WorldWideScience

Sample records for encapsidated rna particle

  1. The HIV-1 Rev/RRE system is required for HIV-1 5' UTR cis elements to augment encapsidation of heterologous RNA into HIV-1 viral particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Hong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA encapsidation is governed by a number of viral encoded components, most notably the Gag protein and gRNA cis elements in the canonical packaging signal (ψ. Also implicated in encapsidation are cis determinants in the R, U5, and PBS (primer binding site from the 5' untranslated region (UTR. Although conventionally associated with nuclear export of HIV-1 RNA, there is a burgeoning role for the Rev/RRE in the encapsidation process. Pleiotropic effects exhibited by these cis and trans viral components may confound the ability to examine their independent, and combined, impact on encapsidation of RNA into HIV-1 viral particles in their innate viral context. We systematically reconstructed the HIV-1 packaging system in the context of a heterologous murine leukemia virus (MLV vector RNA to elucidate a mechanism in which the Rev/RRE system is central to achieving efficient and specific encapsidation into HIV-1 viral particles. Results We show for the first time that the Rev/RRE system can augment RNA encapsidation independent of all cis elements from the 5' UTR (R, U5, PBS, and ψ. Incorporation of all the 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance RNA encapsidation in the absence of the Rev/RRE system. In fact, we demonstrate that the Rev/RRE system is required for specific and efficient encapsidation commonly associated with the canonical packaging signal. The mechanism of Rev/RRE-mediated encapsidation is not a general phenomenon, since the combination of the Rev/RRE system and 5' UTR cis elements did not enhance encapsidation into MLV-derived viral particles. Lastly, we show that heterologous MLV RNAs conform to transduction properties commonly associated with HIV-1 viral particles, including in vivo transduction of non-dividing cells (i.e. mouse neurons; however, the cDNA forms are episomes predominantly in the 1-LTR circle form. Conclusions Premised on encapsidation of a heterologous RNA into

  2. Development of a novel recombinant encapsidated RNA particle: evaluation as an internal control for diagnostic RT-PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Donald P.; Montague, Nick; Ebert, Katja

    2007-01-01

    -and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and a set for swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) was engineered into a full-length cDNA clone containing the RNA-2 segment of Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV). After co-inoculation with a plasmid that expressed CPMV RNA-1, recombinant virus particles were rescued from cowpea plants (Vigna...

  3. RNA Encapsidation and Packaging in the Phleboviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Hornak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae represents the largest family of segmented RNA viruses, which infect a staggering diversity of plants, animals, and insects. Within the family Bunyaviridae, the Phlebovirus genus includes several important human and animal pathogens, including Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, Uukuniemi virus (UUKV, and the sandfly fever viruses. The phleboviruses have small tripartite RNA genomes that encode a repertoire of 5–7 proteins. These few proteins accomplish the daunting task of recognizing and specifically packaging a tri-segment complement of viral genomic RNA in the midst of an abundance of host components. The critical nucleation events that eventually lead to virion production begin early on in the host cytoplasm as the first strands of nascent viral RNA (vRNA are synthesized. The interaction between the vRNA and the viral nucleocapsid (N protein effectively protects and masks the RNA from the host, and also forms the ribonucleoprotein (RNP architecture that mediates downstream interactions and drives virion formation. Although the mechanism by which all three genomic counterparts are selectively co-packaged is not completely understood, we are beginning to understand the hierarchy of interactions that begins with N-RNA packaging and culminates in RNP packaging into new virus particles. In this review we focus on recent progress that highlights the molecular basis of RNA genome packaging in the phleboviruses.

  4. Mutations in the alpha-helical region of the amino terminus of the Maize rayado fino virus capsid protein and CP:RNA ratios affect virus-like particle encapsidation of RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natilla, Angela; Murphy, Charles; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2015-01-22

    Viral-based nanoplatforms rely on balancing the delicate array of virus properties to optimally achieve encapsidation of foreign materials with various potential objectives. We investigated the use of Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV)-virus-like particles (VLPs) as a multifunctional nanoplatform and their potential application as protein cages. MRFV-VLPs are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal coat proteins (CP1 and CP2) which are capable of self-assembling in Nicotiana benthamiana plants into 30nm particles with T=3 symmetry. The N-terminus of CP1 was targeted for genetic modification to exploit the driving forces for VLP assembly, packaging and retention of RNA in vivo and in vitro. The N-terminus of MRFV-CP1 contains a peptide sequence of 37 amino acids which has been predicted to have an alpha-helical structure, is rich in hydrophobic amino acids, facilitates CP-RNA interactions, and is not required for self-assembly. Amino acid substitutions were introduced in the 37 amino acid N-terminus by site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant VLPs produced in plants by a Potato virus X (PVX)-based vector were tested for particle stability and RNA encapsidation. All mutant CPs resulted in production of VLPs which encapsidated non-viral RNAs, including PVX genomic and subgenomic (sg) RNAs, 18S rRNA and cellular and viral mRNAs. In addition, MRFV-VLPs encapsidated GFP mRNA when was expressed in plant cells from the pGD vector. These results suggest that RNA packaging in MRFV-VLPs is predominantly driven by electrostatic interactions between the N-terminal 37 amino acid extension of CP1 and RNA, and that the overall species concentration of RNA in the cellular pool may determine the abundance and species of the RNAs packaged into the VLPs. Furthermore, RNA encapsidation is not required for VLPs stability, VLPs formed from MRFV-CP1 were stable at temperatures up to 70°C, and can be disassembled into CP monomers, which can then reassemble in vitro into

  5. Promiscuous RNA binding ensures effective encapsidation of APOBEC3 proteins by HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Apolonia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3 proteins are cell-encoded cytidine deaminases, some of which, such as APOBEC3G (A3G and APOBEC3F (A3F, act as potent human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 restriction factors. These proteins require packaging into HIV-1 particles to exert their antiviral activities, but the molecular mechanism by which this occurs is incompletely understood. The nucleocapsid (NC region of HIV-1 Gag is required for efficient incorporation of A3G and A3F, and the interaction between A3G and NC has previously been shown to be RNA-dependent. Here, we address this issue in detail by first determining which RNAs are able to bind to A3G and A3F in HV-1 infected cells, as well as in cell-free virions, using the unbiased individual-nucleotide resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP method. We show that A3G and A3F bind many different types of RNA, including HIV-1 RNA, cellular mRNAs and small non-coding RNAs such as the Y or 7SL RNAs. Interestingly, A3G/F incorporation is unaffected when the levels of packaged HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA and 7SL RNA are reduced, implying that these RNAs are not essential for efficient A3G/F packaging. Confirming earlier work, HIV-1 particles formed with Gag lacking the NC domain (Gag ΔNC fail to encapsidate A3G/F. Here, we exploit this system by demonstrating that the addition of an assortment of heterologous RNA-binding proteins and domains to Gag ΔNC efficiently restored A3G/F packaging, indicating that A3G and A3F have the ability to engage multiple RNAs to ensure viral encapsidation. We propose that the rather indiscriminate RNA binding characteristics of A3G and A3F promote functionality by enabling recruitment into a wide range of retroviral particles whose packaged RNA genomes comprise divergent sequences.

  6. Determinants of Genomic RNA Encapsidation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pachulska-Wieczorek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are transposable genetic elements that replicate intracellularly, and can be considered progenitors of retroviruses. Ty1 and Ty3 are the most extensively characterized LTR retrotransposons whose RNA genomes provide the template for both protein translation and genomic RNA that is packaged into virus-like particles (VLPs and reverse transcribed. Genomic RNAs are not divided into separate pools of translated and packaged RNAs, therefore their trafficking and packaging into VLPs requires an equilibrium between competing events. In this review, we focus on Ty1 and Ty3 genomic RNA trafficking and packaging as essential steps of retrotransposon propagation. We summarize the existing knowledge on genomic RNA sequences and structures essential to these processes, the role of Gag proteins in repression of genomic RNA translation, delivery to VLP assembly sites, and encapsidation.

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Dephosphorylation Occurs during Pregenomic RNA Encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiong; Hu, Zhanying; Cheng, Junjun; Wu, Shuo; Luo, Yue; Chang, Jinhong; Hu, Jianming; Guo, Ju-Tao

    2018-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein consists of an N-terminal assembly domain and a C-terminal domain (CTD) with seven conserved serines or threonines that are dynamically phosphorylated/dephosphorylated during the viral replication cycle. Sulfamoylbenzamide derivatives are small molecular core protein allosteric modulators (CpAMs) that bind to the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine (HAP) pocket between the core protein dimer-dimer interfaces. CpAM binding alters the kinetics and pathway of capsid assembly and can result in the formation of morphologically "normal" capsids devoid of viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) and DNA polymerase. In order to investigate the mechanism underlying CpAM inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation, we developed an immunoblotting assay that can resolve core protein based on its phosphorylation status and demonstrated, for the first time, that core protein is hyperphosphorylated in free dimers and empty capsids from both mock-treated and CpAM-treated cells but is hypophosphorylated in pgRNA- and DNA-containing nucleocapsids. Interestingly, inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation by a heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor prevented core protein dephosphorylation. Moreover, core proteins with point mutations at the wall of the HAP pocket, V124A and V124W, assembled empty capsids and nucleocapsids with altered phosphorylation status. The results thus suggest that core protein dephosphorylation occurs in the assembly of pgRNA and that interference with the interaction between core protein subunits at dimer-dimer interfaces during nucleocapsid assembly alters not only capsid structure, but also core protein dephosphorylation. Hence, inhibition of pgRNA encapsidation by CpAMs might be due to disruption of core protein dephosphorylation during nucleocapsid assembly. IMPORTANCE Dynamic phosphorylation of HBV core protein regulates multiple steps of viral replication. However, the regulatory function was mainly investigated by phosphomimetic mutagenesis, which

  8. Structure of the Hantavirus Nucleoprotein Provides Insights into the Mechanism of RNA Encapsidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are etiological agents of life-threatening hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome. The nucleoprotein (N of hantavirus is essential for viral transcription and replication, thus representing an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined the crystal structure of hantavirus N to 3.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals a two-lobed, mostly α-helical structure that is distantly related to that of orthobunyavirus Ns. A basic RNA binding pocket is located at the intersection between the two lobes. We provide evidence that oligomerization is mediated by amino- and C-terminal arms that bind to the adjacent monomers. Based on these findings, we suggest a model for the oligomeric ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex. Our structure provides mechanistic insights into RNA encapsidation in the genus Hantavirus and constitutes a template for drug discovery efforts aimed at combating hantavirus infections.

  9. An RNA-binding compound that stabilizes the HIV-1 gRNA packaging signal structure and specifically blocks HIV-1 RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemarsdotter, Carin K; Zeng, Jingwei; Long, Ziqi; Lever, Andrew M L; Kenyon, Julia C

    2018-03-14

    NSC260594, a quinolinium derivative from the NCI diversity set II compound library, was previously identified in a target-based assay as an inhibitor of the interaction between the HIV-1 (ψ) stem-loop 3 (SL3) RNA and Gag. This compound was shown to exhibit potent antiviral activity. Here, the effects of this compound on individual stages of the viral lifecycle were examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and Western blot, to see if its actions were specific to the viral packaging stage. The structural effects of NSC260594 binding to the HIV-1 gRNA were also examined by SHAPE and dimerization assays. Treatment of cells with NSC260594 did not reduce the number of integration events of incoming virus, and treatment of virus producing cells did not affect the level of intracellular Gag protein or viral particle release as determined by immunoblot. However, NSC260594 reduced the incorporation of gRNA into virions by up to 82%, without affecting levels of gRNA inside the cell. This reduction in packaging correlated closely with the reduction in infectivity of the released viral particles. To establish the structural effects of NSC260594 on the HIV-1 gRNA, we performed SHAPE analyses to pinpoint RNA structural changes. NSC260594 had a stabilizing effect on the wild type RNA that was not confined to SL3, but that was propagated across the structure. A packaging mutant lacking SL3 did not show this effect. NSC260594 acts as a specific inhibitor of HIV-1 RNA packaging. No other viral functions are affected. Its action involves preventing the interaction of Gag with SL3 by stabilizing this small RNA stem-loop which then leads to stabilization of the global packaging signal region (psi or ψ). This confirms data, previously only shown in analyses of isolated SL3 oligonucleotides, that SL3 is structurally labile in the presence of Gag and that this is critical for the complete psi region to be able to adopt different conformations. Since replication is otherwise unaffected by NSC260594

  10. Isolation and characterization of subgenomic DNAs encapsidated in 'single' T = 1 isometric particles of Maize streak virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, Carolina G.; Javier Ortiz, G.; Padron, Eric; Bean, Samantha J.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Boulton, Margaret I.

    2004-01-01

    'Single' T = 1 isometric particles of Maize streak virus (MSV) have been isolated from infected maize leaves. Biochemical and genetic characterizations show that these particles contain subgenomic (sg) MSV DNA encapsidated by the MSV coat protein. The largest sg DNA is 1.56 kb, slightly larger than half genome size, although sg DNAs as small as 0.2 kb were also cloned. The sg DNAs are not infectious, and they do not appear to play a role in the pathogenicity of MSV. This is the first report of sg DNAs for MSV and, to our knowledge, the first time that encapsidated sg DNAs have been characterized at the sequence level for any geminivirus. These data will assist in our investigations into the role of genomic DNA in the formation of the unique geminate capsid architecture of the Geminiviridae

  11. Effects of mutations in the VP2/VP4 cleavage site of Swine vesicular disease virus on RNA encapsidation and viral infectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, J.M.J.; Leendertse, C.H.; Dekker, A.; Moormann, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    We studied VP0 cleavage of Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV), a member of the Picornaviridae using a full-length cDNA copy of the Dutch SVDV isolate. The influences of mutations, introduced at the cleavage site of SVDV, on VP0 cleavage, RNA encapsidation and viral infection were studied. Double

  12. PRMT5 restricts hepatitis B virus replication through epigenetic repression of covalently closed circular DNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Min; Yue, Lei; Li, Yaming; Liu, Jiangxia; Li, Baocun; Shen, Fang; Wang, Yang; Bai, Lu; Protzer, Ulrike; Levrero, Massimo; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. The covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) minichromosome, which serves as the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, plays a key role in viral persistence. While accumulating evidence suggests that cccDNA transcription is regulated by epigenetic machinery, particularly the acetylation of cccDNA-bound histone 3 (H3) and H4, the potential contributions of histone methylation and related host factors remain obscure. Here, by screening a series of methyltransferases and demethylases, we identified protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) as an effective restrictor of HBV transcription and replication. In cell culture-based models for HBV infection and in liver tissues of patients with chronic HBV infection, we found that symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on cccDNA was a repressive marker of cccDNA transcription and was regulated by PRMT5 depending on its methyltransferase domain. Moreover, PRMT5-triggered symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on the cccDNA minichromosome involved an interaction with the HBV core protein and the Brg1-based human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler, which resulted in down-regulation of the binding of RNA polymerase II to cccDNA. In addition to the inhibitory effect on cccDNA transcription, PRMT5 inhibited HBV core particle DNA production independently of its methyltransferase activity. Further study revealed that PRMT5 interfered with pregenomic RNA encapsidation by preventing its interaction with viral polymerase protein through binding to the reverse transcriptase-ribonuclease H region of polymerase, which is crucial for the polymerase-pregenomic RNA interaction. PRMT5 restricts HBV replication through a two-part mechanism including epigenetic suppression of cccDNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation; these findings improve the understanding of epigenetic regulation of HBV transcription and host

  13. A SELEX-screened aptamer of human hepatitis B virus RNA encapsidation signal suppresses viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The specific interaction between hepatitis B virus (HBV polymerase (P protein and the ε RNA stem-loop on pregenomic (pg RNA is crucial for viral replication. It triggers both pgRNA packaging and reverse transcription and thus represents an attractive antiviral target. RNA decoys mimicking ε in P protein binding but not supporting replication might represent novel HBV inhibitors. However, because generation of recombinant enzymatically active HBV polymerase is notoriously difficult, such decoys have as yet not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a SELEX approach, based on a new in vitro reconstitution system exploiting a recombinant truncated HBV P protein (miniP, to identify potential ε decoys in two large ε RNA pools with randomized upper stem. Selection of strongly P protein binding RNAs correlated with an unexpected strong enrichment of A residues. Two aptamers, S6 and S9, displayed particularly high affinity and specificity for miniP in vitro, yet did not support viral replication when part of a complete HBV genome. Introducing S9 RNA into transiently HBV producing HepG2 cells strongly suppressed pgRNA packaging and DNA synthesis, indicating the S9 RNA can indeed act as an ε decoy that competitively inhibits P protein binding to the authentic ε signal on pgRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the first successful identification of human HBV ε aptamers by an in vitro SELEX approach. Effective suppression of HBV replication by the S9 aptamer provides proof-of-principle for the ability of ε decoy RNAs to interfere with viral P-ε complex formation and suggests that S9-like RNAs may further be developed into useful therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  14. Sequences within both the 5' untranslated region and the Gag gene are important for efficient encapsidation of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Russell D.; Mustafa, Farah; Lew, Kathy A.; Browning, Mathew T.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2003-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the 5' untranslated leader region (UTR), including about 495 bp of the gag gene, is sufficient for the efficient encapsidation and propagation of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) based retroviral vectors. In addition, a deletion upstream of the major splice donor, SD, has been shown to adversely affect MPMV RNA packaging. However, the precise sequence requirement for the encapsidation of MPMV genomic RNA within the 5' UTR and gag remains largely unknown. In this study, we have used a systematic deletion analysis of the 5' UTR and gag gene to define the cis-acting sequences responsible for efficient MPMV RNA packaging. Using an in vivo packaging and transduction assay, our results reveal that the MPMV packaging signal is primarily found within the first 30 bp immediately downstream of the primer binding site. However, its function is dependent upon the presence of the last 23 bp of the 5' UTR and approximately the first 100 bp of the gag gene. Thus, sequences that affect MPMV RNA packaging seem to reside both upstream and downstream of the major splice donor with the downstream region responsible for the efficient functioning of the upstream primary packaging determinant

  15. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Ferrer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community.

  16. The effect of RNA stiffness on the self-assembly of virus particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siyu; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2018-01-01

    Under many in vitro conditions, some small viruses spontaneously encapsidate a single stranded (ss) RNA into a protein shell called the capsid. While viral RNAs are found to be compact and highly branched because of long distance base-pairing between nucleotides, recent experiments reveal that in a head-to-head competition between an ssRNA with no secondary or higher order structure and a viral RNA, the capsid proteins preferentially encapsulate the linear polymer! In this paper, we study the impact of genome stiffness on the encapsidation free energy of the complex of RNA and capsid proteins. We show that an increase in effective chain stiffness because of base-pairing could be the reason why under certain conditions linear chains have an advantage over branched chains when it comes to encapsidation efficiency. While branching makes the genome more compact, RNA base-pairing increases the effective Kuhn length of the RNA molecule, which could result in an increase of the free energy of RNA confinement, that is, the work required to encapsidate RNA, and thus less efficient packaging.

  17. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  18. Maize rayado fino virus capsid proteins assemble into virus-like particles in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Rosemarie W; Hammond, John

    2010-02-01

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV; genus Marafivirus; family Tymoviridae) is an isometric plant virus of 30 nm containing two components: empty shells and complete virus particles (encapsidating the 6.3 kb genomic RNA). Both particles are composed of two serologically related, carboxy co-terminal, coat proteins (CP) of apparent molecular mass 21-22 kDa (CP2) and 24-28 kDa (CP1) in a molar ratio of 3:1, respectively; CP1 contains a 37 amino acid amino terminal extension of CP2. In our study, expression of CP1 or CP2 in Escherichia coli resulted in assembly of each capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs), appearing in electron microscopy as stain-permeable (CP2) or stain-impermeable particles (CP1). CP1 VLPs encapsidated bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA, but not CP mRNA, while CP2 VLPs encapsidated neither CP mRNA nor 16S ribosomal RNA. Expression of CP1 and CP2 in E. coli using a co-expression vector resulted in the assembly of VLPs which were stain-impermeable and encapsidated CP mRNA. These results suggest that the N-terminal 37 amino acid residues of CP1, although not required for particle formation, may be involved in the assembly of complete virions and that the presence of both CP1 and CP2 in the particle is required for specific encapsidation of MRFV CP mRNA. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Telesnitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA, some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive.

  20. Vaccination with human papillomavirus pseudovirus-encapsidated plasmids targeted to skin using microneedles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda C Kines

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus-like particles (HPV VLP serve as the basis of the current licensed vaccines for HPV. We have previously shown that encapsidation of DNA expressing the model antigen M/M2 from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in HPV pseudovirions (PsV is immunogenic when delivered intravaginally. Because the HPV capsids confer tropism for basal epithelium, they represent attractive carriers for vaccination targeted to the skin using microneedles. In this study we asked: 1 whether HPV16 VLP administered by microneedles could induce protective immune responses to HPV16 and 2 whether HPV16 PsV-encapsidated plasmids delivered by microneedles could elicit immune responses to both HPV and the antigen delivered by the transgene. Mice immunized with HPV16 VLP coated microneedles generated robust neutralizing antibody responses and were protected from HPV16 challenge. Microneedle arrays coated with HPV16-M/M2 or HPV16-F protein (genes of RSV were then tested and dose-dependent HPV and F-specific antibody responses were detected post-immunization, and M/M2-specific T-cell responses were detected post RSV challenge, respectively. HPV16 PsV-F immunized mice were fully protected from challenge with HPV16 PsV and had reduced RSV viral load in lung and nose upon intranasal RSV challenge. In summary, HPV16 PsV-encapsidated DNA delivered by microneedles induced neutralizing antibody responses against HPV and primed for antibody and T-cell responses to RSV antigens encoded by the encapsidated plasmids. Although the immunogenicity of the DNA component was just above the dose response threshold, the HPV-specific immunity was robust. Taken together, these data suggest microneedle delivery of lyophilized HPV PsV could provide a practical, thermostable combined vaccine approach that could be developed for clinical evaluation.

  1. The Generation of Turnip Crinkle Virus-Like Particles in Plants by the Transient Expression of Wild-Type and Modified Forms of Its Coat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P

    2015-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a member of the genus carmovirus of the Tombusviridae family, has a genome consisting of a single positive-sense RNA molecule that is encapsidated in an icosahedral particle composed of 180 copies of a single type of coat protein. We have employed the CPMV-HT transient expression system to investigate the formation of TCV-like particles following the expression of the wild-type coat protein or modified forms of it that contain either deletions and/or additions. Transient expression of the coat protein in plants results in the formation of capsid structures that morphologically resemble TCV virions (T = 3 structure) but encapsidate heterogeneous cellular RNAs, rather than the specific TCV coat protein messenger RNA. Expression of an amino-terminal deleted form of the coat protein resulted in the formation of smaller T = 1 structures that are free of RNA. The possibility of utilizing TCV as a carrier for the presentation of foreign proteins on the particle surface was also explored by fusing the sequence of GFP to the C-terminus of the coat protein. The expression of coat protein-GFP hybrids permitted the formation of VLPs but the yield of particles is diminished compared to the yield obtained with unmodified coat protein. Our results confirm the importance of the N-terminus of the coat protein for the encapsidation of RNA and show that the coat protein's exterior P domain plays a key role in particle formation.

  2. RNA packaging of MRFV virus-like particles: The interplay between RNA pools and capsid coat protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be produced through self-assembly of capsid protein (CP) into particles with discrete shapes and sizes and containing different types of RNA molecules. The general principle that governs particle assembly and RNA packaging is determined by unique interactions between ...

  3. Novel functions of prototype foamy virus Gag glycine- arginine-rich boxes in reverse transcription and particle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllers, Erik; Uhlig, Tobias; Stirnnagel, Kristin; Fiebig, Uwe; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2011-02-01

    Prototype foamy virus (PFV) Gag lacks the characteristic orthoretroviral Cys-His motifs that are essential for various steps of the orthoretroviral replication cycle, such as RNA packaging, reverse transcription, infectivity, integration, and viral assembly. Instead, it contains three glycine-arginine-rich boxes (GR boxes) in its C terminus that putatively represent a functional equivalent. We used a four-plasmid replication-deficient PFV vector system, with uncoupled RNA genome packaging and structural protein translation, to analyze the effects of deletion and various substitution mutations within each GR box on particle release, particle-associated protein composition, RNA packaging, DNA content, infectivity, particle morphology, and intracellular localization. The degree of viral particle release by all mutants was similar to that of the wild type. Only minimal effects on Pol encapsidation, exogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and genomic viral RNA packaging were observed. In contrast, particle-associated DNA content and infectivity were drastically reduced for all deletion mutants and were undetectable for all alanine substitution mutants. Furthermore, GR box I mutants had significant changes in particle morphology, and GR box II mutants lacked the typical nuclear localization pattern of PFV Gag. Finally, it could be shown that GR boxes I and III, but not GR box II, can functionally complement each other. It therefore appears that, similar to the orthoretroviral Cys-His motifs, the PFV Gag GR boxes are important for RNA encapsidation, genome reverse transcription, and virion infectivity as well as for particle morphogenesis.

  4. Analysis of the RNA species isolated from defective particles of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Banerjee, A K

    1976-10-01

    Serial high multiplicity passage of a cloned stock of vesicular stomatitis virus was found to generate defective interfering particles containing three size classes of RNA, with sedimentaiton coefficients of 31 S, 23 S and 19 S. The 31 S and 23 S RNA species were found to be complementary to both the 12 to 18 S and 31 S size classes of VSV mRNAs. The 19 S class of RNA was found to be partially base-paired. All three RNA species were found to contain ppAp at their 5' termini.

  5. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  6. Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

  7. Dynamics of HIV-1 RNA Near the Plasma Membrane during Virus Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Luca; Hatch, Steven C; Chen, Jianbo; Nikolaitchik, Olga; Burdick, Ryan C; Chen, De; Westlake, Christopher J; Lockett, Stephen; Pathak, Vinay K; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2015-11-01

    To increase our understanding of the events that lead to HIV-1 genome packaging, we examined the dynamics of viral RNA and Gag-RNA interactions near the plasma membrane by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We labeled HIV-1 RNA with a photoconvertible Eos protein via an RNA-binding protein that recognizes stem-loop sequences engineered into the viral genome. Near-UV light exposure causes an irreversible structural change in Eos and alters its emitted fluorescence from green to red. We studied the dynamics of HIV-1 RNA by photoconverting Eos near the plasma membrane, and we monitored the population of photoconverted red-Eos-labeled RNA signals over time. We found that in the absence of Gag, most of the HIV-1 RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane transiently, for a few minutes. The presence of Gag significantly increased the time that RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane: most of the RNAs were still detected after 30 min. We then quantified the proportion of HIV-1 RNAs near the plasma membrane that were packaged into assembling viral complexes. By tagging Gag with blue fluorescent protein, we observed that only a portion, ∼13 to 34%, of the HIV-1 RNAs that reached the membrane were recruited into assembling particles in an hour, and the frequency of HIV-1 RNA packaging varied with the Gag expression level. Our studies reveal the HIV-1 RNA dynamics on the plasma membrane and the efficiency of RNA recruitment and provide insights into the events leading to the generation of infectious HIV-1 virions. Nascent HIV-1 particles assemble on plasma membranes. During the assembly process, HIV-1 RNA genomes must be encapsidated into viral complexes to generate infectious particles. To gain insights into the RNA packaging and virus assembly mechanisms, we labeled and monitored the HIV-1 RNA signals near the plasma membrane. Our results showed that most of the HIV-1 RNAs stayed near the plasma membrane for only a few minutes in the absence of Gag, whereas

  8. Gene expression in the muscle and central nervous system following intramuscular inoculation of encapsidated or naked poliovirus replicons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Cheryl A.; Messinger, Jeff; Palmer, Matthew T.; Peduzzi, Jean D.; Morrow, Casey D.

    2003-01-01

    The spread of intramuscularly inoculated poliovirus to the central nervous system (CNS) has been documented in humans, monkeys, and mice transgenic for the human poliovirus receptor. Poliovirus spread is thought to be due to infection of the peripheral nerve and retrograde transport of poliovirus through the axon to the neuron cell body, where final virus uncoating occurs and translation/replication ensues. In previous studies, we have shown that polio-based vectors (replicons) can be used for gene delivery to motor neurons of the CNS. Using a replicon that encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP), we found that following intrathecal inoculation, GFP expression was confined to motorneurons of the spinal cord. To further characterize the gene expression of poliovirus in the periphery and CNS, we have intramuscularly inoculated transgenic mice with poliovirus replicons encoding GFP. Expression of GFP was demonstrated in the muscle, sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and the ventral horn motorneurons following intramuscular inoculation. There was no evidence of paralysis or behavioral abnormalities in the mice following intramuscular inoculation of the replicon encoding GFP. Injection of replicon RNA alone (naked RNA) into the muscle of transgenic mice or rats, which do not express the poliovirus receptor, also resulted in expression of GFP in the muscle, sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglion, and ventral horn motorneurons, indicating that transport of the replicon RNA from the periphery to CNS had occurred. GFP expression was found in the muscles and sciatic nerve as early as 6 h after injection of replicons or replicon RNA, even after sciatic nerve section. Analysis at longer times postinjection revealed GFP expression similar to 6 h levels in the cut sciatic nerves and robust expression in the nerves of uncut animals. The infection and expression of GFP in the CNS following intramuscular inoculation of encapsidated replicons encoding GFP occurred in juvenile or

  9. A Polyamide Inhibits Replication of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Targeting RNA in the Nucleocapsid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumpper, Ryan H.; Li, Weike; Castañeda, Carlos H.; Scuderi, M. José; Bashkin, James K.; Luo, Ming; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2018-02-07

    Polyamides have been shown to bind double-stranded DNA by complementing the curvature of the minor groove and forming various hydrogen bonds with DNA. Several polyamide molecules have been found to have potent antiviral activities against papillomavirus, a double-stranded DNA virus. By analogy, we reason that polyamides may also interact with the structured RNA bound in the nucleocapsid of a negative-strand RNA virus. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was selected as a prototype virus to test this possibility since its genomic RNA encapsidated in the nucleocapsid forms a structure resembling one strand of an A-form RNA duplex. One polyamide molecule, UMSL1011, was found to inhibit infection of VSV. To confirm that the polyamide targeted the nucleocapsid, a nucleocapsid-like particle (NLP) was incubated with UMSL1011. The encapsidated RNA in the polyamide-treated NLP was protected from thermo-release and digestion by RNase A. UMSL1011 also inhibits viral RNA synthesis in the intracellular activity assay for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The crystal structure revealed that UMSL1011 binds the structured RNA in the nucleocapsid. The conclusion of our studies is that the RNA in the nucleocapsid is a viable antiviral target of polyamides. Since the RNA structure in the nucleocapsid is similar in all negative-strand RNA viruses, polyamides may be optimized to target the specific RNA genome of a negative-strand RNA virus, such as respiratory syncytial virus and Ebola virus.

    IMPORTANCENegative-strand RNA viruses (NSVs) include several life-threatening pathogens, such as rabies virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Ebola virus. There are no effective antiviral drugs against these viruses. Polyamides offer an exceptional opportunity because they may be optimized to target each NSV. Our studies on vesicular stomatitis virus, an NSV, demonstrated that a polyamide molecule could specifically target the viral RNA in the nucleocapsid and inhibit

  10. Correlation between particle multiplicity and location on virion RNA of the assembly initiation site for viruses of the tobacco mosaic virus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M; Meshi, T; Okada, Y; Otsuki, Y; Takebe, I

    1981-07-01

    The initiation site for reconstitution on genome RNA was determined by electron microscopic serology for a watermelon strain of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV-W), which is chemically and serologically related to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The initiation site was located at the same position as that of the cowpea strain, a virus that produces short rods of encapsidated subgenomic messenger RNA for the coat protein (a two-component TMV), being about 320 nucleotides away from the 3' terminus, and hence within the coat protein cistron. Although CGMMV-W was until now believed to be a single-component TMV, the location of the initiation site indicated the presence of short rods containing coat protein messenger RNA in CGMMV-W-infected tissue, as in the case for the cowpea strain. We found such short rods in CGMMV-W-infected tissue. The results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the site of the initiation region for reconstitution determines the rod multiplicity of TMV. The finding of the second two-component TMV, CGMMV, indicates that the cowpea strain of TMV is not unique in being a two-component virus and that the location of the assembly initiation site on the genome RNA can be a criterion for grouping of viruses.

  11. Small angle scattering study of the structure and organization of RNA and protein in Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Narayan C.; Warren, Garfield T.; Cheng, Si; Kao, C. Cheng; Ni, Peng; Dragnea, Bogdan; Sokol, Paul E.

    2012-02-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a small icosahedral of the alpha virus-like superfamily of RNA with a segmented positive-strand RNA genome and a mean diameter ˜ 268å that offers high levels of RNA synthesis and virus production in plants. BMV also tightly regulates the packaging of its four RNAs (RNA1 through RNA4) into three separate particles; RNA1 and RNA2 are encapsidated separately while one copy each of RNA3 and RNA4 are normally packaged together. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were applied to study the size, shape and protein-RNA organization of BMV. D2O/H2O mixture was used to enhance contrast in SANS measurement. The radial distribution of BMV from the Fourier transform of scattering spectrum gives a clear indication of RNA packing, and distribution and their structure in the BMV. The result reveals that the virus is about 266 å in diameter and is composed of RNA inside the virion coated with a protein shell.

  12. Effects of RNA branching on the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Wagner, Jef; Schoot, Paul van der|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/102140618; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses self assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although

  13. Appearance of newly formed mRNA and rRNA as ribonucleoprotein-particles in the cytoplasmic subribosomal fraction of pea embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Noribumi; Takaiwa, Fumio; Fukuei, Keisuke; Sakamaki, Tadashi; Tanifuji, Shigeyuki

    1977-01-01

    Incorporation studies with 3 H-uridine or 3 H-adenosine showed that germinating pea embryos synthesize all types of poly A(+) RNA, rRNA and 4-5S RNA at the early stage of germination. After the pulse labeling for 30 min, only heterodisperse RNA and 4-5S RNA appeared in the cytoplasm as labeled RNA species. At this time the radioactivity was associated with cytoplasmic structures heavier than 80S and RNP particles of 68-70S, 52-55S, 36-38S and 20-22S which are presumed to be free mRNP particles in plants. When the pulse-labeled embryos were incubated for a further 60 min in an isotope-free medium, the labeled 17S and 25S rRNA emerged in the cytoplasm, together with labeled heterodisperse and 4-5S RNAs. More radioactivity accumulated in the regions of the polysome, 62-65S and 38-42S particles. The results of analysis of RNAs extracted from the whole cytoplasm, polysome or subribosomal fractions indicated that small subunits of newly formed ribosomes appear more rapidly in the cytoplasm than new large subunits, which accumulate for a while as free particles in the cytoplasm than are incorporated into polysomes. The actinomycin treatment which caused preferential inhibition of rRNA synthesis reduced the accumulation of free, newly formed ribosome subunits and partially permitted detection of the presumed mRNP particles in the subribosomal region even after the chase treatment. (auth.)

  14. Processing of the 17-S Escherichia coli precursor RNA in the 27-S pre-ribosomal particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, F; Vasseur, M [Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1976-01-01

    An RNase activity probably involved in the maturation of 16-S pre-ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli has been partially purified from crude cell extracts. When 27-S ribosome precursor particles are incubated with this enzyme preparation in vitro, their 17-S RNA is converted to a product with the same electrophoretic mobility as mature 16-S rRNA. FingerprS rRNA. Generation of the normal 5'-P terminus seems to require a factor present in cell extracts since incubation of the 27-S precursor particle in an extract obtained after centrifugation at 30,000 x g causes conversion of the 17-S RNA to a 16-S species containing both termini of mature 16-S rRNS. Preliminary experiments suggest that correct maturation of the 5' end of the 17-S precursor RNA requires a system in which protein synthesis can take place.

  15. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  16. Ribonucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic RNA. XXXII. U2 small nuclear RNA precursors and their accurate 3' processing in vitro as ribonucleoprotein particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieben, E D; Nenninger, J M; Pederson, T

    1985-05-05

    Biosynthetic precursors of U2 small nuclear RNA have been identified in cultured human cells by hybrid-selection of pulse-labeled RNA with cloned U2 DNA. These precursor molecules are one to approximately 16 nucleotides longer than mature U2 RNA and contain 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine "caps". The U2 RNA precursors are associated with proteins that react with a monoclonal antibody for antigens characteristic of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Like previously described precursors of U1 and U4 small nuclear RNAs, the pre-U2 RNAs are recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, although it is not known if this is their location in vivo. The precursors are processed to mature-size U2 RNA when cytoplasmic extracts are incubated in vitro at 37 degrees C. Mg2+ is required but ATP is not. The ribonucleoprotein structure of the pre-U2 RNA is maintained during the processing reaction in vitro, as are the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine caps. The ribonucleoprotein organization is of major importance, as exogenous, protein-free U2 RNA precursors are degraded rapidly in the in vitro system. Two lines of evidence indicate that the conversion of U2 precursors to mature-size U2 RNA involves a 3' processing reaction. First, the reaction is unaffected by a large excess of mature U2 small nuclear RNP, whose 5' trimethylguanosine caps would be expected to compete for a 5' processing activity. Second, when pre-U2 RNA precursors are first stoichiometrically decorated with an antibody specific for 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine, the extent of subsequent processing in vitro is unaffected. These results provide the first demonstration of a eukaryotic RNA processing reaction in vitro occurring within a ribonucleoprotein particle.

  17. RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  18. U1 small nuclear RNA variants differentially form ribonucleoprotein particles in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somarelli, Jason A; Mesa, Annia; Rodriguez, Carol E; Sharma, Shalini; Herrera, Rene J

    2014-04-25

    The U1 small nuclear (sn)RNA participates in splicing of pre-mRNAs by recognizing and binding to 5' splice sites at exon/intron boundaries. U1 snRNAs associate with 5' splice sites in the form of ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) that are comprised of the U1 snRNA and 10 core components, including U1A, U1-70K, U1C and the 'Smith antigen', or Sm, heptamer. The U1 snRNA is highly conserved across a wide range of taxa; however, a number of reports have identified the presence of expressed U1-like snRNAs in multiple species, including humans. While numerous U1-like molecules have been shown to be expressed, it is unclear whether these variant snRNAs have the capacity to form snRNPs and participate in splicing. The purpose of the present study was to further characterize biochemically the ability of previously identified human U1-like variants to form snRNPs and bind to U1 snRNP proteins. A bioinformatics analysis provided support for the existence of multiple expressed variants. In vitro gel shift assays, competition assays, and immunoprecipitations (IPs) revealed that the variants formed high molecular weight assemblies to varying degrees and associated with core U1 snRNP proteins to a lesser extent than the canonical U1 snRNA. Together, these data suggest that the human U1 snRNA variants analyzed here are unable to efficiently bind U1 snRNP proteins. The current work provides additional biochemical insights into the ability of the variants to assemble into snRNPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Concentration of circulating miRNA-containing particles in serum enhances miRNA detection and reflects CRC tissue-related deregulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElSharawy, Abdou; Röder, Christian; Becker, Thomas; Habermann, Jens K; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Kalthoff, Holger

    2016-11-15

    The emerging potential of miRNAs as biomarkers for cancer detection demands parallel evaluation of strategies for reliable identification of disease-related signatures from easily accessible and pertinent body compartments. Here, we addressed whether efficient concentration of circulating miRNA-carrying particles is a rationale for miRNA biomarker discovery. We systematically compared miRNA signatures in 93 RNA preparations from three serum entities (whole serum, particle-concentrated, and particle-depleted fractions) and corresponding tissue samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) as a model disease. Significant differences between whole sera and particle-concentrated serum fractions of CRC patients emerged for 45 of 742 tested miRNAs. Twenty-eight of these 45 miRNAs were differentially expressed between particle-concentrated serum fractions of metastatic CRC- and healthy individuals. Over half of these candidates (15 of 28) showed deregulations only in concentrated serum fractions, but not in whole sera, compared to the respective controls.Our results also provided evidence of a consistent downregulation of miR-486 and miR-92a, and further showed a possible "strand-specific" deregulation of extracellular miRNAs in CRC. More importantly, most of the identified miRNAs in the enriched sera reflected the patterns of the corresponding tumor tissues and showed links to cancer-related inflammation. Further investigation of seven serum pools revealed a subset of potential extracellular miRNA candidates to be implicated in both neoplastic and inflammatory bowel disease.Our findings demonstrate that enrichment and sensitive detection of miRNA carriers is a promising approach to detect CRC-related pathological changes in liquid biopsies, and has potential for clinical diagnostics.

  20. A Functional Link between RNA Replication and Virion Assembly in the Potyvirus Plum Pox Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Araiz; Valli, Adrian; Calvo, María; García, Juan Antonio

    2018-05-01

    Accurate assembly of viral particles in the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV) has been shown to depend on the contribution of the multifunctional viral protein HCPro. In this study, we show that other viral factors, in addition to the capsid protein (CP) and HCPro, are necessary for the formation of stable PPV virions. The CP produced in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves from a subviral RNA termed LONG, which expresses a truncated polyprotein that lacks P1 and HCPro, together with HCPro supplied in trans , was assembled into virus-like particles and remained stable after in vitro incubation. In contrast, deletions in multiple regions of the LONG coding sequence prevented the CP stabilization mediated by HCPro. In particular, we demonstrated that the first 178 amino acids of P3, but not a specific nucleotide sequence coding for them, are required for CP stability and proper assembly of PPV particles. Using a sequential coagroinfiltration assay, we observed that the subviral LONG RNA replicates and locally spreads in N. benthamiana leaves expressing an RNA silencing suppressor. The analysis of the effect of both point and deletion mutations affecting RNA replication in LONG and full-length PPV demonstrated that this process is essential for the assembly of stable viral particles. Interestingly, in spite of this requirement, the CP produced by a nonreplicating viral RNA can be stably assembled into virions as long as it is coexpressed with a replication-proficient RNA. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of coupling encapsidation to other viral processes to secure a successful infection. IMPORTANCE Viruses of the family Potyviridae are among the most dangerous threats for basically every important crop, and such socioeconomical relevance has made them a subject of many research studies. In spite of this, very little is currently known about proteins and processes controlling viral genome encapsidation by the coat protein. In the case of Plum pox virus (genus

  1. Viral Delivery of dsRNA for Control of Insect Agricultural Pests and Vectors of Human Disease: Prospects and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kolliopoulou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RNAi is applied as a new and safe method for pest control in agriculture but efficiency and specificity of delivery of dsRNA trigger remains a critical issue. Various agents have been proposed to augment dsRNA delivery, such as engineered micro-organisms and synthetic nanoparticles, but the use of viruses has received relatively little attention. Here we present a critical view of the potential of the use of recombinant viruses for efficient and specific delivery of dsRNA. First of all, it requires the availability of plasmid-based reverse genetics systems for virus production, of which an overview is presented. For RNA viruses, their application seems to be straightforward since dsRNA is produced as an intermediate molecule during viral replication, but DNA viruses also have potential through the production of RNA hairpins after transcription. However, application of recombinant virus for dsRNA delivery may not be straightforward in many cases, since viruses can encode RNAi suppressors, and virus-induced silencing effects can be determined by the properties of the encoded RNAi suppressor. An alternative is virus-like particles that retain the efficiency and specificity determinants of natural virions but have encapsidated non-replicating RNA. Finally, the use of viruses raises important safety issues which need to be addressed before application can proceed.

  2. Analysis of Genetic Variation across the Encapsidated Genome of Microplitis demolitor Bracovirus in Parasitoid Wasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaelen R Burke

    Full Text Available Insect parasitoids must complete part of their life cycle within or on another insect, ultimately resulting in the death of the host insect. One group of parasitoid wasps, the 'microgastroid complex' (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, engage in an association with beneficial symbiotic viruses that are essential for successful parasitism of hosts. These viruses, known as Bracoviruses, persist in an integrated form in the wasp genome, and activate to replicate in wasp ovaries during development to ultimately be delivered into host insects during parasitism. The lethal nature of host-parasitoid interactions, combined with the involvement of viruses in mediating these interactions, has led to the hypothesis that Bracoviruses are engaged in an arms race with hosts, resulting in recurrent adaptation in viral (and host genes. Deep sequencing was employed to characterize sequence variation across the encapsidated Bracovirus genome within laboratory and field populations of the parasitoid wasp species Microplitis demolitor. Contrary to expectations, there was a paucity of evidence for positive directional selection among virulence genes, which generally exhibited signatures of purifying selection. These data suggest that the dynamics of host-parasite interactions may not result in recurrent rounds of adaptation, and that adaptation may be more variable in time than previously expected.

  3. Defective RNA particles derived from Tomato black ring virus genome interfere with the replication of parental virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Minicka, Julia; Zarzyńska-Nowak, Aleksandra; Budzyńska, Daria; Elena, Santiago F

    2018-05-02

    Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) is the only member of the Nepovirus genus that is known to form defective RNA particles (D RNAs) during replication. Here, de novo generation of D RNAs was observed during prolonged passages of TBRV isolates originated from Solanum lycopersicum and Lactuca sativa in Chenopodium quinoa plants. D RNAs of about 500 nt derived by a single deletion in the RNA1 molecule and contained a portion of the 5' untranslated region and viral replicase, and almost the entire 3' non-coding region. Short regions of sequence complementarity were found at the 5' and 3' junction borders, which can facilitate formation of the D RNAs. Moreover, in this study we analyzed the effects of D RNAs on TBRV replication and symptoms development of infected plants. C. quinoa, S. lycopersicum, Nicotiana tabacum, and L. sativa were infected with the original TBRV isolates (TBRV-D RNA) and those containing additional D RNA particles (TBRV + D RNA). The viral accumulation in particular hosts was measured up to 28 days post inoculation by RT-qPCR. Statistical analyses revealed that D RNAs interfere with TBRV replication and thus should be referred to as defective interfering particles. The magnitude of the interference effect depends on the interplay between TBRV isolate and host species. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural basis of genomic RNA (gRNA) dimerization and packaging determinants of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Suriya J; Vivet-Boudou, Valérie; Ali, Lizna M; Jabeen, Ayesha; Kalloush, Rawan M; Richer, Delphine; Mustafa, Farah; Marquet, Roland; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2014-11-14

    two MMTV RNAs, leading to gRNA dimerization and its subsequent encapsidation into the assembling virus particles. The results presented here enhance our understanding of the MMTV gRNA dimerization and packaging processes and the role of structural motifs with respect to RNA-RNA and possibly RNA-protein interactions that might be taking place during MMTV life cycle.

  5. Role of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport during the life cycle of retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatoshi eShida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have evolved mechanisms for transporting their intron-containing RNAs (including genomic and messenger RNAs, which encode virion components from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the infected cell. Human retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, encode the regulatory proteins Rev and Rex, which form a bridge between the viral RNA and the export receptor CRM1. Recent studies show that these transport systems are not only involved in RNA export, but also in the encapsidation of genomic RNA; furthermore, they influence subsequent events in the cytoplasm, including the translation of the cognate mRNA, transport of Gag proteins to the plasma membrane, and the formation of virus particles. Moreover, the mode of interaction between the viral and cellular RNA transport machinery underlies the species-specific propagation of HIV-1 and HTLV-1, forming the basis for constructing animal models of infection. This review article discusses recent progress regarding these issues.

  6. A novel self-replicating chimeric lentivirus-like particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgens, Christy K; Young, Kelly R; Madden, Victoria J; Johnson, Philip R; Johnston, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Successful live attenuated vaccines mimic natural exposure to pathogens without causing disease and have been successful against several viruses. However, safety concerns prevent the development of attenuated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a vaccine candidate. If a safe, replicating virus vaccine could be developed, it might have the potential to offer significant protection against HIV infection and disease. Described here is the development of a novel self-replicating chimeric virus vaccine candidate that is designed to provide natural exposure to a lentivirus-like particle and to incorporate the properties of a live attenuated virus vaccine without the inherent safety issues associated with attenuated lentiviruses. The genome from the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) was modified to express SHIV89.6P genes encoding the structural proteins Gag and Env. Expression of Gag and Env from VEE RNA in primate cells led to the assembly of particles that morphologically and functionally resembled lentivirus virions and that incorporated alphavirus RNA. Infection of CD4⁺ cells with chimeric lentivirus-like particles was specific and productive, resulting in RNA replication, expression of Gag and Env, and generation of progeny chimeric particles. Further genome modifications designed to enhance encapsidation of the chimeric virus genome and to express an attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protease for particle maturation improved the ability of chimeric lentivirus-like particles to propagate in cell culture. This study provides proof of concept for the feasibility of creating chimeric virus genomes that express lentivirus structural proteins and assemble into infectious particles for presentation of lentivirus immunogens in their native and functional conformation.

  7. How does a scanning ribosomal particle move along the 5'-untranslated region of eukaryotic mRNA? Brownian Ratchet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirin, Alexander S

    2009-11-17

    A model of the ATP-dependent unidirectional movement of the 43S ribosomal initiation complex (=40S ribosomal subunit + eIF1 + eIF1A + eIF2.GTP.Met-tRNA(i) + eIF3) during scanning of the 5'-untranslated region of eukaryotic mRNA is proposed. The model is based on the principles of molecular Brownian ratchet machines and explains several enigmatic data concerning the scanning complex. In this model, the one-dimensional diffusion of the ribosomal initiation complex along the mRNA chain is rectified into the net-unidirectional 5'-to-3' movement by the Feynman ratchet-and-pawl mechanism. The proposed mechanism is organized by the heterotrimeric protein eIF4F (=eIF4A + eIF4E + eIF4G), attached to the scanning ribosomal particle via eIF3, and the RNA-binding protein eIF4B that is postulated to play the role of the pawl. The energy for the useful work of the ratchet-and-pawl mechanism is supplied from ATP hydrolysis induced by the eIF4A subunit: ATP binding and its hydrolysis alternately change the affinities of eIF4A for eIF4B and for mRNA, resulting in the restriction of backward diffusional sliding of the 43S ribosomal complex along the mRNA chain, while stochastic movements ahead are allowed.

  8. Distinct binding interactions of HIV-1 Gag to Psi and non-Psi RNAs: implications for viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joseph A; Jones, Christopher P; Parent, Leslie J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-08-01

    Despite the vast excess of cellular RNAs, precisely two copies of viral genomic RNA (gRNA) are selectively packaged into new human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) particles via specific interactions between the HIV-1 Gag and the gRNA psi (ψ) packaging signal. Gag consists of the matrix (MA), capsid, nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains. Binding of the Gag NC domain to ψ is necessary for gRNA packaging, but the mechanism by which Gag selectively interacts with ψ is unclear. Here, we investigate the binding of NC and Gag variants to an RNA derived from ψ (Psi RNA), as well as to a non-ψ region (TARPolyA). Binding was measured as a function of salt to obtain the effective charge (Zeff) and nonelectrostatic (i.e., specific) component of binding, Kd(1M). Gag binds to Psi RNA with a dramatically reduced Kd(1M) and lower Zeff relative to TARPolyA. NC, GagΔMA, and a dimerization mutant of Gag bind TARPolyA with reduced Zeff relative to WT Gag. Mutations involving the NC zinc finger motifs of Gag or changes to the G-rich NC-binding regions of Psi RNA significantly reduce the nonelectrostatic component of binding, leading to an increase in Zeff. These results show that Gag interacts with gRNA using different binding modes; both the NC and MA domains are bound to RNA in the case of TARPolyA, whereas binding to Psi RNA involves only the NC domain. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism for selective gRNA encapsidation.

  9. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  10. PARTICLE, a Triplex-Forming Long ncRNA, Regulates Locus-Specific Methylation in Response to Low-Dose Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Bríd O’Leary

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to low-dose irradiation causes transiently elevated expression of the long ncRNA PARTICLE (gene PARTICLE, promoter of MAT2A-antisense radiation-induced circulating lncRNA. PARTICLE affords both a cytosolic scaffold for the tumor suppressor methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT2A and a nuclear genetic platform for transcriptional repression. In situ hybridization discloses that PARTICLE and MAT2A associate together following irradiation. Bromouridine tracing and presence in exosomes indicate intercellular transport, and this is supported by ex vivo data from radiotherapy-treated patients. Surface plasmon resonance indicates that PARTICLE forms a DNA-lncRNA triplex upstream of a MAT2A promoter CpG island. We show that PARTICLE represses MAT2A via methylation and demonstrate that the radiation-induced PARTICLE interacts with the transcription-repressive complex proteins G9a and SUZ12 (subunit of PRC2. The interplay of PARTICLE with MAT2A implicates this lncRNA in intercellular communication and as a recruitment platform for gene-silencing machineries through triplex formation in response to irradiation.

  11. Small finger protein of avian and murine retroviruses has nucleic acid annealing activity and positions the replication primer tRNA onto genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, A C; Sarih, L; Gabus, C; Litvak, S; Keith, G; Darlix, J L

    1988-06-01

    Retrovirus virions carry a diploid genome associated with a large number of small viral finger protein molecules which are required for encapsidation. Our present results show that finger protein p12 of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and p10 of murine leukaemia virus (MuLV) positions replication primer tRNA on the replication initiation site (PBS) at the 5' end of the RNA genome. An RSV mutant with a Val-Pro insertion in the finger motif of p12 is able to partially encapsidate genomic RNA but is not infectious because mutated p12 is incapable of positioning the replication primer, tRNATrp. Since all known replication competent retroviruses, and the plant virus CaMV, code for finger proteins analogous to RSV p12 or MuLV p10, the initial stage of reverse transcription in avian, mammalian and human retroviruses and in CaMV is probably controlled in an analogous way.

  12. Nano-siRNA Particles and Combination Therapies for Ovarian Tumor Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    accumulate in tumors, and can silence gene expression in cancer cells. The sponge-like microporous particles we refer to as RNAi microsponges (RNAi MS...Transmission electron microscopy (JEOL 2010 and 2000FX) was utilized to observe the internal structure of the ODN-MSs and LbL-ODN-NPs. Images were...C.; Chan, V.; Pal, A.; Mayes, A.; Rubner, M. Fabrication of microporous thin films from polyelectrolyte multilayers. Langmuir 2000, 16, 5017-5023

  13. Intracellular vesicle acidification promotes maturation of infectious poliovirus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsia L Richards

    Full Text Available The autophagic pathway acts as part of the immune response against a variety of pathogens. However, several pathogens subvert autophagic signaling to promote their own replication. In many cases it has been demonstrated that these pathogens inhibit or delay the degradative aspect of autophagy. Here, using poliovirus as a model virus, we report for the first time bona fide autophagic degradation occurring during infection with a virus whose replication is promoted by autophagy. We found that this degradation is not required to promote poliovirus replication. However, vesicular acidification, which in the case of autophagy precedes delivery of cargo to lysosomes, is required for normal levels of virus production. We show that blocking autophagosome formation inhibits viral RNA synthesis and subsequent steps in the virus cycle, while inhibiting vesicle acidification only inhibits the final maturation cleavage of virus particles. We suggest that particle assembly, genome encapsidation, and virion maturation may occur in a cellular compartment, and we propose the acidic mature autophagosome as a candidate vesicle. We discuss the implications of our findings in understanding the late stages of poliovirus replication, including the formation and maturation of virions and egress of infectious virus from cells.

  14. Identification of amino acid residues in protein SRP72 required for binding to a kinked 5e motif of the human signal recognition particle RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwieb Christian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cells depend critically on the signal recognition particle (SRP for the sorting and delivery of their proteins. The SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex which binds to signal sequences of secretory polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome. Among the six proteins of the eukaryotic SRP, the largest protein, SRP72, is essential for protein targeting and possesses a poorly characterized RNA binding domain. Results We delineated the minimal region of SRP72 capable of forming a stable complex with an SRP RNA fragment. The region encompassed residues 545 to 585 of the full-length human SRP72 and contained a lysine-rich cluster (KKKKKKKKGK at postions 552 to 561 as well as a conserved Pfam motif with the sequence PDPXRWLPXXER at positions 572 to 583. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that both regions participated in the formation of a complex with the RNA. In agreement with biochemical data and results from chymotryptic digestion experiments, molecular modeling of SRP72 implied that the invariant W577 was located inside the predicted structure of an RNA binding domain. The 11-nucleotide 5e motif contained within the SRP RNA fragment was shown by comparative electrophoresis on native polyacrylamide gels to conform to an RNA kink-turn. The model of the complex suggested that the conserved A240 of the K-turn, previously identified as being essential for the binding to SRP72, could protrude into a groove of the SRP72 RNA binding domain, similar but not identical to how other K-turn recognizing proteins interact with RNA. Conclusions The results from the presented experiments provided insights into the molecular details of a functionally important and structurally interesting RNA-protein interaction. A model for how a ligand binding pocket of SRP72 can accommodate a new RNA K-turn in the 5e region of the eukaryotic SRP RNA is proposed.

  15. Identification of amino acid residues in protein SRP72 required for binding to a kinked 5e motif of the human signal recognition particle RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Iakhiaev, Alexei; Zwieb, Christian

    2010-11-13

    Human cells depend critically on the signal recognition particle (SRP) for the sorting and delivery of their proteins. The SRP is a ribonucleoprotein complex which binds to signal sequences of secretory polypeptides as they emerge from the ribosome. Among the six proteins of the eukaryotic SRP, the largest protein, SRP72, is essential for protein targeting and possesses a poorly characterized RNA binding domain. We delineated the minimal region of SRP72 capable of forming a stable complex with an SRP RNA fragment. The region encompassed residues 545 to 585 of the full-length human SRP72 and contained a lysine-rich cluster (KKKKKKKKGK) at postions 552 to 561 as well as a conserved Pfam motif with the sequence PDPXRWLPXXER at positions 572 to 583. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that both regions participated in the formation of a complex with the RNA. In agreement with biochemical data and results from chymotryptic digestion experiments, molecular modeling of SRP72 implied that the invariant W577 was located inside the predicted structure of an RNA binding domain. The 11-nucleotide 5e motif contained within the SRP RNA fragment was shown by comparative electrophoresis on native polyacrylamide gels to conform to an RNA kink-turn. The model of the complex suggested that the conserved A240 of the K-turn, previously identified as being essential for the binding to SRP72, could protrude into a groove of the SRP72 RNA binding domain, similar but not identical to how other K-turn recognizing proteins interact with RNA. The results from the presented experiments provided insights into the molecular details of a functionally important and structurally interesting RNA-protein interaction. A model for how a ligand binding pocket of SRP72 can accommodate a new RNA K-turn in the 5e region of the eukaryotic SRP RNA is proposed.

  16. Non-canonical binding interactions of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of P34 protein modulate binding within the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are involved in many aspects of RNA metabolism. In Trypanosoma brucei, our laboratory has identified two trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37 that are involved in the maturation of the 60S subunit during ribosome biogenesis. These proteins are part of the T. brucei 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) and P34 binds to 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein L5 through its N-terminus and its RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. We generated truncated P34 proteins to determine these domains' interactions with 5S rRNA and L5. Our analyses demonstrate that RRM1 of P34 mediates the majority of binding with 5S rRNA and the N-terminus together with RRM1 contribute the most to binding with L5. We determined that the consensus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) 1 and 2 sequences, characteristic of canonical RRM domains, are not fully conserved in the RRM domains of P34. However, the aromatic amino acids previously described to mediate base stacking interactions with their RNA target are conserved in both of the RRM domains of P34. Surprisingly, mutation of these aromatic residues did not disrupt but instead enhanced 5S rRNA binding. However, we identified four arginine residues located in RRM1 of P34 that strongly impact L5 binding. These mutational analyses of P34 suggest that the binding site for 5S rRNA and L5 are near each other and specific residues within P34 regulate the formation of the 5S RNP. These studies show the unique way that the domains of P34 mediate binding with the T. brucei 5S RNP.

  17. RNA polymerase of the killer virus of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgopoulos, D.E.; Leibowitz, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The L/sub A/ and M double-stranded (ds) RNA segments of the cytoplasmically inherited killer virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are encapsidated in virions that contain a DNA-independent transcriptase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of full-length (+) stranded copies of the genomic dsRNA segments, denoted l/sub A/ and m. The L/sub A/ dsRNA segment appears to encode the major capsid protein in which both dsRNA molecules are encapsidated, while M dsRNA encodes products responsible for the two killer phenotypes of toxin production and resistance to toxin. Proteins extracted from transcriptionally active virions fail to cross-react with antibody to yeast DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, suggesting that none of the subunits of the host cell polymerases are active in viral transcription. Sequence analysis of the in vitro transcripts reveals neither to be 3'-terminally polyadenylated, although m contains an apparent internal polyA-like tract. In the presence of any three ribonucleoside triphosphates (0.5 mM), the fourth ribonucleoside triphosphate shows an optimal rate of incorporation into transcript at a concentration of 20 μM. However, in a 3-hour reaction, the yield of a product RNA increases with the concentration of the limiting ribonucleotide up to 0.5 mM. Gel electrophoresis of the reaction products reveals that increasing the substrate concentration accelerates the appearance of radioactivity in full-length l/sub A/ and m transcripts

  18. Dimerization of human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) RNA: stimulation by cations and possible mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, R; Baudin, F; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L; Mougel, M; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B

    1991-05-11

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined close to their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure. Recent findings indicated that retroviral RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably related events during virion assembly. We studied the cation-induced dimerization of HIV-1 RNA and results indicate that all in vitro generated HIV-1 RNAs containing a 100 nucleotide domain downstream from the 5' splice site are able to dimerize. RNA dimerization depends on the concentration of RNA, mono- and multivalent cations, the size of the monovalent cation, temperature, and pH. Up to 75% of HIV-1 RNA is dimeric in the presence of spermidine. HIV-1 RNA dimer is fairly resistant to denaturing agents and unaffected by intercalating drugs. Antisense HIV-1 RNA does not dimerize but heterodimers can be formed between HIV-1 RNA and either MoMuLV or RSV RNA. Therefore retroviral RNA dimerization probably does not simply proceed through mechanisms involving Watson-Crick base-pairing. Neither adenine and cytosine protonation, nor quartets containing only guanines appear to determine the stability of the HIV-1 RNA dimer, while quartets involving both adenine(s) and guanine(s) could account for our results. A consensus sequence PuGGAPuA found in the putative dimerization-encapsidation region of all retroviral genomes examined may participate in the dimerization process.

  19. Preparation of MS2 phage-like particles and their use as potential process control viruses for detection and quantification of enteric RNA viruses in different matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Mikel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The detection and quantification of enteric RNA viruses is based on isolation of viral RNA from the sample followed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. To control the whole process of analysis and in order to guarantee the validity and reliability of results, process control viruses (PCV are used. The present article describes the process of preparation and use of such PCV– MS2 phage-like particles (MS2 PLP – in RT-qPCR detection and quantification of enteric RNA viruses. The MS2 PLP were derived from bacteriophage MS2 carrying a unique and specific de novo-constructed RNA target sequence originating from the DNA of two extinct species. The amount of prepared MS2 particles was quantified using four independent methods - UV spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and a specifically developed duplex RT-qPCR. To evaluate the usefulness of MS2 PLP in routine diagnostics different matrices known to harbor enteric RNA viruses (swab samples, liver tissue, serum, feces, and vegetables were artificially contaminated with specific amounts of MS2 PLP. The extraction efficiencies were calculated for each individual matrix. The prepared particles fulfill all requirements for PCV – they are very stable, non-infectious, and are genetically distinct from the target RNA viruses. Due to these properties they represent a good morphological and physiochemical model. The use of MS2 PLP as a PCV in detection and quantification of enteric RNA viruses was evaluated in different types of matrices.

  20. Transmission of HCV to a chimpanzee using virus particles produced in an RNA-transfected HepG2 cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, S; Kalkeri, G; McClure, H M; Garry, R F; Clejan, S; Thung, S N; Murthy, K K

    2001-10-01

    It was demonstrated previously that HepG2 cells produce negative strand RNA and virus-like particles after transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA clone [Dash et al. (1997) American Journal of Pathology, 151:363-373]. To determine in vivo infectivity of these in vitro synthesized viral particles, a chimpanzee was inoculated intravenously with HCV derived from HepG2 cells. The infected chimpanzee was examined serially for elevation of liver enzymes, for the presence of HCV RNA in the serum by reverse transcription nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), anti-HCV antibodies in the serum, and inflammation in the liver. The chimpanzee developed elevated levels of liver enzymes after the second week, but the levels fluctuated over a 10-week period. HCV RNA was detected in the serum of the chimpanzee at the second, seventh and ninth weeks after inoculation, and remained positive up to 25 weeks. Liver biopsies at Weeks 18 and 19 revealed of mild inflammation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of HCV recovered from the infected chimpanzee at the second and ninth weeks showed 100% sequence homology with the clone used for transfection studies. Serum anti-HCV antibodies were not detected by EIA during the 25 weeks follow-up period. These results suggest that intravenous administration of the virus-like particles derived from RNA-transfected HepG2 cells are infectious, and therefore, the pMO9.6-T7 clone is an infectious clone. These results provide new information that in vitro synthesized HCV particles produced from full-length HCV clone can cause infection in a chimpanzee. This study will facilitate the use of innovative approaches to the study of assembly of HCV particles and mechanisms of virus infectivity in cell culture. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. cis elements and trans-acting factors involved in dimer formation of murine leukemia virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, A C; Roy, C; Wang, P A; Erard, M; Housset, V; Gabus, C; Paoletti, C; Darlix, J L

    1990-02-01

    The genetic material of all retroviruses examined so far consists of two identical RNA molecules joined at their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure (DLS). Since the precise location of the DLS as well as the mechanism and role(s) of RNA dimerization remain unclear, we analyzed the dimerization process of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) genomic RNA. For this purpose we derived an in vitro model for RNA dimerization. By using this model, murine leukemia virus RNA was shown to form dimeric molecules. Deletion mutagenesis in the 620-nucleotide leader of MoMuLV RNA showed that the dimer promoting sequences are located within the encapsidation element Psi between positions 215 and 420. Furthermore, hybridization assays in which DNA oligomers were used to probe monomer and dimer forms of MoMuLV RNA indicated that the DLS probably maps between positions 280 and 330 from the RNA 5' end. Also, retroviral nucleocapsid protein was shown to catalyze dimerization of MoMuLV RNA and to be tightly bound to genomic dimer RNA in virions. These results suggest that MoMuLV RNA dimerization and encapsidation are probably controlled by the same cis element, Psi, and trans-acting factor, nucleocapsid protein, and thus might be linked during virion formation.

  2. Theoretical analysis of the distribution of isolated particles in totally asymmetric exclusion processes: Application to mRNA translation rate estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao Duc, Khanh; Saleem, Zain H.; Song, Yun S.

    2018-01-01

    The Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) is a classical stochastic model for describing the transport of interacting particles, such as ribosomes moving along the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) during translation. Although this model has been widely studied in the past, the extent of collision between particles and the average distance between a particle to its nearest neighbor have not been quantified explicitly. We provide here a theoretical analysis of such quantities via the distribution of isolated particles. In the classical form of the model in which each particle occupies only a single site, we obtain an exact analytic solution using the matrix ansatz. We then employ a refined mean-field approach to extend the analysis to a generalized TASEP with particles of an arbitrary size. Our theoretical study has direct applications in mRNA translation and the interpretation of experimental ribosome profiling data. In particular, our analysis of data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests a potential bias against the detection of nearby ribosomes with a gap distance of less than approximately three codons, which leads to some ambiguity in estimating the initiation rate and protein production flux for a substantial fraction of genes. Despite such ambiguity, however, we demonstrate theoretically that the interference rate associated with collisions can be robustly estimated and show that approximately 1% of the translating ribosomes get obstructed.

  3. Y-box-binding protein 1 interacts with hepatitis C virus NS3/4A and influences the equilibrium between viral RNA replication and infectious particle production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Melançon, Pierre; Racine, Marie-Ève; Baril, Martin; Lamarre, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protein has several essential roles in the virus life cycle, most probably through dynamic interactions with host factors. To discover cellular cofactors that are co-opted by HCV for its replication, we elucidated the NS3/4A interactome using mass spectrometry and identified Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as an interacting partner of NS3/4A protein and HCV genomic RNA. Importantly, silencing YB-1 expression decreased viral RNA replication and severely impaired the propagation of the infectious HCV molecular clone JFH-1. Immunofluorescence studies further revealed a drastic HCV-dependent redistribution of YB-1 to the surface of the lipid droplets, an important organelle for HCV assembly. Core and NS3 protein-dependent polyprotein maturation were shown to be required for YB-1 relocalization. Unexpectedly, YB-1 knockdown cells showed the increased production of viral infectious particles while HCV RNA replication was impaired. Our data support that HCV hijacks YB-1-containing ribonucleoparticles and that YB-1-NS3/4A-HCV RNA complexes regulate the equilibrium between HCV RNA replication and viral particle production.

  4. Cis elements and trans-acting factors involved in the RNA dimerization of the human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Gabus, C; Nugeyre, M T; Clavel, F; Barré-Sinoussi, F

    1990-12-05

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules joined at their 5' ends by the Dimer Linkage Structure (DLS). To study the mechanism of dimerization and the DLS of HIV-1 RNA, large amounts of bona fide HIV-1 RNA and of mutants have been synthesized in vitro. We report that HIV-1 RNA forms dimeric molecules and that viral nucleocapsid (NC) protein NCp15 greatly activates dimerization. Deletion mutagenesis in the RNA 5' 1333 nucleotides indicated that a small domain of 100 nucleotides, located between positions 311 to 415 from the 5' end, is necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 RNA dimerization. This dimerization domain encompasses an encapsidation element located between the 5' splice donor site and initiator AUG of gag and shows little sequence variations in different strains of HIV-1. Furthermore, cross-linking analysis of the interactions between NC and HIV-1 RNA (311 to 415) locates a major contact site in the encapsidation element of HIV-1 RNA. The genomic RNA dimer is tightly associated with nucleocapsid protein molecules in avian and murine retroviruses, and this ribonucleoprotein structure is believed to be the template for reverse transcription. Genomic RNA-protein interactions have been analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virions and results showed that NC protein molecules are tightly bound to the genomic RNA dimer. Since retroviral RNA dimerization and packaging appear to be under the control of the same cis element, the encapsidation sequences, and trans-acting factor, the NC protein, they are probably related events in the course of virion assembly.

  5. Mutations in matrix and SP1 repair the packaging specificity of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 mutant by reducing the association of Gag with spliced viral RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristic Natalia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of HIV-1 contains several secondary structures that are important for regulating viral replication. The stem-loop 1 (SL1 sequence in the 5' untranslated region directs HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization and packaging into the virion. Without SL1, HIV-1 cannot replicate in human T cell lines. The replication restriction phenotype in the SL1 deletion mutant appears to be multifactorial, with defects in viral RNA dimerization and packaging in producer cells as well as in reverse transcription of the viral RNA in infected cells. In this study, we sought to characterize SL1 mutant replication restrictions and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of compensation in revertants. Results HIV-1 lacking SL1 (NLΔSL1 did not replicate in PM-1 cells until two independent non-synonymous mutations emerged: G913A in the matrix domain (E42K on day 18 postinfection and C1907T in the SP1 domain (P10L on day 11 postinfection. NLΔSL1 revertants carrying either compensatory mutation showed enhanced infectivity in PM-1 cells. The SL1 revertants produced significantly more infectious particles per nanogram of p24 than did NLΔSL1. The SL1 deletion mutant packaged less HIV-1 genomic RNA and more cellular RNA, particularly signal recognition particle RNA, in the virion than the wild-type. NLΔSL1 also packaged 3- to 4-fold more spliced HIV mRNA into the virion, potentially interfering with infectious virus production. In contrast, both revertants encapsidated 2.5- to 5-fold less of these HIV-1 mRNA species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of RNA cross-linked with Gag in formaldehyde-fixed cells demonstrated that the compensatory mutations reduced the association between Gag and spliced HIV-1 RNA, thereby effectively preventing these RNAs from being packaged into the virion. The reduction of spliced viral RNA in the virion may have a major role in facilitating infectious virus production, thus restoring the infectivity of NLΔSL1

  6. The RNA of turnip yellow mosaic virus exhibits icosahedral order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Steven B.; Lucas, Robert W.; Greenwood, Aaron; McPherson, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Difference electron density maps, based on structure factor amplitudes and experimental phases from crystals of wild-type turnip yellow mosaic virus and those of empty capsids prepared by freeze-thawing, show a large portion of the encapsidated RNA to have an icosahedral distribution. Four unique segments of base-paired, double-helical RNA, one to two turns in length, lie between 33-A and 101-A radius and are organized about either 2-fold or 5-fold icosahedral axes. In addition, single-stranded loops of RNA invade the pentameric and hexameric capsomeres where they contact the interior capsid surface. The remaining RNA, not seen in electron density maps, must serve as connecting links between these secondary structural elements and is likely icosahedrally disordered. The distribution of RNA observed crystallographically appears to be in agreement with models based on biochemical data and secondary structural analyses

  7. Investigation of RNA structure in satellite panicum mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, D.L.; Day, J.; Larson, S.B.; McPherson, A.

    2006-01-01

    Three new crystal forms of satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) were grown and their structures solved from X-ray diffraction data using molecular replacement techniques. The crystals were grown under conditions of pH and ionic strength that were appreciably different then those used for the original structure determination. In rhombohedral crystals grown at pH 8.5 and low ionic strength PEG 3350 solutions, Fourier syntheses revealed segments, ten amino acid residues long, of amino-terminal polypeptides not previously seen, as well as masses of electron density within concavities on the interior of the capsid, which appeared in the neighborhoods of icosahedral five- and threefold axes. The densities were compatible with secondary structural domains of RNA, and they included a segment of double helical RNA of about four to five base pairs oriented, at least approximately, along the fivefold axes. The distribution of RNA observed for SPMV appears to be distinctly different than the encapsidated nucleic acid conformation previously suggested for another satellite virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus. This study further shows that analysis of viruses in crystals grown under different chemical conditions may reveal additional information regarding the structure of encapsidated RNA

  8. A G-C-rich palindromic structural motif and a stretch of single-stranded purines are required for optimal packaging of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaballah, Soumeya Ali; Aktar, Suriya J; Ali, Jahabar; Phillip, Pretty Susan; Al Dhaheri, Noura Salem; Jabeen, Aayesha; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2010-09-03

    During retroviral RNA packaging, two copies of genomic RNA are preferentially packaged into the budding virus particles whereas the spliced viral RNAs and the cellular RNAs are excluded during this process. Specificity towards retroviral RNA packaging is dependent upon sequences at the 5' end of the viral genome, which at times extend into Gag sequences. It has earlier been suggested that the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) contains packaging sequences within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and Gag. These studies have also suggested that the packaging determinants of MPMV that lie in the UTR are bipartite and are divided into two regions both upstream and downstream of the major splice donor. However, the precise boundaries of these discontinuous regions within the UTR and the role of the intervening sequences between these dipartite sequences towards MPMV packaging have not been investigated. Employing a combination of genetic and structural prediction analyses, we have shown that region "A", immediately downstream of the primer binding site, is composed of 50 nt, whereas region "B" is composed of the last 23 nt of UTR, and the intervening 55 nt between these two discontinuous regions do not contribute towards MPMV RNA packaging. In addition, we have identified a 14-nt G-C-rich palindromic sequence (with 100% autocomplementarity) within region A that has been predicted to fold into a structural motif and is essential for optimal MPMV RNA packaging. Furthermore, we have also identified a stretch of single-stranded purines (ssPurines) within the UTR and 8 nt of these ssPurines are duplicated in region B. The native ssPurines or its repeat in region B when predicted to refold as ssPurines has been shown to be essential for RNA packaging, possibly functioning as a potential nucleocapsid binding site. Findings from this study should enhance our understanding of the steps involved in MPMV replication including RNA encapsidation process. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  9. Myosin Va associates with mRNA in ribonucleoprotein particles present in myelinated peripheral axons and in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, Aldo; Farías, Joaquina; Puppo, Agostina; Canclini, Lucía; Mercer, John A; Munroe, David; Sotelo, José R; Sotelo-Silveira, José R

    2014-03-01

    Sorting of specific mRNAs to particular cellular locations and regulation of their translation is an essential mechanism underlying cell polarization. The transport of RNAs by kinesins and dyneins has been clearly established in several cell models, including neurons in culture. A similar role appears to exist in higher eukaryotes for the myosins. Myosin Va (Myo5a) has been described as a component of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) in the adult rat nervous system and associated to ZBP1 and ribosomes in ribosomal periaxoplasmic plaques (PARPs), making it a likely candidate for mediating some aspects of RNA transport in neurons. To test this hypothesis, we have characterized RNPs containing Myo5a in adult brains of rats and mice. Microarray analysis of RNAs co-immunoprecipitated with Myo5a indicates that this motor may associate with a specific subpopulation of neuronal mRNAs. We found mRNAs encoding α-synuclein and several proteins with functions in translation in these RNPs. Immunofluorescence analyses of RNPs showed apparent co-localization of Myo5a with ribosomes, mRNA and RNA-binding proteins in discrete structures present both in axons of neurons in culture and in myelinated fibers of medullary roots. Our data suggest that PARPs include RNPs bearing the mRNA coding for Myo5a and are equipped with kinesin and Myo5a molecular motors. In conclusion, we suggest that Myo5a is involved in mRNA trafficking both in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. On-Particle Rolling Circle Amplification-Based Core-Satellite Magnetic Superstructures for MicroRNA Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Qiu, Zhen; Ma, Jing

    2018-01-01

    -specific nuclease in the presence of target microRNA, resulting in a release of MNPs that can be quantified in an optomagnetic sensor. The proposed biosensor has a simple mix-separate-measure strategy. For let-7b detection, the proposed biosensor offers a wide linear detection range of approximately 5 orders...

  11. Replication of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 3 with movement and coat protein genes replaced by corresponding genes of Prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, J A; Reusken, C B; Bol, J F; Pallás, V

    1997-12-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) are tripartite positive-strand RNA plant viruses that encode functionally similar translation products. Although the two viruses are phylogenetically closely related, they infect a very different range of natural hosts. The coat protein (CP) gene, the movement protein (MP) gene or both genes in AMV RNA 3 were replaced by the corresponding genes of PNRSV. The chimeric viruses were tested for heterologous encapsidation, replication in protoplasts from plants transformed with AMV replicase genes P1 and P2 (P12 plants) and for cell-to-cell transport in P12 plants. The chimeric viruses exhibited basic competence for encapsidation and replication in P12 protoplasts and for a low level of cell-to-cell movement in P12 plants. The potential involvement of the MP gene in determining host specificity in ilarviruses is discussed.

  12. Cytoplasmic assembly of snRNP particles from stored proteins and newly transcribed snRNA's in L929 mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauterer, R.A.; Feeney, R.J.; Zieve, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Newly synthesized snRNAs appear transiently in the cytoplasm where they assemble into ribonucleoprotein particles, the snRNP particles, before returning permanently to the interphase nucleus. In this report, bona fide cytoplasmic fractions, prepared by cell enucleation, are used for a quantitative analysis of snRNP assembly in growing mouse fibroblasts. The half-lives and abundances of the snRNP precursors in the cytoplasm and the rates of snRNP assembly are calculated in L929 cells. With the exception of U6, the major snRNAs are stable RNA species; U1 is almost totally stable while U2 has a half-life of about two cell cycles. In contrast, the majority of newly synthesized U6 decays with a half-life of about 15 h. The relative abundances of the newly synthesized snRNA species U1, U2, U3, U4 and U6 in the cytoplasm are determined by Northern hybridization using cloned probes and are approximately 2% of their nuclear abundance. The half-lives of the two major snRNA precursors in the cytoplasm (U1 and U2) are approximately 20 min as determined by labeling to steady state. The relative abundance of the snRNP B protein in the cytoplasm is determined by Western blotting with the Sm class of autoantibodies and is approximately 25% of the nuclear abundance. Kinetic studies, using the Sm antiserum to immunoprecipitate the methionine-labeled snRNP proteins, suggest that the B protein has a half-life of 90 to 120 min in the cytoplasm. These data are discussed and suggest that there is a large pool of more stable snRNP proteins in the cytoplasm available for assembly with the less abundant but more rapidly turning-over snRNAs

  13. The AAA-ATPase NVL2 is a component of pre-ribosomal particles that interacts with the DExD/H-box RNA helicase DOB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagahama, Masami; Yamazoe, Takeshi; Hara, Yoshimitsu; Tani, Katsuko; Tsuji, Akihiko; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear VCP/p97-like protein 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family with two conserved ATP-binding modules. Our previous studies have shown that NVL2 is localized to the nucleolus by interacting with ribosomal protein L5 and may participate in ribosome synthesis, a process involving various non-ribosomal factors including chaperones and RNA helicases. Here, we show that NVL2 is associated with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. Moreover, we used yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays to identify an NVL2-interacting protein that could yield insights into NVL2 function in ribosome biogenesis. We found that NVL2 interacts with DOB1, a DExD/H-box RNA helicase, whose yeast homologue functions in a late stage of the 60S subunit synthesis. DOB1 can interact with a second ATP-binding module mutant of NVL2, which shows a dominant negative effect on ribosome synthesis. In contrast, it cannot interact with a first ATP-binding module mutant, which does not show the dominant negative effect. When the dominant negative mutant of NVL2 was overexpressed in cells, DOB1 appeared to remain associated with nuclear pre-ribosomal particles. Such accumulation was not observed upon overexpression of wild-type NVL2 or a nondominant-negative mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that NVL2 might regulate the association/dissociation reaction of DOB1 with pre-ribosomal particles by acting as a molecular chaperone

  14. Intracellular coordination of potyviral RNA functions in infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina eMäkinen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Establishment of an infection cycle requires mechanisms to allocate the genomes of (+-stranded RNA viruses in a balanced ratio to translation, replication, encapsidation, and movement, as well as mechanisms to prevent translocation of viral RNA (vRNA to cellular RNA degradation pathways. The ratio of vRNA allocated to various functions is likely balanced by the availability of regulatory proteins or competition of the interaction sites within regulatory ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. Due to the transient nature of viral processes and the interdependency between vRNA pathways, it is technically demanding to work out the exact molecular mechanisms underlying vRNA regulation. A substantial number of viral and host proteins have been identified that facilitate the steps that lead to the assembly of a functional potyviral RNA replication complex and their fusion with chloroplasts. Simultaneously with on-going viral replication, part of the replicated potyviral RNA enters movement pathways. Although not much is known about the processes of potyviral RNA release from viral replication complexes (VRCs, the molecular interactions involved in these processes determine the fate of the replicated vRNA. Some viral and host cell proteins have been described that direct replicated potyviral RNA to translation to enable potyviral gene expression and productive infection. The antiviral defense of the cell causes vRNA degradation by RNA silencing. We hypothesize that also plant pathways involved in mRNA decay may have a role in the coordination of potyviral RNA expression. In this review, we discuss the roles of different potyviral and host proteins in the coordination of various potyviral RNA functions.

  15. Intracellular coordination of potyviral RNA functions in infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Hafrén, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of an infection cycle requires mechanisms to allocate the genomes of (+)-stranded RNA viruses in a balanced ratio to translation, replication, encapsidation, and movement, as well as mechanisms to prevent translocation of viral RNA (vRNA) to cellular RNA degradation pathways. The ratio of vRNA allocated to various functions is likely balanced by the availability of regulatory proteins or competition of the interaction sites within regulatory ribonucleoprotein complexes. Due to the transient nature of viral processes and the interdependency between vRNA pathways, it is technically demanding to work out the exact molecular mechanisms underlying vRNA regulation. A substantial number of viral and host proteins have been identified that facilitate the steps that lead to the assembly of a functional potyviral RNA replication complex and their fusion with chloroplasts. Simultaneously with on-going viral replication, part of the replicated potyviral RNA enters movement pathways. Although not much is known about the processes of potyviral RNA release from viral replication complexes, the molecular interactions involved in these processes determine the fate of the replicated vRNA. Some viral and host cell proteins have been described that direct replicated potyviral RNA to translation to enable potyviral gene expression and productive infection. The antiviral defense of the cell causes vRNA degradation by RNA silencing. We hypothesize that also plant pathways involved in mRNA decay may have a role in the coordination of potyviral RNA expression. In this review, we discuss the roles of different potyviral and host proteins in the coordination of various potyviral RNA functions.

  16. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  17. The RNA 5 of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus is a biologically inactive copy of the 3'-UTR of the genomic RNA 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Terlizzi, B; Skrzeczkowski, L J; Mink, G I; Scott, S W; Zimmerman, M T

    2001-01-01

    In addition to the four RNAs known to be encapsidated by Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV), an additional small RNA (RNA 5) was present in purified preparations of several isolates of both viruses. RNA 5 was always produced following infection of a susceptible host by an artificial mixture of RNAs 1, 2, 3, and 4 indicating that it was a product of viral replication. RNA 5 does not activate the infectivity of mixtures that contain the three genomic RNAs (RNA 1 + RNA 2 + RNA 3) nor does it appear to modify symptom expression. Results from hybridization studies suggested that RNA 5 had partial sequence homology with RNAs 1, 2, 3, and 4. Cloning and sequencing the RNA 5 of isolate CH 57/1-M of PNRSV, and the 3' termini of the RNA 1, RNA 2 and RNA 3 of this isolate indicated that it was a copy of the 3' untranslated terminal region (3'-UTR) of the genomic RNA 3.

  18. Extraction of total nucleic acid based on silica-coated magnetic particles for RT-qPCR detection of plant RNA virus/viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Yi; Yan, Wenlong; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a nucleic acid extraction method based on silica-coated magnetic particles (SMPs) and RT-qPCR assay was developed to detect Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Lily symptomless virus (LSV), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and grape yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd-1). The amplification sequences of RT-qPCR were reversely transcribed in vitro as RNA standard templates. The standard curves covered six or seven orders of magnitude with a detection limit of 100 copies per each assay. Extraction efficiency of the SMPs method was evaluated by recovering spiked ssRNAs from plant samples and compared to two commercial kits (TRIzol and RNeasy Plant mini kit). Results showed that the recovery rate of SMPs method was comparable to the commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from lily leaves, whereas it was two or three times higher than commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from grapevine leaves. SMPs method was also used to extract viral nucleic acid from15 ArMV-positive lily leaf samples and 15 LSV-positive lily leaf samples. SMPs method did not show statistically significant difference from other methods on detecting ArMV, but LSV. The SMPs method has the same level of virus load as the TRIzol, and its mean virus load of was 0.5log10 lower than the RNeasy Plant mini kit. Nucleic acid was extracted from 19 grapevine-leaf samples with SMPs and the two commercial kits and subsequently screened for HSVd and GYSVd-1 by RT-qPCR. Regardless of HSVd or GYSVd-1, SMPs method outperforms other methods on both positive rate and the viroid load. In conclusion, SMPs method was able to efficiently extract the nucleic acid of RNA viruses or viroids, especially grapevine viroids, from lily-leaf or grapevine-leaf samples for RT-qPCR detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure determination of feline calicivirus virus-like particles in the context of a pseudo-octahedral arrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim P Burmeister

    Full Text Available The vesivirus feline calicivirus (FCV is a positive strand RNA virus encapsidated by an icosahedral T=3 shell formed by the viral VP1 protein. Upon its expression in the insect cell - baculovirus system in the context of vaccine development, two types of virus-like particles (VLPs were formed, a majority built of 60 subunits (T=1 and a minority probably built of 180 subunits (T=3. The structure of the small particles was determined by x-ray crystallography at 0.8 nm resolution helped by cryo-electron microscopy in order to understand their formation. Cubic crystals belonged to space group P213. Their self-rotation function showed the presence of an octahedral pseudo-symmetry similar to the one described previously by Agerbandje and co-workers for human parvovirus VLPs. The crystal structure could be solved starting from the published VP1 structure in the context of the T=3 viral capsid. In contrast to viral capsids, where the capsomers are interlocked by the exchange of the N-terminal arm (NTA domain, this domain is disordered in the T=1 capsid of the VLPs. Furthermore it is prone to proteolytic cleavage. The relative orientation of P (protrusion and S (shell domains is alerted so as to fit VP1 to the smaller T=1 particle whereas the intermolecular contacts around 2-fold, 3-fold and 5-fold axes are conserved. By consequence the surface of the VLP is very similar compared to the viral capsid and suggests a similar antigenicity. The knowledge of the structure of the VLPs will help to improve their stability, in respect to a use for vaccination.

  20. Probing of RNA structures in a positive sense RNA virus reveals selection pressures for structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Choudhary, Krishna; Aviran, Sharon; Perry, Keith L

    2018-01-01

    Abstract In single stranded (+)-sense RNA viruses, RNA structural elements (SEs) play essential roles in the infection process from replication to encapsidation. Using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) and covariation analysis, we explore the structural features of the third genome segment of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), RNA3 (2216 nt), both in vitro and in plant cell lysates. Comparing SHAPE-Seq and covariation analysis results revealed multiple SEs in the coat protein open reading frame and 3′ untranslated region. Four of these SEs were mutated and serially passaged in Nicotiana tabacum plants to identify biologically selected changes to the original mutated sequences. After passaging, loop mutants showed partial reversion to their wild-type sequence and SEs that were structurally disrupted by mutations were restored to wild-type-like structures via synonymous mutations in planta. These results support the existence and selection of virus open reading frame SEs in the host organism and provide a framework for further studies on the role of RNA structure in viral infection. Additionally, this work demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput chemical probing in plant cell lysates and presents a new method for calculating SHAPE reactivities from overlapping reverse transcriptase priming sites. PMID:29294088

  1. Cytomegalovirus sequence variability, amplicon length, and DNase-sensitive non-encapsidated genomes are obstacles to standardization and commutability of plasma viral load results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, Klaudia; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Gosert, Rainer; Loginov, Raisa; Bir, Katia; Helanterä, Ilkka; Schaub, Stefan; Khanna, Nina; Hirsch, Hans H

    2018-04-22

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) management post-transplantation relies on quantification in blood, but inter-laboratory and inter-assay variability impairs commutability. An international multicenter study demonstrated that variability is mitigated by standardizing plasma volumes, automating DNA extraction and amplification, and calibration to the 1st-CMV-WHO-International-Standard as in the FDA-approved Roche-CAP/CTM-CMV. However, Roche-CAP/CTM-CMV showed under-quantification and false-negative results in a quality assurance program (UK-NEQAS-2014). To evaluate factors contributing to quantification variability of CMV viral load and to develop optimized CMV-UL54-QNAT. The UL54 target of the UK-NEQAS-2014 variant was sequenced and compared to 329 available CMV GenBank sequences. Four Basel-CMV-UL54-QNAT assays of 361 bp, 254 bp, 151 bp, and 95 bp amplicons were developed that only differed in reverse primer positions. The assays were validated using plasmid dilutions, UK-NEQAS-2014 sample, as well as 107 frozen and 69 prospectively collected plasma samples from transplant patients submitted for CMV QNAT, with and without DNase-digestion prior to nucleic acid extraction. Eight of 43 mutations were identified as relevant in the UK-NEQAS-2014 target. All Basel-CMV-UL54 QNATs quantified the UK-NEQAS-2014 but revealed 10-fold increasing CMV loads as amplicon size decreased. The inverse correlation of amplicon size and viral loads was confirmed using 1st-WHO-International-Standard and patient samples. DNase pre-treatment reduced plasma CMV loads by >90% indicating the presence of unprotected CMV genomic DNA. Sequence variability, amplicon length, and non-encapsidated genomes obstruct standardization and commutability of CMV loads needed to develop thresholds for clinical research and management. Besides regular sequence surveys, matrix and extraction standardization, we propose developing reference calibrators using 100 bp amplicons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All

  2. A study of the dimer formation of Rous sarcoma virus RNA and of its effect on viral protein synthesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, E; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1990-01-11

    The genetic material of all retroviruses examined so far is an RNA dimer where two identical RNA subunits are joined at their 5' ends by a structure named dimer linkage structure (DLS). Since the precise location and structure of the DLS as well as the mechanism and role(s) of RNA dimerization remain unclear, we analysed the dimerization process of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA. For this purpose we set up an in vitro model for RSV RNA dimerization. Using this model RSV RNA was shown to form dimeric molecules and this dimerization process was greatly activated by nucleocapsid protein (NCp12) of RSV. Furthermore, RSV RNA dimerization was performed in the presence of complementary 5'32P-DNA oligomers in order to probe the monomer and dimer forms of RSV RNA. Data indicated that the DLS of RSV RNA probably maps between positions 544-564 from the 5' end. In an attempt to define sequences needed for the dimerization of RSV RNA, deletion mutageneses were generated in the 5' 600 nt. The results showed that the dimer promoting sequences probably are located within positions 208-270 and 400-600 from the 5' end and hence possibly encompassing the cis-acting elements needed for the specific encapsidation of RSV genomic RNA. Also it is reported that synthesis of the polyprotein precursor Pr76gag is inhibited upon dimerization of RSV RNA. These results suggest that dimerization and encapsidation of genome length RSV RNA might be linked in the course of virion formation since they appear to be under the control of the same cis elements, E and DLS, and the trans-acting factor nucleocapsid protein NCp12.

  3. The studies of DNA double-strand break (DSB) rejoining and mRNA expression of repair gene XRCCs in malignant transformed cell lines of human bronchial epithelial cells generated by α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingfen; Sui Jianli; Geng Yu; Zhou Pingkun; Wu Dechang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficiency of γ-ray-induced DNA DSB rejoining and the mRNA expression of DNA repair genes in malignantly transformed cell lines of human bronchial epithelial cells generated by exposure to a-particles. Methods: Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to detect DNA. DSBs mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Results: The residual DNA DSB damage level after 4hrs repair following 0-150 Gy of γ-irradiation in the malignantly transformed cell lines BERP35T-1 and BERP35T-4 was significantly higher than that in their parental BEP2D cells. The analysis of mRNA level revealed a 2.5-to 6.5-fold down-regulated expression of the DNA repair genes XRCC-2, XRCC-3 and Ku80 (XRCC-5) in BERP35T-1 and BERP35T-4 cells as compared with the parental BEP2D cells. In contrast, the expression of DNA-PKcs(XRCC7) was 2.4-fold up-regulated in the transformed cell line BERP35T-4, in which there was a significantly higher proportion of polyploid cells. Conclusion: This study results show that the deficiency of DNA DSB rejoining and depressed mRNA expression of DNA repair genes could be involved in the malignant transformation process of BEP2D cells induced by exposure to α-particles

  4. Retrovirus-specific differences in matrix and nucleocapsid protein-nucleic acid interactions: implications for genomic RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Grigsby, Iwen F; Gorelick, Robert J; Mansky, Louis M; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral RNA encapsidation involves a recognition event between genomic RNA (gRNA) and one or more domains in Gag. In HIV-1, the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is involved in gRNA packaging and displays robust nucleic acid (NA) binding and chaperone functions. In comparison, NC of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a deltaretrovirus, displays weaker NA binding and chaperone activity. Mutation of conserved charged residues in the deltaretrovirus bovine leukemia virus (BLV) matrix (MA) and NC domains affects virus replication and gRNA packaging efficiency. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the MA domain may generally contribute to NA binding and genome encapsidation in deltaretroviruses. Here, we examined the interaction between HTLV-2 and HIV-1 MA proteins and various NAs in vitro. HTLV-2 MA displays higher NA binding affinity and better chaperone activity than HIV-1 MA. HTLV-2 MA also binds NAs with higher affinity than HTLV-2 NC and displays more robust chaperone function. Mutation of two basic residues in HTLV-2 MA α-helix II, previously implicated in BLV gRNA packaging, reduces NA binding affinity. HTLV-2 MA binds with high affinity and specificity to RNA derived from the putative packaging signal of HTLV-2 relative to nonspecific NA. Furthermore, an HIV-1 MA triple mutant designed to mimic the basic character of HTLV-2 MA α-helix II dramatically improves binding affinity and chaperone activity of HIV-1 MA in vitro and restores RNA packaging to a ΔNC HIV-1 variant in cell-based assays. Taken together, these results are consistent with a role for deltaretrovirus MA proteins in viral RNA packaging.

  5. Adenovirus-mediated siRNA targeting TNF-α and overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 promotes early osteoblast differentiation on a cell model of Ti particle-induced inflammatory response in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, H.H.; Yu, C.C.; Sun, S.X. [Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China); Ma, X.J. [Ningxia Medical Autonomous Region of the First People' s Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China); Yang, X.C.; Sun, K.N.; Jin, Q.H. [Affiliated Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yinchuan (China)

    2013-10-02

    Wear particles are phagocytosed by macrophages and other inflammatory cells, resulting in cellular activation and release of proinflammatory factors, which cause periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening, the most common causes of total joint arthroplasty failure. During this pathological process, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) plays an important role in wear-particle-induced osteolysis. In this study, recombination adenovirus (Ad) vectors carrying both target genes [TNF-α small interfering RNA (TNF-α-siRNA) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)] were synthesized and transfected into RAW264.7 macrophages and pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells, respectively. The target gene BMP-2, expressed on pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and silenced by the TNF-α gene on cells, was treated with titanium (Ti) particles that were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. We showed that recombinant adenovirus (Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2) can induce osteoblast differentiation when treated with conditioned medium (CM) containing RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with a combination of Ti particles and Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 (Ti-ad CM) assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand was downregulated in pro-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells treated with Ti-ad CM in comparison with conditioned medium of RAW264.7 macrophages challenged with Ti particles (Ti CM). We suggest that Ad-siTNFα-BMP-2 induced osteoblast differentiation and inhibited osteoclastogenesis on a cell model of a Ti particle-induced inflammatory response, which may provide a novel approach for the treatment of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  6. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA binding affinity as well as the stoichiometry using recombinant proteins and synthetic oligos. Our RNA binding analysis revealed that each ISAV-NP binds ~12 nts of RNA, shorter than the 24-28 nts originally estimated for the influenza A virus NP based on population average. The 12-nt stoichiometry was further confirmed by results from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Considering that RNPs of ISAV and the influenza viruses have similar morphologies and dimensions, our findings suggest that NP-free RNA may exist on orthomyxovirus RNPs, and selective RNP packaging may be accomplished through direct RNA-RNA interactions.

  7. Small-angle X-ray Solution Scattering Study of the Multi-aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Complex Reveals an Elongated and Multi-armed particle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, José; Renault, Louis; Pérez, Javier; Mirande, Marc

    2013-01-01

    In animal cells, nine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are associated with the three auxiliary proteins p18, p38, and p43 to form a stable and conserved large multi-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex (MARS), whose molecular mass has been proposed to be between 1.0 and 1.5 MDa. The complex acts as a molecular hub for coordinating protein synthesis and diverse regulatory signal pathways. Electron microscopy studies defined its low resolution molecular envelope as an overall rather compact, asymmetric triangular shape. Here, we have analyzed the composition and homogeneity of the native mammalian MARS isolated from rabbit liver and characterized its overall internal structure, size, and shape at low resolution by hydrodynamic methods and small-angle x-ray scattering in solution. Our data reveal that the MARS exhibits a much more elongated and multi-armed shape than expected from previous reports. The hydrodynamic and structural features of the MARS are large compared with other supramolecular assemblies involved in translation, including ribosome. The large dimensions and non-compact structural organization of MARS favor a large protein surface accessibility for all its components. This may be essential to allow structural rearrangements between the catalytic and cis-acting tRNA binding domains of the synthetases required for binding the bulky tRNA substrates. This non-compact architecture may also contribute to the spatiotemporal controlled release of some of its components, which participate in non-canonical functions after dissociation from the complex. PMID:23836901

  8. Citrus psorosis virus RNA 1 is of negative polarity and potentially encodes in its complementary strand a 24K protein of unknown function and 280K putative RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naum-Onganía, Gabriela; Gago-Zachert, Selma; Peña, Eduardo; Grau, Oscar; Garcia, Maria Laura

    2003-10-01

    Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), the type member of genus Ophiovirus, has three genomic RNAs. Complete sequencing of CPsV RNA 1 revealed a size of 8184 nucleotides and Northern blot hybridization with chain specific probes showed that its non-coding strand is preferentially encapsidated. The complementary strand of RNA 1 contains two open reading frames (ORFs) separated by a 109-nt intergenic region, one located near the 5'-end potentially encoding a 24K protein of unknown function, and another of 280K containing the core polymerase motifs characteristic of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp). Comparison of the core RdRp motifs of negative-stranded RNA viruses, supports grouping CPsV, Ranunculus white mottle virus (RWMV) and Mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV) within the same genus (Ophiovirus), constituting a monophyletic group separated from all other negative-stranded RNA viruses. Furthermore, RNAs 1 of MiLV, CPsV and RWMV are similar in size and those of MiLV and CPsV also in genomic organization and sequence.

  9. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  10. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    connects to external tools to provide a flexible semiautomatic editing environment. A new method, Pcluster, is introduced for dividing the sequences of an RNA alignment into subgroups with secondary structure differences. Pcluster was used to evaluate 574 seed alignments obtained from the Rfam database...... and we identified 71 alignments with significant prediction of inconsistent base pairs and 102 alignments with significant prediction of novel base pairs. Four RNA families were used to illustrate how SARSE can be used to manually or automatically correct the inconsistent base pairs detected by Pcluster......: the mir-399 RNA, vertebrate telomase RNA (vert-TR), bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), and the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. The general use of the method is illustrated by the ability to accommodate pseudoknots and handle even large and divergent RNA families. The open architecture...

  11. Analytical study of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus dimeric RNA generated in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Gabus, C; Allain, B

    1992-12-01

    The retroviral genome consists of two identical RNA molecules associated at their 5' ends by a stable structure called the dimer linkage structure. The dimer linkage structure, while maintaining the dimer state of the retroviral genome, might also be involved in packaging and reverse transcription, as well as recombination during proviral DNA synthesis. To study the dimer structure of the retroviral genome and the mechanism of dimerization, we analyzed features of the dimeric genome of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) type A and identified elements required for its dimerization. Here we report that the REV dimeric genome extracted from virions and infected cells, as well as that synthesized in vitro, is more resistant to heat denaturation than avian sarcoma and leukemia virus, murine leukemia virus, or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 dimeric RNA. The minimal domain required to form a stable REV RNA dimer in vitro was found to map between positions 268 and 452 (KpnI and SalI sites), thus corresponding to the E encapsidation sequence (J. E. Embretson and H. M. Temin, J. Virol. 61:2675-2683, 1987). In addition, both the 5' and 3' halves of E are necessary in cis for RNA dimerization and the extent of RNA dimerization is influenced by viral sequences flanking E. Rapid and efficient dimerization of REV RNA containing gag sequences in addition to the E sequences and annealing of replication primer tRNA(Pro) to the primer-binding site necessitate the nucleocapsid protein.

  12. Cooperation of an RNA Packaging Signal and a Viral Envelope Protein in Coronavirus RNA Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Krishna; Makino, Shinji

    2001-01-01

    Murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) produces a genome-length mRNA, mRNA 1, and six or seven species of subgenomic mRNAs in infected cells. Among these mRNAs, only mRNA 1 is efficiently packaged into MHV particles. MHV N protein binds to all MHV mRNAs, whereas envelope M protein interacts only with mRNA 1. This M protein-mRNA 1 interaction most probably determines the selective packaging of mRNA 1 into MHV particles. A short cis-acting MHV RNA packaging signal is necessary and suffi...

  13. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    introducerede vores gruppe den enkeltstrengede RNA-origami metode, der giver mulighed for cotranscriptional foldning af veldefinerede nanostrukturer, og er en central del af arbejdet præsenteret heri. Denne ph.d.-afhandling udforsker potentielle anvendelser af RNA-origami nanostrukturer, som nanomedicin eller...... biosensorer. Afhandlingen består af en introduktion til RNA-nanoteknologi feltet, en introduktion af enkeltstrenget RNA-origami design, og fire studier, der beskriver design, produktion og karakterisering af både strukturelle og funktionelle RNA-origamier. Flere RNA-origami designs er blevet undersøgt, og...... projekterne, der indgår i denne afhandling, inkluderer de nyeste fremskridt indenfor strukturel RNA-nanoteknologi og udvikling af funktionelle RNA-baserede enheder. Det første studie beskriver konstruktion og karakterisering af en enkeltstrenget 6-helix RNA-origami stuktur, som er den første demonstration af...

  14. M2e-displaying virus-like particles with associated RNA promote T helper 1 type adaptive immunity against influenza A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Itatí Ibañez

    Full Text Available The ectodomain of influenza A matrix protein 2 (M2e is a candidate for a universal influenza A vaccine. We used recombinant Hepatitis B core antigen to produce virus-like particles presenting M2e (M2e-VLPs. We produced the VLPs with and without entrapped nucleic acids and compared their immunogenicity and protective efficacy. Immunization of BALB/c mice with M2e-VLPs containing nucleic acids induced a stronger, Th1-biased antibody response compared to particles lacking nucleic acids. The former also induced a stronger M2e-specific CD4(+ T cell response, as determined by ELISPOT. Mice vaccinated with alum-adjuvanted M2e-VLPs containing the nucleic acid-binding domain were better protected against influenza A virus challenge than mice vaccinated with similar particles lacking this domain, as deduced from the loss in body weight following challenge with X47 (H3N2 or PR/8 virus. Challenge of mice that had been immunized with M2e-VLPs with or without nucleic acids displayed significantly lower mortality, morbidity and lung virus titers than control-immunized groups. We conclude that nucleic acids present in M2e-VLPs correlate with improved immune protection.

  15. Characterization of a novel single-stranded RNA mycovirus in pleurotus ostreatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hyun Jae; Lim, Dongbin; Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2003-01-01

    A mycovirus, named oyster mushroom spherical virus (OMSV), was isolated from cultivated oyster mushrooms with a severe epidemic of oyster mushroom Die-back disease. OMSV was a 27-nm spherical virus encapsidating a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) of 5.784 kb with a coat protein of approximately 28.5 kDa. The nucleotide sequence of the virus revealed that its genomic RNA was positive strand, containing 5784 bases with seven open reading frames (ORF). ORF1 had the motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and helicase. ORF2 encoded a coat protein. ORF3 to 7 could encode putative polypeptides of approximately 12, 12.5, 21, 14.5, and 23 kDa, respectively, but none of them showed significant similarity to any other known polypeptides. The 5' end of the viral RNA was uncapped and the 3' end was polyadenylated with 74 bases. Genomic structure and organization and the derived amino acid sequence of RdRp and helicase domain were similar to those of tymoviruses, a plant virus group

  16. A human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus, as a eucaryotic vector: Transient expression and encapsidation of the procaryotic gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tratschin, J.D.; West, M.H.P.; Sandbank, T.; Carter, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors have used the defective human parvovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a novel eurocaryotic vector (parvector) for the expression of a foreign gene in human cells. The recombinant, pAV2, contains the AAV genome in a pBR322-derived bacterial plasmid. When pAV2 is transfected into human cells together with helper adenovirus particles, the AAV genome is rescued from the recombinant plasmid and replicated to produce infectious AAV particles at high efficiency. To create a vector, we inserted a procaryotic sequence coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) into derivatives of pAV2 following either of the AAV promoters p/sub 40/ (pAVHiCAT) and p/sub 19/ (pAVBcCAT). When transfected into human 293 cells or HeLa cells, pAVHiCAT expressed CAT activity in the absence of adenovirus. In the presence of adenovirus, this vector produced increased amounts of CAT activity and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was replicated. In 293 cells, pAVBcCAT expressed a similar amount of CAT activity in the absence or presence of adenovirus and the recombinant AAV-CAT genome was not replicated. In HeLa cells, pAVBcCAT expressed low levels of CAT activity, but this level was elevated by coinfection with adenovirus particles or by cotransfection with a plasmid which expressed the adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) product. The E1A product is a transcriptional activator and is expressed in 293 cells. Thus, expression from two AAV promoters is differentially regulated: expression from p/sub 19/ is increased by E1A, whereas p/sub 40/ yields high levels of constitutive expression in the absence of E1A. Both AAV vectors were packaged into AAV particles by complementation with wild-type AAV and yielded CAT activity when subsequently infected into cells in the presence of adenovirus.

  17. Up-regulation of mRNA ventricular PRNP prion protein gene expression in air pollution highly exposed young urbanites: endoplasmic reticulum stress, glucose regulated protein 78, and nanosized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Franco-Lira, Maricela; González-Maciel, Angélica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Harritt, Lou; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Ferreira-Azevedo, Lara; Drecktrah, Dan; Zhu, Hongtu; Sun, Qiang; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana; Diaz, Philippe; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian

    2013-11-28

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children and young adults exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants including fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) vs. clean air controls, exhibit myocardial inflammation and inflammasome activation with a differential right and left ventricular expression of key inflammatory genes and inflammasomes. We investigated the mRNA expression levels of the prion protein gene PRNP, which plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and metal toxicity, and the glucose regulated protein 78, a key protein in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling, in ventricular autopsy samples from 30 children and young adults age 19.97 ± 6.8 years with a lifetime of low (n:4) vs. high (n:26) air pollution exposures. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out in human ventricles, and electron microscopy studies were also done in 5 young, highly exposed Mexico City dogs. There was significant left ventricular PRNP and bi-ventricular GRP78 mRNA up-regulation in Mexico City young urbanites vs. controls. PRNP up-regulation in the left ventricle was significantly different from the right, p < 0.0001, and there was a strong left ventricular PRNP and GRP78 correlation (p = 0.0005). Marked abnormalities in capillary endothelial cells, numerous nanosized particles in myocardial ER and in abnormal mitochondria characterized the highly exposed ventricles. Early and sustained cardiac ER stress could result in detrimental irreversible consequences in urban children, and while highly complex systems maintain myocardial homeostasis, failure to compensate for chronic myocardial inflammation, oxidative and ER stress, and particles damaging myocardial organelles may prime the development of pathophysiological cardiovascular states in young urbanites. Nanosized PM could play a key cardiac myocyte toxicity role.

  18. Up-Regulation of mRNA Ventricular PRNP Prion Protein Gene Expression in Air Pollution Highly Exposed Young Urbanites: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Glucose Regulated Protein 78, and Nanosized Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Villarreal-Calderon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mexico City Metropolitan Area children and young adults exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants including fine and ultrafine particulate matter (PM vs. clean air controls, exhibit myocardial inflammation and inflammasome activation with a differential right and left ventricular expression of key inflammatory genes and inflammasomes. We investigated the mRNA expression levels of the prion protein gene PRNP, which plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and metal toxicity, and the glucose regulated protein 78, a key protein in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling, in ventricular autopsy samples from 30 children and young adults age 19.97 ± 6.8 years with a lifetime of low (n:4 vs. high (n:26 air pollution exposures. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies were carried out in human ventricles, and electron microscopy studies were also done in 5 young, highly exposed Mexico City dogs. There was significant left ventricular PRNP and bi-ventricular GRP78 mRNA up-regulation in Mexico City young urbanites vs. controls. PRNP up-regulation in the left ventricle was significantly different from the right, p < 0.0001, and there was a strong left ventricular PRNP and GRP78 correlation (p = 0.0005. Marked abnormalities in capillary endothelial cells, numerous nanosized particles in myocardial ER and in abnormal mitochondria characterized the highly exposed ventricles. Early and sustained cardiac ER stress could result in detrimental irreversible consequences in urban children, and while highly complex systems maintain myocardial homeostasis, failure to compensate for chronic myocardial inflammation, oxidative and ER stress, and particles damaging myocardial organelles may prime the development of pathophysiological cardiovascular states in young urbanites. Nanosized PM could play a key cardiac myocyte toxicity role.

  19. A stable RNA virus-based vector for citrus trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folimonov, Alexey S.; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Dawson, William O.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-based vectors are important tools in plant molecular biology and plant genomics. A number of vectors based on viruses that infect herbaceous plants are in use for expression or silencing of genes in plants as well as screening unknown sequences for function. Yet there is a need for useful virus-based vectors for woody plants, which demand much greater stability because of the longer time required for systemic infection and analysis. We examined several strategies to develop a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)-based vector for transient expression of foreign genes in citrus trees using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These strategies included substitution of the p13 open reading frame (ORF) by the ORF of GFP, construction of a self-processing fusion of GFP in-frame with the major coat protein (CP), or expression of the GFP ORF as an extra gene from a subgenomic (sg) mRNA controlled either by a duplicated CTV CP sgRNA controller element (CE) or an introduced heterologous CE of Beet yellows virus. Engineered vector constructs were examined for replication, encapsidation, GFP expression during multiple passages in protoplasts, and for their ability to infect, move, express GFP, and be maintained in citrus plants. The most successful vectors based on the 'add-a-gene' strategy have been unusually stable, continuing to produce GFP fluorescence after more than 4 years in citrus trees

  20. Phenotypic silencing of cytoplasmic genes using sequence-specific double-stranded short interfering RNA and its application in the reverse genetics of wild type negative-strand RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS by short interfering RNA has opened up new directions in the phenotypic mutation of cellular genes. However, its efficacy on non-nuclear genes and its effect on the interferon pathway remain unexplored. Since directed mutation of RNA genomes is not possible through conventional mutagenesis, we have tested sequence-specific 21-nucleotide long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs for their ability to silence cytoplasmic RNA genomes. Results Short dsRNAs were generated against specific mRNAs of respiratory syncytial virus, a nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA virus with a cytoplasmic life cycle. At nanomolar concentrations, the dsRNAs specifically abrogated expression of the corresponding viral proteins, and produced the expected mutant phenotype ex vivo. The dsRNAs did not induce an interferon response, and did not inhibit cellular gene expression. The ablation of the viral proteins correlated with the loss of the specific mRNAs. In contrast, viral genomic and antigenomic RNA, which are encapsidated, were not directly affected. Conclusions Synthetic inhibitory dsRNAs are effective in specific silencing of RNA genomes that are exclusively cytoplasmic and transcribed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. RNA-directed RNA gene silencing does not require cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of viral cDNA, and thus, will allow the generation of phenotypic null mutants of specific RNA viral genes under normal infection conditions and at any point in the infection cycle. This will, for the first time, permit functional genomic studies, attenuated infections, reverse genetic analysis, and studies of host-virus signaling pathways using a wild type RNA virus, unencumbered by any superinfecting virus.

  1. Specificity in the association of tomato black ring virus satellite RNA with helper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncino, C; Hemmer, O; Fritsch, C

    1995-10-20

    The satellite RNAs (sat-RNAs) associated with some isolates of tomato black ring virus (TBRV) consist of single-stranded molecules of about 1375 nucleotides, encoding a nonstructural protein of 48K which has been shown to be involved in the replication of the sat-RNA. The TBRV sat-RNAs are also dependent for their replication and for their encapsidation on the helper virus. To characterize the nature of the association between sat-RNA and helper virus, transcripts of sat-RNA from TBRV isolates C and L (respectively, of serotypes G and S) have been prepared and inoculated onto Chenopodium quinoa leaves or protoplasts. Transcript of the TBRV sat-RNA C is efficiently multiplied when coinoculated with the genomic RNAs of TBRV isolate G (used instead of TBRV isolate C, because isolate G was depleted of sat-RNA), but does not multiply with TBRV isolate L. On the other hand, transcript of the sat-RNA L is able to multiply with the cognate helper virus and, less efficiently, with grapevine chrome mosaic virus (another nepovirus, 80% similar to TBRV), but does not multiply with TBRV G. The specificity of the association resides at the level of sat-RNA replication. Analysis of the multiplication of chimeric sat-RNAs, obtained by exchanging different regions between the two sat-RNAs C and L, showed that the 5' and the 3' noncoding regions of the sat-RNA, although important for replication, are not implicated in specificity. The results suggest that the determinants of the specificity are contained in the 48K sat-RNA-encoded protein.

  2. Characterization of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air by DNA sequence and restriction fragment analysis of ribosomal RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Després

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the applicability of DNA analyses for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 and total suspended particulates (TSP have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze.

    From filter segments loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses.

    Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high-alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m−3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~108 haploid bacterial genomes or ~105 haploid human genomes, respectively.

    Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42 and some from Actinobacteria (10 and Firmicutes (1. The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3 and Basidiomycota (1, which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2 and moss spores (2, while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist.

  3. A parallel implementation of the Wuchty algorithm with additional experimental filters to more thoroughly explore RNA conformational space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Stone

    Full Text Available We present new modifications to the Wuchty algorithm in order to better define and explore possible conformations for an RNA sequence. The new features, including parallelization, energy-independent lonely pair constraints, context-dependent chemical probing constraints, helix filters, and optional multibranch loops, provide useful tools for exploring the landscape of RNA folding. Chemical probing alone may not necessarily define a single unique structure. The helix filters and optional multibranch loops are global constraints on RNA structure that are an especially useful tool for generating models of encapsidated viral RNA for which cryoelectron microscopy or crystallography data may be available. The computations generate a combinatorially complete set of structures near a free energy minimum and thus provide data on the density and diversity of structures near the bottom of a folding funnel for an RNA sequence. The conformational landscapes for some RNA sequences may resemble a low, wide basin rather than a steep funnel that converges to a single structure.

  4. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  5. A small and efficient dimerization/packaging signal of rat VL30 RNA and its use in murine leukemia virus-VL30-derived vectors for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, C; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1994-02-01

    Retroviral genomes consist of two identical RNA molecules associated at their 5' ends by the dimer linkage structure located in the packaging element (Psi or E) necessary for RNA dimerization in vitro and packaging in vivo. In murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived vectors designed for gene transfer, the Psi + sequence of 600 nucleotides directs the packaging of recombinant RNAs into MLV virions produced by helper cells. By using in vitro RNA dimerization as a screening system, a sequence of rat VL30 RNA located next to the 5' end of the Harvey mouse sarcoma virus genome and as small as 67 nucleotides was found to form stable dimeric RNA. In addition, a purine-rich sequence located at the 5' end of this VL30 RNA seems to be critical for RNA dimerization. When this VL30 element was extended by 107 nucleotides at its 3' end and inserted into an MLV-derived vector lacking MLV Psi +, it directed the efficient encapsidation of recombinant RNAs into MLV virions. Because this VL30 packaging signal is smaller and more efficient in packaging recombinant RNAs than the MLV Psi + and does not contain gag or glyco-gag coding sequences, its use in MLV-derived vectors should render even more unlikely recombinations which could generate replication-competent viruses. Therefore, utilization of the rat VL30 packaging sequence should improve the biological safety of MLV vectors for human gene transfer.

  6. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Katahira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex.

  7. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  8. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  9. Crystal structure of the bacteriophage Qβ coat protein in complex with the RNA operator of the replicase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumnieks, Janis; Tars, Kaspars

    2014-03-06

    The coat proteins of single-stranded RNA bacteriophages specifically recognize and bind to a hairpin structure in their genome at the beginning of the replicase gene. The interaction serves to repress the synthesis of the replicase enzyme late in infection and contributes to the specific encapsidation of phage RNA. While this mechanism is conserved throughout the Leviviridae family, the coat protein and operator sequences from different phages show remarkable variation, serving as prime examples for the co-evolution of protein and RNA structure. To better understand the protein-RNA interactions in this virus family, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of the coat protein from bacteriophage Qβ bound to its cognate translational operator. The RNA binding mode of Qβ coat protein shares several features with that of the widely studied phage MS2, but only one nucleotide base in the hairpin loop makes sequence-specific contacts with the protein. Unlike in other RNA phages, the Qβ coat protein does not utilize an adenine-recognition pocket for binding a bulged adenine base in the hairpin stem but instead uses a stacking interaction with a tyrosine side chain to accommodate the base. The extended loop between β strands E and F of Qβ coat protein makes contacts with the lower part of the RNA stem, explaining the greater length dependence of the RNA helix for optimal binding to the protein. Consequently, the complex structure allows the proposal of a mechanism by which the Qβ coat protein recognizes and discriminates in favor of its cognate RNA. © 2013.

  10. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepmann, Michael; Shalamova, Lyudmila A; Gerresheim, Gesche K; Rossbach, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), while also downstream elements like the cis -replication element (CRE) in the coding region and the 3' UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis -elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5'- and 3'-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA-RNA interactions (LRIs) are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis -elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) binds to two target sites at the 5' end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3' UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis -elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis -element in question acts on HCV

  11. Systematic identification of novel, essential host genes affecting bromovirus RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi L Gancarz

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA virus replication involves viral proteins and cellular proteins at nearly every replication step. Brome mosaic virus (BMV is a well-established model for dissecting virus-host interactions and is one of very few viruses whose RNA replication, gene expression and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previously, our laboratory identified ∼100 non-essential host genes whose loss inhibited or enhanced BMV replication at least 3-fold. However, our isolation of additional BMV-modulating host genes by classical genetics and other results underscore that genes essential for cell growth also contribute to BMV RNA replication at a frequency that may be greater than that of non-essential genes. To systematically identify novel, essential host genes affecting BMV RNA replication, we tested a collection of ∼900 yeast strains, each with a single essential gene promoter replaced by a doxycycline-repressible promoter, allowing repression of gene expression by adding doxycycline to the growth medium. Using this strain array of ∼81% of essential yeast genes, we identified 24 essential host genes whose depleted expression reproducibly inhibited or enhanced BMV RNA replication. Relevant host genes are involved in ribosome biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation and protein homeostasis, among other cellular processes. BMV 2a(Pol levels were significantly increased in strains depleted for a heat shock protein (HSF1 or proteasome components (PRE1 and RPT6, suggesting these genes may affect BMV RNA replication by directly or indirectly modulating 2a(Pol localization, post-translational modification or interacting partners. Investigating the diverse functions of these newly identified essential host genes should advance our understanding of BMV-host interactions and normal cellular pathways, and suggest new modes of virus control.

  12. A physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein is required for genome-packaging specificity in an RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Rao, A L N

    2012-06-01

    Genome packaging is functionally coupled to replication in RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (Poliovirus), insects (Flock house virus [FHV]), and plants (Brome mosaic virus [BMV]). However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We have observed previously that in FHV and BMV, unlike ectopically expressed capsid protein (CP), packaging specificity results from RNA encapsidation by CP that has been translated from mRNA produced from replicating genomic RNA. Consequently, we hypothesize that a physical interaction with replicase increases the CP specificity for packaging viral RNAs. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the molecular interaction between replicase protein and CP using a FHV-Nicotiana benthamiana system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation in conjunction with fluorescent cellular protein markers and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that FHV replicase (protein A) and CP physically interact at the mitochondrial site of replication and that this interaction requires the N-proximal region from either amino acids 1 to 31 or amino acids 32 to 50 of the CP. In contrast to the mitochondrial localization of CP derived from FHV replication, ectopic expression displayed a characteristic punctate pattern on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This pattern was altered to relocalize the CP throughout the cytoplasm when the C-proximal hydrophobic domain was deleted. Analysis of the packaging phenotypes of the CP mutants defective either in protein A-CP interactions or ER localization suggested that synchronization between protein A-CP interaction and its subcellular localization is imperative to confer packaging specificity.

  13. Viral RNA annealing activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein require only peptide domains outside the zinc fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rocquigny, H; Gabus, C; Vincent, A; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B; Darlix, J L

    1992-07-15

    The nucleocapsid (NC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a large number of NC protein molecules, probably wrapping the dimeric RNA genome within the virion inner core. NC protein is a gag-encoded product that contains two zinc fingers flanked by basic residues. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions, NCp15 is ultimately processed into NCp7 and p6 proteins. During virion assembly the retroviral NC protein is necessary for core formation and genomic RNA encapsidation, which are essential for virus infectivity. In vitro NCp15 activates viral RNA dimerization, a process most probably linked in vivo to genomic RNA packaging, and replication primer tRNA(Lys,3) annealing to the initiation site of reverse transcription. To characterize the domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 NC protein necessary for its various functions, the 72-amino acid NCp7 and several derived peptides were synthesized in a pure form. We show here that synthetic NCp7 with or without the two zinc fingers has the RNA annealing activities of NCp15. Further deletions of the N-terminal 12 and C-terminal 8 amino acids, leading to a 27-residue peptide lacking the finger domains, have little or no effect on NC protein activity in vitro. However deletion of short sequences containing basic residues flanking the first finger leads to a complete loss of NC protein activity. It is proposed that the basic residues and the zinc fingers cooperate to select and package the genomic RNA in vivo. Inhibition of the viral RNA binding and annealing activities associated with the basic residues flanking the first zinc finger of NC protein could therefore be used as a model for the design of antiviral agents.

  14. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Niepmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR, while also downstream elements like the cis-replication element (CRE in the coding region and the 3′ UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis-elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5′- and 3′-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA–RNA interactions (LRIs are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis-elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122 binds to two target sites at the 5′ end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3′ UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis-elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis-element in

  15. Proteolytic processing of the primary translation products of cowpea mosaic virus RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, H.

    1984-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is the type member of a group of plant viruses, the comoviruses, with a genome consisting of two single stranded RNA molecules separately encapsidated in icosahedral particles. A characteristic feature of the two genome RNAs is that they are both polyadenylated at their

  16. RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly studied in vivo by RNA transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinschmidt, A.M.; Pederson, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a method for studying RNA processing and ribonucleoprotein assembly in vivo, by using RNA synthesized in vitro. SP6-transcribed 32 P-labeled U2 small nuclear RNA precursor molecules were introduced into cultured human 293 cells by calcium phosphate-mediated uptake, as in standard DNA transfection experiments. RNase protection mapping demonstrated that the introduced pre-U2 RNA underwent accurate 3' end processing. The introduced U2 RNA was assembled into ribonucleoprotein particles that reacted with an antibody specific for proteins known to be associated with the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle. The 3' end-processed, ribonucleoprotein-assembled U2 RNA accumulated in the nuclear fraction. When pre-U2 RNA with a 7-methylguanosine group at the 5' end was introduced into cells, it underwent conversion to a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine cap structure, a characteristic feature of the U-small nuclear RNAs. Pre-U2 RNA introduced with an adenosine cap (Ap-ppG) also underwent processing, small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, and nuclear accumulation, establishing that a methylated guanosine cap structure is not required for these steps in U2 small nuclear ribonucleprotein biosynthesis. Beyond its demonstrated usefulness in the study of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein biosynthesis, RNA transfection may be of general applicability to the investigation of eukaryotic RNA processing in vivo and may also offer opportunities for introducing therapeutically targeted RNAs (ribozymes or antisense RNA) into cells

  17. RNA secondary structures of the bacteriophage phi6 packaging regions.

    OpenAIRE

    Pirttimaa, M J; Bamford, D H

    2000-01-01

    Bacteriophage phi6 genome consists of three segments of double-stranded RNA. During maturation, single-stranded copies of these segments are packaged into preformed polymerase complex particles. Only phi6 RNA is packaged, and each particle contains only one copy of each segment. An in vitro packaging and replication assay has been developed for phi6, and the packaging signals (pac sites) have been mapped to the 5' ends of the RNA segments. In this study, we propose secondary structure models ...

  18. SHAPE analysis of the FIV Leader RNA reveals a structural switch potentially controlling viral packaging and genome dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Julia C; Tanner, Sian J; Legiewicz, Michal; Phillip, Pretty S; Rizvi, Tahir A; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Lever, Andrew M L

    2011-08-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects many species of cat, and is related to HIV, causing a similar pathology. High-throughput selective 2' hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (SHAPE), a technique that allows structural interrogation at each nucleotide, was used to map the secondary structure of the FIV packaging signal RNA. Previous studies of this RNA showed four conserved stem-loops, extensive long-range interactions (LRIs) and a small, palindromic stem-loop (SL5) within the gag open reading frame (ORF) that may act as a dimerization initiation site (DIS), enabling the virus to package two copies of its genome. Our analyses of wild-type (wt) and mutant RNAs suggest that although the four conserved stem-loops are static structures, the 5' and 3' regions previously shown to form LRI also adopt an alternative, yet similarly conserved conformation, in which the putative DIS is occluded, and which may thus favour translational and splicing functions over encapsidation. SHAPE and in vitro dimerization assays were used to examine SL5 mutants. Dimerization contacts appear to be made between palindromic loop sequences in SL5. As this stem-loop is located within the gag ORF, recognition of a dimeric RNA provides a possible mechanism for the specific packaging of genomic over spliced viral RNAs.

  19. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Toro-Ascuy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1, Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2, or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC and processing bodies (PBs. More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A, allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2, an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries.

  20. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  1. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. © 2015 Madru et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Deciphering the role of the Gag-Pol ribosomal frameshift signal in HIV-1 RNA genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2014-04-01

    A key step of retroviral replication is packaging of the viral RNA genome during virus assembly. Specific packaging is mediated by interactions between the viral protein Gag and elements in the viral RNA genome. In HIV-1, similar to most retroviruses, the packaging signal is located within the 5' untranslated region and extends into the gag-coding region. A recent study reported that a region including the Gag-Pol ribosomal frameshift signal plays an important role in HIV-1 RNA packaging; deletions or mutations that affect the RNA structure of this signal lead to drastic decreases (10- to 50-fold) in viral RNA packaging and virus titer. We examined here the role of the ribosomal frameshift signal in HIV-1 RNA packaging by studying the RNA packaging and virus titer in the context of proviruses. Three mutants with altered ribosomal frameshift signal, either through direct deletion of the signal, mutation of the 6U slippery sequence, or alterations of the secondary structure were examined. We found that RNAs from all three mutants were packaged efficiently, and they generate titers similar to that of a virus containing the wild-type ribosomal frameshift signal. We conclude that although the ribosomal frameshift signal plays an important role in regulating the replication cycle, this RNA element is not directly involved in regulating RNA encapsidation. To generate infectious viruses, HIV-1 must package viral RNA genome during virus assembly. The specific HIV-1 genome packaging is mediated by interactions between the structural protein Gag and elements near the 5' end of the viral RNA known as packaging signal. In this study, we examined whether the Gag-Pol ribosomal frameshift signal is important for HIV-1 RNA packaging as recently reported. Our results demonstrated that when Gag/Gag-Pol is supplied in trans, none of the tested ribosomal frameshift signal mutants has defects in RNA packaging or virus titer. These studies provide important information on how HIV-1

  3. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  4. Small-angle X-ray titration study on the complex formation between 5-S RNA and the L18 protein of the Escherichia coli 50-S ribosome particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, R.; Garrett, A.

    1977-01-01

    The 5-S RNA (A) and the L 18 protein (B) from Escherichia coli ribosomes form one single AB complex in the concentration ranges supposed to prevail in vivo; at concentrations of L 18 higher than 40 mM there is some indication for a minor species, most probably an AB 2 species. This is indicated from the X-ray scattering titration data of the 5-S RNA/L 18 system recorded at 21 0 C in ribosomal reconstitution buffer. As a result of the 1 : 1 complex formation, there is a relatively small but defined increase in the radius of gyration from 3.61 to 3.85 nm. This result as well as the experimental scattering curve can be explained by models where it is assumed that the elongated L 18 model is quite far from the electron density centre and where protein L 18 interacts with one or both of the minor arms of the supposed Y-shaped 5-S RNA molecule. (orig.) [de

  5. Particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    2000-01-01

    In this article G.Charpak presents the principles on which particle detection is based. Particle accelerators are becoming more and more powerful and require new detectors able to track the right particle in a huge flux of particles. The gigantic size of detectors in high energy physics is often due to the necessity of getting a long enough trajectory in a magnetic field in order to deduce from the curvature an accurate account of impulses in the reaction. (A.C.)

  6. Strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Work done in the mid 1950s at Brookhaven National Laboratory on strange particles is described. Experiments were done on the Cosmotron. The author describes his own and others' work on neutral kaons, lambda and theta particles and points out the theoretical gap between predictions and experimental findings. By the end of the decade, the theory of strange particles was better understood. (UK)

  7. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  8. Mechanisms of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 RNA packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Na; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Dilley, Kari A

    2011-01-01

    do not support the cis-packaging hypothesis but instead indicate that trans packaging is the major mechanism of HIV-2 RNA packaging. To further characterize the mechanisms of HIV-2 RNA packaging, we visualized HIV-2 RNA in individual particles by using fluorescent protein-tagged RNA-binding proteins......Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) has been reported to have a distinct RNA packaging mechanism, referred to as cis packaging, in which Gag proteins package the RNA from which they were translated. We examined the progeny generated from dually infected cell lines that contain two HIV-2...... proviruses, one with a wild-type gag/gag-pol and the other with a mutant gag that cannot express functional Gag/Gag-Pol. Viral titers and RNA analyses revealed that mutant viral RNAs can be packaged at efficiencies comparable to that of viral RNA from which wild-type Gag/Gag-Pol is translated. These results...

  9. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...... means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including...

  10. Retroviral RNA Dimerization: From Structure to Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Dubois

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the retroviruses is a dimer composed by two homologous copies of genomic RNA (gRNA molecules of positive polarity. The dimerization process allows two gRNA molecules to be non-covalently linked together through intermolecular base-pairing. This step is critical for the viral life cycle and is highly conserved among retroviruses with the exception of spumaretroviruses. Furthermore, packaging of two gRNA copies into viral particles presents an important evolutionary advantage for immune system evasion and drug resistance. Recent studies reported RNA switches models regulating not only gRNA dimerization, but also translation and packaging, and a spatio-temporal characterization of viral gRNA dimerization within cells are now at hand. This review summarizes our current understanding on the structural features of the dimerization signals for a variety of retroviruses (HIVs, MLV, RSV, BLV, MMTV, MPMV…, the mechanisms of RNA dimer formation and functional implications in the retroviral cycle.

  11. mRNA processing in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory center on basic enzymatic reactions of RNA. Still undefined are reactions involved in the conversion of precursors of mRA (pre-mRNA) to mRNA in eukaryotes. The pre-mRNA is called heterogeneous nuclear RNA and is 2 to 6 times larger than mRNA. The conversion, called splicing, involves a removal of internal sequences called introns by endoribonuclease action followed by a rejoining of the 3'- and 5'-end fragments, called exons, by ligating activity. It has not been possible yet to study the enzymes involved in vitro. Also undefined are reactions involved in the turnover or discarding of certain of the pre-mRNA molecules. Yeast is a simple eukaryote and may be expected to have the same, but perhaps simpler, processing reactions as the higher eukaryotes. Two enzymes involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in yeast are under investigation. Both enzymes have been partially purified from ribonucleoprotein particles of yeast. The first is a unique decapping enzyme which cleaves [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp [ 14 C]RNA-poly (A) of yeast, yielding [ 3 H]m 7 GDP and is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m 7 GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed. The second enzyme is an endoribonuclease which converts both the [ 3 H] and [ 14 C] labels of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from an oligo(dT)-cellulose bound form to an unbound, acid-insoluble form. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA. The inhibition of the enzyme by ethidium bromide and its stimulation by small nuclear RNA suggest that it may be a processing ribonuclease, requiring specific double-stranded features in its substrate. The characterization of the unique decapping enzyme and endoribonuclease may help to understand reactions involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in eukaryotes

  12. Exportin-5 mediates nuclear export of SRP RNA in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiwa, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2015-04-01

    The signal recognition particle is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is essential for the translocation of nascent proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum. It has been shown that the RNA component (SRP RNA) is exported from the nucleus by CRM1 in the budding yeast. However, how SRP RNA is exported in higher species has been elusive. Here, we show that SRP RNA does not use the CRM1 pathway in Xenopus oocytes. Instead, SRP RNA uses the same export pathway as pre-miRNA and tRNA as showed by cross-competition experiments. Consistently, the recombinant Exportin-5 protein specifically stimulated export of SRP RNA as well as of pre-miRNA and tRNA, whereas an antibody raised against Exportin-5 specifically inhibited export of the same RNA species. Moreover, biotinylated SRP RNA can pull down Exportin-5 but not CRM1 from HeLa cell nuclear extracts in a RanGTP-dependent manner. These results, taken together, strongly suggest that the principal export receptor for SRP RNA in vertebrates is Exportin-5 unlike in the budding yeast. © 2015 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  14. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  15. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA:Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged......Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...

  16. Particle cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the Universe at the largest and smallest scales traditionally has been the subject of cosmology and particle physics, respectively. Studying the evolution of the Universe connects today's large scales with the tiny scales in the very early Universe and provides the link between the physics of particles and of the cosmos. This series of five lectures aims at a modern and critical presentation of the basic ideas, methods, models and observations in today's particle cosmology.

  17. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  18. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook teaches particle physics very didactically. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams lead to a better understanding of the explanations. The content of the book covers all important topics of particle physics: Elementary particles are classified from the point of view of the four fundamental interactions. The nomenclature used in particle physics is explained. The discoveries and properties of known elementary particles and resonances are given. The particles considered are positrons, muon, pions, anti-protons, strange particles, neutrino and hadrons. The conservation laws governing the interactions of elementary particles are given. The concepts of parity, spin, charge conjugation, time reversal and gauge invariance are explained. The quark theory is introduced to explain the hadron structure and strong interactions. The solar neutrino problem is considered. Weak interactions are classified into various types, and the selection rules are stated. Non-conservation of parity and the universality of the weak interactions are discussed. Neutral and charged currents, discovery of W and Z bosons and the early universe form important topics of the electroweak interactions. The principles of high energy accelerators including colliders are elaborately explained. Additionally, in the book detectors used in nuclear and particle physics are described. This book is on the upper undergraduate level.

  19. Magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  20. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when po...

  1. High-throughput determination of RNA structure by proximity ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Vijay; Qiu, Ruolan; Shendure, Jay

    2015-09-01

    We present an unbiased method to globally resolve RNA structures through pairwise contact measurements between interacting regions. RNA proximity ligation (RPL) uses proximity ligation of native RNA followed by deep sequencing to yield chimeric reads with ligation junctions in the vicinity of structurally proximate bases. We apply RPL in both baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human cells and generate contact probability maps for ribosomal and other abundant RNAs, including yeast snoRNAs, the RNA subunit of the signal recognition particle and the yeast U2 spliceosomal RNA homolog. RPL measurements correlate with established secondary structures for these RNA molecules, including stem-loop structures and long-range pseudoknots. We anticipate that RPL will complement the current repertoire of computational and experimental approaches in enabling the high-throughput determination of secondary and tertiary RNA structures.

  2. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  3. Particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, R.I.

    1976-01-01

    Charged particles are entrained in a predetermined direction, independent of their polarity, in a circular orbit by a magnetic field rotating at high speed about an axis in a closed cylindrical or toroidal vessel. The field may be generated by a cylindrical laser structure, whose beam is polygonally reflected from the walls of an excited cavity centered on the axis, or by high-frequency energization of a set of electromagnets perpendicular to the axis. In the latter case, a separate magnetostatic axial field limits the orbital radius of the particles. These rotating and stationary magnetic fields may be generated centrally or by individual magnets peripherally spaced along its circular orbit. Chemical or nuclear reactions can be induced by collisions between the orbiting particles and an injected reactant, or by diverting high-speed particles from one doughnut into the path of counterrotating particles in an adjoining doughnut

  4. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    of the transcriptome, 5’ end capture of RNA is combined with next-generation sequencing for high-throughput quantitative assessment of transcription start sites by two different methods. The methods presented here allow for functional investigation of coding as well as noncoding RNA and contribute to future...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA...

  5. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation

  6. Micro RNA in Exosomes from HIV-Infected Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Roth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membrane-bound vesicles secreted by cells that function to shuttle RNA and proteins between cells. To examine the role of exosomal micro RNA (miRNA during the early stage of HIV-1 infection we characterized miRNA in exosomes from HIV-infected macrophages, compared with exosomes from non-infected macrophages. Primary human monocytes from uninfected donors were differentiated to macrophages (MDM which were either mock-infected or infected with the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 BaL strain. Exosomes were recovered from culture media and separated from virus particles by centrifugation on iodixanol density gradients. The low molecular weight RNA fraction was prepared from purified exosomes. After pre-amplification, RNA was hybridized to microarrays containing probes for 1200 miRNA species of known and unknown function. We observed 48 miRNA species in both infected and uninfected MDM exosomes. Additionally, 38 miRNAs were present in infected-cell exosomes but not uninfected-cell exosomes. Of these, 13 miRNAs were upregulated in exosomes from HIV-infected cells, including 4 miRNA species that were increased by more than 10-fold. Though numerous miRNA species have been identified in HIV-infected cells, relatively little is known about miRNA content in exosomes from these cells. In the future, we plan to investigate whether the upregulated miRNA species we identified are increased in exosomes from HIV-1-positive patients.

  7. Heavy ion effects on yeast: Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, K.J.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.

    1990-01-01

    Diploid wild-type yeast cells were exposed to beams of heavy ions covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) (43-13,700 keV/microns). Synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was assessed as a functional measure of damage produced by particle radiation. An exponential decrease of relative rRNA synthesis with particle fluence was demonstrated in all cases. The inactivation cross sections derived were found to increase with LET over the entire range of LET studied. The corresponding values for relative biological effectiveness were slightly less than unity. Maximum cross sections measured were close to 1 micron 2, implying that some larger structure within the yeast nucleus (e.g., the nucleolus) might represent the target for an impairment of synthetic activity by very heavy ions rather than the genes coding for rRNA. Where tested, an oxygen effect for rRNA synthesis could not be demonstrated

  8. A glimpse at mRNA dynamics reveals cellular domains and rapid trafficking through granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, Alice Myriam Christi van

    2011-01-01

    mRNA transport and targeting are essential to gene expression regulation. Specific mRNA sequences can bind several proteins and together form RiboNucleoProtein particles (RNP). The various proteins within the RNP determine mRNA fate: translation, transport or decay. RNP composition varies with

  9. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen

    1992-01-01

    We shall discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection (including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a few ideas on future developments.

  10. Studies on the Virome of the Entomopathogenic Fungus Beauveria bassiana Reveal Novel dsRNA Elements and Mild Hypervirulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Coutts, Robert H A

    2017-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has a wide host range and is used as a biocontrol agent against arthropod pests. Mycoviruses have been described in phytopathogenic fungi while in entomopathogenic fungi their presence has been reported only rarely. Here we show that 21.3% of a collection of B. bassiana isolates sourced from worldwide locations, harbor dsRNA elements. Molecular characterization of these elements revealed the prevalence of mycoviruses belonging to the Partitiviridae and Totiviridae families, the smallest reported virus to date, belonging to the family Narnaviridae, and viruses unassigned to a family or genus. Of particular importance is the discovery of members of a newly proposed family Polymycoviridae in B. bassiana. Polymycoviruses, previously designated as tetramycoviruses, consist of four non-conventionally encapsidated capped dsRNAs. The presence of additional non-homologous genomic segments in B. bassiana polymycoviruses and other fungi illustrates the unprecedented dynamic nature of the viral genome. Finally, a comparison of virus-free and virus-infected isogenic lines derived from an exemplar B. bassiana isolate revealed a mild hypervirulent effect of mycoviruses on the growth of their host isolate and on its pathogenicity against the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella, highlighting for the first time the potential of mycoviruses as enhancers of biocontrol agents.

  11. Auroral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries

  12. Elementary particles and particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethge, K.; Schroeder, U.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a textbook for an introductory course of elementary particle physics. After a general introduction the symmetry principles governing the interactions of elementary particles are discussed. Then the phenomenology of the electroweak and strong interactions are described together with a short introduction to the Weinberg-Salam theory respectively to quantum chromodynamics. Finally a short outlook is given to grand unification with special regards to SU(5) and cosmology in the framework of the current understanding of the fundamental principles of nature. In the appendix is a table of particle properties and physical constants. (HSI) [de

  13. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  14. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned.

  15. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mR...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs.......Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...

  16. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Joram, Christian; CERN. Geneva

    1991-01-01

    Lecture 5: Detector characteristics: ALEPH Experiment cut through the devices and events - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operartion and a few ideas on the future performance. Lecture 4-pt. b Following the Scintillators. Lecture 4-pt. a : Scintillators - Used for: -Timing (TOF, Trigger) - Energy Measurement (Calorimeters) - Tracking (Fibres) Basic scintillation processes- Inorganic Scintillators - Organic Scintil - Discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection ( including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a fiew ideas on future developpement session 3 - part. b Following Calorimeters lecture 3-pt. a Calorimeters - determine energy E by total absorption of charged or neutral particles - fraction of E is transformed into measurable quantities - try to acheive sig...

  18. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  19. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  20. On the conformational stability of the smallest RNA kissing complexes maintained through two G·C base pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Wally; Weerasekera, Akila; Kim, Chul-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Two identical 5′GACG3′ tetra-loop motifs with different stem sequences (called H2 and H3) are found in the 5′ end region of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MMLV) genomic RNA. They play important roles in RNA dimerization and encapsidation through two identical tetra-loops (5′GACG3′) forming a loop-to-loop kissing complex, the smallest RNA kissing complex ever found in nature. We examined the effects of a loop-closing base pair as well as a stem sequence on the conformational stability of the kissing complex. UV melting analysis and gel electrophoresis were performed on eight RNA sequences mimicking the H2 and H3 hairpin tetra-loops with variation in loop-closing base pairs. Our results show that changing the loop-closing base pair from the wildtype (5′A·U3′ for H3, 5′U·A3′ for H2) to 5′G·C3’/5′C·G3′ has significant effect on the stability of the kissing complexes: the substitution to 5′C·G3′ significantly decreases both thermal and mechanical stability, while switching to the 5′G·C3′ significantly increases the mechanical stability only. The kissing complexes with the wildtype loop-closing base pairs (5′A·U3′ for H3 and 5′U·A3′ for H2) show different stability when attached to a different stem sequence (H2 stem vs. H3 stem). This suggests that not only the loop-closing base pair itself, but also the stem sequence, affects the conformational stability of the RNA kissing complex. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic parameters of the smallest RNA kissing interactions were measured. • The effects of loop-closing base pairs on the RNA kissing complex was investigated. • Changing the base pair to 5′CG3′ decreases the stability of the kissing complex. • Changing it to 5′GC3′ increases the mechanical resilience of the kissing complex. • Difference in its stem sequence also affects the stability of the kissing complex.

  1. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  2. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    , regulation of the blood brain barrier and glial scar tissue formation. Despite the involvement in various CNS functions only a limited number of studies have addressed mRNA localization in astrocytes. This PhD project was initially focused on developing and implementing methods that could be used to asses mRNA......Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation...... localization in astrocyte protrusions, and following look into the subcellular localization pattern of specific mRNA species of both primary astrocytes isolated from cortical hemispheres of newborn mice, and the mouse astrocyte cell line, C8S. The Boyden chamber cell fractionation assay was optimized, in a way...

  3. Elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, R.

    1984-01-01

    Two previous monographs report on investigations into the extent to which a unified field theory can satisfactorily describe physical reality. The first, Unified field Theory, showed that the paths within a non-Riemannian space are governed by eigenvalue equations. The second, Fundamental Constants, show that the field tensors satisfy sets of differential equations with solutions which represent the evolution of the fields along the paths of the space. The results from the first two monographs are used in this one to make progress on the theory of elementary particles. The five chapters are as follows - Quantum mechanics, gravitation and electromagnetism are aspects of the Unified theory; the fields inside the particle; the quadratic and linear theories; the calculation of the eigenvalues and elementary particles as stable configurations of interacting fields. It is shown that it is possible to construct an internal structure theory for elementary particles. The theory lies within the framework of Einstein's programme-to identify physical reality with a specified geometrical structure. (U.K.)

  4. Pinpointing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The Conference on Position-Sensitive Detectors held at London's University College from 7-11 September highlighted the importance and the growing applications of these precision devices in many branches of science, underlining once again the high spinoff potential for techniques developed inside particle physics

  5. Particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mais, H.; Ripken, G.; Wrulich, A.; Schmidt, F.

    1986-02-01

    After a brief description of typical applications of particle tracking in storage rings and after a short discussion of some limitations and problems related with tracking we summarize some concepts and methods developed in the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. We show how these concepts can be applied to the proton ring HERA. (orig.)

  6. Pinpointing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David J.

    1987-10-15

    The Conference on Position-Sensitive Detectors held at London's University College from 7-11 September highlighted the importance and the growing applications of these precision devices in many branches of science, underlining once again the high spinoff potential for techniques developed inside particle physics.

  7. Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    While biomedicine and geoscience use grids to bring together many different sub-disciplines, particle physicists use grid computing to increase computing power and storage resources, and to access and analyze vast amounts of data collected from detectors at the world's most powerful accelerators (1 page)

  8. Functional gene silencing mediated by chitosan/siRNA nanocomplexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, A M; Su, D; Che, O; Li, W S; Sun, L; Zhang, Z Y; Xu, F [Department of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Yang, B, E-mail: andrewfxu1998@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles to knock down FHL2 gene expression were reported in this work. The physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface charge, morphology and complex stability of chitosan nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA were evaluated. Nanoparticles which were formulated with chitosan/siRNA exhibited irregular, lamellar and dendritic structures with a hydrodynamic radius size of about 148 nm and net positive charges with zeta-potential value of 58.5 mV. The knockdown effect of the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles on gene expression in FHL2 over-expressed human colorectal cancer Lovo cells was investigated. The result showed that FHL2 siRNA formulated within chitosan nanoparticles could knock down about 69.6% FHL2 gene expression, which is very similar to the 68.8% reduced gene expression when siRNA was transfected with liposome Lipofectamine. Western analysis further showed significant FHL-2 protein expression reduced by the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. The results also showed that blocking FHL2 expression by siRNA could also inhibit the growth and proliferation of human colorectal cancer Lovo cells. The current results demonstrated that chitosan-based siRNA nanoparticles were a very efficient delivery system for siRNA in vivo as previously reported.

  9. Functional gene silencing mediated by chitosan/siRNA nanocomplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, A M; Su, D; Che, O; Li, W S; Sun, L; Zhang, Z Y; Xu, F; Yang, B

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles to knock down FHL2 gene expression were reported in this work. The physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface charge, morphology and complex stability of chitosan nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA were evaluated. Nanoparticles which were formulated with chitosan/siRNA exhibited irregular, lamellar and dendritic structures with a hydrodynamic radius size of about 148 nm and net positive charges with zeta-potential value of 58.5 mV. The knockdown effect of the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles on gene expression in FHL2 over-expressed human colorectal cancer Lovo cells was investigated. The result showed that FHL2 siRNA formulated within chitosan nanoparticles could knock down about 69.6% FHL2 gene expression, which is very similar to the 68.8% reduced gene expression when siRNA was transfected with liposome Lipofectamine. Western analysis further showed significant FHL-2 protein expression reduced by the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. The results also showed that blocking FHL2 expression by siRNA could also inhibit the growth and proliferation of human colorectal cancer Lovo cells. The current results demonstrated that chitosan-based siRNA nanoparticles were a very efficient delivery system for siRNA in vivo as previously reported.

  10. SL1 revisited: functional analysis of the structure and conformation of HIV-1 genome RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuragi, Sayuri; Yokoyama, Masaru; Shioda, Tatsuo; Sato, Hironori; Sakuragi, Jun-Ichi

    2016-11-11

    The dimer initiation site/dimer linkage sequence (DIS/DLS) region of HIV is located on the 5' end of the viral genome and suggested to form complex secondary/tertiary structures. Within this structure, stem-loop 1 (SL1) is believed to be most important and an essential key to dimerization, since the sequence and predicted secondary structure of SL1 are highly stable and conserved among various virus subtypes. In particular, a six-base palindromic sequence is always present at the hairpin loop of SL1 and the formation of kissing-loop structure at this position between the two strands of genomic RNA is suggested to trigger dimerization. Although the higher-order structure model of SL1 is well accepted and perhaps even undoubted lately, there could be stillroom for consideration to depict the functional SL1 structure while in vivo (in virion or cell). In this study, we performed several analyses to identify the nucleotides and/or basepairing within SL1 which are necessary for HIV-1 genome dimerization, encapsidation, recombination and infectivity. We unexpectedly found that some nucleotides that are believed to contribute the formation of the stem do not impact dimerization or infectivity. On the other hand, we found that one G-C basepair involved in stem formation may serve as an alternative dimer interactive site. We also report on our further investigation of the roles of the palindromic sequences on viral replication. Collectively, we aim to assemble a more-comprehensive functional map of SL1 on the HIV-1 viral life cycle. We discovered several possibilities for a novel structure of SL1 in HIV-1 DLS. The newly proposed structure model suggested that the hairpin loop of SL1 appeared larger, and genome dimerization process might consist of more complicated mechanism than previously understood. Further investigations would be still required to fully understand the genome packaging and dimerization of HIV.

  11. RNA secondary structures of the bacteriophage phi6 packaging regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttimaa, M J; Bamford, D H

    2000-06-01

    Bacteriophage phi6 genome consists of three segments of double-stranded RNA. During maturation, single-stranded copies of these segments are packaged into preformed polymerase complex particles. Only phi6 RNA is packaged, and each particle contains only one copy of each segment. An in vitro packaging and replication assay has been developed for phi6, and the packaging signals (pac sites) have been mapped to the 5' ends of the RNA segments. In this study, we propose secondary structure models for the pac sites of phi6 single-stranded RNA segments. Our models accommodate data from structure-specific chemical modifications, free energy minimizations, and phylogenetic comparisons. Previously reported pac site deletion studies are also discussed. Each pac site possesses a unique architecture, that, however, contains common structural elements.

  12. Assembling RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanoparticles are designed and self-assembled according to noncanonical interactions of naturally conserved RNA motifs and/or canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, which have potential applications in gene therapy and nanomedicine. These artificially engineered nanoparticles are mainly synthesized from in vitro transcribed RNAs, purified by denaturing and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and characterized with native PAGE, AFM, and TEM technologies. The protocols of in vitro transcription, denaturing and native PAGE, and RNA nanoparticle self-assembly are described in detail.

  13. Short Hairpin RNA (shRNA): Design, Delivery, and Assessment of Gene Knockdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Chris B.; Guthrie, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Max Tze-Han; Taxman, Debra J.

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the cellular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi) was first described, scientists began using this powerful technique to study gene function. This included designing better methods for the successful delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into mammalian cells. While the simplest method for RNAi is the cytosolic delivery of siRNA oligonucleotides, this technique is limited to cells capable of transfection and is primarily utilized during transient in vitro studies. The introduction of shRNA into mammalian cells through infection with viral vectors allows for stable integration of shRNA and long-term knockdown of the targeted gene; however, several challenges exist with the implementation of this technology. Here we describe some well-tested protocols which should increase the chances of successful design, delivery, and assessment of gene knockdown by shRNA. We provide suggestions for designing shRNA targets and controls, a protocol for sequencing through the secondary structure of the shRNA hairpin structure, and protocols for packaging and delivery of shRNA lentiviral particles. Using real-time PCR and functional assays we demonstrate the successful knockdown of ASC, an inflammatory adaptor molecule. These studies demonstrate the practicality of including two shRNAs with different efficacies of knockdown to provide an additional level of control and to verify dose dependency of functional effects. Along with the methods described here, as new techniques and algorithms are designed in the future, shRNA is likely to include further promising application and continue to be a critical component of gene discovery. PMID:20387148

  14. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  15. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  16. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response correlates with neutrophil influx linking inhaled particles and cardiovascular risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lamson, Jacob Stuart; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the mRNA expression of Serum Amyloid A (Saa3) in lung tissue from female C57BL/6J mice exposed to different particles including nanomaterials (carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles, multi- and single walled carbon nanotubes), diesel exhaust particles and airborne dust collected...... at a biofuel plant. Mice were exposed to single or multiple doses of particles by inhalation or intratracheal instillation and pulmonary mRNA expression of Saa3 was determined at different time points of up to 4 weeks after exposure. Also hepatic mRNA expression of Saa3, SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar...... lavage fluid and in plasma and high density lipoprotein levels in plasma were determined in mice exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Results Pulmonary exposure to particles strongly increased Saa3 mRNA levels in lung tissue and elevated SAA3 protein levels in broncheoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma...

  17. Hot particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensees are required to assess the dose to skin from a hot particle contamination event at a depth of skin of7mg/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 and compare the value to the current dose limit for the skin. Although the resulting number is interesting from a comparative standpoint and can be used to predict local skin reactions, comparison of the number to existing limits based on uniform exposures is inappropriate. Most incidents that can be classified as overexposures based on this interpretation of dose actually have no effect on the health of the worker. As a result, resources are expended to reduce the likelihood that an overexposure event will occur when they could be directed toward eliminating the cause of the problem or enhancing existing programs such as contamination control. Furthermore, from a risk standpoint, this practice is not ALARA because some workers receive whole body doses in order to minimize the occurrence of hot particle skin contaminations. In this paper the authors suggest an alternative approach to controlling hot particle exposures

  18. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  19. Remote Network Access (RNA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Remote Network Access (RNA) includes or is associated with all communication devices/software, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and virus protection applications to ensure security of the OIG, DoD, Network from remote...

  20. RNA/PNA Approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this approach we want to develop structural analogue of the leader that might have higher affinity towards the Phosphoprotein, but would impair the dimerization process and viral leader RNA binding.

  1. Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis in yeast by ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, K; Kiefer, J [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenzentrum

    1984-12-01

    Synthesis of ribosomal RNA(r-RNA) was measured for 1 h after exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ..gamma..-rays, X-rays or ..cap alpha.. particles. ..gamma..- or X-ray induced transcription inhibition was always found to decrease exponentially with dose. D/sub 0/ values of 2150 or 1950 Gy were determined in wild-type cells, corresponding to a mean energy of about 60 eV per r-RNA gene. The finding of differential sensitivities of the two high molecular-weight r-RNA species which are cotranscribed from r-DNA is compatible with the existence of a transcription terminating mechanism. Cells from a mutant strain (rad-9), radiation sensitive to colony forming ability, showed an approximately equal sensitivity for transcription inhibition compared to the wild-type (D/sub 0/ (2095) = 2400 Gy). Inactivation of r-RNA synthesis in cells exposed to ..cap alpha..-particles at room-temperature showed a decreased sensitivity with higher particle fluences ('resistant tail'). This phenomenon was drastically reduced if the temperature during irradiation was lowered to 4/sup 0/C and completely abolished when dried cells were used. An inactivation cross-section for ..cap alpha..-particle induced transcription inhibition of about 0.02 ..mu..m/sup 2/ can be derived from the experimental data.

  2. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of its...

  3. Fluctuations and synchrony of RNA synthesis in nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V; Baev, Alexander; Berezney, Ronald; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-06-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences are synthesized at exceptionally high rates and, together with ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), are utilized as building blocks for the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. Although it is widely acknowledged that tight regulation and coordination of rRNA and r-protein production are fundamentally important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, still little is known about the real-time kinetics of the ribosome component synthesis in individual cells. In this communication we introduce a label-free MicroRaman spectrometric approach for monitoring rRNA synthesis in live cultured cells. Remarkably high and rapid fluctuations of rRNA production rates were revealed by this technique. Strikingly, the changes in the rRNA output were synchronous for ribosomal genes located in separate nucleoli of the same cell. Our findings call for the development of new concepts to elucidate the coordination of ribosomal components production. In this regard, numerical modeling further demonstrated that the production of rRNA and r-proteins can be coordinated, regardless of the fluctuations in rRNA synthesis. Overall, our quantitative data reveal a spectacular interplay of inherently stochastic rates of RNA synthesis and the coordination of gene expression.

  4. New particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, A.

    1980-07-01

    Current state of art in the discovery of new elementary particles is reviewed. At present, quarks and mesons are accepted as the basic constituents of matter. The charmonium model (canti-c system), and the 'open charm' are discussed. Explanations are offered for the recent discovery of the heavy lepton tau. Quark states such as the beauty and taste are also dealt with at length. The properties of the tanti-t bound system are speculated. It is concluded that the understanding of canti-c and banti-b families is facilitated by the assumption of the quarkonium model. Implications at the astrophysical level are indicated.

  5. Particle Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    * Assumes no prior knowledge* Adopts a modelling approach* Numerous tutorial problems, worked examples and exercises included* Elementary topics augmented by planetary motion and rotating framesThis text provides an invaluable introduction to mechanicsm confining attention to the motion of a particle. It begins with a full discussion of the foundations of the subject within the context of mathematical modelling before covering more advanced topics including the theory of planetary orbits and the use of rotating frames of reference. Truly introductory , the style adoped is perfect for those u

  6. Direct interaction between two viral proteins, the nonstructural protein 2C and the capsid protein VP3, is required for enterovirus morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades-long studies, the mechanism of morphogenesis of plus-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the genus Enterovirus of Picornaviridae, including poliovirus (PV, is not understood. Numerous attempts to identify an RNA encapsidation signal have failed. Genetic studies, however, have implicated a role of the non-structural protein 2C(ATPase in the formation of poliovirus particles. Here we report a novel mechanism in which protein-protein interaction is sufficient to explain the specificity in PV encapsidation. Making use of a novel "reporter virus", we show that a quasi-infectious chimera consisting of the capsid precursor of C-cluster coxsackie virus 20 (C-CAV20 and the nonstructural proteins of the closely related PV translated and replicated its genome with wild type kinetics, whereas encapsidation was blocked. On blind passages, encapsidation of the chimera was rescued by a single mutation either in capsid protein VP3 of CAV20 or in 2C(ATPase of PV. Whereas each of the single-mutation variants expressed severe proliferation phenotypes, engineering both mutations into the chimera yielded a virus encapsidating with wild type kinetics. Biochemical analyses provided strong evidence for a direct interaction between 2C(ATPase and VP3 of PV and CAV20. Chimeras of other C-CAVs (CAV20/CAV21 or CAV18/CAV20 were blocked in encapsidation (no virus after blind passages but could be rescued if the capsid and 2C(ATPase coding regions originated from the same virus. Our novel mechanism explains the specificity of encapsidation without apparent involvement of an RNA signal by considering that (i genome replication is known to be stringently linked to translation, (ii morphogenesis is known to be stringently linked to genome replication, (iii newly synthesized 2C(ATPase is an essential component of the replication complex, and (iv 2C(ATPase has specific affinity to capsid protein(s. These conditions lead to morphogenesis at the site where newly

  7. A ribosome without RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold S Bernhardt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It was Francis Crick who first asked why the ribosome contains so much RNA, and discussed the implications of this for the direct flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. Remarkable advances in our understanding of the ribosome and protein synthesis, including the recent publication of two mammalian mitochondrial ribosome structures, have shed new light on this intriguing aspect of evolution in molecular biology. We examine here whether RNA is indispensable for coded protein synthesis, or whether an all-protein ‘ribosome’ (or ‘synthosome’ might be possible, with a protein enzyme catalyzing peptide synthesis, and release factor-like protein adaptors able to read a message composed of deoxyribonucleotides. We also compare the RNA world hypothesis with the alternative ‘proteins first’ hypothesis in terms of their different understandings of the evolution of the ribosome, and whether this might have been preceded by an ancestral form of nonribosomal peptide synthesis catalyzed by protein enzymes.

  8. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatterer, Jörg C.; Wieder, Matthew S.; Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois; Brenowitz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated · OH footprinting. ► Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. ► High · OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels–Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ( · OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS 2 ) can produce sufficient · OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels–Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C–C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme’s active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels–Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to · OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop’s flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated · OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  9. Translation of the flavivirus kunjin NS3 gene in cis but not its RNA sequence or secondary structure is essential for efficient RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijlman, Gorben P; Kondratieva, Natasha; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2006-11-01

    Our previous studies using trans-complementation analysis of Kunjin virus (KUN) full-length cDNA clones harboring in-frame deletions in the NS3 gene demonstrated the inability of these defective complemented RNAs to be packaged into virus particles (W. J. Liu, P. L. Sedlak, N. Kondratieva, and A. A. Khromykh, J. Virol. 76:10766-10775). In this study we aimed to establish whether this requirement for NS3 in RNA packaging is determined by the secondary RNA structure of the NS3 gene or by the essential role of the translated NS3 gene product. Multiple silent mutations of three computer-predicted stable RNA structures in the NS3 coding region of KUN replicon RNA aimed at disrupting RNA secondary structure without affecting amino acid sequence did not affect RNA replication and packaging into virus-like particles in the packaging cell line, thus demonstrating that the predicted conserved RNA structures in the NS3 gene do not play a role in RNA replication and/or packaging. In contrast, double frameshift mutations in the NS3 coding region of full-length KUN RNA, producing scrambled NS3 protein but retaining secondary RNA structure, resulted in the loss of ability of these defective RNAs to be packaged into virus particles in complementation experiments in KUN replicon-expressing cells. Furthermore, the more robust complementation-packaging system based on established stable cell lines producing large amounts of complemented replicating NS3-deficient replicon RNAs and infection with KUN virus to provide structural proteins also failed to detect any secreted virus-like particles containing packaged NS3-deficient replicon RNAs. These results have now firmly established the requirement of KUN NS3 protein translated in cis for genome packaging into virus particles.

  10. RNA Regulation of Estrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Berglund, Rodger Voelker, Paul Barber and Julien Diegel 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...estrogen  receptors  [reviewed  in  (3,  4)],  also   functions   by  interacting  directly  with  RNA  to  alter  RNA...Mog myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 6.06 207115_x_at mbtd1 mbt domain containing 1 6.06 208004_at Prol1 proline rich, lacrimal 1 6.06 205247_at

  11. RNA Regulation by Estrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Julien Diegel, Amy Mahady, and Micah Bodner 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: aberglund@molbio.uoregon.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...4)],  also   functions   by  interacting  directly  with  RNA  to  alter  RNA  processing  events  such  as  splicing...1 6.06 208004_at Prol1 proline rich, lacrimal 1 6.06 205247_at NOTCH4 Notch homolog 4 (Drosophila) 6.06 211203_s_at Cntn1 contactin 1 6.06 220689_at

  12. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways.......Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...

  13. Fermilab | Particle Physics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Science Science Particle Physics Neutrinos Scientific Computing Research & Development Key Discoveries Benefits of Particle Physics Particle Superconducting Test Accelerator LHC and Future Accelerators Accelerators for Science and Society Particle Physics

  14. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andronescu Mirela

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand.

  15. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  16. Branched RNA: A New Architecture for RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Branched RNAs with two and four strands were synthesized. These structures were used to obtain branched siRNA. The branched siRNA duplexes had similar inhibitory capacity as those of unmodified siRNA duplexes, as deduced from gene silencing experiments of the TNF-α protein. Branched RNAs are considered novel structures for siRNA technology, and they provide an innovative tool for specific gene inhibition. As the method described here is compatible with most RNA modifications described to date, these compounds may be further functionalized to obtain more potent siRNA derivatives and can be attached to suitable delivery systems.

  17. The RNA gene information: retroelement-microRNA entangling as the RNA quantum code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yoichi Robertus

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and retroelements may be a master of regulator in our life, which are evolutionally involved in the origin of species. To support the Darwinism from the aspect of molecular evolution process, it has tremendously been interested in the molecular information of naive RNA. The RNA wave model 2000 consists of four concepts that have altered from original idea of the miRNA genes for crosstalk among embryonic stem cells, their niche cells, and retroelements as a carrier vesicle of the RNA genes. (1) the miRNA gene as a mobile genetic element induces transcriptional and posttranscriptional silencing via networking-processes (no hierarchical architecture); (2) the RNA information supplied by the miRNA genes expands to intracellular, intercellular, intraorgan, interorgan, intraspecies, and interspecies under the cycle of life into the global environment; (3) the mobile miRNAs can self-proliferate; and (4) cells contain two types information as resident and genomic miRNAs. Based on RNA wave, we have developed an interest in investigation of the transformation from RNA information to quantum bits as physicochemical characters of RNA with the measurement of RNA electron spin. When it would have been given that the fundamental bases for the acquired characters in genetics can be controlled by RNA gene information, it may be available to apply for challenging against RNA gene diseases, such as stress-induced diseases.

  18. Association of protein C23 with rapidly labeled nucleolar RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, A.H.; Olson, M.O.

    1986-01-01

    The association of nucleolar phosphoprotein C23 with preribosomal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles was examined in Novikoff hepatoma nucleoli. RNA was labeled with [ 3 H]uridine for various times in cell suspensions, and RNP particles were extracted from isolated nucleoli and fractionated by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The majority of protein C23 cosedimented with fractions containing rapidly labeled RNA (RL fraction). To determine whether there was a direct association of RNA with protein C23, the RL fraction was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (254 nm) for short periods of time. After 2 min of exposure there was a 50% decrease in C23 as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, with no significant further decrease at longer times. When UV-treated fractions were subjected to phenol/chloroform extractions, as much as 30% of the labeled RNA was found in the phenol (protein) layer, indicating that RNA became cross-linked to protein. Similarly, there was an increase in protein C23 extracted into the water layer after irradiation. By SDS-PAGE analyses the cross-linked species migrated more slowly than protein C23, appearing as a smear detected either by [ 3 H]uridine radioactivity or by anti-C23 antibody. With anti-C23 antibodies, up to 25% of the labeled RNA was precipitated from the RL fraction. Dot-blot hybridizations, using cloned rDNA fragments as probes, indicated that the RNA in the RL fraction and the immunoprecipitated RNA contained sequences from 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA

  19. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Mäkinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and

  20. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Lõhmus, Andres; Pollari, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and their individual

  1. Negative-strand RNA viruses: The plant-infecting counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, R.J.M.; Garcia, M.L.; Goodin, M.; Sasaya, T.; Haenni, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome

  2. Particle kickers

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    These devices are designed to provide a current pulse of 5000 Amps which will in turn generate a fast magnetic pulse that steers the incoming beam into the LHC. Today, the comprehensive upgrade of the LHC injection kicker system is entering its final stages. The upgraded system will ensure the LHC can be refilled without needing to wait for the kicker magnets to cool, thus enhancing the performance of the whole accelerator.   An upgraded kicker magnet in its vacuum tank, with an upgraded beam screen. The LHC is equipped with two kicker systems installed at the injection points (near points 2 and 8, see schematic diagram) where the particle beams coming from the SPS are injected into the accelerator’s orbit. Each system comprises four magnets and four pulse generators in which the field rises to 0.12 Tesla in less than 900 nanoseconds and for a duration of approximately 8 microseconds. Although the injection kickers only pulse 12 times to fill the LHC up with beam, the LHC beam circ...

  3. RNA-Catalyzed Polymerization and Replication of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, D. P.; Samantha, B.; Tjhung, K. F.; Joyce, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to reconstruct RNA-based life, in vitro evolution was used to obtain an RNA polymerase ribozyme that can synthesize a variety of complex functional RNAs and can catalyze the exponential amplification of short RNAs.

  4. Towards Defined DNA and RNA Delivery Vehicles Using Nucleic Acid Nanotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Anders Hauge; Schaffert, David Henning; Kjems, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Both DNA and RNA nanostructures show exceptional programmability, modularity, and self-assembly ability. Using DNA or RNA molecules it is possible to assemble monodisperse particles that are homogeneous in size and shape and with identical positioning of surface modifications. For therapeutic app...

  5. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more...... sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  6. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double

  7. RNA Interference - Towards RNA becoming a Medicine -42 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research. A brief history of the development ofRNAi is shown in. Box 2. Mechanism of ... new RNA strand using target RNA as the template and thereby converting it ... thought to excise precursor stRNA from their -70 nt stem loop precursor to ...

  8. Comparative RNA genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last two decades it has become clear that RNA is much more than just a boring intermediate in protein expression. Ancient RNAs still appear in the core information metabolism and comprise a surprisingly large component in bacterial gene regulation. A common theme with these types of mostly...... small RNAs is their reliance of conserved secondary structures. Large scale sequencing projects, on the other hand, have profoundly changed our understanding of eukaryotic genomes. Pervasively transcribed, they give rise to a plethora of large and evolutionarily extremely flexible noncoding RNAs...... that exert a vastly diverse array of molecule functions. In this chapter we provide a—necessarily incomplete—overview of the current state of comparative analysis of noncoding RNAs, emphasizing computational approaches as a means to gain a global picture of the modern RNA world....

  9. The content of DNA and RNA in microparticles released by Jurkat and HL-60 cells undergoing in vitro apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, Charles F.; Pisetsky, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Microparticles are small membrane-bound vesicles that are released from apoptotic cells during blebbing. These particles contain DNA and RNA and display important functional activities, including immune system activation. Furthermore, nucleic acids inside the particle can be analyzed as biomarkers in a variety of disease states. To elucidate the nature of microparticle nucleic acids, DNA and RNA released in microparticles from the Jurkat T and HL-60 promyelocytic cell lines undergoing apoptosis in vitro were studied. Microparticles were isolated from culture media by differential centrifugation and characterized by flow cytometry and molecular approaches. In these particles, DNA showed laddering by gel electrophoresis and was present in a form that allowed direct binding by a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody, suggesting antigen accessibility even without fixation. Analysis of RNA by gel electrophoresis showed intact 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA bands, although lower molecular bands consistent with 28s ribosomal RNA degradation products were also present. Particles also contained messenger RNA as shown by RT-PCR amplification of sequences for β-actin and GAPDH. In addition, gel electrophoresis showed the presence of low molecular weight RNA in the size range of microRNA. Together, these results indicate that microparticles from apoptotic Jurkat and HL-60 cells contain diverse nucleic acid species, indicating translocation of both nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA and RNA as particle release occurs during death

  10. MicroRNA from tuberculosis RNA: A bioinformatics study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The role of microRNA in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis is the interesting topic in chest medicine at present. Recently, it was proposed that the microRNA can be a useful biomarker for monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis and might be the important part in pathogenesis of disease. Here, the authors perform a bioinformatics study to assess the microRNA within known tuberculosis RNA. The microRNA part can be detected and this can be important key information in further study of the p...

  11. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to 32 P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K a for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 x 10 9 M -1 . The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3' end of the genome with a K a similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3' noncoding region

  12. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5' 32 P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52 0 C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  13. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes.

  14. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  15. Peptidomimetics with beta-peptoid resudies as carriers for intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    cytometry. We conclude that simple complex formation via electrostatic interactions between siRNA and the cationic peptidomimetics is not sufficient for the delivery of siRNA to the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in the cytoplasm. We are currently testing chemical conjugates of si...... prepared by mixing and characterized with respect to size and surface charge. At ratios of peptide nitrogen to siRNA phosphate (N/P) of 1 and below, particles with narrow size distributions (poly dispersity indexes lower than 0.11) ranging from approximately 100 to 350 nm were formed, and they showed...... a negative zeta potential (-24 to -31 mV). At higher N/P ratios, larger aggregates with zeta potential close to neutral were formed. However, the complexes were not able to silence the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in HeLa-cells stably expressing EGFP, which was measured by flow...

  16. RNA meets disease in paradise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia; Roth, Anna; Diederichs, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Getting off the train in Jena-Paradies, 60 participants joined for the 12 (th) Young Scientist Meeting of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ) entitled "RNA & Disease". Excellent speakers from around the world, graduate students, postdocs and young group leaders enjoyed a meeting in a familiar atmosphere to exchange inspiring new data and vibrant scientific discussions about the fascinating history and exciting future of non-coding RNA research including microRNA, piRNA and long non-coding RNA as well as their function in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Characterization of an internal ribosomal entry segment within the 5' leader of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A RNA and development of novel MLV-REV-based retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Lastra, M; Gabus, C; Darlix, J L

    1997-11-01

    The murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related type C viruses constitute a major class of retroviruses that includes numerous endogenous and exogenous mammalian viruses and the related avian spleen necrosis virus (SNV). The MLV-related viruses possess a long and multifunctional 5' untranslated leader involved in key steps of the viral life cycle--splicing, translation, RNA dimerization, encapsidation, and reverse transcription. Recent studies have shown that the 5' leader of Friend murine leukemia virus and Moloney murine leukemia virus can direct cap independent translation of gag precursor proteins (Berlioz et al., 1995; Vagner et al., 1995b). These data, together with structural homology studies (Koning et al., 1992), prompted us to undertake a search for new internal ribosome entry segment (IRES) of retroviral origin. Here we describe an IRES element within the 5' leader of avian reticuloendotheliosis virus type A (REV-A) genomic RNA. Data show that the REV-A 5' IRES element maps downstream of the packaging/dimerization (E/DLS) sequence (Watanabe and Temin, 1982; Darlix et al., 1992) and the minimal IRES sequence appears to be within a 129 nt fragment (nucleotides 452-580) of the 5' leader, immediately upstream of the gag AUG codon. The REV-A IRES has been successfully utilized in the construction of novel high titer MLV-based retroviral vectors, containing one or more IRES elements of retroviral origin. These retroviral constructs, which represent a starting point for the design of novel vectors suitable for gene therapy, are also of interest as a model system of internal translation initiation and its possible regulation during development, cancer, or virus infection.

  18. From "Cellular" RNA to "Smart" RNA: Multiple Roles of RNA in Genome Stability and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Flavia; Jalihal, Ameya P; Francia, Sofia; Meers, Chance; Neeb, Zachary T; Rossiello, Francesca; Gioia, Ubaldo; Aguado, Julio; Jones-Weinert, Corey; Luke, Brian; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Nowacki, Mariusz; Storici, Francesca; Carninci, Piero; Walter, Nils G; Fagagna, Fabrizio d'Adda di

    2018-03-30

    Coding for proteins has been considered the main function of RNA since the "central dogma" of biology was proposed. The discovery of noncoding transcripts shed light on additional roles of RNA, ranging from the support of polypeptide synthesis, to the assembly of subnuclear structures, to gene expression modulation. Cellular RNA has therefore been recognized as a central player in often unanticipated biological processes, including genomic stability. This ever-expanding list of functions inspired us to think of RNA as a "smart" phone, which has replaced the older obsolete "cellular" phone. In this review, we summarize the last two decades of advances in research on the interface between RNA biology and genome stability. We start with an account of the emergence of noncoding RNA, and then we discuss the involvement of RNA in DNA damage signaling and repair, telomere maintenance, and genomic rearrangements. We continue with the depiction of single-molecule RNA detection techniques, and we conclude by illustrating the possibilities of RNA modulation in hopes of creating or improving new therapies. The widespread biological functions of RNA have made this molecule a reoccurring theme in basic and translational research, warranting it the transcendence from classically studied "cellular" RNA to "smart" RNA.

  19. Particle theory and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaisser, T.K.; Shafi, Q.; Barr, S.M.; Seckel, D.; Rusjan, E.; Fletcher, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research of professor at Bartol research institute in the following general areas: particle phenomenology and non-accelerator physics; particle physics and cosmology; theories with higher symmetry; and particle astrophysics and cosmology

  20. EGF receptor targeted lipo-oligocation polyplexes for antitumoral siRNA and miRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Katharina; Klein, Philipp M.; Heissig, Philipp; Roidl, Andreas; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-11-01

    Antitumoral siRNA and miRNA delivery was demonstrated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted oligoaminoamide polyplexes. For this purpose, the T-shaped lipo-oligomer 454 was used to complex RNA into a core polyplex, which was subsequently functionalized with the targeting peptide ligand GE11 via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker. To this end, free cysteines on the surface of 454 polyplex were coupled with a maleimide-PEG-GE11 reagent (Mal-GE11). Resulting particles with sizes of 120-150 nm showed receptor-mediated uptake into EGFR-positive T24 bladder cancer cells, MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells and Huh7 liver cancer cells. Furthermore, these formulations led to ligand-dependent gene silencing. RNA interference (RNAi) triggered antitumoral effects were observed for two different therapeutic RNAs, a miRNA-200c mimic or EG5 siRNA. Using polyplexes modified with a ratio of 0.8 molar equivalents of Mal-GE11, treatment of T24 or MDA-MB 231 cancer cells with miR-200c led to the expected decreased proliferation and migration, changes in cell cycle and enhanced sensitivity towards doxorubicin. Delivery of EG5 siRNA into Huh7 cells resulted in antitumoral activity with G2/M arrest, triggered by loss of mitotic spindle separation and formation of mono-astral spindles. These findings demonstrate the potential of GE11 ligand-containing RNAi polyplexes for cancer treatment.

  1. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  2. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  3. The RNA core weakly influences the interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 at key environmental interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, Thanh H.; Easter, Nickolas; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Huyett, Lauren; Defnet, Emily; Mylon, Steven E.; Ferri, James K.; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the RNA core on interfacial interactions of the bacteriophage MS2 was investigated. After removal of the RNA core, empty intact capsids were characterized and compared to untreated MS2. Electron density of untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and synchrotron-based small angle spectroscopy (SAXS). Suspensions of both particles exhibited similar electrophoretic mobility across a range of pH values. Similar effects were observed at pH 5.9 across a range of NaCl or CaCl2 concentrations. We compared key interfacial interactions (particle-particle and particle/air-water interface) between suspensions of each type of particle using time resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) to observe and quantify aggregation kinetics and axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure adsorption at the air-water interface. Both suspensions showed insignificant aggregation over 4 h in 600 mM NaCl solutions. In the presence of Ca2+ ions, aggregation of both types of particles was consistent with earlier aggregation studies and was characterized by both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited regimes occurring at similar [Ca2+]. However, the removal of the RNA from MS2 had no apparent effect on the aggregation kinetics of particles. Despite some differences in the kinetics of adsorption to the air-water interface, the changes in surface tension which result from particle adsorption showed no difference between the untreated MS2 and RNA-free MS2. The interactions and structure of particles at the air-water interface were further probed using interfacial dilational rheology. The surface elasticity (E s) and surface viscosity (ηs) at the interface were low for both the untreated virus and the RNA-free capsid. This observation suggests that the factors that impact the adsorption kinetics are not important for an equilibrated interface. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  5. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  6. Identifying microRNA/mRNA dysregulations in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Gregory D; Seiler, Michael; Rodriguez, Lorna; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Bhanot, Gyan

    2012-03-27

    MicroRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA molecules that co-regulate the expression of multiple genes via mRNA transcript degradation or translation inhibition. Since they often target entire pathways, they may be better drug targets than genes or proteins. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many tumours and associated with aggressive or poor prognosis phenotypes. Since they regulate mRNA in a tissue specific manner, their functional mRNA targets are poorly understood. In previous work, we developed a method to identify direct mRNA targets of microRNA using patient matched microRNA/mRNA expression data using an anti-correlation signature. This method, applied to clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC), revealed many new regulatory pathways compromised in ccRCC. In the present paper, we apply this method to identify dysregulated microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). TCGA Microarray data was normalized and samples whose class labels (tumour or normal) were ambiguous with respect to consensus ensemble K-Means clustering were removed. Significantly anti-correlated and correlated genes/microRNA differentially expressed between tumour and normal samples were identified. TargetScan was used to identify gene targets of microRNA. We identified novel microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer. For example, the expression level of RAD51AP1 was found to be strongly anti-correlated with the expression of hsa-miR-140-3p, which was significantly down-regulated in the tumour samples. The anti-correlation signature was present separately in the tumour and normal samples, suggesting a direct causal dysregulation of RAD51AP1 by hsa-miR-140-3p in the ovary. Other pairs of potentially biological relevance include: hsa-miR-145/E2F3, hsa-miR-139-5p/TOP2A, and hsa-miR-133a/GCLC. We also identified sets of positively correlated microRNA/mRNA pairs that are most likely result from indirect regulatory mechanisms. Our findings identify

  7. SmD1 Modulates the miRNA Pathway Independently of Its Pre-mRNA Splicing Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Peng Xiong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of endogenous regulatory RNAs that play a key role in myriad biological processes. Upon transcription, primary miRNA transcripts are sequentially processed by Drosha and Dicer ribonucleases into ~22-24 nt miRNAs. Subsequently, miRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs that contain Argonaute (AGO family proteins and guide RISC to target RNAs via complementary base pairing, leading to post-transcriptional gene silencing by a combination of translation inhibition and mRNA destabilization. Select pre-mRNA splicing factors have been implicated in small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways in fission yeast, worms, flies and mammals, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we show that SmD1, a core component of the Drosophila small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP implicated in splicing, is required for miRNA biogenesis and function. SmD1 interacts with both the microprocessor component Pasha and pri-miRNAs, and is indispensable for optimal miRNA biogenesis. Depletion of SmD1 impairs the assembly and function of the miRISC without significantly affecting the expression of major canonical miRNA pathway components. Moreover, SmD1 physically and functionally associates with components of the miRISC, including AGO1 and GW182. Notably, miRNA defects resulting from SmD1 silencing can be uncoupled from defects in pre-mRNA splicing, and the miRNA and splicing machineries are physically and functionally distinct entities. Finally, photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP analysis identifies numerous SmD1-binding events across the transcriptome and reveals direct SmD1-miRNA interactions. Our study suggests that SmD1 plays a direct role in miRNA-mediated gene silencing independently of its pre-mRNA splicing activity and indicates that the dual roles of splicing factors in post-transcriptional gene regulation may be

  8. Extracellular plasma RNA from colon cancer patients is confined in a vesicle-like structure and is mRNA-enriched

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Miguel; García, Vanesa; Peña, Cristina; Domínguez, Gemma; Silva, Javier; Diaz, Raquel; Espinosa, Pablo; Citores, Maria Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Bonilla, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Little is yet known about the origin and protective mechanism of free nucleic acids in plasma. We investigated the possibility of these free nucleic acids being particle associated. Plasma samples from colon cancer patients and cell culture media were subjected to various antibody incubations, ultracentrifugation, and RNA extraction protocols for total RNA, epithelial RNA, and mRNA. Flow cytometry using a Ber-EP4 antibody and confocal laser microscopy after staining with propidium iodide were also performed. mRNA levels of the LISCH7 and SDHA genes were determined in cells and in culture media. Ber-EP4 antibody and polystyrene beads coated with oligo dT sequences were employed. We observed that, after incubation, total RNA and mRNA were always detected after membrane digestion, and that epithelial RNA was detected before this procedure. In ultracentrifugation, mRNA was caught in the supernatant only if a former lysis mediated or in the pellet if there was no previous digestion. Flow cytometry determinations showed that antibody-coated microbeads keep acellular structures bearing epithelial antigens apart. Confocal laser microscopy made 1- to 2-μm-diameter particles perceptible in the vicinity of magnetic polystyrene beads. Relevant differences were observed between mRNA of cells and culture media, as there was a considerable difference in LISCH7 mRNA levels between HT29 and IMR90 cell co-cultures and their culture media. Our results support the view that extracellular RNA found in plasma from cancer patients circulates in association with or is protected in a multiparticle complex, and that an active release mechanism by tumor cells may be a possible origin. PMID:18456845

  9. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2012-01-01

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ( 1 H– 15 N 2D HMQC) and proton–proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ( 1 H– 1 H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino resonances for a

  10. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  11. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    OpenAIRE

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  12. On RNA-RNA interaction structures of fixed topological genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Benjamin M M; Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-04-01

    Interacting RNA complexes are studied via bicellular maps using a filtration via their topological genus. Our main result is a new bijection for RNA-RNA interaction structures and a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. The bijection allows to either reduce the topological genus of a bicellular map directly, or to lose connectivity by decomposing the complex into a pair of single stranded RNA structures. Our main result is proved bijectively. It provides an explicit algorithm of how to rewire the corresponding complexes and an unambiguous decomposition grammar. Using the concept of genus induction, we construct bicellular maps of fixed topological genus g uniformly in linear time. We present various statistics on these topological RNA complexes and compare our findings with biological complexes. Furthermore we show how to construct loop-energy based complexes using our decomposition grammar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus uses tRNA(Lys,3) as primer for reverse transcription in HeLa-CD4+ cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Koken, S. E.; Essink, B. B.; van Wamel, J. L.; Berkhout, B.

    1994-01-01

    Significant amounts of different tRNA molecules are present in retroviral particles, but one specific tRNA species functions as primer in reverse transcription. It is generally believed that the HIV-1 virus uses the tRNA(Lys,3) molecule as primer. This is based on sequence complementarity between

  14. antaRNA: ant colony-based RNA sequence design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinkauf, Robert; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    RNA sequence design is studied at least as long as the classical folding problem. Although for the latter the functional fold of an RNA molecule is to be found ,: inverse folding tries to identify RNA sequences that fold into a function-specific target structure. In combination with RNA-based biotechnology and synthetic biology ,: reliable RNA sequence design becomes a crucial step to generate novel biochemical components. In this article ,: the computational tool antaRNA is presented. It is capable of compiling RNA sequences for a given structure that comply in addition with an adjustable full range objective GC-content distribution ,: specific sequence constraints and additional fuzzy structure constraints. antaRNA applies ant colony optimization meta-heuristics and its superior performance is shown on a biological datasets. http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/antaRNA CONTACT: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. RNA İNTERFERANS (RNAİ)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDOĞDU, Ramazan; ÇELİK, Venhar

    2009-01-01

    RNA interferans, uygun çift zincirli RNA’nın hücreye girdiği zaman, endojenik komplementer mRNA dizisinin parçalanmasına yol açan, transkripsiyon sonrası gen susturma mekanizmasıdır. RNA interferans, Dicer adı verilen bir RNase III enzimi tarafından çift zincirli RNA’nın küçük engelleyici RNA’lara (siRNA) kesilmesi ile başlamaktadır. Bu siRNA’lar daha sonra, bir multiprotein-RNA nükleaz kompleksi olan, RNA- indükleyici baskılama kompleksine (RISC) bağlanır. RISC, siRNA’ları komplementer mRNA’...

  16. Radiation sensitivity of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponta, H.; Pfennig-Yeh, M.L.; Herrlich, P.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Wagner, E.F.; Schweiger, M.

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNA function is inactivated by irradiation with ultraviolet light. A unit length mRNA (in bases) is 2-3 times more sensitive than a unit length of DNA (in base pairs) with respect to the inactivation of template function. These data stem from four experimental systems all of which do not repair DNA: the translation of E. coli mRNA in rifampicin-treated cells, of T7 mRNA in infected E.coli, of f2 phage RNA in vivo, and of stable mRNA in chromosomeless minicells. The comparison of relative sensitivities to UV is relevant to the technique of UV mapping of transcription units which enjoys increasing popularity in pro- and eukaryotic genetic research. (orig.) [de

  17. Radiation sensitivity of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponta, H; Pfennig-Yeh, M L; Herrlich, P [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik und Toxikologie von Spaltstoffen; Karlsruhe Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik); Wagner, E F; Schweiger, M [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Biochemie

    1979-08-01

    Messenger RNA function is inactivated by irradiation with ultraviolet light. A unit length mRNA (in bases) is 2-3 times more sensitive than a unit length of DNA (in base pairs) with respect to the inactivation of template function. These data stem from four experimental systems all of which do not repair DNA: the translation of E. coli mRNA in rifampicin-treated cells, of T7 mRNA in infected E.coli, of f2 phage RNA in vivo, and of stable mRNA in chromosomeless minicells. The comparison of relative sensitivities to UV is relevant to the technique of UV mapping of transcription units which enjoys increasing popularity in pro- and eukaryotic genetic research.

  18. The relations of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okun, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book presents papers on elementary particle physics, relations between various particles, and the connections between particle physics with other branches of physics. The papers include: Contemporary status and prospects of high-energy physics; Particle physics prospects; and High energy physics

  19. Particle adhesion and removal

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, K L

    2015-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive and easily accessible reference source covering all important aspects of particle adhesion and removal.  The core objective is to cover both fundamental and applied aspects of particle adhesion and removal with emphasis on recent developments.  Among the topics to be covered include: 1. Fundamentals of surface forces in particle adhesion and removal.2. Mechanisms of particle adhesion and removal.3. Experimental methods (e.g. AFM, SFA,SFM,IFM, etc.) to understand  particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions.4. Mechanics of adhesion of micro- and  n

  20. Ribosomal proteins S12 and S13 function as control elements for translocation of the mRNA:tRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Anthony R; Southworth, Daniel R; Brunelle, Julie L; Culver, Gloria M; Green, Rachel

    2003-08-01

    Translocation of the mRNA:tRNA complex through the ribosome is promoted by elongation factor G (EF-G) during the translation cycle. Previous studies established that modification of ribosomal proteins with thiol-specific reagents promotes this event in the absence of EF-G. Here we identify two small subunit interface proteins S12 and S13 that are essential for maintenance of a pretranslocation state. Omission of these proteins using in vitro reconstitution procedures yields ribosomal particles that translate in the absence of enzymatic factors. Conversely, replacement of cysteine residues in these two proteins yields ribosomal particles that are refractive to stimulation with thiol-modifying reagents. These data support a model where S12 and S13 function as control elements for the more ancient rRNA- and tRNA-driven movements of translocation.

  1. Review of particle properties. Particle Data Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group [Rev. Mod. Phys. 48 (1976) No. 2, Part II; and Supplement, Phys. Lett. 68B (1977) 1]. Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available

  2. RNase-assisted RNA chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA chromatography combined with mass spectrometry represents a widely used experimental approach to identify RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific RNA targets. An important drawback of most of these protocols is the high background due to direct or indirect nonspecific binding of cellular proteins to the beads. In many cases this can hamper the detection of individual proteins due to their low levels and/or comigration with contaminating proteins. Increasing the salt concentration during washing steps can reduce background, but at the cost of using less physiological salt concentrations and the likely loss of important RNA-binding proteins that are less stringently bound to a given RNA, as well as the disassembly of protein or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Here, we describe an improved RNA chromatography method that relies on the use of a cocktail of RNases in the elution step. This results in the release of proteins specifically associated with the RNA ligand and almost complete elimination of background noise, allowing a more sensitive and thorough detection of RNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific RNA transcript. PMID:20571124

  3. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.

    2011-01-01

    in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as our...... experiments have not been collected in such a way that they are possible to analyze. In this review, we have collected detailed data from more than 150 experiments including all to date published and many unpublished experiments. Despite a large variation in the data, trends that are found are that RNAi...... is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success...

  4. Screening of siRNA nanoparticles for delivery to airway epithelial cells using high-content analysis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hibbitts, Alan

    2011-08-01

    Aims: Delivery of siRNA to the lungs via inhalation offers a unique opportunity to develop a new treatment paradigm for a range of respiratory conditions. However, progress has been greatly hindered by safety and delivery issues. This study developed a high-throughput method for screening novel nanotechnologies for pulmonary siRNA delivery. Methodology: Following physicochemical analysis, the ability of PEI–PEG–siRNA nanoparticles to facilitate siRNA delivery was determined using high-content analysis (HCA) in Calu-3 cells. Results obtained from HCA were validated using confocal microscopy. Finally, cytotoxicity of the PEI–PEG–siRNA particles was analyzed by HCA using the Cellomics® multiparameter cytotoxicity assay. Conclusion: PEI–PEG–siRNA nanoparticles facilitated increased siRNA uptake and luciferase knockdown in Calu-3 cells compared with PEI–siRNA.

  5. Stimulation of poliovirus RNA synthesis and virus maturation in a HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication system by viral protein 3CDpro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Eckard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poliovirus protein 3CDpro possesses both proteinase and RNA binding activities, which are located in the 3Cpro domain of the protein. The RNA polymerase (3Dpol domain of 3CDpro modulates these activities of the protein. We have recently shown that the level of 3CDpro in HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions is suboptimal for efficient virus production. However, the addition of either 3CDpro mRNA or of purified 3CDpro protein to in vitro reactions, programmed with viral RNA, results in a 100-fold increase in virus yield. Mutational analyses of 3CDpro indicated that RNA binding by the 3Cpro domain and the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of the protein are both required for function. The aim of these studies was to determine the exact step or steps at which 3CDpro enhances virus yield and to determine the mechanism by which this occurs. Our results suggest that the addition of extra 3CDpro to in vitro translation RNA-replication reactions results in a mild enhancement of both minus and plus strand RNA synthesis. By examining the viral particles formed in the in vitro reactions on sucrose gradients we determined that 3CDpro has only a slight stimulating effect on the synthesis of capsid precursors but it strikingly enhances the maturation of virus particles. Both the stimulation of RNA synthesis and the maturation of the virus particles are dependent on the presence of an intact RNA binding site within the 3Cpro domain of 3CDpro. In addition, the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of 3CDpro is required for efficient production of mature virus. Surprisingly, plus strand RNA synthesis and virus production in in vitro reactions, programmed with full-length transcript RNA, are not enhanced by the addition of extra 3CDpro. Our results indicate that the stimulation of RNA synthesis and virus maturation by 3CDpro in vitro is dependent on the presence of a VPg-linked RNA template.

  6. Concepts and introduction to RNA bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology have emerged from implementing methods for predicting the secondary structure of single sequences. The field has evolved to exploit multiple sequences to take evolutionary information into account, such as compensating (and structure preserving) base...... for interactions between RNA and proteins.Here, we introduce the basic concepts of predicting RNA secondary structure relevant to the further analyses of RNA sequences. We also provide pointers to methods addressing various aspects of RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology....

  7. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yanjun; Li, Chunquan; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Chunlong; Su, Fei; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it i...

  8. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P

    2008-01-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation

  9. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caval, Vincent; Piver, Eric; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Pagès, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. ► In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. ► Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. ► Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. ► Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  10. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caval, Vincent [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Piver, Eric [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Service de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire, CHRU de Tours (France); Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc [LaboRetro, ENS-Lyon INSERM, U758, 46 Allee d' Italie, 69364 Lyon (France); Pages, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.pages@univ-tours.fr [INSERM U966, Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte de Medecine, 10 Bd. Tonnelle, 37000 Tours (France); Service de Biochimie et Biologie Moleculaire, CHRU de Tours (France)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  11. 34A, miRNA-944, miRNA-101 and miRNA-218 in cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNAs (21 - 24 nucleotides in length) that are critical for many important processes such as development, ... RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Total RNA was extracted from each of the experimental groups using ... used as an endogenous control to normalize the expression of miRNA-143, miRNA-34A, miRNA-.

  12. RNA viruses in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andrew S; Rise, Matthew L; Culley, Alexander I; Steward, Grieg F

    2009-03-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous in the sea and appear to outnumber all other forms of marine life by at least an order of magnitude. Through selective infection, viruses influence nutrient cycling, community structure, and evolution in the ocean. Over the past 20 years we have learned a great deal about the diversity and ecology of the viruses that constitute the marine virioplankton, but until recently the emphasis has been on DNA viruses. Along with expanding knowledge about RNA viruses that infect important marine animals, recent isolations of RNA viruses that infect single-celled eukaryotes and molecular analyses of the RNA virioplankton have revealed that marine RNA viruses are novel, widespread, and genetically diverse. Discoveries in marine RNA virology are broadening our understanding of the biology, ecology, and evolution of viruses, and the epidemiology of viral diseases, but there is still much that we need to learn about the ecology and diversity of RNA viruses before we can fully appreciate their contributions to the dynamics of marine ecosystems. As a step toward making sense of how RNA viruses contribute to the extraordinary viral diversity in the sea, we summarize in this review what is currently known about RNA viruses that infect marine organisms.

  13. Transfecting Human Monocytes with RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannull, Jens; Nair, Smita K

    2016-01-01

    Targeting monocytes as a delivery system for drugs or nucleic acids, and thereby harnessing their natural tissue-infiltrating capacity, has become an area of intense investigation in both basic and clinical research. Herein we describe an efficient method to deliver mRNA (messenger RNA) or siRNA (small interfering RNA) into human monocytes by electroporation. This method can be applied in the laboratory to monocytes isolated via magnetic bead-based techniques, or in a clinical setting using monocytes that were collected via counterflow centrifugation elutriation using the Elutra(®) Cell Separation System. We further demonstrate that electroporation of monocytes with RNA represents a robust and highly relevant approach to modify monocytes for cell-based therapies. Last, the procedure described can readily be adapted to monocytes from different species, hence facilitating research in animal models.

  14. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus Genome Packaging Signal Is Located at the 5′ End of the Genome and Promotes Viral RNA Incorporation into Virions in a Replication-Independent Process

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Lucia; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A.; Capiscol, Carmen; del Palacio, Lorena; Enjuanes, Luis; Sola, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Preferential RNA packaging in coronaviruses involves the recognition of viral genomic RNA, a crucial process for viral particle morphogenesis mediated by RNA-specific sequences, known as packaging signals. An essential packaging signal component of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been further delimited to the first 598 nucleotides (nt) from the 5′ end of its RNA genome, by using recombinant viruses transcribing subgenomic mRNA that included potential packaging signals. Th...

  15. Fast prediction of RNA-RNA interaction using heuristic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Interaction between two RNA molecules plays a crucial role in many medical and biological processes such as gene expression regulation. In this process, an RNA molecule prohibits the translation of another RNA molecule by establishing stable interactions with it. Some algorithms have been formed to predict the structure of the RNA-RNA interaction. High computational time is a common challenge in most of the presented algorithms. In this context, a heuristic method is introduced to accurately predict the interaction between two RNAs based on minimum free energy (MFE). This algorithm uses a few dot matrices for finding the secondary structure of each RNA and binding sites between two RNAs. Furthermore, a parallel version of this method is presented. We describe the algorithm's concurrency and parallelism for a multicore chip. The proposed algorithm has been performed on some datasets including CopA-CopT, R1inv-R2inv, Tar-Tar*, DIS-DIS, and IncRNA54-RepZ in Escherichia coli bacteria. The method has high validity and efficiency, and it is run in low computational time in comparison to other approaches.

  16. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  17. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  18. Generation of miRNA sponge constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiver, Joost; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Smigielska-Czepiel, Katarzyna; Halsema, Nancy; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA molecules with repeated miRNA antisense sequences that can sequester miRNAs from their endogenous targets and thus serve as a decoy. Stably expressed miRNA sponges are especially valuable for long-term loss-of-function studies and can be used in vitro and in vivo. We

  19. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-03

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Gamache

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT. To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1, a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2 that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  1. Role of the CCA bulge of prohead RNA of bacteriophage ø29 in DNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Morais, Marc C; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley

    2008-11-14

    The oligomeric ring of prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the ATP-driven DNA packaging motor of bacteriophage ø29. The A-helix of pRNA binds the DNA translocating ATPase gp16 (gene product 16) and the CCA bulge in this helix is essential for DNA packaging in vitro. Mutation of the bulge by base substitution or deletion showed that the size of the bulge, rather than its sequence, is primary in DNA packaging activity. Proheads reconstituted with CCA bulge mutant pRNAs bound the packaging ATPase gp16 and the packaging substrate DNA-gp3, although DNA translocation was not detected with several mutants. Prohead/bulge-mutant pRNA complexes with low packaging activity had a higher rate of ATP hydrolysis per base pair of DNA packaged than proheads with wild-type pRNA. Cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of proheads reconstituted with a CCA deletion pRNA showed that the protruding pRNA spokes of the motor occupy a different position relative to the head when compared to particles with wild-type pRNA. Therefore, the CCA bulge seems to dictate the orientation of the pRNA spokes. The conformational changes observed for this mutant pRNA may affect gp16 conformation and/or subsequent ATPase-DNA interaction and, consequently, explain the decreased packaging activity observed for CCA mutants.

  2. Structural insights into RNA processing by the human RISC-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Noland, Cameron; Siridechadilok, Bunpote; Taylor, David W; Ma, Enbo; Felderer, Karin; Doudna, Jennifer A; Nogales, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Targeted gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) requires loading of a short guide RNA (small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA)) onto an Argonaute protein to form the functional center of an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). In humans, Argonaute2 (AGO2) assembles with the guide RNA-generating enzyme Dicer and the RNA-binding protein TRBP to form a RISC-loading complex (RLC), which is necessary for efficient transfer of nascent siRNAs and miRNAs from Dicer to AGO2. Here, using single-particle EM analysis, we show that human Dicer has an L-shaped structure. The RLC Dicer's N-terminal DExH/D domain, located in a short 'base branch', interacts with TRBP, whereas its C-terminal catalytic domains in the main body are proximal to AGO2. A model generated by docking the available atomic structures of Dicer and Argonaute homologs into the RLC reconstruction suggests a mechanism for siRNA transfer from Dicer to AGO2.

  3. microRNA-independent recruitment of Argonaute 1 to nanos mRNA through the Smaug RNA-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Pinder, Benjamin D; Smibert, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    Argonaute 1 directly interacts with the RNA binding protein Smaug in Drosophila, is thereby recruited to the Smaug target nanos mRNA and is required for Smaug-mediated translational repression of the nanos mRNA.

  4. Accelerators of atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarancev, V.

    1975-01-01

    A brief survey is presented of accelerators and methods of accelerating elementary particles. The principle of collective accelerating of elementary particles is clarified and the problems are discussed of its realization. (B.S.)

  5. Elementary particles and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouze, J.; Paty, M.

    2000-01-01

    The universe is the most efficient laboratory of particle physics and the understanding of cosmological processes implies the knowledge of how elementary particles interact. This article recalls the mutual influences between on the one hand: astrophysics and cosmology and on the other hand: nuclear physics and particle physics. The big-bang theory relies on nuclear physics to explain the successive stages of nucleo-synthesis and the study of solar neutrinos has led to discover new aspects of this particle: it is likely that neutrinos undergo oscillations from one neutrino type to another. In some universe events such as the bursting of a super-nova, particles are released with a kinetic energy that would be impossible to reach on earth with a particle accelerator. These events are become common points of interest between astrophysicists and particle physicists and have promoted a deeper cooperation between astrophysics and elementary particle physics. (A.C.)

  6. Particle Physics Education Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    back to home page Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top

  7. IntaRNA 2.0: enhanced and customizable prediction of RNA-RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Wright, Patrick R; Backofen, Rolf

    2017-07-03

    The IntaRNA algorithm enables fast and accurate prediction of RNA-RNA hybrids by incorporating seed constraints and interaction site accessibility. Here, we introduce IntaRNAv2, which enables enhanced parameterization as well as fully customizable control over the prediction modes and output formats. Based on up to date benchmark data, the enhanced predictive quality is shown and further improvements due to more restrictive seed constraints are highlighted. The extended web interface provides visualizations of the new minimal energy profiles for RNA-RNA interactions. These allow a detailed investigation of interaction alternatives and can reveal potential interaction site multiplicity. IntaRNAv2 is freely available (source and binary), and distributed via the conda package manager. Furthermore, it has been included into the Galaxy workflow framework and its already established web interface enables ad hoc usage. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Review of particle properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, G P; Barnett, R M; Hinchliffe, I; Lynch, G R; Rittenberg, A; Ross, R R; Suzuki, M; Trippe, T G; Wohl, C G; Armstrong, B

    1988-04-14

    This review of the properties of gauge bosons, leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of the Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group (Phys. Lett. 170B (1986)). Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. We continue the more orderly set of particle names implemented in the 1986 edition. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available.

  9. Beyond the God particle

    CERN Document Server

    Lederman, Leon M

    2013-01-01

    On July 4, 2012, the long-sought Higgs Boson--aka "the God Particle"--was discovered at the world's largest particle accelerator, the LHC, in Geneva, Switzerland. On March 14, 2013, physicists at CERN confirmed it. This elusive subatomic particle forms a field that permeates the entire universe, creating the masses of the elementary particles that are the basic building blocks of everything in the known world--from viruses to elephants, from atoms to quasars.

  10. Direct, rapid RNA sequence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peattie, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The original methods of RNA sequence analysis were based on enzymatic production and chromatographic separation of overlapping oligonucleotide fragments from within an RNA molecule followed by identification of the mononucleotides comprising the oligomer. Over the past decade the field of nucleic acid sequencing has changed dramatically, however, and RNA molecules now can be sequenced in a variety of more streamlined fashions. Most of the more recent advances in RNA sequencing have involved one-dimensional electrophoretic separation of 32 P-end-labeled oligoribonucleotides on polyacrylamide gels. In this chapter the author discusses two of these methods for determining the nucleotide sequences of RNA molecules rapidly: the chemical method and the enzymatic method. Both methods are direct and degradative, i.e., they rely on fragmatic and chemical approaches should be utilized. The single-strand-specific ribonucleases (A, T 1 , T 2 , and S 1 ) provide an efficient means to locate double-helical regions rapidly, and the chemical reactions provide a means to determine the RNA sequence within these regions. In addition, the chemical reactions allow one to assign interactions to specific atoms and to distinguish secondary interactions from tertiary ones. If the RNA molecule is small enough to be sequenced directly by the enzymatic or chemical method, the probing reactions can be done easily at the same time as sequencing reactions

  11. Cofactors in the RNA World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA world theories figure prominently in many scenarios for the origin and early evolution of life. These theories posit that RNA molecules played a much larger role in ancient biology than they do now, acting both as the dominant biocatalysts and as the repository of genetic information. Many features of modern RNA biology are potential examples of molecular fossils from an RNA world, such as the pervasive involvement of nucleotides in coenzymes, the existence of natural aptamers that bind these coenzymes, the existence of natural ribozymes, a biosynthetic pathway in which deoxynucleotides are produced from ribonucleotides, and the central role of ribosomal RNA in protein synthesis in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. Here, we uses both a top-down approach that evaluates RNA function in modern biology and a bottom-up approach that examines the capacities of RNA independent of modern biology. These complementary approaches exploit multiple in vitro evolution techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Together these complementary approaches advance our understanding of the most primitive organisms, their early evolution, and their eventual transition to modern biochemistry.

  12. Efficient RNA structure comparison algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Abdullah N; Anandan, Jithendar; Fry, Eric; Monschke, Keith; Ganneboina, Nitin; Bowerman, Jason

    2017-12-01

    Recently proposed relative addressing-based ([Formula: see text]) RNA secondary structure representation has important features by which an RNA structure database can be stored into a suffix array. A fast substructure search algorithm has been proposed based on binary search on this suffix array. Using this substructure search algorithm, we present a fast algorithm that finds the largest common substructure of given multiple RNA structures in [Formula: see text] format. The multiple RNA structure comparison problem is NP-hard in its general formulation. We introduced a new problem for comparing multiple RNA structures. This problem has more strict similarity definition and objective, and we propose an algorithm that solves this problem efficiently. We also develop another comparison algorithm that iteratively calls this algorithm to locate nonoverlapping large common substructures in compared RNAs. With the new resulting tools, we improved the RNASSAC website (linked from http://faculty.tamuc.edu/aarslan ). This website now also includes two drawing tools: one specialized for preparing RNA substructures that can be used as input by the search tool, and another one for automatically drawing the entire RNA structure from a given structure sequence.

  13. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Turner, M.S.

    1982-06-01

    work is described in these areas: cosmological baryon production; cosmological production of free quarks and other exotic particle species; the quark-hadron transition in the early universe; astrophysical and cosmological constraints on particle properties; massive neutrinos; phase transitions in the early universe; and astrophysical implications of an axion-like particle

  14. Particle-nuclear intersections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    With the traditional distinctions between particle and nuclear physics becoming increasing blurred, the Fifth Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics, held from May 31 to June 6 in St. Petersburg, Florida, brought together particle and nuclear physicists to discuss common research efforts and to define and plan a united approach

  15. Review of particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, T.G.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Kelly, R.L.; Rittenberg, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Yost, G.P.; Barash-Schmidt, N.; Bricman, C.; Hemingway, R.J.; Losty, M.J.; Roos, M.; Chaloupka, V.; Armstrong, B.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group [Phys. Letters 50B, No.1 (1974), and Supplement, Rev. Mod. Phys. 47 (1975) 535]. Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available

  16. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  17. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  18. Study of particle swarm optimization particle trajectories

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van den Bergh, F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available . These theoretical studies concentrate mainly on simplified PSO systems. This paper overviews current theoretical studies, and extend these studies to investigate particle trajectories for general swarms to include the influence of the inertia term. The paper also...

  19. The ViennaRNA web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas R; Bernhart, Stephan H; Lorenz, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The ViennaRNA package is a widely used collection of programs for thermodynamic RNA secondary structure prediction. Over the years, many additional tools have been developed building on the core programs of the package to also address issues related to noncoding RNA detection, RNA folding kinetics, or efficient sequence design considering RNA-RNA hybridizations. The ViennaRNA web services provide easy and user-friendly web access to these tools. This chapter describes how to use this online platform to perform tasks such as prediction of minimum free energy structures, prediction of RNA-RNA hybrids, or noncoding RNA detection. The ViennaRNA web services can be used free of charge and can be accessed via http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at.

  20. Light scattering by cosmic particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenier, J.W.; Min, M.

    2008-01-01

    We define cosmic particles as particles outside the Earth. Two types of cosmic particles can be distinguished, namely liquid and solid particles. The solid particles are often called grains or cosmic dust particles. Cosmic particles occur in a great variety of astronomical objects and environments.

  1. Slowing of charged particles by particle methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, B.

    1985-03-01

    We review some facts about particle methods for solving linear hyperbolic equations. We show how one gets an evaluation of integral quantities like: ∫ u(x,t) zeta(x,t) dxdt where u denotes the solution and zeta an arbitrary weight function. Then, we apply the method to the equation describing charged particle transport in a plasma with emphasis on the evaluation of energy deposition on ions and electrons [fr

  2. Dense particles and slow sedimenting particles produced by ultraviolet irradiation of poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetz, K.; Zeichhardt, H.; Willingmann, P.; Habermehl, K.-O.

    1983-01-01

    Low doses of u.v. radiation rapidly inactivate poliovirus, the virus progressively converting into dense particles (DPs) of buoyant density 1.44 g/ml in CsCl. The DPs are structurally and antigenically related to standard virus (N-antigen), i.e. indistinguishable from virus in their RNA and protein content and in sedimentation properties. Furthermore, there is no difference in reactivity of the structural proteins of virus and DPs with the monofunctional reagent [ 3 H]N-succinimidyl propionate ( 3 H-NSP). However, DPs differ from virus in that their capsids are permeable to several ions, and they can be degraded by RNase and protease. Increasing the radiation dose causes a successive transformation of DPs into 105S slow-sedimenting particles (SSPs), antigenically related to 76S artificial empty capsids (AECs) or H-antigen, but differing physically and structurally. The SSPs have a higher S value than AECs and contain all the capsid proteins, including VP4, and the RNA, both of these macromolecules being absent from AECs. It is concluded, therefore, that transformation from N- to H- antigenicity by u.v. radiation does not require release of RNA and VP4. Conversion of virus particles to SSPs correlates with altered reactivity of VP2 and to a lesser extent VP1 and VP3, with the monofunctional reagent 3 H-NSP. (author)

  3. Dense particles and slow sedimenting particles produced by ultraviolet irradiation of poliovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetz, K.; Zeichhardt, H.; Willingmann, P.; Habermehl, K.O. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-06-01

    Low doses of u.v. radiation rapidly inactivate poliovirus, the virus progressively converting into dense particles (DPs) of buoyant density 1.44 g/ml in CsCl. The DPs are structurally and antigenically related to standard virus (N-antigen), i.e. indistinguishable from virus in their RNA and protein content and in sedimentation properties. Furthermore, there is no difference in reactivity of the structural proteins of virus and DPs with the monofunctional reagent (/sup 3/H)N-succinimidyl propionate (/sup 3/H-NSP). However, DPs differ from virus in that their capsids are permeable to several ions, and they can be degraded by RNase and protease. Increasing the radiation dose causes a successive transformation of DPs into 105S slow-sedimenting particles (SSPs), antigenically related to 76S artificial empty capsids (AECs) or H-antigen, but differing physically and structurally. The SSPs have a higher S value than AECs and contain all the capsid proteins, including VP4, and the RNA, both of these macromolecules being absent from AECs. It is concluded, therefore, that transformation from N- to H- antigenicity by u.v. radiation does not require release of RNA and VP4. Conversion of virus particles to SSPs correlates with altered reactivity of VP2 and to a lesser extent VP1 and VP3, with the monofunctional reagent /sup 3/H-NSP.

  4. Rapid Generation of MicroRNA Sponges for MicroRNA Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiver, Joost; Gibcus, Johan H.; Hettinga, Chris; Adema, Annelies; Richter, Mareike K. S.; Halsema, Nancy; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Ding, Ye; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are transcripts with repeated miRNA antisense sequences that can sequester miRNAs from endogenous targets. MiRNA sponges are valuable tools for miRNA loss-of-function studies both in vitro and in vivo. We developed a fast and flexible method to generate miRNA sponges and

  5. Elementary particles. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranft, G.; Ranft, J.

    1977-01-01

    In this part the subject is covered under the following headings, methods for producing high-energy particles; interaction of high-energy particles with matter; methods for the detection of high-energy particles; symmetry properties and conservation laws; quantum number and selection rules; theorem of scattering behaviour at asymptotically high energies; statistical methods in elementary particle physics; interaction of high-energy particles with nuclei; relations of high-energy physics to other branches of science and its response to engineering. Intended as information on high-energy physics for graduate students and research workers familiar with the fundamentals of classical and quantum physics

  6. Review of particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanet, L.; Gieselmann, K. Technical Associate; Barnett, R.M.; Groom, D.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. Technical Associate; Wagman, G.S. Technical Associate; Murayama, H.; Stone, J.; Hernandez, J.J.; Porter, F.C.; Morrison, R.J.; Manohar, A.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Caso, C.; Lantero, P. Technical Associate; Crawford, R.L.; Roos, M.; Toernqvist, N.A.; Hayes, K.G.; Hoehler, G.

    1994-01-01

    This biennial review summarizes much of Particle Physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2300 new measurements from 700 papers, we list evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, monopoles, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. A booklet is available containing the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some of the other sections of this full Review

  7. Functional characterization of recombinant chloroplast signal recognition particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Mant, A; Kuhn, A; Koch, J; Dübel, S; Robinson, C; Sinning, I

    2001-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ubiquitous system for the targeting of membrane and secreted proteins. The chloroplast SRP (cpSRP) is unique among SRPs in that it possesses no RNA and is functional in post-translational as well as co-translational targeting. We have expressed and purified

  8. Fluidization of spherocylindrical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Vinay V.; Nijssen, Tim M. J.; Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Hofman, Jeroen; Kuipers, Hans; Padding, Johan T.

    2017-06-01

    Multiphase (gas-solid) flows are encountered in numerous industrial applications such as pharmaceutical, food, agricultural processing and energy generation. A coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) approach is a popular way to study such flows at a particle scale. However, most of these studies deal with spherical particles while in reality, the particles are rarely spherical. The particle shape can have significant effect on hydrodynamics in a fluidized bed. Moreover, most studies in literature use inaccurate drag laws because accurate laws are not readily available. The drag force acting on a non-spherical particle can vary considerably with particle shape, orientation with the flow, Reynolds number and packing fraction. In this work, the CFD-DEM approach is extended to model a laboratory scale fluidized bed of spherocylinder (rod-like) particles. These rod-like particles can be classified as Geldart D particles and have an aspect ratio of 4. Experiments are performed to study the particle flow behavior in a quasi-2D fluidized bed. Numerically obtained results for pressure drop and bed height are compared with experiments. The capability of CFD-DEM approach to efficiently describe the global bed dynamics for fluidized bed of rod-like particles is demonstrated.

  9. Monosodium titanate particle characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.T.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    A characterization study was performed on monosodium titanate (MST) particles to determine the effect of high shear forces expected from the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process pumps on the particle size distribution. The particles were characterized using particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). No significant changes in particle size distributions were observed between as-received MST and after 2--4 hours of shearing. Both as-received and sheared MST particles contained a large percentage of porosity with pore sizes on the order of 500 to 2,000 Angstroms. Because of the large percentage of porosity, the overall surface area of the MST is dominated by the internal surfaces. The uranium and plutonium species present in the waste solution will have access to both interior and exterior surfaces. Therefore, uranium and plutonium loading should not be a strong function of MST particle size

  10. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Infinite Coordination Polymer Nano- and Micro-Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    attachment (Figure 1). Particles were synthesized by combining DABA-bis-HP-N3 and ferric nitrate in dilute NaOH. The crude particles were purified by...cervical cancer cells using dye-labeled DNA (Figure 2). The ICP-DNA particles were found to cross cell membranes with efficiency very similar to the...deliver their genetic cargo to the cell and effect expression of a known cancer -related mRNA transcript in vitro. SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells were chosen

  12. Predicting and Modeling RNA Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhof, Eric; Masquida, Benoît; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A general approach for modeling the architecture of large and structured RNA molecules is described. The method exploits the modularity and the hierarchical folding of RNA architecture that is viewed as the assembly of preformed double-stranded helices defined by Watson-Crick base pairs and RNA modules maintained by non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Despite the extensive molecular neutrality observed in RNA structures, specificity in RNA folding is achieved through global constraints like lengths of helices, coaxiality of helical stacks, and structures adopted at the junctions of helices. The Assemble integrated suite of computer tools allows for sequence and structure analysis as well as interactive modeling by homology or ab initio assembly with possibilities for fitting within electronic density maps. The local key role of non-Watson-Crick pairs guides RNA architecture formation and offers metrics for assessing the accuracy of three-dimensional models in a more useful way than usual root mean square deviation (RMSD) values. PMID:20504963

  13. Synergy between NMR measurements and MD simulations of protein/RNA complexes: application to the RRMs, the most common RNA recognition motifs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krepl, Miroslav; Clery, A.; Blatter, M.; Allain, F.H.T.; Šponer, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 13 (2016), s. 6452-6470 ISSN 0305-1048 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : molecular- dynamics simulations * particle mesh ewald * pre-ribosomal-rna Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 10.162, year: 2016

  14. Dynein-dependent transport of nanos RNA in Drosophila sensory neurons requires Rumpelstiltskin and the germ plasm organizer Oskar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Brechbiel, Jillian L; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2013-09-11

    Intracellular mRNA localization is a conserved mechanism for spatially regulating protein production in polarized cells, such as neurons. The mRNA encoding the translational repressor Nanos (Nos) forms ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that are dendritically localized in Drosophila larval class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons. In nos mutants, class IV da neurons exhibit reduced dendritic branching complexity, which is rescued by transgenic expression of wild-type nos mRNA but not by a localization-compromised nos derivative. While localization is essential for nos function in dendrite morphogenesis, the mechanism underlying the transport of nos RNP particles was unknown. We investigated the mechanism of dendritic nos mRNA localization by analyzing requirements for nos RNP particle motility in class IV da neuron dendrites through live imaging of fluorescently labeled nos mRNA. We show that dynein motor machinery components mediate transport of nos mRNA in proximal dendrites. Two factors, the RNA-binding protein Rumpelstiltskin and the germ plasm protein Oskar, which are required for diffusion/entrapment-mediated localization of nos during oogenesis, also function in da neurons for formation and transport of nos RNP particles. Additionally, we show that nos regulates neuronal function, most likely independent of its dendritic localization and function in morphogenesis. Our results reveal adaptability of localization factors for regulation of a target transcript in different cellular contexts.

  15. Shielding the messenger (RNA): microRNA-based anticancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotillo, Elena; Thomas-Tikhonenko, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    It has been a decade since scientists realized that microRNAs (miRNAs) are not an oddity invented by worms to regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Rather, many of these 21–22-nucleotide-short RNAs exist in invertebrates and vertebrates alike and some of them are in fact highly conserved. miRNAs are now recognized as an important class of non-coding small RNAs that inhibit gene expression by targeting mRNA stability and translation. In the last ten years, our knowledge of the miRNAs world was expanding at vertiginous speed, propelled by the development of computational engines for miRNA identification and target prediction, biochemical tools and techniques to modulate miRNA activity, and last but not least, the emergence of miRNA-centric animal models. One important conclusion that has emerged from this effort is that many microRNAs and their cognate targets are strongly implicated in cancer, either as oncogenes or tumor and metastasis suppressors. In this review we will discuss the diverse role that miRNAs play in cancer initiation and progression and also the tools with which miRNA expression could be corrected in vivo. While the idea of targeting microRNAs towards therapeutic ends is getting considerable traction, basic, translational, and clinical research done in the next few years will tell whether this promise is well-founded. PMID:21514318

  16. Lecture II. Charmed particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The discussion of charmed particle spectroscopy covers the particle properties and interrelations from a charmed quark composition point of view including SU(4)-symmetry generalities, mesons, baryons, charmed particle masses, and decays of charmed particles. 6 references

  17. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to find the critical balance between extracellular association and intracellular dissociation of mRNA-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heyang; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Remaut, Katrien

    2018-05-10

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) is a promising tool to study interactions on a single molecule level. The diffusion of fluorescent molecules in and out of the excitation volume of a confocal microscope leads to the fluorescence fluctuations that give information on the average number of fluorescent molecules present in the excitation volume and their diffusion coefficients. In this context, we complexed mRNA into lipoplexes and polyplexes and explored the association/dissociation degree of complexes by using gel electrophoresis and FCS. FCS enabled us to measure the association and dissociation degree of mRNA-based complexes both in buffer and protein-rich biological fluids such as human serum and ascitic fluid, which is a clear advantage over gel electrophoresis that was only applicable in protein-free buffer solutions. Furthermore, following the complex stability in buffer and biological fluids by FCS assisted to understand how complex characteristics, such as charge ratio and strength of mRNA binding, correlated to the transfection efficiency. We found that linear polyethyleneimine prevented efficient translation of mRNA, most likely due to a too strong mRNA binding, whereas the lipid based carrier Lipofectamine ® messengerMAX did succeed in efficient release and subsequent translation of mRNA in the cytoplasm of the cells. Overall, FCS is a reliable tool for the in depth characterization of mRNA complexes and can help us to find the critical balance keeping mRNA bound in complexes in the extracellular environment and efficient intracellular mRNA release leading to protein production. The delivery of messenger RNA (mRNA) to cells is promising to treat a variety of diseases. Therefore, the mRNA is typically packed in small lipid particles or polymer particles that help the mRNA to reach the cytoplasm of the cells. These particles should bind and carry the mRNA in the extracellular environment (e.g. blood, peritoneal fluid, ...), but should release

  18. Droplet Microfluidic and Magnetic Particles Platform for Cancer Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Davide; Champ, Jérôme; Teste, Bruno; Serra, M; Malaquin, Laurent; Descroix, Stéphanie; de Cremoux, Patricia; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Analyses of nucleic acids are routinely performed in hospital laboratories to detect gene alterations for cancer diagnosis and treatment decision. Among the different possible investigations, mRNA analysis provides information on abnormal levels of genes expression. Standard laboratory methods are still not adapted to the isolation and quantitation of low mRNA amounts and new techniques needs to be developed in particular for rare subsets analysis. By reducing the volume involved, time process, and the contamination risks, droplet microfluidics provide numerous advantages to perform analysis down to the single cell level.We report on a droplet microfluidic platform based on the manipulation of magnetic particles that allows the clinical analysis of tumor tissues. In particular, it allows the extraction of mRNA from the total-RNA sample, Reverse Transcription, and cDNA amplification, all in droplets.

  19. Efficient Inhibition of wear debris-induced inflammation by locally delivered siRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaochun; Tao Kun; Cheng Tao; Zhu Junfeng; Zhang Xianlong

    2008-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common long-term complication of total joint replacement, which is associated with the generation of wear debris. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on wear debris-induced inflammation. A local delivery of lentivirus-mediated TNF-α siRNA into the modified murine air pouch, which was stimulated by polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles, resulted in significant blockage of TNF-α both in mRNA and protein levels for up to 4 weeks. In addition, significant down-regulation of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was observed in TNF-α siRNA-treated pouches. The safety profile of gene therapy was proven by Bioluminescent assay and quantitative fluorescent flux. Histological analysis revealed less inflammatory responses (thinner pouch membrane and decreased cellular infiltration) in TNF-α siRNA-treated pouches. These findings suggest that local delivery of TNF-α siRNA might be an excellent therapeutic candidate to inhibit particle-induced inflammation.

  20. Methods for forming particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V.; Zhang, Fengyan; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin

    2016-06-21

    Single source precursors or pre-copolymers of single source precursors are subjected to microwave radiation to form particles of a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Such particles may be formed in a wurtzite phase and may be converted to a chalcopyrite phase by, for example, exposure to heat. The particles in the wurtzite phase may have a substantially hexagonal shape that enables stacking into ordered layers. The particles in the wurtzite phase may be mixed with particles in the chalcopyrite phase (i.e., chalcopyrite nanoparticles) that may fill voids within the ordered layers of the particles in the wurtzite phase thus produce films with good coverage. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form layers of semiconductor materials comprising a I-III-VI.sub.2 material. Devices such as, for example, thin-film solar cells may be fabricated using such methods.

  1. LHCb unveils new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announces the observation of four “exotic” particles from its analysis of the LHC data.   The LHCb experimental cavern. On 28 June, the LHCb collaboration reported the observation of three new "exotic" particles and confirmation of the existence of a fourth one in data from the LHC. These particles each appear to be formed by four quarks (the fundamental constituents of the matter inside all the atoms of the universe): two quarks and two antiquarks (that is, a tetraquark). Due to their non-standard quark content, the newly observed particles have been included in the broad category of so-called exotic particles, although their exact theoretical interpretation is still under study.            The quark model, proposed by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964, is considered to be the most valid scheme for the classification of hadrons (all the composite particles) that has been fou...

  2. Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  3. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takada

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon, within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons

  4. RegRNA: an integrated web server for identifying regulatory RNA motifs and elements

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hsi-Yuan; Chien, Chia-Hung; Jen, Kuan-Hua; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2006-01-01

    Numerous regulatory structural motifs have been identified as playing essential roles in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. RegRNA is an integrated web server for identifying the homologs of regulatory RNA motifs and elements against an input mRNA sequence. Both sequence homologs and structural homologs of regulatory RNA motifs can be recognized. The regulatory RNA motifs supported in RegRNA are categorized into several classes: (i) motifs in mRNA 5′-untra...

  5. Music of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternheimer, J.

    1983-01-01

    This Note offers a new point of view on particle masses. It is shown that they are distributed following a musical scale, the chromatic tempered scale -for stable particles- subdivided into microintervals including unstable particles. A theoretical explanation, based on causality, allows one also to calculate their global distribution along the mass scale, in agreement with experiment, and indicating the existence of ''musical'' laws in the vibratory organisation of matter [fr

  6. Low energy particle composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    More than 50 papers presented at this Conference dealt with the composition of low energy particles. The topics can be divided roughly into two broad categories. The first is the study of the energy spectra and composition of the steady or 'quiet-time' particle flux, whose origin is at this time unknown. The second category includes the study of particles and photons which are associated with solar flares or active regions on the sun. (orig.) [de

  7. Music of elementary particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternheimer, J.

    1983-12-12

    This note offers a new point of view on particle masses. It is shown that they are distributed following a musical scale, the chromatic tempered scale -for stable particles- subdivided into microintervals including unstable particles. A theoretical explanation, based on causality, allows one also to calculate their global distribution along the mass scale, in agreement with experiment, and indicating the existence of ''musical'' laws in the vibratory organisation of matter.

  8. Review of particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricman, C.; Dionisi, C.; Hemingway, R.J.; Mazzucato, M.; Montanet, L.; Barash-Schmidt, N.; Crawford, R.C.; Roos, M.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Horne, C.P.; Kelly, R.L.; Losty, M.J.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Armstrong, B.

    1978-01-01

    This review of the properties of leptons, mesons, and baryons is an updating of Review of Particle Properties, Particle Data Group [Rev. Mod. Phys. 48 (1976) No. 2, Part II; and Supplement, Phys. Lett. 68B (1977) 1]. Data are evaluated, listed, averaged, and summarized in tables. Numerous tables, figures, and formulae of interest to particle physicists are also included. A data booklet is available. (Auth.)

  9. Condensed elementary particle matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajantie, K.

    1996-01-01

    Quark matter is a special case of condensed elementary particle matter, matter governed by the laws of particle physics. The talk discusses how far one can get in the study of particle matter by reducing the problem to computations based on the action. As an example the computation of the phase diagram of electroweak matter is presented. It is quite possible that ultimately an antireductionist attitude will prevail: experiments will reveal unpredicted phenomena not obviously reducible to the study of the action. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination by rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Sandra D.; Tzeng, W.-P.; Chen, M.-H.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether rubella virus (RUB) undergoes intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination, cells were cotransfected with pairs of in vitro transcripts from genomic cDNA plasmid vectors engineered to contain nonoverlapping deletions: the replicative transcript maintained the 5'-proximal nonstructural (NS) ORF (which contained the replicase, making it RNA replication competent), had a deletion in the 3'-proximal structural protein (SP) ORF, and maintained the 3' end of the genome, including the putative 3' cis-acting elements (CSE), while the nonreplicative transcript consisted of the 3' half of the genome including the SP-ORF and 3' CSE. Cotransfection yielded plaque-forming virus that synthesized the standard genomic and subgenomic RNAs and thus was generated by RNA-RNA recombination. Using transcripts tagged with a 3'-terminal deletion, it was found that recombinants contained the 3' end derived from the replicative strand, indicating a cis-preference for initiation of negative-strand synthesis. In cotransfections in which the replicative transcript lacked the 3' CSE, recombination occurred, albeit at lower efficiency, indicating that initiation in trans from the NS-ORF can occur. The 3' CSE was sufficient as a nonreplicative transcript, showing that it can serve as a promoter for negative-strand RNA synthesis. While deletion mutagenesis showed that the presence of the junction untranslated region (J-UTR) between the ORFs appeared to be necessary on both transcripts for recombination in this region of the genome, analysis with transcripts tagged with restriction sites showed that the J-UTR was not a hot spot for recombination compared to neighboring regions in both ORFs. Sequence analysis of recombinants revealed that both precise (homologous) and imprecise recombination (aberrant, homologous resulting in duplications) occurred; however, imprecise recombination only involved the J-UTR or the 3' end of the NS-ORF and the J-UTR (maintaining the NS-ORF), indicating

  11. Particle correlations at ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erazmus, B.; Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.; Martin, L.; Mikhailov, K.; Pluta, J.; Sinyukov, Yu.; Stavinsky, A.; Werner, K

    1998-12-31

    The ability of the ALICE detector for determination of the space-time characteristics of particle production in heavy-ion collisions at LHC from measurements of the correlation functions of identical and non-identical particles at small relative velocities is discussed. The possibility to use the correlations of non-identical particles for a direct determination of the delays in emission of various particle species at time scales as small as 10{sup -23} s is demonstrated. The influence of the multi-boson effects on pion multiplicities, single-pion spectra and two-pion correlation functions is discussed. (author) 63 refs.

  12. Particle Correlations at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kress, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Particle correlations are extensively studied to obtain information about the dynamics of hadron production. From 1989 to 2000 the four LEP collaborations recorded more than 16 million hadronic Z0 decays and several thousand W+W- events. In Z0 decays, two-particle correlations were analysed in detail to study Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac correlations for various particle species. In fully-hadronic W+W- decays, particle correlations were used to study whether the two W bosons decay independently. A review of selected results is presented.

  13. Particle Image Velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chen; Vasilevskis, Sandijs; Kozlowski, Bartosz

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a non-intrusive, whole filed optical method providing instantaneous velocity information in fluids. The flow is seeded with tracer particles. The particles are illuminated in the target area with a light sheet at least twice within a short time interval....... The camera images the target area and captures each light pulse in separate image frames. The displacement of the particle between the light pulses can be used to determine the velocity vectors. This guideline introduces the principle of the PIV system and the system configuration. The measurement procedure...

  14. Review of particle properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikasa, K.; Hagiwara, K.; Kawabata, S.; Barnett, R.M.; Groom, D.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Wohl, C.G.; Yost, G.P.; Armstrong, B. Technical Associate; Wagman, G.S. Technical Associate; Stone, J.; Porter, F.C.; Morrison, R.J.; Cutkosky, R.E.; Montanet, L.; Gieselmann, K. Technical Associate; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Caso, C.; Crawford, R.L.; Roos, M.; Toernqvist, N.A.; Hayes, K.G.; Hoehler, G.; Manley, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    In this Review, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We also summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, the top quark, heavy neutrinos, monopoles, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. A booklet is available containing the Summary Tables and abbreviated versions of some other sections of this full Review

  15. Elementary particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1984-12-01

    The present state of the art in elementary particle theory is reviewed. Topics include quantum electrodynamics, weak interactions, electroweak unification, quantum chromodynamics, and grand unified theories. 113 references

  16. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  17. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  18. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montgomery, Rusty L; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular

  19. Biochemistry and Function of the RNA Exosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of the evolutionary conserved RNA exosome was a milestone in RNA biology. First identified as an activity essential for the processing of ribosomal RNA, the exosome has since proved to be central for RNA processing and degradation in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cell...

  20. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    of yeast alanine tRNA by Robert Holley's group at Cornell. University ... decode nonsense codons) with John Smith and Brenner. However, my ... tRNA from 10 g of unfractionated tRNA. ... tRNA crystals were, in fact, protein (Hendrikson et al.

  1. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  2. A discontinuous RNA platform mediates RNA virus replication: building an integrated model for RNA-based regulation of viral processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plus-strand RNA viruses contain RNA elements within their genomes that mediate a variety of fundamental viral processes. The traditional view of these elements is that of local RNA structures. This perspective, however, is changing due to increasing discoveries of functional viral RNA elements that are formed by long-range RNA-RNA interactions, often spanning thousands of nucleotides. The plus-strand RNA genomes of tombusviruses exemplify this concept by possessing different long-range RNA-RNA interactions that regulate both viral translation and transcription. Here we report that a third fundamental tombusvirus process, viral genome replication, requires a long-range RNA-based interaction spanning approximately 3000 nts. In vivo and in vitro analyses suggest that the discontinuous RNA platform formed by the interaction facilitates efficient assembly of the viral RNA replicase. This finding has allowed us to build an integrated model for the role of global RNA structure in regulating the reproduction of a eukaryotic RNA virus, and the insights gained have extended our understanding of the multifunctional nature of viral RNA genomes.

  3. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. On topological RNA interaction structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2013-07-01

    Recently a folding algorithm of topological RNA pseudoknot structures was presented in Reidys et al. (2011). This algorithm folds single-stranded γ-structures, that is, RNA structures composed by distinct motifs of bounded topological genus. In this article, we set the theoretical foundations for the folding of the two backbone analogues of γ structures: the RNA γ-interaction structures. These are RNA-RNA interaction structures that are constructed by a finite number of building blocks over two backbones having genus at most γ. Combinatorial properties of γ-interaction structures are of practical interest since they have direct implications for the folding of topological interaction structures. We compute the generating function of γ-interaction structures and show that it is algebraic, which implies that the numbers of interaction structures can be computed recursively. We obtain simple asymptotic formulas for 0- and 1-interaction structures. The simplest class of interaction structures are the 0-interaction structures, which represent the two backbone analogues of secondary structures.

  5. Tapping the RNA world for therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Judy

    2018-04-16

    A recent revolution in RNA biology has led to the identification of new RNA classes with unanticipated functions, new types of RNA modifications, an unexpected multiplicity of alternative transcripts and widespread transcription of extragenic regions. This development in basic RNA biology has spawned a corresponding revolution in RNA-based strategies to generate new types of therapeutics. Here, I review RNA-based drug design and discuss barriers to broader applications and possible ways to overcome them. Because they target nucleic acids rather than proteins, RNA-based drugs promise to greatly extend the domain of 'druggable' targets beyond what can be achieved with small molecules and biologics.

  6. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Particle Swarm Optimisation with Spatial Particle Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Vesterstrøm, Jakob Svaneborg; Riget, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce spatial extension to particles in the PSO model in order to overcome premature convergence in iterative optimisation. The standard PSO and the new model (SEPSO) are compared w.r.t. performance on well-studied benchmark problems. We show that the SEPSO indeed managed...

  8. Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Symmetry is a fundamental concept which can be found in the whole range of human activities e. g. from arts to science. The beauty of a statues is often related to its symmetric form. In physics, all the laws are related to some sort of symmetry. Equally important is a small breakdown ofsymmetry. Even for the case of a statue, its beauty might be enhanced by introducing small distortions. In this course, we investigate the role symmetry in the world of elementary particles. Some symmetries found there are very similar to those which can be seen in our daily life, while others are more exotic and related to the quantum nature of the elementary particles. Our particular focus ismade on symmetry and its violation between the matter and anti-matter, known as CP violation. It is experimentally well established that particleand anti-particle behave a tiny bit differently in the world of elementary particles. We discuss how this would be explained and how we can extendour knowledge. Evolution of our universe is stro...

  9. A Regulatory RNA Inducing Transgenerationally Inherited Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lea Møller

    . The variation in Arabidopsis enables different regulatory networks and mechanisms to shape the phenotypic characteristics. The thesis describes the identification of regulatory RNA encoded by an enzyme encoding gene. The RNA regulates by inducing transgenerationally inherited phenotypes. The function of the RNA...... is dependent on the genetic background illustrating that polymorphisms are found in either interactors or target genes of the RNA. Furthermore, the RNA provides a mechanistic link between accumulation of glucosinolate and onset of flowering....

  10. Screening of Modified RNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen

    protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form......Because of sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... RNAs include the 2´-5´ oligoadenylate synthetase system, the protein kinase R, RIG-I and Toll-like receptor activated pathways all resulting in antiviral defence mechanism. We have previously shown that antiviral innate immune reactions against double stranded RNAs could be detected in vivo as partial...

  11. TargetRNA: a tool for predicting targets of small RNA action in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tjaden, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Many small RNA (sRNA) genes in bacteria act as posttranscriptional regulators of target messenger RNAs. Here, we present TargetRNA, a web tool for predicting mRNA targets of sRNA action in bacteria. TargetRNA takes as input a genomic sequence that may correspond to an sRNA gene. TargetRNA then uses a dynamic programming algorithm to search each annotated message in a specified genome for mRNAs that evince basepair-binding potential to the input sRNA sequence. Based on the calculated basepair-...

  12. Meeting report: discussions and preliminary findings on extracellular RNA measurement methods from laboratories in the NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise C. Laurent

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs have been identified in all tested biofluids and have been associated with a variety of extracellular vesicles, ribonucleoprotein complexes and lipoprotein complexes. Much of the interest in exRNAs lies in the fact that they may serve as signalling molecules between cells, their potential to serve as biomarkers for prediction and diagnosis of disease and the possibility that exRNAs or the extracellular particles that carry them might be used for therapeutic purposes. Among the most significant bottlenecks to progress in this field is the lack of robust and standardized methods for collection and processing of biofluids, separation of different types of exRNA-containing particles and isolation and analysis of exRNAs. The Sample and Assay Standards Working Group of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium is a group of laboratories funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop such methods. In our first joint endeavour, we held a series of conference calls and in-person meetings to survey the methods used among our members, placed them in the context of the current literature and used our findings to identify areas in which the identification of robust methodologies would promote rapid advancements in the exRNA field.

  13. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from cowpea mosaic virus-infected cowpea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorssers, L.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this thesis was the purification and identification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase engaged in replicating viral RNA in cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV)- infected cowpea leaves.

    Previously, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase produced upon infection of

  14. Molecular characterization of a bipartite double-stranded RNA virus and its satellite-like RNA co-infecting the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijiang eLiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of mycoviruses have been found in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In this study, we report a novel mycovirus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum botybirnavirus 1 (SsBRV1 that was originally isolated from the hypovirulent strain SCH941 of S. sclerotiorum. SsBRV1 has rigid spherical virions that are ~38 nm in diameter, and three dsRNA segments (dsRNA1, 2 and 3 with lengths of 6.4, 6.0 and 1.7 kbp, respectively were packaged in the virions. dsRNA1 encodes a cap-pol fusion protein, and dsRNA2 encodes a polyprotein with unknown functions but contributes to the formation of virus particles. The dsRNA3 is dispensable and may be a satellite-like RNA (SatlRNA of SsBRV1. Although phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp domain demonstrated that SsBRV1 is related to Botrytis porri RNA virus 1 (BpRV1 and Ustilago maydis dsRNA virus-H1 (UmV-H1, the structure proteins of SsBRV1 do not have any significant sequence similarities with other known viral proteins with the exception of those of BpRV1. SsBRV1 carrying dsRNA3 seems to have no obvious effects on the colony morphology, but can significantly reduce the growth rate and virulence of S. sclerotiorum. Notably, a growth hormone receptor binding domain (GHBP, Pfam12772 is detected in ORF2-encoded protein of SsBRV1, which have not been reported in any other viruses. These findings provide new insights into the virus taxonomy, virus evolution and the interactions between SsBRV1 and the fungal hosts.

  15. Particle size determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    A specification is given for an apparatus to provide a completely automatic testing cycle to determine the proportion of particles of less than a predetermined size in one of a number of fluid suspensions. Monitoring of the particle concentration during part of the process can be carried out by an x-ray source and detector. (U.K.)

  16. Elementary particle theory

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanovich, Eugene

    2018-01-01

    This book introduces notation, terminology, and basic ideas of relativistic quantum theories. The discussion proceeds systematically from the principle of relativity and postulates of quantum logics to the construction of Poincaré invariant few-particle models of interaction and scattering. It is the first of three volumes formulating a consistent relativistic quantum theory of interacting charged particles.

  17. History of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    back to history page Back Particle Physics Timeline For over two thousand years people have thought the Standard Model. We invite you to explore this history of particle physics with a focus on the : Quantum Theory 1964 - Present: The Modern View (the Standard Model) back to history page Back Sections of

  18. Light particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra Prakash, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the broad topic of particles in turbulence, which has applications in a diverse number of fields. A vast majority of fluid flows found in nature and in the industry are turbulent and contain dispersed elements. In this thesis, I have focused on light particles (air bubbles in

  19. Particle physics instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a series of three lectures aimed at giving an overview of basic particle detection principles, the interaction of particles with matter, the application of these principles in modern detector systems, as well techniques to read out detector signals in high-rate experiments. (author)

  20. Particles, contacts, bulk behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Tomas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Granular matter consists of discrete “particles”. These can be separate sand-grains, agglomerates (made of many primary particles), or solid materials like rock, composites, or metal-alloys—all with particulate inhomogeneous, possibly anisotropic micro-structure. Particles can be as small as

  1. Particle Astrophysics of Neutrinos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amol Dighe

    Energy spectra of neutrino sources. ASPERA. Page 4. Some unique features of neutrinos. The second most abundant particles in the universe. Cosmic microwave background photons: 400 / cm3. Cosmic background neutrinos: 330 / cm3. The lightest massive particles. A million times lighter than the electron. No direct mass ...

  2. Astro-particle-physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1985-09-01

    Opening remarks at the Fourth Marcel Grossman Meeting, 17-21 June 1985, in Rome, Italy, are reported. The meeting was concerned with the symbiosis of cosmology and particle physics. Numerous connections between work in particle physics and cosmology, in both experimental and theoretical areas, are pointed out

  3. When is a particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drell, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    The concept of elementary constituents or ultimate building blocks of nature in recent years is reviewed. The quark hypothesis, neutrinos, color, hard collisions, psi and other recent resonances, flavor, quantum chromodynamics, the tau particle, and particle structure are among the ideas considered. 22 references

  4. Concepts of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.; Weisskopf, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    This volume elucidates basic and well-established concepts of particle physics for the autodidact who is curious about recent developments in fundamental physics. Elementary quantum mechanics is a background must. Contents, abridged: The evolution of the particle concept before the advent of quantum mechanics. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and atomic physics. Relativistic quantum theory. Nuclear phenomena. Subnuclear phenomena. Index

  5. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  6. Optics of charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollnik, H.

    1987-01-01

    Suitable for both the specialist and non-specialist, this book develops all statements from first principles. Key chapters of the book focus upon how to design particle-optical systems, the systematics of image abberations, the effects of fringing fields, systematics of beams, and solutions for particle-optical systems. An undergraduate background in physics and mathematics is required for this work

  7. Introduction to particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitoun, R.

    2000-01-01

    This book proposes an introduction to particle physics that requires only a high-school level mathematical knowledge. Elementary particles (leptons, quarks, bosons) are presented according to a modern view taking into account of their symmetries and interactions. The author shows how physicists have elaborated the standard model and what are its implications in cosmology. (J.S.)

  8. Microchip Coulter particle counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik Darling; Blankenstein, Gert; Branebjerg, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a micro device employing the Coulter principle for counting and sizing of living cells and particles in liquid suspension. The microchip Coulter particle counter (μCPC) has been employed in a planar silicon structure covered with glass, which enables detailed observation during...

  9. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  10. Teaching particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hanley, P

    2000-01-01

    Particle physics attracts many students who hear of news from CERN or elsewhere in the media. This article examines which current A-level syllabuses include which bits of particle physics and surveys the many different types of resource available to teachers and students. (0 refs).

  11. Particles, imaging and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1986-01-01

    The book on particles, imaging and nuclei is one of the Background Readers for the Revised Nuffield Advanced Physics course. The contents contain five educational articles, which extend concepts covered in the course and examine recent developments in physics. Four of the articles on:- particles and the forces of nature, radioisotopes, lasers probe the atomic nucleus, and nuclear history, are indexed separately. (UK)

  12. RNA Study Using DNA Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Masubuchi, Takeya; Ueda, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is one of the fundamental steps of gene expression, where RNA polymerases (RNAPs) bind to their template genes and make RNAs. In addition to RNAP and the template gene, many molecules such as transcription factors are involved. The interaction and the effect of these factors depend on the geometry. Molecular layout of these factors, RNAP and gene is thus important. DNA nanotechnology is a promising technology that allows controlling of the molecular layout in the range of nanometer to micrometer scale with nanometer resolution; thus, it is expected to expand the RNA study beyond the current limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative-strand RNA viruses: the plant-infecting counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormelink, Richard; Garcia, Maria Laura; Goodin, Michael; Sasaya, Takahide; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2011-12-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome organization, while others have just recently been/or are still classified in floating genera. In most cases, at least two striking differences can still be discerned between the animal/human-infecting viruses and their plant-infecting counterparts which for the latter relate to their adaptation to plants as hosts. The first one is the capacity to modify plasmodesmata to facilitate systemic spread of infectious viral entities throughout the plant host. The second one is the capacity to counteract RNA interference (RNAi, also referred to as RNA silencing), the innate antiviral defence system of plants and insects. In this review an overview will be presented on the negative-strand RNA plant viruses classified within the families Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Ophioviridae and floating genera Tenuivirus and Varicosavirus. Genetic differences with the animal-infecting counterparts and their evolutionary descendants will be described in light of the above processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Voss, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood...... and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated micro......RNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis....

  15. microRNA-independent recruitment of Argonaute 1 to nanos mRNA through the Smaug RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Benjamin D; Smibert, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins are typically recruited to target messenger RNAs via an associated small RNA such as a microRNA (miRNA). Here, we describe a new mechanism of Ago recruitment through the Drosophila Smaug RNA-binding protein. We show that Smaug interacts with the Ago1 protein, and that Ago1 interacts with and is required for the translational repression of the Smaug target, nanos mRNA. The Ago1/nanos mRNA interaction does not require a miRNA, but it does require Smaug. Taken together, our data suggest a model whereby Smaug directly recruits Ago1 to nanos mRNA in a miRNA-independent manner, thereby repressing translation.

  16. Cyclophilin B stimulates RNA synthesis by the HCV RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Julie A; Meng, Xiao; Frick, David N

    2009-04-01

    Cyclophilins are cellular peptidyl isomerases that have been implicated in regulating hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a target of cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive drug recently shown to suppress HCV replication in cell culture. Watashi et al. recently demonstrated that CypB is important for efficient HCV replication, and proposed that it mediates the anti-HCV effects of CsA through an interaction with NS5B [Watashi K, Ishii N, Hijikata M, Inoue D, Murata T, Miyanari Y, et al. Cyclophilin B is a functional regulator of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase. Mol Cell 2005;19:111-22]. We examined the effects of purified CypB proteins on the enzymatic activity of NS5B. Recombinant CypB purified from insect cells directly stimulated NS5B-catalyzed RNA synthesis. CypB increased RNA synthesis by NS5B derived from genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV strains. Stimulation appears to arise from an increase in productive RNA binding. NS5B residue Pro540, a previously proposed target of CypB peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity, is not required for stimulation of RNA synthesis.

  17. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  18. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  19. Particle-assisted wetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Yan Feng; Tierno, Pietro; Marczewski, Dawid; Goedel, Werner A

    2005-01-01

    Wetting of a solid surface by a liquid is dramatically impeded if either the solid or the liquid is decorated by particles. Here it is shown that in the case of contact between two liquids the opposite effect may occur; mixtures of a hydrophobic liquid and suitable particles form wetting layers on a water surface though the liquid alone is non-wetting. In these wetting layers, the particles adsorb to, and partially penetrate through, the liquid/air and/or the liquid/water interface. This formation of wetting layers can be explained by the reduction in total interfacial energy due to the replacement of part of the fluid/fluid interfaces by the particles. It is most prominent if the contact angles at the fluid/fluid/particle contact lines are close to 90 0

  20. Transcriptome Profiles in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells after Exposure to gamma-rays and different HZE particles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distinct transcriptome profiles in response to low-LET and high-LET and different radiation qualities of HZE particles. Total RNA obtained from HBEC3KT cells after 1...

  1. RNA and Proteins: Mutual Respect [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen B. Hall

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA are often found in ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs, where they function in cellular processes to synthesize proteins (the ribosome, chemically modify RNAs (small nucleolar RNPs, splice pre-mRNAs (the spliceosome, and, on a larger scale, sequester RNAs, degrade them, or process them (P bodies, Cajal bodies, and nucleoli. Each RNA–protein interaction is a story in itself, as both molecules can change conformation, compete for binding sites, and regulate cellular functions. Recent studies of Xist long non-coding RNP, the U4/5/6 tri-small nuclear RNP complex, and an activated state of a spliceosome reveal new features of RNA interactions with proteins, and, although their stories are incomplete, they are already fascinating.

  2. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Benefits of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  3. Synthesis of double-stranded RNA in a virus-enriched fraction from Agaricus bisporus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriskantha, A.; Wach, P.; Schlagnhaufer, B.; Romaine, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    Partially purified virus preparations from sporophores of Agaricus bisporus affected with LaFrance disease had up to a 15-fold-higher RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity than did comparable preparations from health sporophores. Enzyme activity was dependent upon the presence of Mg 2+ and the four nucleoside triphosphates and was insensitive to actinomycin D, α-amanitin, and rifampin. The 3 H-labeled enzyme reaction products were double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) as indicated by CF-11 cellulose column chromatography and by their ionic-strength-dependent sensitivity to hydrolysis by RNase A. The principal dsRNA products had estimated molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10 6 and 1.4 /times/ 10 6 . Cs 2 SO 4 equilibrium centrifugation of the virus preparation resolved a single peak of RNA polymerase activity that banded with a 35-nm spherical virus particle containing dsRNAs with molecular weights of 4.3 /times/ 10 6 and 1.4 /times/ 10 6 . The data suggest that the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with the 35-nm spherical virus is a replicase which catalyzes the synthesis of the genomic dsRNAs

  4. Studies on the role of NonA in mRNA biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlova, Natalia; Braga, Jose; Lundgren, Josefin; Rino, Jose; Young, Patrick; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Visa, Neus

    2006-01-01

    The NonA protein of Drosophila melanogaster is an abundant nuclear protein that belongs to the DBHS (Drosophila behavior, human splicing) protein family. The DBHS proteins bind both DNA and RNA in vitro and have been involved in different aspects of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, transcription regulation and nuclear retention of mRNA. We have used double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells to silence the expression of NonA and to investigate its role in mRNA biogenesis. We show that knockdown of NonA does not affect transcription nor splicing. We demonstrate that NonA forms a complex with the essential nuclear export factor NXF1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We have constructed stable S2 cell lines that express full-length and truncated NXF1 fused to GFP in order to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. We show that knockdown of NonA reduces the intranuclear mobility of NXF1-GFP associated with poly(A) + RNA in vivo, while the mobility of the truncated NXF1-GFP that does not bind RNA is not affected. Our data suggest that NonA facilitates the intranuclear mobility of mRNP particles

  5. tRNA conjugation with chitosan nanoparticles: An AFM imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-04-01

    The conjugation of tRNA with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes 15,100 and 200 kDa was investigated in aqueous solution using multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Structural analysis showed that chitosan binds tRNA via G-C and A-U base pairs as well as backbone PO2 group, through electrostatic, hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts with overall binding constants of KCh-15-tRNA=4.1 (±0.60)×10(3)M(-1), KCh-100-tRNA=5.7 (±0.8)×10(3)M(-1) and KCh-200-tRNA=1.2 (±0.3)×10(4)M(-1). As chitosan size increases more stable polymer-tRNA conjugate is formed. AFM images showed major tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred as chitosan concentration increased. Even though chitosan induced major biopolymer structural changes, tRNA remains in A-family structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (NIH); (CH-Boston)

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.

  7. Role of CBCA in RNA biogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iasillo, Claudia

    RNA transcription and RNA processing are key steps in eukaryotic gene expression, which includes, therefore, RNA synthesis by RNA polymerase enzymes and a range of modifications of the pre-mRNA before the transcript can leave the nucleus and reach the cytoplasm for translation. Interestingly......, a large body of evidence suggests that these RNA processing events occur often already during transcription. One of these modifications, the co-transcriptional 5’ end capping of a nascent RNA, is occurring specifically during RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription. The 5’ cap exerts its role via...... the nuclear Cap Binding Complex (CBC). This thesis focuses on the protein ARS2, which binds the CBC to form the CBCA complex. CBCA can further associate with different proteins playing different roles in RNA metabolism. For example, CBCA binds the Nuclear Exosome Targeting Complex (NEXT), which...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of amino acid-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles for siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Feray; Kara, Goknur; Cokol Cakmak, Melike; Cokol, Murat; Denkbas, Emir Baki

    2017-10-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNA) are short nucleic acid fragments of about 20-27 nucleotides, which can inhibit the expression of specific genes. siRNA based RNAi technology has emerged as a promising method for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, a major limitation in the therapeutic use of siRNA is its rapid degradation in plasma and cellular cytoplasm, resulting in short half-life. In addition, as siRNA molecules cannot penetrate into the cell efficiently, it is required to use a carrier system for its delivery. In this work, chemically and morphologically different calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles, including spherical-like hydroxyapatite (HA-s), needle-like hydroxyapatite (HA-n) and calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel technique and the effects of particle characteristics on the binding capacity of siRNA were investigated. In order to enhance the gene loading efficiency, the nanoparticles were functionalized with arginine and the morphological and their structural characteristics were analyzed. The addition of arginine did not significantly change the particle sizes; however, it provided a significantly increased binding of siRNA for all types of CaP nanoparticles, as revealed by spectrophotometric measurements analysis. Arginine functionalized HA-n nanoparticles showed the best binding behavior with siRNA among the other nanoparticles due to its high, positive zeta potential (+18.8mV) and high surface area of Ca ++ rich "c" plane. MTT cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that all the nanoparticles tested herein were biocompatible. Our results suggest that high siRNA entrapment in each of the three modified non-toxic CaP nanoparticles make them promising candidates as a non-viral vector for delivering therapeutic siRNA molecules to treat cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydration dependent dynamics in RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Greg L.; Bardaro, Michael F.; Echodu, Dorothy C.; Drobny, Gary P.; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    The essential role played by local and collective motions in RNA function has led to a growing interest in the characterization of RNA dynamics. Recent investigations have revealed that even relatively simple RNAs experience complex motions over multiple time scales covering the entire ms-ps motional range. In this work, we use deuterium solid-state NMR to systematically investigate motions in HIV-1 TAR RNA as a function of hydration. We probe dynamics at three uridine residues in different structural environments ranging from helical to completely unrestrained. We observe distinct and substantial changes in 2 H solid-state relaxation times and lineshapes at each site as hydration levels increase. By comparing solid-state and solution state 13 C relaxation measurements, we establish that ns-μs motions that may be indicative of collective dynamics suddenly arise in the RNA as hydration reaches a critical point coincident with the onset of bulk hydration. Beyond that point, we observe smaller changes in relaxation rates and lineshapes in these highly hydrated solid samples, compared to the dramatic activation of motion occurring at moderate hydration

  10. RNA Editing in Plant Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Wissinger, Bernd; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1989-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  11. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    by appending oligo(A)-tails onto structured substrates. Another role of the nuclear exosome is that of mRNA surveillance. In strains harboring a mutated THO/Sub2p system, involved in messenger ribonucleoprotein particle biogenesis and nuclear export, the exosome-associated 3' 5' exonuclease Rrp6p is required...

  12. Linear particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A linear particle accelerator which provides a pulsed beam of charged particles of uniform energy is described. The accelerator is in the form of an evacuated dielectric tube, inside of which a particle source is located at one end of the tube, with a target or window located at the other end of the dielectric tube. Along the length of the tube are externally located pairs of metal plates, each insulated from each other in an insulated housing. Each of the plates of a pair are connected to an electrical source of voltage of opposed polarity, with the polarity of the voltage of the plates oriented so that the plate of a pair, nearer to the particle source, is of the opposed polarity to the charge of the particle emitted by the source. Thus, a first plate about the tube located nearest the particle source, attracts a particle which as it passes through the tube past the first plate is then repelled by the reverse polarity of the second plate of the pair to continue moving towards the target

  13. In vitro and in vivo delivery of siRNA via VIPER polymer system to lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Daniel P; Cheng, Yilong; Kandil, Rima; Xie, Yuran; Mohammadi, Mariam; Harz, Hartmann; Sharma, Akhil; Peeler, David J; Moszczynska, Anna; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Pun, Suzie H; Merkel, Olivia M

    2018-04-28

    The block copolymer VIPER (virus-inspired polymer for endosomal release) has been reported to be a promising novel delivery system of DNA plasmids both in vitro and in vivo. VIPER is comprised of a polycation segment for condensation of nucleic acids as well as a pH-sensitive segment that exposes the membrane lytic peptide melittin in acidic environments to facilitate endosomal escape. The objective of this study was to investigate VIPER/siRNA polyplex characteristics, and compare their in vitro and in vivo performance with commercially available transfection reagents and a control version of VIPER lacking melittin. VIPER/siRNA polyplexes were formulated and characterized at various charge ratios and shown to be efficiently internalized in cultured cells. Target mRNA knockdown was confirmed by both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR and the kinetics of knockdown was monitored by live cell spinning disk microscopy, revealing knockdown starting by 4 h post-delivery. Intratracheal instillation of VIPER particles formulated with sequence specific siRNA to the lung of mice resulted in a significantly more efficient knockdown of GAPDH compared to treatment with VIPER particles formulated with scrambled sequence siRNA. We also demonstrated using pH-sensitive labels that VIPER particles experience less acidic environments compared to control polyplexes. In summary, VIPER/siRNA polyplexes efficiently deliver siRNA in vivo resulting in robust gene silencing (>75% knockdown) within the lung. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nucleocapsid-Independent Specific Viral RNA Packaging via Viral Envelope Protein and Viral RNA Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Krishna; Chen, Chun-Jen; Maeda, Junko; Makino, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    For any of the enveloped RNA viruses studied to date, recognition of a specific RNA packaging signal by the virus's nucleocapsid (N) protein is the first step described in the process of viral RNA packaging. In the murine coronavirus a selective interaction between the viral transmembrane envelope protein M and the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, composed of N protein and viral RNA containing a short cis-acting RNA element, the packaging signal, determines the selective RNA packaging into vi...

  15. Charged particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    A device for detecting the emission of charged particles from a specimen is described. The specimen is placed within an accumulator means which statically accumulates any charged particles emitted from the specimen. The accumulator means is pivotally positioned between a first capacitor plate having a positive electrical charge and a second capacitor plate having a negative electrical charge. The accumulator means is attracted to one capacitor plate and repelled from the other capacitor plate by an amount proportional to the amount and intensity of charged particles emitted by the specimen. (auth)

  16. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    A brief overview is given of recent work that integrates cosmology and particle physics. The observational data regarding the abundance of matter and radiation in the Universe is described. The manner in which the cosmological survival density of stable massive particles can be calculated is discussed along with the process of cosmological nucleosynthesis. Several applications of these general arguments are given with reference to the survival density of nucleons, neutrinos and unconfined fractionally charge particles. The use of nucleosynthesis to limit the number of lepton generations is described together with the implications of a small neutrino mass for the origin of galaxies and clusters. (Auth.)

  17. Particles near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, T.; Willenbrock, S.

    1993-01-01

    We propose returning to the definition of the width of a particle in terms of the pole in the particle's propagator. Away from thresholds, this definition of width is equivalent to the standard perturbative definition, up to next-to-leading order; however, near a threshold, the two definitions differ significantly. The width as defined by the pole position provides more information in the threshold region than the standard perturbative definition and, in contrast with the perturbative definition, does not vanish when a two-particle s-wave threshold is approached from below

  18. Sources for charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arianer, J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a basic course on charged particle sources for post-graduate students and thematic schools on large facilities and accelerator physics. A simple but precise description of the creation and the emission of charged particles is presented. This course relies on every year upgraded reference documents. Following relevant topics are considered: electronic emission processes, technological and practical considerations on electron guns, positron sources, production of neutral atoms, ionization, plasma and discharge, different types of positive and negative ion sources, polarized particle sources, materials for the construction of ion sources, low energy beam production and transport. (N.T.)

  19. Cosmology and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steigman, G [California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Bartol Research Foundation, Newark, Delaware (USA))

    1982-01-29

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses.

  20. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srednicki, M.

    1990-01-01

    At least eighty percent of the mass of the universe consists of some material which, unlike ordinary matter, neither emits nor absorbs light. This book collects key papers related to the discovery of this astonishing fact and its profound implications for astrophysics, cosmology, and the physics of elementary particles. The book focusses on the likely possibility that the dark matter is composed of an as yet undiscovered elementary particle, and examines the boundaries of our present knowledge of the properties such a particle must possess. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  1. Modular arrangement of regulatory RNA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roßmanith, Johanna; Narberhaus, Franz

    2017-03-04

    Due to their simple architecture and control mechanism, regulatory RNA modules are attractive building blocks in synthetic biology. This is especially true for riboswitches, which are natural ligand-binding regulators of gene expression. The discovery of various tandem riboswitches inspired the design of combined RNA modules with activities not yet found in nature. Riboswitches were placed in tandem or in combination with a ribozyme or temperature-responsive RNA thermometer resulting in new functionalities. Here, we compare natural examples of tandem riboswitches with recently designed artificial RNA regulators suggesting substantial modularity of regulatory RNA elements. Challenges associated with modular RNA design are discussed.

  2. MicroRNA Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Bo; Chen, Yongming; Leong, Kam W.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) directs post-transcriptional regulation of a network of genes by targeting mRNA. Although relatively recent in development, many miRNAs direct differentiation of various stem cells including induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a major player in regenerative medicine. An effective and safe delivery of miRNA holds the key to translating miRNA technologies. Both viral and nonviral delivery systems have seen success in miRNA delivery, and each approach possesses advantages an...

  3. Viral RNA polymerase scanning and the gymnastics of Sendai virus RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolakofsky, Daniel; Le Mercier, Philippe; Iseni, Frederic; Garcin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    mRNA synthesis from nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus (NNV) genomes is unique in that the genome RNA is embedded in an N protein assembly (the nucleocapsid) and the viral RNA polymerase does not dissociate from the template after release of each mRNA, but rather scans the genome RNA for the next gene-start site. A revised model for NNV RNA synthesis is presented, in which RNA polymerase scanning plays a prominent role. Polymerase scanning of the template is known to occur as the viral transcriptase negotiates gene junctions without falling off the template

  4. iDoRNA: An Interacting Domain-based Tool for Designing RNA-RNA Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittrawan Thaiprasit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA-RNA interactions play a crucial role in gene regulation in living organisms. They have gained increasing interest in the field of synthetic biology because of their potential applications in medicine and biotechnology. However, few novel regulators based on RNA-RNA interactions with desired structures and functions have been developed due to the challenges of developing design tools. Recently, we proposed a novel tool, called iDoDe, for designing RNA-RNA interacting sequences by first decomposing RNA structures into interacting domains and then designing each domain using a stochastic algorithm. However, iDoDe did not provide an optimal solution because it still lacks a mechanism to optimize the design. In this work, we have further developed the tool by incorporating a genetic algorithm (GA to find an RNA solution with maximized structural similarity and minimized hybridized RNA energy, and renamed the tool iDoRNA. A set of suitable parameters for the genetic algorithm were determined and found to be a weighting factor of 0.7, a crossover rate of 0.9, a mutation rate of 0.1, and the number of individuals per population set to 8. We demonstrated the performance of iDoRNA in comparison with iDoDe by using six RNA-RNA interaction models. It was found that iDoRNA could efficiently generate all models of interacting RNAs with far more accuracy and required far less computational time than iDoDe. Moreover, we compared the design performance of our tool against existing design tools using forty-four RNA-RNA interaction models. The results showed that the performance of iDoRNA is better than RiboMaker when considering the ensemble defect, the fitness score and computation time usage. However, it appears that iDoRNA is outperformed by NUPACK and RNAiFold 2.0 when considering the ensemble defect. Nevertheless, iDoRNA can still be an useful alternative tool for designing novel RNA-RNA interactions in synthetic biology research. The source code of iDoRNA

  5. Layer-by-layer nanoparticles as an efficient siRNA delivery vehicle for SPARC silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang Fei; Mundargi, Raghavendra C; Chen, Min Hui Averil; Lessig, Jacqueline; Neu, Björn; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Wong, Tina T

    2014-05-14

    Efficient and safe delivery systems for siRNA therapeutics remain a challenge. Elevated secreted protein, acidic, and rich in cysteine (SPARC) protein expression is associated with tissue scarring and fibrosis. Here we investigate the feasibility of encapsulating SPARC-siRNA in the bilayers of layer-by-layer (LbL) nanoparticles (NPs) with poly(L-arginine) (ARG) and dextran (DXS) as polyelectrolytes. Cellular binding and uptake of LbL NPs as well as siRNA delivery were studied in FibroGRO cells. siGLO-siRNA and SPARC-siRNA were efficiently coated onto hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. The multilayered NPs were characterized with regard to particle size, zeta potential and surface morphology using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The SPARC-gene silencing and mRNA levels were analyzed using ChemiDOC western blot technique and RT-PCR. The multilayer SPARC-siRNA incorporated nanoparticles are about 200 nm in diameter and are efficiently internalized into FibroGRO cells. Their intracellular fate was also followed by tagging with suitable reporter siRNA as well as with lysotracker dye; confocal microscopy clearly indicates endosomal escape of the particles. Significant (60%) SPARC-gene knock down was achieved by using 0.4 pmole siRNA/μg of LbL NPs in FibroGRO cells and the relative expression of SPARC mRNA reduced significantly (60%) against untreated cells. The cytotoxicity as evaluated by xCelligence real-time cell proliferation and MTT cell assay, indicated that the SPARC-siRNA-loaded LbL NPs are non-toxic. In conclusion, the LbL NP system described provides a promising, safe and efficient delivery platform as a non-viral vector for siRNA delivery that uses biopolymers to enhance the gene knock down efficiency for the development of siRNA therapeutics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comprehensive characterization of lncRNA-mRNA related ceRNA network across 12 major cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Li, Feng; Sun, Zeguo; Wu, Tan; Shi, Xinrui; Li, Jing; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to indirectly regulate mRNAs through shared microRNAs, which represents a novel layer of RNA crosstalk and plays critical roles in the development of tumor. However, the global regulation landscape and characterization of these lncRNA related ceRNA crosstalk in cancers is still largely unknown. Here, we systematically characterized the lncRNA related ceRNA interactions across 12 major cancers and the normal physiological states by integrating multidimensional molecule profiles of more than 5000 samples. Our study suggest the large difference of ceRNA regulation between normal and tumor states and the higher similarity across similar tissue origin of tumors. The ceRNA related molecules have more conserved features in tumor networks and they play critical roles in both the normal and tumorigenesis processes. Besides, lncRNAs in the pan-cancer ceRNA network may be potential biomarkers of tumor. By exploring hub lncRNAs, we found that these conserved key lncRNAs dominate variable tumor hallmark processes across pan-cancers. Network dynamic analysis highlights the critical roles of ceRNA regulation in tumorigenesis. By analyzing conserved ceRNA interactions, we found that miRNA mediate ceRNA regulation showed different patterns across pan-cancer; while analyzing the cancer specific ceRNA interactions reveal that lncRNAs synergistically regulated tumor driver genes of cancer hallmarks. Finally, we found that ceRNA modules have the potential to predict patient survival. Overall, our study systematically dissected the lncRNA related ceRNA networks in pan-cancer that shed new light on understanding the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis. PMID:27580177

  7. Elementary particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out

  8. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  9. The Acquisition of Particles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    process of language acquisition on the basis of linguistic evidence the child is exposed to. ..... particle verbs are recognized in language processing differs from the way morphologically ..... In Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 11.

  10. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  11. Particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The report of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory describes the work carried out in 1985 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  12. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  13. Modern particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079874

    2013-01-01

    Unique in its coverage of all aspects of modern particle physics, this textbook provides a clear connection between the theory and recent experimental results, including the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. It provides a comprehensive and self-contained description of the Standard Model of particle physics suitable for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students studying experimental particle physics. Physical theory is introduced in a straightforward manner with full mathematical derivations throughout. Fully-worked examples enable students to link the mathematical theory to results from modern particle physics experiments. End-of-chapter exercises, graded by difficulty, provide students with a deeper understanding of the subject. Online resources available at www.cambridge.org/MPP feature password-protected fully-worked solutions to problems for instructors, numerical solutions and hints to the problems for students and PowerPoint slides and JPEGs of figures from the book

  14. Search for Hidden Particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Solovev, V

    The SHiP Experiment is a new general-purpose fixed target facility at the SPS to search for hidden particles as predicted by a very large number of recently elaborated models of Hidden Sectors which are capable of accommodating dark matter, neutrino oscillations, and the origin of the full baryon asymmetry in the Universe. Specifically, the experiment is aimed at searching for very weakly interacting long lived particles including Heavy Neutral Leptons - right-handed partners of the active neutrinos; light supersymmetric particles - sgoldstinos, etc.; scalar, axion and vector portals to the hidden sector. The high intensity of the SPS and in particular the large production of charm mesons with the 400 GeV beam allow accessing a wide variety of light long-lived exotic particles of such models and of SUSY. Moreover, the facility is ideally suited to study the interactions of tau neutrinos.

  15. Blog: the God particle

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Dateline video journalist Aaron Lewis this week reprots on the search to find the elusive "God particle", which, if found, could explain to scientists how everything in the world got its mass."(1/2 page)

  16. Research in particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, F.; Suranyi, P; Wijewardhana, L.C.R.

    1991-10-01

    In the test particle approximation, the scattering amplitude for two-particle scattering in (2+1)-dimensional Chern-Simons-Witten gravity and supergravity was computed and compared to the corresponding metric solutions. The formalism was then extended to the exact gauge theoretic treatment of the two-particle scattering problem and compared to 't Hooft's results from the metric approach. We have studied dynamical symmetry breaking in 2+1 dimensional field theories. We have analyzed strong Extended Technicolor (ETC) models where the ETC coupling is close to a critical value. There are effective scalar fields in each of the theories. We have worked our how such scalar particles can be produced and how they decay. The φ 4 field theory was investigated in the Schrodinger representation. The critical behavior was extracted in an arbitrary number of dimensions in second order of a systematic truncation approximation. The correlation exponent agrees with known values within a few percent

  17. Particle Engulfment and Pushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    As a liquefied metal solidifies, particles dispersed in the liquid are either pushed ahead of or engulfed by the moving solidification front. Similar effects can be seen when the ground freezes and pushes large particles out of the soil. The Particle Engulfment and Pushing (PEP) experiment, conducted aboard the fourth U.S. Microgravity Payload (USMP-4) mission in 1997, used a glass and plastic beads suspended in a transparent liquid. The liquid was then frozen, trapping or pushing the particles as the solidifying front moved. This simulated the formation of advanced alloys and composite materials. Such studies help scientists to understand how to improve the processes for making advanced materials on Earth. The principal investigator is Dr. Doru Stefanescu of the University of Alabama. This image is from a video downlink.

  18. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Franck Close

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  19. Orchestrating the Selection and Packaging of Genomic RNA by Retroviruses: An Ensemble of Viral and Host Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddis Maldonado, Rebecca J.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious retrovirus particles contain two copies of unspliced viral RNA that serve as the viral genome. Unspliced retroviral RNA is transcribed in the nucleus by the host RNA polymerase II and has three potential fates: (1) it can be spliced into subgenomic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for the translation of viral proteins; or it can remain unspliced to serve as either (2) the mRNA for the translation of Gag and Gag–Pol; or (3) the genomic RNA (gRNA) that is packaged into virions. The Gag structural protein recognizes and binds the unspliced viral RNA to select it as a genome, which is selected in preference to spliced viral RNAs and cellular RNAs. In this review, we summarize the current state of understanding about how retroviral packaging is orchestrated within the cell and explore potential new mechanisms based on recent discoveries in the field. We discuss the cis-acting elements in the unspliced viral RNA and the properties of the Gag protein that are required for their interaction. In addition, we discuss the role of host factors in influencing the fate of the newly transcribed viral RNA, current models for how retroviruses distinguish unspliced viral mRNA from viral genomic RNA, and the possible subcellular sites of genomic RNA dimerization and selection by Gag. Although this review centers primarily on the wealth of data available for the alpharetrovirus Rous sarcoma virus, in which a discrete RNA packaging sequence has been identified, we have also summarized the cis- and trans-acting factors as well as the mechanisms governing gRNA packaging of other retroviruses for comparison. PMID:27657110

  20. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for survivin targeted siRNA delivery in breast tumor therapy and preventing its metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao

    Nanoparticle-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a promising therapeutic strategy in various cancers. However, it is difficult to deliver degradative siRNA to tumor tissue, and thus a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery is essential for cancer therapy. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-modified chitosan (PEG-CS) was synthesized successfully for delivering nucleic acid drug. We deemed that PEGylated CS could improve its solubility by forming a stable siRNA loaded in nanoparticles, and enhancing transfection efficiency of siRNA-loaded CS nanoparticles in cancer cell line. The research results showed that siRNA loaded in PEGylated CS (PEG-CS/siRNA) nanoparticles with smaller particle size had superior structural stability in the physical environment compared to CS nanoparticles. The data of in vitro antitumor activity revealed that 4T1 tumor cell growth was significantly inhibited and cellular uptake of PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles in 4T1 cells was dramatically enhanced compared to naked siRNA groups. The results from flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles were more easily taken up than naked siRNA. Importantly, PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors of 4T1 cells in vivo. It has been demonstrated that the PEG-CS is a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery, and it can effectively reduce tumor growth and prevent metastasis.

  1. Defective interfering particles in monolayer-propagated Newcastle disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, J.M.; Simon, E.H.

    1976-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) serially passaged in chick embryo fibroblasts (M-NDV) gives rise to defective interfering (NDV-DI) particles, while NDV passaged in embryonated eggs (E-NDV) does not. Co-infection with these particles and infectious virions results in a 99 percent reduction in yield. Interference is not due to interferon or to prevention of absorption of infectious virions and is specific for NDV. The particles mediating interference sediment at the same velocity as infectious virions. The accumulation of NDV-DI particles in monolayers but not in eggs may be a consequence of the fact that M-NDV virions are larger and probably contain more RNA, or it may reflect differences in NDV replicative processes in eggs and monolayers, or both

  2. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    CERN Document Server

    Lakatos, G

    2003-01-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or ...

  3. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  4. PARTICLE BEAMS: Frontier course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Driven by the quest for higher energies and optimal physics conditions, the behaviour of particle beams in accelerators and storage rings is the subject of increasing attention. Thus the second course organized jointly by the US and CERN Accelerator Schools looked towards the frontiers of particle beam knowledge. The programme held at South Padre Island, Texas, from 23-29 October attracted 125 participants including some 35 from Europe

  5. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.; Schramm, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    During the past year, the research of the members of our group has spanned virtually all the topics at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: inflationary Universe scenarios, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on particle properties, ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics, quantum field theory in curved space-time, cosmology with extra dimensions, superstring cosmology, neutrino astronomy with large, underground detectors, and the formation of structure in the Universe

  6. Ionization particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ried, L.

    1982-01-01

    A new device is claimed for detecting particles in a gas. The invention comprises a low cost, easy to assemble, and highly accurate particle detector using a single ionization chamber to contain a reference region and a sensing region. The chamber is designed with the radioactive source near one electrode and the second electrode located at a distance less than the distance of maximum ionization from the radioactive source

  7. PARTICLE BEAMS: Frontier course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-01-15

    Driven by the quest for higher energies and optimal physics conditions, the behaviour of particle beams in accelerators and storage rings is the subject of increasing attention. Thus the second course organized jointly by the US and CERN Accelerator Schools looked towards the frontiers of particle beam knowledge. The programme held at South Padre Island, Texas, from 23-29 October attracted 125 participants including some 35 from Europe.

  8. The Least Particle Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Robert

    2011-10-01

    The Least Particle Theory states that the universe was cast as a great sea of energy. MaX Planck declared a quantum of energy to be the least value in the universe. We declare the quantum of energy to be the least particle in the universe. Stephen Hawking declared quantum mechanics to be of no value in todays gross mechanics. That's like saying the number 1 has no place in mathematics.

  9. Single particle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, P.J.; Jensen, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the opening of the 3-quasiparticle continuum at 3Δ sets the energy scale for the enhancement of the effective mass near the Fermi surface of nuclei. The authors argue that the spreading width of single-particle states due to coupling with low-lying collective modes is qualitatively different from the two-body collision mechanism, and contributes little to the single-particle lifetime in the sense of the optical model. (orig.)

  10. Particle physics experiments 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents research work carried out in 1986 on 52 elementary particle experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. Most of the experiments were collaborative and involved research groups from different countries. About half of the experiments were conducted at CERN, the remaining experiments employed the accelerators: LAMPT, LEP, PETRA, SLAC, and HERA. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (U.K.)

  11. Gravity, particles and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The author deals with the relationship between gravitation and elementary particle physics, and the implications of these subjects for astrophysics. The text is split up into two parts. The first part represents a relatively non-technical overview of the subject, while the second part represents a technical examination of the most important aspects of non-Einsteinian gravitational theory and its relation to astrophysics. Relevant references from the fields of gravitation, elementary particle theory and astrophysics are included. (Auth.)

  12. Particle electric dipole moments

    CERN Document Server

    Pendlebury, J M

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of particle electric dipole moments (EDMs) continue to put powerful constraints on theories of T-symmetry and CP-symmetry violation, which form currently one of the most prominent fields in particle physics. EDM measurements have been concentrated on neutral systems such as the neutron and atoms and molecules. These measurements allow one to deduce, in turn, the electric dipole moments of the fundamental fermions, that is, the lighter leptons and quarks and also those of some heavy nuclei.

  13. Applications of particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbalat, O.

    1994-01-01

    Particle accelerators are now widely used in a variety of applications for scientific research, applied physics, medicine, industrial processing, while possible utilisation in power engineering is envisaged. Earlier presentations of this subject, given at previous CERN Accelerator School sessions have been updated with papers contributed to the first European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology (ECAART) held in September 1989 in Frankfurt and to the Second European Particle Accelerator Conference in Nice in June 1990. (orig.)

  14. Reductively Responsive Hydrogel Nanoparticles with Uniform Size, Shape, and Tunable Composition for Systemic siRNA Delivery in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Da; Tian, Shaomin; Baryza, Jeremy; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-10-05

    To achieve the great potential of siRNA based gene therapy, safe and efficient systemic delivery in vivo is essential. Here we report reductively responsive hydrogel nanoparticles with highly uniform size and shape for systemic siRNA delivery in vivo. "Blank" hydrogel nanoparticles with high aspect ratio were prepared using continuous particle fabrication based on PRINT (particle replication in nonwetting templates). Subsequently, siRNA was conjugated to "blank" nanoparticles via a disulfide linker with a high loading ratio of up to 18 wt %, followed by surface modification to enhance transfection. This fabrication process could be easily scaled up to prepare large quantity of hydrogel nanoparticles. By controlling hydrogel composition, surface modification, and siRNA loading ratio, siRNA conjugated nanoparticles were highly tunable to achieve high transfection efficiency in vitro. FVII-siRNA conjugated nanoparticles were further stabilized with surface coating for in vivo siRNA delivery to liver hepatocytes, and successful gene silencing was demonstrated at both mRNA and protein levels.

  15. Dispersal of sticky particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramana; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we show through simulations that when sticky particles are broken continually, particles are dispersed into fine dust only if they are present in a narrow range of volume fractions. The upper limit of this range is 0.20 in the 2D and 0.10 in the 3D space. An increase in the dimensionality of space reduces the upper limit nearly by a factor of two. This scaling holds for dispersal of particles in hyperdimensional space of dimensions up to ten, the maximum dimension studied in this work. The maximum values of volume fractions obtained are significantly lower than those required for close packing and random packing of discs in 2D and spheres in 3D space. These values are also smaller than those required for critical phenomena of cluster percolation. The results obtained are attributed to merger cascades of sticky particles, triggered by breakup events. A simple theory that incorporates this cascade is developed to quantitatively explain the observed scaling of the upper limit with the dimensionality of space. The theory also captures the dynamics of the dispersal process in the corresponding range of particle volume fractions. The theory suggests that cascades of order one and two predominantly decide the upper limit for complete dispersal of particles.

  16. spinning self-dual particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, J.; Rivelles, V.O.

    1989-01-01

    Self-dual particles in two-dimensions are presented. They were obtained from chiral boson particle by square root technique. The propagator of spinning self-dual particle is calculated using the BFV formalism. (M.C.K.)

  17. How the RNA isolation method can affect microRNA microarray results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolska, Agnieszka; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Litman, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    RNA microarray analysis on porcine brain tissue. One method is a phenol-guanidine isothiocyanate-based procedure that permits isolation of total RNA. The second method, miRVana™ microRNA isolation, is column based and recovers the small RNA fraction alone. We found that microarray analyses give different results...... that depend on the RNA fraction used, in particular because some microRNAs appear very sensitive to the RNA isolation method. We conclude that precautions need to be taken when comparing microarray studies based on RNA isolated with different methods.......The quality of RNA is crucial in gene expression experiments. RNA degradation interferes in the measurement of gene expression, and in this context, microRNA quantification can lead to an incorrect estimation. In the present study, two different RNA isolation methods were used to perform micro...

  18. Topology and prediction of RNA pseudoknots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reidys, Christian; Huang, Fenix; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Several dynamic programming algorithms for predicting RNA structures with pseudoknots have been proposed that differ dramatically from one another in the classes of structures considered. Results: Here, we use the natural topological classification of RNA structures in terms...

  19. Atomic force microscopy investigation of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus capsid disruption and RNA extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. G.; McPherson, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV) was subjected to a variety of procedures which disrupted the protein capsids and produced exposure of the ssRNA genome. The results of the treatments were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both in situ and ex situ freeze-thawing produced RNA emission, though at low efficiency. The RNA lost from such particles was evident, in some cases in the process of exiting the virions. More severe disruption of TYMV and extrusion of intact RNA onto the substrate were produced by drying the virus and rehydrating with neutral buffer. Similar products were also obtained by heating TYMV to 70-75 deg. C and by exposure to alkaline pH. Experiments showed the nucleic acid to have an elaborate secondary structure distributed linearly along its length

  20. Specific cross-linking of capsid proteins to virus RNA by ultraviolet irradiation of polio virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetz, K.; Habermehl, K.O. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany, F.R.))

    1982-04-01

    Poliovirus was irradiated with u.v. light under conditions causing approx. 5% cross-linking of capsid protein to virus RNA. Cross-linked RNA-protein complexes, freed from unbound protein, were treated with nuclease, and then analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The smallest capsid polypeptide VP4 was found to be associated with the RNA to the greatest degree, followed by VP2 and VP1, while VP3 was attached only in trace amounts. Low radiation doses, which produced cross-linking of RNA to protein, did not cause breakdown of the virus particles or conformational changes of the capsid as examined physically and serologically. However, higher doses caused structural alterations of the virus capsid.

  1. Specific cross-linking of capsid proteins to virus RNA by ultraviolet irradiation of polio virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetz, K.; Habermehl, K.-O.

    1982-01-01

    Poliovirus was irradiated with u.v. light under conditions causing approx. 5% cross-linking of capsid protein to virus RNA. Cross-linked RNA-protein complexes, freed from unbound protein, were treated with nuclease, and then analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. The smallest capsid polypeptide VP4 was found to be associated with the RNA to the greatest degree, followed by VP2 and VP1, while VP3 was attached only in trace amounts. Low radiation doses, which produced cross-linking of RNA to protein, did not cause breakdown of the virus particles or conformational changes of the capsid as examined physically and serologically. However, higher doses caused structural alterations of the virus capsid. (author)

  2. Efficient cellular release of Rift Valley fever virus requires genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Piper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Rift Valley fever virus is responsible for periodic, explosive epizootics throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The development of therapeutics targeting this virus is difficult due to a limited understanding of the viral replicative cycle. Utilizing a virus-like particle system, we have established roles for each of the viral structural components in assembly, release, and virus infectivity. The envelope glycoprotein, Gn, was discovered to be necessary and sufficient for packaging of the genome, nucleocapsid protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase into virus particles. Additionally, packaging of the genome was found to be necessary for the efficient release of particles, revealing a novel mechanism for the efficient generation of infectious virus. Our results identify possible conserved targets for development of anti-phlebovirus therapies.

  3. RNA Structural Alignments, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous alignment and secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences is often referred to as "RNA structural alignment." A class of the methods for structural alignment is based on the principles proposed by Sankoff more than 25 years ago. The Sankoff algorithm simultaneously folds and aligns...... is so high that it took more than a decade before the first implementation of a Sankoff style algorithm was published. However, with the faster computers available today and the improved heuristics used in the implementations the Sankoff-based methods have become practical. This chapter describes...... the methods based on the Sankoff algorithm. All the practical implementations of the algorithm use heuristics to make them run in reasonable time and memory. These heuristics are also described in this chapter....

  4. Fatgraph models of RNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fenix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper we discuss fatgraphs as a conceptual framework for RNA structures. We discuss various notions of coarse-grained RNA structures and relate them to fatgraphs.We motivate and discuss the main intuition behind the fatgraph model and showcase its applicability to canonical as well as noncanonical base pairs. Recent discoveries regarding novel recursions of pseudoknotted (pk configurations as well as their translation into context-free grammars for pk-structures are discussed. This is shown to allow for extending the concept of partition functions of sequences w.r.t. a fixed structure having non-crossing arcs to pk-structures. We discuss minimum free energy folding of pk-structures and combine these above results outlining how to obtain an inverse folding algorithm for PK structures.

  5. RNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 nov. 2013 ... Keywords: FMNR, mode of management, re-greening, leadership, evolutionary trend. INTRODUCTION .... régénération : L'évolution de la densité des ligneux entre. 2005 et 2012 ..... la production et la qualité fourragères de la.

  6. Structures of Adenovirus Incomplete Particles Clarify Capsid Architecture and Show Maturation Changes of Packaging Protein L1 52/55k.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condezo, Gabriela N; Marabini, Roberto; Ayora, Silvia; Carazo, José M; Alba, Raúl; Chillón, Miguel; San Martín, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most complex icosahedral, nonenveloped viruses. Even after its structure was solved at near-atomic resolution by both cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, the location of minor coat proteins is still a subject of debate. The elaborated capsid architecture is the product of a correspondingly complex assembly process, about which many aspects remain unknown. Genome encapsidation involves the concerted action of five virus proteins, and proteolytic processing by the virus protease is needed to prime the virion for sequential uncoating. Protein L1 52/55k is required for packaging, and multiple cleavages by the maturation protease facilitate its release from the nascent virion. Light-density particles are routinely produced in adenovirus infections and are thought to represent assembly intermediates. Here, we present the molecular and structural characterization of two different types of human adenovirus light particles produced by a mutant with delayed packaging. We show that these particles lack core polypeptide V but do not lack the density corresponding to this protein in the X-ray structure, thereby adding support to the adenovirus cryo-electron microscopy model. The two types of light particles present different degrees of proteolytic processing. Their structures provide the first glimpse of the organization of L1 52/55k protein inside the capsid shell and of how this organization changes upon partial maturation. Immature, full-length L1 52/55k is poised beneath the vertices to engage the virus genome. Upon proteolytic processing, L1 52/55k disengages from the capsid shell, facilitating genome release during uncoating. Adenoviruses have been extensively characterized as experimental systems in molecular biology, as human pathogens, and as therapeutic vectors. However, a clear picture of many aspects of their basic biology is still lacking. Two of these aspects are the location of minor coat proteins in the capsid and the

  7. Nonradioactive RNA mobility shift with chemiluminescent detection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hesham

    RNA mobility shift is one among many procedures used to study RNA-protein interaction. Yet, there are some limitations for the radioactive RNA mobility shift including; 1) the risk of using radiolabeled nucleotides, 2) the long time to get the results; this could range from days to weeks, and 3) its high cost as compared to ...

  8. Optimization of chemiluminescent detection of mitochondrial RNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNA mobility shift is one among many procedures used to study RNA-protein interaction. Yet, there are some limitations for the radioactive RNA mobility shift including; 1) the risk of using radiolabeled nucleotides, 2) the long time to get the results; this could range from days to weeks, and 3) its high cost as compared to ...

  9. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  10. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  11. Tospovirus : induction and suppression of RNA silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    While infecting their hosts, viruses must deal with host immunity. In plants the antiviral RNA silencing pathway is an important part of plant innate immunity. Tospoviruses are segmented negative-stranded RNA viruses of plants. To counteract the antiviral RNA silencing response in plants,

  12. A Specific Hepatic Transfer RNA for Phosphoserine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Pekka H.; Bernfield, Merton R.

    1970-01-01

    Radioactive O-phosphoryl-L-serine was detected after alkaline deacylation of rat and rooster liver [3H]seryl-tRNA acylated in vitro with homologous synthetases. Ribonuclease treatment of this tRNA yielded a compound with the properties of phosphoseryl-adenosine. Benzoylated DEAE-cellulose chromatography of seryl-tRNA yielded four distinct peaks, only one of which contained phosphoserine. A unique fraction for phosphoserine was also found on chromatography of nonacylated tRNA. In ribosome binding studies, this fraction responded very slightly with poly(U,C), but not with any of the known serine trinucleotide codons. Substantial incorporation of [3H]-serine into protein from this tRNA species was observed in an aminoacyl-tRNA dependent polysomal system derived from chick oviducts. No phosphoserine was found in Escherichia coli or yeast seryl-tRNA acylated with homologous enzymes, nor in E. coli seryl-tRNA acylated with liver synthetase. In the absence of tRNA, free phosphoserine was not formed in reaction mixtures, which suggests that phosphoseryl-tRNA arises by phosphorylation of the unique seryl-tRNA species. These results demonstrate a discrete tRNASer species in rat and rooster liver containing phosphoserine and suggest that this tRNA is involved in ribosomal polypeptide synthesis. PMID:4943179

  13. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  14. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  15. Supplementary data: Materials and methods RNA expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ritt8

    Supplementary data: Materials and methods. RNA expression analysis. Freshly collected tissue was taken in TRIzol reagent for total RNA isolation according to the manufacturer's protocol. The cDNA synthesis was carried out in 1 μg total RNA using Random hexamer (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA) and Superscript III ...

  16. Regulatory RNAs derived from transfer RNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Thoru

    2010-10-01

    Four recent studies suggest that cleavages of transfer RNAs generate products with microRNA-like features, with some evidence of function. If their regulatory functions were to be confirmed, these newly revealed RNAs would add to the expanding repertoire of small noncoding RNAs and would also provide new perspectives on the coevolution of transfer RNA and messenger RNA.

  17. Regulatory BC1 RNA in Cognitive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacoangeli, Anna; Dosunmu, Aderemi; Eom, Taesun; Stefanov, Dimitre G.; Tiedge, Henri

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic regulatory BC1 RNA is a non-protein-coding (npc) RNA that operates in the translational control of gene expression. The absence of BC1 RNA in BC1 knockout (KO) animals causes translational dysregulation that entails neuronal phenotypic alterations including prolonged epileptiform discharges, audiogenic seizure activity in vivo, and…

  18. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  19. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  20. RNA Packing Specificity and Folding during Assembly of the Bacteriophage MS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottar Rolfsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a combination of biochemistry, mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM, we have been able to show that quasi-equivalent conformer switching in the coat protein (CP of an RNA bacteriophage (MS2 is controlled by a sequence-specific RNA–protein interaction. The RNA component of this complex is an RNA stem-loop encompassing just 19 nts from the phage genomic RNA, which is 3569 nts in length. This binding results in the conversion of a CP dimer from a symmetrical conformation to an asymmetric one. Only when both symmetrical and asymmetrical dimers are present in solution is assembly of the T = 3 phage capsid efficient. This implies that the conformers, we have characterized by NMR correspond to the two distinct quasi-equivalent conformers seen in the 3D structure of the virion. An icosahedrally-averaged single particle cryo-EM reconstruction of the wild-type phage (to ∼9 Å resolution has revealed icosahedrally ordered density encompassing up to 90% of the single-stranded RNA genome. The RNA is seen with a novel arrangement of two concentric shells, with connections between them along the 5-fold symmetry axes. RNA in the outer shell interacts with each of the 90 CP dimers in the T = 3 capsid and although the density is icosahedrally averaged, there appears to be a different average contact at the different quasi-equivalent protein dimers: precisely the result that would be expected if protein conformer switching is RNA-mediated throughout the assembly pathway. This unprecedented RNA structure provides new constraints for models of viral assembly and we describe experiments aimed at probing these. Together, these results suggest that viral genomic RNA folding is an important factor in efficient assembly, and further suggest that RNAs that could sequester viral CPs but not fold appropriately could act as potent inhibitors of viral assembly.

  1. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    ) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer...

  2. Effective Anti-miRNA Oligonucleotides Show High Releasing Rate of MicroRNA from RNA-Induced Silencing Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyoshi, Jumpei; Matsuyama, Yohei; Kobori, Akio; Murakami, Akira; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Yamayoshi, Asako

    2017-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by forming RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) and have been considered as promising therapeutic targets. MiRNA is an essential component of RISC for the modulation of gene expression. Therefore, the release of miRNA from RISC is considered as an effective method for the inhibition of miRNA functions. In our previous study, we reported that anti-miRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs), which are composed of the 2'-O-methyl (2'-OMe) RNA, could induce the release of miRNA from RISC. However, the mechanisms underlying the miRNA-releasing effects of chemically modified AMOs, which are conventionally used as anti-cancer drugs, are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the miRNA releasing rate from RISC and the inhibitory effect on RISC activity (IC 50 ) using conventional chemically modified AMOs. We demonstrated that the miRNA-releasing effects of AMOs are directly proportional to the IC 50 values, and AMOs, which have an ability to promote the release of miRNA from RISC, can effectively inhibit RISC activity in living cells.

  3. Diverging affinity of tospovirus RNA silencing suppressor proteins, NSs, for various RNA duplex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Hemmes, Hans; Huismann, Rik; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The tospovirus NSs protein was previously shown to suppress the antiviral RNA silencing mechanism in plants. Here the biochemical analysis of NSs proteins from different tospoviruses, using purified NSs or NSs containing cell extracts, is described. The results showed that all tospoviral NSs proteins analyzed exhibited affinity to small double-stranded RNA molecules, i.e., small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNA (miRNA)/miRNA* duplexes. Interestingly, the NSs proteins from tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) also showed affinity to long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), whereas tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV) NSs did not. The TSWV NSs protein was shown to be capable of inhibiting Dicer-mediated cleavage of long dsRNA in vitro. In addition, it suppressed the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-specific siRNAs during coinfiltration with an inverted-repeat-GFP RNA construct in Nicotiana benthamiana. In vivo interference of TSWV NSs in the miRNA pathway was shown by suppression of an enhanced GFP (eGFP) miRNA sensor construct. The ability to stabilize miRNA/miRNA* by different tospovirus NSs proteins in vivo was demonstrated by increased accumulation and detection of both miRNA171c and miRNA171c* in tospovirus-infected N. benthamiana. All together, these data suggest that tospoviruses interfere in the RNA silencing pathway by sequestering siRNA and miRNA/miRNA* molecules before they are uploaded into their respective RNA-induced silencing complexes. The observed affinity to long dsRNA for only a subset of the tospoviruses studied is discussed in light of evolutional divergence and their ancestral relation to the animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae.

  4. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation. © 2017 Goldfarb and Cech; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. The early history of tRNA recognition by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    2006-10-04

    Oct 4, 2006 ... Discovery of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and importance ... The pioneering work of Fritz Lipmann on the high-energy ... the peculiar structural and functional relationships tRNAs ... a bulk of only 20 families of tRNA molecules in contrast ...... balance of tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase; Science 242.

  6. Entanglement between particle partitions in itinerant many-particle states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haque, M.; Zozulya, O.S.; Schoutens, K.

    2009-01-01

    We review 'particle-partitioning entanglement' for itinerant many-particle systems. This is defined as the entanglement between two subsets of particles making up the system. We identify generic features and mechanisms of particle entanglement that are valid over whole classes of itinerant quantum

  7. C-Terminal Substitution of HBV Core Proteins with Those from DHBV Reveals That Arginine-Rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 Domain Is Critical for HBV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyeung; Shin, Bo-Hye; Park, Gil-Soon; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of carboxyl-terminal nucleic acid binding domain of HBV core (C) protein for hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, chimeric HBV C proteins were generated by substituting varying lengths of the carboxyl-terminus of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) C protein for the corresponding regions of HBV C protein. All chimeric C proteins formed core particles. A chimeric C protein with 221–262 amino acids of DHBV C protein, in place of 146–185 amino acids of the HBV C protein, supported HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation and DNA synthesis: 40% amino acid sequence identity or 45% homology in the nucleic-acid binding domain of HBV C protein was sufficient for pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, although we predominantly detected spliced DNA. A chimeric C protein with 221–241 and 251–262 amino acids of DHBV C, in place of HBV C 146–166 and 176–185 amino acids, respectively, could rescue full-length DNA synthesis. However, a reciprocal C chimera with 242–250 of DHBV C (242RAGSPLPRS 250) introduced in place of 167–175 of HBV C (167RRRSQSPRR 175) significantly decreased pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, and full-length DNA was not detected, demonstrating that the arginine-rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 domain may be critical for efficient viral replication. Five amino acids differing between viral species (underlined above) were tested for replication rescue; R169 and R175 were found to be important. PMID:22911745

  8. Confirming the RNAi-mediated mechanism of action of siRNA-based cancer therapeutics in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Judge, Adam D.; Robbins, Marjorie; Tavakoli, Iran; Levi, Jasna; Hu, Lina; Fronda, Anna; Ambegia, Ellen; McClintock, Kevin; MacLachlan, Ian

    2009-01-01

    siRNAs that specifically silence the expression of cancer-related genes offer a therapeutic approach in oncology. However, it remains critical to determine the true mechanism of their therapeutic effects. Here, we describe the preclinical development of chemically modified siRNA targeting the essential cell-cycle proteins polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and kinesin spindle protein (KSP) in mice. siRNA formulated in stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALP) displayed potent antitumor efficacy in b...

  9. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1986-10-01

    This series of lectures is about the role of particle physics in physical processes that occurred in the very early stages of the bug gang. Of particular interest is the role of particle physics in determining the evolution of the early Universe, and the effect of particle physics on the present structure of the Universe. The use of the big bang as a laboratory for placing limits on new particle physics theories will also be discussed. Section 1 reviews the standard cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis. Section 2 reviews the decoupling of weakly interacting particles in the early Universe, and discusses neutrino cosmology and the resulting limits that may be placed on the mass and lifetime of massive neutrinos. Section 3 discusses the evolution of the vacuum through phase transitions in the early Universe and the formation of topological defects in the transitions. Section 4 covers recent work on the generation of the baryon asymmetry by baryon-number violating reactions in Grand Unified Theories, and mentions some recent work on baryon number violation effects at the electroweak transition. Section 5 is devoted to theories of cosmic inflation. Finally, Section 6 is a discussion of the role of extra spatial dimensions in the evolution of the early Universe. 78 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Neutron particle injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kiyoshi.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma particles are used as target particles for converting ions to neutral particles by a charge exchange reaction in a neutralization cell, and a neutralization cell is disposed in adjacent with drawing electrodes. In addition, a magnetic field generation means is disposed additionally for generating magnetic rays substantially in parallel with the drawing electrode at the downmost stream in the progressing direction of the ions. The intensity of electric fields between the drawing electrode at the downmost stream and the nearest electrode, among electrodes present at the upstream, is made smaller than the intensity of electric fields between other electrodes. Since magnetic rays substantially in parallel with the drawing electrode at the downmost stream in the progressing direction of the ions are generated, the ions are prevented from being accelerated in the direction reverse to the progressing direction thereby further enhancing the neutralization efficiency of the neutralizing cell. Then, there can be provided effects that the constitution of the electrode of NBI (Neutral particle Beam Injector) can be simplified and the power source for preventing acceleration of neutral particles can be saved. (N.H.)

  11. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salati, P.

    1986-01-01

    If the hot Big Bang model is correct, the very early universe provides us with a good laboratory to test our ideas on particle physics. The temperature and the density at that time are so high that each known particle must exist in chemical and in thermal equilibrium with the others. When the universe cools, the particles freeze out, leaving us today with a cosmic background. Such a kind of relic is of great interest because we can probe the Big Bang Model by studying the fossilized gas of a known particle. Conversely we can use that model to derive information about a hypothetical particle. Basically the freezing of a gas occurs a temperature T o and may be thermal or chemical. Studying the decoupling of a stable neutrino brings information on its mass: if the mass M ν lies in the forbidden range, the neutrino has to be unstable and its lifetime is constrained by cosmology. As for the G.U.T. Monopole, cosmology tells us that its present mass density is either to big or to small (1 monopole/observable universe) owing to a predicted flux far from the Parker Limit. Finally, the super red-giant star life time constrains the axion or the Higgs to be more massive than .2 MeV [fr

  12. New particle searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Standard Model is a remarkable result of decades of work in particle physics, but it is clearly an incomplete representation of the world. Exploring possibilities beyond the Standard Model is a major preoccupation of both theorists and experimentalists. Despite the many suggestions that are extant about the missing links within the Standard Model as well as extensions beyond it, no hard experimental evidence exists. In particular, in more than five years of experimentation both at PETRA and PEP no new particles have been found that would indicate new physics. Several reasons are possible for these negative results: the particles may be too heavy; the experiments may not be looking in the proper way; the cross sections may be too small or finally the particles may not exist. A continuing PEP program, at high luminosity will ensure that the second and third reason continue to be addressed. The higher energy e + e - storage rings such as TRISTAN and LEP will extend the mass limits. High mass particles can also be produced at the CERN collider and soon with the Tevatron collider. A concise summary of the mass limits from the PETRA experiments has been given in a recent Mark J publication. The results shown provide a convenient yardstick against which to measure future search experiments

  13. Magnetic particles as powerful purification tool for high sensitive mass spectrometric screening procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Jochen F; Otto, Angela M

    2010-02-01

    The effective isolation and purification of proteins from biological fluids is the most crucial step for a successful protein analysis when only minute amounts are available. While conventional purification methods such as dialysis, ultrafiltration or protein precipitation often lead to a marked loss of protein, SPE with small-sized particles is a powerful alternative. The implementation of particles with superparamagnetic cores facilitates the handling of those particles and allows the application of particles in the nanometer to low micrometer range. Due to the small diameters, magnetic particles are advantageous for increasing sensitivity when using subsequent MS analysis or gel electrophoresis. In the last years, different types of magnetic particles were developed for specific protein purification purposes followed by analysis or screening procedures using MS or SDS gel electrophoresis. In this review, the use of magnetic particles for different applications, such as, the extraction and analysis of DNA/RNA, peptides and proteins, is described.

  14. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 3. The Anti-particle

    CERN Multimedia

    Franck Close

    2008-01-01

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 3. The Anti-particle. It appears to be the stuff of science fiction. Associated with every elementary particle is an antiparticle which has the same mass and opposite charge. Should the two meet and combine, the result is annihilation - and a flash of light. Thanks to mysterious processes that occurred after the Big Bang there are a vastly greater number of particles than anti-particles. So how could their elusive existence be proved? At CERN particle physicists are crashing together subatomic particles at incredibly high speeds to create antimatter, which they hope will finally reveal what happened at the precise moment of the Big Bang to create the repertoire of elementary particles and antiparticles in existence today.

  15. Internal control for real-time polymerase chain reaction based on MS2 bacteriophage for RNA viruses diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambenedetti, Miriam Ribas; Pavoni, Daniela Parada; Dallabona, Andreia Cristine; Dominguez, Alejandro Correa; Poersch, Celina de Oliveira; Fragoso, Stenio Perdigão; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2017-05-01

    Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is routinely used to detect viral infections. In Brazil, it is mandatory the use of nucleic acid tests to detect hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus in blood banks because of the immunological window. The use of an internal control (IC) is necessary to differentiate the true negative results from those consequent from a failure in some step of the nucleic acid test. The aim of this study was the construction of virus-modified particles, based on MS2 bacteriophage, to be used as IC for the diagnosis of RNA viruses. The MS2 genome was cloned into the pET47b(+) plasmid, generating pET47b(+)-MS2. MS2-like particles were produced through the synthesis of MS2 RNA genome by T7 RNA polymerase. These particles were used as non-competitive IC in assays for RNA virus diagnostics. In addition, a competitive control for HCV diagnosis was developed by cloning a mutated HCV sequence into the MS2 replicase gene of pET47b(+)-MS2, which produces a non-propagating MS2 particle. The utility of MS2-like particles as IC was evaluated in a one-step format multiplex real-time RT-PCR for HCV detection. We demonstrated that both competitive and non-competitive IC could be successfully used to monitor the HCV amplification performance, including the extraction, reverse transcription, amplification and detection steps, without compromising the detection of samples with low target concentrations. In conclusion, MS2-like particles generated by this strategy proved to be useful IC for RNA virus diagnosis, with advantage that they are produced by a low cost protocol. An attractive feature of this system is that it allows the construction of a multicontrol by the insertion of sequences from more than one pathogen, increasing its applicability for diagnosing different RNA viruses.

  16. Sequence analysis of RNase MRP RNA reveals its origination from eukaryotic RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanglong; Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Li, Yong

    2006-01-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryote-specific endoribonuclease that generates RNA primers for mitochondrial DNA replication and processes precursor rRNA. RNase P is a ubiquitous endoribonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA transcripts to produce their mature 5′ termini. We found extensive sequence homology of catalytic domains and specificity domains between their RNA subunits in many organisms. In Candida glabrata, the internal loop of helix P3 is 100% conserved between MRP and P RNAs. The helix P8 of MRP RNA from microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is identical to that of P RNA. Sequence homology can be widely spread over the whole molecule of MRP RNA and P RNA, such as those from Dictyostelium discoideum. These conserved nucleotides between the MRP and P RNAs strongly support the hypothesis that the MRP RNA is derived from the P RNA molecule in early eukaryote evolution. PMID:16540690

  17. RNA polymerase II mediated transcription from the polymerase III promoters in short hairpin RNA expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumi, Mohammad; Ishihara, Shunji; Aziz, Monowar; Kazumori, Hideaki; Ishimura, Norihisa; Yuki, Takafumi; Kadota, Chikara; Kadowaki, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase III promoters of human ribonuclease P RNA component H1, human U6, and mouse U6 small nuclear RNA genes are commonly used in short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vectors due their precise initiation and termination sites. During transient transfection of shRNA vectors, we observed that H1 or U6 promoters also express longer transcripts enough to express several reporter genes including firefly luciferase, green fluorescent protein EGFP, and red fluorescent protein JRed. Expression of such longer transcripts was augmented by upstream RNA polymerase II enhancers and completely inhibited by downstream polyA signal sequences. Moreover, the transcription of firefly luciferase from human H1 promoter was sensitive to RNA polymerase II inhibitor α-amanitin. Our findings suggest that commonly used polymerase III promoters in shRNA vectors are also prone to RNA polymerase II mediated transcription, which may have negative impacts on their targeted use

  18. Using RNA Interference to Study Protein Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Carol D.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference can be extremely useful in determining the function of an endogenously-expressed protein in its normal cellular environment. In this chapter, we describe a method that uses small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knock down mRNA and protein expression in cultured cells so that the effect of a putative regulatory protein on gene expression can be delineated. Methods of assessing the effectiveness of the siRNA procedure using real time quantitative PCR and Western analysis are also in...

  19. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  20. The Importance of the KR-Rich Region of the Coat Protein of Ourmia melon virus for Host Specificity, Tissue Tropism, and Interference With Antiviral Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marika; Vallino, Marta; Abbà, Simona; Ciuffo, Marina; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Turina, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal region of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) coat protein (CP) contains a short lysine/arginine-rich (KR) region. By alanine scanning mutagenesis, we showed that the KR region influences pathogenicity and virulence of OuMV without altering viral particle assembly. A mutant, called OuMV6710, with three basic residue substitutions in the KR region, was impaired in the ability to maintain the initial systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and to infect both cucumber and melon plants systemically. The integrity of this protein region was also crucial for encapsidation of viral genomic RNA; in fact, certain mutations within the KR region partially compromised the RNA encapsidation efficiency of the CP. In Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, OuMV6710 was impaired in particle accumulation; however, this phenotype was abolished in dcl2/dcl4 and dcl2/dcl3/dcl4 Arabidopsis mutants defective for antiviral silencing. Moreover, in contrast to CPwt, in situ immunolocalization experiments indicated that CP6710 accumulates efficiently in the spongy mesophyll tissue of infected N. benthamiana and A. thaliana leaves but only occasionally infects palisade tissues. These results provided strong evidence of a crucial role for OuMV CP during viral infection and highlighted the relevance of the KR region in determining tissue tropism, host range, pathogenicity, and RNA affinity, which may be all correlated with a possible CP silencing-suppression activity.

  1. Particles in flows

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, Giovanni; Nečasová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to face particles in flows from many different, but essentially interconnected sides and points of view. Thus the selection of authors and topics represented in the chapters, ranges from deep mathematical analysis of the associated models, through the techniques of their numerical solution, towards real applications and physical implications. The scope and structure of the book as well as the selection of authors was motivated by the very successful summer course and workshop "Particles in Flows'' that was held in Prague in the August of 2014. This meeting revealed the need for a book dealing with this specific and challenging multidisciplinary subject, i.e. particles in industrial, environmental and biomedical flows and the combination of fluid mechanics, solid body mechanics with various aspects of specific applications.

  2. Charged particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, T.I.; Nolde, G.V.

    1974-01-01

    A charged particle accelerator is described. It is made of an enclosure arranged for channeling a stream of charged particles along a predetermined path, and propelling means juxtaposed to said enclosure for generating therein a magnetic field moving in a predetermined direction with respect to each point of said path, the magnetic flux vector of that field being transverse to that path at every point, which gives the particles, along said path, a velocity connected to that of the mobile field by a predetermined relation. This can be applied to the fast production of chemical compounds, to the emission of neutrons and of thermal energy, and to the production of mechanical energy for propelling space ships [fr

  3. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  4. Charged particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ress, T I; Nolde, G V

    1974-11-25

    A charged particle accelerator is described. It is made of an enclosure arranged for channeling a stream of charged particles along a predetermined path, and propelling means juxtaposed to the enclosure for generating a magnetic field moving in a predetermined direction with respect to each point of the path, the magnetic flux vector of that field being transverse to that path at every point, which gives the particles, along said path, a velocity connected to that of the mobile field by a predetermined relation. This can be applied to the fast production of chemical compounds, to the emission of neutrons and of thermal energy, and to the production of mechanical energy for propelling space ships.

  5. Radiance and particle fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, L.; Battista, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined fluence in terms of the number of the radiation particles crossing a small sampling sphere. A second definition has been proposed in which the length of track segments contained within any sampling volume are used to calculate the incident fluence. This approach is often used in Monte Carlo simulations of individual particle tracks, allowing the fluence to be scored in small volumes of any shape. In this paper we stress that the second definition generalizes the classical (ICRU) concept of fluence. We also identify the assumptions inherent in the two definitions of fluence and prove their equivalence for the case of straight-line particle trajectories. (author)

  6. New particle data

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 edition of the Review of Particle Physics has been published. It appears in the July 1st edition of Physical Review D with the reference: K. Hagiwara et al., Physical Review D66, 010001 (2002). The printing of the Particle Physics Booklets is planned to be finished at the end of August, so copies are expected to arrive at CERN for distribution by mid-September. The full data are available at the Berkeley site, as well as at various other mirrors around the world. As for copies of the full Review, for which CERN is responsible for the distribution outside the Americas, the Far East and Australasia, the quantity has been reduced by 60% compared to the 2000 edition. It will thus no longer be possible for all individuals to have their personal copy. Priority will be given to ensure that copies are sent to all groups and institutes engaged in particle physics research.

  7. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    This book by Helmut Wiedemann is a well-established, classic text, providing an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. The present 4th edition has been significantly revised, updated and expanded. The newly conceived Part I is an elementary introduction to the subject matter for undergraduate students. Part II gathers the basic tools in preparation of a more advanced treatment, summarizing the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part III is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed, in Part IV, by an introduction and description of the main beam parameters and including a new chapter on beam emittance and lattice design. Part V is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part VI then discusses the details of charged particle acceleration. Parts VII and VIII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and describe very intense bea...

  8. The particle zoo

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079223

    2016-01-01

    What is everything really made of? If we split matter down into smaller and infinitesimally smaller pieces, where do we arrive? At the Particle Zoo - the extraordinary subatomic world of antimatter, neutrinos, strange-flavoured quarks and yetis, gravitons, ghosts and glueballs, mindboggling eleven-dimensional strings and the elusive Higgs boson itself. Be guided around this strangest of zoos by Gavin Hesketh, experimental particle physicist at humanity's greatest experiment, the Large Hadron Collider. Concisely and with a rare clarity, he demystifies how we are uncovering the inner workings of the universe and heading towards the next scientific revolution. Why are atoms so small? How did the Higgs boson save the universe? And is there a theory of everything? The Particle Zoo answers these and many other profound questions, and explains the big ideas of Quantum Physics, String Theory, The Big Bang and Dark Matter...and, ultimately, what we know about the true, fundamental nature of reality.

  9. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  10. Magnetic particle inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to familiarize the student with magnetic particle inspection and relate it to classification of various defects. Magnetic particle inspection is a method of detecting the presence of cracks, laps, tears, inclusions, and similar discontinuities in ferromagnetic materials such as iron and steel. This method will most clearly show defects that are perpendicular to the magnetic field. The Magnaglo method uses a liquid which is sprayed on the workpiece to be inspected, and the part is magnetized at the same time. The workpiece is then viewed under a black light, and the presence of discontinuity is shown by the formation of a bright indication formed by the magnetic particles over the discontinuity. The equipment and experimental procedures are described.

  11. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  12. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding.

  13. siRNA and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Marjorie; Judge, Adam; MacLachlan, Ian

    2009-06-01

    Canonical small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes are potent activators of the mammalian innate immune system. The induction of innate immunity by siRNA is dependent on siRNA structure and sequence, method of delivery, and cell type. Synthetic siRNA in delivery vehicles that facilitate cellular uptake can induce high levels of inflammatory cytokines and interferons after systemic administration in mammals and in primary human blood cell cultures. This activation is predominantly mediated by immune cells, normally via a Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway. The siRNA sequence dependency of these pathways varies with the type and location of the TLR involved. Alternatively nonimmune cell activation may also occur, typically resulting from siRNA interaction with cytoplasmic RNA sensors such as RIG1. As immune activation by siRNA-based drugs represents an undesirable side effect due to the considerable toxicities associated with excessive cytokine release in humans, understanding and abrogating this activity will be a critical component in the development of safe and effective therapeutics. This review describes the intracellular mechanisms of innate immune activation by siRNA, the design of appropriate sequences and chemical modification approaches, and suitable experimental methods for studying their effects, with a view toward reducing siRNA-mediated off-target effects.

  14. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  15. MysiRNA-designer: a workflow for efficient siRNA design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mysara

    Full Text Available The design of small interfering RNA (siRNA is a multi factorial problem that has gained the attention of many researchers in the area of therapeutic and functional genomics. MysiRNA score was previously introduced that improves the correlation of siRNA activity prediction considering state of the art algorithms. In this paper, a new program, MysiRNA-Designer, is described which integrates several factors in an automated work-flow considering mRNA transcripts variations, siRNA and mRNA target accessibility, and both near-perfect and partial off-target matches. It also features the MysiRNA score, a highly ranked correlated siRNA efficacy prediction score for ranking the designed siRNAs, in addition to top scoring models Biopredsi, DISR, Thermocomposition21 and i-Score, and integrates them in a unique siRNA score-filtration technique. This multi-score filtration layer filters siRNA that passes the 90% thresholds calculated from experimental dataset features. MysiRNA-Designer takes an accession, finds conserved regions among its transcript space, finds accessible regions within the mRNA, designs all possible siRNAs for these regions, filters them based on multi-scores thresholds, and then performs SNP and off-target filtration. These strict selection criteria were tested against human genes in which at least one active siRNA was designed from 95.7% of total genes. In addition, when tested against an experimental dataset, MysiRNA-Designer was found capable of rejecting 98% of the false positive siRNAs, showing superiority over three state of the art siRNA design programs. MysiRNA is a freely accessible (Microsoft Windows based desktop application that can be used to design siRNA with a high accuracy and specificity. We believe that MysiRNA-Designer has the potential to play an important role in this area.

  16. WORKSHOP: Stable particle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro G.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Particle beam stability is crucial to any accelerator or collider, particularly big ones, such as Brookhaven's RHIC heavy ion collider and the larger SSC and LHC proton collider schemes. A workshop on the Stability of Particle Motion in Storage Rings held at Brookhaven in October dealt with the important issue of determining the short- and long-term stability of single particle motion in hadron storage rings and colliders, and explored new methods for ensuring it. In the quest for realistic environments, the imperfections of superconducting magnets and the effects of field modulation and noise were taken into account. The workshop was divided into three study groups: Short-Term Stability in storage rings, including chromatic and geometric effects and correction strategies; Long-Term Stability, including modulation and random noise effects and slow varying effects; and Methods for determining the stability of particle motion. The first two were run in parallel, but the third was attended by everyone. Each group considered analytical, computational and experimental methods, reviewing work done so far, comparing results and approaches and underlining outstanding issues. By resolving conflicts, it was possible to identify problems of common interest. The workshop reaffirmed the validity of methods proposed several years ago. Major breakthroughs have been in the rapid improvement of computer capacity and speed, in the development of more sophisticated mathematical packages, and in the introduction of more powerful analytic approaches. In a typical storage ring, a particle may be required to circulate for about a billion revolutions. While ten years ago it was only possible to predict accurately stability over about a thousand revolutions, it is now possible to predict over as many as one million turns. If this trend continues, in ten years it could become feasible to predict particle stability over the entire storage period. About ninety participants

  17. Plasma particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will require an 87-kilometer accelerator ring to boost particles to 40 TeV. The SSC's size is due in part to the fact that its operating principle is the same one that has dominated accelerator design for 50 years: it guides particles by means of magnetic fields and propels them by strong electric fields. If one were to build an equally powerful but smaller accelerator, one would need to increase the strength of the guiding and propelling fields. Actually, however, conventional technology may not be able to provide significant increases in field strength. There are two reasons. First, the forces from magnetic fields are becoming greater than the structural forces that hold a magnetic material together; the magnets that produce these fields would themselves be torn apart. Second, the energy from electric fields is reaching the energies that bind electrons to atoms; it would tear electrons from nuclei in the accelerator's support structures. It is the electric field problem that plasma accelerators can overcome. Plasma particle accelerators are based on the principle that particles can be accelerated by the electric fields generated within a plasma. Because the plasma has already been ionized, plasma particle accelerators are not susceptible to electron dissociation. They can in theory sustain accelerating fields thousands of times stronger that conventional technologies. So far two methods for creating plasma waves for accelerators have been proposed and tested: the wakefield and the beat wave. Although promising electric fields have been produced, more research is necessary to determine whether plasma particle accelerators can compete with the existing accelerators. 7 figs

  18. Caulimoviridae Tubule-Guided Transport Is Dictated by Movement Protein Properties ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús; Fajardo, Thor; Zicca, Stefania; Pallás, Vicente; Stavolone, Livia

    2010-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata (PD) either as nucleoprotein complexes (NPCs) or as tubule-guided encapsidated particles with the help of movement proteins (MPs). To explore how and why MPs specialize in one mechanism or the other, we tested the exchangeability of MPs encoded by DNA and RNA virus genomes by means of an engineered alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) system. We show that Caulimoviridae (DNA genome virus) MPs are competent for RNA virus particle transport but are unable to mediate NPC movement, and we discuss this restriction in terms of the evolution of DNA virus MPs as a means of mediating DNA viral genome entry into the RNA-trafficking PD pathway. PMID:20130061

  19. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  20. Kin Selection in the RNA World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Samuel R; West, Stuart A

    2017-12-05

    Various steps in the RNA world required cooperation. Why did life's first inhabitants, from polymerases to synthetases, cooperate? We develop kin selection models of the RNA world to answer these questions. We develop a very simple model of RNA cooperation and then elaborate it to model three relevant issues in RNA biology: (1) whether cooperative RNAs receive the benefits of cooperation; (2) the scale of competition in RNA populations; and (3) explicit replicator diffusion and survival. We show: (1) that RNAs are likely to express partial cooperation; (2) that RNAs will need mechanisms for overcoming local competition; and (3) in a specific example of RNA cooperation, persistence after replication and offspring diffusion allow for cooperation to overcome competition. More generally, we show how kin selection can unify previously disparate answers to the question of RNA world cooperation.

  1. Composite magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, G.E.; Janata, J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim on behalf of I.C.I. Ltd., relates to the preparation and use of composite magnetic particles, comprising a low density core, and having a magnetic coating over at least a proportion of the surface. The density of such particles can be chosen to suit a range of applications, e.g. in affinity chromatography, in radioimmunoassay, in the transport of the associated component, such as a drug or enzyme, to a specific site in a living organism. (U.K.)

  2. Overview of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the situation in particle physics and a prognosis of its future: ideas which have been tested or will soon be tested (standard model and the light Higgs particle), ideas whose time has not yet come (supersymmetry, supersymmetry and N=1 supergravity, right-left symmetry and preons, unification of gravity with other forces, anomaly-free supergravities, supersymmetry strings, string theory as the ''Theory of Everything'' (T.O.E.); passive and non accelerator experiments. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Collection of particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frew, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus and a method for collecting particles formed by vaporisation during a high temperature treatment of steel (eg cutting or welding) are described in which gas is drawn from the area in which the treatment is taking place through a collector in which the particles are separated magnetically. The air may be drawn by an air ejector from a hood around the treatment area. The invention has particular application where the high temperature treatment is the laser cutting of the stainless steel wrapper around a nuclear fuel sub-assembly. (author)

  4. The paradox particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Christine

    1993-11-15

    As well as being a leading physics writer, Christine Sutton of Oxford is also a particle physicist, currently working on the Zeus experiment at DESY's HERA electron-proton collider. Her latest book ''Spaceship Neutrino'' Cambridge University Press ISBN 0 521 36404 3 [hardback] or 0 521 36703 4 [paperback]) is a fascinating account of the emergence of the neutrino on the stage of science. In sixty years, the neutrino has been transformed from an apologetic idea its originator dared not publish to one of the main experimental tools of modern high energy research, while cosmologists have realized that this bizarre particle could play a major role in the Universe.

  5. Beta particle measurement fundamentals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The necessary concepts for understanding beta particle behavior are stopping power, range, and scattering. Dose as a consequence of beta particle interaction with tissue can be derived and explained by these concepts. Any calculations of dose, however, assume or require detailed knowledge of the beta spectrum at the tissue depth of calculation. A rudimentary knowledge of the incident spectrum can be of use in estimating dose, interpretating dose measuring devices and designing protection. The stopping power and range based on the csda will give a conservative estimate in cases of protection design, as scattering will reduce the range. Estimates of dose may be low because scattering effects were neglected

  6. Particles and forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peierls, R.

    1981-01-01

    The particles and forces of matter, found in the Universe, are discussed with especial reference to some of the laws which govern behaviour in the sub-atomic world and which determine the way forces work to give matter its various characteristics. The recent history of the search for elementary constituents of matter in this century is outlined and the replacement of the simplicity anticipated in the 1930s by the proliferation of particle states uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s which led to the quark model is examined. (U.K.)

  7. Single particle detecting telescope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Iga, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Kanada, M.; Yamashita, Y.; Wada, T.; Furukawa, S.

    1981-01-01

    We constructed the single particle detecting telescope system for detecting a fractionally charged particle. The telescope consists of position detecting counters, wall-less multi-cell chambers, single detecting circuits and microcomputer system as data I/0 processor. Especially, a frequency of double particle is compared the case of the single particle detecting with the case of an ordinary measurement

  8. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  9. New particle searches and discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trippe, T.G.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Horne, C.P.; Kelly, R.L.; Rittenberg, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Yost, G.P.; Armstrong, B.; Bricman, C.; Hemingway, R.J.; Losty, M.J.; Roos, M.

    1977-01-01

    This supplement to the 1976 edition of 'Review of particle properties', Particle Data Group [Rev. Mod. Phys. 48, No. 2, Part II (1976)], contains tabulations of experimental data bearing on the 'new particles' and related topics; categories covered include charmed particles, psi's and their decay products, and heavy leptons. Errata to the previous edition are also given. (Auth.)

  10. Origin of the RNA world: The fate of nucleobases in warm little ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Ben K. D.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Semenov, Dmitry A.; Henning, Thomas K.

    2017-10-01

    Before the origin of simple cellular life, the building blocks of RNA (nucleotides) had to form and polymerize in favorable environments on early Earth. At this time, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles delivered organics such as nucleobases (the characteristic molecules of nucleotides) to warm little ponds whose wet–dry cycles promoted rapid polymerization. We build a comprehensive numerical model for the evolution of nucleobases in warm little ponds leading to the emergence of the first nucleotides and RNA. We couple Earth's early evolution with complex prebiotic chemistry in these environments. We find that RNA polymers must have emerged very quickly after the deposition of meteorites (less than a few years). Their constituent nucleobases were primarily meteoritic in origin and not from interplanetary dust particles. Ponds appeared as continents rose out of the early global ocean, but this increasing availability of “targets” for meteorites was offset by declining meteorite bombardment rates. Moreover, the rapid losses of nucleobases to pond seepage during wet periods, and to UV photodissociation during dry periods, mean that the synthesis of nucleotides and their polymerization into RNA occurred in just one to a few wet–dry cycles. Under these conditions, RNA polymers likely appeared before 4.17 billion years ago.

  11. Origin of the RNA world: The fate of nucleobases in warm little ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Ben K D; Pudritz, Ralph E; Semenov, Dmitry A; Henning, Thomas K

    2017-10-24

    Before the origin of simple cellular life, the building blocks of RNA (nucleotides) had to form and polymerize in favorable environments on early Earth. At this time, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles delivered organics such as nucleobases (the characteristic molecules of nucleotides) to warm little ponds whose wet-dry cycles promoted rapid polymerization. We build a comprehensive numerical model for the evolution of nucleobases in warm little ponds leading to the emergence of the first nucleotides and RNA. We couple Earth's early evolution with complex prebiotic chemistry in these environments. We find that RNA polymers must have emerged very quickly after the deposition of meteorites (less than a few years). Their constituent nucleobases were primarily meteoritic in origin and not from interplanetary dust particles. Ponds appeared as continents rose out of the early global ocean, but this increasing availability of "targets" for meteorites was offset by declining meteorite bombardment rates. Moreover, the rapid losses of nucleobases to pond seepage during wet periods, and to UV photodissociation during dry periods, mean that the synthesis of nucleotides and their polymerization into RNA occurred in just one to a few wet-dry cycles. Under these conditions, RNA polymers likely appeared before 4.17 billion years ago.

  12. MicroRNA and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin D; Lund, Anders H

    2012-01-01

    biological phenomena and pathologies. The best characterized non-coding RNA family consists in humans of about 1400 microRNAs for which abundant evidence have demonstrated fundamental importance in normal development, differentiation, growth control and in human diseases such as cancer. In this review, we...... summarize the current knowledge and concepts concerning the involvement of microRNAs in cancer, which have emerged from the study of cell culture and animal model systems, including the regulation of key cancer-related pathways, such as cell cycle control and the DNA damage response. Importantly, micro...

  13. RNA2DMut: a web tool for the design and analysis of RNA structure mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N

    2018-03-01

    With the widespread application of high-throughput sequencing, novel RNA sequences are being discovered at an astonishing rate. The analysis of function, however, lags behind. In both the cis - and trans -regulatory functions of RNA, secondary structure (2D base-pairing) plays essential regulatory roles. In order to test RNA function, it is essential to be able to design and analyze mutations that can affect structure. This was the motivation for the creation of the RNA2DMut web tool. With RNA2DMut, users can enter in RNA sequences to analyze, constrain mutations to specific residues, or limit changes to purines/pyrimidines. The sequence is analyzed at each base to determine the effect of every possible point mutation on 2D structure. The metrics used in RNA2DMut rely on the calculation of the Boltzmann structure ensemble and do not require a robust 2D model of RNA structure for designing mutations. This tool can facilitate a wide array of uses involving RNA: for example, in designing and evaluating mutants for biological assays, interrogating RNA-protein interactions, identifying key regions to alter in SELEX experiments, and improving RNA folding and crystallization properties for structural biology. Additional tools are available to help users introduce other mutations (e.g., indels and substitutions) and evaluate their effects on RNA structure. Example calculations are shown for five RNAs that require 2D structure for their function: the MALAT1 mascRNA, an influenza virus splicing regulatory motif, the EBER2 viral noncoding RNA, the Xist lncRNA repA region, and human Y RNA 5. RNA2DMut can be accessed at https://rna2dmut.bb.iastate.edu/. © 2018 Moss; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. RNA versatility, flexibility, and thermostability for practice in RNA nanotechnology and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Farzin; Pi, Fengmei; Zhao, Zhengyi; Gu, Shanqing; Hu, Haibo; Yu, Hang; Guo, Peixuan

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, RNA has attracted widespread attention as a unique biomaterial with distinct biophysical properties for designing sophisticated architectures in the nanometer scale. RNA is much more versatile in structure and function with higher thermodynamic stability compared to its nucleic acid counterpart DNA. Larger RNA molecules can be viewed as a modular structure built from a combination of many 'Lego' building blocks connected via different linker sequences. By exploiting the diversity of RNA motifs and flexibility of structure, varieties of RNA architectures can be fabricated with precise control of shape, size, and stoichiometry. Many structural motifs have been discovered and characterized over the years and the crystal structures of many of these motifs are available for nanoparticle construction. For example, using the flexibility and versatility of RNA structure, RNA triangles, squares, pentagons, and hexagons can be constructed from phi29 pRNA three-way-junction (3WJ) building block. This review will focus on 2D RNA triangles, squares, and hexamers; 3D and 4D structures built from basic RNA building blocks; and their prospective applications in vivo as imaging or therapeutic agents via specific delivery and targeting. Methods for intracellular cloning and expression of RNA molecules and the in vivo assembly of RNA nanoparticles will also be reviewed. WIREs RNA 2018, 9:e1452. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1452 This article is categorized under: RNA Methods > RNA Nanotechnology RNA Structure and Dynamics > RNA Structure, Dynamics and Chemistry RNA in Disease and Development > RNA in Disease Regulatory RNAs/RNAi/Riboswitches > Regulatory RNAs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Matter: the fundamental particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    "The largest particle physics centre in the world is located in Europe. It straddles the Franco-Swiss border, near Geneva. At CERN - the European Organisation for Nuclear Research , which is focused on the science of nuclear matter rather than on the exploitation of atomic energy - there are over 6 500 scientists." (1 page)

  16. Our Particle Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and “why is the universe the way it is?” Not long before ... to each other. The interactions of particles in the universe ... theory by Jean Perrin in 1908 convinced people that atoms and ..... ing the origin and evolution of our universe13. This is an ...

  17. Elementary particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Ward, B.F.L.; Close, F.E.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses freon bubble chamber experiments exposed to μ + and neutrinos, photon-proton interactions; shower counter simulations; SLD detectors at the Stanford Linear Collider, and the detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider; elementary particle interactions; physical properties of dielectric materials used in High Energy Physics detectors; and Nuclear Physics

  18. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.

    1983-01-01

    The authors describe the connection between cosmology and particle physics in an introductory way. In this connection the big bang theory and unified gauge models of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions are considered. Furthermore cosmological nucleosynthesis is discussed in this framework, and the problem of cosmic neutrinos is considered with special regards to its rest mass. (HSI).

  19. Charged particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Humphries, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Detailed enough for a text and sufficiently comprehensive for a reference, this volume addresses topics vital to understanding high-power accelerators and high-brightness-charged particle beams. Subjects include stochastic cooling, high-brightness injectors, and the free electron laser. Humphries provides students with the critical skills necessary for the problem-solving insights unique to collective physics problems. 1990 edition.

  20. Lord of the particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Loll, Anna-Cathrin

    2009-01-01

    "Rolf-Dieter Heuer is the new director general of the world's largest particle physics research center. Though the German physicist never expected to gain this influential position in Switzerland, it seems a natural step in his career trajectory" (1.5 pages)