investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, with analysis of mixed chromatograms. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus constellatus were identified from pleural fluid in a patient with Lemierre's syndrome...

  18. Outcomes of endodontic therapy in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Susan D.; Horowitz, Allan J.; Man, Martin; Wu, Hongyu; Foran, Denise; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Matthews, Abigail G.; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors undertook a study involving members of a dental practice-based research network to determine the outcome and factors associated with success and failure of endodontic therapy. Methods Members in participating practices (practitioner-investigators [P-Is]) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking treatment in the practice who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years previously. If a patient had more than one tooth so treated, the P-I selected as the index tooth the tooth treated earliest during the three- to five-year period. The authors excluded from the study any teeth that served as abutments for removable partial dentures or overdentures, third molars and teeth undergoing active orthodontic endodontic therapy. The primary outcome was retention of the index tooth. Secondary outcomes, in addition to extraction, that defined failure included clinical or radiographic evidence (or both) of periapical pathosis, endodontic retreatment or pain on percussion. Results P-Is in 64 network practices enrolled 1,312 patients with a mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up of 3.9 (0.6) years. During that period, 3.3 percent of the index teeth were extracted, 2.2 percent underwent retreatment, 3.6 percent had pain on percussion and 10.6 percent had periapical radiolucencies for a combined failure rate of 19.1 percent. The presence of preoperative periapical radiolucency with a diagnosis of either irreversible pulpitis or necrotic pulp was associated with failure after multivariate analysis, as were multiple canals, male sex and Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. Conclusions These results suggest that failure rates for endodontic therapy are higher than previously reported in general practices, according to results of studies based on dental insurance claims data. Clinical Implications The results of this study can help guide the practitioner in deciding the most appropriate course of therapy for

  19. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy against EndodonticEnterococcus faecalisandCandida albicansMono and Mixed Biofilms in the Presence of Photosensitizers: A Comparative Study with Classical Endodontic Irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Patrícia; Fernandes, Chantal; Caramelo, Francisco; Mota, Marta; Miranda, Isabel M; Faustino, M A F; Neves, M G P M S; Uliana, Marciana P; de Oliveira, Kleber T; Santos, João M; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Endodontic biofilms eradication from the infected root canal system remains as the primary focus in endodontic field. In this study, it was assessed the efficacy of antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT) with the Zn(II)chlorin e6 methyl ester (Zn(II)e 6 Me) activated by red light against monospecies and mixed biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans . The results were compared with the ones obtained with Rose Bengal (RB), Toluidine Blue-O (TBO), the synthetic tetracationic porphyrin (TMPyP) as well as classical endodontic irrigants (3% NaOCl, 17% EDTA and 2% CHX). The antimicrobial efficacy of aPDT toward monospecies and mixed biofilms was quantified resorting to safranin red method. The changes of biofilm organization and of cellular ultrastructure were evaluated through several microscopy techniques (light, laser confocal and transmission electron microscopy). Zn(II)e 6 Me once activated with light for 60 or 90 s was able to remove around 60% of the biofilm's biomass. It was more efficient than TBO and RB and showed similar efficiency to TMPyP and classical irrigants, CHX and EDTA. As desirable in a PS, Zn(II)e 6 Me in the dark showed smaller activity than TMPyP. Only NaOCl revealed higher efficiency, with 70-90% of the biofilm's biomass removal. The organization of biofilms and the normal microbial cell ultrastructure were extensively damaged by the presence of Zn(II)e 6 Me. aPDT with Zn(II)e 6 Me showed to be an efficient antimicrobial strategy deserving further studies leading to a future clinical usage in endodontic disinfection.

  20. Ultrasonics in endodontics: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Grande, Nicola Maria; Somma, Francesco

    2007-02-01

    During the past few decades endodontic treatment has benefited from the development of new techniques and equipment, which have improved outcome and predictability. Important attributes such as the operating microscope and ultrasonics (US) have found indispensable applications in a number of dental procedures in periodontology, to a much lesser extent in restorative dentistry, while being very prominently used in endodontics. US in endodontics has enhanced the quality of treatment and represents an important adjunct in the treatment of difficult cases. Since its introduction, US has become increasingly more useful in applications such as gaining access to canal openings, cleaning and shaping, obturation of root canals, removal of intracanal materials and obstructions, and endodontic surgery. This comprehensive review of the literature aims at presenting the numerous uses of US in clinical endodontics and emphasizes the broad applications in a modern-day endodontic practice.

  1. Endodontic retreatment in case of failure. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărgărit, Ruxandra; Andrei, Oana Celia

    2011-01-01

    In medical practice, clinicians come across an increased number of endodontic treatments, which, like other dental treatments, can fail. The increase in the number of endodontic treatment resulted in an increased number of failures, their management raising complex and serious endodontic problems. The endodontic retreatment of a failure is required by the increased desire to preserve the tooth on the dental arch, thus preventing the need for dental extraction that may have adverse consequences in terms of functional and psychological effect on patients. This article presents two clinical cases that required endodontic retreatment in order to avoid the complications that could ultimately require tooth extraction. The teeth in question (a mandibular first molar and an upper central incisor) having a special importance, and a physiognomic role, the endodontic retreatment consisted in covering them in porcelain fused to the metal crowns.

  2. Microbial protection and virulence in periodontal tissue as a function of polymicrobial communities: symbiosis and dysbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Frank A; Darveau, Richard P

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses polymicrobial interactions with the host in both health and disease. As our ability to identify specific bacterial clonal types, with respect to their abundance and location in the oral biofilm, improves, we will learn more concerning their contribution to both oral health and disease. Recent studies examining host- bacteria interactions have revealed that commensal bacteria not only protect the host simply by niche occupation, but that bacterial interactions with host tissue can promote the development of proper tissue structure and function. These data indicate that our host-associated polymicrobial communities, such as those found in the oral cavity, co-evolved with us and have become an integral part of who we are. Understanding the microbial community factors that underpin the associations with host tissue that contribute to periodontal health may also reveal how dysbiotic periodontopathic oral communities disrupt normal periodontal tissue functions in disease. A disruption of the oral microbial community creates dysbiosis, either by overgrowth of specific or nonspecific microorganisms or by changes in the local host response where the community can now support a disease state. Dysbiosis provides the link between systemic changes (e.g. diabetes) and exogenous risk factors (e.g. smoking), and the dysbiotic community, and can drive the destruction of periodontal tissue. Many other risk factors associated with periodontal disease, such as stress, aging and genetics, are also likely to affect the microbial community, and more research is needed, utilizing sophisticated bacterial taxonomic techniques, to elucidate these effects on the microbiome and to develop strategies to target the dysbiotic mechanisms and improve periodontal health. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Survival, bacterial clearance and thrombocytopenia are improved in polymicrobial sepsis by targeting nuclear transport shuttles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Ann Veach

    Full Text Available The rising tide of sepsis, a leading cause of death in the US and globally, is not adequately controlled by current antimicrobial therapies and supportive measures, thereby requiring new adjunctive treatments. Severe microvascular injury and multiple organ failure in sepsis are attributed to a "genomic storm" resulting from changes in microbial and host genomes encoding virulence factors and endogenous inflammatory mediators, respectively. This storm is mediated by stress-responsive transcription factors that are ferried to the nucleus by nuclear transport shuttles importins/karyopherins. We studied the impact of simultaneously targeting two of these shuttles, importin alpha 5 (Imp α5 and importin beta 1 (Imp β1, with a cell-penetrating Nuclear Transport Modifier (NTM in a mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis. NTM reduced nuclear import of stress-responsive transcription factors nuclear factor kappa B, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 alpha, and activator protein 1 in liver, which was also protected from sepsis-associated metabolic changes. Strikingly, NTM without antimicrobial therapy improved bacterial clearance in blood, spleen, and lungs, wherein a 700-fold reduction in bacterial burden was achieved while production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in blood plasma was suppressed. Furthermore, NTM significantly improved thrombocytopenia, a prominent sign of microvascular injury in sepsis, inhibited neutrophil infiltration in the liver, decreased L-selectin, and normalized plasma levels of E-selectin and P-selectin, indicating reduced microvascular injury. Importantly, NTM combined with antimicrobial therapy extended the median time to death from 42 to 83 hours and increased survival from 30% to 55% (p = 0.022 as compared to antimicrobial therapy alone. This study documents the fundamental role of nuclear signaling mediated by Imp α5 and Imp β1 in the mechanism of polymicrobial sepsis and highlights the

  4. Cytologic effects of primary tooth endodontic filling materials

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Hung, Chi-Jr; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Chien, Hung-Chih; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2009-01-01

    Primary tooth endodontic filling materials should be bio-compatible with periodontal tissue. The purpose of this study was to analyze the biologic effects of different endodontic filling materials for primary teeth on a human osteosarcoma cell line (U2OS). Materials and methods: Experimental groups comprised different mixes of endodontic filling materials: zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE) + formocresol (FC); calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] + FC; Ca(OH)2 + iodoform + deionized water; Ca(OH)2 + iodofor...

  5. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishen, Anil; Peters, Ove A.; Zehnder, Matthias; Diogenes, Anibal R.; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment. PMID:27217630

  7. Regenerative Endodontics: Barriers and Strategies for Clinical Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sahng G.; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y.; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a great deal of enthusiasm and effort, regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges towards clinical translation. Recent adoption by the American Dental Association (ADA) of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for the majority of endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other orga...

  8. Interpretation of Endodontic File Length Adjustments Using Radiovisiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    radiographic views. I ENDODONTIC WORKING LENGTH History of Dental Radiography The x-ray was discovered in 1895 by Wilhelm Roentgen in WUrzburg, Germany...bisecting angle I I I 32 I technique is unreliable for making radiographs of diagnostic g value in endodontics . Much research has been done assessing the...conventional radiography but not at a statistically * significant level. Two reports by Shearer et al. 5 0 ,51 looked specifically at the endodontic

  9. Currently used systems of dental posts for endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Joana; Almeida, Paulo; Fernandes, Sampaio; Marques, Arcelina; Vaz, Mário

    2017-01-01

    An advanced stage of a tooth decay promotes an extremely damaged tooth that needs endodontic treatment to be restored. When satisfactory coronal tooth structure remains, an artificial crown can be placed without a post. On the other hand, the treatment of seriously damaged teeth often require an endodontic post. The main reason for using post is to enable rebuilding of the tooth structure prior to crown restoration. Dentists believe that endodontic posts provide a stable ...

  10. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Z; Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5...

  11. Microsurgical endodontic retreatment of post restored posterior teeth: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill

    2010-12-01

    Post-treatment apical periodontitis may persist due to biological factors as outlined by Nair or when treatment procedures have been ineffective in eliminating the intraradicular infection. This case series reports on the management of five posterior teeth restored with posts where microsurgical techniques were employed utilising the operating microscope, ultrasonics, micro-instrumentation and mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material. Healing was evident at 12-month review appointments. Microsurgical techniques have significantly improved the outcomes for healing of periapical lesions when compared to traditional approaches to endodontic surgery. Success rates have been shown to be comparable with conventional orthograde treatment. © 2010 The Author. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  12. Endodontic therapy using magnification devices: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Taschieri, Silvio

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate if the use of magnification devices in endodontics is associated with the improvement of clinical and radiographic outcomes. The treatment success as determined by clinical and radiographic evaluation after 1-year follow-up was the main outcome. The main search terms used alone or in combination were: endodontic treatment, endodontic therapy, endodontic surgery, apicoectomy, periapical surgery, microscope, endoscope, loupes, magnification devices. The authors searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Oral Health Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for articles published up to September 2009 plus hand-searching of relevant journals and reference list of pertinent reviews and included studies. Prospective clinical trials comparing endodontic therapy performed with or without using magnification devices, as well as trials comparing two or more magnification devices for endodontic therapy were considered. Three prospective studies were included, all dealing with endodontic surgery. No significant difference in outcomes was found among patients treated using magnifying loupes, surgical microscope or endoscope. Similarly, no difference was found with or without using the endoscope. No comparative study on magnification devices was found regarding orthograde endodontic treatment. The type of magnification device per se can only minimally affect the treatment outcome. Well-designed randomized trials should be performed to determine the true difference in treatment outcomes when using a magnification device in both orthograde and surgical endodontic treatment, if any exist. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regenerative endodontics: barriers and strategies for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J; Kim, Sahng G; Zhou, Jian; Ye, Ling; Cho, Shoko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Fu, Susan Y; Yang, Rujing; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-07-01

    Regenerative endodontics has encountered substantial challenges toward clinical translation. The adoption by the American Dental Association of evoked pulp bleeding in immature permanent teeth is an important step for regenerative endodontics. However, there is no regenerative therapy for most endodontic diseases. Simple recapitulation of cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies that are under development for other organ systems has not led to clinical translation in regeneration endodontics. Recent work using novel biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors that orchestrate the homing of host endogenous cells represents a departure from traditional cell transplantation approaches and may accelerate clinical translation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    OpenAIRE

    Osama S Alothmani; Lara T Friedlander; Nicholas P Chandler

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected ...

  15. Hypercementosis: a challenge for endodontic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Cecilia Definski Fagonde; Fernanda Geraldes Pappen; Josué Martos; Luiz Fernando Machado Silveira

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The purpose of this study was to describe through literature review, the morphological characteristics of teeth with hypercementosis that are relevant to endodontic practice. Literature review: The pathologic deposition of cement increases proportionally as the patient’s age increases. Genetic factors seem to be related to hypercementosis occurrence in young patients. Based on literature, it is possible to notice a lack of scientific studies which guide the endodon...

  16. Recent considerations in regenerative endodontic treatment approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Aksel

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Although the regenerative treatment approaches have good clinical outcomes in the majority of case reports, the outcomes are unpredictable. Since the current clinical protocols for regenerative endodontics do not fully fulfill the triad of tissue engineering ((growth factors, scaffold and stem cells, further translational studies are required to achieve more pulp- and dentin-like tissue in the root canal system to achieve pulp regeneration.

  17. [The application of laser in endodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W X; Liu, N N; Wang, X L; He, X Y

    2016-08-01

    Since laser was introduced in the field of medicine in 1970's, its application range has continuously expanded. The application of laser in endodontics also increased due to its safety and effectiveness in dental treatments. The majority of the laser application researches in dentistry focused on dentin hypersensitivity, removal of carious tissues, tooth preparations, pulp capping or pulpotomy, and root canal treatment. In this article, we reviewed literature on the effects of laser in the treatments of dental and pulp diseases.

  18. The flexural properties of endodontic post materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, Dominic A; Shortall, Adrian C; Marquis, Peter M; Lumley, Philip J

    2010-08-01

    To measure the flexural strengths and moduli of endodontic post materials and to assess the effect on the calculated flexural properties of varying the diameter/length (D/L) ratio of three-point bend test samples. Three-point bend testing of samples of 2mm diameter metal and fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) rods was carried out and the mechanical properties calculated at support widths of 16 mm, 32 mm and 64 mm. Weibull analysis was performed on the strength data. The flexural strengths of all the FRC post materials exceeded the yield strengths of the gold and stainless steel samples; the flexural strengths of two FRC materials were comparable with the yield strength of titanium. Stainless steel recorded the highest flexural modulus while the titanium and the two carbon fiber materials exhibited similar values just exceeding that of gold. The remaining glass fiber materials were of lower modulus within the range of 41-57 GPa. Weibull modulus values for the FRC materials ranged from 16.77 to 30.09. Decreasing the L/D ratio produced a marked decrease in flexural modulus for all materials. The flexural strengths of FRC endodontic post materials as new generally exceed the yield strengths of metals from which endodontic posts are made. The high Weibull modulus values suggest good clinical reliability of FRC posts. The flexural modulus values of the tested posts were from 2-6 times (FRC) to 4-10 times (metal) that of dentin. Valid measurement of flexural properties of endodontic post materials requires that test samples have appropriate L/D ratios. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural Therapeutic Options in Endodontics - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Anand, Suresh; Abarajithan, Mohan; Sheriff, Sultan O.; Jacob, Pulikkotil S.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Complete eradication of microbial biofilms and elimination of the smear layer are the key factors during endodontic treatment. Various chemical irrigants have been proposed in the literature for the same. The major setback with these chemical irrigants is that they are not bio-friendly to the dental and peri-radicular tissues. In the recent years, research to use natural products for root canal disinfection has gained importance. The aim of this article is to compile various herbal products t...

  20. ENDODONTICS AND THERMOVISION-TEMPERATURE CHANGES DURING PHOTO-ACTIVATED DISINFECTION IN ROOT CANALS. THERMOVISION DIAGNOSIS IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetelina G. Gueorgieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The application of thermovision in endodontics is an innovative method and has a great informative value, evidence proved, thanks to the use of last generation camera Flir A310 and software ThermaCam Reporter 8.3 Pro. In the recent years a new method of root canal disinfection is introduced – photo-activated disinfection (PAD. Temperature increase have always been a concern during dental laser treatment.Aim: The purpose of our study is to evaluate the temperature elevation on the outer root surface at extracted teeth and in periapical tissues when photodynamic therapy with 630-nm diode laser is used for root canal disinfection. Materials and methods: For the laboratory study we used 72 single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth. They were divided into six groups depending on the power of the light source (220 mW, 360 mW and 500 mW and the type of photosensitizer agent – Fotosan and Zn-phtalocianine. In our clinical study participated 8 patients, who came in to our clinic with complaints of spontaneous pain or were with infected root canals and were referred for endodontic treatment. PAD was performed with a diode laser with wavelength of 630 nm using an endodontic handpiece with fiberoptic connector, allowing penetration to 4 mm from the apical stop, and movements of fibreoptic (200 µm in apicalcoronal direction.Results: The highest temperature value was detected at 500 mW and 360 mW. The average temperature increase recorded in our study at the external surface of the root canal did not exceed 10ºC only at power setting of 220 mW during PAD with Zn-phtalocianine.Conclusion: In conclusion, photo-activated disinfection of the root canal with Zn-phtalocianine and 630-nm diode laser using 200 μm fibreoptic tips at a power setting of 220 mW for 60 seconds induces a temperature increase which isn’t sufficient to damage the neighbouring tissues. Based on this results we don’t recommend root canal preparation over 02 or 04

  1. Bactericidal effect of hydroxyl radicals generated by the sonolysis and photolysis of hydrogen peroxide for endodontic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibi, Haruna; Hayashi, Makoto; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Tamura, Muneaki; Yoshida, Ayaka; Kobayashi, Yoshimi; Shimizu, Kohei; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Imai, Kenichi; Ogiso, Bunnai

    2017-02-01

    The aim of endodontic root canal treatment is the elimination of bacteria and their products from an infected tooth root canal. To effectively disinfect a root canal, an ultrasonic irrigation system, in which hydroxyl radicals (HO · ) generated artificially by sonolysis of H 2 O 2 , was developed previously for endodontic applications and was demonstrated to have bactericidal efficacy against Enterococcus faecalis. To improve this system, we examined the in vitro bactericidal effects of HO · generated from H 2 O 2 , activated by simultaneous irradiation with ultrasound for sonolysis and dental LED light for photolysis with a peak wavelength of 405 nm. Regarding the LED irradiation, two methods were used: (i) 'ideal' experimental conditions (irradiation close to the glass tube), and (ii) simulated endodontic conditions (more distant irradiation of a masked glass tube). In these conditions, HO · generation from H 2 O 2 was detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, and bactericidal efficacy against E. faecalis was assessed by measuring the colony forming units (CFU)/mL. The results indicated that HO · generation by ESR measurements and the bactericidal effect on E. faecalis by viable count using CFU/mL were enhanced significantly in a time-dependent manner in both conditions. In a comparison of these conditions, bactericidal activity under 'ideal' experimental conditions was similar to that under simulated endodontic conditions. Moreover, the irradiation time for effective killing of E. faecalis through the sonolysis and photolysis of H 2 O 2 under simulated endodontic conditions was shorter than that with sonolysis alone. These results demonstrate that H 2 O 2 activated by ultrasound and LED light may be a safe and effective disinfection technique for endodontic root canal treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Activation of Alkaline Irrigation Fluids in Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Laurence J; George, Roy

    2017-10-23

    In conventional endodontic treatment, alkaline solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) are used in combination to disinfect the root canal system and to eliminate debris and smear layers. An important concept that has emerged over recent years is the use of active physical methods for agitating these fluids to improve their penetration within areas that are not reached by endodontic instruments and to accelerate the chemical actions of these alkaline fluids against planktonic microorganisms, biofilms, soft tissue remnants and smear layers. Ultrasonic agitation and more recently pulsed lasers have emerged as two promising methods for activating endodontic irrigation fluids. Ultrasonic agitation with piezoelectric devices employs a moving tip, while laser agitation uses a stationary tip. Both methods cause cavitation, followed by implosions and shear forces which assist with debridement. Fluid streaming further enhances the activity of the fluids. While agitation enhances performance of irrigants, extrusion of fluids from the root canal during activation is a hazard that must be controlled.

  3. Higher powered magnification improved endodontic surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, David

    2012-01-01

    Medline, Embase and PubMed databases were searched together with hand-searches of a range of journals (Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery). Clinical studies in several languages (English, French, German, Italian and Spanish) with a minimum follow-up of six months evaluated using clinical and radiographic examination included. Assessment and data abstraction were carried out independently. Weighted pooled success rates and relative risk assessment between TRS and EMS were calculated and a meta-analysis was carried out using a random effects model. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Weighted pooled success rates calculated from extracted raw data showed an 88% positive outcome for CRS (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8455-0.9164) and 94% for EMS (95% CI, 0.8889-0.9816). This difference was statistically significant (P magnification rendered by the dental operating microscope or the endoscope.

  4. Activation of Alkaline Irrigation Fluids in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy

    2017-01-01

    In conventional endodontic treatment, alkaline solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) are used in combination to disinfect the root canal system and to eliminate debris and smear layers. An important concept that has emerged over recent years is the use of active physical methods for agitating these fluids to improve their penetration within areas that are not reached by endodontic instruments and to accelerate the chemical actions of these alkaline fluids against planktonic microorganisms, biofilms, soft tissue remnants and smear layers. Ultrasonic agitation and more recently pulsed lasers have emerged as two promising methods for activating endodontic irrigation fluids. Ultrasonic agitation with piezoelectric devices employs a moving tip, while laser agitation uses a stationary tip. Both methods cause cavitation, followed by implosions and shear forces which assist with debridement. Fluid streaming further enhances the activity of the fluids. While agitation enhances performance of irrigants, extrusion of fluids from the root canal during activation is a hazard that must be controlled. PMID:29065540

  5. Activation of Alkaline Irrigation Fluids in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence J. Walsh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In conventional endodontic treatment, alkaline solutions of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA are used in combination to disinfect the root canal system and to eliminate debris and smear layers. An important concept that has emerged over recent years is the use of active physical methods for agitating these fluids to improve their penetration within areas that are not reached by endodontic instruments and to accelerate the chemical actions of these alkaline fluids against planktonic microorganisms, biofilms, soft tissue remnants and smear layers. Ultrasonic agitation and more recently pulsed lasers have emerged as two promising methods for activating endodontic irrigation fluids. Ultrasonic agitation with piezoelectric devices employs a moving tip, while laser agitation uses a stationary tip. Both methods cause cavitation, followed by implosions and shear forces which assist with debridement. Fluid streaming further enhances the activity of the fluids. While agitation enhances performance of irrigants, extrusion of fluids from the root canal during activation is a hazard that must be controlled.

  6. An animal model to study regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Buhrley, Matthew; Wright, Kenneth; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2011-02-01

    A growing body of evidence is demonstrating the possibility for regeneration of tissues within the pulp space and continued root development in teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. There are areas of research related to regenerative endodontics that need to be investigated in an animal model. The purpose of this study was to investigate ferret cuspid teeth as a model to investigate factors involved in regenerative endodontics. Six young male ferrets between the ages of 36-133 days were used in this investigation. Each animal was anesthetized and perfused with 10% buffered formalin. Block sections including the mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth and their surrounding periapical tissues were obtained, radiographed, decalcified, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to determine various stages of apical closure in these teeth. The permanent mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth with open apices erupted approximately 50 days after birth. Initial signs of closure of the apical foramen in these teeth were observed between 90-110 days. Complete apical closure was observed in the cuspid teeth when the animals were 133 days old. Based on the experiment, ferret cuspid teeth can be used to investigate various factors involved in regenerative endodontics that cannot be tested in human subjects. The most appropriate time to conduct the experiments would be when the ferrets are between the ages of 50 and 90 days. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. STUDIES ON BACTERIAL INFECTIONS OF DIABETIC FOOT ULCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    ABSTRACT. Microbial study for aerobic organisms from 100 cases of diabetic foot ulcers was carried out to determine the etiological agents and their antibiogram. Polymicrobial infection was observed in all the cases. The most frequently isolated aerobic organisms were Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

  8. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Neha Shashikant; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Harakuni, Sheetal; Sogi, Suma; Assudani, Harsha G; Mistry, Laresh Naresh

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Camellia sinensis (green tea) as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric) showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001). The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea). The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important role in eradicating the population of predominant micro-organisms in treating these teeth with

  9. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Shashikant Dhariwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric and Camellia sinensis (green tea as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001. The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea. Conclusion: The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important

  10. Frequency of endodontic treatment in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of endodontic treatment in dental patients treated in a Nigerian Teaching Hospital. Method: A survey of 470 patients undergoing endodontic treatment at the conservative clinic of the department of restorative dentistry of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was conducted to determine ...

  11. Reason for Endodontic Treatment of Permanent Teeth of Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the reasons for endodontic treatment. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study of all patients aged 17years and above of both gender attending the conservative clinic for endodontic treatment during the 18 months study period. Reasons for pulp disease leading to teeth being indicated for root ...

  12. Phenotype and Genotype of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated form Root Canal and Saliva of Primary Endodontic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaki Mubarak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the phenotype and genotype of E. faecalis isolated from the root canal and saliva of primary endodontic patients with periapical lesions. Eighteen adult male and female individuals suffering from primary endodontic infection, either had or had not periapical lesions, were involved in this study. Root canal scraping and saliva were collected from each subject and used for bacterial quantitation using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Enterococci were isolated using ChromAgar medium and then identified using both biochemical (Gram staining and catalase tests and molecular biology (conventional PCR methods. Gelatinase activity, polysaccharide capsul profile and mRNA ace expression level were determined using microbiological, biochemical and molecular biology approach, respectively.  Genotype of E. faecalis was determined based on nucleotide sequence of ace and gelE genes analyzed using web-based 3730xl DNA Analyze software. The results showed that high proportion of E. faecalis found in both root canal and saliva of is related to the incidence of periapical lessions in the primary endodontic patients. This is contrast to the insignificant relationship found between Cps polymorphism, gelatinase activity, and mRNA ace expression with periapical lesions in the patients, respectively.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v23i1.960

  13. A practitioner's guide to gutta-percha removal during endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, S S; Thomas, M B M

    2017-02-24

    Endodontic retreatment can be a challenging task that can result in many complications if not approached cautiously. Many of these difficulties revolve around regaining access to the pulp chamber through extensive coronal restorations and removing residual root filling material, the commonest being gutta-percha (GP), from within obturated canals. This can often be an untidy, time consuming process that places teeth at a greater risk of iatrogenic injury and inhibits the operator achieving the necessary chemical disinfection required to eliminate the persistent apical disease. Therefore the following article aims to aid practitioners, particularly those who are unfamiliar, with accessing and removing GP from endodontically treated teeth. The outlined systematic approach is accessible in general practice, where the vast majority of endodontic treatment is conducted, requires basic equipment and with the correct experience can be applied to both straight and curved canals. By overcoming this initial stage of retreatment, subsequent chemical disinfection, which is critical to success, can be carried out to a higher standard reducing risks of re-infection.

  14. Orbital, mediastinal, and cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema after endodontic retreatment of a mandibular premolar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gregory K; Zats, Boris; Kunin, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema (SCE) rarely occurs from endodontic treatment. Most reported cases of iatrogenic SCE occur in the cervicofacial region. Only a few cases have been reported of SCE extending into the mediastinum or orbital spaces. In the present report, we describe a concomitant occurrence of orbital, mediastinal, and cervicofacial SCE immediately after endodontic retreatment. A 33-year-old woman presented to the hospital with acute swelling of the right side of her face and neck. Earlier in the day, she began experiencing rapid swelling while undergoing endodontic retreatment of a mandibular right first premolar by her general dentist. The dentist immediately referred the case to an oral surgeon who then ordered additional tests and radiographic studies at the hospital. From there, the patient received consultation and comprehensive treatment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and dental staff. Physical examination, laboratory tests, and computed tomographic studies confirmed a diagnosis of SCE. Extensive air pockets were detected within the orbital, mediastinum, and cervicofacial spaces. The patient was admitted to the hospital and underwent treatment and observation for massive SCE with likely secondary infection. On the fifth day, she was discharged after showing dramatic improvement. SCE may go undetected or misdiagnosed. Complications may be fatal. Therefore, clinicians should apply preventive measures and know how to identify and manage SCE. We review reports of SCE in the last century, discuss etiology and differential diagnosis, and present recommendations for prevention and management of SCE. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. To Cut or not to Cut: Can Large Periapical Cysts be Treated by Endodontic Treatment only?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MHK Motamedi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The periapical cyst originates from the epithe-lium in a granuloma and is frequently associated with an inflammatory response to a necrotic pulp. This condition is clinically asymptomatic but can result in a slow-growth, bone resorption and swelling in the affected region.The hypothesis: Some authors support that if the endodontic infection is eliminated, the immune system is able to promote lesion repair, while others believe that surgical intervention is invariably nec-essary to remove cyst epithelium. This hypothesis indicates that large periapical cysts may be treated by only nonsurgical endodontic treatment.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Radicular cysts exist in two structurally distinct classes namely, those containing cavities completely enclosed in epithelial lining (periapical true cysts and those containing epithelium-lined cavities that are open to the root canals (periapical pocket cysts. From a clinical point of view a periapical pocket cyst may heal after conventional root canal therapy whereas an apical true cyst is less likely to be resolved without surgical intervention. During the endodontic therapy of teeth associated with periapi-cal cysts, root canal instrumentation could be done slightly beyond the apical foramen. This will produce a transitory acute inflammation and destruction of the protective epithelial layer of the cyst, converting it into a granulated tissue, which has better resolution. Instru-mentation beyond the apical foramen could be carried out because it would help in cyst resolution through the relief of the intra-cystic pressure.

  16. Establishment and maintenance of asepsis in endodontics - a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Leona; Björkner, Annika Elisabeth; Bergenholtz, Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    Successful endodontic treatment depends on effective measures to eliminate and prevent infection of root canals. Initially treatment should start with isolation and disinfection of the operating field. This review makes an inventory of the available knowledge regarding its establishment and maintenance. A literature search was conducted in the PubMed database in order to identify clinical trials examining disinfection or unintentional contamination of the endodontic operative field. A list of 115 articles was obtained and screened. Five relevant articles were identified. These articles were read in full text. The reference lists from these articles were checked manually for additional studies and three studies were obtained. A total of eight articles met the inclusion criteria. There was a great variety in terms of aim, method, and material of the included studies. None could prove a totally reliable aseptic operative field and not one chemical, or combination of chemicals, were found in more than one study. No study documented complete asepsis following initial disinfection, and no study could document predictable maintenance of an established bacteria-free surface. Critical appraisal and standardization of the disinfection and aseptic procedures in endodontics are needed.

  17. The use of optical fiber in endodontic photodynamic therapy. Is it really relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Aguinaldo S; Fregnani, Eduardo R; Rodriguez, Helena M; Nunez, Silvia C; Sabino, Caetano P; Suzuki, Hideo; Ribeiro, Martha S

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the necessity of use of an optical fiber/diffusor when performing antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) associated with endodontic therapy. Fifty freshly extracted human single-rooted teeth were used. Conventional endodontic treatment was performed using a sequence of ProTaper (Dentsply Maillefer Instruments), the teeth were sterilized, and the canals were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis 3 days' biofilm. The samples were divided into five groups: group 1--ten roots irradiated with a laser tip (area of 0.04 cm(2)), group 2--ten roots irradiated with a smaller laser tip (area of 0.028 cm(2)), and group 3--ten teeth with the crown, irradiate with the laser tip with 0.04 cm(2) of area. The forth group (G4) followed the same methodology as group 3, but the irradiation was performed with smaller tip (area of 0.028 cm(2)) and G5 ten teeth with crown were irradiated using a 200-mm-diameter fiber/diffusor coupled to diode laser. Microbiological samples were taken after accessing the canal, after endodontic therapy, and after PDT. Groups 1 and 2 showed a reduction of two logs (99%), groups 3 and 4 of one log (85% and 97%, respectively), and group 5 of four logs (99.99%). Results suggest that the use of PDT added to endodontic treatment in roots canals infected with E. faecalis with the optical fiber/diffusor is better than when the laser light is used directed at the access of cavity.

  18. The antimicrobial effectiveness of photodynamic therapy used as an addition to the conventional endodontic re-treatment: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurič, Ivona Bago; Plečko, Vanda; Pandurić, Dragana Gabrić; Anić, Ivica

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) used as an adjunct to the endodontic re-treatment in the eradication of microorganisms from previously filled root canals. The study sample consisted of 21 randomly selected patients with root filled and infected root canal system with chronic apical periodontitis on incisors or canines, who have had previously endodontic treatment. Microbiological samples from the root canals were collected after accessing the canal, following the endodontic re-treatment and after the aPDT procedure. During instrumentation, the root canals were irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and the final irrigation protocol included 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid followed by NaOCl. Root canals were filled with a phenothiazinium chloride and irradiated with a diode laser (λ=660 nm, 100 mW) for 1 min. Microbiological samples from the root canals were cultivated on selective plates, and the identification was done by micromorphology, macromorphology and different API strips as well as bacterial counts (colony forming units). Fourteen bacteria species were isolated from the root canals initially, with a mean value of 4.57 species per canal. Although endodontic re-treatment alone produced a significant reduction in the number of bacteria species (pendodontic treatment and aPDT was statistically more effective (pendodontic therapy achieved a significant further reduction of intracanal microbial load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de; Borges, Aline Chiodi; Brighenti, Fernanda Lourenção; Salvador, Marcos José; Gontijo, Aline Vidal Lacerda; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi

    2017-11-06

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral) against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment) and positive controls (chlorhexidine) were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05). Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral). The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC) reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  20. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers.

  1. Some problems encountered in endodontic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, K C; Teo, C S

    1986-07-01

    This retrospective survey highlights some of the problems faced by undergraduate students using the bisecting angle technique in endodontic radiography. The radiographs of maxillary incisors and premolars were observed to suffer from a greater amount of distortion than radiographs of the corresponding mandibular teeth. Further, the presence of rubber dam equipment affected the accuracy of the radiographs, and this was more apparent on the radiographs of the maxillary incisors and premolars compared to the mandibular incisors and premolars. Other problems identified included superimposition, indistinct and missed root apices. Methods to overcome these problems are suggested.

  2. An innovative approach in microscopic endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mittal, Shifali

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the dental operating microscope was a turning point in the history of dentistry. It triggered a rapid transition from the conventional world of macro-dentistry to the precise, detailed world of micro-dentistry. However, working at these higher-power magnifications brings the clinician into the realm where even slight hand movements are disruptive. Physiologic hand tremor is a problem resulting in difficulty in mouth mirror placement. Hence, in this paper, a new instrument was designed to overcome the drawback of hand tremors during microscopic endodontics. PMID:24944459

  3. Proposal of a "Checklist" for endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Flores García, Victor; Perea Pérez, Bernardo; Labajo González, María Elena; Santiago Sáez, Andrés; Cisneros Cabello, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: On the basis of the “Surgical Checklist” proposed by the WHO, we propose a new Checklist model adapted to the procedures of endodontic treatment. Study Design: The proposed document contains 21 items which are broken down into two groups: those which must be verified before beginning the treatment, and those which must be verified after completing it, but before the patient leaves the dentist’s office. Results: The Checklist is an easy-to-use tool that requires little time but pro...

  4. Endodontic retreatment--unusual anatomy of a maxillary second and mandibular first premolar: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Amarnath; Bolla, Nagesh; Vemuri, Sayesh; Kurian, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    An accurate diagnosis of the morphology of the root canal system is a prerequisite for successful root canal treatment. A major cause of endodontic treatment failure in missed (or) untreated root canals is that they still harbor infection. Careful radiographic interpretation and examination of pulp chamber floors are helpful in locating root canal entrances. These case reports present anatomical variations in upper and lower premolars.

  5. Sterilization of rotary NiTi instruments within endodontic sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H W A; Tan, K H; Dashper, S G; Reynolds, E C; Parashos, P

    2015-08-17

    To determine whether the following can be sterilized by autoclaving - endodontic sponges, rotary nickel-titanium (NiTi) instruments within endodontic sponges, and rotary NiTi instruments with rubber stoppers. Sixty-four samples of eight different endodontic sponges (n = 512) were placed into brain heart infusion broth (BHI) for 72 h. An aliquot of this was then spread onto horse blood agar and cultured aerobically and anaerobically to test sterility at purchase. Bacterial suspensions of Enterococcus faecalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Geobacillus stearothermophilus in BHI were used to contaminate sterile sponges and rotary NiTi instruments (with and without rubber stoppers) inserted into sponges. The various samples were autoclaved and then cultured aerobically and anaerobically. Success of sterilization was measured qualitatively as no growth. The experiment was repeated with clinically used rotary NiTi instruments (n = 512). All experiments were conducted in quadruplicate. No sponges on purchase had microbial growth when anaerobically cultured but some did when aerobically cultured. All autoclaved sponges and instruments (within or without sponges, and with or without rubber stoppers) were associated with no microbial growth. All nonautoclaved positive control samples showed microbial growth. Autoclaving was effective in the sterilization of sponges and endodontic instruments. Endodontic sponges should be autoclaved before clinical use. For clinical efficiency and cost-effectiveness, rotary NiTi instruments can be sterilized in endodontic sponges without removal of rubber stoppers. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal M Gathani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ′A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ′Platelet rich plasma′, ′Platelet rich fibrin′, ′Stem cells′, ′Natural and artificial scaffolds′ from 1982-2015′. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon.

  7. Scaffolds in regenerative endodontics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathani, Kinjal M.; Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya

    2016-01-01

    Root canal therapy has enabled us to save numerous teeth over the years. The most desired outcome of endodontic treatment would be when diseased or nonvital pulp is replaced with healthy pulp tissue that would revitalize the teeth through regenerative endodontics. ‘A search was conducted using the Pubmed and MEDLINE databases for articles with the criteria ‘Platelet rich plasma’, ‘Platelet rich fibrin’, ‘Stem cells’, ‘Natural and artificial scaffolds’ from 1982–2015’. Tissues are organized as three-dimensional structures, and appropriate scaffolding is necessary to provide a spatially correct position of cell location and regulate differentiation, proliferation, or metabolism of the stem cells. Extracellular matrix molecules control the differentiation of stem cells, and an appropriate scaffold might selectively bind and localize cells, contain growth factors, and undergo biodegradation over time. Different scaffolds facilitate the regeneration of different tissues. To ensure a successful regenerative procedure, it is essential to have a thorough and precise knowledge about the suitable scaffold for the required tissue. This article gives a review on the different scaffolds providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon. PMID:27857762

  8. Alkaline Materials and Regenerative Endodontics: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Kahler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periapical health is the primary goal of endodontic treatment in mature and immature teeth. In addition, the goals of treatment of immature teeth with arrested root development include root growth to length and maturation of the apex, as well as thickening of the canal wall. These goals are valid for immature teeth that have been subjected to trauma and dental caries or that are the result of developmental anomalies that expose the tooth to the risk of pulp necrosis and consequently result in the cessation of root maturation. Regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs have been described as a “paradigm shift” in the treatment of immature teeth with pulp necrosis and underdeveloped roots, as there is the potential for further root maturation and return of vitality. Treatment with REPs is advocated as the treatment of choice for immature teeth with pulp necrosis. REP protocols involve the use of alkaline biomaterials, primarily sodium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregates and Biodentine, and are the essential components of a successful treatment regimen.

  9. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of type II dens invaginatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MA, Rajini; Kaiwar, Anjali; N, Meena; Kumari R, Anitha; Shetty, Ashish; DN, Naveen; N, Shubhashini

    2009-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of teeth with dens invaginatus, characterized by an infolding of enamel and dentin, extending deep into the pulp cavity near the root apex, may be complicated and challenging. The complexity of the internal anatomy may create challenges for the complete removal of diseased pulpal tissue and the subsequent sealing of the canal system. Because of the bizarre root canal anatomy and widely open apex, a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic treatment or extraction is the most common choice of therapy. This article describes case reports of nonsurgical endodontic treatment of Type II dens invaginatus associated with periradicular lesion. PMID:20617071

  10. Endodontic, surgical and periodontal treatment of dens invaginatus. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellarin, M; Demitri, V; Politi, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a single stage global treatment of endodontic, periapical and periodontal lesions in a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus. A 24 year-old woman presenting a lateral maxillary incisor with dens invaginatus in association with periapica1 and periodontal lesions underwent simultaneous surgical, endodontic and periodontal regenerative procedures. At 2, 6, 12, 18 months follow-up the radiographic healing appeared to be improved and the periapical lesion healed completely 1 year after surgical intervention. Surgery in association with endodontic and periodontal procedures represents the treatment of choice to maximize long term prognosis in cases of dens invaginatus with chronic periapical and periodontal lesions.

  11. Antibiotic content of selective culture media for isolation of Capnocytophaga species from oral polymicrobial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, E; Jolivet-Gougeon, A; Bonnaure-Mallet, M; Fosse, T

    2013-10-01

    In oral microbiome, because of the abundance of commensal competitive flora, selective media with antibiotics are necessary for the recovery of fastidious Capnocytophaga species. The performances of six culture media (blood agar, chocolate blood agar, VCAT medium, CAPE medium, bacitracin chocolate blood agar and VK medium) were compared with literature data concerning five other media (FAA, LB, TSBV, CapR and TBBP media). To understand variable growth on selective media, the MICs of each antimicrobial agent contained in this different media (colistin, kanamycin, trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, aztreonam and bacitracin) were determined for all Capnocytophaga species. Overall, VCAT medium (Columbia, 10% cooked horse blood, polyvitaminic supplement, 3·75 mg l(-1) of colistin, 1·5 mg l(-1) of trimethoprim, 1 mg l(-1) of vancomycin and 0·5 mg l(-1) of amphotericin B, Oxoid, France) was the more efficient selective medium, with regard to the detection of Capnocytophaga species from oral samples (P culture, a simple blood agar allowed the growth of all Capnocytophaga species. Nonetheless, in oral samples, because of the abundance of commensal competitive flora, selective media with antibiotics are necessary for the recovery of Capnocytophaga species. The demonstrated superiority of VCAT medium made its use essential for the optimal detection of this bacterial genus. This work showed that extreme caution should be exercised when reporting the isolation of Capnocytophaga species from oral polymicrobial samples, because the culture medium is a determining factor. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Davison

    Full Text Available The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2-13, Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838 domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics.

  13. Cymbopogon citratus essential oil: effect on polymicrobial caries-related biofilm with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alcionéia Carvalho de OLIVEIRA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil and its main compound (citral against primary dental colonizers and caries-related species. Chemical characterization of the essential oil was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS, and the main compound was determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested against Actinomyces naeslundii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, S. gordonii, S. mitis, S. mutans, S. sanguinis and S. sobrinus. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations were determined by broth microdilution assay for streptococci and lactobacilli reference, and for clinical strains. The effect of the essential oil on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation/disruption was investigated. Negative (without treatment and positive controls (chlorhexidine were used. The effect of citral on preformed biofilm was also tested using the same methodology. Monospecies and microcosm biofilms were tested. ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used (α=0.05. Cytotoxicity of the essential oil to human keratinocytes was performed by MTT assay. GC/MS demonstrated one major component (citral. The essential oil showed an inhibitory effect on all tested bacterial species, including S. mutans and L. acidophilus. Essential oil of C. citratus (10X MIC reduced the number of viable cells of lactobacilli and streptococci biofilms (p < 0.05. The essential oil inhibited adhesion of caries-related polymicrobial biofilm to dental enamel (p < 0.01. Citral significantly reduced the number of viable cells of streptococci biofilm (p < 0.001. The essential oil showed low cytotoxicity to human keratinocytes. Based on these findings, this study can contribute to the development of new formulations for products like mouthwash, against dental biofilms.

  14. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengerfeldt V

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Veiko Vengerfeldt,1 Reet Mändar,2,3 Mare Saag,1 Anneli Piir,2 Tiiu Kullisaar2 1Institute of Dental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 2Institute of Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tartu, 3Competence Centre on Health Technologies, Tartu, Estonia Background: Apical periodontitis (AP is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful.Purpose: To compare oxidative stress (OxS levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects.Patients and methods: The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP, 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP, eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to −80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI] were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. Results: The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p=0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p<0

  15. Ultrasonics in endodontic surgery: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paolis, Gianfranco; Vincenti, Valentina; Prencipe, Matteo; Milana, Valerio; Plotino, Gianluca

    2010-04-01

    Currently, although ultrasonics (US) is used in dentistry for therapeutic and diagnostic applications as well as for cleaning of instruments before sterilization, its main use is for scaling and root planing of teeth and in root canal therapy, both for orthograde and retrograde therapy. Both in conventional and surgical treatments, US in endodontics has enhanced quality of clinical procedures and represents an important adjunct in the treatment of difficult cases. More precisely it has become increasingly more useful in applications such as gaining access to canal openings, cleaning and shaping, obturation of root canals, removal of intracanal materials and obstructions, and endodontic surgery. This review of the literature aims at presenting the numerous advantages of US in surgical endodontics and emphasizes its application in a modern-day endodontic practice.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3890 - Endodontic stabilizing splint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inserted through the root canal into the upper or lower jaw bone to stabilize a tooth. (b) Classification... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3890 Endodontic stabilizing splint. (a...

  17. Bioactive Materials in Endodontics: An Evolving Component of Clinical Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Satyajit; Patro, Swadheena; Mishra, Sumita

    2016-06-01

    Achieving biocompatibility in a material requires an interdisciplinary approach that involves a sound knowledge of materials science, bioengineering, and biotechnology. The host microbial-material response is also critical. Endodontic treatment is a delicate procedure that must be planned and executed properly. Despite major advances in endodontic therapy in recent decades, clinicians are confronted with a complex root canal anatomy and a wide selection of endodontic filling materials that, in turn, may not be well tolerated by the periapical tissues and may evoke an immune reaction. This article discusses published reports of various bioactive materials that are used in endodontic therapy, including calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate, a bioactive dentin substrate, calcium phosphate ceramics, and calcium phosphate cements.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Calcium Hydroxide in Endodontics: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial. PMID:23323217

  19. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Sethi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, a novel modality specifically designed to produce precise, undistorted 3D reconstructed images of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT is increasingly being embraced by various fields in dentistry, remarkably in endodontic practice. A systematic literature-based and book-based review was conducted using the keywords “CBCT in endodontics” and “endodontic applications of CBCT.” This article hereby discusses the prospects of CBCT in endodontics with an emphasis on its application in diagnosis and management along with treatment outcome assessment.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide in endodontics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Z; Shalavi, S; Yazdizadeh, M

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of endodontic therapy is to preserve the patient's natural teeth without compromising the patient's local or systemic health. Calcium hydroxide has been included in several materials and antimicrobial formulations that are used in several treatment modalities in endodontics, such as inter-appointment intracanal medicaments. The purpose of this article was to review the antimicrobial properties of calcium hydroxide in endodontics. Calcium hydroxide has a high pH (approximately 12.5-12.8) and is classified chemically as a strong base. The lethal effects of calcium hydroxide on bacterial cells are probably due to protein denaturation and damage to DNA and cytoplasmic membranes. Calcium hydroxide has a wide range of antimicrobial activity against common endodontic pathogens but is less effective against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. Calcium hydroxide is also a valuable anti-endotoxin agent. However, its effect on microbial biofilms is controversial.

  1. Ludwig's angina: an unusual sequel to endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffin, J R

    1989-05-01

    Ludwig's angina is an unusual sequel to endodontic treatment: such a case is described. Principles of management are discussed with emphasis placed on the need to secure the airway early. The literature is reviewed.

  2. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    to prevent or heal disease, i.e. apical periodontitis . Accordingly, endodontic treatment outcomes can better be defined in reference to healing and...population. It is hoped that the results of this study will ultimately allow us to provide more accurate prognosis and improved treatment planning related...CS, BeGole EA, Johnson BR. Outcome of One-visit and Two-visit Endodontic Treatment of Necrotic Teeth with Apical Periodontitis : A Randomized

  3. Endodontic retreatment: Analysis of three specialists’ retreatment rates

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Golgo Kunert; Itaborai Revoredo Kunert; Caroline Solda; Marina Canali Lângaro; Alessandra Nunes Machado; Fernando Branco Barletta

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic retreatment is a clinical intervention intended to correct errors that have occurred in a treatment performed previously. There are several causes of failures. The anatomical variations between root canals and the diffi culties of achieving microbial disinfection are reported as two of the main causes. However, in the dental offi ces of both general practitioners and specialists, it is very common that the causes of indications for endodontic retreatment are technical failures due ...

  4. Operating microscope in Endodontics: visual magnification and luminosity

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Moreira Feix; Daiana Boijink; Ronise Ferreira; Márcia Helena Wagner; Fernando Branco Barletta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The surgical microscope has been used in Endodontics in order to minimize the obscurity of the surgical field, because it provides a high magnification and luminosity, thereby enhancing the procedures performed and providing a final result of higher quality. Objective and literature review: The objective of this study was to review the literature by addressing the current situation of the operating microscope in Endodontics, emphasizing its advantages and limitations. Despite be...

  5. Restorative and endodontic management of an anomalous mandibular molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, O; el-Deeb, M

    1991-03-01

    Morphologic variations of dental hard tissue should be recognized and considered during restorative procedures. Overlooking anomalies increases the potential for clinical complications. Amalgam was used erroneously in a patient when the presence of a paramolar structure was overlooked. The clinical complications that resulted from overlooking the anomaly led to restorative, endodontic, and periodontal failures. The present report describes the use of conservative endodontics and a cast restoration, taking into account the presence of the paramolar structure, to correct the case.

  6. Endodontic therapy or single tooth implant? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Lozada, Jaime; Puterman, Israel; White, Shane N

    2008-06-01

    Should a tooth with pulpal involvement be saved through endodontic therapy, or extracted and replaced with a single tooth implant? Within the limitations of the existing literature, this systematic review of treatment outcomes found that initial endodontic treatment had a high long-term survival rate, equivalent to replacement of a missing tooth with an implant-supported restoration. Single tooth implants should be considered as the first treatment option for patients requiring extraction and tooth replacement.

  7. [Overall digitalization: leading innovation of endodontics in big data era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, J Q

    2016-04-09

    In big data era, digital technologies bring great challenges and opportunities to modern stomatology. The applications of digital technologies, such as cone-beam CT(CBCT), computer aided design,(CAD)and computer aided manufacture(CAM), 3D printing and digital approaches for education , provide new concepts and patterns to the treatment and study of endodontic diseases. This review provides an overview of the application and prospect of commonly used digital technologies in the development of endodontics.

  8. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  9. Absorbed radiation by various tissues during simulated endodontic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabinejad, M.; Danforth, R.; Andrews, K.; Chan, C.

    1989-06-01

    The amount of absorbed radiation by various organs was determined by placing lithium fluoride thermoluminescent chip dosimeters at selected anatomical sites in and on a human-like X-ray phantom and exposing them to radiation at 70- and 90-kV X-ray peaks during simulated endodontic radiography. The mean exposure dose was determined for each anatomical site. The results show that endodontic X-ray doses received by patients are low when compared with other radiographic procedures.

  10. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of type II dens invaginatus

    OpenAIRE

    MA, Rajini; Kaiwar, Anjali; N, Meena; Kumari R, Anitha; Shetty, Ashish; DN, Naveen; N, Shubhashini

    2009-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of teeth with dens invaginatus, characterized by an infolding of enamel and dentin, extending deep into the pulp cavity near the root apex, may be complicated and challenging. The complexity of the internal anatomy may create challenges for the complete removal of diseased pulpal tissue and the subsequent sealing of the canal system. Because of the bizarre root canal anatomy and widely open apex, a combination of nonsurgical and surgical endodontic treatment or extrac...

  11. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics—A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics—A New Era in Clinical Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Mohamed A. Saoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of ‘regenerative endodontics’ emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists’ Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals

  12. Regeneration and Repair in Endodontics—A Special Issue of the Regenerative Endodontics—A New Era in Clinical Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoud, Tarek Mohamed A.; Ricucci, Domenico; Lin, Louis M.; Gaengler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most common cause of pulp-periapical disease. When the pulp tissue involved in caries becomes irreversibly inflamed and progresses to necrosis, the treatment option is root canal therapy because the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue in the root canal system is not accessible to the host's innate and adaptive immune defense mechanisms and antimicrobial agents. Therefore, the infected or non-infected necrotic pulp tissue must be removed from the canal space by pulpectomy. As our knowledge in pulp biology advances, the concept of treatment of pulpal and periapical disease also changes. Endodontists have been looking for biologically based treatment procedures, which could promote regeneration or repair of the dentin-pulp complex destroyed by infection or trauma for several decades. After a long, extensive search in in vitro laboratory and in vivo preclinical animal experiments, the dental stem cells capable of regenerating the dentin-pulp complex were discovered. Consequently, the biological concept of ‘regenerative endodontics’ emerged and has highlighted the paradigm shift in the treatment of immature permanent teeth with necrotic pulps in clinical endodontics. Regenerative endodontics is defined as biologically based procedures designed to physiologically replace damaged tooth structures, including dentin and root structures, as well as the pulp-dentin complex. According to the American Association of Endodontists’ Clinical Considerations for a Regenerative Procedure, the primary goal of the regenerative procedure is the elimination of clinical symptoms and the resolution of apical periodontitis. Thickening of canal walls and continued root maturation is the secondary goal. Therefore, the primary goal of regenerative endodontics and traditional non-surgical root canal therapy is the same. The difference between non-surgical root canal therapy and regenerative endodontic therapy is that the disinfected root canals in the former

  13. Radiographic assessment of endodontic working length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama S Alothmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of radiographs for working length determination is usual practice in endodontics. Exposing radiographs following the principles of the paralleling technique allows more accurate length determination compared to the bisecting-angle method. However, it has been reported that up to 28.5% of cases can have the file tip extending beyond the confines of the root canals despite an acceptable radiographic appearance. The accuracy of radiographic working length determination could be affected by the location of the apical foramen, tooth type, canal curvature and superimposition of surrounding structures. Variations among observers by virtue of training and experience may also influence the accuracy of the procedure. The interpretation of radiographs could be affected by film speed and viewing conditions, with the superiority of digital imaging over conventional radiography for working length determination remaining debatable. The combination of several methods is recommended for acquiring the most accurate working length.

  14. Magnification's effect on endodontic fine motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, David J; Glickman, Gerald N; Solomon, Eric S; He, Jianing

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effect of magnification on fine motor skills used in endodontics. This study used a novel manual dexterity test that was performed with and without magnification. An 8x operating microscope and 2.5x dental loupes were used for the magnification tests. Forty subjects, 20 with microscope experience and 20 without, participated in the study. Performance on the test was evaluated by using an accuracy scoring system, and the time needed to complete the test was recorded for each subject. A significant increase in accuracy score with each level of magnification was demonstrated (P magnification to enhance fine motor skills was supported in all age groups and experience levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Nanoparticles for antimicrobial purposes in Endodontics: A systematic review of in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samiei, Mohammad [Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Advanced Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farjami, Afsaneh; Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki [Hematology & Oncology Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lotfipour, Farzaneh, E-mail: lotfipoor@tbzmed.ac.ir [School of Advanced Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hematology & Oncology Research Center and Faculty of Pharmacy, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Antimicrobial nanoparticles with enhanced physiochemical properties have attracted attention as modern antimicrobials, especially in the complicated oral cavity environment. The goal of the present article is to review the current state of nanoparticles used for antimicrobial purposes in root canal infections. Methods: A review was conducted in electronic databases using MeSH keywords to identify relevant published literature in English. The analysis and eligibility criteria were documented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analysis (PRISMA-guidelines). No restrictions on publication date were imposed. Data regarding root canal disinfections, general antimicrobial mechanisms of nanoparticles, type of nanoparticles as antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial effect of nanoparticles in endodontics were collected and subjected to descriptive data analysis. Results: The literature search in electronic databases according to the inclusion criteria provided 83 titles and abstracts. Among them 15 papers were related to antimicrobial effect of nanoparticles in Endodontics. Silver nanoparticles with sustainable activity were the most studied agent for its antimicrobial behavior in root canal infection. Aided polymeric nanoparticles with photo or ultrasound, glass bioactive nanoparticles as well as Calcium derivative based nanoparticles, with improved activity in comparison with the non-nano counterparts, are of importance in infection control of dental root canal. Bioactive Non-organic nanoparticles with structural capabilities present enhanced antimicrobial activity in root canal infections. Discussion: All included studies showed an enhanced or at least equal effect of nanoparticulate systems to combat dental root canal infections compared to conventional antimicrobial procedures. However, it is crucial to understand their shortcomings and their probable cellular effects and toxicity as well as environmental effects

  16. Retreatment or radiographic monitoring in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nieuwenhuysen, J P; Aouar, M; D'Hoore, W

    1994-03-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to assess 1032 endodontically treated roots in relation to: (i) the success rate of retreatment (612 roots)--only cases that had recall examinations of 6 months or longer were evaluated; (ii) the influence of various factors on the technical and clinical results of the retreatment; and (iii) the consequences of radiographic monitoring of 420 asymptomatic roots when the root filling was radiographically deficient (short, overextended and/or permeable root fillings). Technical assessment of the retreatment showed that the root was adequately sealed in 52.3% of cases, the root filling was improved in 33.8%, was identical with the initial treatment in 11.1% and was worse than the first treatment in 2.8% of the canals. Clinical assessment of the retreatment of symptomatic roots showed that 71.8% of the retreatments were judged successful, 18.9% showed some healing and 9.3% had failed. The initial size of the periapical lesion, the use of rubber dam, the root filling technique and the apical level of the root filling had a statistically significant influence on the result of the retreatment. Monitoring radiographically (median time span 6 years) led to maintenance of the status quo in 94.8% of cases, healing in 2.4% and failure in 2.8% of the canals. Retreatment is clearly indicated when periapical radiolucency, clinical signs and/or symptoms are present with relative success of up to 91%. When no or little radiographic evidence of periapical pathology was present, when clinical signs and symptoms were absent or when the root filling was radiographically deficient, radiographic monitoring led to complications in only a limited number of cases. clinical decision, endodontic retreatment, radiographic evaluation.

  17. Laser Doppler flowmetry in endodontics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, H

    2009-06-01

    Vascular supply is the most accurate marker of pulp vitality. Tests for assessing vascular supply that rely on the passage of light through a tooth have been considered as possible methods for detecting pulp vitality. Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), which is a noninvasive, objective, painless, semi-quantitative method, has been shown to be reliable for measuring pulpal blood flow. The relevant literature on LDF in the context of endodontics up to March 2008 was reviewed using PubMed and MEDLINE database searches. This search identified papers published between June 1983 and March 2008. Laser light is transmitted to the pulp by means of a fibre optic probe. Scattered light from moving red blood cells will be frequency-shifted whilst that from the static tissue remains unshifted. The reflected light, composed of Doppler-shifted and unshifted light, is returned by afferent fibres and a signal is produced. This technique has been successfully employed for estimating pulpal vitality in adults and children, differential diagnosis of apical radiolucencies (on the basis of pulp vitality), examining the reactions to pharmacological agents or electrical and thermal stimulation, and monitoring of pulpal responses to orthodontic procedures and traumatic injuries. Assessments may be highly susceptible to environmental and technique-related factors. Nonpulpal signals, principally from periodontal blood flow, may contaminate the signal. Because this test produces no noxious stimuli, apprehensive or distressed patients accept it more readily than current methods of pulp vitality assessment. A review of the literature and a discussion of the application of this system in endodontics are presented.

  18. Peregrination of endodontic tools-past to present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Tumkur Shivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical practice of yesterday′s endodontics becomes the heresy of today, and today′s endodontic practice becomes the heresy of tomorrow. The history of endodontics begins in the 17 th century. Since then, there have been numerous advances and developments, and research has proceeded continuously without pause. The manufacture of the first instruments for endodontic use dates back to 1875. These early instruments were made by hand from thin steel wires, and they performed the function of modern barbed broaches. In 1955, Ingle was the first to express the need for standardization of canal instruments. In 1965, the American Association of Endodontists adopted the terminology and nomenclature of the proposed standardized system. For many years, the standard cutting instruments have been the reamer, the K-type file, and the Hedstroem file. Recent changes in both metallurgy and endodontic concepts have led to the introduction of a wide range of new instruments. An effort has been made here to present the journey of endodontic instruments from the past to the present.

  19. Histological evaluation of the root apices of failed endodontic cases

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    Camilla Nicole Pecora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this histological study was to evaluate the different causes of the failures of the endodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: Adult patients who were referred for endodontic surgery and for whom root-end resection was considered suitable were invited to participate in this study. The inclusion criteria were: (1 Patients aged between 18 and 65 years; (2 teeth with apical periodontitis that was diagnosed radiographically; (3 the tooth could not be adequately and better managed by root-canal retreatment; and (4 the crown of the tooth was adequately restored. One hundred root apices were surgically removed together with the periapical pathological tissue from 92 patients (56 males and 36 women.Histological sectioning was performed on calcified specimens that were embedded in a suitable medium. Results: The causes of endodontic failure identified through histological evaluation were as follows: Presence of bacterial and debris into canals (51%, apex transposition and overfilling (3%, presence of the isthmus (21%, bacterial colonization of root surface (2%, untreated canals (11%, and filling material outside root canal (4%. There was no significant difference between the distribution of teeth and the causes of endodontic failures (P = 0.32. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the most common cause of endodontic failure is the insufficient cleaning of the root canal system. It also explores the effectiveness of histological evaluation of the root apex following root-end resection in exploring the causes of endodontic failures.

  20. Epidemiologic evaluation of the outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehrabi, Robert; Rotstein, Ilan

    2010-05-01

    Teeth undergoing initial endodontic therapy have a very high survival rate. Some teeth that continue to show signs of pathosis after the initial therapy will require nonsurgical (orthograde) retreatment. Outcome assessment of endodontic retreatment is crucial for appropriate case selection and treatment planning. However, reports on outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment performed by endodontists are limited in number, and the reported data vary. In this study, outcomes of orthograde endodontic retreatment performed on 4744 teeth were assessed during a period of 5 years. Data were obtained from retreatments that were performed by endodontists participating in the Delta Dental Insurance plan that insures approximately 15 million individuals in the USA. Overall, 89% of teeth were retained in the oral cavity 5 years after the endodontic retreatment. Four percent of all teeth underwent apical surgery that occurred mostly within 2 years from completion of orthograde retreatment. Eleven percent of teeth were extracted at the end of the 5-year observation period. It appears that orthograde endodontic retreatment yields high incidence of tooth retention after 5 years. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving the quality of endodontic record keeping through clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E; Shekaran, L; Muthukrishnan, A

    2017-03-10

    Introduction Record keeping is an essential part of day-to-day practice and plays an important role in treatment, audit and dento-legal procedures. Creating effective endodontic records is challenging due to the scope of information required for comprehensive notes. Two audits were performed to assess the standards of endodontic record keeping by dentists in a restorative dentistry department and students on an endodontic MSc course.Methods Fifty sets of departmental records and 10 sets of student records were retrospectively evaluated against the European Society of Endodontology 2006 guidelines. Results of the first cycle of both audits were presented to departmental staff and MSc students, alongside an educational session. Additionally, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms were developed. Both audits were repeated using the same number of records, thus completing both audit cycles.Results The most commonly absent records included consent, anaesthetic details, rubber dam method, working length reference point, irrigation details and obturation technique. Almost all areas of record keeping improved following the second audit cycle, with some areas reaching 100% compliance when record keeping forms were used. Statistically significant improvements were seen in 24 of the 29 areas in the departmental audit and 14 of the 29 areas in the MSc audit (P = 0.05).Conclusions Significant improvements in endodontic record keeping can be achieved through the provision of education, departmental guidelines, consent leaflets and endodontic record keeping forms.

  2. Methodological Quality Assessment of Meta-analyses in Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Sereen; Lee, Su-Min; Kohli, Meetu R; Setzer, Frank C; Karabucak, Bekir

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this review were to assess the methodological quality of published meta-analyses related to endodontics using the assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR) tool and to provide a follow-up to previously published reviews. Three electronic databases were searched for eligible studies according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria: Embase via Ovid, The Cochrane Library, and Scopus. The electronic search was amended by a hand search of 6 dental journals (International Endodontic Journal; Journal of Endodontics; Australian Endodontic Journal; Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology; Endodontics and Dental Traumatology; and Journal of Dental Research). The searches were conducted to include articles published after July 2009, and the deadline for inclusion of the meta-analyses was November 30, 2016. The AMSTAR assessment tool was used to evaluate the methodological quality of all included studies. A total of 36 reports of meta-analyses were included. The overall quality of the meta-analyses reports was found to be medium, with an estimated mean overall AMSTAR score of 7.25 (95% confidence interval, 6.59-7.90). The most poorly assessed areas were providing an a priori design, the assessment of the status of publication, and publication bias. In recent publications in the field of endodontics, the overall quality of the reported meta-analyses is medium according to AMSTAR. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current considerations concerning endodontically treated teeth: alteration of hard dental tissues and biomechanical properties following endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriu, Bogdan; Vârlan, Constantin; Suciu, Ioana; Vârlan, Virginia; Bodnar, Dana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this general article is to present an overview of the current knowledge about composition and structural changes and also about specific biomechanical alterations related to vitality loss or endodontic therapy. For a long time, these issues have been controversially approached from a clinical standpoint and are therefore still confusing for many practitioners. Vitality loss or endodontic procedures seem to induce only negligible changes in hard dental tissue moisture. Physico-chemical properties of dentin can be modified by some of the endodontic chemical products used for chemo-mechanical debridement. On the other hand, tooth biomechanical behavior is affected, since tooth strength is reduced proportionally to coronal tissue loss, due to either pre-existent carious/non-carious lesions or cavity acces preparation, besides restorative procedures. The related literature shows the lack of accepted clinical standards and consensus regarding the optimal way of approaching the specific tooth biomechanics following endodontic therapy.

  4. Endodontic procedures for retreatment of periapical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Massimo; Corbella, Stefano; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Tsesis, Igor; Rosen, Eyal; Lolato, Alessandra; Taschieri, Silvio

    2016-10-19

    When primary root canal therapy fails, periapical lesions can be retreated with or without surgery. Root canal retreatment is a non-surgical procedure that involves removal of root canal filling materials from the tooth, followed by cleaning, shaping and obturating of the canals. Root-end resection is a surgical procedure that involves exposure of the periapical lesion through an osteotomy, surgical removal of the lesion, removal of part of the root-end tip, disinfection and, commonly, retrograde sealing or filling of the apical portion of the remaining root canal. This review updates one published in 2008. To assess effects of surgical and non-surgical therapy for retreatment of teeth with apical periodontitis.To assess effects of surgical root-end resection under various conditions, for example, when different materials, devices or techniques are used. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 10 February 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 10 February 2016) and Embase Ovid (1980 to 10 February 2016). We searched the US National Registry of Clinical Trials (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials (to 10 February 2016). We placed no restrictions regarding language and publication date. We handsearched the reference lists of the studies retrieved and key journals in the field of endodontics. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving people with periapical pathosis. Studies could compare surgery versus non-surgical treatment or could compare different types of surgery. Outcome measures were healing of the periapical lesion assessed after one-year follow-up or longer; postoperative pain and discomfort; and adverse effects such as tooth loss, mobility, soft tissue recession, abscess, infection, neurological damage or loss of root sealing material

  5. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type b) How to Take Your Child's Temperature Impetigo Infant Botulism Infections That Pets Carry Influenza (Flu) ... Herpes Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Hives (Urticaria) Impetigo Infections That Pets Carry Lyme Disease Measles Molluscum ...

  6. Orthograde retreatment and apexification after unsuccessful endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgley, C M; Wagner, R

    2003-11-01

    To describe a case where a second orthograde retreatment was successful in the management of an infected mandibular right first molar that previously had received both orthograde and retrograde treatments. Periapical surgery is unlikely to be successful unless the root canal system has been adequately debrided and sealed. A case is described where orthograde endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy were unsuccessful in the management of and infected mandibular right first molar. The periapical radiolucency eventually disappeared following a second orthograde retreatment. Teh second retreatment included 12 months of intracanal calcium hydroxide placement to promote apexification, thus allowing subsequent controlled obturation with gutta percha and AH26. At a 5-year review following completion of treatment, the tooth remained asymptomatic and was in normal function. Orthograde retreatment is a treatment option to manage refractory lesions in teeth that have previously received endodontic treatment, retreatment and apicectomy. Orthograde retreatment using long-term intracanal calcium hydroxide can help promote root-end closure of a resected apex.

  7. Nanoparticles for antimicrobial purposes in Endodontics: A systematic review of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Farjami, Afsaneh; Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial nanoparticles with enhanced physiochemical properties have attracted attention as modern antimicrobials, especially in the complicated oral cavity environment. The goal of the present article is to review the current state of nanoparticles used for antimicrobial purposes in root canal infections. A review was conducted in electronic databases using MeSH keywords to identify relevant published literature in English. The analysis and eligibility criteria were documented according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analysis (PRISMA-guidelines). No restrictions on publication date were imposed. Data regarding root canal disinfections, general antimicrobial mechanisms of nanoparticles, type of nanoparticles as antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial effect of nanoparticles in endodontics were collected and subjected to descriptive data analysis. The literature search in electronic databases according to the inclusion criteria provided 83 titles and abstracts. Among them 15 papers were related to antimicrobial effect of nanoparticles in Endodontics. Silver nanoparticles with sustainable activity were the most studied agent for its antimicrobial behavior in root canal infection. Aided polymeric nanoparticles with photo or ultrasound, glass bioactive nanoparticles as well as Calcium derivative based nanoparticles, with improved activity in comparison with the non-nano counterparts, are of importance in infection control of dental root canal. Bioactive Non-organic nanoparticles with structural capabilities present enhanced antimicrobial activity in root canal infections. All included studies showed an enhanced or at least equal effect of nanoparticulate systems to combat dental root canal infections compared to conventional antimicrobial procedures. However, it is crucial to understand their shortcomings and their probable cellular effects and toxicity as well as environmental effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Ex vivo model for studying polymicrobial biofilm formation in root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Díez Ortega

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic disease has mainly a microbial origin. It is caused by biofilms capable of attaching and surviving in the root canal. Therefore, it is important to study the conditions in which those biofilms grow, develop and colonize the root canal system. However, few studies have used natural teeth as models, which would take into account the root canal anatomical complexity and simulate the clinical reality. In this study, we used human premolar root canals to standardize in vitro biofilm optimal formation conditions for microorganisms such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. 128 lower premolars underwent canal preparation using K-type files, and were treated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and EDTA. Samples were inoculated with microorganisms and incubated for 15, 30, 45, and 60 days under anaerobiosis (CO2 atmosphere and aerobiosis. Microorganism presence was confirmed by Gram staining, cell culture, and electron microscopy. Exopolysaccharide matrix and microorganism aggregation were observed following 15 days of incubation. Bacterial growth towards the apical third of the root canal and biofilm maturation was detected after 30 days. CO2 atmosphere favored microbial growth the most. In vitro biofilm maturation was confirmed after 30 days of incubation under a CO2 atmosphere for both bacteria and yeast.

  9. Endodontic Management of Mandibular First Molar with Middle Distal Canal: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Reddy Venumuddala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of variations in root canal morphology is critical for a successful endodontic treatment. This article presents the endodontic management of a unique case of mandibular molar with middle distal canal which is quite uncommon.

  10. Foreign body of endodontic origin in the maxillary sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tanasiewicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies found in the maxillary sinus include tooth roots, burs, dental impression material, root-filling materials, dental implants, and needles. The purpose of this paper was to present an unusual case of a large foreign body of endodontic origin (root-filling material removed from the maxillary sinus. A 45-year-old generally healthy male patient reported to the Department of Conservative Dentistry with Endodontics of the Medical University of Silesia, because of orbital and buccal pain on the right side of his face and headaches in the preceding 6 months. Those symptoms were associated with the end of endodontic treatment of teeth 14 and 16. Periapical X-rays, including of teeth 14 and 16, showed the presence of root canal filling with extrusion of endodontic obturation material beyond the apices of tooth 14. In the case of tooth 16, a completely filled palatal canal and incompletely filled buccal canals were found. There was also an irregular dimness at the upper edge of the X-ray image. Panoramic radiography and computed tomography demonstrated a foreign body in the right sinus. Sinus exploration was performed via a surgical procedure conducted using topical anesthesia. The root apices of tooth 14 were resected, and foreign substance was removed. The practitioner did not correctly recognize a complication that occurred during endodontic treatment, which resulted in extrusion of endodontic material beyond the root apices of tooth 14. This case emphasizes the potential impact that an involved maxillary sinus may have on endodontic therapy. Detailed diagnostic identification based on the medical interview, physical and histopathological examinations, and diagnostic imaging allowed rapid surgical intervention and prevented local and general complications. It is important to realize that the range of the periapical X-ray projection is not always sufficient.

  11. Relationship between IL-1β production and endodontic status of human periapical lesions

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    Popovska Lidija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Apical periodontitis is mainly caused by bacterial infection within the root canal and periapical bone destruction which are prominent features of this lesion. The aim of this study was to determine the quantity of interleukin-1β in the tissues of periapical lesions and to analyze its relationships with: lesion size, previous treatments and pathohistological finding of involved teeth. Methods. Periapical tissues were obtained from patients undergoing periapical surgery. Out of all 80 cases included in the study, 24 had no previous endodontic treatment (open lesions, 37 were with endodontic failure (closed lesion and in 15 cases root canal retreatment was performed few months before the surgery. By excluding four samples, the total of 76 samples, consisted of periapical lesions and the apical part of the tooth root, was collected. Each periapical tissue sample was divided into two equal parts. The one half of each lesion was used for quantification of interleukin-1β in tissue homogenates by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. The other part of each lesion was used for histopathological evaluation. Results. For each of the tissue homogenates, the quantity of interleukin-1β was measured, and it ranged from 0.6 pg/mg up to 74 pg/mg. There was no significant difference between the symptomatology and amount of interleukin-1β. Statistical data analysis showed a moderate correlation between lesion size and interleukin-1β measured values. The highest levels of interleukin-1β corresponded with chronic lesions in the stages of acute exacerbation and granulomas in early developing stages. Persistant granulomas, scar tissues, non-inflamed cysts and teeth with recently finished endodontic treatments showed a significantly lower level of interleukin-1β. Conclusion. The study results suggest that the differences in quantity of interleukin-1β correlate to lesion progression and phases of development.

  12. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in endodontic lesions detected by culture and by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, B P F A; Jacinto, R C; Pinheiro, E T; Sousa, E L R; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R; Souza-Filho, F J

    2005-08-01

    he aim of this study was to investigate the presence of four black-pigmented bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, in endodontic infections by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Microbial samples were obtained from 50 teeth with untreated necrotic pulps (primary infection) and from 50 teeth with failing endodontic treatment (secondary infection). Microbiological strict anaerobic techniques were used for serial dilution, plating, incubation, and identification. For PCR detection, the samples were analyzed using species-specific primers of 16S rDNA and the downstream intergenic spacer region. Culture and PCR detected the test species in 13/100 and 50/100 of the study teeth, respectively. The organisms were cultured from 11/50 (22%) of primarily infected root canal samples and from 2/50 (4%) of secondary root canal samples. PCR detection identified the target species in 32/50 (64%) and 18/50 (36%) of primary and secondary infections, respectively. P. gingivalis was rarely isolated by culture methods (1%), but was the most frequently identified test species by PCR (38%). Similarly, P. endodontalis was not recovered by culture from any tooth studied, but was detected by PCR in 25% of the sampled teeth. PCR-based identification also showed higher detection rates of P. intermedia (33%) and P. nigrescens (22%) than culture (13%). In conclusion, P. gingivalis, P. endodontalis, P. intermedia, and P. nigrescens were identified more frequently in teeth with necrotic pulp than in teeth with failing endodontic treatment. Also, a higher frequency of black-pigmented species was detected by PCR than by culture.

  13. Endodontic retreatment vs dental implants of teeth with an uncertain endodontic prognosis: 1-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Tallarico, Marco; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Gianserra, Rodolfo

    To ascertain whether in the presence of a previously endodontically treated tooth with a periapical pathology and/or symptoms and an uncertain prognosis, it is better to endodontically retreat it or to replace the tooth with a single implant-supported crown. Forty patients requiring the treatment of a previously endodontically treated tooth, with a periapical pathology and/or symptoms of endodontic origin and an uncertain prognosis, as judged by the recruiting investigators, were randomly allocated to endodontic retreatment (endo group; 20 patients) or tooth extraction and replacement with an implant-supported crown (implant group; 20 patients) according to a parallel group design at two different centres. Patients were followed to 1 year after completion of the treatment. Outcome measures were: failure of the procedure, complications, marginal bone level changes at both teeth and implants, endodontic radiographic success (teeth only), number of patients' visits and days to complete the treatment, patients' chair time, costs, aesthetics assessed using the pink esthetic score (PES) for the soft tissues and the white esthetic score (WES) for the tooth/crown recorded by independent assessors. No patient dropped out and no complications occurred during the entire follow-up; however, one endodontically retreated tooth (5%) and one implant (5%) fractured, the difference for treatment failures being not statistically significant (difference in proportions = 0; 95% CI -0.14 to 0.14; P Fisher's exact test) = 1.000). The mean marginal bone levels at endo retreatment/implant insertion were 2.34 ± 0.88 mm for the endo and 0.23 ± 0.35 mm for the implant group, which was statistically significantly different (mean difference = 2.11 mm; 95% CI: 1.68 to 2.55; P (t-test) endodontic retreatment, of the 13 teeth that originally had a periapical radiolucency, one was lost, six showed complete healing; four a radiographic improvement; and two showed no changes/worsening. Two of the

  14. Root canal revascularization. The beginning of a new era in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahabi, Mothanna K; Ali, Mahmoud M

    2014-05-01

    Endodontic management of immature anterior teeth with necrotic pulps is a great challenge. Although there are different treatment procedures to deal with this problem such as apexification by using calcium hydroxide dressings or applying a barrier of mineral trioxide aggregate and gutta-percha obturation, the outcomes are still unsatisfactory and the root might still be weak. Recently, a new treatment protocol by revascularization of immature non-vital, infected teeth was introduced to regenerate dental structure and complete the root maturation. However, larger case series with longer follow-up periods are required to accept revascularization as the standard protocol for management of immature non-vital, infected teeth. In this review, we discuss the concept of root canal revascularization, revascularization mechanisms, and the structure of the regenerated tissues.

  15. [Desmoplastic fibroma. Differential diagnosis of a periapical lesion from endodontic failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalegui, B; Gil, J; Zabalegui, I

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of endodontically involved teeth requires accurate diagnosis of the clinical pulpal condition to determine the primary cause of pathosis. The case presented shows the differential diagnosis between a desmoplastic fibroma and a failure of a misdiagnosed endodontic treatment. The initial direction of treatment should had never been the endodontic therapy but local surgical curettage of the lesion.

  16. Application of Chitosan and Propolis in Endodontic Treatment: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoskiewicz-Malinowska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Urszula; Malicka, Barbara; Walczak, Katarzyna; Zietek, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan and propolis are natural substances that can be commonly found in the environment. Chitosan is one of the several cationic polysaccharides found in nature. It is a natural biopolymer transformed from chitin which is a product of crustacean shells. Propolis is produced by honeybees through mixing the secretions of their hypopharyngeal glands with the digested product of resins collected from plants. Due to their excellent chemical and biological properties, chitosan and propolis arouse keen interest in dental science, including endodontics. There are various possibilities for applying propolis and chitosan based medicaments in endodontic treatment of root canals, and what is particularly emphasized is their potential effectiveness against resistant microorganisms such as E. faecalis and C. albicans, as well as biocompatible to the periapical tissues in comparison with the most commonly used agents. They aim at microflora which is difficult to eliminate, and their medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antiseptic properties, make them suitable for use in endodontic treatment. Due to the potential side effects of commonly used synthetic drugs and other safety related reasons, natural alternatives for endodontic usage are continuously explored and tested. The paper presents the possibilities of applying propolis and chitosan in endodontic treatment on the basis of chosen articles published in recent years. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, M.H.; Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  18. Outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment and endodontic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Handysides, Robert; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment with those of endodontic surgery to determine which modality offers more favorable outcomes. The study began with targeted electronic searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane databases, followed with exhaustive hand searching and citation mining for all articles reporting clinical and/or radiographic outcomes for at least a mean follow-up of 2 years for these procedures. Pooled and weighted success rates were determined from a meta-analysis of the data abstracted from the articles. A significantly higher success rate was found for endodontic surgery at 2-4 years (77.8%) compared with nonsurgical retreatment for the same follow-up period (70.9%; P retreatment showing a higher success rate of 83.0% compared with 71.8% for endodontic surgery (P Endodontic surgery studies showed a statistically significant decrease in success with each increasing follow-up interval (P retreatment success rates demonstrated a statistically significant increase in weighted success from 2-4 years (70.9%) to 4-6 years (83.0%; P endodontic surgery offers more favorable initial success, but nonsurgical retreatment offers a more favorable long-term outcome.

  19. CBCT: a revolutionary diagnostic aid for endodontic dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtu, A; Aggarwal, A; Mohan, S; Singhal, A; Bansal, R; Agnihotri, K

    2014-09-01

    Successful management of endodontic problems is reliant on diagnostic imaging techniques to provide critical information about the teeth under investigation, and their surrounding anatomy. Until recently, most of this core information was obtained from conventional radiographs. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region heralds a true paradigm shift from a two dimensional (2D) to a three dimensional (3D) approach to data acquisition and image reconstruction. CBCT systems provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and post treatment evaluation. CBCT has been the subject of unparalleled levels of independent research in dental imaging in the area of endodontics. It gives the edge of 3D imaging at lower radiation level in comparison to conventional CT and has helped to treat endodontic cases with external resoption, root canal variations and apical periodontitis providing the size, site and extent accurately. This paper reviews the fundamentals of CBCT and presents the applications of this imaging system in contemporary endodontic practice.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endodontics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, Dario; Gambarini, Gianluca; Capuani, Silvia; Testarelli, Luca

    2018-04-01

    This review analyzes the increasing role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in dentistry and its relevance in endodontics. Limits and new strategies to develop MRI protocols for endodontic purposes are reported and discussed. Eligible studies were identified by searching the PubMed databases. Only original articles on dental structures, anatomy, and endodontics investigated by in vitro and in vivo MRI were included in this review. Original articles on MRI in dentistry not concerning anatomy and endodontics were excluded. All the consulted studies showed well-defined images of pathological conditions such as caries and microcracks. The enhanced contrast of pulp provided a high-quality reproduction of the tooth shape and root canal in vitro and in vivo. Assessment of periapical lesions is possible even without the use of contrast medium. MRI is a nonionizing technique characterized by high tissue contrast and high image resolution of soft tissues; it could be considered a valid and safe diagnostic investigation in endodontics because of its potential to identify pulp tissues, define root canal shape, and locate periapical lesions. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel surface coating materials for endodontic dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, M.H. [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Materials Engineering Dept., Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, V.; Moosavi, S.B. [Isfahan Univ. of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to design and produce novel coating materials in order to obtain two goals including; improvement of the corrosion behavior of metallic dental endodontic implant and the bone osteointegration simultaneously. Stainless steel 316L (SS) was used as a metallic substrate and a novel Hydroxyapatite/Titanium (HA/Ti) composite coating was prepared on it. Structural characterization techniques including XRD, SEM and EDX were utilized to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the coating. Electrochemical tests were performed in physiological solutions in order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens as an indication of biocompatibility. Two types of endodontic implants including; SS with and without (HA/Ti) composite coating were prepared and subsequently implanted in the mandibular canine of 20 cats after completion of root canal treatment and osseous preparation. After a healing period of 4 months, osteointegration evaluation and histopathological interpretation was carried out using SEM and optical microscopy. Results indicate that the novel HA/Ti composite coating improves the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of SS endodontic dental implant. The clinical evaluation (in vivo test) results showed that there was significant difference in osteointegration between coated and uncoated endodontic dental implants and average bone osteointegration of coated implants were more than uncoated implants. The histopathological results and bone tissue response to the coated implants was acceptable and it was concluded that HA/Ti composite coated SS could be used as well as an endodontic dental implant. (author)

  2. 3D Computer aided treatment planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Vissink, Arjan; Ng, Yuan Ling; Gulabivala, Kishor

    2016-02-01

    Obliteration of the root canal system due to accelerated dentinogenesis and dystrophic calcification can challenge the achievement of root canal treatment goals. This paper describes the application of 3D digital mapping technology for predictable navigation of obliterated canal systems during root canal treatment to avoid iatrogenic damage of the root. Digital endodontic treatment planning for anterior teeth with severely obliterated root canal systems was accomplished with the aid of computer software, based on cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) scans and intra-oral scans of the dentition. On the basis of these scans, endodontic guides were created for the planned treatment through digital designing and rapid prototyping fabrication. The custom-made guides allowed for an uncomplicated and predictable canal location and management. The method of digital designing and rapid prototyping of endodontic guides allows for reliable and predictable location of root canals of teeth with calcifically metamorphosed root canal systems. The endodontic directional guide facilitates difficult endodontic treatments at little additional cost. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. ENDODONTIC TREATMENT AND POST-CORE RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Hafifah

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic root canal treatment is to maintain the tooth as long as possible in the arch’s width in a good functional status. In order to reach that goal, all irritation to the pulp should be eliminated so that the tooth has a healthy periodontal tissue support. A female patient, aged 37 years, came for her upper front tooth which had been restored with a pin crown a year ago. One month ago she had a swelling accompanied with throbbing pain. There was no history of general diseases and her oral hygiene was good. Clinically 11 was restored with a pin crown and the radiographic picture showed a narrow pulp chamber, normal roots with normal canals, thickened periodontium, broken laminar dura, and diffuse periapical rarefaction. The tooth was diagnosed with pulpal necrosis. A conventional root canal treatment was performed followed by the insertion of a post core crown. The result showed a satisfactory treatment plan, a good restoration, successful treatment in this case was due to the role of the dentist to create healthy soft and hard tissues in the oral cavity before restoration, and also due to patient cooperation.

  4. Baicalin improves survival in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis via suppressing inflammatory response and lymphocyte apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An imbalance between overwhelming inflammation and lymphocyte apoptosis is the main cause of high mortality in patients with sepsis. Baicalin, the main active ingredient of the Scutellaria root, exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and even antibacterial properties in inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the therapeutic effect of baicalin on polymicrobial sepsis remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in C57BL/6 mice. Mice were infused with baicalin intraperitoneally at 1 h, 6 h and 12 h after CLP. Survival rates were assessed over the subsequent 8 days. Bacterial burdens in blood and peritoneal cavity were calculated to assess the bacterial clearance. Neutrophil count in peritoneal lavage fluid was also calculated. Injuries to the lung and liver were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Levels of cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17, in blood and peritoneum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Adaptive immune function was assessed by apoptosis of lymphocytes in the thymus and counts of different cell types in the spleen. Baicalin significantly enhanced bacterial clearance and improved survival of septic mice. The number of neutrophils in peritoneal lavage fluid was reduced by baicalin. Less neutrophil infiltration of the lung and liver in baicalin-treated mice was associated with attenuated injuries to these organs. Baicalin significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines but increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine in blood and peritoneum. Apoptosis of CD3(+ T cell was inhibited in the thymus. The numbers of CD4(+, CD8(+ T lymphocytes and dendritic cells (DCs were higher, while the number of CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells was lower in the baicalin group compared with the CLP group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Baicalin improves survival of mice

  5. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik Krarup; Garcia, Javier; Væth, Michael; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes) were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  6. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong AWY

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy WY Wong, Chengfei Zhang, Chun-hung Chu Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China Abstract: Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit. Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of

  7. Comparison of the effectiveness of sterilizing endodontic files by 4 different methods: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubramanian, R; Das, U M; Bhatnagar, S

    2010-01-01

    Sterilization is the best method to counter the threats of microorganisms. The purpose of sterilization in the field of health care is to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. In dentistry, it primarily relates to processing reusable instruments to prevent cross-infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of 4 methods of sterilizing endodontic instruments: Autoclaving, carbon dioxide laser sterilization, chemical sterilization (with glutaraldehyde) and glass-bead sterilization. The endodontic file was sterilized by 4 different methods after contaminating it with bacillus stearothermophillus and then checked for sterility by incubating after putting it in test tubes containing thioglycollate medium. The study showed that the files sterilized by autoclave and lasers were completely sterile. Those sterilized by glass bead were 90% sterile and those with glutaraldehyde were 80% sterile. The study concluded that autoclave or laser could be used as a method of sterilization in clinical practice and in advanced clinics; laser can be used also as a chair side method of sterilization.

  8. Photodynamic therapy versus ultrasonic irrigation: interaction with endodontic microbial biofilm, an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Omid H; Chevalier, Marlene; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie; Medioni, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy was introduced as an adjuvant to conventional chemo-mechanical debridement during endodontic treatment to overcome the persistence of biofilms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to disrupt an experimental microbial biofilm inside the root canal in a clinically applicable working time. Thirty extracted teeth were prepared and then divided in three groups. All samples were infected with an artificially formed biofilm made of Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus salivarius, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia bacteria. First group was treated with Aseptim Plus® photo-activated (LED) disinfection system, second group by a 650 nm Diode Laser and Toluidine blue as photosensitizer, and the third group, as control group, by ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) using EDTA 17% and NaOCl 2.6% solutions. The working time for all three groups was fixed at 3 min. Presence or absence of biofilm was assessed by aerobic and anaerobic cultures. There was no statistically significant difference between results obtained from groups treated by Aseptim Plus® and Diode Laser (Ptherapy could not disrupt endodontic artificial microbial biofilm and could not inhibit bacterial growth in a clinically favorable working time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-microbial efficiency of silver diamine fluoride as an endodontic medicament - An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod B Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Antisepsis achieved through appropriate use of irrigants is essential for endodontic success. Identification of newer anti-bacterial agents gives alternatives to clean the canal as eradication of the infection prior to obturation does affect prognosis. Objective: Comparison of the anti-bacterial action of 3.8% silver diamine fluoride and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate against Enterococcus faecalis in root canals. Materials and Methods: Forty-four single-rooted teeth were decoronated, and the root section was enlarged with peeso-reamer (No: 3 to standardize length and diameter. The samples were then autoclaved and divided into two study groups and two control groups. Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 was inoculated into all test samples for 72 hours. The samples were enlarged with peeso-reamer (No: 5 after placement of respective medicament for 24 hours. Shavings were collected and inoculated on Brain Heart Infusion agar for 24 hrs to measure the colony forming units. Results: Both 3.8% silver diamine fluoride and 2% chlorhexidine showed a superior capacity to sterilize the root canals than control groups. Conclusion: The use of silver diamine fluoride as an endodontic irrigant is feasible as it can effectively remove the microbes present in the canal and circumpulpal dentin.

  10. Comparison of the effectiveness of sterilizing endodontic files by 4 different methods: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatasubramanian R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sterilization is the best method to counter the threats of microorganisms. The purpose of sterilization in the field of health care is to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. In dentistry, it primarily relates to processing reusable instruments to prevent cross-infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of 4 methods of sterilizing endodontic instruments: Autoclaving, carbon dioxide laser sterilization, chemical sterilization (with glutaraldehyde and glass-bead sterilization. The endodontic file was sterilized by 4 different methods after contaminating it with bacillus stearothermophillus and then checked for sterility by incubating after putting it in test tubes containing thioglycollate medium. The study showed that the files sterilized by autoclave and lasers were completely sterile. Those sterilized by glass bead were 90% sterile and those with glutaraldehyde were 80% sterile. The study concluded that autoclave or laser could be used as a method of sterilization in clinical practice and in advanced clinics; laser can be used also as a chair side method of sterilization.

  11. Endodontic retreatment strategies used by general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, Thomas; Heden, Gunnar; Reit, Claes

    2004-04-01

    Root-filled teeth with persistant periapical radiolucencies are often classified as endodontic failures. Studies have shown that general dental practitioners (GDP) do not consistantly suggest retreatment of "failures." The "Praxis Concept" (PC) theory hypothesizes that dentists conceive periapical health and disease as different states on a continuum. This study examined endodontic retreatment concepts among 157 GDPs from Värmland, Sweden. In 6 simulated cases the periapical condition, quality of root filling and presence of a root canal-retained post were systematically varied. Five options were offered: no therapy, wait and see, nonsurgical retreatment, surgical retreatment, and extraction. The investigation showed large interindividual variation in retreatment behavior among the GDPs. Only 9 dentists (6%) where found to repeatedly suggest retreatment of endodontic failures. A majority of GDPs (79%) performed in accordance with PC. The data indicate that several retreatment decision rules are used by Swedish GDPs, but PC-derived strategies attract the majority.

  12. Effect of combined digital imaging parameters on endodontic file measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Matheus Lima; Pinto, Geraldo Camilo de Souza; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Tosoni, Guilherme Monteiro

    2012-10-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of a dedicated endodontic filter, spatial resolution, and contrast resolution on the determination of endodontic file lengths. Forty extracted single-rooted teeth were x-rayed with K-files (ISO size 10 and 15) in the root canals. Images were acquired using the VistaScan system (Dürr Dental, Beitigheim-Bissingen, Germany) under different combining parameters of spatial resolution (10 and 25 line pairs per millimeter [lp/mm]) and contrast resolution (8- and 16-bit depths). Subsequently, a dedicated endodontic filter was applied on the 16-bit images, creating 2 additional parameters. Six observers measured the length of the endodontic files in the root canals using the software that accompanies the system. The mean values of the actual file lengths and the measurements of the radiographic images were submitted to 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test at a level of significance of 5%. The intraobserver reproducibility was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. All combined image parameters showed excellent intraobserver agreement with intraclass correlation coefficient means higher than 0.98. The imaging parameter of 25 lp/mm and 16 bit associated with the use of the endodontic filter did not differ significantly from the actual file lengths when both file sizes were analyzed together or separately (P > .05). When the size 15 file was evaluated separately, only 8-bit images differed significantly from the actual file lengths (P ≤ .05). The combination of an endodontic filter with high spatial resolution and high contrast resolution is recommended for the determination of file lengths when using storage phosphor plates. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Microstructural effects on Ni-Ti endodontic instruments failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, G. [ENSCP, Paris (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Structurale; UFR d' Odontologie, Paris (France); Jordan, L. [ENSCP, Paris (France). Lab. de Metallurgie Structurale; UFR d' Odontologie, Paris (France); CECM, CNRS, Vitry-sur-Seine (France)

    2001-11-01

    Endodontic treatments consist to eliminate the vascular nervous system of the tooth. The objectives of this treatment are adequate cleaning and shaping the root canals of the tooth. The endodontic treatment is essential to the success of prosthetics therapy and the lifetime of the tooth. The difficulties of endodontic treatments lie in the abruptness of canal curvature. Ni-Ti endodontic instruments were introduced to facilitate instrumentation of curved canals. They are superelastic and flex far more than stainless-steel instruments. Despite the increased flexibility we can observe unexpected fractures of these Ni-Ti files. The purpose of this work is to understand the process history on fracture life. Our results are based on microstructural and mechanical investigations of Ni-Ti engine-driven rotary files: X-ray diffraction, SEM, DSC, microhardness and bending tests. Thus, and as we expected, endodontic files are very work-hardened: there is a high density of defects in the alloy, which will impede the phase transformation. DSC : the phase transformation A/R-Phase is predominant, the martensitic transformation is difficult to observe. The microvickers hardness confirms these observations (dislocations and precipitates). The X-rays show that the experimental peaks are broad, which is typical of a distorted lattice. Moreover, machining resulted in the work hardening of files. Some thermal treatments are involved in promoting some changes in the mechanical properties and transformation characteristics. Annealing around 400 C shows good results : the recovery allows a compromise between an adequate density of defects to see the R-Phase germination and a low density to limit the brittleness of these instruments. The surface state of the endodontic files is an important factor for failures and fractures initiation. In these applications, it is very critical to predict the service life based on the theoretical modeling. (orig.)

  14. Different Patterns of Restoration Provision Between Initial Endodontic Treatment and Retreatment: A Retrospective Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Giannakoulas, Dimitrios G; Kournetas, Nikos; Grigoriou, Stamatina; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between type of endodontic treatment and choice of definitive restoration and to show the prevalence of endodontic treatment options according to patient age and type of tooth. Data were collected from the archive system of the School of Dentistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Athens, Greece. The sample included endodontically treated teeth being restored definitively at the time of data collection. Statistically significant difference was found regarding the type of restoration between initial endodontic treatments and retreatments (P Endodontic retreatment seemed to have a significant effect on the choice of definitive restoration of the tooth.

  15. Regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering: what the future holds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodis, Harold E; Kinaia, Bassam Michael; Kinaia, Atheel M; Chogle, Sami M A

    2012-07-01

    The work performed by researchers in regenerative endodontics and tissue engineering over the last decades has been superb; however, many questions remain to be answered. The basic biologic mechanisms must be elucidated that will allow the development of dental pulp and dentin in situ. Stress must be placed on the many questions that will lead to the design of effective, safe treatment options and therapies. This article discusses those questions, the answers to which may become the future of regenerative endodontics. The future remains bright, but proper support and patience are required. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Infection and Pulp Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahng G. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex has been a great challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Previous work has shown that the presence of prior infection may influence the characteristics of tissues formed in the root canal space after regenerative endodontic treatment. The formation of ectopic tissues such as periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum has been observed in the root canal space of immature necrotic teeth with apical periodontitis, while the regeneration of dentin and pulp has been identified in previously non-infected teeth. The current regenerative endodontic therapy utilizes disinfection protocols, which heavily rely on chemical irrigation using conventional disinfectants. From a microbiological point of view, the current protocols may not allow a sufficiently clean root canal microenvironment, which is critical for dentin and pulp regeneration. In this article, the significance of root canal disinfection in regenerating the pulp-dentin complex, the limitations of the current regenerative endodontic disinfection protocols, and advanced disinfection techniques designed to reduce the microorganisms and biofilms in chronic infection are discussed.

  17. Management of persistent periapical infection on maxillary lateral incisorby apex resection of: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Yusri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic failure can be caused by different etiology, one of them is a persistent periapical infection in the root canal system. If the endodontic convensional retreatment is difficult to be done, surgical endodontic will be recomended. Endodontic surgical can eliminate the causative agent of periradicular disease and to restore the biological condition of periodontium and functional. A 22 years old male patient came to the Dental Hospital Hasanuddin University at Tamalanrea with the chief complaint is discomfort of the left maxillary lateral incisor. Radiograph examinations showed radiolucency 4 mm of tooth 22. The diagnosis is chronic apical periodontitis.Three month after endodontic conventional, the patients complaint is settled. Extended care plan will be treated is apex resection. The purpose of this case report is to present the treatment protocol of apex resection on  the maxillary left lateral incisor.

  18. Mechanical behavior of pathfinding endodontic instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Hélio P; Elias, Carlos N; Siqueira, José F; Soares, Renata G; Souza, Letícia C; Oliveira, Julio C M; Lopes, Weber S P; Mangelli, Marcelo

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the mechanical properties of 3 pathfinding endodontic instruments. The test instruments were subjected to mechanical tests to evaluate resistance to bending (flexibility), buckling, cyclic fatigue, and torsional load in clockwise rotation. Data were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons. In the buckling resistance test, the highest values were observed for C-Pilot files (VDW, Munich, Germany) and the lowest for Scout RaCe (FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instruments. In the bending resistance test, the lowest flexibility was observed for the C-Pilot instrument, and no significant difference was observed between Scout RaCe and PathFile (Maillefer/Dentsply, Ballaigues, Switzerland) instruments. The ranking in the fatigue resistance test was the following: PathFile > Scout RaCe > C-Pilot, with statistically significant differences observed in the number of cycles to fracture between all the instruments. In the torsional assay, the angular deflection to fracture decreased in the following order: Scout RaCe > PathFile > C-Pilot. As for the maximum torque values, the ranking was as follows: C-Pilot > PathFile > Scout RaCe. Findings revealed that the stainless-steel C-Pilot instrument showed increased resistance to buckling but decreased flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance when compared with nickel-titanium pathfinding instruments. PathFile instruments showed the highest resistance to cyclic fatigue, and Scout RaCe files exhibited the highest angular deflection to fracture. The different mechanical behavior of the instruments indicates that the combined use of stainless steel hand instruments and rotary nickel-titanium instruments during the exploration of narrow curved canals may be necessary to exploit the best performance of each pathfinding instrument. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel approach to probe host-pathogen interactions of bovine digital dermatitis, a model of a complex polymicrobial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    the assumption that treponemes were the major DD pathogens but also indicated the active involvement of other phyla (primarily Bacteroidetes). Bacterial genes involved in chemotaxis, flagellar synthesis and protection against oxidative and acidic stress were among the major factors defining the disease......'s capacity to mount an efficient immune response and maintain immunological memory towards DD. The common antigenic markers identified here using a high-density peptide microarray address this issue and may be useful for future preventive measures against DD....

  20. Impacted stapler pin in fractured maxillary central incisor with open apex: Advanced endodontic management using biodentine as innovative apical matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of foreign objects in the pulp chamber of fractured permanent teeth is a rare phenomenon and often diagnosed accidently .These foreign bodies are most commonly self inflicted by young patients and remain impacted within the pulp canal thereby acting as potential source of infection and painful conditions1. In the present case report, we present successful endodontic management of stapler pin lodged in fractured maxillary central incisor with challenge of open apex in young patient using biodentine as a novel apical matrix.

  1. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm...the immune system and may be involved in both the response to sepsis and malignancy. For example, in neonatal mice, BMP signaling is a normal part of

  2. Validation of an extracted tooth model of endodontic irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, C K; Burnside, G; Chan, S N; Giles, L H; Jarad, F D

    2011-01-01

    An extracted tooth model of endodontic irrigation, incorporating reproducible inoculation and irrigation procedures, was tested against Enterococcus faecalis using a variety of different irrigants in a Latin square methodology. ANOVA revealed no significant variations between the twelve teeth or experiments undertaken on different occasions; however, variation between irrigants was significant. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. endodontic treatment of unusually long discolored maxillary central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    system together with prompt and adequate restoration. Therefore, the endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external ... The access cavity was restored with composite resin. At three month post operative review visit, the tooth was clinically asymptomatic and radiographically, there.

  4. Bisphosphonates and their clinical implications in endodontic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moinzadeh, A.T.; Shemesh, H.; Neirynck, N.A.M.; Aubert, C.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the factors that may play a role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BPs) and undergoing nonsurgical endodontic treatment as well as some recommendations for its prevention. BPs are a widely prescribed group of

  5. Establishing Apical Patency and its Effect on Endodontic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    accurate prognosis and improved treatment planning related to establishing apical patency. The preliminary results of this interim analysis indicate there...canal space and periodontal ligament. Establishing apical patency is controversial with only 50% of dental programs in the United States teaching the...concept. Both sides can cite articles favoring their position. However, the clinical impact of establishing patency on endodontic treatment outcome

  6. Patterns of bone loss around teeth restored with endodontic posts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsamakis, S.; Timmerman, M.; van der Velden, U.; de Cleen, M.; van der Weijden, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study described the pattern of bone loss around teeth with endodontic posts in periodontitis patients, and compared it with contra-lateral teeth without posts. Material and Methods: From full-mouth radiographic surveys of 146 periodontitis patients (35 years), 194

  7. Radiographic evaluation of cases referred for surgical endodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornbusch, H.; Broersma, L.; Boering, G.; Wesselink, P.R.

    Aim The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that more patients with failed root-canal treatment or other endodontic problems are referred for periradicular surgery rather than nonsurgical re-treatment. Methodology Three sets of 100 periapical radiographs representing typical cases referred

  8. A survey of dental residents' expectations for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguno, Christine; Murray, Peter E; Howard, Cameron; Madras, Jonathan; Mangan, Stephen; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The objective was to survey a group of dental residents regarding their expectations for using regenerative endodontic procedures as part of future dental treatments. After institutional review board approval, the opinions of 32 dentists who were having postgraduate residency training to become specialists in a dental school were surveyed. The survey had 40 questions about professional status, ethical beliefs, judgment, and clinical practice. It was found that 83.9% of dentists had no continuing education or training in stem cells or regenerative endodontic procedures. Results showed that 96.8% of dentists are willing to receive training to be able to provide regenerative endodontic procedures for their patients. Of the total group, 49.1% of dentists already use membranes, scaffolds, or bioactive materials to provide dental treatment. It was determined that 47.3% of dentists agree that the costs of regenerative procedures should be comparable with current treatments. It was also found that 55.1% of dentists were unsure whether regenerative procedures would be successful. Dentists are supportive of using regenerative endodontic procedures in their dental practice, and they are willing to undergo extra training and to buy new technology to provide new procedures. Nevertheless, dentists also need more evidence for the effectiveness and safety of regenerative treatments before they will be recommended for most patients. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The Effect of Smear Layer Removal on Endodontic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Funding was provided by WRNMMC, Bethesda, MD. The Endodontics Department at the Naval Postgraduate Dental School (NPDS) is a referral-based clinic...thank Dr. Francois Tuamokumo and Dr. Glen Imamura from the Walter Reed Department of Research Programs for the statistical analysis support. The

  10. Treatment of periodontal-endodontic lesions--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Julia C; Walter, Clemens; Amato, Mauro; Weiger, Roland

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of periodontal-endodontic lesions is challenging due to the involvement of both periodontal and endodontic tissues. To evaluate the treatment options and outcomes of periodontal-endodontic lesions. A systematic literature search was performed for articles published by 12 May 2013 using electronic databases and hand search. Two reviewers conducted the study selection, data collection and validity assessment. The PRISMA criteria were applied. From 1087 titles identified by the search strategy, five studies and 18 case reports were included. Clinical studies and case reports were published from the years 1981 to 2012. A pronounced heterogeneity exists among studies regarding applied treatment protocols and quality of reporting. In all clinical studies, comprising 111 teeth, a non-surgical root canal treatment (RCT) was performed as initial treatment step. Non-surgical and/or a surgical periodontal therapy was applied in some studies without re-evaluation of the endodontic healing. Probing pocket depth reductions were reported in all included studies, comprising the data from 80 teeth at follow-up. A sequential treatment with root canal treatment as a first treatment step appears to be reasonable. An adequate time for tissue healing is suggested prior to re-evaluation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  12. Regenerative endodontic treatment for necrotic immature permanent premolar: A report of case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal B Ghivari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontic procedures provide new hope of converting nonvital tooth into vital once again. These potential regenerative approaches include root canal revascularization, postnatal stem-cell therapy, pulp implant, scaffold implant, three-dimensional cell printing, injectable scaffolds, and gene therapy. In this article, we describe successful revascularization treatment of necrotic permanent premolar tooth. Clinical and radiographic examination showed pulp involvement due to deep pit defect and periapical infection. Examination findings suggested revascularization treatment which was started with irrigation of canals using 1.25% of sodium hypochlorite and saline, followed by placement of 3-week dressing of triple antibiotic paste (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and minocycline. After removal of triple antibiotic paste blood clot was induced and mineral trioxide aggregate was placed on the blood clot followed by sealing the canal with glass ionomer cement. During radiographic and clinical follow-ups, the patient was asymptomatic and periapical lesion was healed, roots continued to develop, and root apex maturogenesis was complete.

  13. Polymorphisms in cytokine genes IL6, TNF, IL10, IL17A and IFNG influence susceptibility to complicated skin and skin structure infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stappers, M.H.T.; Thys, Y.; Oosting, M.; Plantinga, T.S.; Ioana, M.; Reimnitz, P.; Mouton, J.W.; Netea, M.G.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Gyssens, I.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs) are caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative, aerobic and anaerobic pathogens, with a polymicrobial aetiology being frequent. Recognition of invading pathogens by the immune system results in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory

  14. Assessment of patients' awareness and factors influencing patients' demands for sedation in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yoo Kyeom; Montagnese, Thomas A; Harding, Jarrod; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2015-02-01

    Endodontic therapy is perceived by many as a procedure to be feared. Many studies have reported that fear and anxiety are major deterrents to seeking dental care in general, but only a few deal with the use of sedation in endodontic therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess patients' awareness of and factors influencing the potential demand for sedation in endodontics. We hypothesized that there is an association between demographic factors and the demand for sedation in endodontics. A survey consisting of 24 questions was given to patients 18 years and older who presented to the graduate endodontic clinic. Results were collected and statistically analyzed. Thirty-six percent of patients reported that their perception of sedation was being put to sleep, and 27% perceived it as related to or reducing pain. Concerns associated with endodontic therapy were the fear of pain (35%), fear of needles (16%), difficulty getting numb (10%), and anxiety (7%). The 2 major demographic factors that influenced the demand for sedation were cost and the level of anxiety (P endodontic therapy if the option of sedation was available. The demand for sedation in endodontics is high. Patients' understanding of sedation varies. More patients would consider having endodontic procedures if sedation was available. The provision of sedation by endodontists could result in more patients accepting endodontic therapies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Amy Wy; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

  16. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampathkumar; Suresh Kumar, Beri Narasimiah; Shyamala, Palaniyandi Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper can...

  17. Surgical infections: a microbiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Saini

    Full Text Available Surgical infections are mostly polymicrobial, involving both aerobes and anaerobes. One hundred seventeen cases comprised of abscesses (n=51, secondary peritonitis (n=25, necrotizing fascitis (n=22 and wounds with devitalized tissues (n=19 were studied. The number of microorganisms isolated per lesion was highest in secondary peritonitis (2.32. The aerobe/ anaerobe ratio was 0.81 in secondary peritonitis and 1.8 in necrotizing fascitis. Most secondary peritonitis (80%, necrotizing fascitis (75% and wounds with devitalized tissues (66.7% were polymicrobial. Common microorganisms isolated in our study were E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptostreptococcus spp. The most effective antibiotics for S. aureus were clindamycin (79.1% and cefuroxime (70.8%. For Gram-negatives (Klebsiella spp., E. coli and Proteus spp., the most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maximally sensitive to amikacin (35.2% and ciprofloxacin (35.2%. The greatest degree of multidrug resistance to all the drugs was found in P. aeruginosa (52.9%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (33.3%, Proteus spp. (33.3%, E. coli (22.2%, and S. aureus (12.5%. All the anaerobes that we isolated were 100% sensitive to metronidazole and chloramphenicol, followed by clindamycin (95% to 100%. Apart from antibiotic therapy, non-antimicrobial methods, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy and debridement also play an important role in the treatment of surgical infections.

  18. Resazurin metabolism assay for root canal disinfectant evaluation on dual-species biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.M.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Wesselink, P.R.; Crielaard, W.; Deng, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Endodontic infections are caused by polymicrobial biofilms. Therefore, novel root canal disinfectants should be evaluated not only on single-species biofilms but also on dual- or mixed-species biofilms. A simple, high-throughput assay is urgently needed for this. In this study, the

  19. Resazurin Metabolism Assay for Root Canal Disinfectant Evaluation on Dual-species Biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wesselink, Paul R.; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    Introduction: Endodontic infections are caused by polymicrobial biofilms. Therefore, novel root canal disinfectants should be evaluated not only on single-species biofilms but also on dual- or mixed-species biofilms. A simple, high-throughput assay is urgently needed for this. In this study, the

  20. Quando e como valorizar culturas de urina polimicrobianas no laboratório de microbiologia clínica When and how to enhance polymicrobial urine cultures at the laboratory of clinical microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Conrado de Oliveira Silveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Na maioria dos laboratórios de Microbiologia considera-se contaminação uma cultura de urina com mais de um morfotipo colonial, ignorando-se o desenvolvimento ou solicitando-se novo material. Raramente o isolado é considerado significativo. OBJETIVOS: Com a finalidade de estudar as infecções urinárias polimicrobianas, no período de agosto de 2003 a janeiro de 2004, na cidade de Tubarão, Santa Catarina, foram selecionadas 117 amostras de urina de pacientes internados no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, de ambos os sexos, com idades que variavam de 14 a 98 anos. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se uma análise minuciosa dos prontuários dos pacientes. Procedeu-se o Gram da gota de urina não centrifugada e a cultura com alça calibrada de 1 ou 10 μl em ágar CLED (cistina-lactose deficiente em eletrólitos. Todas as culturas foram repetidas com nova coleta de urina com supervisão direta. Os clínicos aguardaram a segunda coleta (confirmatória para iniciar a antibioticoterapia. Descartaram-se os pacientes que iniciaram a antibioticoterapia imediatamente após a primeira coleta ou que estavam utilizando antimicrobianos. RESULTADOS: Obteve-se o total de seis (12,8% culturas polimicrobianas confirmadas, em um universo de 47 amostras com crescimento bacteriano estudadas. Os resultados foram compatíveis com as indicações clínicas. CONCLUSÃO: É importante ressaltar a correlação entre os achados laboratoriais e as indicações clínicas dos pacientes. Recomenda-se avaliar criteriosamente isolados polimicrobianos em amostras de urina, sejam ambulatoriais ou hospitalares.INTRODUCTION: In most microbiology laboratories, a urine culture is regarded as contaminated when there is more than one colonial morphotype, thus either it is ignored or a new sample is requested. The isolate is rarely considered significant. OBJECTIVES: In order to study the polymicrobial urinary tract infections, 117 urine samples were selected from inpatients of

  1. [Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in endodontics: rational case selection criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I

    2016-01-01

    To present rational case selection criteria for the use of CBCT (Cone Beam Computed Tomography) in endodontics. This article reviews the literature concerning the benefits of CBCT in endodontics, alongside its radiation risks, and present case selection criteria for referral of endodontic patients to CBCT. Up to date, the expected ultimate benefit of CBCT to the endodontic patient is yet uncertain, and the current literature is mainly restricted to its technical efficacy. In addition, the potential radiation risks of CBCT scan are stochastic in nature and uncertain, and are worrying especially in pediatric patients. Both the efficacy of CBCT in supporting the endodontic practitioner decision making and in affecting treatment outcomes, and its long term potential radiation risks are yet uncertain. Therefore, a cautious rational decision making is essential when a CBCT scan is considered in endodontics. Risk-benefit considerations are presented.

  2. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Amy WY; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-hung

    2014-01-01

    Amy WY Wong, Chengfei Zhang, Chun-hung Chu Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People's Republic of China Abstract: Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on ...

  3. Outcome of orthograde endodontic retreatment - a two-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Nešković Jelena; Živković Slavoljub; Medojević Milica; Maksimović Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Endodontic retreatment is a complex intervention that requires detailed analysis of possible reasons for failure, and flawless practical execution of the procedure. Objective. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of endodontic retreatment based on clinical and radiographic criteria after a two-year observation period. Methods. Clinical study included 49 teeth indicated for endodontic retreatment based on periapical index (PAI). All t...

  4. An overview of the endodontic curriculum in Fiji from 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Arpana A; Abbott, Paul V

    2015-12-01

    This paper seeks to provide the reader with an overview of the endodontic curriculum in Fiji from 2009 to 2013. It also intends to inform readers of the changes in endodontic teaching, the learning methods utilised, curriculum development, the transition from block teaching to partial block teaching combined with longitudinal teaching, and the future plans for the endodontic module. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  5. Endodontics, Endodontic Retreatment, and Apical Surgery Versus Tooth Extraction and Implant Placement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chércoles-Ruiz, Anna; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following clinical question: Which is the best treatment option for a pulpally involved tooth? An electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane, PubMed (MEDLINE), and ScienceDirect databases between December 2015 and February 2016. A manual search was also performed. The inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies performed on humans with at least 1 year of follow-up and published within the last 10 years. Two researchers independently screened the title and abstract of every article identified in the search in order to establish its eligibility. The selected articles were classified into different levels of evidence by means of the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Sixty articles met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The survival rate of single-tooth implants was greater than the success rate of the distinct conservative treatments. However, among comparative studies, no important differences between both treatments were observed until at least 8 years later. The endodontic treatment and the implant placement are both valid and complementary options for planning oral rehabilitation. Although a level B recommendation can be stated, these results come from retrospective comparative studies because there is a lack of randomized clinical studies comparing both types of therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-01-01

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  7. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina D. Fahmy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases.

  8. A new cone beam computerized tomography system for use in endodontic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumachi, T; Honda, K

    2007-03-01

    To present a newly developed cone beam computerized tomography system (3DX Micro-CT) and its application in endodontic surgery. Cone beam CT has attracted considerable attention as a new diagnostic imaging technique in dentistry. The assessment of fractured endodontic instruments and the planning of endodontic surgery present challenges that conventional radiography cannot meet successfully. In this report, the value of the 3DX cone beam computerized radiography system is illustrated by the case of a fractured endodontic instrument protruding into the maxillary sinus.

  9. Er:YAG laser for endodontics: efficiency and safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibst, Raimund; Stock, Karl; Gall, Robert; Keller, Ulrich

    1997-12-01

    Recently it has been shown that bacterias can be sterilized by Er:YAG laser irradiation. By optical fiber transmission the bactericidal effect can also be used in endodontics. In order to explore potential laser parameters, we further investigated sterilization of caries and measured temperatures in models simulating endodontic treatment. It was found out that the bactericidal effect is cumulative, with single pulses being active. This offers to choose all laser parameters except pulse energy (radiant exposure) from technical, practical or safety considerations. For clinical studies the following parameter set is proposed for efficient and safe application (teeth with a root wall thickness > 1 mm, and prepared up to ISO 50): pulse energy: 50 mJ, repetition rate: 15 Hz, fiber withdrawal velocity: 2 mm/s. With these settings 4 passes must be performed to accumulate the total dose for sterilization.

  10. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment of geminated teeth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Ali Cağin; Güler, Eda

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this case presentation is to describe nonsurgical retreatment of anterior teeth with gemination. A 21-year-old male patient was referred for endodontic treatment of his maxillary left lateral incisor. In the clinical examination, a large crown was observed in the left maxillary incisor region when compared with the right maxillary lateral incisor. In the present case, a tooth gemination of a maxillary lateral incisor has been described. A periapical radiograph showed that the tooth had partially separated two crowns having a single root and one root canal, but the access cavity of the distal crown had not been opened, and the root canal had been obturated with single cone technique. Nonsurgical endodontic retreatment was decided for geminated lateral incisor. At the 6-month follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and there was no radiolucency around the apical region.

  11. Can audit improve patient care and treatment outcomes in endodontics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, D; Williams, D

    2013-05-01

    Clinical audit is part of the NHS clinical governance framework for dentistry and is recommended as a quality improvement process for patient care, yet there is very mixed evidence supporting audit's ability to produce change in practice. Findings show evidence of changes following audit which improved patient care and practice efficiency. However, there is a general lack of dissemination of audit results, little useful feedback provided to participants, limited use of formal re-auditing of a particular topic and little reported on whether audit improves outcomes for patients. As part of its clinical governance responsibility, the Community Dental Service (CDS) is committed to ensuring that its clinical audit is robust, strategic and measures patient outcomes in its evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present a complete endodontic audit cycle; its recommendations and effects on the process and on outcomes of clinical patient endodontic care; and to evaluate if audit was a useful tool in this case.

  12. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of a Maxillary Mature Premolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingan Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative endodontic treatment was performed on a mature maxillary premolar diagnosed as chronic pulpitis. The root canals were chemomechanically prepared and placed intracanal medicaments at the first appointment. Then 2 weeks later, a blood clot was created in the canals, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. At 6-month follow-up, cementum-like tissue seemed to be formed in the root canal along with nearly recovered pulp vitality. At 12-month recall, the radiographic results revealed evidence of root wall thickening. At 30-month recall, no periapical lesion was found. This case report indicates that regenerative endodontic treatment for the mature premolar is feasible. More cases are needed for further validation.

  13. Overview on the Current Antibiotic Containing Agents Used in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are systemically and locally used extensively in endodontics. However, local antibiotic application mode is considered more effective than systemic administration. The local mode enables the dentist to target bacteria in every nook and corner of root canal system, which is otherwise beyond reach if targeted by instrumentation or conventional root canal treatment protocols. Therefore, they are an important adjunct to conventional treatment of root canal. The present study reviews the various antibiotic containing dental agents used in endodontics. A web-based research on MedLine was performed with terms Review Articles published in the last 10 year's dental journals in English for literature researching, extracting, and synthesizing data. Relevant articles were shortlisted. Important cross-reference articles were also reviewed. PMID:25210667

  14. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 4. Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J

    2010-08-28

    Endodontic procedures are challenging and technically demanding. In the UK standards of treatment have been shown to have fallen short of acceptable guidelines, laying many dentists open to litigation on questions of clinical negligence by patients who understand and know what should be considered as current best practice in this area. Failure to communicate with patients about the procedure and not obtaining consent for treatment is a key area of complaint, as is inadequate record keeping. When treatment is undertaken within the framework of accepted guidelines it would be very difficult for a patient to open a claim for clinical negligence should a failure occur. This article looks at potential dento-legal problems in endodontics and how, through compliance with best practice, they may be avoided.

  15. Diagnosis demystified: CT as diagnostic tool in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shruthi, Nagaraja; Murthy, B V Sreenivasa; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-06-27

    Diagnosis in endodontics is usually based on clinical and radiographical presentations, which are only empirical methods. The role of healing profession is to apply knowledge and skills towards maintaining and restoring the patient's health. Recent advances in imaging technologies have added to correct interpretation and diagnosis. CT is proving to be an effective tool in solving endodontic mysteries through its three-dimensional visualisation. CT imaging offers many diagnostic advantages to produce reconstructed images in selected projection and low-contrast resolution far superior to that of all other X-ray imaging modalities. This case report is an endeavour towards effective treatment planning of cases with root fracture, root resorption using spiral CT as an adjuvant diagnostic tool.

  16. The impact of loupes and microscopes on vision in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, P; Neuhaus, K W; Lussi, A

    2014-05-01

    To report on an intraradicular visual test in a simulated clinical setting under different optical conditions. Miniaturized visual tests with E-optotypes (bar distance from 0.01 to 0.05 mm) were fixed inside the root canal system of an extracted maxillary molar at different locations: at the orifice, a depth of 5 mm and the apex. The tooth was mounted in a phantom head for a simulated clinical setting. Unaided vision was compared with Galilean loupes (2.5× magnification) with integrated light source and an operating microscope (6× magnification). The influence of the dentists' age within two groups was evaluated: endodontic instruments. Dentists over 40 years of age were dependent on the microscope to inspect the root canal system. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Platelet-rich fibrin: a boon in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebentish, Priyanka D; Umashetty, Girish; Kaur, Harpreet; Doizode, Trupthi; Kaslekar, Mithun; Chowdhury, Shouvik

    2016-12-01

    Research into regenerative dentistry has contributed momentum to the field of molecular biology. Periapical surgery aims at removing periapical pathology to achieve complete wound healing and regeneration of bone and periodontal tissue. Regenerative endodontic procedures are widely being added to the current armamentarium of pulp therapy procedures. The regenerative potential of platelets has been deliberated. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a wonderful tissue-engineering product and has recently gained much popularity due its promising results in wound healing bone induction. The features of this product are an attribute of platelets which, after cellular interactions, release growth factors and have shown application in diverse disciplines of dentistry. This paper is intended to shed light onto the various prospects of PRF and to provide clinical insight into regenerative endodontic therapy.

  18. [Endodontically treated teeth. Success--failure. Endorestorative treatment plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalegui, B

    1990-01-01

    More and more often the general dentist is finding the presence of endodontically treated teeth during his treatment planning procedure. He has to ask himself if the endo-treated tooth functions and will continue to function function successfully, when deciding which final endo-restorative procedure to apply. For this reason the dentist or the endodontist with whom he works should clinically evaluate these teeth, establish a diagnostic criteria of their success or failure and a treatment plan according to the prognosis. The purpose of this article is to offer an organized clinical view of the steps to follow when evaluating an endodontically treated tooth and how to establish a final endo-restorative plan.

  19. Rotary endodontics in primary teeth – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sageena George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endodontic treatment in primary teeth can be challenging and time consuming, especially during canal preparation, which is considered one of the most important steps in root canal therapy. The conventional instrumentation technique for primary teeth remains the “gold-standard” over hand instrumentation, which makes procedures much more time consuming and adversely affects both clinicians and patients. Recently nickel–titanium (Ni–Ti rotary files have been developed for use in pediatric endodontics. Using rotary instruments for primary tooth pulpectomies is cost effective and results in fills that are consistently uniform and predictable. This article reviews the use of nickel–titanium rotary files as root canal instrumentation in primary teeth. The pulpectomy technique is described here according to different authors and the advantages and disadvantages of using rotary files are discussed.

  20. Evaluation of bioactivity in vitro of endodontic calcium aluminate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, I.R.; Andrade, T.L.; Santos, G.L.; Pandolfelli, V.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioactivity is referred to as the capacity of a material to develop a stable bond with living tissue via the deposition of hydroxyapatite. Materials which exhibit this property can be used to repair diseased or damaged bone tissue and can be designed to remain in situ indefinitely. An indication of bioactivity can be obtained by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of a substrate in simulated body fluids (SBF) in vitro. Therefore, set samples of calcium aluminate endodontic cement were maintained in contact with SBF solutions (Kokubo and Rigo) and their surfaces were later evaluated by means of SEM, EDX and DRX. Measurements of pH and ionic conductivity were also carried out for SBF solutions in contact with set samples of endodontic cement. The ideal conditions of precipitation were obtained in SBF Rigo been observed a surface layer with spherical morphology characteristic of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite.(author)

  1. Polymicrobial subdural empyema: involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by lytA PCR and antigen detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Thomas; Clemmensen, Dorte; Ridderberg, Winnie

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a subdural empyema (SDE) caused by a coinfection with Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus pneumoniae, initially considered a S. intermedius infection only. An otherwise healthy 11-year-old female was admitted to the hospital after 5 days of illness. Symptoms....... The empyema was evacuated twice, day 8 and 18, with good results. Primary samples showed growth of S. intermedius only. The severity of the clinical picture elicited supplementary samples, which were additionally positive for S. pneumoniae by an in-house specific lytA PCR and/or a commercial antigen test....

  2. The use of magnification in endodontic therapy: the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayat, B G

    1998-01-01

    Clinicians have recognized that the use of magnification can improve the performance of dental procedures. Of the various magnification systems available, loupes have been the most popular, yet their magnification is limited. This article reviews and describes the function and clinical application of the surgical operating microscope (SOM), emphasizing its utilization in endodontic treatment. Several cases are presented to document the clinical procedure and to illustrate the difference between operative procedures performed without magnification and those completed using the SOM with micromirrors.

  3. The Effect of Smear Layer Removal on Endodontic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    patency, diabetes and hypertension) showed no statistically significant differences.   Figure 1 DISCUSSION: A Report on the practice of endodontic...as history of hypertension, diabetes and treatment factors such as preoperative diagnosis or presence of apical pathosis were evaluated for effect... periodontitis . Endod Dent Traumatol 1986; 2: 20-34. 20. Hulsmann M, Heckendorff M, Lennon A. Chelating agents in root canal treatment: mode of action and

  4. A quality assessment of randomized controlled trial reports in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, C; Souza, E M; Voinea, G C; Pulgar, R; Valderrama, M J; De-Deus, G

    2017-03-01

    To assess the quality of the randomized clinical trial (RCT) reports published in Endodontics between 1997 and 2012. Retrieval of RCTs in Endodontics was based on a search of the Thomson Reuters Web of Science (WoS) database (March 2013). Quality evaluation was performed using a checklist based on the Jadad criteria, CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement and SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials). Descriptive statistics were used for frequency distribution of data. Student's t-test and Welch test were used to identify the influence of certain trial characteristics upon report quality (α = 0.05). A total of 89 RCTs were evaluated, and several methodological flaws were found: only 45% had random sequence generation at low risk of bias, 75% did not provide information on allocation concealment, and 19% were nonblinded designs. Regarding statistics, only 55% of the RCTs performed adequate sample size estimations, only 16% presented confidence intervals, and 25% did not provide the exact P-value. Also, 2% of the articles used no statistical tests, and in 87% of the RCTs, the information provided was insufficient to determine whether the statistical methodology applied was appropriate or not. Significantly higher scores were observed for multicentre trials (P = 0.023), RCTs signed by more than 5 authors (P = 0.03), articles belonging to journals ranked above the JCR median (P = 0.03), and articles complying with the CONSORT guidelines (P = 0.000). The quality of RCT reports in key areas for internal validity of the study was poor. Several measures, such as compliance with the CONSORT guidelines, are important in order to raise the quality of RCTs in Endodontics. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    defined as the absence of clinical symptoms and radiographically, the absence of a lesion, and the presence of a normal periodontal ligament (PDL...Hemoglobin Levels and Prevalence of Apical Periodontitis in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. J Endod 2015;41:601-6. Santos SM, Soares JA, Costa GM, Brito...endodontic treatment. J Endod 2011;37:!-5. Zhang M, Liang Y, Gao X, Jiang L, Van der Sluis L, Wu M. Management of apical periodontitis : healing of

  6. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Priyank Sethi; Ritu Tiwari; Maneesha Das; Mahesh Pratap Singh; Manish Agarwal; Alfred Joseph Ravikumar

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D) structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), a...

  7. Prevalence of periapical lesions in endodontic treatment teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Machado Barroso; Kleber Borgo Kill; Marcelo Peçanha; João Batista Gagno Intra; Rosana de Souza Pereira; Armelindo Roldi; Bruno Fabri; Francisco Carlos Ribeiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the te...

  8. Etiopathogenesis of post-endodontic periapical scar formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, E.; Foltán, R.; Hanzelka, T.; Pavlíková, G.; Klíma, K.; Šedý, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (2012), s. 5-15 ISSN 2155-8213 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GAP304/10/0320 Grant - others:UK(CZ) UNCE 204021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : postendodontic scar * endodontics * tooth Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  9. Quantification of Lipoteichoic Acid Contents and Cultivable Bacteria at the Different Phases of the Endodontic Retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Ribeiro, Marlos; De-Jesus-Soares, Adriana; Zaia, Alexandre A; Ferraz, Caio C R; Almeida, José F A; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2016-04-01

    The infectious content of root canals, including bacteria and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), cause injuries to the periapical tissues. The purpose of this clinical study was to quantify the levels of both LTA and cultivable bacteria at the different phases of endodontic retreatment (ER) of teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis. It also aimed to investigate the presence of gram-positive microorganisms before and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) and intracanal medication (ICM). Twenty infected root canals of single-rooted teeth were randomly assigned into 2 groups according to the chemical substance used for CMP (n = 10 per group): chlorhexidine (CHX) group, 2% CHX gel, and the sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) group, 6% NaOCl. Root canal samples were taken using paper points before (S1) and after CMP (S2) and after 30 days of ICM with calcium hydroxide + 2% CHX gel (S3). Microorganisms were identified by the culture technique using biochemical tests. Cultivable bacteria were determined by counting the colony-forming unit. LTA levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (pg/mL). A total of 70 gram-positive species, out of 102 species isolated, were found in the root canals (54 in S1, 4 in S2, and 12 in S3). Enterococcus faecalis was the most frequent isolated taxon in all phases of the ER. LTA (574.0 ± 94.7) and cultivable bacteria (101.2 ± 79.2) were present in all S1 samples. CMP decreased the overall levels of cultivable bacteria by 99.4% and LTA by 24.8% (P bacteria was 99.5% and on LTA it was 38.6% (P .05). The reduction rates of bacteria were higher than the LTA. Moreover, gram-positive microorganisms were present in all phases of the endodontic retreatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Viral infection of the pregnant cervix predisposes to ascending bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicot, Karen; Cardenas, Ingrid; Wünsche, Vera; Aldo, Paulomi; Guller, Seth; Means, Robert; Romero, Roberto; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is the major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity, and bacterial infections that ascend from the lower female reproductive tract (FRT) are the most common route of uterine infection leading to preterm birth. The uterus and growing fetus are protected from ascending infection by the cervix, which controls and limits microbial access by the production of mucus, cytokines and anti-microbial peptides (AMPs). If this barrier is compromised, bacteria may enter the uterine cavity leading to preterm birth. Using a mouse model, we demonstrate, for the first time, that viral infection of the cervix, during pregnancy, reduces the capacity of the FRT to prevent bacterial infection of the uterus. This is due to differences in susceptibility of the cervix to infection by virus during pregnancy and the associated changes in TLR and AMP expression and function. We suggest that preterm labor is a polymicrobial disease, which requires a multifactorial approach for its prevention and treatment. PMID:23752614

  11. A New Classification of Endodontic-Periodontal Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S. Al-Fouzan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interrelationship between periodontal and endodontic disease has always aroused confusion, queries, and controversy. Differentiating between a periodontal and an endodontic problem can be difficult. A symptomatic tooth may have pain of periodontal and/or pulpal origin. The nature of that pain is often the first clue in determining the etiology of such a problem. Radiographic and clinical evaluation can help clarify the nature of the problem. In some cases, the influence of pulpal pathology may cause the periodontal involvement and vice versa. The simultaneous existence of pulpal problems and inflammatory periodontal disease can complicate diagnosis and treatment planning. An endo-perio lesion can have a varied pathogenesis which ranges from simple to relatively complex one. The differential diagnosis of endodontic and periodontal diseases can sometimes be difficult, but it is of vital importance to make a correct diagnosis for providing the appropriate treatment. This paper aims to discuss a modified clinical classification to be considered for accurately diagnosing and treating endo-perio lesion.

  12. Prevalence of Treponemaspp. in endodontic retreatment-resistant periapical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Pereira ROSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of the Treponema species in longstanding endodontic retreatment-resistant lesions of teeth with apical periodontitis, the association of this species with clinical/radiographic features, and the association among the different target species. Microbial samples of apical lesions were collected from twenty-five adult patients referred to endodontic surgery after unsuccessful root canal retreatment. Nested-PCR and conventional PCR were used for Treponema detection. Twenty-three periradicular tissue samples showed detectable levels of bacterial DNA. Treponema species were detected in 28% (7/25 of the cases. The most frequently detected species were T. socranskii (6/25, followed by T. maltophilum (3/25, T. amylovorum (3/25, T. lecithinolyticum(3/25, T. denticola (3/25, T. pectinovorum (2/25 and T. medium(2/25. T. vicentii was not detected in any sample. Positive statistical association was found between T. socranskiiand T. denticola,and between T. maltophilumand T. lecithinolyticum. No association was detected between the presence of any target microorganism and the clinical or radiographic features. Treponemaspp.are present, in a low percentage, in longstanding apical lesions from teeth with endodontic retreatment failure.

  13. A cost-effective simulation curriculum for preclinical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Roberta; Glickman, Gerald N

    2004-02-01

    A challenge in contemporary dental education is to achieve a smooth transition from preclinical teaching environments to patient-care clinics in a cost-effective manner. The preclinical endodontic courses at The University of Texas, Dental Branch at Houston provide a unique learning environment that enables the student to perform endodontic treatment on extracted teeth in a typodont, and be involved in diagnosis and treatment-planning discussions. The specially designed stone typodont used has built-in radiographic capability, and is mounted at each chair in the clinic. During each preclinical session, students are assigned clinical cubicles and proper aseptic protocol is followed. Students are required to wear gloves, masks and eyewear, and place a rubber dam during treatment. Written self-assessment evaluations based upon prescribed criteria are utilised; feedback is given by faculty composed of both full-time endodontists and graduate students who periodically rotate and are calibrated on a regular basis. In the lecture phase, clinical case scenarios are presented to reinforce concepts of diagnosis and emergency care and to help integrate endodontics with other disciplines; a Socratic-like teaching style is established by the faculty facilitator to create an environment for developing critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. The overall feedback from graduating students has been very positive. Advantages of this format are an easier transition to patient management, a more keen interest in specialsation and a perceived increase in levels of confidence.

  14. Endodontic or dental implant therapy: the factors affecting treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-07-01

    Clinicians are confronted with difficult choices regarding whether a tooth with pulpal and/or periapical disease should be saved through endodontic treatment or be extracted and replaced with an implant. The authors examined publications (research, literature reviews and systematic reviews) related to the factors affecting decision making for patients who have oral diseases or traumatic injuries. The factors to be considered included patient-related issues (systemic and oral health, as well as comfort and treatment perceptions), tooth- and periodontium-related factors (pulpal and periodontal conditions, color characteristics of the teeth, quantity and quality of bone, and soft-tissue anatomy) and treatment-related factors (the potential for procedural complications, required adjunctive procedures and treatment outcomes). On the basis of survival rates, it appears that more than 95 percent of dental implants and teeth that have undergone endodontic treatment remain functional over time. Clinicians need to consider carefully several factors before choosing whether to perform endodontic therapy or extract a tooth and place an implant. The result should be high levels of comfort, function, longevity and esthetics for patients.

  15. From stem to roots: Tissue engineering in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, M.; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2012-01-01

    The vitality of dentin-pulp complex is fundamental to the life of tooth and is a priority for targeting clinical management strategies. Loss of the tooth, jawbone or both, due to periodontal disease, dental caries, trauma or some genetic disorders, affects not only basic mouth functions but aesthetic appearance and quality of life. One novel approach to restore tooth structure is based on biology: regenerative endodontic procedure by application of tissue engineering. Regenerative endodontics is an exciting new concept that seeks to apply the advances in tissue engineering to the regeneration of the pulp-dentin complex. The basic logic behind this approach is that patient-specific tissue-derived cell populations can be used to functionally replace integral tooth tissues. The development of such ‘test tube teeth’ requires precise regulation of the regenerative events in order to achieve proper tooth size and shape, as well as the development of new technologies to facilitate these processes. This article provides an extensive review of literature on the concept of tissue engineering and its application in endodontics, providing an insight into the new developmental approaches on the horizon. Key words:Regenerative, tissue engineering, stem cells, scaffold. PMID:24558528

  16. Regenerative Endodontic Procedures: A Perspective from Stem Cell Niche Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marí-Beffa, Manuel; Segura-Egea, Juan José; Díaz-Cuenca, Aránzazu

    2017-01-01

    Endodontics uses cell therapy strategies to treat pulpal and periapical diseases. During these therapies, surgeons aim to reconstruct the natural microenvironments that regulate the activity of dental stem cells. We searched for more than 400 articles in PubMed using key words from regenerative endodontics and dental stem cell biology. In 268 articles, we reviewed what factors may influence histologic results after preclinical dental treatments that use regenerative endodontic procedures after pulpectomy. Several factors, such as the origin of stem cells, the biomimicry of scaffolds used, and the size of lesions, are considered to influence the histologic appearance of the regenerated pulp-dentin complex after treatments. Information is accumulating on transcription factors that generate the pulp-dentin complex and survival/trophic factors that would benefit niche recovery and histologic results. In this article, we discuss the noninterchangeability of stem cells, the influence of dentin-entrapped molecule release on pulp regeneration and survival of stem cells, and the need of positional markers to assess treatments histologically. The ex vivo amplification of appropriate dental stem cells, the search for scaffolds storing the molecular diversity entrapped in the dentin, and the use of positional transcription factors as histologic markers are necessary to improve future preclinical experiments. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laser scanning dental probe for endodontic root canal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Molly A. B.; Friedrich, Michal; Hamilton, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Peggy; Berg, Joel; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Complications that arise during endodontic procedures pose serious threats to the long-term integrity and health of the tooth. Potential complexities of root canals include residual pulpal tissue, cracks, mesial-buccal 2 and accessory canals. In the case of a failed root canal, a successful apicoectomy can be jeopardized by isthmuses, accessory canals, and root microfracture. Confirming diagnosis using a small imaging probe would allow proper treatment and prevent retreatment of endodontic procedures. An ultrathin and flexible laser scanning endoscope of 1.2 to 1.6mm outer diameter was used in vitro to image extracted teeth with varied root configurations. Teeth were opened using a conventional bur and high speed drill. Imaging within the opened access cavity clarified the location of the roots where canal filing would initiate. Although radiographs are commonly used to determine the root canal size, position, and shape, the limited 2D image perspective leaves ambiguity that could be clarified if used in conjunction with a direct visual imaging tool. Direct visualization may avoid difficulties in locating the root canal and reduce the number of radiographs needed. A transillumination imaging device with the separated illumination and light collection functions rendered cracks visible in the prepared teeth that were otherwise indiscernible using reflected visible light. Our work demonstrates that a small diameter endoscope with high spatial resolution may significantly increase the efficiency and success of endodontic procedures.

  18. [Treatment of a fractured endodontical instrument in the root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, M; Peters, L B

    2015-12-01

    A 53-year-old woman with continuing pain coming from a lower first molar was diagnosed with apical periodontitis, with a retained fractured instrument in the root canal. There are a variety of treatment options for dealing with a corpus alienum in a root canal. In this case it was decided to treat the tooth endodontically, and leave the fractured instrument fragment in situ. The selection of this treatment option was made on the basis of knowledge of the original diagnosis and the success rates of the various treatment options as described in the relevant literature, weighed against the possible risks and their effects on the prognosis. This suggested that the use of a dental operating microscope has a positive impact on the success rates of endodontic treatment The prognosis for endodontic treatment when a fractured instrument fragment is left within the root canal, as in this case, is not significantly reduced. The presence of preoperative periapical pathology, however, is a more clinically significant prognostic indicator.

  19. A new predoctoral endodontic module: evaluating learning and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Lara; Anderson, Vivienne

    2011-03-01

    The teaching of advanced endodontic courses at the predoctoral level is common, but it can be difficult to assess teaching effectiveness. Advanced modules placed later in the dental curriculum provide the opportunity to introduce a new topic, revisit and reinforce concepts learned previously, and instill the notion of lifelong learning. At any level, the introduction of new techniques to novices must be based on recognition of their prior knowledge and experience and their need for explicit direction, stepwise instruction, and comprehensive feedback. Assessment of students' performance should not only provide insights into what they know and can do, but also steer them towards desired outcomes. In addition, assessment can provide valuable feedback on teaching effectiveness. In this article, we describe a module piloted for inclusion in the University of Otago (New Zealand) fourth-year dental curriculum. This involved the use of tapered hand and rotary nickel-titanium files for root canal preparation and was taught through a didactic program (lectures and problem-based learning seminars) and a series of preclinical hands-on sessions. Findings from formative and summative assessments as well as student, peer, and self-evaluation indicated that the objectives of the module were met and that it was effective in both providing students with the basic skills for using this type of instrumentation and increasing their understanding and enthusiasm for endodontics. We conclude by discussing curriculum changes resulting from our module evaluation, directions for future research, and suggestions for teaching advanced endodontic techniques.

  20. Successful nonsurgical endodontic outcome of a severely affected permanent maxillary canine with dens invaginatus Oehlers type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John K; Ribera, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    The morphogenic complexities of dens invaginatus (DI) Oehlers type 3 in maxillary canines offer significant endodontic challenges. A case report is provided of a 14-year-old female patient who presented with an anomalous-looking permanent maxillary canine associated with a sinus tract. Pulp testing revealed a normal response on the distal aspect of the tooth, whereas the mesial segment tested nonresponsive. A radiolucent lesion was seen on the mesiolateral radicular area adjacent to the severely distended pulp chamber. A gutta-percha point inserted into the sinus tract traced to this same region. The diagnosis was normal pulp coincident with DI Oehlers type 3 with pulp necrosis and chronic apical abscess. Despite a concerted effort to limit the root canal therapy to only the necrotic canal, its proximity to the normal canal obviated this possibility, entailing endodontic treatment of the entire root canal system. The necrotic pulp space was subjected to sustained irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and then completed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. A bolus of gutta-percha was used to create an apical barrier, and then the remainder of the enlarged pulp space was obturated with injectable thermoplasticized gutta-percha. At a 4.5-year recall, there was no clinical and radiographic evidence of infection. Endodontic success was accomplished with meticulous efforts of disinfection. Thermoplasticized gutta-percha can offer utility for obturation of anatomically complicated pulp spaces. The use of the dental operating microscope is an invaluable aid for discernment of the intricacies of teeth affected with DI type 3 variant and can enhance clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Krarup Nielsen

    Full Text Available Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  2. Definition and endodontic treatment of dilacerated canals: a survey of Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, Nafiseh; Kazemi, Zeinab; Hashemi, Siroos; Peters, Ove A; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2011-01-01

    To gather data from Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics regarding treatment of dilacerated canals. A questionnaire addressing definition, endodontic treatment procedures and prognosis was constructed and distributed via e-mail to 708 Diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics. Data from 150 respondents, a 21% response rate, were collected by using a Web-based interface. For statistical analysis, Chi-square tests were used. More than 25% of respondents believed that a dilacerated root should have a curvature > 40°. One-visit treatment is the best therapeutic approach and transportation is the most likely complication in preparation of these canals. A crown-down technique, watch-winding motion and a master apical file # 25 are the best choices for preparation of these canals. Any warm obturation technique is preferred over lateral compaction by most respondents. A crown-down technique for root canal preparation and a thermoplastic obturation technique are recommended for canals whose curvature is more than 40°. The prognosis of the treatment of these canals is judged not lower than normal canals. Crown-down technique and thermoplastic obturation are recommended for dilacerated canals.

  3. Endodontic management of a foreign body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish R Kalyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of a foreign object embedded in a tooth is relatively uncommon. Some people have a habit of placing foreign objects to remove food plugs from the teeth. However, occasionally, these objects may be lodged in the teeth. These foreign objects may act as a potential source of infection and may later lead to a painful condition. A detailed case history, clinical, and radiographic examination is required to ascertain the size, position, and likely composition of the object, and also difficulty involved in its retrieval. This paper describes the successful retrieval of stapler pin located in the apical portion of root canal by simple orthograde nonsurgical technique.

  4. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice

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    Juey-Ming Shih

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO, while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO or saline (SC. The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05. Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05. Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05, at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis.

  5. Associations of diabetes mellitus with orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayahi, Mohamed; Cian, Anais; Kressmann, Benjamin; de Kalbermatten, Benedicte; Rohner, Peter; Egloff, Michael; Jafaar, Jafaar; Malacarne, Sarah; Miozzari, Hermes H; Uçkay, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    Clinical experience suggests that a high proportion of orthopaedic infections occur in persons with diabetes. We reviewed several databases of adult patients hospitalized for orthopaedic infections at Geneva University Hospitals from 2004 to 2014 and retrieved 2740 episodes of infection. Overall, diabetes was noted in the medical record for 659 (24%) of these cases. The patients with, compared with those without, diabetes had more than five times more foot infections (274/659 [42%] vs 155/2081 [7%]; p < 0.01) and a significantly higher serum C-reactive protein level at admission (median 96 vs 70 mg/L; p < 0.01). Diabetic patients were older (median 67 vs 52 years; p < 0.01), more often male (471 [71%] vs 1398 [67%]; p = 0.04), and had more frequent polymicrobial infections (219 [37%] vs 353 [19%]; p < 0.01), including more gram-negative non-fermenting rods (90 [15%] vs 168 [9%]; p < 0.01). Excluding foot infections from these analyses did not change the statistically significant differences. Diabetes was present in 17% of all infected orthopaedic patients without foot involvement. In Geneva canton, the overall prevalence of diabetes is estimated at 5.1%, while we have found that the prevalence is 13% in our hospitalized adults. Diabetes is present in 24% of all adult patients hospitalized for surgery for an orthopaedic infection, a prevalence that is several times higher than for the general population and twice as high as that for the population of hospitalized patients. Compared with non-diabetics, patients with diabetes have significantly more infections that are polymicrobial, including gram-negative non-fermenting rods.

  6. Attitudes of general practice dentists in private dental clinics in Almadinah Almunawarah toward novel endodontic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna AlRahabi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides data regarding the current trends and attitudes of general practitioners in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah regarding novel technologies in endodontic treatment and reveals the gap between the new advances in endodontics and clinical practice, as well as the need to improve root canal treatment in private dental practices.

  7. Diagnosis and decision making in endodontics with the use of cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metska, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    In the current thesis the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been evaluated within the framework of ex vivo and in vivo studies. The first objective of the thesis was to examine whether CBCT scans can be used for the detection of vertical root fractures in endodontically

  8. [Formulation of guidelines for microscopic endodontics suitable for the situation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, J Q

    2016-08-01

    In order to promote the use of dental operating microscope in endodontics, Society of Cariology and Endodontology of Chinese Stomatological Association formulated these guidelines, after extensive consultation with related authorities and careful reference to the available published materials and literatures. It is hoped that these guidelines will be useful for dental practitioners embarking on microscopic endodontics.

  9. Endodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Second Premolar with Three Roots and Three Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonny Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex root canal system with atypical variations is a common finding among mandibular premolars. Endodontic treatment in these teeth may not be successful due to the failure to recognise and treat multiple canals. This paper presents endodontic treatment of a mandibular second premolar with three roots and three canals.

  10. Evaluation of microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Amod; Dugal, Arun; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Hariram; Singh, Vikram; Mishra, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    The microbiology of acute dental infections has been in the midst of many researches. Various bacteriological studies show variations in their conclusion. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microbial flora in orofacial space infections of odontogenic origin, which is essential for appropriate antibiotic selection. Thirty-five patients with odontogenic infection causing fascial space involvement were included. Aspirated specimen was transported in nutrient broth and thyoglycollate media within an hour for further culture and sensitivity testing. This study indicates that orofacial odontogenic infections are usually polymicrobial, consisting of a complex mixture of both anaerobes and aerobes.

  11. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-01-01

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata.

  12. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-10-29

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata.

  13. Radiographic outcome of necrotic immature teeth treated with two endodontic techniques: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ju Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The endodontic treatment of teeth with immature root has always been a challenge. To achieve a better prognosis, regenerative endodontic treatment may become a treatment trend for teeth with apical periodontitis and immature roots. Methods: Clinical and radiographic data were collected from 38 endodontic treated immature teeth (21 apexification and 17 regeneration. Measure the radiographic outcome by quantifying the apical lesion. Results: There was no statistical difference between the two treatments regarding PAI scores at the 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up (p > 0.05. In addition, different operators and the different stages of root development for both techniques showed no significant statistical difference on the final treatment results. Conclusions: In this study, assessment of the radiographic outcomes indicated that regenerative endodontic treatment were identical to the apexification technique. Keywords: Regenerative endodontic treatment, Pulp revascularization, Apexification, Periapical index (PAI, Radiology

  14. One versus two appointment endodontic treatment on teeth with apical periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Jekti Nugroho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological purpose of endodontic treatment on tooth with apical periodontitis is reducing microbes to achieve periradicular tissue healing and prevent microbes recolonized. This is achieved by antimicrobial measures, including chemomechanical procedures and intracanal medication, with root canal obturation steps. One of the problem in endodontic is the planning consideration to treat with one or two visits. Does intra-appointment medication is an absolute measure to promote desinfection and treatment success. To provide a guideline about  one or two visit endodontic treatment decision making for dental professionals. Root canal system on tooth with apical periodontitis treated in two visit endodontic and calcium hydroxide as the intra-appointment medication achieved better microbiological status than the one treated in one visit endodontic.

  15. Single versus multiple visits for endodontic treatment of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figini, L; Lodi, G; Gorni, F; Gagliani, M

    2007-10-17

    Root canal treatment (RoCT), or endodontic treatment, is a common procedure in dentistry. The main indications for RoCT are irreversible pulpitis and necrosis of the dental pulp caused by carious processes, tooth cracks or chips, or dental trauma. Successful RoCT is characterised by an absence of symptoms and clinical signs in teeth without radiographic evidence of periodontal involvement. The success of RoCT depends on a series of variables related to the preoperative condition of the tooth, as well as the endodontic procedures. To compare the effectiveness of single- and multiple-visit RoCT, measured as tooth extraction due to endodontic problems and radiological success.To assess the difference in short- and long-term complications between single- and multiple-visit RoCT. The following databases were searched for relevant trials: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Handsearching was performed for the major oral medicine journals. References of included studies and reviews were checked. Endodontics experts were contacted through e-mail. No language limitations were imposed. Date of last search was 6th March 2007. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of patients needing RoCT were included. Surgical endodontic treatment was excluded. The outcomes considered were the number of teeth extracted for endodontic problems; radiological success after at least 1 year, that is, absence of any periapical radiolucency; postoperative pain; painkiller use; swelling; or sinus track formation. Data were collected using a specific extraction form. The validity of included studies was assessed on the basis of allocation concealment, blindness of the study, and loss of participants. Data were analysed by calculating risk ratios. When valid and relevant data were collected, a meta-analysis of the data was undertaken. Twelve randomised controlled trials were included in the review. Four studies had a low risk of bias, four a moderate

  16. Innovations in endodontic filling materials: guttapercha vs Resilon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Francisco José; Gallina, Giuseppe; Gallottini, Livio; Russo, Riccardo; Cumbo, Enzo Maria

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of endodontic treatment is to achieve a complete, tridimensional, hermetic sealing of the root canal system to prevent the entry of microorganisms or their products through both the coronal and apical pathways. Gutta-percha is the most widely used material for root canal filling and despite its numerous properties, such as biocompatibility and thermoplasticity, it has however an important limit: the lack of adhesion to the canal walls. Attempts to address this problem have been made over the years by using endodontic cements capable of bonding to canal dentine but their tendency to resorption in time can compromise the quality of treatment. The first step towards a real adhesive endodontic filling(4) is rather recent; in fact, it goes back to 2003 when, on the occasion of the American Dental Association (ADA) Annual Session, Resilon Research LLC introduced a new canal filling adhesive system based on a thermoplastic synthetic resin material called Resilon™. The real innovation of this system is its capacity of creating a core made of Resilon™ bonded to the cement which adheres to dentine walls previously conditioned with a self-etching primer(4) so no changes in the techniques of canal preparation are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of two filling materials (gutta-percha and Resilon) to adapt to the canal anatomy, especially on the apical third, using the continuous wave of condensation technique. Our data suggest that in the third apical the gutta-percha best shows rheological properties that are as important as the bond capability.

  17. An implant periapical lesion associated with an endodontic-periodontic lesion of an adjacent molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-An Chou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adjacent natural teeth with untreated pulpal or periodontal pathology may be a potential risk for implant infection. We report a rare case of an implant periapical lesion (IPL possibly caused by direct extension of a periradicular lesion of an adjacent tooth. A 40-year-old female patient, who had previously received three implants on the edentulous areas of teeth 16, 36 and 46, had a recurrent infection over the lower left second molar area for 2 years. A periapical radiograph revealed incomplete root canal treatment and an infrabony defect on the mesial side of the lower left second molar; the defect extended to the apical third of the adjacent implant on tooth 36. Open flap debridement was performed 1 year after implant placement, but pain and swelling persisted for another year. Therefore, the second molar was extracted at the patient's request. The patient was unable to seek earlier and prompt treatment as she was abroad; therefore, we were able to observe the progression of severity in the IPL. One year after the extraction, the symptoms had subsided, and a periapical radiograph showed that the radiolucent lesion had decreased in size. She was followed for another 1.5 years and showed marked improvement. In this case, the IPL probably originated from the endodontic-periodontic problem of the adjacent molar, and the infected implant was saved by removing the infection source. We also discuss the treatment and prognosis of IPLs. To prevent the occurrence of an IPL, it is important to evaluate the pulpal and periodontal status of the teeth near the implant site when making a comprehensive treatment plan for an implant.

  18. The solutions to your problems in endodontic retreatment and microsurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Ang

    2016-06-01

    How to find the 4th canal in the upper Second molars in 60% of your patients, How to find the 4th canal in the upper First molars in 90% of your patients, How to retreat canals root filled with metal posts, fiber posts, gutta percha, hard canal cement & thermafils, How to remove fractured posts and posts cemented with resin cements. Understand why and how to perform Endodontic Surgery: How to treat large periapical lesions microsurgically, How to use the latest Ultrasonic technology under the Surgical Operating Microscope in all forms of microsurgery, Learn about the modern concepts in transplants, apicoectomies and intentional replantations.

  19. Endodontic periapical lesion-induced mental nerve paresthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Shadmehr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paresthesia is a burning or prickling sensation or partial numbness, resulting from neural injury. The symptoms can vary from mild neurosensory dysfunction to total loss of sensation in the innervated area. Only a few cases have described apical periodontitis to be the etiological factor of impaired sensation in the area innervated by the inferior alveolar and mental nerves. The aim of the present paper is to report a case of periapical lesion-induced paresthesia in the innervation area of the mental nerve, which was successfully treated with endodontic retreatment.

  20. Endodontic and periodontal treatments of a geminated mandibular first premolar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryanpour, S; Bercy, P; Van Nieuwenhuysen, J-P

    2002-02-01

    To describe a rare case of gemination involving a mandibular first premolar. The complex morphology of geminated teeth renders their endodontic and periodontal management difficult. Root canal and periodontal treatments were performed on a geminated mandibular first premolar with three canals. Clinical examination showed two separated crowns with united roots. Radiographically, two distinct pulp chambers with two joined and a third independent canal were seen. Conventional root canal treatment resulted in complete healing of the apical lesion. However, the occurrence of a vertical fracture led to the extraction of the mesial segment. At the follow-up visit, the distal segment was clinically healthy and continued to satisfy functional demands.

  1. Suspected Rhinolithiasis Associated With Endodontic Disease in a Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kevin; Fiani, Nadine; Peralta, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Rhinoliths are rare, intranasal, mineralized masses formed via the precipitation of mineral salts around an intranasal nidus. Clinical signs are typically consistent with inflammatory rhinitis and nasal obstruction, but asymptomatic cases are possible. Rhinoliths may be classified as exogenous or endogenous depending on the origin of the nidus, with endogenous rhinoliths reportedly being less common. This case report describes a suspected case of endogenous rhinolithiasis in a cat which was detected as an incidental finding during radiographic assessment of a maxillary canine tooth with endodontic disease. Treatment consisted of removal of the suspected rhinolith via a transalveolar approach after surgical extraction of the maxillary canine tooth.

  2. Ultrastructural examination of failed molar retreatment with secondary apical periodontitis: an examination of endodontic biofilms in an endodontic retreatment failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gary B; Schwartz, Richard S; Schaudinn, Christoph; Gorur, Amita; Costerton, J William

    2009-09-01

    A light and electron microscope examination of the resected root tip of a failing endodontically re-treated lower molar was examined. The tooth had been initially treated 10 years ago and then re-treated 2 years ago. The resected root tip was sectioned axially, and thin sections were examined through the entire length of the specimen. Thin sections were examined with a transmission electron microscope. The thin sections were randomly chosen along the isthmus areas between the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals. Our findings suggest that a complex, variable, multispecies biofilm was present the entire length of the specimen.

  3. The effect of tadalafil therapy on kidney damage caused by sepsis in a polymicrobial septic model induced in rats: a biochemical and histopathological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Benli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Sepsis is an inflammatory reaction to bacteria involving the whole body and is a significant cause of mortality and economic costs. The purpose of this research was to determine whether tadalafil exhibits a preventive effect on sepsis in a septic model induced in rats with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Materials and Methods Rats were randomly separated into groups, 10 rats in each: (i a sham (control group, (ii an untreated sepsis group, (iii a sepsis group treated with 5mg/kg tadalafil and (iv a sepsis group treated with 10mg/kg tadalafil. A polymicrobial sepsis model was induced in rats using CLP. Rats were sacrificed after 16h, and blood and kidney tissues were collected for biochemical and histopathological study. Results Levels of the inflammatory parameter IL-6 decreased significantly in the sepsis groups receiving tadalafil in comparison with the untreated sepsis group (p<0.05. In terms of histopathology, inflammation scores investigated in kidney tissues decreased significantly in the sepsis groups receiving tadalafil compared to the untreated sepsis group (p<0.05. In addition, levels of creatinine and cystatin C measured in septic rats receiving tadalafil were lower by a clear degree than in septic rats (p<0.05. Conclusion In this study, tadalafil exhibited a preventive effect for sepsis-related damage by suppressing inflammation in serum and kidney tissue of septic rats in a polymicrobial sepsis model induced with CLP.

  4. Increased natural CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their suppressor activity do not contribute to mortality in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scumpia, Philip O; Delano, Matthew J; Kelly, Kindra M; O'Malley, Kerri A; Efron, Philip A; McAuliffe, Priscilla F; Brusko, Todd; Ungaro, Ricardo; Barker, Tolga; Wynn, James L; Atkinson, Mark A; Reeves, Westley H; Salzler, Michael J Clare; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2006-12-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), including natural CD4+CD25+ Tregs and inducible IL-10 producing T regulatory type 1 (T(R)1) cells, maintain tolerance and inhibit autoimmunity. Recently, increased percentages of Tregs have been observed in the blood of septic patients, and ex vivo-activated Tregs were shown to prevent polymicrobial sepsis mortality. Whether endogenous Tregs contribute to sepsis outcome remains unclear. Polymicrobial sepsis, induced by cecal ligation and puncture, caused an increased number of splenic Tregs compared with sham-treated mice. Splenic CD4+CD25+ T cells from septic mice expressed higher levels of Foxp3 mRNA and were more efficient suppressors of CD4+CD25- T effector cell proliferation. Isolated CD4+ T cells from septic mice displayed increased intracellular IL-10 staining following stimulation, indicating that T(R)1 cells may also be elevated in sepsis. Surprisingly, Ab depletion of total CD4+ or CD4+CD25+ populations did not affect mortality. Furthermore, no difference in survival outcome was found between CD25 or IL-10 null mice and wild-type littermates, indicating that Treg or T(R)1-generated IL-10 are not required for survival. These results demonstrate that, although sepsis causes a relative increase in Treg number and increases their suppressive function, their presence does not contribute significantly to overall survival in this model.

  5. Outcome of orthograde endodontic retreatment - a two-year follow-up

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    Nešković Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endodontic retreatment is a complex intervention that requires detailed analysis of possible reasons for failure, and flawless practical execution of the procedure. Objective. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of endodontic retreatment based on clinical and radiographic criteria after a two-year observation period. Methods. Clinical study included 49 teeth indicated for endodontic retreatment based on periapical index (PAI. All teeth were divided into two groups. Group I comprised teeth without any periapical lesion (PAI score of 1 and 2 while Group II consisted of teeth with visible periapical radiolucency (PAI score of 3, 4, and 5. Endodontic retreatment was completed in two visits with inter-appointment medication of 2% chlorhexidine and calcium hydroxide for two weeks. Outcome of endodontic retreatment was evaluated 12-24 months after final obturation. Results. Endodontic retreatment was successful in 93.3% in Group I after 24 months. In Group II, successful treatment and complete healing was found in 52.9% of teeth, whereas 14.7% of teeth showed only partial healing. However, clinical symptomatology was not present in any of the cases. Considering the absence of clinical signs and subjective symptoms, retreatment was successful in 67.6% of cases where chronic periapical inflammation was present. Conclusion. Endodontic retreatment was successful in high percentage in teeth with and without periapical lesions.

  6. Outcome of orthograde endodontic retreatment--A two-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesković, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub; Medojević, Milica; Maksimović, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Endodontic retreatment is a complex intervention that requires detailed analysis of possible reasons for failure, and flawless practical execution of the procedure. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of endodontic retreatment based on clinical and radiographic criteria after a two-year observation period. Clinical study included 49 teeth indicated for endodontic retreatment based on periapical index (PAI). All teeth were divided into two groups. Group I comprised teeth without any periapical lesion (PAI score of 1 and 2) while Group II consisted of teeth with visible periapical radiolucency (PAI score of 3, 4, and 5). Endodontic retreatment was completed in two visits with inter-appointment medication of 2% chlorhexidine and calcium hydroxide for two weeks. Outcome of endodontic retreatment was evaluated 12-24 months after final obturation. Endodontic retreatment was successful in 93.3% in Group I after 24 months. In Group II, successful treatment and complete healing was found in 52.9% of teeth, whereas 14.7% of teeth showed only partial healing. However, clinical symptomatology was not present in any of the cases. Considering the absence of clinical signs and subjective symptoms, retreatment was successful in 67.6% of cases where chronic periapical inflammation was present. Endodontic retreatment was successful in high percentage in teeth with and without periapical lesions.

  7. Orthograde endodontic retreatment of teeth with individual cast posts: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramić, Bojana; Stojanac, Igor; Premović, Milica; Drobac, Milan; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2012-01-01

    The failure of primary endodontic treatment is manifested by various clinical symptoms following endodontic therapy or, more frequently, by the development of chronic inflammatory process in the apex region without any subjective symptoms. In case of unfavorable outcome of the primary endodontic treatment, orthograde endodontic retreatment is the method of choice for a prolonged therapy. Two female patients, 47 and 44 years old, were presented at the Dental Clinic of Vojvodina for endodontic retreatment of teeth 22, 23 and 13, within the repeated prosthetic restoration. Intraradicular individual cast posts were removed using ultrasonic instruments. Remains of gutta-percha were removed by engine driven rotary re-treatment files, root canals were shaped and cleaned using the crown-down technique, and obturated with gutta-percha and epoxy-resin-based sealer using the lateral compaction technique. When there are metal posts or broken instruments in the root canal, the use of ultrasonic instruments is considered a safe method characterized by negligible tooth substance loss and minimal root damage causing fractures and perforations, and the entire procedure is effective and predictable. Non-surgical orthograde endodontic retreatment, when properly performed in accessible and penetrable root canals, achieves a high cure rate, good and lasting results and eliminates the need for radical procedures, such as apical surgery or tooth extraction. When nonsurgical endodontic retreatment is done, treated teeth must be restored by full coronal coverage as soon as possible, to prevent coronal leakage or fracture.

  8. Orthograde endodontic retreatment of teeth with individual cast posts: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramić Bojana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The failure of primary endodontic treatment is manifested by various clinical symptoms following endodontic therapy or, more frequently, by the development of chronic inflammatory process in the apex region without any subjective symptoms. In case of unfavorable outcome of the primary endodontic treatment, orthograde endodontic retreatment is the method of choice for a prolonged therapy. Outline of Cases. Two female patients, 47 and 44 years old, were presented at the Dental Clinic of Vojvodina for endodontic retreatment of teeth 22, 23 and 13, within the repeated prosthetic restoration. Intraradicular individual cast posts were removed using ultrasonic instruments. Remains of gutta-percha were removed by engine driven rotary re-treatment files, root canals were shaped and cleaned using the crown-down technique, and obturated with gutta-percha and epoxy-resin-based sealer using the lateral compaction technique. Conclusion. When there are metal posts or broken instruments in the root canal, the use of ultrasonic instruments is considered a safe method characterized by negligible tooth substance loss and minimal root damage causing fractures and perforations, and the entire procedure is effective and predictable. Non-surgical orthograde endodontic retreatment, when properly performed in accessible and penetrable root canals, achieves a high cure rate, good and lasting results and eliminates the need for radical procedures, such as apical surgery or tooth extraction. When nonsurgical endodontic retreatment is done, treated teeth must be restored by full coronal coverage as soon as possible, to prevent coronal leakage or fracture.

  9. Demographics, Microbiology and Outcome in Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections

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    Chance Witt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI are potentially severe infections that have a high morbidity and mortality even with modern medical care. This study examines factors associated with outcomes in patients with NSTI in an academic tertiary care hospital. Design: This is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with NSTI between 2003 and 2008. Baseline demographics and comorbid conditions, laboratory and clinical parameters, timing of surgery, and outcomes, including length of stay and mortality, were compared with univariate analysis; significant factors were then analyzed for their effects on mortality using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Sixty-nine patients with NSTI were analyzed; 61% were men. Diabetes (39% was the most common comorbid condition. Most infections (55% were polymicrobial. The most common organism in monomicrobial infections was Staphylococcus aureus, and 50 % of these isolates were methicillin resistant. Nine patients (13% required amputation. Mortality was 20%, and the most significant predictor of mortality was a higher respiratory rate on admission (p=0.02. Conclusion: Patients in this series frequently had diabetes, usually had polymicrobial infections, and had a 20% mortality rate.

  10. Taurodontism: a review of the condition and endodontic treatment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, H; Azarpazhooh, A; Mayhall, J T

    2008-05-01

    Taurodontism can be defined as a change in tooth shape caused by the failure of Hertwig's epithelial sheath diaphragm to invaginate at the proper horizontal level. An enlarged pulp chamber, apical displacement of the pulpal floor, and no constriction at the level of the cementoenamel junction are the characteristic features. Although permanent molar teeth are most commonly affected, this change can also be seen in both the permanent and deciduous dentition, unilaterally or bilaterally, and in any combination of teeth or quadrants. Whilst it appears most frequently as an isolated anomaly, its association with several syndromes and abnormalities has also been reported. The literature on taurodontism in the context of endodontics up to March 2007 was reviewed using PubMed, MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. Despite the clinical challenges in endodontic therapy, taurodontism has received little attention from clinicians. In performing root canal treatment on such teeth, one should appreciate the complexity of the root canal system, canal obliteration and configuration, and the potential for additional root canal systems. Careful exploration of the grooves between all orifices particularly with magnification, use of ultrasonic irrigation; and a modified filling technique are of particular use.

  11. Bactericidal effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aun, Carlos E.; Barberini, Alexandre F.; Camargo, Selma C. C.; Silva Kfouri, Luciana; Lorenzetti Simionato, Maria R.

    1999-05-01

    The success of endodontic therapy is based on the elimination of bacterial colonization from the endodontic system and periapical tissues. Recent studies have been showing the bactericidal effect of laser in root canal treatment. The propose of the study is to evaluate the effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in contaminated root canal treatment. The propose of the study is to evaluate the effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in contaminated root canals from upper central incisor. For the experiment 12 teeth were selected, respect at the apical third, sterilized, and 10 μm Streptococcus sanguis liquid culture were inoculated in the root canals. The laser test groups were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser at standard setting of 15Hz, 100mj and 1,5 W for 10, 20 and 30 seconds each in slow helicoidal movements from the apex to the top using a 300 micrometers fiber. After the procedure the specimens were placed in Tryptic Soy Agar, the number of colony forming units was evaluated. The experiment showed a significant reduction on viability of Streptococcus sanguis at the respective time of 20 and 30 seconds.

  12. Fatigue behavior of lubricated Ni-Ti endodontic rotary instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Brotzu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of Ni-Ti alloys in the practice of endodontic comes from their important properties such as shape memory and superelasticity phenomena, good corrosion resistance and high compatibility with biological tissues. In the last twenty years a great variety of nickel-titanium rotary instruments, with various sections and taper, have been developed and marketed. Although they have many advantages and despite their increasing popularity, a major concern with the use of Ni-Ti rotary instruments is the possibility of unexpected failure in use due to several reasons: novice operator handling, presence manufacturing defects, fatigue etc. Recently, the use of an aqueous gel during experimental tests showed a longer duration of the instruments. The aim of the present work is to contribute to the study of the fracture behavior of these endodontic rotary instruments particularly assessing whether the use of the aqueous lubricant gel can extend their operative life stating its reasons. A finite element model (FEM has been developed to support the experimental results. The results were rather contradictory, also because the Perspex (Poly-methyl methacrylate, PMMA cannot simulate completely the dentin mechanical behavior; however the results highlight some interesting points which are discussed in the paper.

  13. Stiffness of endodontically-treated teeth related to restoration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeh, E S; Douglas, W H; Messer, H H

    1989-11-01

    Endodontically-treated posterior teeth are susceptible to fracture; consequently, full-occlusal-coverage restorations are recommended. We designed this study to examine the potential for alternative restorative techniques for pulpless teeth, using strain gauges mounted on extracted maxillary second premolars to measure strains generated by nondestructive occlusal loading. Cuspal stiffness was evaluated on the following sequentially performed procedures: unaltered tooth, completion of all endodontic procedures, appropriate restorative preparation, and restoration. The restorative procedures evaluated were: (1) amalgam, (2) cast gold onlay, (3) composite restoration with enamel etch, and (4) composite restoration with enamel and dentin etch. Finally, all teeth were loaded to fracture. Cast gold was the strongest restorative material tested (2.11 relative stiffness, compared with that of the unaltered tooth at 1.00), and amalgam was the weakest (0.35 relative stiffness). Composite restoration and enamel plus dentin etch were almost as strong as the unaltered tooth (0.87 relative stiffness), while enamel-etch-only yielded lower stiffness (0.51).

  14. Clinical decision making in restorative dentistry, endodontics, and antibiotic prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of geographic location of graduation (Israel, Eastern Europe, Latin America) on decision making regarding management of dental caries, periapical lesions, and antibiotic prescribing routines. A questionnaire was given to ninety-eight general practitioners regarding demographic and work habits. Photographs of lesions were shown on a screen. Participants reported recommended treatment and whether they would routinely prescribe antibiotics following regular endodontic treatment, retreatment, and impacted third molar surgical extraction in healthy patients. There was a 94 percent (n=92) response rate, of which eighty-five responses were used in the data analysis. Surgical treatment of asymptomatic enamel caries lesions was not recommended by most of the subjects, and surgery was recommended for DEJ caries lesions in low or moderate caries risk patients, both without significant differences between geographic regions of dental school graduation. Israelis had a lower frequency of retreatment in asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post restoration (without crown) compared to Latin Americans and East Europeans. Most of the participants would not retreat asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post and crown. After third molar surgery, 46 percent of participants routinely prescribed antibiotics. Significantly more Latin American graduates prescribed antibiotics following endodontic treatment, retreatment, and third molar extractions (pantibiotics) and overtreatment (caries) among young practitioners reflect failure of undergraduate education in proper use of antibiotics and management of the carious lesions according to the patient's clinical presentation and caries risk assessment rather than routinely undertaking surgical caries treatment.

  15. Utilization of blended learning to teach preclinical endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Cristina; Barrero, Carlos; Duggan, Dereck; Platin, Enrique; Rivera, Eric; Hannum, Wallace; Petrola, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Blended learning (BL) is the integration of classroom learning with an online environment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dental students who experienced BL in a preclinical endodontic course demonstrated better manual skills, conceptual knowledge, and learning experience compared to those experiencing traditional learning. All eighty-one students (100 percent) in a preclinical endodontics course agreed to participate and were assigned to either the traditional or BL group. A root canal procedure was used to determine the level of manual skills gained by each group. Pre- and post-intervention quizzes were given to all students to evaluate conceptual knowledge gained, and the students' perspectives on the methods were evaluated with a survey. The BL group scored better than the traditional group on the manual skills exercise at a statistically significant level (p=0.0067). There were no differences in the post-intervention quiz scores between the two groups, and the students' opinions were positive regarding BL. With BL, the students were able to learn and demonstrate dental skills at a high level.

  16. Regenerative Endodontics in light of the stem cell paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Vinicius; Botero, Tatiana M.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells play a critical role in development and in tissue regeneration. The dental pulp contains a small sub-population of stem cells that are involved in the response of the pulp to caries progression. Specifically, stem cells replace odontoblasts that have undergone cell death as a consequence of the cariogenic challenge. Stem cells also secrete factors that have the potential to enhance pulp vascularization and provide the oxygen and nutrients required for the dentinogenic response that is typically observed in teeth with deep caries. However, the same angiogenic factors that are required for dentin regeneration may ultimately contribute to the demise of the pulp by enhancing vascular permeability and interstitial pressure. Recent studies focused on the biology of dental pulp stem cells revealed that the multipotency and angiogenic capacity of these cells could be exploited therapeutically in dental pulp tissue engineering. Collectively, these findings suggest new treatment paradigms in the field of Endodontics. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential impact of dental pulp stem cells to Regenerative Endodontics. PMID:21726222

  17. Endodontic management of dens invaginatus Type IIIb: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Jorge N R; da Costa, Rui Pereira; Anderson, Craig; Quaresma, Sérgio André; Corte-Real, Luís S M; Monroe, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Dens invaginatus may be seen as a developmental malformation. It is characterized by an invagination of the enamel and dentin, creating a lumen inside the affected tooth, which may extend as deep as the apical foramen. Oehlers Type IIIb is considered the most challenging clinical conditions. The purpose of this study is to discuss the nonsurgical endodontic management of vital and necrotic dens invaginatus Type IIIb cases. Due to the complex anatomical consideration of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, endodontic treatment is extremely technique sensitive. A conservative approach was used in a vital case to treat the invaginated lumen only, to preserve the vitality of the pulp, and a more invasive approach was used in a necrotic case to debride the lumen and necrotic pulp for proper disinfection of the root canal system. Although different, all the approaches were successful. The clinical signs and symptoms were resolved. The vital case remains vital after 19 months, and the recall radiographs were able to show satisfactory periapical healing both in vital and necrotic cases. Due to the highly complex anatomy of dens invaginatus Type IIIb, the decision of preserving the pulp vitality may not be related only to pulpal diagnosis but also to the technical requirements of the treatment. Although very technically sensitive, it may be possible to treat the invaginated lumen exclusively, while preserving the vitality of the pulp. Necrotic cases may require a more aggressive approach to achieve a favorable prognosis.

  18. Nano-odontology: nanostructured assemblies for endodontic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, F; Mendoza-Palomares, C; Avoaka-Boni, M C; Ramaroson, J; Bahi, S; Richert, L; Granier, F; Benkirane-Jessel, N; Haikel, Y

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the pulp is so fundamental to the functional life of the tooth that new strategies are required to avoid the removal of the whole pulp following irreversible pulpitis and to regenerate the lost endodontic tissues. Nano-odontology would provide suitable solutions for pulp tissue conservative and regenerative approaches. In our group, we have shown that when covalently coupled to Poly-Glutamic Acid (PGA) the incorporation of an anti-inflammatory hormone (melanocortin, a-MSH) into the multilayered films Poly-L-Lysine (PLL)/PGA increases the anti-inflammatory reaction of pulp fibroblasts and macrophages stimulated by LPS (Lipo-Polysaccharides). Recently, usual linear PLL polymers have been chemically grafted for making new Dendrigraft polymers (DGLG4) whose higher branching ratios can give useful properties. The objective is to use nanostructured assemblies containing DGLG4 and PGA-alpha-MSH to design a new nanomaterial. These nanostructured assemblies (DGLG4-PGA-alpha-MSH)n constitute a thick reservoir of the anti-inflammatory peptide and promote adhesion and proliferation of pulp fibroblast on the biomaterial surface. These nanostructured films could be adapted for an endodontic regeneration application to target pulp connective tissue regeneration. Firstly, the crucial reduction of inflammation could be helpful by using PGA-alpha-MSH and secondly the initiation of the regeneration of the connective tissue will be promoted by the whole nanostructured film of which allows pulp cells colonisation.

  19. Solitary Candida albicans Infection Causing Fournier Gangrene and Review of Fungal Etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tiffany A; Bieniek, Jared M; Sumfest, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial bacterial infections are commonly found in cases of Fournier gangrene (FG), although fungal growth may occur occasionally. Solitary fungal organisms causing FG have rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of an elderly man with a history of diabetes who presented with a necrotizing scrotal and perineal soft tissue infection. He underwent emergent surgical debridement with findings of diffuse urethral stricture disease and urinary extravasation requiring suprapubic tube placement. Candida albicans was found to be the single causative organism on culture, and the patient recovered well following antifungal treatment. Fungal infections should be considered as rare causes of necrotizing fasciitis and antifungal treatment considered in at-risk immunodeficient individuals.

  20. The Effect of Autoclaving on Torsional Moment of Two Nickel-Titanium Endodontic Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    titanium endodontic files 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) J. B. King, H. W. Roberts, B. E... Endodontic Journal, doi:10.1111/j.1365- 2591.2011.01958.x 45, 156–161, 2012 doi:10.1111/j.1365-2591.2011.01958.x Wiley Blackwell Publishing, 111 River...autoclaving on torsional strength of two nickel–titanium (NiTi) rotary endodontic files: Twisted Files (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) and GT Series X

  1. Clinical applications of cone beam computed tomography in endodontics: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohenca, Nestor; Shemesh, Hagay

    2015-09-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics has been extensively reported in the literature. Compared with the traditional spiral computed tomography, limited field of view (FOV) CBCT results in a fraction of the effective absorbed dose of radiation. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the application and advantages associated with advanced endodontic problems and complications, while reducing radiation exposure during complex endodontic procedures. The benefits of the added diagnostic information provided by intraoperative CBCT images in select cases justify the risk associated with the limited level of radiation exposure.

  2. X-Ray diagnostics and their relation to a successful endodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecetkova, A.; Ondrasovicova, J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiography plays very major rule in endodontic. One of the most used method is intraoral radiography ( intraoral diagnostic x-ray, x-ray with hand root instrument, recall, after call and follow up x-ray ). These radiographic pictures help us detect the morphology of the root canal system, endodontic complications and periapical lessions. X-ray radiographs have to be isometric in the ortoradial projection. Some cases we may use the ex-centric projection (mesial and distal projection). Endodontic complications as broken hand root instrument, via falsa, intra-canal step may be confirmed by intraoral x-ray radiographs. (authors)

  3. Fusobacterium nucleatum infections: clinical spectrum and bacteriological features of 78 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, E; Barraud, O

    2016-08-01

    Few series describe the clinical spectrum of Fusobacterium spp. infections. Among them, fewer discuss F. nucleatum, even though there are many clinical cases. We performed a retrospective study over 8 years (from 2007 to 2014) in Limoges University Hospital, France, to assess clinical and bacteriological aspects of infections due to F. nucleatum. Eighty-one patients with F. nucleatum positive cultures were included in this study, irrespective of sample origin. Abscesses (n = 43), bacteraemia (n = 18) and bone infections (n = 8) were the most common types of infections, Abscesses were found in various organs (mostly skin, brain, pleura, liver). Co-morbidities were found in 38 patients (47 %) with neoplasia, diabetes, and alcoholism and history of smoking. There were more neoplasms in patients with bacteraemia than in patients with abscesses (p = 0.007). In 51 cases (65.4 %), infection was polymicrobial, either during bacteraemia or abscesses. Main associations were with Streptococcus spp., Peptostreptococcus spp. and/or Prevotella spp. The sources of infection, when found, were either dental or gastrointestinal. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, clindamycin and metronidazole. Infections involving F. nucleatum are uncommon and potentially severe, with many abscesses requiring surgery. Bacteraemia was mainly associated with co-morbidities such as cancer. Polymicrobial infections were very common and there is probably interaction and/or synergy between F. nucleatum and some other commensal bacteria to cause infections and abscesses.

  4. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation on biofilm-forming bacteria associated with endodontic pathogens in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiri, Yuichiro; Katsumoto, Tetsushi; Azakami, Hiroyuki; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-07-01

    With the development of dental laser delivery systems that can enter into the root canals, it is possible to use Er:YAG lasers to remove the residual biofilm associated with infected root canals. We examined their effects against biofilms made of Actinomyces naeslundii, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus casei, Propionibacterium acnes, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, or Prevotella nigrescens in vitro. After Er:YAG laser irradiation with energy densities ranging between 0.38-0.98 J/cm(2), the biofilm samples on hydroxyapatite disks were quantitatively and morphologically evaluated. The Er:YAG laser was effective against biofilms of 6 of the bacterial species examined, with the exception of those formed by L. casei. After irradiation, the numbers of viable cells in the biofilms were significantly decreased, whereas atrophic changes in bacterial cells and reductions in biofilm cell density were seen morphologically. Er: YAG lasers might be suitable for clinical application as a suppressive and removal device of biofilms in endodontic treatments.

  5. Microbial flora in orodental infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to compare the normal aerobic and anaerobic bacterial oral flora with flora from deep seated dental caries, gingivitis and adult periodontitis. All the samples belonging to both the control and study groups yielded microbes. Aerobe / Anaerobe ratio was high in normal flora (1.48 as compared to dental caries (0.9, gingivitis (0.72 and periodontitis (0.56. Ninety seven percent of orodental infections were polymicrobial and three or more microbes were found in 84% cases of study group as compared to 28% in controls. Streptococcus mutans and anaerobic lactobacilli were common in dental caries, Actinomyces and Peptostreptococcus spp. in gingivitis, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontitis.

  6. Quality-Shaping Factors and Endodontic Treatment amongst General Dental Practitioners with a Focus on Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Demant

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a gap between the endodontic outcome that can be achieved and the outcome observed on the basis of worldwide general dental practitioner data. The quality of root canal treatment (RCT is shaped by the dentist's knowledge, attitude, and skills, but it may also be influenced by the patient's demands and degree of satisfaction. The topic has only been sparsely investigated. Although dental health has increased over the years in Denmark, the number of performed root fillings has also increased, probably because the number of tooth extractions have declined and more molar teeth have been treated. Caries appears to be the main cause for performing RCT and a preventive approach by employing stepwise excavation may reduce RCT, but this strategy does not remove the gap. Factors influencing RCT quality could be the status on adoption of nickel-titanium rotary technology, more focus on infection control (rubber dam use, knowledge of factors important for prognosis, as dentists often think that they are good at doing RCT, but often perform inadequately, an alteration of clinician's awareness of their performance in the context of dental practices, seems warranted. Finally, the development of new preventive modalities for pulp and apical inflammation are crucial.

  7. Periapical and endodontic status scale based on periapical bone lesions and endodontic treatment quality evaluation using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venskutonis, Tadas; Plotino, Gianluca; Tocci, Luigi; Gambarini, Gianluca; Maminskas, Julius; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a new periapical and endodontic status scale (PESS) that is based on the complex periapical index (COPI), which was designed for the identification and classification of periapical bone lesions in cases of apical periodontitis, and the endodontically treated tooth index, which was designed for endodontic treatment quality evaluation by means of cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis. Periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected from the already known indexes and scientific literature for radiologic evaluation. Radiographic images (CBCT imaging, digital orthopantomography [DOR], and digital periapical radiography) from 55 patients were analyzed. All parameters were evaluated on CBCT, DOR, and digital periapical radiographic images by 2 external observers. The statistical analysis was performed with software SPSS version 19.0 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). Chi-square tests were used to compare frequencies of qualitative variables. The level of significance was set at P ≤ .05. Overall intraobserver and interobserver agreements were very good and good, respectively. CBCT analysis found more lesions and lesions of bigger dimension (P analysis, more root canals and more canals associated with lesions were found. The most informative and reproducible periapical and endodontic status parameters were selected, and a new PESS was proposed. The classification proposed in the present study seems to be reproducible and objective and adds helpful information with respect to the existing indexes. Future studies need to be conducted to validate PESS. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A review of the effects of formaldehyde release from endodontic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiadis, B; George, G A; Abbott, P V; Wash, L J

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde is present in most living cells and the environment. In dentistry, patients may be exposed to formaldehyde through the use of several endodontic materials (e.g. AH 26) and during formocresol pulpotomies. This review outlines how the human body reacts to formaldehyde exposure, how recent data has relooked at the issue of carcinogenicity and leukaemia associated with formaldehyde, and whether it is possible to quantify the amount of formaldehyde produced by endodontic cements. The review analyses the way formaldehyde is produced from epoxy resins and addresses the question of whether the amount of formaldehyde from endodontic cements is large enough to override the body's ability to deal with its own endogenous levels of formaldehyde and should the amount of formaldehyde produced be a concern. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Endodontic retreatment of maxillary first molar: the importance of the fourth canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Iandolo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The endodontic retreatment of this right maxillary first molar was performed with the proper protocols and sophisticated tools, with which we can achieve success in the short- and long-term treatments.

  10. Cholesterol Granuloma in the Maxillary Sinus: Are Endodontically Treated Teeth Involved in Its Etiopathogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas Antonio Juvencio de Freitas Filho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol granuloma (CG is a tissue reaction in response to the accumulation of cholesterol crystals rarely found in the maxillary sinus. The etiopathogenesis of maxillary sinus CG remains unclear. We reviewed the literature and added two new reports of cholesterol granuloma in maxillary sinus related to endodontically treated maxillary posterior teeth. The first report refers to a 45-year-old woman diagnosed with rhinitis, who was submitted to endodontic retreatment of maxillary molar, and subsequently showed maxillary sinus opacity with cystic appearance. The second case describes a young adult woman, who presented a cystic mass in maxillary sinus after endodontic treatment, in close association with the apex of the maxillary right second premolar. Both patients were treated by a classic Caldwell-Luc surgery and the microscopic analyses revealed maxillary sinus CG. In the following, the authors discuss the probable involvement of endodontically treated maxillary posterior teeth in the etiopathogenesis of maxillary sinus CG.

  11. A Practice-based Study on the Survival of Restored Endodontically Treated Teeth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skupien, J.A.; Opdam, N.; Winnen, R.; Bronkhorst, E.; Kreulen, C.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This retrospective study evaluated the survival of endodontically treated teeth (ETTs) and investigated factors influencing restoration and tooth survival. METHODS: Data from 795 ETTs were recorded, and success (restoration still intact) and survival (restoration intact or

  12. The perceived prognosis of endodontic treatment and implant therapy among dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Rachel; Aseltine, Robert; Matthews, J Greg; Kaufman, Blythe

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this study were to understand if practicing dentists appreciate the difference in criteria for success used in the endodontic and implant literature, to evaluate the perceived outcome of implant therapy compared with endodontic treatment, and to evaluate current and projected utilization of implant and endodontic treatment. A 16-question survey was distributed to 648 dentists who graduated from the University of Connecticut Dental School over the past 30 years. The response rate was 47%. Forty-nine percent of respondents did not know that different criteria are used in the literature to evaluate implant and root canal treatment. Thirty percent of respondents thought root canal treatment of teeth with necrotic pulp was superior to implants, and only 16% thought retreatment was preferable. A shift in utilization toward implant treatment was not found; however, a perceived superior outcome of implant compared with endodontic treatment does exist among the dental community. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Periapical and endodontic status of permanent teeth in patients with hypophosphatemic rickets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M G; Beck-Nielsen, S S; Haubek, Dorte

    2011-01-01

    genetically. The aim of the present study was to describe the periapical and endodontic status of permanent teeth in patients with genetically and/or biochemically confirmed HR. The patients were recruited from a medical study on HR patients. The patients underwent a dental examination including a digital...... panoramic radiograph, which was scored for endodontically affected teeth (i.e. teeth with periapical radiolucencies and/or endodontically treated teeth). A total of 52 patients (age range: 5·7-74·5 years; 17 males and 35 females) were included. HR patients were characterised by a high number...... of endodontically affected teeth (mean: 4·2; s.d.: 5·0). The number of affected teeth rose significantly with age (P ...

  14. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography: case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Abella

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new method that produces three-dimensional (3D information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissue, with a lower effective radiation dose than traditional CT scans. Specific endodontic applications for CBCT are being identified as the use of this technology becomes more common. CBCT has great potential to become a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing endodontic problems, as well as for assessing root fractures, apical periodontitis, resorptions, perforations, root canal anatomy and the nature of the alveolar bone topography around teeth. This article aims to review cone beam technology and its advantages over CT scans and conventional radiography, to illustrate current and future clinical applications in endodontic practice, and to highlight areas of further research of CBCT in endodontics. Specific case examples illustrate how treatment planning has changed with the images obtained with CBCT technology compared with only periapical radiography.

  15. [Antimicrobial treatment in complicated intraabdominal infections--current situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnánek, F

    2009-04-01

    Compared to other infections, intraabdominal infections include wide spectrum of infections of various severity, have different ethiology, which is frequently polymicrobial, show different microbiological results, which are difficult to interpret. The role of surgical intervention is essential. Intraabdominal infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality. Their prognosis is significantly improved with early and exact diagnosis, appropriate surgical or radiological intervention and timely effective antimicrobial therapy. Practitioners may choose between older or more modern antibiotics, between monotherapy or combination therapy, however, they should also consider clinical condition of the patient, the antibiotic's spectrum of activity, the treatment timing and its duration, the dose and dosing scheme of the particular antimicrobials. Furthermore, antimicrobial therapy should be used with caution, with the aim to prevent development of antimicrobial resistence. Inappropriate choice of antimicrobials in initial empiric therapy results in relapsing infections, surgical intervention and prolongation of hospitalization, and even death rates reflect adequate and timely empiric therapy.

  16. Dentists with enhanced skills (Special Interest) in Endodontics: gatekeepers views in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotane, Swapnil G; Al-Haboubi, Mustafa; Kendall, Nick; Robertson, Claire; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2015-09-21

    Dentists with a special interest hold enhanced skills enabling them to treat cases of intermediate complexity. The aim of this study was to explore primary dental care practitioners' views of dentists with a special interest (DwSIs) in Endodontics in London, with reference to an educational and service initiative established by (the former) London Deanery in conjunction with the NHS. A cross-sectional postal survey of primary care dentists working across different models of care within London was conducted, with a target to achieve views of at least 5 % of London's dentists. The questionnaire instrument was informed by qualitative research and the dental literature and piloted prior to distribution; data were analysed using SPSS v19 and STATA v12.0. Six per cent of London's primary care dentists (n = 243) responded to the survey; 53 % were male. Just over one third (37 %; n = 90) were aware of the DwSI service being provided. Most practitioners reported that having access to a DwSI in Endodontics would support the care of their patients (89 %; n = 215), would carry out more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care if adequately reimbursed (93 %; n = 220), and had more time (76 %; n = 180). Female respondents appeared to be less confident in doing endodontic treatment (p = 0.001). More recently qualified respondents reported greater need for training/support for performing more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.001), were more dissatisfied with access to endodontic service in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.007) and more interested to train as a DwSI in endodontics (p = 0.001) compared with respondents having a greater number of years of clinical experience since qualification. The findings lend support to the concept of developing dentists with enhanced skills as well as ensuring additional funding, time and support to facilitate more routine endodontics through the NHS primary care to meet

  17. Safety Irradiation Parameters of Nd:YAP Laser Beam for Endodontic Treatments: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Namour, A.; Geerts, S.; Zeinoun, T.; De Moor, R.; Nammour, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Nd:YAP laser has several potentialities of clinical applications in endodontics. The aim of our study is to determine the safety range of irradiation parameters during endodontic application of Nd:YAP laser that can be used without damaging and overheating the periodontal tissue. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven caries-free single-rooted extracted human teeth were used. Crowns were sectioned to obtain 11mmroot canal length. Temperature increases at root surfaces were measured ...

  18. Management of Post Endodontic Retreatment Pain With Low Level Laser Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Ashraf, Hengameh; Daghayeghi, Amir Houshang; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pharmacotherapy with analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been traditionally used to relief post-operative pain of endodontic treatments. However, due to the side effects reported for these drugs, some efforts have been made to decrease the post-operative pain of the endodontic treatments through laser irradiation. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the reduction of pain after root canal retreatment.

  19. Laser Assisted Treatment of Extra Oral Cutaneous Sinus Tract of Endodontic Origin: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Ghorbanzadeh, Sajedeh; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sinus tract (or fistula) is a common manifestation of pulpal necrosis with periapical pathosis that requires conventional or rarely surgical- endodontic treatment in order to heal. It is mainly identified intraorally and in rare cases manifestation is extra orally, which may frequently be misdiagnosed with cutaneous lesion and incorrectly treated. New technologies such as lasers have been developed as adjuncts to standard endodontic antimicrobial procedures in order to ...

  20. Comparative assessment of the incidence of vertical root fractures between conventional versus surgical endodontic retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, L; Krengel, M; Winter, M; Stampf, S; Wrbas, K T

    2014-11-01

    Vertical root fractures (VRFs) are a common cause of tooth loss. Little evidence exists though, relating the incidence of VRFs to the type of endodontic retreatment. This retrospective study aimed at evaluating the impact of conventional versus surgical endodontics on root canal-filled teeth with VRFs. Over a period of 13 years, 200 endodontically retreated teeth from 192 patients with VRFs were extracted and further examined. VRFs were assessed in relation to age, gender, tooth group, clinical signs, extension on the root surface, patency, as well as type of endodontic retreatment and restoration. Statistical analysis was conducted using a Cox PH Model, Chi-squared, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Log rank tests at a significance level of 5 %. The majority of teeth with VRFs (62.31 %) had undergone the combination of conventional root canal retreatment and apical surgery. Women (64.06 %) presented VRFs more frequently than men (35.94 %) at the mean age of 51.1 and 55.1 years, respectively. Maxillary first (17.5 %) and second (16.5 %) premolars, restored by a resin-based material without a post (56.28 %) were more susceptible to VRFs. Apically initiated (84.1 %) VRFs could be diagnosed more easily on radiographs. The type of endodontic treatment strongly correlated with VRFs. The prevalence of VRFs in teeth having undergone both conventional and surgical endodontic retreatment could be attributed, among others, to additive dentin damage related to the aforementioned endodontic procedures. The possible involvement of endodontic retreatment in the multifactorial etiology of VRFs needs to be taken into consideration in clinical practice.

  1. Chemical properties of gutta-percha endodontic filling material: investigation of five commercial brands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, Joao Batista A.; Paula, Regina C.M.; Feitosa, Judith P.A.; Gurgel Filho, Eduardo; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2001-01-01

    Chemical composition e thermal stability of five brands of gutta-percha endodontic filling material were investigated. Samples with higher amount of organic materials possess higher thermal stability. Investigation of gutta-percha polymer extracted from the endodontic filling by IR and NMR shows that the polymer is predominantly trans-polyisoprene. The thermal stability and molar mass were similar for four brands, however the 'Tanari' brand has got lower molar mass value than the other ones. (author)

  2. Root Canal Stripping: Malpractice or Common Procedural Accident?An Ethical Dilemma in Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Ciobanu, Ionela Elisabeta; Rusu, Darian; Stratul, Stefan-Ioan; Didilescu, Andreea Cristina; Cristache, Corina Marilena

    2016-01-01

    Root canal stripping is defined as an oblong, vertical perforation that appears especially in the middle section of curved root canals during endodontic treatments with nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) instruments. Its occurrence may drastically affect the outcome of the treatment, transforming a common otherwise efficient endodontic procedure into a complication such as tooth extraction. In order to discuss the ethical and legal consequences, two cases of dental strip perforations are herewith presen...

  3. Endodontic Management of a Fused Mandibular Second Molar and Paramolar: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Salem Milani, Amin

    2010-01-01

    Tooth fusion is a developmental anomaly characterized by the union between the dentin and/or enamel of at least two separately developing teeth. The fusion of posterior teeth is an uncommon occurrence. In this article, we report a rare case of unilateral fusion of a mandibular second molar with a paramolar. Carious exposure mandated endodontic treatment. The unusual morphology and complex root canal system makes diagnosis and treatment difficult. In this case, successful endodontic management...

  4. Medico-legal aspects of altered sensation following endodontic treatment: a retrospective case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givol, Navot; Rosen, Eyal; Bjørndal, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze cases of liability claims related to persistent altered sensation following endodontic treatments so as to characterize the medico-legal aspects of this complication.......The objective of this study was to analyze cases of liability claims related to persistent altered sensation following endodontic treatments so as to characterize the medico-legal aspects of this complication....

  5. Update of guidelines for surgical endodontics - the position after ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G E; Bishop, K; Renton, T

    2012-05-25

    This is the first of a series of articles, which will summarise new or updated clinical guidelines produced by the Clinical Standards Committee of the Faculty of Dental Surgery, Royal College of Surgeons of England (FDSRCS). Important developments for the dental profession from a number of clinical guidelines will be presented, commencing with the Guidelines for surgical endodontics. The impact of recent evidence relating to the outcome of surgical endodontics and techniques such as cone beam computed tomography and microsurgical techniques are considered.

  6. [The diagnostic value of oblique technique for periapical radiography and its usefulness in endodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajczak, Teresa; Wilk, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    The applicability of the intraoral X-rays in the oblique projection during the endodontic treatment is described in this study. The rules concerning the positioning of the X-ray tube, intraoral film and the examined tooth, necessary to obtain images in mesial and distal oblique projections are discussed. The usefulness of the aforementioned projections in visualizing the anatomy, anomalies as well as periapical changes of the dental roots and canals during the endodontic treatment is presented.

  7. Bacterial leakage of provisional restorative materials used in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Gary R; Loucks, Carina A; Reavley, Brenton A

    2010-04-01

    To test the bacterial sealing ability of commonly used provisional endodontic restorative materials. This study investigated Cavit (3M ESPE), Ketac (3M ESPE), DuoTemp (Coltane/Whaledent), and a combination technique using Ketac and Cavit. One hundred molars were randomly selected and then mounted in an apparatus that isolated the crown portion of the tooth. Provisional restorative materials were placed in an open access following manufacturer guidelines. Streptococcus mutans was applied to the samples, and results were tabulated over the course of 4 weeks. Cavit and DuoTemp performed the best, and Ketac performed the worst. After 14 days, however, all materials leaked in over half of the samples. No material can be recommended as superior in providing a reliable seal after 14 days.

  8. DIFFICULT CASES IN ENDODONTICS – PROGNOSIS AND PROPHYLAXIS OF COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Kirilova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are cases in the endodontic treatment which are a real challenge. There are teeth with taurodontism and radix entomolaris. Patients usually lose their teeth because these anatomical features are less familiar. Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate several cases with taurodontism and radix entomolaris. Material and methods: Two cases with taurodontism and one with radix entomolaris that are described in the following article. Careful exploration of the grooves between all orifices with magnification, use of ultrasonic irrigation; and a modified filling technique are of particular use. Results: Results are observed after several years. In performing a root canal treatment on such teeth, one should appreciate the complexity of the root canal system, canal obliteration and configuration, and the potential for additional root canal systems. Conclusions: Knowledge of the phenomenon of taurodontism and radix entomolaris will improve the medical practice of the general dental practitioner.

  9. Endodontic diagnosis: evaluation between clinical and histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Souza Gonçalves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the aim was to analyze the histologic alterations in thirty dental pulps and correlate them with the clinical findings to verify agreement between the clinical and histopathologic diagnosis and contribute to knowledge about endodontic diagnosis. Methods: Using the methodology of Oliveira4, the pulpal conditions were clinically classified as normal, reversible pulpitis, pulpitis at the stage of transition, irreversible pulpitis and necrosis. Results: Lack of correlation was observed between the clinical and histopathologic diagnoses in the cases classified as reversible and at the stage of transition, which histologically consisted of irreversible lesions or degenerative alterations. All the cases clinically classified as irreversible corresponded to the histologic diagnoses. Conclusion: It was concluded that the correlation between clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of dental pulp was shown to be controversial, even though the semiotechnique used had been imperative for guidance about the irreversibility of pulpal lesion.

  10. Efficiency of Intraligamentary Anesthesia of Inferior Molars for Endodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peycheva K.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The periodontal ligament injection appears to be the most consistently reliable in achieving clinically adequate pulpal anaesthesia. Materials and Methods: 130 inferior molar teeth; technique: The tooth was first cleaned with chlorhexidine 0.2% solution. The penetration of the ligament is performed with special intraligamentary needle (30 G - 9, 17,21 mm “sliding” along the side of the tooth, 300º angle between the needle and the tooth, having taken the care of determining support points which will prevent the needle from twisting. The penetration must be deep enough to obtain the seal required for the injection, injection for each root in particular points; volume of solution per root is 0.2-0.4 ml. Results: In 125 cases the technique was absolutely efficient. In only 5 cases with pulpitis chronica ulcerosa there was need for additional intrapulpal anesthesia. Conclusions: The method could be used as a primary anesthetic method for endodontic treatment.

  11. Endodontic Treatment in Submerged Roots: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Pameshwar Hiremath

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. While the extent and pattern of resorption is variable among individuals, there is a progressive loss of ridge contour as a result of physiologic bone remodeling. Even today, with best modalities of tooth preservation, there is a group of elderly individuals who do not benefit from modern preventive practices and who now present a dilemma in terms of maintaining the masticatory apparatus necessary for nutrition. Even with excellent dental care, such patients experience abrasion of the natural tooth crowns with age, and embedded roots are left within the alveolar bone. According to old concepts of dental care, extraction of these roots would have been recommended, but today’s goal of excellence in endodontics dictates otherwise. We report a case in which vital and non-vital root submergence was carried out to prevent alveolar ridge reduction.

  12. Prevalence of periapical lesions in endodontic treatment teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Machado Barroso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the technique of serial sections. The present results showed periapical cyst (48, granuloma (43, Crohn's abscess (2, apical fibrosis (3 and others (11. . Among the lesions analyzed in this study it can be observed a higher incidence of apical periodontal cyst, followed by apical granuloma and other pathologies.

  13. PREVALENCE OF PERIAPICAL LESIONS IN ENDODONTIC TREATMENT TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Ribeiro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of of persistent periapical lesions after conventional endodontic therapy. The persistent periapical lesions were removed paraendodontic surgery, followed by apicoectomy. The root ends were retroprepared with ultrasound and retrofilling with MTA. The specimens were stored in formaldehyde 10%, making a total of 107 samples. The lesions were referred to the Department of Pathology, FOB-USP for microscopic analysis using the technique of serial sections. The present results showed periapical cyst (48, granuloma (43, Crohn's abscess (2, apical fibrosis (3 and others (11. . Among the lesions analyzed in this study it can be observed a higher incidence of apical periodontal cyst, followed by apical granuloma and other pathologies.

  14. The acceptance of dental operating microscope among advance education specialty programs in endodontics in the middle east

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Alrejaie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present the current situation of dental operating microscopy (DOM training in the available Advance Specialty Education Programs in Endodontics in Arab Middle-Eastern countries. Materials and Methods: A web-based survey was sent to the electronic mail address of Advance Specialty Education programs of 15 Arab and middle east countries. The questions were limited to those who have an advanced specialty education program in Endodontics at their University if they are using an operating microscope? Results: Out of 15 countries, only 4 countries have microscopic technology in their Advance Education Programs in Endodontics. Conclusion: Few Arab Middle-Eastern countries have DOM in their advance education programs in endodontics. The highest authority in advancing endodontic education in the Arab Middle-East should consider in the near future the importance of this technology as standard care in teaching advance endodontics. An advance workshops should be organized regularly to provide enough knowledge about this standard educational technology.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of polymer composites for endodontic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashimi, R; Mannocci, F; Foxton, R; Deb, S

    2014-06-01

    To develop a low-density polyethylene-hydroxyapatite (HA-PE) composite with properties tailored to function as a potential root canal filling material. Hydroxyapatite and polyethylene mixed with strontium oxide as a radiopacifier were extruded from a single screw extruder fitted with an appropriate die to form fibres. The composition of the composite was optimized with clinical handling and placement in the canal being the prime consideration. The fibres were characterized using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and their thermal properties determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The tensile strength and elastic modulus of the composite fibres and gutta-percha were compared, dry and after 1 month storage in simulated body fluid (SBF), using a universal testing machine. The radiopacity of the fibres was determined using digital radiography. The interaction of the composites with eugenol was evaluated and compared with gutta-percha. Data of the tensile test were submitted to two-way anova and Bonferroni tests (P composites ranged between 110.5 and 111.2 °C, whereas gutta-percha exhibited a melting point at 52 °C. The tensile strength and elastic modulus of the silanated HA/PE composites were significantly higher than those of gutta-percha (P composites were unchanged. Radiological evaluations demonstrated that silanated HA/PE fibres were sufficiently radiopaque. Promising materials for endodontic applications have been developed, offering relevant benefits over the traditional materials in terms of mechanical and chemical properties. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Factors associated with postoperative pain in endodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, Durre; Ahmad, Muhammad Zubair

    2014-12-01

    To assess postoperative pain in endodontic therapy and its association with clinical factors such as gender, age, tooth type, pulpal diagnosis, and preoperative pain, length of obturation and sealer extrusion. Cross-Sectional study. Dental section of the Aga khan university hospital, Karachi, Pakistan from January to December 2009. One hundred and forty patients (140) requiring endodontic therapy for molar and premolar teeth were included in this study. Local Anesthesia (2% Lidocain with 1:80,000 Epinephrine) was administered. The tooth was isolated with rubber dam. Access cavity was prepared with the help of round carbide No. 2 bur. Canal preparation was completed using crown-down technique. Access was sealed with sterile dry cotton pallet and restored temporarily with double layer of Glass ionomer cement and Cavit. After one week patients were recalled and access was re-opened, obturation was done using cold lateral condensation technique. Ca(OH)(2) based sealer was used. Postoperative radiographs were taken. Patients were recalled after 24 hours and postobturation pain was recorded using Visual analogue scale (VAS).Data was obtained on a structured Performa. χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis. Pain was present in 42.9% of patients. Females more frequently experienced pain (65%) than males (35%). Preoperative pain was found to be significantly associated with postoperative pain (p value < 0.001). Obturation length was not found to be significantly associated with postoperative pain (p value 1.0). Sealer extrusion was not found to be significantly associated with postoperative (P value 0.547).

  17. Cyclic fatigue of instruments for endodontic glide path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, Gianluca; Plotino, Gianluca; Sannino, GianPaolo; Grande, Nicola Maria; Giansiracusa, Alessio; Piasecki, Lucila; da Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier; Al-Sudani, Dina; Testarelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic glide path is the creation of a smooth patency from canal orifice to apex, which can be performed manually or with small tapered NiTi rotary instruments. The use of stainless steel (SS) hand K-files inserted in a reciprocating handpiece can be a possible alternative to create a mechanical glide path. The aim of this study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance between SS K-files used in a reciprocating motion and NiTi rotary instruments in artificial curved canals. Ten SS size 15 K-files used with the M4 handpiece (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA, USA) and ten PathFiles (Maillefer-Dentsply, Ballaigues, CH, Switzerland) NiTi rotary instruments size 16, 0.02 taper were tested for resistance to cyclic fatigue. The time to fracture inside an artificial curved canal was recorded for each instrument. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Mean time (and SD) to failure was 464 s (±40.4) for the Group PF (NiTi rotary PathFile), and 1049 s (±24.8) for the Group M4 (SS K-files reciprocating) with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.033). The SS 15 K-files used with the M4 handpiece showed a significant greater resistance to cyclic fatigue when compared to the NiTi rotary PathFiles. Therefore, the use of small size SS files in a reciprocating motion might be a rational choice for the creation of a mechanical endodontic glide path in curved root canals.

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity of calcium silicate-containing endodontic sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-min; Du, Tian-feng; Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhe-jun; Zheng, Yu-feng; Haapasalo, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 2 novel calcium silicate-containing endodontic sealers to human gingival fibroblasts was studied. EndoSequence BC (Brasseler, Savannah, GA), MTA Fillapex (Angelus Indústria de Produtos Odontológicos S/A, Londrina, PR, Brazil) and a control sealer (AH Plus; Dentsply DeTrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany) were evaluated. Human gingival fibroblasts were incubated for 3 days both with the extracts from fresh and set materials in culture medium and cultured on the surface of the set materials in Dulbecco-modified Eagle medium. Fibroblasts cultured in Dulbecco-modified Eagle medium were used as a control group. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by flow cytometry, and the adhesion of the fibroblasts to the surface of the set materials was assessed using scanning electron microscopy. The data of cell cytotoxicity were analyzed statistically using a 1-way analysis of variance test at a significance level of P extracts from BC Sealer showed higher viabilities at all extract concentrations than cells incubated with extracts from freshly mixed AH Plus and fresh and set MTA Fillapex, esspecially for the high extract concentrations (1:2 and 1:8 dilutions). Extracts from set MTA Fillapex of 2 weeks and older were more cytotoxic than extracts from freshly mixed and 1-week-old cement. With extract concentrations of 1:32 and lower, MTA Fillapex was no longer cytotoxic. After setting, AH Plus was no longer cytotoxic, and the fibroblast cells grew on set AH Plus equally as well as on BC Sealer. BC Sealer and MTA Fillapex, the 2 calcium silicate-containing endodontic sealers, exhibited different cytotoxicity to human gingival fibroblasts. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endodontic treatment options after unsuccessful initial root canal treatment: Alternatives to single-tooth implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; White, Shane N

    2016-03-01

    Initial root canal treatment is highly successful, appreciated by patients, and cost-effective, but failures occur. Should a tooth with unsuccessful initial root canal treatment be treated by means of other endodontic procedures or be replaced by a single-tooth implant? Results from systematic reviews of the outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment, apical surgery, replantation, and autotransplantation show high tooth survival rates. Nonsurgical retreatment generally is prioritized before surgical endodontic treatment. Microsurgical endodontic treatment is superior to traditional surgical endodontic treatment and has high survival rates. Intentional replantation remains a viable alternative to extraction. Autotransplantation has a place, particularly in growing patients with an appropriate donor tooth. Single-tooth implants have higher survival rates, but the natural state has intrinsic value. The first-line treatment option after failure of initial root canal treatment is nonsurgical retreatment. Endodontic surgery, intentional replantation, and autotransplantation should be considered before extraction and replacement by a single-tooth implant. Comprehensive case assessment, evaluation of all endodontic options, and risk assessment for caries and periodontal disease are always necessary when choosing the optimal treatment for a patient when initial root canal treatment has failed to heal. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. An in vitro Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of endodontically treated Teeth with Different Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Babita; Rishi, Rahul; Seal, Mukut; Jain, Kanav; Dutt, Pranjali; Talukdar, Pratim

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare and assess the fracture resistance of root canal treated teeth with different restorative materials. The present in vitro study was carried out on seventy-five freshly extracted, noncarious, single-canal human lower-first premolars with similar anatomic characteristics. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups with 15 teeth being present in each group. Group I is control group (no alteration done), group II is restored with silver amalgam after endodontic therapy, group III is restored with posterior composite after end-odontic therapy, group IV is restored with posterior glass ionomer cement (GIC) after endodontic therapy, and group V is restored with miracle mix after endodontic therapy. Universal testing machine was used to assess the fracture strength. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey's post hoc test were used to determine the significant difference between each group. A p-value of 0.05). The present study concludes that composites are found to be having more fracture resistance followed by silver amalgam on endodontically treated premolar teeth. Restoring nonvital teeth represents a major challenge for clinicians as they are extensively damaged due to caries and endodontic access preparations. With various restorative materials in the market, it becomes difficult for the clinician to choose the better restorative material for postendodontic restoration.