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Sample records for emulsion stability simulations

  1. An algorithm for emulsion stability simulations: account of flocculation, coalescence, surfactant adsorption and the process of Ostwald ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Villalba, German

    2009-03-01

    The first algorithm for Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS) was presented at the V Conferencia Iberoamericana sobre Equilibrio de Fases y Diseño de Procesos [Luis, J.; García-Sucre, M.; Urbina-Villalba, G. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Emulsion Stability In: Equifase 99. Libro de Actas, 1(st) Ed., Tojo J., Arce, A., Eds.; Solucion's: Vigo, Spain, 1999; Volume 2, pp. 364-369]. The former version of the program consisted on a minor modification of the Brownian Dynamics algorithm to account for the coalescence of drops. The present version of the program contains elaborate routines for time-dependent surfactant adsorption, average diffusion constants, and Ostwald ripening.

  2. Physical stability of 20% lipid injectable emulsions via simulated syringe infusion: effects of glass vs plastic product packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, David F; Ling, Pei-Ra; Bistrian, Bruce R

    2007-01-01

    The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has proposed large-globule-size limits to ensure the physical stability of lipid injectable emulsions, expressed as the percent fat >5 microm, or PFAT(5), not exceeding 0.05%. Visibly obvious phase separation as free oil has been shown to occur in some samples if PFAT(5) is >0.4%. We recently found that lipids, newly packaged in plastic (P), exceed the proposed USP limits and seem to produce less stable total nutrient admixtures compared with those made from conventional glass (G), which do meet proposed USP standards. We tested the possible stability differences between 20% lipid injectable emulsions in either P or G in a simulated neonatal syringe infusion study. Eighteen individual syringes were prepared from each 20% lipid injectable emulsion product (n = 36) and attached to a syringe pump set at an infusion rate of 0.5 mL/hour. The starting PFAT(5) levels were measured at time 0 and after 24 hours of infusion, using a laser-based light obscuration technique as described by the USP Chapter . The data were assessed by a 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Container (G vs P) and Time as the independent variables and PFAT as the dependent variable. At time 0, the starting PFAT(5) level for lipids packaged in G was 0.006% +/- 0.001% vs 0.162% +/- 0.026% for P, whereas at the end of the infusion they were 0.013% +/- 0.003% and 0.328% +/- 0.046%, respectively. Significant differences were noted overall between groups for Container, Time, and Container-Time interaction (all p emulsions packaged in newly introduced plastic containers exceed the proposed USP PFAT(5) limits and subsequently become significantly less stable during a simulated syringe-based infusion. Although modest growth (p = NS) in large-diameter fat globules was observed for the glass-based lipids, they remained within proposed USP globule size limits throughout the study. Glass-based lipids seem to be a more stable dosage form and potentially a safer way to

  3. Storage stability of marine phospholipids emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale

    Marine phospholipids (MPL) are believed to provide more advantages than fish oil from the same source. They are considered to have a better bioavailability, a better resistance towards oxidation and a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic...... acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using marine phospholipids emulsions as delivery system through investigation of the physical, oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL emulsions with or without addition of fish oil....... The effect of initial Peroxide Value, total lipids, phospholipids and antioxidants content on stability of MPL emulsions were studied. The physical stability was investigated through measurement of particle size distribution and creaming stability, which involve measurement of changes (%) in emulsion volume...

  4. Nanocellulose-stabilized Pickering emulsions and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Shuji; Togawa, Eiji; Kuroda, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    Pickering emulsion, which is an emulsion stabilized by solid particles, offers a wide range of potential applications because it generally provides a more stable system than surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Among various solid stabilizers, nanocellulose may open up new opportunities for future Pickering emulsions owing to its unique nanosizes, amphiphilicity, and other favorable properties (e.g. chemical stability, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and renewability). In this review, the preparation and properties of nanocellulose-stabilized Pickering emulsions are summarized. We also provide future perspectives on their applications, such as drug delivery, food, and composite materials.

  5. Development of lamivudine containing multiple emulsions stabilized by gum odina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Kumar Jena

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, a multiple emulsion (W/O/W of lamivudine was developed using a new biopolymer, gum odina (GOd to increase bioavailability and patient compliances. GOd was employed to stabilize both the interfaces of liquid membrane in both the external and internal aqueous phases. The developed W/O/W multiple emulsion of lamivudine was characterized by analyzing droplet size, zeta potential, polydispersity index (PDI, sedimentation, viscosity, rheological properties, drug entrapment efficiency, in-vitro drug release and stability at various storage conditions. The results obtained were also compared with W/O/W multiple emulsion of lamivudine prepared using Tween 80 (a standard emulsion stabilizer. The drug entrapment efficiency of W/O/W multiple emulsion stabilized using GOd was measured as 91.60 ± 3.66% with sustained lamivudine release over a period of 6 h. Rheological and microscopic examinations indicated long term stability of the developed emulsion prepared using GOd. The results of the current study provide a promising scope to attain sustained drug release through the W/O/W multiple emulsions stabilized by GOd in antiviral therapies. Keywords: Gum odina, Lamivudine, Multiple emulsions

  6. Multi-responsive ionic liquid emulsions stabilized by microgels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteillet, H.; Workamp, M.; Li, X.; Schuur, Boelo; Kleijn, J.M.; Leermakers, F.; Sprakel, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a complete toolbox to use responsive ionic liquid (IL) emulsions for extraction purposes. IL emulsions stabilized by responsive microgels are shown to allow rapid extraction and reversible breaking and re-emulsification. Moreover, by using a paramagnetic ionic liquid, droplets can be

  7. Synthesis of metallic nanoshells on porphyrin-stabilized emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haorong [Albuquerque, NM; Song, Yujiang [Albuquerque, NM; Shelnutt, John A [Tijeras, NM; Medforth, Craig J [Winters, CA

    2011-12-13

    Metal nanostructures formed by photocatalytic interfacial synthesis using a porphyrin-stabilized emulsion template and the method for making the nanostructures. Catalyst-seeded emulsion droplets are employed as templates for hollow-nanoshell growth. The hollow metal nanospheres may be formed with or without inclusions of other materials.

  8. Formulation and stability of topical water in oil emulsion containing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate the water in oil (W/O) emulsion of corn silk (CS) extract and to evaluate its stability at various storage conditions. Methods: Ethanol CS extract was prepared using maceration (cold) technique. A 4 % CS emulsion was prepared using varying concentrations of liquid paraffin, ABIL EM90 and water.

  9. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence.

  10. The effect of electrolytes on emulsions stabilized by nonionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomgaard, van den A.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of high electrolyte concentrations on the stability of oil-in-water- emulsions stabilized by nonionic surfactants.

    In chapter 1 several stability mechanisms are briefly outlined and the distinction between coalescence and

  11. Physical stability of R-(+)-Limonene emulsions stabilized by Ulva fasciata algae polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ping; Ma, Huiling; Qiu, Qiang; Jing, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The physical stability of R-(+)-Limonene emulsions stabilized by Ulva fasciata polysaccharide (UFP) was investigated in this study. Emulsion physical stability was evaluated under different polysaccharide concentrations (1%-5%, wt/wt) and pH values (3.0-11.0). The stability of R-(+)-Limonene emulsions was demonstrated by droplet size distribution, rheological properties, zeta potential and visual phase separation. R-(+)-Limonene emulsions displayed monomodal droplet size distributions, high absolute values of zeta potential and good storage stability when 3% (wt/wt) UFP was used. The rheological properties and stability of R-(+)-Limonene emulsions appeared to be dependent on polysaccharide concentration. The emulsion stability was impacted by pH. Higher zeta potential (-52.6mV) and smaller mean droplet diameter (2.45μm) were achieved in neutral liquid environment (pH 7.0). Extreme acidity caused the flocculation of emulsions, which was manifested as phase separation, while emulsions were quite stable in an alkaline environment. Through comparing the stabilities of emulsions stabilized by different emulsifiers (i.e. UFP, GA and Gelatin), the result suggested that UFP was the best emulsifying agent among them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxidative enzymatic gelation of sugar beet pectin for emulsion stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Pectin from sugar beet is derived from the sugar beet pulp residue which results when sugar beets are processed for sucrose extraction. The sugar beet pectin has poor gelationability by the classic divalentcation molecular mechanism because of a relatively high acetylation degree and short...... polygalacturonate backbone chain length. However, due to the feruloyl-substitutions on the side chains, the sugar beet pectic polysaccharides can be cross-linked via enzyme catalyzed oxidation. The enzyme kinetics and functionality of such oxidativelycross-linked sugar beet pectin, in relation to stabilizing...... emulsions has recently been investigated in model food emulsions. This paper reviews the pectin chemistry, enzymatic oxidative gelation mechanisms, interaction mechanisms of the sugar beet pectin with the emulsion droplets and explores how the gelation affects the rheology and stability of emulsion systems...

  13. Evaluation of short-term and long-term stability of emulsions by centrifugation and NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcholakova, S.; Denkov, N.; Ivanov, I.; Marinov, R.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of storage time on the coalescence stability and drop size distribution of egg yolk and whey protein concentrate stabilized emulsions is studied. The emulsion stability is evaluated by centrifugation, whereas the drop size distribution is measured by means of NMR and optical microscopy. The experimental results show that there is no general relation between the emulsion stability and the changes in the mean drop diameter upon shelf-storage of protein emulsions. On the other hand, it is shown that the higher short-term stability, measured by centrifugation immediately after emulsion preparation, corresponds to higher long-term stability (after their self-storage up to 60 days) for emulsions stabilized by the same type of emulsifier. In this way, we are able to obtain information for the long-term stability of emulsions in a relatively short period of time.(authors)

  14. Ultrasonic Studies of Emulsion Stability in the Presence of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Józefczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pickering emulsions are made of solid particle-stabilized droplets suspended in an immiscible continuous liquid phase. A magnetic emulsion can be obtained using magnetic particles. Solid magnetic nanoparticles are adsorbed strongly at the oil-water interface and are able to stabilize emulsions of oil and water. In this work emulsions stabilized by magnetite nanoparticles were obtained using high-energy ultrasound waves and a cavitation mechanism and, next, their stability in time was tested by means of acoustic waves with a low energy, without affecting the structure. An acoustic study showed high stability in time of magnetic emulsions stabilized by magnetite particles. The study also showed a strong influence of an external magnetic field, which can lead to changes of the emulsion properties. It is possible to control Pickering emulsion stability with the help of an external stimulus—a magnetic field.

  15. Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-08-24

    We recently showed (Binks et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02696) how evaporation of sunscreen films consisting of solutions of molecular UV filters leads to loss of UV light absorption and derived sun protection factor (SPF). In the present work, we investigate evaporation-induced effects for sunscreen films consisting of particle-stabilized emulsions containing a dissolved UV filter. The emulsions contained either droplets of propylene glycol (PG) in squalane (SQ), droplets of SQ in PG or droplets of decane in PG. In these different emulsion types, the SQ is involatile and shows no evaporation, the PG is volatile and evaporates relatively slowly, whereas the decane is relatively very volatile and evaporates quickly. We have measured the film mass and area, optical micrographs of the film structure, and the UV absorbance spectra during evaporation. For emulsion films containing the involatile SQ, evaporation of the PG causes collapse of the emulsion structure with some loss of specular UV absorbance due to light scattering. However, for these emulsions with droplets much larger than the wavelength of light, the light is scattered only at small forward angles so does not contribute to the diffuse absorbance and the film SPF. The UV filter remains soluble throughout the evaporation and thus the UV absorption by the filter and the SPF remain approximately constant. Both PG-in-SQ and SQ-in-PG films behave similarly and do not show area shrinkage by dewetting. In contrast, the decane-in-PG film shows rapid evaporative loss of the decane, followed by slower loss of the PG resulting in precipitation of the UV filter and film area shrinkage by dewetting which cause the UV absorbance and derived SPF to decrease. Measured UV spectra during evaporation are in reasonable agreement with spectra calculated using models discussed here.

  16. Bioreactor droplets from liposome-stabilized all-aqueous emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Strulson, Christopher A.; Cacace, David N.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Keating, Christine D.

    2014-08-01

    Artificial bioreactors are desirable for in vitro biochemical studies and as protocells. A key challenge is maintaining a favourable internal environment while allowing substrate entry and product departure. We show that semipermeable, size-controlled bioreactors with aqueous, macromolecularly crowded interiors can be assembled by liposome stabilization of an all-aqueous emulsion. Dextran-rich aqueous droplets are dispersed in a continuous polyethylene glycol (PEG)-rich aqueous phase, with coalescence inhibited by adsorbed ~130-nm diameter liposomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and dynamic light scattering data indicate that the liposomes, which are PEGylated and negatively charged, remain intact at the interface for extended time. Inter-droplet repulsion provides electrostatic stabilization of the emulsion, with droplet coalescence prevented even for submonolayer interfacial coatings. RNA and DNA can enter and exit aqueous droplets by diffusion, with final concentrations dictated by partitioning. The capacity to serve as microscale bioreactors is established by demonstrating a ribozyme cleavage reaction within the liposome-coated droplets.

  17. Modulation of Cyclodextrin Particle Amphiphilic Properties to Stabilize Pickering Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yongkang; Luo, Zhigang; Lu, Xuanxuan; Peng, Xichun

    2018-01-10

    Cyclodextrins have been proven to form complexes with linear oil molecules and stabilize emulsions. Amphiphilic properties of cyclodextrin particles were modulated through esterification reaction between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and octadecenyl succinic anhydride (ODSA) under alkaline conditions. ODS-β-CD particles with degree of substitution (DS) of 0.003, 0.011, and 0.019 were obtained. The introduced hydrophobic long chain that was linked within β-CD cavity led to the change of ODS-β-CD in terms of morphological structure, surface charge density, size, and contact angle, upon which the properties and stability of the emulsions stabilized by ODS-β-CD were highly dependent. The average diameter of ODS-β-CD particles ranged from 449 to 1484 nm. With the DS increased from 0.003 to 0.019, the contact angle and absolute zeta potential value of these ODS-β-CD particles improved from 25.7° to 47.3° and 48.1 to 62.8 mV, respectively. The cage structure of β-CD crystals was transformed to channel structure, then further to amorphous structure after introduction of the octadecenyl succinylation chain. ODS-β-CD particles exhibited higher emulsifying ability compared to β-CD. The resulting Pickering emulsions formed by ODS-β-CD particles were more stable during storage. This study investigates the ability of these ODS-β-CD particles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions with respect to their amphiphilic character and structural properties.

  18. FORMULATION AND STABILITY EVALUATION OF BAUHINIA VARIEGATA EXTRACT TOPICAL EMULSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Sabeeh; Akhtar, Naveed

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the results for the development of water in oil (W/O) emulsion containing 2 % Bauhinia variegata (BV) extract with good antioxidant potential for cosmetic application. Different ratios of surfactant, oil and water were investigated to optimize the ratio of ingredients. It was found that emulsifier and oil4ratio were important in improving the stability of emulsion. The formulation having 2.5% Abil EM90, 12% liquid paraffin, 83.5% distilled water and 2% BV extract was found to be most stable. Stability of the formulation was further evaluated by characterizing for organoleptic, sedimentation, microscopic and rheological properties at a range of storage conditions for a period of 12 weeks. Experimental findings showed stable formulation behavior with respect to color change, liquefaction and phase separation. Centrifugation test was carried out to predict the long term stability..The rheological parameters were evaluated from Power Law and the flow index value less than 1 suggested non-Newtonian behavior of the W/O emulsion. The mean droplet size of the internal phase of freshly prepared formulation was 4.06 ? 1.99 pm that did not change significantly (p > 0.05) during the storage. The newly developed formulation exhibited promising attributes over long term storage and open opportunities for the topical delivery of natural antioxidants for cosmetic and pharmaceutical objectives.

  19. Characterization and stability studies of emulsion systems containing pumice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene Estanqueiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Emulsions are the most common form of skin care products. However, these systems may exhibit some instability. Therefore, when developing emulsions for topical application it is interesting to verify whether they have suitable physical and mechanical characteristics and further assess their stability. The aim of this work was to study the stability of emulsion systems, which varied in the proportion of the emulsifying agent cetearyl alcohol (and sodium lauryl sulfate (and sodium cetearyl sulfate (LSX, the nature of the oily phase (decyl oleate, cyclomethicone or dimethicone and the presence or absence of pumice (5% w/w. While maintaining the samples at room temperature, rheology studies, texture analysis and microscopic observation of formulations with and without pumice were performed. Samples were also submitted to an accelerated stability study by centrifugation and to a thermal stress test. Through the testing, it was found that the amount of emulsifying agent affects the consistency and textural properties such as firmness and adhesiveness. So, formulations containing LSX (5% w/w and decyl oleate or dimethicone as oily phase had a better consistency and remained stable with time, so exhibited the best features to be used for skin care products.

  20. Antioxidant activity and emulsion-stabilizing effect of pectic enzyme treated pectin in soy protein isolate-stabilized oil/water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping-Hsiu; Lu, Hao-Te; Wang, Yuh-Tai; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2011-09-14

    The antioxidant activity of pectic enzyme treated pectin (PET-pectin) prepared from citrus pectin by enzymatic hydrolysis and its potential use as a stabilizer and an antioxidant for soy protein isolate (SPI)-stabilized oil in water (O/W) emulsion were investigated. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was found to be positively associated with molecular weight (M(w)) of PET-pectin and negatively associated with degree of esterification (DE) of PET-pectin. PET-pectin (1 kDa and 11.6% DE) prepared from citrus pectin after 24 h of hydrolysis by commercial pectic enzyme produced by Aspergillus niger expressed higher α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, TEAC, and reducing power than untreated citrus pectin (353 kDa and 60% DE). The addition of PET-pectin could increase both emulsifying activity (EA) and emulsion stability (ES) of SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion. When the SPI-stabilized lipid droplet was coated with the mixture of PET-pectin and pectin, the EA and ES of the emulsion were improved more than they were when the lipid droplet was coated with either pectin or PET-pectin alone. The amount of secondary oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) produced in the emulsion prepared with the mixture of SPI and PET-pectin was less than the amount produced in the emulsion prepared with either SPI or SPI/pectin. These results suggest that PET-pectin has an emulsion-stabilizing effect and lipid oxidation inhibition ability on SPI-stabilized emulsion. Therefore, PET-pectin can be used as a stabilizer as well as an antioxidant in plant origin in SPI-stabilized O/W emulsion and thus prolong the shelf life of food emulsion.

  1. Pickering emulsions stabilized by whey protein nanoparticles prepared by thermal cross-linking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Li, Wei; Zhao, Luhai; Wang, Ze; Yan, Xinzhong; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    A Pickering (o/w) emulsion was formed and stabilized by whey protein isolate nanoparticles (WPI NPs). Those WPI NPs were prepared by thermal cross-linking of denatured WPI proteins within w/o emulsion droplets at 80. °C for 15. min. During heating of w/o emulsions containing 10% (w/v) WPI

  2. Physicochemical stability of lycopene-loaded emulsions stabilized by plant or dairy proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Kacie; Schroen, C.G.P.H.; San Martín-González, M.F.; Berton-Carabin, C.C.

    2017-01-01

    Lycopene is a lipophilic bioactive compound that can be challenging to deliver in vivo. To mediate this, delivery strategies, such as protein-stabilized oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, have been suggested to improve the physicochemical stability and bioavailability of lycopene. In this research, the

  3. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization enhances physicochemical properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ávila, C; Escriu, R; Trujillo, A J

    2015-09-01

    The effect of Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (UHPH, 100-300MPa) on the physicochemical properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4.0% (w/v) of soy protein isolate (SPI) and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) was studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (CH, 15MPa). CH emulsions were prepared with non-heated and heated (95°C for 15min) SPI dispersions. Emulsions were characterized by particle size determination with laser diffraction, rheological properties using a rotational rheometer by applying measurements of flow curve and by transmission electron microscopy. The variation on particle size and creaming was assessed by Turbiscan® analysis, and visual observation of the emulsions was also carried out. UHPH emulsions showed much smaller d 3.2 values and greater physical stability than CH emulsions. The thermal treatment of SPI prior CH process did not improve physical stability properties. In addition, emulsions containing 20% of oil exhibited greater physical stability compared to emulsions containing 10% of oil. Particularly, UHPH emulsions treated at 100 and 200MPa with 20% of oil were the most stable due to low particle size values (d 3.2 and Span), greater viscosity and partial protein denaturation. These results address the physical stability improvement of protein isolate-stabilized emulsions by using the emerging UHPH technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enzymatically structured emulsions in simulated gastrointestinal environment: impact on interfacial proteolysis and diffusion in intestinal mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macierzanka, Adam; Böttger, Franziska; Rigby, Neil M; Lille, Martina; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mills, E N Clare; Mackie, Alan R

    2012-12-18

    Fundamental knowledge of physicochemical interactions in the gastrointestinal environment is required in order to support rational designing of protein-stabilized colloidal food and pharmaceutical delivery systems with controlled behavior. In this paper, we report on the colloidal behavior of emulsions stabilized with the milk protein sodium caseinate (Na-Cas), and exposed to conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract. In particular, we looked at how the kinetics of proteolysis was affected by adsorption to an oil-water interface in emulsion and whether the proteolysis and the emulsion stability could be manipulated by enzymatic structuring of the interface. After cross-linking with the enzyme transglutaminase, the protein was digested with use of an in vitro model of gastro-duodenal proteolysis in the presence or absence of physiologically relevant surfactants (phosphatidylcholine, PC; bile salts, BS). Significant differences were found between the rates of digestion of Na-Cas cross-linked in emulsion (adsorbed protein) and in solution. In emulsion, the digestion of a population of polypeptides of M(r) ca. 50-100 kDa was significantly retarded through the gastric digestion. The persistent interfacial polypeptides maintained the original emulsion droplet size and prevented the system from phase separating. Rapid pepsinolysis of adsorbed, non-cross-linked Na-Cas and its displacement by PC led to emulsion destabilization. These results suggest that structuring of emulsions by enzymatic cross-linking of the interfacial protein may affect the phase behavior of emulsion in the stomach and the gastric digestion rate in vivo. Measurements of ζ-potential revealed that BS displaced the remaining protein from the oil droplets during the simulated duodenal phase of digestion. Diffusion of the postdigestion emulsion droplets through ex vivo porcine intestinal mucus was only significant in the presence of BS due to the high negative charge these

  6. Development of novel zein-sodium caseinate nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films for improved water barrier properties via emulsion/solvent evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Juan; Yin, Ye-Chong; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Shi, Wei-Jian; Tang, Chuan-He; Wang, Jin-Mei

    2013-11-20

    This work attempted to develop novel high barrier zein/SC nanoparticle (ZP)-stabilized emulsion films through microfluidic emulsification (ZPE films) or in combination with solvent (ethyl acetate) evaporation techniques (ZPE-EA films). Some physical properties, including tensile and optical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP), and surface hydrophobicity, as well as the microstructure of ZP-stabilized emulsion films were evaluated and compared with SC emulsion (SCE) films. The emulsion/solvent evaporation approach reduced lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions, and lipid droplets of ZP-stabilized emulsions were similar to or slightly lower than that of SC emulsions. However, ZP- and SC-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a completely different microstructure, nanoscalar lipid droplets were homogeneously distributed in the ZPE film matrix and interpenetrating protein-oil complex networks occurred within ZPE-EA films, whereas SCE films presented a heterogeneous microstructure. The different stabilization mechanisms against creaming or coalescence during film formation accounted for the preceding discrepancy of the microstructures between ZP-and SC-stabilized emulsion films. Interestingly, ZP-stabilized emulsion films exhibited a better water barrier efficiency, and the WVP values were only 40-50% of SCE films. A schematic representation for the formation of ZP-stabilized emulsion films was proposed to relate the physical performance of the films with their microstructure and to elucidate the possible forming mechanism of the films.

  7. Emulsifying salt increase stability of cheese emulsions during holding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anni Bygvrå; Sijbrandij, Anna G.; Varming, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    In cheese powder production, cheese is mixed and melted with water and emulsifying salt to form an emulsion (cheese feed) which is required to remain stable at 60°C for 1h and during further processing until spray drying. Addition of emulsifying salts ensures this, but recent demands for reduction...... of sodium and phosphate in foods makes production of cheese powder without or with minimal amounts of emulsifying salts desirable. The present work uses a centrifugation method to characterize stability of model cheese feeds. Stability of cheese feed with emulsifying salt increased with holding time at 60°C......, especially when no stirring was applied. No change in stability during holding was observed in cheese feeds without emulsifying salt. This effect is suggested to be due to continued exerted functionality of the emulsifying salt, possibly through reorganizations of the mineral balance....

  8. Effect of citronella essential oil fractions as oil phase on emulsion stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiyanti, Melati; Meliana, Yenny; Agustian, Egi

    2017-11-01

    The emulsion system consists of water, oil and surfactant. In order to create stable emulsion system, the composition and formulation between water phase, surfactant and oil phase are very important. Essential oil such as citronella oil has been known as active ingredient which has ability as insect repellent. This research studied the effect of citronella oil and its fraction as oil phase on emulsion stability. The cycle stability test was conducted to check the emulsion stability and it was monitored by pH, density, viscosity, particle size, refractive index, zeta potential, physical appearance and FTIR for 4 weeks. Citronellal fraction has better stability compared to citronella oil and rhodinol fraction with slight change of physical and chemical properties before and after the cycle stability test. However, it is need further study to enhance the stability of the emulsion stability for this formulation.

  9. Effect of layer-by-layer coatings and localization of antioxidant on oxidative stability of a model encapsulated bioactive compound in oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanjie; Nitin, N

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of encapsulated bioactives in emulsions is one of the key challenges that limit shelf-life of many emulsion containing products. This study seeks to quantify the role of layer-by-layer coatings and localization of antioxidant molecules at the emulsion interface in influencing oxidation of the encapsulated bioactives. Oxidative barrier properties of the emulsions were simulated by measuring the rate of reaction of peroxyl radicals generated in the aqueous phase with the encapsulated radical sensitive dye in the lipid core of the emulsions. The results of peroxyl radical permeation were compared to the stability of encapsulated retinol (model bioactive) in emulsions. To evaluate the role of layer-by-layer coatings in influencing oxidative barrier properties, radical permeation rates and retinol stability were evaluated in emulsion formulations of SDS emulsion and SDS emulsion with one or two layers of polymers (ϵ-polylysine and dextran sulfate) coated at the interface. To localize antioxidant molecules to the interface, gallic acid (GA) was chemically conjugated with ϵ-polylysine and subsequently deposited on SDS emulsion based on electrostatic interactions. Emulsion formulations with localized GA molecules at the interface were compared with SDS emulsion with GA molecules in the bulk aqueous phase. The results of this study demonstrate the advantage of localization of antioxidant at the interface and the limited impact of short chain polymer coatings at the interface of emulsions in reducing permeation of radicals and oxidation of a model encapsulated bioactive in oil-in-water emulsions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by cellulose ethers: stability, structure and in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, Jennifer; Espert, María; Salvador, Ana; Sanz, Teresa; Quiles, Amparo; Hernando, Isabel

    2017-04-19

    The effect of cellulose ethers in oil-in-water emulsions on stability during storage and on texture, microstructure and lipid digestibility during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was investigated. All the cellulose ether emulsions showed good physical and oxidative stability during storage. In particular, the methylcellulose with high methoxyl substituents (HMC) made it possible to obtain emulsions with high consistency which remained almost unchanged during gastric digestion, and thus could enhance fullness and satiety perceptions at gastric level. Moreover, the HMC emulsion slowed down lipid digestion to a greater extent than a conventional protein emulsion or the emulsions stabilised by the other cellulose ethers. Therefore, HMC emulsions could be used in weight management to increase satiation capacity and decrease lipid digestion.

  11. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloyl groups can promote gelation of sugar beet pectin (SBP). It is uncertain how the enzyme kinetics of this cross-linking reaction are affected in emulsion systems and whether the gelation affects emulsion stability. In this study, SBP (2.5% w...... larger average particle sizes than the emulsions in which the SBP was homogenized into the emulsion system during emulsion preparation (referred as Mix B). Mix B type emulsions were stable. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP helped stabilize the emulsions in Mix A. The kinetics of the enzyme...... catalyzed oxidative gelation of SBP was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (EC 1.11.1.7) and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2) catalysis, respectively. HRP catalyzed gelation rates, determined from the slopes of the increase of elastic modulus (G0) with time, were higher...

  12. Effects of different dairy ingredients on the rheological behaviour and stability of hot cheese emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelimu, Abulimiti; Felix da Silva, Denise; Geng, Xiaolu

    2017-01-01

    The influence of sodium caseinate (SC), butter milk powder (BMP) and their combinations on particle size, rheological properties, emulsion stability and microstructure of hot cheese emulsions made from mixtures of Cheddar and soft white cheese was studied. All emulsions exhibited shear-thinning f......The influence of sodium caseinate (SC), butter milk powder (BMP) and their combinations on particle size, rheological properties, emulsion stability and microstructure of hot cheese emulsions made from mixtures of Cheddar and soft white cheese was studied. All emulsions exhibited shear......-thinning flow behaviour and increasing SC concentration (1–4%) led to an increase in particle size and a decrease in apparent viscosity. In contrast, increasing BMP concentration caused significant decrease in particle size and slightly reduced the apparent viscosity. Stability against creaming...

  13. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin and pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Marly S; McClements, D J; Miglioranza, Lucia H S; Decker, Eric A

    2008-07-23

    The oxidation of fatty acids can be inhibited by engineering the surface of oil-in-water emulsion droplets to decrease interactions between aqueous phase prooxidants and lipids. The objective of this research was to evaluate whether emulsions stabilized by a multilayer emulsifier systems consisting of beta-lactoglobulin and citrus or sugar beet pectin could produce fish oil-in-water emulsions that had good physical and oxidative stability. Sugar beet pectin was compared to citrus pectin because the sugar beet pectin contains the known antioxidant, ferulic acid. A primary Menhaden oil-in-water emulsion was prepared with beta-lactoglobulin upon which the pectins were electrostatically deposited at pH 3.5. Emulsions prepared with 1% oil, 0.05% beta-lactoglobulin, and 0.06% pectins were physically stable for up to 16 days. As determined by monitoring lipid hydroperoxide and headspace propanal formation, emulsions prepared with the multilayer system of beta-lactoglobulin and citrus pectin were more stable than emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin alone. Emulsions prepared with the multilayer system of beta-lactoglobulin and sugar beet pectin were less stable than emulsions stabilized with beta-lactoglobulin alone despite the presence of ferulic acid in the sugar beet pectin. The lower oxidative stability of the emulsions with the sugar beet pectin could be due to its higher iron and copper concentrations which would produce oxidative stress that would overcome the antioxidant capacity of ferulic acid. These data suggest that the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing omega-3 fatty acids could be improved by the use of multilayer emulsion systems containing pectins with low metal concentrations.

  14. Preparation and Application of Water-in-Oil Emulsions Stabilized by Modified Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoma Fei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of alkyl chain modified graphene oxides (AmGO with different alkyl chain length and content was fabricated using a reducing reaction between graphene oxide (GO and alkyl amine. Then AmGO was used as a graphene-based particle emulsifier to stabilize Pickering emulsion. Compared with the emulsion stabilized by GO, which was oil-in-water type, all the emulsions stabilized by AmGO were water-in-oil type. The effects of alkyl chain length and alkyl chain content on the emulsion properties of AmGO were investigated. The emulsions stabilized by AmGO showed good stability within a wide range of pH (from pH = 1 to pH = 13 and salt concentrations (from 0.1 to 1000 mM. In addition, the application of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by AmGO was investigated. AmGO/polyaniline nanocomposite (AmGO/PANi was prepared through an emulsion approach, and its supercapacitor performance was investigated. This research broadens the application of AmGO as a water-in-oil type emulsion stabilizer and in preparing graphene-based functional materials.

  15. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used...... prior to homogenization did not have any clear effect on lipid oxidation in either of the two types of emulsions....

  16. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  17. Emulsifier type, metal chelation and pH affect oxidative stability of n-3-enriched emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    -enriched oil-in-water emulsion. The selected food emulsifiers were Tween 80, Citrem, sodium caseinate and lecithin. Lipid oxidation was evaluated by determination of peroxide values and secondary volatile oxidation products. Moreover, the zeta potential and the droplet sizes were determined. Twen resulted...... in the least oxidatively stable emulsions, followed by Citrem. When iron was present, caseinate-stabilized emulsions oxidized slower than lecithin emulsions at pH 3, whereas the opposite was the case at pH 7. Oxidation generally progressed faster at pH 3 than at pH 7, irrespective of the addition of iron. EDTA...

  18. Physical Stability of Oil in Water Emulsions in the Presence of Gamma Irradiated Gum Tragacanth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meybodi, Neda Mollakhalili; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Farhoodi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Gum tragacanth (GT) exuded from an Iranian Astragalus species was γ-irradiated at 0, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 kGy and used to stabilize a model oil in water emulsion system. Stability and physicochemical properties of emulsion samples were investigated with respect to the effect of irradiation...... treatment on functional properties of gum tragacanth. Particle size distribution, interfacial tension, zeta potential, steady shear and oscillatory rheological measurements were used to characterize and evaluate the emulsion samples and obtain more information about the possible stability mechanism...

  19. Acquisition of Co metal from spent lithium-ion battery using emulsion liquid membrane technology and emulsion stability test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Wulandari, P. T.; Amiliana, R. A.; Huda, M.; Kusumadewi, F. A.

    2018-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are the most common type to be used as energy source in mobile phone. The amount of lithium-ion battery wastes is approximated by 200 – 500 ton/year. In one lithium-ion battery, there are 5 – 20% of cobalt metal, depend on the manufacturer. One of the way to recover a valuable metal from waste is leaching process then continued with extraction, which is the aim of this study. Spent lithium-ion batteries will be characterized with EDX and AAS, the result will show the amount of cobalt metal with form of LiCoO2 in the cathode. Hydrochloric acid concentration used is 4 M, temperature 80°C, and reaction time 1 hour. This study will discuss the emulsion stability test on emulsion liquid membrane. The purpose of emulsion stability test in this study was to determine optimum concentration of surfactant and extractant to produce a stable emulsion. Surfactant and extractant used were SPAN 80 and Cyanex 272 respectively with both concentrations varied. Membrane and feed phase ratios used in this experiment was 1 : 2. The optimum results of this study were SPAN 80 concentrations of 10% w/v and Cyanex 272 0.7 M.

  20. Oxidative Stability and Shelf Life of Food Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation and antioxidant effects in food emulsions are influenced by many different factors, such as the composition of the aqueous phase and interface, the partitioning of the antioxidants between the different phases of the emulsion system, the antioxidant properties, and others. This ch...

  1. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Fu, Xiao-Qi, E-mail: xzx19820708@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS{sub 2}(s) + 91NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO{sub 2}(g) + 6Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(s) + 78NH{sub 3}(g) + 26N{sub 2}O(g) + 2FeSO{sub 4}(s) + 65H{sub 2}O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  2. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An exothermic reaction occurs at about 200 °C between pyrite and ammonium nitrate (emulsion explosives). • The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. • The excellent thermal stability of emulsion explosives does not mean it was also showed when pyrite was added. • A new overall reaction has been proposed as: • 14FeS_2(s) + 91NH_4NO_3(s) → 52NO(g) + 26SO_2(g) + 6Fe_2O_3(s) + 78NH_3(g) + 26N_2O(g) + 2FeSO_4(s) + 65H_2O(g). - Abstract: The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG–DSC–MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10 K/min from room temperature to 350 °C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200 °C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO_2, NH_3, SO_2 and N_2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals.

  3. Method validation and stability study of quercetin in topical emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rúbia Casagrande

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study validated a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method for the quantitative evaluation of quercetin in topical emulsions. The method was linear within 0.05 - 200 μg/mL range with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997, and without interference in the quercetin peak. The detection and quantitation limits were 18 and 29 ng/mL, respectively. The intra- and inter-assay precisions presented R.S.D. values lower than 2%. An average of 93% and 94% of quercetin was recovered for non-ionic and anionic emulsions, respectively. The raw material and anionic emulsion, but not non-ionic emulsion, were stable in all storage conditions for one year. The method reported is a fast and reliable HPLC technique useful for quercetin determination in topical emulsions.

  4. Stability Emulsion and Sensory Characteristics Low Fat Mayonnaise Using Kefir as Emulsifier Replacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herly Evanuarini

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mayonnaise is a kind of semi solid oil in water (o/w emulsion which containing pasteurized egg yolk as an emulsifier. The consumers have demanded that the use of egg yolk be reduced. Kefir was used to develop a low fat mayonnaise as emulsifier replacer to egg yolk. The objective of this research was to observe the emulsion stability, sensory characteristics of low fat mayonnaise prepare during kefir as emulsifier replacer. The research method was using experimental design. The result showed that formulation of low fat mayonnaise by using Rice bran oil 40%, kefir 20% produces the optimal low fat mayonnaise in emulsion stability and accepted by the panelist.

  5. Rheological behavior of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic bentonite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Clint, John H; Whitby, Catherine P

    2005-06-07

    A study of the rheological behavior of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by hydrophobic bentonite particles is described. Concentrated emulsions were prepared and diluted at constant particle concentration to investigate the effect of drop volume fraction on the viscosity and viscoelastic response of the emulsions. The influence of the structure of the hydrophobic clay particles in the oil has also been studied by using oils in which the clay swells to very different extents. Emulsions prepared from isopropyl myristate, in which the particles do not swell, are increasingly flocculated as the drop volume fraction increases and the viscosity of the emulsions increases accordingly. The concentrated emulsions are viscoelastic and the elastic storage and viscous loss moduli also increase with increasing drop volume fraction. Emulsions prepared from toluene, in which the clay particles swell to form tactoids, are highly structured due to the formation of an integrated network of clay tactoids and drops, and the moduli of the emulsions are significantly larger than those of the emulsions prepared from isopropyl myristate.

  6. Oil-in-Water Emulsions Stabilized by Saponified Epoxidized Soybean Oil-Grafted Hydroxyethyl Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xujuan; Li, Qiaoguang; Liu, He; Shang, Shibin; Shen, Minggui; Song, Jie

    2017-05-03

    An oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by saponified epoxidized soybean oil-grafted hydroxyethyl cellulose (H-ESO-HEC) was investigated. By using an ultrasonic method, oil-in-water emulsions were prepared by blending 50 wt % soybean oil and 50 wt % H-ESO-HEC aqueous suspensions. The influence of H-ESO-HEC concentrations on the properties of oil-in-water emulsions was examined. The H-ESO-HEC concentrations in the aqueous phase varied from 0.02 to 0.40 wt %. When the H-ESO-HEC concentration was 0.4 wt %, the emulsion remained stable for >80 days. The mean droplet sizes of the emulsions decreased by increasing the H-ESO-HEC concentration and extending the ultrasonic time. The adsorption amounts of H-ESO-HEC at the oil-water interface increased when the H-ESO-HEC concentrations in the aqueous phase increased. The rheological property revealed that the apparent viscosity of the H-ESO-HEC-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions increased when the H-ESO-HEC concentrations increased. Steady flow curves indicated an interfacial film formation in the emulsions. The evolution of G', G″, and tan η indicated the predominantly elastic behaviors of all the emulsions.

  7. Stability of O/W Emulsion with Synthetic Perfumes Oxidized by Singlet Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Watabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We prepared O/W emulsion composed of a synthetic perfume, n-dodecane, protoporphyrin IX disodium salt (PpIX-2Na, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and water and investigated oxidative decomposition of the synthetic perfume in the emulsion and change in the stability of the emulsion by singlet oxygen (1O2 generated by photosensitization of PpIX-2Na. We used eugenol, linalool, benzyl acetate, α-ionone, α-hexylcinnamaldehyde, and d-limonene as a synthetic perfume. The stability of the O/W emulation including eugenol and linalool significantly decreased with increasing light irradiation time. The decrease in the emulsion stability may be attributable to oxidative decomposition of eugenol and linalool by 1O2 and enlargement of the oil droplet size.

  8. Emulsion stability measurements by single electrode capacitance probe (SeCaP) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schüller, R B; Løkra, S; Egelandsdal, B; Salas-Bringas, C; Engebretsen, B

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a new and novel method for the determination of the stability of emulsions. The method is based on the single electrode capacitance technology (SeCaP). A measuring system consisting of eight individual measuring cells, each with a volume of approximately 10 ml, is described in detail. The system has been tested on an emulsion system based on whey proteins (WPC80), oil and water. Xanthan was added to modify the emulsion stability. The results show that the new measuring system is able to quantify the stability of the emulsion in terms of a differential variable. The whole separation process is observed much faster in the SeCaP system than in a conventional separation column. The complete separation process observed visually over 30 h is seen in less than 1.4 h in the SeCaP system

  9. Solvent-free formation of hydroxyapatite coated biodegradable particles via nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Nishimura, Taiki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Takeda, Shoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles stabilized polymer melt-in-water emulsions without any molecular surfactants. ► Interaction between polymer and HAp played a crucial role. ► HAp-coated polymer particles were obtained from the emulsions without any organic solvents. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particles were fabricated from a nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion in the absence of any molecular surfactants or organic solvents. First, a polymer melt-in-water emulsion was prepared by mixing a water phase containing nanosized HAp particles as a particulate emulsifier and an oil phase consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) or poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) above its melting point. It was clarified that the interaction between ester/carboxyl groups of the polymers and the HAp nanoparticles at the polymer–water interface played a crucial role to prepare the nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion. The HAp nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particle (a polymer solid-in-water emulsion) was fabricated by cooling the emulsion. The particle morphology and particle size were evaluated using scanning electron microscope.

  10. Stability and in vitro digestibility of emulsions containing lecithin and whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Raphaela Araujo; Cavallieri, Ângelo Luiz Fazani; Netto, Flavia Maria; Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2013-09-01

    The effect of pH and high-pressure homogenization on the properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions stabilized by lecithin and/or whey proteins (WPI) was evaluated. For this purpose, emulsions were characterized by visual analysis, droplet size distribution, zeta potential, electrophoresis, rheological measurements and their response to in vitro digestion. Lecithin emulsions were stable even after 7 days of storage and WPI emulsions were unstable only at pH values close to the isoelectric point (pI) of proteins. Systems containing the mixture of lecithin and WPI showed high kinetic instability at pH 3, which was attributed to the electrostatic interaction between the emulsifiers oppositely charged at this pH value. At pH 5.5 and 7, the mixture led to reduction of the droplet size with enhanced emulsion stability compared to the systems with WPI or lecithin. The stability of WPI emulsions after the addition of lecithin, especially at pH 5.5, was associated with the increase of droplet surface charge density. The in vitro digestion evaluation showed that WPI emulsion was more stable against gastrointestinal conditions.

  11. Thermal stability and mechanism of decomposition of emulsion explosives in the presence of pyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xiao-Qi

    2015-12-30

    The reaction of emulsion explosives (ammonium nitrate) with pyrite was studied using techniques of TG-DTG-DTA. TG-DSC-MS was also used to analyze samples thermal decomposition process. When a mixture of pyrite and emulsion explosives was heated at a constant heating rate of 10K/min from room temperature to 350°C, exothermic reactions occurred at about 200°C. The essence of reaction between emulsion explosives and pyrite is the reaction between ammonium nitrate and pyrite. Emulsion explosives have excellent thermal stability but it does not mean it showed the same excellent thermal stability when pyrite was added. Package emulsion explosives were more suitable to use in pyrite shale than bulk emulsion explosives. The exothermic reaction was considered to take place between ammonium nitrate and pyrite where NO, NO2, NH3, SO2 and N2O gases were produced. Based on the analysis of the gaseous, a new overall reaction was proposed, which was thermodynamically favorable. The results have significant implication in the understanding of stability of emulsion explosives in reactive mining grounds containing pyrite minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Kaolinite and Silica Dispersions in Low-Salinity Environments: Impact on a Water-in-Crude Oil Emulsion Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Alvarado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at providing evidence of particle suspension contributions to emulsion stability, which has been cited as a contributing factor in crude oil recovery by low-salinity waterflooding. Kaolinite and silica particle dispersions were characterized as functions of brine salinity. A reference aqueous phase, representing reservoir brine, was used and then diluted with distilled water to obtain brines at 10 and 100 times lower Total Dissolved Solid (TDS. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and X-ray Diffraction (XRD were used to examine at the morphology and composition of clays. The zeta potential and particle size distribution were also measured. Emulsions were prepared by mixing a crude oil with brine, with and without dispersed particles to investigate emulsion stability. The clay zeta potential as a function of pH was used to investigate the effect of particle charge on emulsion stability. The stability was determined through bottle tests and optical microscopy. Results show that both kaolinite and silica promote emulsion stability. Also, kaolinite, roughly 1 mm in size, stabilizes emulsions better than larger clay particles. Silica particles of larger size (5 µm yielded more stable emulsions than smaller silica particles do. Test results show that clay particles with zero point of charge (ZPC at low pH become less effective at stabilizing emulsions, while silica stabilizes emulsions better at ZPC. These result shed light on emulsion stabilization in low-salinity waterflooding.

  13. Stabilization of Model Crude Oil Emulsion using Different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2015-12-31

    Dec 31, 2015 ... interaction of asphaltene with the prepared model oils can be used as a ... techniques, microscopy, interfacial pressure, and ... conclusion that these compounds were asphaltene .... The emulsion may invert from oil in water.

  14. Investigation the physicochemical properties and stability of w/o emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Baloch, M.K.; Hameed, G.

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the stability of W/O emulsions with respect to coalescence time. The various concentrations of water were dispersed in oil phase (soybean oil). The compositions of organic and aqueous phases were varied by adding emulsifier (Monoglyceride), sodium chloride and thickening agent (mango's pulp). The technique employed for the mixing of two phases was homogenization. The Emulsion Stability Index (ESI), Viscosity changes, separation of organic and aqueous phases as a function of storage time have been studied. It has been found that monoglyceride increases the stability and decreases the emulsion stability index (ESI) and also decreases the viscosity changes with storage time while electrolytes and mango's pulp encourage the coalescence process and enhance the instability of the system. On the other hand the system that contained all the organic and aqueous ingredients showed high stability. (author)

  15. A magnetic nanoparticle stabilized gas containing emulsion for multimodal imaging and triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Diancheng; Zhu, Jia-an; Wei, Xiaohui; Men, Weiwei; Yin, Dazhi; Fan, Mingxia; Xu, Yuhong

    2014-06-01

    To develop a multimodal imaging guided and triggered drug delivery system based on a novel emulsion formulation composed of iron oxide nanoparticles, nanoscopic bubbles, and oil containing drugs. Iron oxide paramagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized and modified with surface conjugation of polyethylenimide (PEI) or Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). Both particles were used to disperse and stabilize oil in water emulsions containing coumarin-6 as the model drug. Sulfur hexafluoride was introduced into the oil phase to form nanoscopic bubbles inside the emulsions. The resulted gas containing emulsions were evaluated for their magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) imaging properties. The drug release profile triggered by ultrasound was also examined. We have successfully prepared the highly integrated multi-component emulsion system using the surface modified iron oxide nanoparticles to stabilize the interfaces. The resulted structure had distinctive MR and US imaging properties. Upon application of ultrasound waves, the gas containing emulsion would burst and encapsulated drug could be released. The integrated emulsion formulation was multifunctional with paramagnetic, sono-responsive and drug-carrying characteristics, which may have potential applications for disease diagnosis and imaging guided drug release.

  16. Measuring the emulsion stability in Cherenkov radiation with insignificant modification of a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiechen, A.; Lorenzen, P.Ch.; Reimerdes, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described by which the stability of emulsions can be measured by a modified liquid scintillation counter. The 226 Ra external standard source of a commercially available equipment, fixed in the measuring position, is used for the production of Cherenkov radiation in a sample of an emulsion. This Cherenkov radiation is absorbed by the sample due to its turbidity. The turbidity of emulsions follows a typical course with time designated as creaming-up-curve. These curves can be registered automatically in digital form. (author)

  17. Variation of emulsion stability in sulfuric acid alkylation of isobutane with olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumanov, V.T.; Ovsyannikov, V.P.

    1982-09-01

    The makeup of the emulsion and its stability are determined to a great degree by the surface and viscosity properties of the acid. Investigates the dependence of emulsion stability on the properties of the acid circulating in the reactor section of an alkylation unit. Finds that as the surface-active substances that accumulate in the acid tend to lower its surface tension, and this in turn tends to disperse the hydrocarbon feedstock in the acid phase and forms a stable emulsion in the vigorously stirred reactor. Points out that as the acid viscosity increases, the segregation of microdrops of hydrocarbons from the acid phase becomes slower in the settling of the emulsion under natural conditions.

  18. Modulation and Stabilization of Silk Fibroin-Coated Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Min Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to prepare and characterize stable oil-in-water emulsions containing droplets coated with silk fibroin. Silk fibroin, a native edible fibrous protein originating from silkworm cocoons, was used to prepare 10 % (by mass corn oil-in-water emulsions at ambient temperature (pH=7.0, 10 mM phosphate buffer. Emulsions with relatively small mean particle diameter (d32=0.47 μm and extremely good creaming stability (>7 days could be produced at silk fibroin concentration of 1 % (by mass. The influence of pH (2–8, thermal processing (60–90 °C, 20 min, and concentration of salt (c(NaCl=0–250 mM on the properties and stability of the emulsions was analyzed using ζ-potential, particle size, and creaming stability measurements. The isoelectric point of droplets stabilized with silk fibroin was pH~4. The emulsions were stable to droplet flocculation and creaming at any pH except intermediate value (pH=4.0 when stored at room temperature, which was attributed to their relatively low ζ-potential. Their ζ-potential went from around 25 to –35 mV as the pH was increased from 2 to 8. The emulsions were also stable to thermal treatment (60 and 90 °C for 20 min, pH=3 and 7, with a slight decrease in the magnitude of ζ-potential at temperatures exceeding 60 °C. The emulsions were unstable to aggregation and creaming even at relatively low salt concentrations (c(NaCl=0–250 mM, pH=3 and 7 as a result of electrostatic screening effects. These results suggest that bulk oil stabilized with silk fibroin has improved physical stability and may provide a new way of creating functional oil products and delivery systems.

  19. Physical Stability of Whippable Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Merete Bøgelund

    Whippable emulsions based on vegetable fat are increasingly used as replacement for dairy whipping creams. One of the quality criteria of whippable emulsions is that it should be low-viscous prior to whipping, but sudden viscosity increase or even solidification during storage and transport...... the impact of ingredient composition, with focus on low-molecular-weight (LMW) emulsifiers. Three monoglyceride-based LMW-emulsifiers were selected: Lactic acid ester of saturated monoglyceride (LACTEM), unsaturated monoglyceride (GMU), and saturated monoglyceride (GMS). LMW-emulsifiers had major impact...

  20. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Abreu Almeida

    Full Text Available The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1 fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%, starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30% and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L, including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations.

  1. Evaluation of the stability of concentrated emulsions for lemon beverages using sequential experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Teresa Cristina Abreu; Larentis, Ariane Leites; Ferraz, Helen Conceição

    2015-01-01

    The study of the stability of concentrated oil-in-water emulsions is imperative to provide a scientific approach for an important problem in the beverage industry, contributing to abolish the empiricism still present nowadays. The use of these emulsions would directly imply a reduction of transportation costs between production and the sales points, where dilution takes place. The goal of this research was to evaluate the influence of the main components of a lemon emulsion on its stability, aiming to maximize the concentration of oil in the beverage and to correlate its physicochemical characteristics to product stability, allowing an increase of shelf life of the final product. For this purpose, analyses of surface and interface tension, electrokinetic potential, particle size and rheological properties of the emulsions were conducted. A 2(4-1) fractional factorial design was performed with the following variables: lemon oil/water ratio (30% to 50%), starch and Arabic gum concentrations (0% to 30%) and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (0 mg/L to 100 mg/L), including an evaluation of the responses at the central conditions of each variable. Sequentially, a full design was prepared to evaluate the two most influential variables obtained in the first plan, in which concentration of starch and gum ranged from 0% to 20%, while concentration of lemon oil/water ratio was fixed at 50%, without dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate. Concentrated emulsions with stability superior to 15 days were obtained with either starch or Arabic gum and 50% lemon oil. The most stable formulations presented viscosity over 100 cP and ratio between the surface tension of the emulsion and the mucilage of over 1. These two answers were selected, since they better represent the behavior of emulsions in terms of stability and could be used as tools for an initial selection of the most promising formulations.

  2. Rheological behavior of emulsion gels stabilized by zein/tannic acid complex particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, Yuan; Yang, Xiaoquan; Scholten, Elke

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we report the structure formation and rheological properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized with zein/tannic acid complex particles (ZTPs) over a wide range of particle concentration (1-5%, w/v) and oil content (5-60%, v/v). Microscopy shows that the ZTPs provide stabilization

  3. Helix aspersa gelatin as an emulsifier and emulsion stabilizer: functional properties and effects on pancreatic lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarai, Zied; Balti, Rafik; Sila, Assaâd; Ben Ali, Yassine; Gargouri, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are widely used in food and pharmaceutical applications for the encapsulation, solubilization, entrapment, and controlled delivery of active ingredients. In order to fulfill the increasing demand for clean label excipients, natural polymers could be used to replace the potentially irritative synthetic surfactants used in emulsion formulation. In the present study, we have studied the properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with land snail gelatin (LSG) as the sole emulsifying agent, extracted and described for the first time. LSG was evaluated in terms of proximate composition, oil and water holding capacity, emulsifying and foaming properties, color and amino acid composition. Emulsions of trioctanoylglycerol (TC8) and olive oil were made at different gelatin/oil ratios and changes in droplet-size distribution were determined. The superior emulsifying properties of LSG, the susceptibility of gelatin protein emulsions increasing flocculation on storage, and the coalescence of gelatin emulsions following centrifugation were demonstrated. Furthermore, the effect of LSG on the activity of turkey pancreatic lipase (TPL) was evaluated through the pH-stat methodology with TC8 and olive oil emulsions. The LSG affected the TPL activity in a concentration-dependent way. Our results showed that LSG, comparably to gum arabic, increases the pancreatic lipase activity and improves its stability at the oil-water interface.

  4. Evaluation of stability and viscosity measurement of emulsion from oil from production in northern oilfield in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarasakul, O.; Maneeintr, K.

    2018-04-01

    Emulsion is normally present in oil due to the mixing occurring during oil recovery. The formation of emulsion can cause some problems in production and transportation. Viscosity and stability of emulsion play a key roles in oil transportation and separation to meet sales specification. Therefore, the aims of this research are to measure the viscosity of oil an emulsion and to evaluate the stability of emulsion of light oil from Fang oilfield in Thailand. The parameters of this study are temperature, shear rate and water cut ranging from 50 to 80 °C, 3.75 to 70 s-1 and 0 to 60%, respectively. These effects of parameters on viscosity and stability of emulsion are required for the design of the process and to increase oil production with various conditions. The results shows that viscosity decreases as temperature and shear rate increase. In contrast, viscosity becomes higher when water cut is lower. Furthermore, droplet sizes of water-in-oil emulsion at different conditions are investigated the stability of emulsion. The droplet sizes become smaller when high shear rate is applied and emulsion becomes more stable. Furthermore, correlations are developed to predict the viscosity and stability of the oil and emulsion from Thailand.

  5. Stabilization of heavy oil-water emulsions using a bio/chemical emulsifier mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahbakhsh, A.; Taghizadeh, M.; Movagharnejad, K. [Chemical Engineering Department, Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yakhchali, B. [National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    In this study, the viscosity reduction of heavy oil has been investigated through the formation of oil-water emulsion using a bio/chemical emulsifier mixture. Four bioemulsifiers from indigenous Rhodococcus ergthropolis and Bacillus licheniformis strains were used to stabilize a highly-viscous oil-in-water emulsion. The Taguchi method with an L{sub 9} orthogonal array design was used to investigate the effect of various control factors on the formation of the oil/water emulsions. An emulsion with lowest viscosity was formed using ACO4 strain. The substantial stability of the oil-in-water emulsion allows the heavy oil to be transported practically over long distances or remain stationary for a considerable period of time prior to utilization. As the result of Taguchi analysis, the temperature and concentration of the emulsifier had a significant influence on viscosity reduction of the emulsion. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Water-in-oil Pickering emulsions stabilized by stearoylated microcrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Liu, Huan; Liu, Peiwen; Peng, Xinwen; Zhang, Kai

    2018-03-01

    Hydrophobic particles with static water contact angles larger than 90° are more like to stabilize W/O Pickering emulsions. In particular, high internal phase Pickering emulsions (HIPEs) are of great interest for diverse applications. However, W/O HIPEs have rarely been realized using sustainable biopolymers. Herein, we used stearoylated microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) to stabilize W/O Pickering emulsions and especially, W/O HIPEs. Moreover, these W/O HIPEs can be further used as platforms for the preparation of porous materials, such as porous foams. Stearoylated microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) was prepared by modifying MCC with stearoyl chloride under heterogeneous conditions. Using SMCC as emulsifiers, W/O medium and high internal phase Pickering emulsions (MIPEs and HIPEs) with various organic solvents as continuous phases were prepared using one-step and two-step methods, respectively. Polystyrene (PS) foams were prepared after polymerization of oil phase using HIPEs as templates and their oil/water separation capacity were studied. SMCC could efficiently stabilize W/O Pickering emulsions and HIPEs could only be prepared via the two-step method. The internal phase volume fraction of the SMCC-stabilized HIPEs reached as high as 89%. Diverse internal phase volume fractions led to distinct inner structures of foams with closed or open cells. These macroporous polystyrene (PS) foams demonstrated great potential for the effective absorption of organic solvents from underwater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The study of stability, combustion characteristics and performance of water in diesel emulsion fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafiq Zulkifli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A single cylinder diesel engine study of water in diesel emulsions was conducted to investigate the stability effect of emulsion fuel on three different fuel blends and the water emulsification effect on the engine performance. Emulsified fuels contained 2% of surfactant including Span 80 Tween 80 and tested 10 HLB number. The blends also varied of 5%, 10% and 15% of water in diesel ratios namely as BSW5, BSW10 and BSW15. The fuel blends performance was tested using a single cylinder, direct injection diesel engine, operating at 1860 rpm. The results on stability reveal that high shear homogenizer yields more stability on emulsion fuel than mechanical stirrer and ultrasonic water bath. The engine performance results show that the ignition delay and peak pressure increase with the increment of water percentage up to 15%. However, the results indicate the increment of water percentage is also shows a significant decrease in engine power.

  8. Modeling and simulation of milk emulsion drying in spray dryers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Birchal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at modeling and simulating the drying of whole milk emulsion in spray dryers. Drops and particles make up the discrete phase and are distributed into temporal compartments following their residence time in the dryer. Air is the continuous and well-mixed phase. Mass and energy balances are developed for each phase, taking into account their interactions. Constitutive equations for describing the drop swelling and drying mechanisms as well as the heat and mass transfer between particles and hot air are proposed and analyzed. A set of algebraic-differential equations is obtained and solved by specific numerical codes. Results from experiments carried out in a pilot spray dryer are used to validate the model developed and the numerical algorithm. Comparing the simulated and experimental data, it is shown that the model predicts well the individual drop-particle history inside the dryer as well as the overall outlet air-particle temperature and humidity.

  9. The effect of packaging materials on the stability of sunscreen emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Maria Inês R M; Da Costa E Oliveira, Daniella Almança Gonçalves; Kedor-Hackmann, Erika R M; Singh, Anil K

    2005-06-13

    The purpose of this research was to study the stability of a emulsion containing UVA, UVB and infrared sunscreens after storage in different types of packaging materials (glass and plastic flasks; plastic and metallic tubes). The samples, emulsions containing benzophenone-3 (B-3), octyl methoxycinnamate (OM) and Phycocorail, were stored at 10, 25, 35 and 45 degrees C and representative samples were analyzed after 2, 7, 30, 60 and 90 days period. The stability studies were conducted by analyzing samples at pre-determined intervals by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) along with periodic rheological measurements.

  10. Novel carboxymethyl cellulose-polyvinyl alcohol blend films stabilized by Pickering emulsion incorporation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasihi, Hadi; Fazilati, Mohammad; Hashemi, Mahdi; Noshirvani, Nooshin

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of increasing the antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of biodegradable active films stabilized via Pickering emulsions. The blend films were prepared from carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), emulsified with oleic acid (OL) and incorporated with rosemary essential oil (REO). Formation of Pickering emulsion was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, mean droplet size and emulsion stability. Morphological, optical, physical, mechanical, thermal, antifungal and antioxidant properties of the films incorporated with different concentrations of REO (0.5, 1.5 and 3%) were determined. The results showed an increase in UV absorbance and elongation at break but, a decrease in tensile strength and thermal stability of the films. Interestingly, films containing REO exhibited considerable antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. In vitro microbial tests exhibited 100% fungal inhibition against Penicillium digitatum in the films containing 3% REO. In addition, no fungal growth were observed after 60days of storage at 25°C in bread slices were stored with active films incorporated with 3% REO, could attributed to the slow and regular release of REO caused by Pickering emulsions. The results of this study suggest that Pickering emulsion is a very promising method, which significantly affects antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the films. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Viscosity of the oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer and nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tushar; Kumar, G. Suresh; Chon, Bo Hyun; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2014-11-01

    Information on the viscosity of Pickering emulsion is required for their successful application in upstream oil and gas industry to understand their stability at extreme environment. In this work, a novel formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) Pickering emulsion stabilized using nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer (polyacrylamide) system as formulated in our earlier work (Sharma et al., Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 2014) is investigated for rheological stability at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions using a controlled-strain rheometer. The nanoparticle (SiO2 and clay) concentration is varied from 1.0 to 5.0 wt%. The results are compared with the rheological behavior of simple o/w emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. Both the emulsions exhibit non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. A positive shift in this behavior is observed for surfactant-polymer stabilized emulsion at high pressure conditions. Yield stress is observed to increase with pressure for surfactant-polymer emulsion. In addition, increase in temperature has an adverse effect on the viscosity of emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. In case of nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer stabilized o/w emulsion system, the viscosity and yield stress are predominantly constant for varying pressure and temperature conditions. The viscosity data for both o/w emulsion systems are fitted by the Herschel-Bulkley model and found to be satisfactory. In general, the study indicates that the Pickering emulsion stabilized by nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system shows improved and stable rheological properties as compared to conventional emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system indicating their successful application for HPHT environment in upstream oil and gas industry.

  12. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of plant and dairy protein blends on the physicochemical stability of lycopene-loaded emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Kacie K.H.Y.; Schroën, Karin; San Martín-González, M.F.; Berton-Carabin, Claire C.

    2018-01-01

    Whey-plant protein-based emulsions had high physicochemical stability. Whey and plant protein blend-based interfaces were viscoelastic while casein-based interfaces were relatively viscous. Whey-plant and plant-plant protein blends behaved synergistically leading to enhanced emulsion stability.

  13. New insights about flocculation process in sodium caseinate-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck-Iriart, Cristián; Montes-de-Oca-Ávalos, Juan; Herrera, María Lidia; Candal, Roberto Jorge; Pinto-de-Oliveira, Cristiano Luis; Linares-Torriani, Iris

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation process was studied in emulsions formulated with 10wt.% sunflower oil, 2, 5 or 7.5wt.% NaCas, and with or without addition of sucrose (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 30wt.%). Two different processing conditions were used to prepare emulsions: ultraturrax homogenization or further homogenization by ultrasound. Emulsions with droplets with diameters above (coarse) or below (fine) 1μm were obtained. Emulsions were analyzed for droplet size distribution by static light scattering (SLS), stability by Turbiscan, and structure by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS data were fitted by a theoretical model that considered a system composed of poly dispersed spheres with repulsive interaction and presence of aggregates. Flocculation behavior was caused by the self-assembly properties of NaCas, but the process was more closely related to interfacial protein content than micelles concentration in the aqueous phase. The results indicated that casein aggregation was strongly affected by disaccharide addition, hydrophobic interaction of the emulsion droplets, and interactions among interfacial protein molecules. The structural changes detected in the protein micelles in different environments allowed understanding the macroscopic physical behavior observed in concentrated NaCas emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking of sodium caseinate improves oxidative stability of flaxseed oil emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hairan; Forssell, Pirkko; Kylli, Petri; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Buchert, Johanna; Boer, Harry; Partanen, Riitta

    2012-06-20

    Sodium caseinate was modified by transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking reaction prior to the emulsification process in order to study the effect of cross-linking on the oxidative stability of protein stabilized emulsions. The extent of the cross-linking catalyzed by different dosages of transglutaminase was investigated by following the ammonia production during the reaction and using SDS-PAGE gel. O/W emulsions prepared with the cross-linked and non-cross-linked sodium caseinates were stored for 30 days under the same conditions. Peroxide value measurement, oxygen consumption measurement, and headspace gas chromatography analysis were used to study the oxidative stability of the emulsions. The emulsion made of the cross-linked sodium caseinate showed an improved oxidative stability with reduced formation of fatty acid hydroperoxides and volatiles and a longer period of low rate oxygen consumption. The improving effect of transglutaminase catalyzed cross-linking could be most likely attributed to the enhanced physical stability of the interfacial protein layer against competitive adsorption by oil oxidation products.

  15. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García-Moreno, Pedro J; Anankanbil, Sampson; Guo, Zheng; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2018-07-30

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50-70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein determination) and oxidative (primary and secondary oxidation products) stabilities of the emulsions were studied during 12 days of storage. Creaming stability was higher for emulsions produced with alginates and CAS compared to emulsions prepared with only CAS. Combined use of CAS + LCMA performed better in terms of physical stability compared to emulsions produced with only CAS. However, the oxidative stability of this emulsion was inferior probably due to the presence of an unsaturated carbon chain in LCMA structure. CAS + SCMA emulsions not only showed better physical stability such as smaller droplet size, lower creaming and higher viscosity, but also had an improved oxidative stability than emulsions produced with only CAS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical simulation and experimental verification of oil recovery by macro-emulsion floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamharatana, F. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Thomas, S.; Farouq Ali, S. M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    The process of emulsion flooding as an enhanced oil recovery method was described. The process involves several mechanisms that occur at the same time during displacement, therefore, simulation by emulsion flooding requires a good understanding of flow mechanics of emulsions in porous media. This paper provides a description of the process and its mathematical representation. Emulsion rheology, droplet capture and surfactant adsorption are represented mathematically and incorporated into a one-dimensional, three-phase mathematical model to account for interactions of surfactant, oil, water and the rock matrix. The simulator was validated by comparing simulation results with the results from linear core floods performed in the laboratory. Best match was achieved by a multi-phase non-Newtonian rheological model of an emulsion with interfacial tension-dependent relative permeabilities and time-dependent capture. 13 refs., 1 tab., 42 figs.

  17. Cross-linking proteins by laccase: Effects on the droplet size and rheology of emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, A C K; Perrechil, F A; Costa, A A S; Santana, R C; Cunha, R L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of laccase and ferulic acid on the characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate at different pH (3, 5 and 7). Emulsions were prepared by high pressure homogenization of soybean oil with sodium caseinate solution containing varied concentrations of laccase (0, 1 and 5mg/mL) and ferulic acid (5 and 10mM). Laccase treatment and pH exerted a strong influence on the properties with a consequent effect on stability, structure and rheology of emulsions stabilized by Na-caseinate. At pH7, O/W emulsions were kinetically stable due to the negative protein charge which enabled electrostatic repulsion between oil droplets resulting in an emulsion with small droplet size, low viscosity, pseudoplasticity and viscoelastic properties. The laccase treatment led to emulsions showing shear-thinning behavior as a result of a more structured system. O/W emulsions at pH5 and 3 showed phase separation due to the proximity to protein pI, but the laccase treatment improved their stability of emulsions especially at pH3. At pH3, the addition of ferulic acid and laccase produced emulsions with larger droplet size but with narrower droplet size distribution, increased viscosity, pseudoplasticity and viscoelastic properties (gel-like behavior). Comparing laccase treatments, the combined addition of laccase and ferulic acid generally produced emulsions with lower stability (pH5), larger droplet size (pH3, 5 and 7) and higher pseudoplasticity (pH5 and 7) than emulsion with only ferulic acid. The results suggested that the cross-linking of proteins by laccase and ferulic acid improved protein emulsifying properties by changing functional mechanisms of the protein on emulsion structure and rheology, showing that sodium caseinate can be successfully used in acid products when treated with laccase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Microfluidic Method to Assess Emulsion Stability in Crude-Oil/Water Separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebs, T.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The control of emulsion stability and droplet size is of crucial importance for oil production, especially for the processes of crude/oil water separation and cleanup of produced water. To recover pure oil and water, coalescence between droplets needs to take place, the extent of which will depend

  19. In situ stabilizer formation from methacrylic acid macromonomers in emulsion polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreur-Piet, Ingeborg; Heuts, Johan P.A.

    2017-01-01

    Oligomers of methacrylic acid containing a propenyl ω-endgroup (i.e. MAA-macromonomers) were synthesized by cobalt-mediated catalytic chain transfer polymerization and used as precursors to stabilizers in emulsion polymerization. It was found that only in those polymerizations in which these

  20. Characterization of Whey Protein Oil-In-Water Emulsions with Different Oil Concentrations Stabilized by Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Hebishy

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of ultra-high-pressure homogenization (UHPH: 100 or 200 MPa at 25 °C, in comparison to colloid mill (CM: 5000 rpm at 20 °C and conventional homogenization (CH: 15 MPa at 60 °C, on the stability of oil-in-water emulsions with different oil concentrations (10, 30 or 50 g/100 g emulsified by whey protein isolate (4 g/100 g was investigated. Emulsions were characterized for their microstructure, rheological properties, surface protein concentration (SPC, stability to creaming and oxidative stability under light (2000 lux/m2. UHPH produced emulsions containing lipid droplets in the sub-micron range (100–200 nm and with low protein concentrations on droplet surfaces. Droplet size (d3.2, µm was increased in CH and UHPH emulsions by increasing the oil concentration. CM emulsions exhibited Newtonian flow behaviour at all oil concentrations studied; however, the rheological behaviour of CH and UHPH emulsions varied from Newtonian flow (n ≈ 1 to shear-thinning (n ˂ 1 and thixotropic behaviour in emulsions containing 50% oil. This was confirmed by the non-significant differences in the d4.3 (µm value between the top and bottom of emulsions in tubes left at room temperature for nine days and also by a low migration velocity measured with a Turbiscan LAB instrument. UHPH emulsions showed significantly lower oxidation rates during 10 days storage in comparison to CM and CH emulsions as confirmed by hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS. UHPH emulsions treated at 100 MPa were less oxidized than those treated at 200 MPa. The results from this study suggest that UHPH treatment generates emulsions that have a higher stability to creaming and lipid oxidation compared to colloid mill and conventional treatments.

  1. Stability Proxies for Water-in-Oil Emulsions and Implications in Aqueous-based Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoosh Moradi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Several researchers have proposed that mobility control mechanisms can positively contribute to oil recovery in the case of emulsions generated in Enhanced-Oil Recovery (EOR operations. Chemical EOR techniques that use alkaline components or/and surfactants are known to produce undesirable emulsions that create operational problems and are difficult to break. Other water-based methods have been less studied in this sense. EOR processes such as polymer flooding and LoSalTM injection require adjustments of water chemistry, mainly by lowering the ionic strength of the solution or by decreasing hardness. The decreased ionic strength of EOR solutions can give rise to more stable water-in-oil emulsions, which are speculated to improve mobility ratio between the injectant and the displaced oil. The first step toward understanding the connection between the emulsions and EOR mechanisms is to show that EOR conditions, such as salinity and hardness requirements, among others, are conducive to stabilizing emulsions. In order to do this, adequate stability proxies are required. This paper reviews commonly used emulsion stability proxies and explains the advantages and disadvantage of methods reviewed. This paper also reviews aqueous-based EOR processes with focus on heavy oil to contextualize in-situ emulsion stabilization conditions. This context sets the basis for comparison of emulsion stability proxies.

  2. Parenteral emulsions stabilized with a mixture of phospholipids and PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate: evaluation of accelerated and long-term stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaa, Muhannad; Müller, Bernd W

    2002-09-01

    Different emulsion formulations were prepared using phospholipids (Lipoid S57) and PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate (Solutol HS15) as single emulsifiers or in mixtures. The accelerated stability after autoclaving, freezing and centrifugation was investigated. The long-term stability was also studied at different temperatures (4, 20, and 37 degrees C) for 8 months. Emulsion stabilized with phospholipids displayed a stable behavior after the autoclaving and centrifugation, but it broke down after the freezing process. In mixture with Solutol HS15, however, the emulsion showed appropriate shelf stability at different temperatures for 8 months. A change in the particle size of the emulsion prepared only with Solutol HS15 was observed after centrifugation (slight) and after autoclaving (marked). In contrast to phospholipid emulsion, this emulsion (with only Solutol HS15) was less prone to breaking down after the freezing, as no complete phase separation was observed. The results obtained using an emulsifier mixture revealed that a combination of an anionic surfactant (phospholipids) and non-ionic surfactant (PEG-660-12-hydroxy-stearate) improves the emulsion's stability, compared to the emulsion's stability prepared using only a single emulsifier. However, no direct correlation could be found between the accelerated and the long-term stability data.

  3. Stabilization of kerosene/water emulsions using bioemulsifiers obtained by fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars with Lactobacillus pentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla-Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Torrado, Ana María; Domínguez, José Manuel; Moldes, Ana Belén

    2010-09-22

    The results of the present study show that Lactobacillus pentosus can produce extracellular bioemulsifiers by utilizing hemicellulosic sugars from grape marc as a source of carbon. The effectiveness of these bioemulsifiers (LPEM) was studied by preparing kerosene/water (K/W) emulsions in the presence and absence of these emulsifiers. Various parameters such as relative emulsion volume (EV), stabilizing capacity (ES), viscosity, and droplet size of K/W emulsions were measured. The EV values for K/W emulsions stabilized by concentrated LPEM were approximately 74.5% after 72 h of emulsion formation, with ES values of 97%. These values were higher than those obtained with dodecyl sodium sulfate as emulsifier (EV=62.3% and ES=87.7%). Additionally, K/W emulsions stabilized by LPEM produced polydisperse emulsions containing droplets of radius between 10 and 40 μm, which were smaller than those obtained for K/W emulsions without LPEM (droplet radius=60-100 μm). Moreover, the viscosity values of the K/W emulsions without and with LPEM were approximately 236 and 495 cP, respectively.

  4. Quinoa starch granules as stabilizing particles for production of Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Marilyn; Sjöö, Malin; Timgren, Anna; Dejmek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Intact starch granules isolated from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) were used to stabilize emulsion drops in so-called Pickering emulsions. Miglyol 812 was used as dispersed phase and a phosphate buffer (pH7) with different salt (NaCl) concentrations was used as the continuous phase. The starch granules were hydrophobically modified to different degrees by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) or by dry heat treatment at 120 degrees C in order to study the effect on the resulting emulsion drop size. The degree of OSA-modification had a low to moderate impact on drop size. The highest level of modification (4.66%) showed the largest mean drop size, and lowest amount of free starch, which could be an effect of a higher degree of aggregation of the starch granules and, thereby, also the emulsion drops stabilized by them. The heat treated starch granules had a poor stabilizing ability and only the starch heated for the longest time (150 min at 120 degrees C) had a better emulsifying capacity than the un-modified native starch granules. The effect of salt concentration was rather limited. However, an increased concentration of salt slightly increased the mean drop size and the elastic modulus.

  5. Block copolymer stabilized nonaqueous biocompatible sub-micron emulsions for topical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanase, Leonard Ionut; Riess, Gérard

    2013-05-20

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400/Miglyol 812 non-aqueous sub-micron emulsions were developed due to the fact that they are of interest for the design of drug-loaded biocompatible topical formulations. These types of emulsions were favourably stabilized by poly (2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly (butadiene) (P2VP-b-PBut) copolymer with DPBut>DP2VP, each of these sequences being well-adapted to the solubility parameters of PEG 400 and Miglyol 812, respectively. This type of block copolymers, which might limit the Ostwald ripening, appeared to be more efficient stabilizers than low molecular weight non-ionic surfactants. The emulsion characteristics, such as particle size, stability and viscosity at different shear rates were determined as a function of the phase ratio, the copolymer concentration and storage time. It was further shown that Acyclovir, as a model drug of low water solubility, could be incorporated into the PEG 400 dispersed phase, with no significant modification of the initial emulsion characteristics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tri-fuel (diesel-biodiesel-ethanol) emulsion characterization, stability and the corrosion effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, M. H.; Mukhtar, N. A. M.; Yohaness Hagos, Ftwi; Noor, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the result of experimenting emulsified tri-fuel in term of stability, physico-chemical properties and corrosion effect on three common metals. The results were interpreted in terms of the impact of five minutes emulsification approach. Tri-fuel emulsions were varied in proportion ratio consist of biodiesel; 0%, 5%, 10%, and ethanol; 5%, 10%, 15%. Fuel characterization includes density, calorific value, flash point, and kinematic viscosity. Flash point of tri-fuel emulsion came with range catalog. Calorific value of tri-fuel emulsion appeared in declining pattern as more ethanol and biodiesel were added. Biodiesel promoted flow resistance while ethanol with opposite effect. 15% ethanol content in tri-fuel emulsion separated faster than 10% ethanol content but ethanol content with 5% yield no phase separation at all. Close cap under static immersion with various ratio of tri-fuel emulsions for over a month, corrosiveness attack was detected via weight loss technique on aluminum, stainless steel and mild steel.

  7. Pickering emulsions stabilized by biodegradable block copolymer micelles for controlled topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredj-Bourezg, Faiza; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Chevalier, Yves

    2017-10-05

    Surfactant-free biocompatible and biodegradable Pickering emulsions were investigated as vehicles for skin delivery of hydrophobic drugs. O/w emulsions of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil droplets loaded with all-trans retinol as a model hydrophobic drug were stabilized by block copolymer nanoparticles: either poly(lactide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-b-PEG) or poly(caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG). Those innovative emulsions were prepared using two different processes allowing drug loading either inside oil droplets or inside both oil droplets and non-adsorbed block copolymer nanoparticles. Skin absorption of retinol was investigated in vitro on pig skin biopsies using the Franz cell method. Supplementary experiments by confocal fluorescence microscopy allowed the visualization of skin absorption of the Nile Red dye on histological sections. Retinol and Nile Red absorption experiments showed the large accumulation of hydrophobic drugs in the stratum corneum for the Pickering emulsions compared to the surfactant-based emulsion and an oil solution. Loading drug inside both oil droplets and block copolymer nanoparticles enhanced again skin absorption of drugs, which was ascribed to the supplementary contribution of free block copolymer nanoparticles loaded with drug. Such effect allowed tuning drug delivery to skin over a wide range by means of a suitable selection of either the formulation or the drug loading process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability of total nutrient admixtures with lipid injectable emulsions in glass versus plastic packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, David F; Silvestri, Anthony P; Bistrian, Bruce R; Mikrut, Bernard A

    2007-02-15

    The physical stability of two emulsions compounded as part of a total nutrient admixture (TNA) was studied in lipids packaged in either glass or plastic containers. Five weight-based adult TNA formulations that were designed to meet the full nutritional needs of adults with body weights between 40 and 80 kg were studied. Triplicate preparations of each TNA were assessed over 30 hours at room temperature by applying currently proposed United States Pharmacopeia (USP) criteria for mean droplet diameter, large-diameter tail, and globule-size distribution (GSD) for lipid injectable emulsions. In accordance with conditions set forth in USP chapter 729, the higher levels of volume-weighted percent of fat exceeding 5 microm (PFAT(5)) should not exceed 0.05% of the total lipid concentration. Significant differences were noted among TNA admixtures based on whether the lipid emulsion product was manufactured in glass or plastic. The plastic-contained TNAs failed the proposed USP methods for large-diameter fat globules in all formulations from the outset, and 60% had significant growth in large-diameter fat globules over time. In contrast, glass-contained TNAs were stable throughout and in all cases would have passed proposed USP limits. Certain lipid injectable emulsions packaged in plastic containers have baseline abnormal GSD profiles compared with those packaged in glass containers. When used to compound TNAs, the abnormal profile worsens and produces less stable TNAs than those compounded with lipid injectable emulsions packaged in glass containers.

  9. Size-dependent properties of silica nanoparticles for Pickering stabilization of emulsions and foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ijung, E-mail: ijungkim@utexas.edu [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Worthen, Andrew J.; Johnston, Keith P. [The University of Texas at Austin, McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering (United States); DiCarlo, David A.; Huh, Chun [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Nanoparticles are a promising alternative to surfactants to stabilize emulsions or foams in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes due to their effectiveness in very harsh environments found in many of the oilfields around the world. While the size-dependent properties of nanoparticles have been extensively studied in the area of optics or cellular uptake, little is known on the effects of nanoparticle size on emulsion/foam generation, especially for EOR applications. In this study, silica nanoparticles with four different sizes (5, 12, 25, and 80 nm nominal diameter) but with the same surface treatment were employed to test their emulsion or foam generation behavior in high-salinity conditions. The decane-in-brine emulsion generated by sonication or flowing through sandpack showed smaller droplet size and higher apparent viscosity as the nanoparticle size decreased. Similarly, the CO{sub 2}-in-brine foam generation in sandstone or sandpacks was also significantly affected by the nanoparticle size, exhibiting higher apparent foam viscosity as the nanoparticle size decreased. In case of foam generation in sandstone cores with 5 nm nanoparticles, a noticeable hysteresis occurred when the flow velocity was initially increased and then decreased, implying a strong foam generation initially; and then the trapping of the generated foam in the rock pores, as the flow velocity decreased. On the other hand, weak foams stabilized with larger nanoparticles indicated a rapid coalescence of bubbles which prevented foam generation. Overall, stable emulsions/foams were achievable by the smaller particles as a result of greater diffusivity and/or higher number concentration, thus allowing more nanoparticles with higher surface area to volume ratio to be adsorbed at the fluid/fluid interfaces of the emulsion/foam dispersion.Graphical abstract.

  10. Solid-stabilized emulsion formation using stearoyl lactylate coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengsarkar, Pranav S.; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2014-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can exhibit highly tunable physicochemical properties that are extremely important in applications such as catalysis, biomedicine and environmental remediation. The small size of iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions due to their high energy of adsorption at the interface of oil droplets in water. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of the primary particle characteristics and stabilizing agent chemistry on the stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using stoichiometric amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+ salts. Sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL), a Food and Drug Administration approved food additive, was used to functionalize the iron oxide nanoparticles. SSL is useful in the generation of fat-in-water emulsions due to its high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and its bilayer-forming capacity. Generation of a monolayer or a bilayer coating on the nanoparticles was controlled through systematic changes in reagent concentrations. The coated particles were then characterized using various analytical techniques to determine their size, their crystal structure and surface functionalization. The capacity of these bilayer coated nanoparticles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions under various salt concentrations and pH values was also systematically determined using various characterization techniques. This study successfully demonstrated the ability to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles (20-40 nm) coated with SSL in order to generate stable Pickering emulsions that were pH-responsive and resistant to significant destabilization in a saline environment, thereby lending themselves to applications in advanced oil spill recovery and remediation.

  11. Effect of emulsifier type, pH and iron on oxidative stability of 5% fish oil‐in‐water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    The effect of using different emulsifiers on lipid oxidation in 5% w/w fish oil‐in‐water emulsions was investigated. Emulsifiers included two of milk protein origin (whey protein isolate (Whey) or sodium caseinate (Cas)), soy lecithin (Lec) or emulsifiers high in milk phospholipid (20 or 75...... iron) or 42 days (without added iron). Physical parameters and oxidative stability of the emulsions were investigated by analysis of particle size, zeta potential, primary and secondary oxidation products. Increase in emulsifier concentration generally increased the oxidative stability. Type...... of emulsifier and physical conditions affected the physical and oxidative stability of the emulsions. A general observation was that emulsions produced with the milk protein based emulsifiers were more oxidatively stable compared with the other emulsions. Practical applications: The overall conclusion from...

  12. Effect of gelation of inner dispersed phase on stability of (w1/o/w2) multiple emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppermann, A.K.L.; Renssen, M.; Schuch, A.; Stieger, M.A.; Scholten, E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of water-in-oil-in-water (w1/o/w2) multiple emulsions offers a method for the reduction of oil in foods. In this study we investigated the influence of osmotic pressure tailoring and gelation of the inner dispersed w1 water droplets on the stability and yield of multiple emulsions. Yield is

  13. Influence of pH value on microstructure of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by chickpea protein flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Manuel; Isurralde, Nadia; Romero, Alberto; Guerrero, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    Food industry is highly interested in the development of healthier formulations of oil-in-water emulsions, stabilized by plant proteins instead of egg or milk proteins. These emulsions would avoid allergic issues or animal fat. Among other plant proteins, legumes are a cost-competitive product. This work evaluates the influence of pH value (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5) on emulsions stabilized by chickpea-based emulsions at two different protein concentration (2.0 and 4.0 wt%). Microstructure of chickpea-based emulsions is assessed by means of backscattering, droplet size distributions and small amplitude oscillatory shear measurements. Visual appearances as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy images are obtained to provide useful information on the emulsions structure. Interestingly, results indicate that the pH value and protein concentration have a strong influence on emulsion microstructure and stability. Thus, the system which contains protein surfaces positively charged shows the highest viscoelastic properties, a good droplet size distribution profile and non-apparent destabilization phenomena. Interestingly, results also reveal the importance of rheological measurements in the prediction of protein interactions and emulsion stability since this technique is able to predict destabilization mechanisms sooner than other techniques such as backscattering or droplet size distribution measurements.

  14. Oxidative Stability of Granola Bars Enriched with Multilayered Fish Oil Emulsion in the Presence of Novel Brown Seaweed Based Antioxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermund, Ditte Baun; Karadaǧ, Ayşe; Andersen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    as a barrier to the penetration and diffusion of molecular species that promote oxidation. The positive charge of oil droplets in the secondary emulsion may also inhibit iron-lipid interaction through electrostatic repulsion. Additional protection against lipid oxidation was obtained when fish oil emulsions......Fucus vesiculosus extracts that have both radical scavenging activity and metal chelating ability in vitro were used as natural antioxidant in granola bars enriched with fish oil emulsion by using primary and secondary emulsion systems stabilized by sodium caseinate alone and sodium caseinate...

  15. [Blood plasma protein adsorption capacity of perfluorocarbon emulsion stabilized by proxanol 268 (in vitro and in vivo studies)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklifas, A N; Zhalimov, V K; Temnov, A A; Kukushkin, N I

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption abilities of the perfluorocarbon emulsion stabilized by Proxanol 268 were investigated in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the saturation point for the blood plasma proteins was nearly reached after five minutes of incubation of the emulsion with human/rabbit blood plasma and was stable for all incubation periods studied. The decrease in volume ratio (emulsion/plasma) was accompanied by the increase in the adsorptive capacity of the emulsion with maximal values at 1/10 (3.2 and 1.5 mg of proteins per 1 ml of the emulsion, for human and rabbit blood plasma, respectively) that was unchanged at lower ratios. In vivo, in rabbits, intravenously injected with the emulsion, the proteins with molecular masses of 12, 25, 32, 44, 55, 70, and 200 kDa were adsorbed by the emulsion (as in vitro) if it was used 6 hours or less before testing. More delayed testing (6 h) revealed elimination of proteins with molecular masses of 25 and 44 kDa and an additional pool of adsorpted new ones of 27, 50, and 150 kDa. Specific adsorptive capacity of the emulsion enhanced gradually after emulsion injection and reached its maximum (3.5-5 mg of proteins per 1 ml of the emulsion) after 24 hours.

  16. Influence of calcium, magnesium, or potassium ions on the formation and stability of emulsions prepared using highly hydrolyzed whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, C; Singh, H; Munro, P A; Singh, A M

    2000-05-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions (4 wt % soy oil) containing 4 wt % whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) (27% degree of hydrolysis) and different levels of calcium, magnesium, or potassium chloride were prepared in a two-stage homogenizer. Other emulsions containing 4 wt % WPH but including 0.35 wt % hydroxylated lecithin and different levels of the above minerals were similarly prepared. The formation and stability of these emulsions were determined by measuring oil droplet size distributions using laser light scattering and by confocal scanning laser microscopy and a gravity creaming test. Both lecithin-free and lecithin-containing emulsions showed no change in droplet size distributions with increasing concentration of potassium in the range 0-37.5 mM. In contrast, the diameter of emulsion droplets increased with increasing calcium or magnesium concentration >12.5 mM. Emulsions containing hydroxylated lecithin were more sensitive to the addition of calcium or magnesium than the lecithin-free emulsions. Storage of emulsions at 20 degrees C for 24 h further increased the diameter of droplets and resulted in extensive creaming in emulsions containing >25 mM calcium or magnesium. It appears that both flocculation and coalescence processes were involved in the destabilization of emulsions induced by the addition of divalent cations.

  17. Emulsion stabilizing capacity of intact starch granules modified by heat treatment or octenyl succinic anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timgren, Anna; Rayner, Marilyn; Dejmek, Petr; Marku, Diana; Sjöö, Malin

    2013-03-01

    Starch granules are an interesting stabilizer candidate for food-grade Pickering emulsions. The stabilizing capacity of seven different intact starch granules for making oil-in-water emulsions has been the topic of this screening study. The starches were from quinoa; rice; maize; waxy varieties of rice, maize, and barley; and high-amylose maize. The starches were studied in their native state, heat treated, and modified by octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA). The effect of varying the continuous phase, both with and without salt in a phosphate buffer, was also studied. Quinoa, which had the smallest granule size, had the best capacity to stabilize oil drops, especially when the granules had been hydrophobically modified by heat treatment or by OSA. The average drop diameter (d 32) in these emulsions varied from 270 to 50 μm, where decreasing drop size and less aggregation was promoted by high starch concentration and absence of salt in the system. Of all the starch varieties studied, quinoa had the best overall emulsifying capacity, and OSA modified quinoa starch in particular. Although the size of the drops was relatively large, the drops themselves were in many instances extremely stable. In the cases where the system could stabilize droplets, even when they were so large that they were visible to the naked eye, they remained stable and the measured droplet sizes after 2 years of storage were essentially unchanged from the initial droplet size. This somewhat surprising result has been attributed to the thickness of the adsorbed starch layer providing steric stabilization. The starch particle-stabilized Pickering emulsion systems studied in this work has potential practical application such as being suitable for encapsulation of ingredients in food and pharmaceutical products.

  18. Oxidative stability of 70% fish oil‐in‐water emulsions: Impact of emulsifiers and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of five different emulsifiers on lipid oxidation in 70% fish oil‐in‐water emulsions to be used as delivery systems for long chain polyunsaturated omega‐3 fatty acids to foods. The emulsifiers were either phospholipid (PL) based......‐in‐water emulsions prepared with whey protein isolate, sodium caseinate, milk phospholipids, or soy lecithin. The emulsions can be used as delivery systems for fish oil to foods. However, only emulsions prepared with proteins at high pH offered advantages with respect to better oxidative stability during storage...... compared to neat fish oil. Thus, when fish oil is added to a food product in a delivery emulsion, the type of emulsion used should be carefully considered....

  19. The Influence of Chemically Modified Potato Maltodextrins on Stability and Rheological Properties of Model Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Pycia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the maltodextrins prepared from chemically modified starches (crosslinked, stabilized, crosslinked and stabilized on the stability and rheological properties of model oil-in-water (o/w emulsions. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that emulsion stability depended on hydrolysates dextrose equivalent (DE value. Maltodextrin with the lowest degree of depolymerization effectively stabilized the dispersed system, and the effectiveness of this action depended on the maltodextrin type and concentration. Addition of distarch phosphate-based maltodextrin stabilized emulsion at the lowest applied concentration, and the least effective was maltodextrin prepared from acetylated starch. Emulsions stabilized by maltodextrins (DE 6 prepared from distarch phosphate and acetylated distarch adipate showed the predominance of the elastic properties over the viscous ones. Only emulsion stabilized by maltodextrin prepared from distarch phosphate (E1412 revealed the properties of strong gel. Additionally, the decrease in emulsions G′ and G″ moduli values, combined with an increase in the value of DE maltodextrins, was observed.

  20. Effect of the coexistence of sodium caseinate and Tween 20 as stabilizers of food emulsions at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, Luisa; Cinelli, Giuseppe; Cofelice, Martina; Ceglie, Andrea; Lopez, Francesco; Cuomo, Francesca

    2018-02-05

    In the present investigation the properties of edible nanoemulsions were studied. Sodium caseinate represents a good candidate for food emulsion preparations thanks to its surface-active properties and because it is perceived as a natural product by consumers. Nevertheless, it is very sensitive to acidic pH close to its isoelectric point and, if used as emulsion stabilizer, this aspect can negatively affect the emulsion stability. In order to prevent this drawback, sodium caseinate was used in combination with a non-ionic surfactant (Tween 20) as emulsifier of oil/water nanoemulsions. For these reasons, nanoemulsions stabilized by Tween 20, sodium caseinate and by a blend of the two emulsifiers were studied and compared according to their response to pH variations. Nanoemulsions were characterized for size of the dispersed phase with variation of time and temperature, for their rheological properties, for surface charge as a function of pH and for protein fluorescence. Noticeably, it was ascertained that, at pH close to caseinate isoelectric point, emulsions stabilized with the blend of caseinate and Tween 20 were more stable, compared with emulsions stabilized only with sodium caseinate. Such behavior was explained according to the composition of the emulsifiers at the oil/water interface where, at acidic pH, the presence of Tween 20 ensured the steric stabilization thus improving the role of sodium caseinate as emulsion stabilizer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tuning the Wettability of Halloysite Clay Nanotubes by Surface Carbonization for Optimal Emulsion Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Zhang, Yueheng; Su, Yang; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; John, Vijay T

    2015-12-29

    The carbonization of hydrophilic particle surfaces provides an effective route for tuning particle wettability in the preparation of particle-stabilized emulsions. The wettability of naturally occurring halloysite clay nanotubes (HNT) is successfully tuned by the selective carbonization of the negatively charged external HNT surface. The positively charge chitosan biopolymer binds to the negatively charged external HNT surface by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding, yielding carbonized halloysite nanotubes (CHNT) on pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere. Relative to the native HNT, the oil emulsification ability of the CHNT at intermediate levels of carbonization is significantly enhanced due to the thermodynamically more favorable attachment of the particles at the oil-water interface. Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) imaging reveals that networks of CHNT attach to the oil-water interface with the particles in a side-on orientation. The concepts advanced here can be extended to other inorganic solids and carbon sources for the optimal design of particle-stabilized emulsions.

  2. Physical stability, microstructure and micro-rheological properties of water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions stabilized by porcine gelatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiaomei; Qiu, Shuang; Zhang, Hongwei; Cheng, Yongqiang; Yin, Lijun

    2018-07-01

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions could be utilized for fat-reduced food formulation and delivery of bioactive nutrients. However, due to thermodynamic instability, it is difficult to prepare stable double emulsions. The purpose of this study was to improve the stability of W/O/W double emulsions containing 2.0 M MgCl 2 by adding porcine gelatin in the inner water phase. The impact of gelatin on the physical stability, microstructure and micro-rheological properties of W/O/W emulsions was investigated. It was found that, when the concentration of porcine gelatin exceeded 4.0 wt%, the stability of emulsions was improved, due to increased viscoelasticity of emulsion droplets. When MgCl 2 concentration increased to 2.0 M, the particle size of emulsions increased, due to the osmotic pressure gradient, and the presence of gelatin further increased the droplet size. Confocal microscopy results showed that the presence of gelatin could improve the stability of W/O/W emulsions against coalescence。. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Improved sugar beet pectin-stabilized emulsions through complexation with sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O; Al-Assaf, Saphwan

    2013-02-13

    The study investigates the complexes formed between sodium caseinate (SC) and sugar beet pectin (SBP) and to harness them to stabilize SBP emulsions. We find that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are involved in the complexation. In SC/SBP mixed solution, soluble SC/SBP complexes first form on acidification and then aggregate into insoluble complexes, which disassociate into soluble polymers upon further decreasing pH. The critical pH's for the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes and disappearance of insoluble complexes are designated as pH(c), pH(φ), and pH(d), respectively. These critical pH values define four regions in the phase diagram of complexation, and SC/SBP emulsions were prepared in these regions. The results show that the stability of SBP-stabilized emulsion is greatly improved at low SC/SBP ratios and acidic pH's. This enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the amount of adsorbed SBP as a result of cooperative adsorption to sodium caseinate. Using a low ratio of SC/SBP ensured that all caseinate molecules are completely covered by adsorbed SBP chains, which eliminates possible instability induced by thermal aggregation of caseinate molecules resulting from stress acceleration at elevated temperatures. A mechanistic model for the behavior is proposed.

  4. Pickering emulsion stabilized by cashew gum- poly-l-lactide copolymer nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and amphotericin B encapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A R; Feitosa, J P A; Paula, H C B; Goycoolea, F M; de Paula, R C M

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we provide proof-of-concept of formation, physical characteristics and potential use as a drug delivery formulation of Pickering emulsions (PE) obtained by a novel method that combines nanoprecipitation with subsequent spontaneous emulsification process. To this end, pre-formed ultra-small (d.∼10 nm) nanoprecipitated nanoparticles of hydrophobic derivatives of cashew tree gum grafted with polylactide (CGPLAP), were conceived to stabilize Pickering emulsions obtained by spontaneous emulsification. These were also loaded with Amphotericin B (AmB), a drug of low oral bioavailability used in the therapy of neglected diseases such as leishmaniasis. The graft reaction was performed in two CG/PLA molar ratio conditions (1:1 and 1:10). Emulsions were prepared by adding the organic phase (Miglyol 812 ® ) in the aqueous phase (nanoprecipitated CGPLAP), resulting the immediate emulsion formation. The isolation by centrifugation does not destabilize or separate the nanoparticles from oil droplets of the PE emulsion. Emulsions with CGPLAP 1:1 presented unimodal distributions at different CGPLA concentration, lower values in size and PDI and the best stability over time. The AmB was incorporated in the emulsions with a process efficiency of 21-47%, as determined by UV-vis. AmB in CGPLAP emulsions is in less aggregated state than observed in commercial AmB formulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of intragastric acid stability of fat emulsions on gastric emptying, plasma lipid profile and postprandial satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciani, Luca; Faulks, Richard; Wickham, Martin S J; Bush, Debbie; Pick, Barbara; Wright, Jeff; Cox, Eleanor F; Fillery-Travis, Annette; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2009-03-01

    Fat is often included in common foods as an emulsion of dispersed oil droplets to enhance the organoleptic quality and stability. The intragastric acid stability of emulsified fat may impact on gastric emptying, satiety and plasma lipid absorption. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether, compared with an acid-unstable emulsion, an acid-stable fat emulsion would empty from the stomach more slowly, cause more rapid plasma lipid absorption and cause greater satiety. Eleven healthy male volunteers received on two separate occasions 500 ml of 15 % (w/w) [13C]palmitate-enriched olive oil-in-water emulsion meals which were either stable or unstable in the acid gastric environment. MRI was used to measure gastric emptying and the intragastric oil fraction of the meals. Blood sampling was used to measure plasma lipids and visual analogue scales were used to assess satiety. The acid-unstable fat emulsion broke and rapidly layered in the stomach. Gastric emptying of meal volume was slower for the acid-stable fat emulsion (P rate of energy delivery of fat from the stomach to the duodenum was not different up to t = 110 min. The acid-stable emulsion induced increased fullness (P distribution of fat emulsions against the gastric acid environment. This could have implications for the design of novel foods.

  6. The role of lecithin degradation on the pH dependent stability of halofantrine encapsulated fat nano-emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Iman; Harding, Ian H; Bowater, Ian C; Eldridge, Daniel S; Charman, William N

    2017-08-07

    We report on the successful incorporation of the antimalarial drug, halofantrine, into laboratory based soybean oil emulsions which were designed to mimic the commercially available parenteral fat emulsion, Intralipid ® . A high pH (minimum of pH 9, preferable pH of 11) was required for the drug laden emulsion to remain stable on storage and also to resist breaking under various stresses. Ageing of lecithin samples on storage was noted to result in degradation and a decrease in pH. We argue that this is the main reason for a similar decrease in pH for lecithin based emulsions and subsequent instability in drug laden emulsions. As expected, incorporation of the drug (halofantrine) resulted in lower stability. The (intensity weighted) particle size increased from 281nm for the drug free emulsion to 550nm following a loading of 1gL -1 of halofantrine, indicative of a lowering in stability and this was reflected in a shorter shelf life. Interestingly, incorporation of even higher concentrations of drug then resulted in better stability albeit never as stable as the drug free emulsion. We also report on unusual and complex surface tension behaviour for fresh lecithin where multiple critical concentration points were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of egg white protein on the quality and stability of corn oil-in-water emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Batool, J.; Ajaz, M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of egg albumin has been examined on the texture and stability of O/W emulsion. The corn oil was used as dispersed phase while the aqueous phase as continuous phase of the emulsion. The aqueous phase was designed with the protein contents (0.5- 4 wt. %) at pH 7. The different oil phase (10-40 wt. %) were homogenized in aqueous phase (90-60 wt. %). It was observed that the viscosity and turbidity of the emulsion were increased with the increase of protein concentration and oil phase contents. Flow profile showed that shear stress was increased with increase of shear rate but it decreased at higher shear rate (100 s-1) in heated emulsion. On the other hand the emulsion viscosity was decreased with the increase of shear rate showing non- Newtonian behavior. This work may be useful in the formulation and physicochemical properties of food products i.e. sauces, mayonnaise etc. (author)

  8. Oxidative Stability in Oil-in-Water Emulsions with Quercetin or Rutin Under Iron Catalysis or Riboflavin Photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, BoRa; Ka, HaeJung; Kwon, YongJun; Choi, HyungSeok; Kim, Sunghwa; Kim, Jisu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2017-04-01

    The effects of quercetin and rutin on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions were tested under riboflavin (RF) photosensitization in the presence or absence of FeCl 2 . The degree of oxidation in O/W emulsions was determined by headspace oxygen content, conjugated dienes, and lipid hydroperoxides. Quercetin chelated more metal than did rutin in iron catalyzed O/W emulsions. Generally, 0.1 mM quercetin and rutin was oxidative while 0.5 and 1.0 mM quercetin and rutin was antioxidative in O/W emulsions under RF photosensitization. Depending on the analysis method, the antioxidants had different strengths. The antioxidative or oxidative properties of quercetin and rutin vary in O/W emulsions and depend the quercetin and rutin concentrations and oxidative forces like transition metals, RF photosensitization, or a combination thereof. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  9. Oxidative Stability of Granola Bars Enriched with Multilayered Fish Oil Emulsion in the Presence of Novel Brown Seaweed Based Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermund, Ditte B; Karadağ, Ayşe; Andersen, Ulf; Jónsdóttir, Rósa; Kristinsson, Hordur G; Alasalvar, Cesarettin; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-11-09

    Fucus vesiculosus extracts that have both radical scavenging activity and metal chelating ability in vitro were used as natural antioxidant in granola bars enriched with fish oil emulsion by using primary and secondary emulsion systems stabilized by sodium caseinate alone and sodium caseinate-chitosan. The bars were stored at 20 °C and evaluated over a period of 10 weeks by measuring the development of primary and secondary oxidation products. The samples prepared with secondary emulsion system developed less oxidation products probably due to increased interfacial layer thickness that would act as a barrier to the penetration and diffusion of molecular species that promote oxidation. The positive charge of oil droplets in the secondary emulsion may also inhibit iron-lipid interaction through electrostatic repulsion. Additional protection against lipid oxidation was obtained when fish oil emulsions were added to the granola bars especially in combination with acetone and ethanol extracts of Fucus vesiculosus.

  10. The potential applications in heavy oil EOR with the nanoparticle and surfactant stabilized solvent-based emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, F. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The main challenges in developing the heavy oil reservoirs in the Alaska North Slope (ANS) include technical challenges regarding thermal recovery; sand control and disposal; high asphaltene content; and low in-situ permeability. A chemical enhanced oil recovery method may be possible for these reservoirs. Solvent based emulsion flooding provides mobility control; oil viscosity reduction; and in-situ emulsification of heavy oil. This study evaluated the potential application of nano-particle-stabilized solvent based emulsion injection to enhance heavy oil recovery in the ANS. The optimized micro-emulsion composition was determined using laboratory tests such as phase behaviour scanning, rheology studies and interfacial tension measurements. The optimized nano-emulsions were used in core flooding experiments to verify the recovery efficiency. The study revealed that the potential use of this kind of emulsion flooding is a promising enhanced oil recovery process for some heavy oil reservoirs in Alaska, Canada and Venezuela. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  11. Relations between interfacial properties and heavy crude oil emulsions stability; Relations entre les proprietes interfaciales et la stabilite des emulsions de brut lourd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoebler-Poteau, S.

    2006-02-15

    Oil in water emulsions are currently being investigated to facilitate the transport of viscous heavy oils. The behavior of these emulsions is largely controlled by oil / water interfaces. The surface-active components of crude oil such as asphaltenes and naphthenic acids compete among themselves at these interfaces and also with possibly added synthetic surfactant emulsifier.Here, we present a study of dynamic interfacial tension and rheology of interfaces between water and a model oil (toluene) in which asphaltenes and other surface active molecules from crude oil are dissolved. We show that different parameters such as aging of the interface, asphaltenes concentration, the pH and salinity of the aqueous phase have a strong influence on interfacial properties of asphaltenes at the oil/water interface. Several micro-pipette experiments, in which micrometric drops have been manipulated, are described as well as small angle neutron scattering measurements. The influence of lower molecular weight surface-active species, such as the natural naphthenic acids contained in maltenes (crude oil without asphaltenes) has been investigated, and an interaction between asphaltenes and maltenes which facilitates molecular arrangement at the interface was detected. The microscopic properties of the different interfaces and the stability of the corresponding emulsions are determined to be correlated.The results obtained on model emulsions and model oil/water interfaces were found to be helpful in order to explain and predict the behavior of heavy crude oil emulsions. (author)

  12. Agglomeration of Celecoxib by Quasi Emulsion Solvent Diffusion Method: Effect of Stabilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maghsoodi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion (QESD has evolved into an effective technique to manufacture agglomerates of API crystals. Although, the proposed technique showed benefits, such as cost effectiveness, that is considerably sensitive to the choice of a stabilizer, which agonizes from a absence of systemic understanding in this field. In the present study, the combination of different solvents and stabilizers were compared to investigate any connections between the solvents and stabilizers. Methods: Agglomerates of celecoxib were prepared by QESD method using four different stabilizers (Tween 80, HPMC, PVP and SLS and three different solvents (methyl acetate, ethyl acetate and isopropyl acetate. The solid state of obtained particles was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. The agglomerated were also evaluated in term of production yield, distribution of particles and dissolution behavior. Results: The results showed that the effectiveness of stabilizer in terms of particle size and particle size distribution is specific to each solvent candidate. A stabilizer with a lower HLB value is preferred which actually increased its effectiveness with the solvent candidates with higher lipophilicity. HPMC appeared to be the most versatile stabilizer because it showed a better stabilizing effect compared to other stabilizers in all solvents used. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the efficiency of stabilizers in forming the celecoxib agglomerates by QESD was influenced by the HLB of the stabilizer and lipophilicity of the solvents.

  13. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: Roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Dongwei

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  14. Dispersion Stability of O/W Emulsions with Different Oil Contents Under Various Freezing and Thawing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Kazutaka; Miyagawa, Yayoi; Nakagawa, Kyuya; Adachi, Shuji

    2017-07-01

    Freezing and thawing of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion-type foods bring about oil-water separation and deterioration; hence, the effects of freezing and thawing conditions on the destabilization of O/W emulsions were examined. The freezing rate and thawing temperature hardly affected the stability of the O/W emulsion. O/W emulsions having different oil fractions were stored at temperatures ranging from -30 to -20 °C and then thawed. The stability after thawing depended on the storage temperature, irrespective of the oil fraction of the emulsion. A good correlation was found between the time at which the stability began to decrease and the time taken for the oil to crystalize. These results indicated that the dominant cause for the destabilization of the O/W emulsion during freezing and thawing is the crystallization of the oil phase and that the effects of the freezing and thawing rates on the stability are insignificant. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  15. Ceramic membrane fouling during ultrafiltration of oil/water emulsions: roles played by stabilization surfactants of oil droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dongwei; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Jun

    2015-04-07

    Oil/water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by surfactants is the part of oily wastewater that is most difficult to handle. Ceramic membrane ultrafiltration presently is an ideal process to treat O/W emulsions. However, little is known about the fouling mechanism of the ceramic membrane during O/W emulsion treatment. This paper investigated how stabilization surfactants of O/W emulsions influence the irreversible fouling of ceramic membranes during ultrafiltration. An unexpected phenomenon observed was that irreversible fouling was much less when the charge of the stabilization surfactant of O/W emulsions is opposite to the membrane. The less ceramic membrane fouling in this case was proposed to be due to a synergetic steric effect and demulsification effect which prevented the penetration of oil droplets into membrane pores and led to less pore blockage. This proposed mechanism was supported by cross section images of fouled and virgin ceramic membranes taken with scanning electron microscopy, regression results of classical fouling models, and analysis of organic components rejected by the membrane. Furthermore, this mechanism was also verified by the existence of a steric effect and demulsification effect. Our finding suggests that ceramic membrane oppositely charged to the stabilization surfactant should be applied in ultrafiltration of O/W emulsions to alleviate irreversible membrane fouling. It could be a useful rule for ceramic membrane ultrafiltration of oily wastewater.

  16. Effects of sodium caseinate concentration and storage conditions on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Dwyer, Sandra P; O' Beirne, David; Eidhin, Deirdre Ní; O' Kennedy, Brendan T

    2013-06-01

    The oxidative stability of various oils (sunflower, camelina and fish) and 20% oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, were examined. The mean particle size decreased from 1179 to 325 nm as sodium caseinate (emulsifier) concentration was increased from 0.25% to 3% in O/W emulsions (Psodium caseinate concentration increased, and similarly decreased as microfluidisation pressure increased (P<0.05). Increasing storage temperature of the emulsions from 5 to 60°C, resulted in lower detectable lipid oxidation products during storage (P<0.05). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stability indicating HPLC-UV method for detection of curcumin in Curcuma longa extract and emulsion formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Haroon Khalid; Liew, Kai Bin; Loh, Gabriel Onn Kit; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2015-03-01

    A stability-indicating HPLC-UV method for the determination of curcumin in Curcuma longa extract and emulsion was developed. The system suitability parameters, theoretical plates (N), tailing factor (T), capacity factor (K'), height equivalent of a theoretical plate (H) and resolution (Rs) were calculated. Stress degradation studies (acid, base, oxidation, heat and UV light) of curcumin were performed in emulsion. It was found that N>6500, Tcurcumin were ⩽0.87% and ⩽2.0%, while the inter-day precision and accuracy values were ⩽2.1% and ⩽-1.92. Curcumin degraded in emulsion under acid, alkali and UV light. In conclusion, the stability-indicating method could be employed to determine curcumin in bulk and emulsions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of dodecylamine-functionalized graphene quantum dots and their application as stabilizers in an emulsion polymerization of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Wang; Ruiyi, Li; Zaijun, Li; Junkang, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Pickering emulsions have attracted considerable interest due to their potential applications in many fields, such as the food, pharmaceutical, petroleum and cosmetics industries. The study reports the synthesis of dodecylamine-functionalized graphene quantum dots (d-GQDs) and their implementation as stabilizers in an emulsion polymerization of styrene. First, d-GQDs are prepared by thermal pyrolysis of citric acid and dodecylamine in 0.1M ammonium hydroxide. The resulting d-GQDs consist of small graphene sheets with abundant amino, carboxyl, acylamino, hydroxyl and alkyl chains on the edge. The amphiphilic structure gives the d-GQDs high surface activity. The addition of d-GQDs can reduce the surface tension of water to 30.8mNm -1 and the interfacial tension of paraffin oil/water to 0.0182mNm -1 . The surface activity is much better than that of previously reported solid particle surfactants for Pickering emulsions and is close to that of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, which is, a classical organic surfactants. Then, d-GQDs are employed as solid particle surfactants for stabilizing styrene-in-water emulsions. The emulsions exhibit excellent stability at pH 7. However, stability is lost when the pH is more than 9 or less than 4. The pH-switchable behaviour can be attributed to the protonation of amino groups in a weak acid medium and dissociation of carboxyl groups in a weak base medium. Finally, 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) is introduced into the Pickering emulsions to trigger emulsion polymerization of styrene. The as-prepared polystyrene spheres display a uniform morphology with a narrow diameter distribution. The fluorescent d-GQDs coated their surfaces. This study presents an approach for the fabrication of amphiphilic GQDs and GQDs-based functional materials, which have a wide range of potential applications in emulsion polymerization, as well as in sensors, catalysts, and energy storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rheological properties and physical stability of ecological emulsions stabilized by a surfactant derived from cocoa oil and high pressure homogenization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trujillo-Cayado, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to investigate the influence of the emulsification method on the rheological properties, droplet size distribution and physical stability of O/W green emulsions formulated with an eco-friendly surfactant derived from cocoa oil. The methodology used can be applied to other emulsions. Polyoxyethylene glycerol esters are non-ionic surfactants obtained from a renewable source which fulfill the environmental and toxicological requirements to be used as eco-friendly emulsifying agents. In the same way, N,NDimethyloctanamide and α-Pinene (solvents used as oil phase could be considered green solvents. Emulsions with submicron mean diameters and slight shear thinning behavior were obtained regardless of the homogenizer, pressure or number of passes used. All emulsions exhibited destabilization by creaming and a further coalescence process which was applied to the coarse emulsion prepared with a rotor-stator homogenizer. The emulsion obtained with high pressure at 15000 psi and 1-pass was the most stable.El objetivo de este trabajo fue estudiar la influencia del método de emulsificación sobre las propiedades reológicas, la distribución de tamaños de gota y la estabilidad física de emulsiones verdes O/W formuladas con un tensioactivo derivado del aceite de coco respetuoso con el medioambiente. La metodología empleada puede ser aplicada a cualquier otro tipo de emulsiones. Los ésteres polietoxilados de glicerina son tensioactivos no iónicos obtenidos de fuentes renovables que cumplen requisitos medioambientales y toxicológicos para ser usados como agentes emulsionantes ecológicos. Del mismo modo, la N,N-dimetil octanamida y el α-Pineno (disolventes usados como fase oleosa pueden ser considerados como disolventes verdes. Se han obtenido emulsiones con diámetros medio submicrónicos y comportamiento ligeramente pseudoplástico independientemente del equipo, la presión o el número de pasadas empleados. Todas las

  20. Effect of Leaves of Caesalpinia decapetala on Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Gallego

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Caesalpinia decapetala (Roth Alston (Fabaceae (CD is used in folk medicine to prevent colds and treat bronchitis. This plant has antitumor and antioxidant activity. The antioxidant effects of an extract from Caesalpinia decapetala (Fabaceae were assessed by storage of model food oil-in-water emulsions with analysis of primary and secondary oxidation products. The antioxidant capacity of the plant extract was evaluated by the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy. Lyophilized extracts of CD were added at concentrations of 0.002%, 0.02% and 0.2% into oil-in-water emulsions, which were stored for 30 days at 33 ± 1 °C, and then, oxidative stability was evaluated. The CD extract had high antioxidant activity (700 ± 70 µmol Trolox/g dry plant for the ORAC assay, mainly due to its phenolic components: gallic acid, quercetin, catechin, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-coumaric acid. At a concentration of 0.2%, the extract significantly reduced the oxidative deterioration of oil-in-water emulsions. The results of the present study show the possibility of utilizing CD as a promising source of natural antioxidants for retarding lipid oxidation in the food and cosmetic industries.

  1. Evaluating factors affecting the permeability of emulsions used to stabilize radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Garey A; Medina, Victor F

    2005-05-15

    Present strategies for alleviating radioactive contamination from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or dirty bomb involve either demolishing and removing radioactive surfaces or abandoning portions of the area near the release point. In both cases, it is imperative to eliminate or reduce migration of the radioisotopes until the cleanup is complete or until the radiation has decayed back to acceptable levels. This research investigated an alternative strategy of using emulsions to stabilize radioactive particulate contamination. Emergency response personnel would coat surfaces with emulsions consisting of asphalt or tall oil pitch to prevent migration of contamination. The site can then be evaluated and cleaned up as needed. In order for this approach to be effective, the treatment must eliminate migration of the radioactive agents in the terror device. Water application is an environmental condition that could promote migration into the external environment. This research investigated the potential for water, and correspondingly contaminant, migration through two emulsions consisting of Topein, a resinous byproduct during paper manufacture. Topein C is an asphaltic-based emulsion and Topein S is a tall oil pitch, nonionic emulsion. Experiments included water adsorption/ mobilization studies, filtration tests, and image analysis of photomicrographs from an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and a stereomicroscope. Both emulsions were effective at reducing water migration. Conductivity estimates were on the order of 10(-80) cm s(-1) for Topein C and 10(-7) cm s(-1) for Topein S. Water mobility depended on emulsion flocculation and coalescence time. Photomicrographs indicate that Topein S consisted of greater and more interconnected porosity. Dilute foams of isolated spherical gas cells formed when emulsions were applied to basic surfaces. Gas cells rose to the surface and ruptured, leaving void spaces that penetrated throughout the emulsion. These

  2. Development and stability evaluation of water-in-edible oils emulsions formulated with the incorporation of hydrophilic Hibiscus sabdariffa extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Moral, Sandra; Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Martínez-Férez, Antonio

    2018-09-15

    New functional oils (extra virgin olive oil, EVOO and sunflower oil, SO) containing antioxidants from Hibiscus sabdariffa extract were developed by W/O emulsion. Their physical and chemical stability was measured over time. The lowest coalescence rate was obtained with 8 and 12 wt% surfactant amount for EVOO and SO emulsions, respectively. Before the evaluation of the oxidative stability, an optimization of phenolic compounds extraction from emulsions by multi-response surface methodology was performed. EVOO emulsions were chemically more stable over time than SO emulsions in terms of total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant activity and chemical composition measured by HPLC-ESI.TOF-MS. TPC significantly increased (from 2.02 ± 0.07 to 2.71 ± 0.06 mg Eq GAE/g extract) and the antioxidant activity measured by TEAC remained constant for 1 month of storage. Thus, W/O emulsion technology has proven to be a potential method to vehiculize and stabilize bioactive compounds from H. sabdariffa into edible oils. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improvement of stability of oil-in-water emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets by addition of sodium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallandre, S; Decker, E A; McClements, D J

    2007-11-01

    The potential of sodium alginate for improving the stability of emulsions containing caseinate-coated droplets was investigated. One wt% corn oil-in-water emulsions containing anionic caseinate-coated droplets (0.15 wt% sodium caseinate) and anionic sodium alginate (0 to 1 wt%) were prepared at pH 7. The pH of these emulsions was then adjusted to 3.5, so that the anionic alginate molecules adsorbed to the cationic caseinate-coated droplets. Extensive droplet aggregation occurred when there was insufficient alginate to completely saturate the droplet surfaces due to bridging flocculation, and when the nonadsorbed alginate concentration was high enough to induce depletion flocculation. Emulsions with relatively small particle sizes could be formed over a range of alginate concentrations (0.1 to 0.4 wt%). The influence of pHs (3 to 7) and sodium chloride (0 to 500 mM) on the properties of primary (0 wt% alginate) and secondary (0.15 wt% alginate) emulsions was studied. Alginate adsorbed to the droplet surfaces at pHs 3, 4, and 5, but not at pHs 6 and 7, due to electrostatic attraction between anionic groups on the alginate and cationic groups on the adsorbed caseinate. Secondary emulsions had better stability than primary emulsions at pH values near caseinate's isoelectric point (pHs 4 and 5). In addition, secondary emulsions were stable up to higher ionic strengths (< 300 mM) than primary emulsions (<50 mM). The controlled electrostatic deposition method utilized in this study could be used to extend the range of application of dairy protein emulsifiers in the food industry.

  4. An alkyl polyglucoside-mixed emulsifier as stabilizer of emulsion systems: the influence of colloidal structure on emulsions skin hydration potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Snezana; Lukic, Milica; Jaksic, Ivana; Reichl, Stephan; Tamburic, Slobodanka; Müller-Goymann, Christel

    2011-06-01

    To be considered as a suitable vehicle for drugs/cosmetic actives, an emulsion system should have a number of desirable properties mainly dependent on surfactant used for its stabilization. In the current study, C(12-14) alkyl polyglucoside (APG)-mixed emulsifier of natural origin has been investigated in a series of binary (emulsifier concentration 10-25% (w/w)) and ternary systems with fixed emulsifier content (15% (w/w)) with or without glycerol. To elucidate the systems' colloidal structure the following physicochemical techniques were employed: polarization and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (WAXD and SAXD), thermal analysis (DSC and TGA), complex rheological, pH, and conductivity measurements. Additionally, the emulsion vehicles' skin hydration potential was tested in vivo, on human skin under occlusion. In a series of binary systems with fixed emulsifier/water ratios ranging from 10/90 to 25/75 the predominance of a lamellar mesophase was found, changing its character from a liquid crystalline to a gel crystalline type. The same was observed in gel emulsions containing equal amounts of emulsifier and oil (15% (w/w)), but varying in glycerol content (0-25%). Different emulsion samples exhibited different water distribution modes in the structure, reflecting their rheological behavior and also their skin hydration capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interfacial composition and stability of emulsions made with mixtures of commercial sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Aiqian

    2008-10-15

    The interfacial composition and the stability of oil-in-water emulsion droplets (30% soya oil, pH 7.0) made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and whey protein concentrate (WPC) (1:1 by protein weight) at various total protein concentrations were examined. The average volume-surface diameter (d32) and the total surface protein concentration of emulsion droplets were similar to those of emulsions made with both sodium caseinate alone and WPC alone. Whey proteins were adsorbed in preference to caseins at low protein concentrations (caseins were adsorbed in preference to whey proteins at high protein concentrations. The creaming stability of the emulsions decreased markedly as the total protein concentration of the system was increased above 2% (sodium caseinate >1%). This was attributed to depletion flocculation caused by the sodium caseinate in these emulsions. Whey proteins did not retard this instability in the emulsions made with mixtures of sodium caseinate and WPC. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Water-Oil Emulsion Breaking by Stabilized Solution Consisting of Anionic Surface Acting Agent - Soda Ash - Polymer (ASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulichkov, S. V.; Avtomonov, E. G.; Andreeva, L. V.; Solomennik, S. F.; Nikitina, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper provides a laboratory research of breaking natural water-oil emulsions: - by non-stabilized ASP; by stabilized ASP; by mixture of stabilized and non-stabilized ASP in different proportions and production of refinery water of the required quality with the use of IronGuard 2495 as flocculant. Oil-in-water emulsion is stable. Classic methods are not suitable for residual water treatment: sediment gravity flow; filtration; centrifuge test. Microemulsion formed after ASP application has low boundary tension and high pH. It contributes to transfer of oil phase into a water one, forming oil-in-water emulsion. Alkaline condition has adverse effect on demulsifying ability of agents, flocculation and boundary tension. For breaking of water-oil emulsion at EBU before the interchanger water or water-oil emulsion from the wells that were not APS-treated in ratio of 1:9 shall be delivered. Residual water after EBU must be prepared in water tanks by dilution in great volume.

  7. Selective retardation of perfume oil evaporation from oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by either surfactant or nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-12-07

    We have used dynamic headspace analysis to investigate the evaporation rates of perfume oils from stirred oil-in-water emulsions into a flowing gas stream. We compare the behavior of an oil of low water solubility (limonene) and one of high water solubility (benzyl acetate). It is shown how the evaporation of an oil of low water solubility is selectively retarded and how the retardation effect depends on the oil volume fraction in the emulsion. We compare how the evaporation retardation depends on the nature of the adsorbed film stabilizing the emulsion. Surfactant films are less effective than adsorbed films of nanoparticles, and the retardation can be further enhanced by compression of the adsorbed nanoparticle films by preshrinking the emulsion drops.

  8. Self-organizing Map Analysis for Understanding Comprehensive Relationships between Formulation Variables, State of Water, and the Physical Stability of Pharmaceutical Emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Naoki; Horita, Akihiro; Ueno, Naomi; Kida, Chihiro; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Obata, Yasuko; Toshokan, Toshokan

    2015-01-01

    The physical stability of pharmaceutical emulsions is an important quality attribute to be considered. To obtain a better understanding of this issue, this study investigated the contribution of the state of water to the physical stability of pharmaceutical emulsions. The key technology to evaluate the state of water was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For sample preparation, model emulsions with different formulation variables (surfactant content, water content, and hydrophilic–lipophilic ...

  9. Characterisation of crude oil components, asphaltene aggregation and emulsion stability by means of near infrared spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aske, Narve

    2002-06-01

    Effective separation of water-in-crude oil emulsions is a central challenge for the oil industry on the Norwegian Continental Shelf, especially with the future increase in subsea and even down-hole processing of well fluids. The mechanisms and properties governing emulsion stability are far from fully understood but the indigenous surface active crude oil components are believed to play a major role. In this work a thorough physico-chemical characterisation of a set of crude oils originating from a variety of production fields has been performed. Crude oil properties responsible for emulsion stability were identified by use of multivariate analysis techniques like partial least squares regression (PLS) and principal component analysis (PCA). Interfacial elasticity along with both asphaltene content and asphaltene aggregation state were found to be main contributors to emulsion stability. Information on a crude oils ability to form elastic crude oil-water interfaces was found to be especially crucial when discussing emulsion stability. However, measured values of interfacial elasticity were highly dependent on asphaltene aggregation state. Several experimental techniques was utilised and partly developed for the crude oil characterisation. A high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) scheme was developed for SARA-fractionation of crude oils and an oscillating pendant drop tensiometer was used for characterisation of interfacial rheological properties. For emulsion stability a cell for determining the stability as a function of applied electric fields was used. In addition, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) was used throughout the work both for chemical and physical characterisation of crude oils and model systems. High pressure NIR was used to study the aggregation of asphaltenes by pressure depletion. A new technique for detection of asphaltene aggregation onset pressures based on NIR combined with PCA was developed. It was also found that asphaltene aggregation is

  10. Stabilization of emulsions by gum tragacanth (Astragalus spp.) correlates to the galacturonic acid content and methoxylation degree of the gum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi Gavlighi, Hassan; Meyer, Anne S.; Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    2013-01-01

    Gum tragacanth samples from six species of Iranian Astragalus bush plants (“goat's-horn”) were evaluated for their emulsion stabilizing effects and their detailed chemical composition in order to examine any possible correlation between the make-up and the emulsion stabilizing properties of gum......:50 (A. rahensis, A. microcephalus, A. compactus) or tipped toward higher bassorin than tragacanthin (A. gossypinus). The monosaccharide make-up of the six gums also varied, but all the gums contained relatively high levels of galacturonic acid (∼100–330 mg/g), arabinose (50–360 mg/g), xylose (∼150...

  11. Shear flow behaviour and emulsion-stabilizing effect of natural polysaccharide-protein gum in aqueous system and oil/water (O/W) emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of the current work was to characterize the shear rheological flow behaviour and emulsifying properties of the natural biopolymer from durian seed. The present study revealed that the extraction condition significantly affected the physical and functional characteristics of the natural biopolymer from durian seed. The dynamic oscillatory test indicated that the biopolymer from durian seed showed more gel (or solid) like behaviour than the viscous (or liquid) like behaviour (G'>G″) at a relatively high concentration (20%) in the fixed frequency (0.1 Hz). This might be explained by the fact that the gum coils disentangle at low frequencies during the long period of oscillation, thus resulting in more gel like behaviour than the viscous like behaviour. The average droplet size of oil in water (O/W) emulsions stabilized by durian seed gum significantly varied from 0.42 to 7.48 μm. The results indicated that O/W emulsions showed significant different stability after 4 months storage. This might be interpreted by the considerable effect of the extraction condition on the chemical and molecular structure of the biopolymer, thus affecting its emulsifying capacity. The biopolymer extracted by using low water to seed (W/S) ratio at the low temperature under the alkaline condition showed a relatively high emulsifying activity in O/W emulsion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Pea Protein Aggregates on the Structure and Stability of Pea Protein/Soybean Polysaccharide Complex Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoru Yin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS, and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry.

  13. Influence of pea protein aggregates on the structure and stability of pea protein/soybean polysaccharide complex emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baoru; Zhang, Rujing; Yao, Ping

    2015-03-20

    The applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry have been hampered by their precipitation in acidic solution. In this study, pea protein isolate (PPI) with poor dispersibility in acidic solution was used to form complexes with soybean soluble polysaccharide (SSPS), and the effects of PPI aggregates on the structure and stability of PPI/SSPS complex emulsions were investigated. Under acidic conditions, high pressure homogenization disrupts the PPI aggregates and the electrostatic attraction between PPI and SSPS facilitates the formation of dispersible PPI/SSPS complexes. The PPI/SSPS complex emulsions prepared from the PPI containing aggregates prove to possess similar droplet structure and similar stability compared with the PPI/SSPS emulsions produced from the PPI in which the aggregates have been previously removed by centrifugation. The oil droplets are protected by PPI/SSPS complex interfacial films and SSPS surfaces. The emulsions show long-term stability against pH and NaCl concentration changes. This study demonstrates that PPI aggregates can also be used to produce stable complex emulsions, which may promote the applications of plant proteins in the food and beverage industry.

  14. PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL STABILITY ANALYSIS OF COSMETIC MULTI- PLE EMULSIONS LOADED WITH ASCORBYL PALMITATE AND SODIUM ASCORBYL PHOSPHATE SALTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hira; Akhtar, Naveed; Ali, Atif; Khan, Haji M Shoaib; Sohail, Muhammad; Naeem, Muhammad; Nawaz, Zarqa

    2016-09-01

    Stability of hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives for quenching synergistic antioxidant activities and to treat oxidative related diseases is a major issue. This study was aimed to encapsulate hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives (ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) as functional ingredients in a newly formulated multiple emulsion of the W//W type to attain the synergistic antioxidant effects and the resultant system's long term physical and chemical stability. Several multiple emulsions using the same concentration of emulsifiers but different concentrations of ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate were developed. Three finally selected multiple emulsions (ME₁, ME₂ and ME₃) were evaluated for physical stability in terms of rheology, microscopy, conductivity, pH, and organoleptic characteristics under different storage conditions for 3 months. Chemical stability was determined by HPLC on Sykam GmbH HPLC system (Germany), equipped with a variable UV detector. Results showed that at accelerated storage conditions all the three multiple emulsions had shear thinning behavior of varying shear stress with no influence of location of functional ingredients in a carrier system. Conductivity values increased and pH values remained within the skin pH range for 3 months. Microscopic analysis showed an increase in globule size with the passage of time, especially at higher temperatures while decreased at low temperatures. Centrifugation test did not cause phase separation till the 45th day, but little effects after 2 months. Chemical stability analysis by HPLC at the end of 3 months showed that ascorbyl palmitate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate were almost stable in all multiple emulsions with no influence of their location in a carrier system. Multiple emulsions were found a stable carrier for hydrophilic and lipophilic vitamin C derivatives to enhance their desired effects. Considering that many topical formulations

  15. Real-time measurements to characterize dynamics of emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuanjie; Nitin, N

    2016-05-01

    Efficient delivery of bioactives remains a critical challenge due to their limited bioavailability and solubility. While many encapsulation systems are designed to modulate the digestion and release of bioactives within the human gastrointestinal tract, there is limited understanding of how engineered structures influence the delivery of bioactives. The objective of this study was to develop a real-time quantitative method to measure structural changes in emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion and to correlate these changes with the release of free fatty acids (FFAs). Fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) was used for rapid in-situ measurement of the structural changes in emulsion interface during simulated intestinal digestion. By using FRET, changes in the intermolecular spacing between the two different fluorescent probes labeled emulsifier were characterized. Changes in FRET measurements were compared with the release of FFAs. The results showed that bile salts and pancreatic lipase interacted immediately with the emulsion droplets and disrupted the emulsion interface as evidenced by reduction in FRET efficacy compared to the control. Similarly, a significant amount of FFAs was released during digestion. Moreover, addition of a second layer of polymers at emulsion interface decreased the extent of interface disruption by bile salts and pancreatic lipase and impacted the amount or rate of FFA release during digestion. These results were consistent with the lower donor/acceptor ratio of the labeled probes from the FRET result. Overall, this study provides a novel approach to analyze the dynamics of emulsion interface during digestion and their relationship with the release of FFAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlled formation of emulsion gels stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein under malondialdehyde (MDA)-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibai; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2015-04-15

    This study presented the cold-set gelation of emulsions stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein (MP) under oxidative stress originated from malondialdehyde (MDA). Gel properties were compared over a range of MDA/NaCl concentrations including gel viscoelastic properties, strength, water-holding capacity (WHC), amount of protein entrapped, and microstructure. The oxidative stability of emulsion gels as indicated by lipid hydroperoxide was further determined and compared. Results indicated that emulsion stabilized by MP at swollen state under certain ionic strengths (0.2-0.6 M) was the premise of gel formation under MDA. In the presence of intermediate MDA concentrations (2.5-10 mM), the emulsion gels showed an improved elasticity, strength, WHC, and oxidative stability. This improvement should be mainly attributed to the enhanced protein-protein cross-linkings via MDA, which were homogeneously formed among absorbed and/or unabsorbed proteins, entrapping a greater amount and fractions of protein within network. Therefore, the oil droplets were better adherent to the gel matrix. Nevertheless, addition of high MDA concentrations (25-50 mM) led to the formation of excessive covalent bonds, which might break protein-protein bonds and trigger the desorption of protein from the interface. This ultimately caused "oil leak" phenomena as well as the collapse of gel structure and, thus, overall decreased gel properties and oxidative stability.

  17. Formulating orange oil-in-water beverage emulsions for effective delivery of bioactives: Improvements in chemical stability, antioxidant activity and gastrointestinal fate of lycopene using carrier oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, Erika; Raikos, Vassilios

    2018-04-01

    The influence of carrier oil type on the chemical stability, antioxidant properties and bioaccessibility of lycopene in orange oil-in-water beverage emulsions was investigated. The emulsions were formulated with orange oil (A), which was partially (50%) replaced with tributyrin (B) or corn oil (C) because of their distinctively different fatty acid composition. The addition of corn oil enhanced the physical stability of the beverage during chilled storage by inhibiting Ostwald ripening. The formation of oxidation products was insignificant after storage for 28 days at 4 °C, regardless the type of added oil. Lycopene was more susceptible to chemical degradation in the presence of unsaturated, long chain triglycerides and the retention followed the order: A (87.94%), B (64.41%) and C (57.39%). Interestingly, bioaccessibility of lycopene was significantly lower for emulsions formulated with 50% corn oil as opposed to 100% orange oil as indicated by the simulated in vitro gastric digestion model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Selective removal of erythromycin by magnetic imprinted polymers synthesized from chitosan-stabilized Pickering emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hongxiang; Chen, Qunhui; Pan, Jianming; Zhang, Yunlei; Huang, Yong; Qi, Xueyong

    2015-05-30

    Magnetic imprinted polymers (MIPs) were synthesized by Pickering emulsion polymerization and used to adsorb erythromycin (ERY) from aqueous solution. The oil-in-water Pickering emulsion was stabilized by chitosan nanoparticles with hydrophobic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as magnetic carrier. The imprinting system was fabricated by radical polymerization with functional and crosslinked monomer in the oil phase. Batches of static and dynamic adsorption experiments were conducted to analyze the adsorption performance on ERY. Isotherm data of MIPs well fitted the Freundlich model (from 15 °C to 35 °C), which indicated heterogeneous adsorption for ERY. The ERY adsorption capacity of MIPs was about 52.32 μmol/g at 15 °C. The adsorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo-first-order model, which suggested that physical interactions were primarily responsible for ERY adsorption. The Thomas model used in the fixed-bed adsorption design provided a better fit to the experimental data. Meanwhile, ERY exhibited higher affinity during adsorption on the MIPs compared with the adsorption capacity of azithromycin and chloramphenicol. The MIPs also exhibited excellent regeneration capacity with only about 5.04% adsorption efficiency loss in at least three repeated adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Compatibility and Stability of VARUBI (Rolapitant) Injectable Emulsion Admixed with Intravenous Granisetron Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, George; Powers, Dan; Yeung, Stanley; Chen, Frank; Neelon, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Prophylaxis or therapy with a combination of a neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist (RA), a 5-hydroxytryptamine- 3 (5-HT3) RA, and dexamethasone is recommended by international antiemesis guidelines for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting for patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy and for select patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. VARUBI (rolapitant) is a substance P/NK-1 RA that was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an injectable emulsion in combination with other antiemetic agents in adults for the prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, including, but not limited to, highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Granisetron Hydrochloride Injection USP is one of the 5-HT3 RAs indicated for the prevention of nausea and/or vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of emetogenic cancer therapy, including high-dose cisplatin. Herein, we describe the physical and chemical compatibility and stability of VARUBI (rolapitant) injectable emulsion (166.5 mg/92.5 mL [1.8 mg/mL], equivalent to 185 mg of rolapitant hydrochloride) admixed with Granisetron Hydrochloride Injection USP (1.0 mg/mL, equivalent to 1.12 mg/mL hydrochloride). Binary admixtures of VARUBI injectable emulsion and Granisetron Hydrochloride Injection USP were prepared and stored in VARUBI ready-to-use glass vials and in four types of commonly used intravenous administration (tubing) sets. Evaluation of the physical and chemical compatibility and stability of the admixtures in the VARUBI ready-to-use vials stored at room temperature (20°C to 25°C) under fluorescent light and under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C protected from light) was conducted at 0, 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours, and that of the admixtures in the intravenous tubing sets was evaluated at 0, 2, and 6 hours of storage at 20°C to 25°C. Physical stability was evaluated by visual examination

  20. Physicochemical properties of peanut oil-based diacylglycerol and their derived oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhao; Zhao, Mouming; Liu, Ning; Liu, Daolin; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Qiangzhong

    2015-10-01

    High purity peanut oil-based diacylglycerol (PO-DAG) (94.95 wt%) was prepared via enzymatic glycerolysis from peanut oil (PO). The resulting dominance of DAGs was proven to greatly influence the properties of corresponding fresh or frozen-thawed emulsions. Stable fresh oil-in-water emulsions were produced using either PO-DAG or PO, with stability enhanced by increased concentrations of Na-CN. The lower equilibrium interfacial tension along with greater negative ζ-potential of PO revealed that Na-CN was preferentially adsorbed to the PO interface. Adding 0.05 mol/L NaCl to the PO emulsions minimized depletion flocculation caused by the unadsorbed Na-CN, but further NaCl addition increased oil droplet size and concomitant coalescence. For the PO-DAG emulsions, adding 0.2 mol/L NaCl did not significantly (p>0.05) affect their ζ-potential but adding 0.05 or 0.1 mol/L NaCl lowered ζ-potential, although NaCl at these concentrations increased oil droplet size and coalescence. Freezing-thawing process considerably weakened the stability of PO-DAG emulsions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Control of strength and stability of emulsion-gels by a combination of long- and short-range interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijdenstein, T.B.J.; Hendriks, W.P.G.; Linden, van der E.; Vliet, van T.; Aken, van G.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the change in phase behavior and mechanical properties of oil-in-water emulsion gels brought about by variation of long- and short-range attractive interactions. The model system studied consisted of oil droplets stabilized by the protein -lactoglobulin (-lg). A long-range

  2. Combination of sodium caseinate and succinylated alginate improved stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Sodium caseinate (CAS) and commercial sodium alginate (CA), long chain modified alginate (LCMA) or short chain modified alginate (SCMA) were used in combination for emulsifying and stabilizing high fat (50–70%) fish oil-in-water emulsions. Physical (creaming, droplet size, viscosity and protein...

  3. Determination of Formulation Conditions Allowing Double Emulsions Stabilized by PGPR and Sodium Caseinate to Be Used as Capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Maxime; Laurichesse, Eric; Besse, Samantha; Soubabère, Olivier; Schmitt, Véronique

    2018-02-27

    Water-in-oil-in-water (W 1 /O/W 2 ) double emulsions stabilized by polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), a lipophilic food grade small polymer, and sodium caseinate, a hydrophilic milk protein, were developed to encapsulate vitamin B12, a model hydrophilic substance easy to titrate. Using rheology, sensitive to drop size evolution and water fluxes, static light scattering, and microscopy both giving the evolution of drops' size and vitamin B12 titration assessing the encapsulation, we were able to detect independently the double emulsion drop size, the encapsulation loss, and the flux of water as a function of time. By differentiating the PGPR required to cover the W 1 -droplets' surface from PGPR in excess in the oil phase, we built a PGPR-inner droplet volume fraction diagram highlighting the domains where the double emulsion is stable toward encapsulation and/or water fluxes. We demonstrated the key role played by nonadsorbed PGPR concentration in the intermediate sunflower oil phase on the emulsion stability while, surprisingly, the inner droplet volume fraction had no effect on the emulsion stability. At low PGPR concentration, a release of vitamin B12 was observed and the leakage mechanism of coalescence between droplets and oil-water interface of the oily drops (also called globules hereafter), was identified using confocal microscopy. For high enough PGPR content, the emulsions were stable and may therefore serve as efficient capsules without need of an additional gelling, thickening, complexion or interface rigidifying agent. We generalized these results with the encapsulation of an insecticide: Cydia pomonella granulovirus used in organic arboriculture.

  4. Stabilization of emulsion and butter like products containing essential fatty acids using kalonji seeds extract and curcuminoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Sameera A; Momin, Shamim A; Bhowmick, Dipti N; Pratap, Amit A

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the tendency of essential fatty acids (EFAs) to undergo autoxidation, their storage becomes a key problem. Generally, they are stabilized by synthetic antioxidants like TBHQ that are toxic in nature. Recently many studies were reported where these EFAs are stabilized by natural antioxidants. In the present study, curcuminoids and kalonji seeds ethanol extract (KEE) were used to stabilize these EFAs in refined sunflower oil (RSFO), water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion and butter like products (BLPs). In RSFO, though curcuminoids alone exerted pro-oxidant effect, KEE and curcuminoids showed synergistic antioxidant activity that was comparable to TBHQ. KEE exhibited good antioxidant activity in emulsions and BLPs, providing fine physical properties like slipping point, dropping point and spreadability. EFAs increased the nutritional value of BLPs and antioxidants added for their stabilization provided their medicinal benefits.

  5. A comparison of the stability of beverage cloud emulsions formulated with different gum acacia- and starch-based emulsifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, S J; Reineccius, G A; Peppard, T L

    2010-06-01

    The performance of several hydrocolloids (3 gum acacias, 1 modified gum acacia, and 3 modified starches) in stabilizing beverage emulsions and corresponding model beverages was investigated employing different core materials, emulsifier usage levels, and storage temperatures. Concentrated emulsions were prepared using orange terpenes or Miglyol 812 (comprising medium-chain triglycerides, MCT) weighted 1:1 with ester gum, stored at 25 or 35 degrees C, and analyzed on days 0, 1, and 3. On day 3, model beverages were made from each emulsion, stored at both temperatures, and analyzed weekly for 4 wk. Stability of concentrated emulsions was assessed by measuring mean particle size and by visual observations of ringing; beverage stability was judged similarly and also by loss of turbidity. Particle size measurements showed concentrated emulsions containing gum acacia or modified gum acacia with either core material were stable over 3 d storage at both temperatures whereas those made with modified starches were not, destabilization being faster at 35 degrees C. Beverages based on orange terpenes, in contrast to Miglyol, yielded smaller mean particle sizes, both on manufacture and during storage, regardless of hydrocolloid used. Visual observations of ringing generally supported this finding. Modified gum acacia was evaluated at both recommended and higher usage levels, stability increasing in the latter case. In general, all gum acacia and modified gum acacia emulsifiers were superior in stability to those based on modified starches, at either temperature, for orange terpene-based beverages. In Miglyol-based beverages, similar results were seen, except 1 modified starch performed as well as the gum acacia products.

  6. Spray dried microparticles of chia oil using emulsion stabilized by whey protein concentrate and pectin by electrostatic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noello, C; Carvalho, A G S; Silva, V M; Hubinger, M D

    2016-11-01

    Chia seed oil has a high content of α-linolenic acid (60%) and linoleic acid (20%). Use of this oil in different products is limited due to its liquid state, and the presence of insaturation is a trigger for oxidation. In this context, to facilitate the incorporation of chia oil in food products and increase its protection against oxidation, the aim of this work was to produce chia oil microparticles by spray drying using emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate (ζ-potential +13.4 at pH3.8) and pectin (ζ-potential -40.4 at pH3.8) through the electrostatic layer-by-layer deposition technique and emulsions prepared with only whey protein concentrate. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate and stabilized by whey protein concentrate-pectin were prepared using maltodextrin (10 DE) and modified starch (Hi-Cap® 100). They were characterized in relation to stability, droplet size, ζ-Potential and optical microscopy. The microparticles were characterized in relation to moisture content, water activity, particle size, microstructure and oxidative stability by the Rancimat method. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate-pectin with added maltodextrin 10 DE and emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate with added modified starch (Hi-Cap® 100) were stable after 24h. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate and by whey protein concentrate-pectin showed droplets with mean diameter ranging from 0.80 to 1.31μm, respectively and ζ-potential varying from -6.9 to -27.43mV, respectively. After spray drying, the microparticles showed an mean diameter ranging from 7.00 to 9.00μm. All samples presented high encapsulation efficiency values, above 99%. Microparticles produced with modified starch showed a smoother spherical surface than particles with maltodextrin 10 DE, which presented a wrinkled surface. All microparticles exhibited higher oxidative stability than chia oil in pure form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure and high dynamic pressure on stability and rheological properties of model oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigikocin, Erman; Mert, Behic; Alpas, Hami

    2011-09-01

    Both static and dynamic high pressure applications provide interesting modifications in food structures which lead to new product formulations. In this study, the effects of two different treatments, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and high dynamic pressure (HDP), on oil-in-water emulsions were identified and compared. Microfluidization was selected from among the HDP homogenization techniques. The performance of each process was analyzed in terms of rheological modifications and emulsion stability improvements compared with the coarse emulsions. The stability of the emulsions was determined comparatively by using an analytical photo-centrifuge device employing novel analysis technology. Whey protein isolate (WPI) in combination with a food polysaccharide (xanthan gum, guar gum or locust bean gum) were used as emulsifying and stabilizing ingredients. The effective disruption of oil droplets and the degradation of polysaccharides by the shear forces under high pressure in HDP microfluidization yielded finer emulsions with lower viscosities, leading to distinctive improvements in emulsion stability. On the other hand, improvements in stability obtained with HHP treatment were due to the thickening of the emulsions mainly induced by protein unfolding. The corresponding increases in viscosity were intensified in emulsion formulations containing higher oil content. Apart from these, HHP treatment was found to be relatively more contributive to the enhancements in viscoelastic properties.

  8. pH-induced inversion of water-in-oil emulsions to oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) using core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer as interfacial stabilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qijing; Deng, Xiaoyong; An, Zesheng

    2014-06-01

    A pH-responsive core cross-linked star (CCS) polymer containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) arms was used as an interfacial stabilizer for emulsions containing toluene (80 v%) and water (20 v%). In the pH range of 12.1-9.3, ordinary water-in-oil emulsions were formed. Intermediate multiple emulsions of oil-in-water-in-oil and water-in-oil-in-water were formed at pH 8.6 and 7.5, respectively. Further lowering the pH resulted in the formation of gelled high internal phase emulsions of oil-in-water type in the pH range of 6.4-0.6. The emulsion behavior was correlated with interfacial tension, conductivity and configuration of the CCS polymer at different pH. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Physical stability of asphalt emulsion admix seal radon barrier for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.E.

    1983-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is investigating the use of an asphalt emulsion admix seal to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. A key requirement of any cover system is its long-term stability; the cover must withstand failure over very long periods of time. An important determinant of overall cover system stability is the integrity of the 6.35-cm (2.5-in.) thick asphalt admix seal. Therefore, the physical stability of this seal was examined. The investigation considered the mechanical interaction between the tailings pile and cover. The potential effect of differential settlement of the tailings pile on the integrity of the seal system was also examined. Results indicate that the minimum span length the seal could withstand without failing is 0.34 m (1.1 ft). This assumes a differential settlement of 4.92 cm (1.94 in.) at the center resulting from the application of a 0.76-m (2.5-ft) cover. At spans greater than 0.60 m (1.97 ft), no tensile strain would develop

  10. Light backscatter fiber optic sensor: a new tool for predicting the stability of pork emulsions containing antioxidative potato protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Gema; Xiong, Youling L; Payne, Fred; Castillo, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether light backscatter response from fresh pork meat emulsions is correlated to final product stability indices. A specially designed fiber optic measurement system was used in combination with a miniature fiber optic spectrometer to determine the intensity of light backscatter within the wavelength range 300-1100 nm (UV/VIS/NIR) at different radial distances (2, 2.5 and 3mm) with respect to the light source in pork meat emulsions with two fat levels (15%, 30%) and two levels (0, 2.5%) of the natural antioxidant hydrolyzed potato protein (HPP). Textural parameters (hardness, deformability, cohesiveness and breaking force), cooking loss, TBARS (1, 2, 3, and 7 days of storage at 4 °C) and CIELAB color coordinates of cooked emulsions were measured. The light backscatter was directly correlated with cooking losses, color, breaking force and TBARS. The optical configuration proposed would compensate for the emulsion heterogeneity, maximizing the existing correlation between the optical signal and the emulsion quality metrics.

  11. Physical and Oxidative Stability of Flaxseed Oil-in-Water Emulsions Fabricated from Sunflower Lecithins: Impact of Blending Lecithins with Different Phospholipid Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Chen, Fang; Wang, Xingguo; Jin, Qingzhe; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2017-06-14

    There is great interest in the formulation of plant-based foods enriched with nutrients that promote health, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids. This study evaluated the impact of sunflower phospholipid type on the formation and stability of flaxseed oil-in-water emulsions. Two sunflower lecithins (Sunlipon 50 and 90) with different phosphatidylcholine (PC) levels (59 and 90%, respectively) were used in varying ratios to form emulsions. Emulsion droplet size, charge, appearance, microstructure, and oxidation were measured during storage at 55 °C in the dark. The physical and chemical stability increased as the PC content of the lecithin blends decreased. The oxidative stability of emulsions formulated using Sunlipon 50 was better than emulsions formulated using synthetic surfactants (SDS or Tween 20). The results are interpreted in terms of the impact of emulsifier type on the colloidal interactions between oil droplets and on the molecular interactions between pro-oxidants and oil droplet surfaces.

  12. Stabilization Improves Theranostic Properties of Lipiodol{sup ®}-Based Emulsion During Liver Trans-arterial Chemo-embolization in a VX2 Rabbit Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, F., E-mail: frederic.deschamps@gustaveroussy.fr; Farouil, G. [Université Paris-Saclay, Département de radiologie Interventionnelle, Gustave Roussy (France); Gonzalez, W.; Robic, C. [Guerbet France, Guerbet (France); Paci, A.; Mir, L. M. [Université Paris-Saclay, UMR 8203 (France); Tselikas, L.; Baère, T. de [Université Paris-Saclay, Département de radiologie Interventionnelle, Gustave Roussy (France)

    2017-06-15

    PurposeTo demonstrate that stability is a crucial parameter for theranostic properties of Lipiodol{sup ®}-based emulsions during liver trans-arterial chemo-embolization.Materials and MethodsWe compared the theranostic properties of two emulsions made of Lipiodol{sup ®} and doxorubicin in two successive animal experiments (One VX2 tumour implanted in the left liver lobe of 30 rabbits). Emulsion-1 reproduced one of the most common way of preparation (ratio of oil/water: 1/1), and emulsion-2 was designed to obtain a water-in-oil emulsion with enhanced stability (ratio of oil/water: 3/1, plus an emulsifier). The first animal experiment compared the tumour selectivity of the two emulsions: seven rabbits received left hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of emulsion-1 and eight received HAI of emulsion-2. 3D-CBCT acquisitions were acquired after HAI of every 0.1 mL to measure the densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes. The second animal experiment compared the plasmatic and tumour doxorubicin concentrations after HAI of 1.5 mg of doxorubicin administered either alone (n = 3) or in emulsion-1 (n = 6) or in emulsion-2 (n = 6).ResultsEmulsion-2 resulted in densities’ ratios between the tumours and the left liver lobes that were significantly higher compared to emulsion-1 (up to 0.4 mL infused). Plasmatic doxorubicin concentrations (at 5 min) were significantly lower after HAI of emulsion-2 (19.0 μg/L) than emulsion-1 (275.3 μg/L, p < 0.01) and doxorubicin alone (412.0 μg/L, p < 0.001), and tumour doxorubicin concentration (day-1) was significantly higher after HAI of emulsion-2 (20,957 ng/g) than in emulsion-1 (8093 ng/g, p < 0.05) and doxorubicin alone (2221 ng/g, p < 0.01).ConclusionStabilization of doxorubicin in a water-in-oil Lipiodol{sup ®}-based emulsion results in better theranostic properties.

  13. Effect of castor oil emulsion eyedrops on tear film composition and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïssa, Cécile; Guillon, Michel; Simmons, Peter; Vehige, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    An emulsion eyedrop containing castor oil has been shown to modify the tear film lipid layer and increase tear film stability. The primary objectives of this investigation were to measure the prevalence of castor oil in the tear fluid over time and quantify the effects on the lipid layer. A secondary objective was to quantify the initial effects on ocular symptomatology. The investigation was an open label pilot study on 5 normal and 10 dry eye subjects. A single eyedrop (Castor oil emulsion, Allergan) was instilled in each eye; the tear film appearance and composition were monitored for 4h via in vivo visualisation using the Tearscope and post in vivo tear samples analysis by HPLC. Combined results for both normal and dry eye subjects showed that castor oil was detected up to 4h after a single eyedrop instillation and associated with an increase in the level of tear film lipid. The relative amount of various lipid families was also changed. An increase in tear lipid layer thickness was significant up to one hour post-instillation for the symptomatic sub-population. The changes in tear film characteristics were associated with significantly lower symptoms up to four hours post-instillation for the symptomatic sub-population. This pilot investigation showed that castor oil eyedrops achieved a residence time of at least four hours post-instillation, producing a more stable tear film and an associated significant decrease in ocular symptoms over the entire follow-up period for the symptomatic subjects. 2009 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Casein-Phospholipid Combinations as Emulsifier on the Physical and Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of casein (0.3% w/w) and phospholipid (0.5% w/w) emulsifier combinations on the physical and oxidative stability of 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions at pH 7. For that purpose, three phospholipids were evaluated, namely, lecithin (LC......), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The emulsion stabilized with LC showed the best physical stability having the most negative zeta potential and the lowest mean droplet size. In addition, this emulsion was also the least oxidized in terms of peroxide value and concentration of the volatile...

  15. Rheological properties of emulsions stabilized by green banana (Musa cavendishii pulp fitted by power law model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Rosalyn Izidoro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the rheological behaviour of emulsions (mayonnaises stabilized by green banana pulp using the response surface methodology was studied. In addition, the emulsions stability was investigated. Five formulations were developed, according to design for constrained surfaces and mixtures, with the proportion, respectively: water/soy oil/green banana pulp: F1 (0.10/0.20/0.70, F2 (0.20/0.20/0.60, F3 (0.10/0.25/0.65, F4 (0.20/0.25/0.55 and F5 (0.15/0.225/0.625 .Emulsions rheological properties were performed with a rotational Haake Rheostress 600 rheometer and a cone and plate geometry sensor (60-mm diameter, 2º cone angle, using a gap distance of 1mm. The emulsions showed pseudoplastic behaviour and were adequately described by the Power Law model. The rheological responses were influenced by the difference in green banana pulp proportions and also by the temperatures (10 and 25ºC. The formulations with high pulp content (F1 and F3 presented higher shear stress and apparent viscosity. Response surface methodology, described by the quadratic model,showed that the consistency coefficient (K increased with the interaction between green banana pulp and soy oil concentration and the water fraction contributed to the flow behaviour index increase for all emulsions samples. Analysis of variance showed that the second-order model had not significant lack-of-fit and a significant F-value, indicating that quadratic model fitted well into the experimental data. The emulsions that presented better stability were the formulations F4 (0.20/0.25/0.55 and F5 (0.15/0.225/0.625.No presente trabalho, foi estudado o comportamento reológico de emulsões adicionadas de polpa de banana verde utilizando a metodologia de superfície de resposta e também foram investigadas a estabilidade das emulsões. Foram desenvolvidas cinco formulações, de acordo com o delineamento para superfícies limitadas e misturas, com as proporções respectivamente: água/óleo de

  16. Joint Effects of Granule Size and Degree of Substitution on Octenylsuccinated Sweet Potato Starch Granules As Pickering Emulsion Stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinfeng; Ye, Fayin; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Yun; Zhao, Guohua

    2018-05-02

    The granules of sweet potato starch were size fractionated into three portions with significantly different median diameters ( D 50 ) of 6.67 (small-sized), 11.54 (medium-sized), and 16.96 μm (large-sized), respectively. Each portion was hydrophobized at the mass-based degrees of substitution (DS m ) of approximately 0.0095 (low), 0.0160 (medium), and 0.0230 (high). The Pickering emulsion-stabilizing capacities of modified granules were tested, and the resultant emulsions were characterized. The joint effects of granule size and DS m on emulsifying capacity (EC) were investigated by response surface methodology. For small-, medium-, and large-sized fractions, their highest emulsifying capacities are comparable but, respectively, encountered at high (0.0225), medium (0.0158), and low (0.0095) DS m levels. The emulsion droplet size increased with granule size, and the number of freely scattered granules in emulsions decreased with DS m . In addition, the term of surface density of the octenyl succinic group (SD -OSG ) was first proposed for modified starch granules, and it was proved better than DS m in interpreting the emulsifying capacities of starch granules with varying sizes. The present results implied that, as the particulate stabilizers, the optimal DS m of modified starch granules is size specific.

  17. A simplified approach for the simulation of water-in-oil emulsions in gravity separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakehal, D.; Narayanan, C. [ASCOMP GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland); Vilagines, R.; Akhras, A.R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Research and Development Center

    2009-07-01

    A new method of simulating 3-phase flow separation processes in a crude oil product was presented. The aim of the study was to increase the liquid capacity of the vessels and develop methods of testing variable flow entry procedures. The simulated system was based on gravity separation. Oil well streams were injected into large tanks where gas, oil and water were separated under the action of inertia and gravity. An interface tracking technique was combined with a Euler-Euler model developed as part of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program. Emulsion physics were modelled by interface tracking between the gas and oil-in-water liquid mixture. Additional scalar transport equations were solved in order to account for the diffusive process between the oil and water. Various settling velocity models were used to consider the settling of the dispersed water phase in oil. Changes in viscosity and non-Newtonian emulsion behaviour were also considered. The study showed that the interface tracking technique accurately predicted flow when combined with an emulsion model designed to account for the settling of water in the oil phase. Further research is now being conducted to validate computational results against in situ measurements. 13 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  18. Kinetics of vinyl acetate emulsion polymerization in a pulsed tubular reactor: comparison between experimental and simulation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayer C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A new reactor, the pulsed sieve plate column (PSPC, was developed to perform continuous emulsion polymerization reactions. This reactor combines the enhanced flexibility of tubular reactors with the mixing behavior provided by sieved plates and by the introduction of pulses that is important to prevent emulsion destabilization. The main objective of this work is to study the kinetics of vinyl acetate (VA emulsion polymerization reactions performed in this PSPC. Therefore, both experimental studies and reaction simulations were performed. Results showed that it is possible to obtain high conversions with rather low residence times in the PSPC.

  19. Influence of fat crystals in the oil phase on stability of oil-in-water emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Coalescence at rest and during flow was studied in emulsions of paraffin oil in water with several surfactants and with crystals of solid paraffin or tristearate in the oil phase. Solid fat in the oil phase was estimated by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance. Without crystals, oil-in-water emulsions

  20. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    of this study was therefore to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey...

  1. Emulsification technique affects oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    of this study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared by two different kinds of high pressure homogenizers i.e. a microfluidizer and a two valve high pressure homogenizer. Emulsions were made with equal droplet sizes, and with either 1% sodium caseinate or 1% whey protein...

  2. Effects of electron beam irradiated natural casings on the quality properties and shelf stability of emulsion sausage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Ji-Hun; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hack-Youn; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2012-05-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiated hog and sheep casings (1, 3, and 8 kGy) on the physicochemical properties and shelf stability of emulsion sausage was evaluated. There were no significant differences in pH, instrumental color, sensory properties (overall acceptability), and hardness between all the samples. The cooking yields for the irradiated treated samples were larger than that of the yields obtained for the non-irradiated samples for both the hog and sheep casing. The irradiated natural casings accelerated lipid oxidation, and inhibited the formation of volatile basic nitrogen and the increase in total aerobic bacteria. In conclusion, the natural casings irradiated below at a dose of 3 kGy had no effect on physicochemical and sensory properties of the emulsion sausages, however, that improved the shelf-stability over 5 weeks. Therefore, natural casings irradiated at moderate doses are suitable for sausage production.

  3. Factors affecting emulsion stability and quality of oil recovered from enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S; Maurer, D; Johnson, L A

    2009-11-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess how the stability of the emulsion recovered from aqueous extraction processing of soybeans was affected by characteristics of the starting material and extraction and demulsification conditions. Adding endopeptidase Protex 6L during enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction processing (EAEP) of extruded soybean flakes was vital to obtaining emulsions that were easily demulsified with enzymes. Adding salt (up to 1.5 mM NaCl or MgCl(2)) during extraction and storing extruded flakes before extraction at 4 and 30 degrees C for up to 3 months did not affect the stabilities of emulsions recovered from EAEP of soy flour, flakes and extruded flakes. After demulsification, highest free oil yield was obtained with EAEP of extruded flakes, followed by flour and then flakes. The same protease used for the extraction step was used to demulsify the EAEP cream emulsion from extruded full-fat soy flakes at concentrations ranging from 0.03% to 2.50% w/w, incubation times ranging from 2 to 90 min, and temperatures of 25, 50 or 65 degrees C. Highest free oil recoveries were achieved at high enzyme concentrations, mild temperatures, and short incubation times. Both the nature of enzyme (i.e., protease and phospholipase), added alone or as a cocktail, concentration of enzymes (0.5% vs. 2.5%) and incubation time (1 vs. 3 h), use during the extraction step, and nature of enzyme added for demulsifying affected free oil yield. The free oil recovered from EAEP of extruded flakes contained less phosphorus compared with conventional hexane-extracted oil. The present study identified conditions rendering the emulsion less stable, which is critical to increasing free oil yield recovered during EAEP of soybeans, an environmentally friendly alternative processing method to hexane extraction.

  4. Physical and oxidative stability of high fat fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with combinations of sodium caseinate and sodium alginate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yesiltas, Betül; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke

    2017-01-01

    .2 ratio NaCas:NaAlg by Box-Behnken's design, the formulae 70%-1.4%-1.2 was decided due to high fish oil content's decreasing effect on droplet size and peroxide value. Practical applications: Physically and oxidatively stable high fat (50-70%) omega-3 delivery fish oil-in-water emulsions are of high......A systematic study was carried out in order to evaluate the physical and oxidative stability of high fat omega-3 delivery fish oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with combinations of sodium caseinate (NaCas) and sodium alginate (NaAlg). The influence of 3 factors related to emulsion composition...... (fish oil content: 50, 60 and 70%; total amount of NaCas and NaAlg: 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8 %; and ratio NaCas:NaAlg: 0.4, 1.2 and 2) on physical (droplet size, viscosity and zeta potential) and oxidative (primary and secondary oxidation products) parameters was evaluated. It was possible to produce emulsions...

  5. Amorphous nano-curcumin stabilized oil in water emulsion: Physico chemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, N P; Hamilton, Ian E; Norton, Ian T

    2017-06-01

    Particle characteristics e.g. size and polymorphism are known to significantly affect the Pickering ability of the solid particles by influencing their interaction at the oil and water (O/W) interface. In this study, nano-sized amorphous curcumin particles were fabricated using nanonization technology to use them as Pickering particles. After nanonization, native crystalline curcumin particles were converted into amorphous, nanosized particles of ∼220nm. Amorphous nature of the particle was evident from the decreased melting point from 177±1°C (native curcumin) to 146±3°C (nanonized curcumin) and enthalpy from 27±2J/g to 3.5±1J/g. Interfacial tension (IFT) studies have shown a decrease in IFT at the O/W interface from ∼27mN/m to ∼15mN/m in the presence of amorphous curcumin particles in water phase compared to crystalline curcumin particles. Curcumin stabilized O/W emulsion has an initial droplet size of ∼1.2μm and they were stable for 30days at 4°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compatibility and Stability of Rolapitant Injectable Emulsion Admixed with Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, George; Yeung, Stanley; Chen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone combination therapy is the standard of care for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Herein, we describe the physical and chemical stability of an injectable emulsion of the Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist rolapitant 185 mg in 92.5 mL (free base, 166.5 mg in 92.5 mL) admixed with either 2.5 mL of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (10 mg) or 5 mL of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (20 mg). Admixtures were prepared and stored in two types of container closures (glass and Crystal Zenith plastic bottles) and four types of intravenous administration tubing sets (or intravenous tubing sets). The assessment of the physical and chemical stability was conducted on admixtures packaged in bottled samples stored at room temperature (20°C to 25°C under fluorescent light) and evaluated at 0, 1, and 6 hours. For admixtures in intravenous tubing sets, the assessment of physicochemical stability was performed after 0 and 7 hours of storage at 20°C to 25°C, and then after 20 hours (total 27 hours) under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C) and protected from light. Physical stability was assessed by visually examining the bottle contents under normal room light and measuring turbidity and particulate matter. Chemical stability was assessed by measuring the pH of the admixture and determining drug concentrations through high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Results showed that all samples were physically compatible throughout the duration of the study. The admixtures stayed within narrow and acceptable ranges in pH, turbidity, and particulate matter. Admixtures of rolapitant and dexamethasone were chemically stable when stored in glass and Crystal Zenith bottles for at least 6 hours at room temperature, as well as in the four selected intravenous tubing sets for 7 hours at 20°C to 25°C and then for 20 (total 27 hours) hours at 2°C to 8°C. No loss of potency

  7. The effect of pH and salt on the stability and physicochemical properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with gum tragacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmaleki, Khadije; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadi, Reza; Fadavi, Ghasem; Meybodi, Neda Mollakhalili

    2016-04-20

    The effect of pH (2.5, 4.0 and 5.4) and salt concentration (0.0, 0.5 and 1.0wt%) on the physical stability of oil-in-water emulsions stabilized with gum tragacanth were investigated during 150 days of storage. Mean droplet diameter, zeta-potential, interfacial tension and steady-shear and dynamic rheological properties were determined to achieve more information about the likely stability mechanisms. The results showed that increasing salt concentration did not have a significant effect on emulsion stability. Emulsions were highly unstable at pH 2.5, with their emulsion-stability index declining almost three times more than that of other emulsions during the storage time. Based on the size distribution data, a direct correlation was not observed between droplet size distribution and emulsion stability. Rheological analysis revealed that pH 2.5 had the lowest apparent viscosity, storage modulus, energy of cohesion (EC) and a-value, and the highest tanδ and b-value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability of bisphenol A (BPA) in oil-in water emulsions under riboflavin photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eun Yeong; Park, Chan Uk; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2012-08-01

    Effects of riboflavin photosensitization on the degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) were determined in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or sodium azide, which are a metal chelator or a singlet oxygen quencher, respectively. Also, the distribution of BPA between the continuous and dispersed phases in O/W emulsions was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration of BPA in O/W emulsions significantly decreased by 38.6% after 2 h under visible light irradiation and in the presence of riboflavin (P riboflavin photosensitization (P riboflavin photodegradation in O/W emulsions. Concentration of BPA, an endocrine disrupting chemical, was decreased significantly in oil-in-water emulsions under riboflavin and visible light irradiation. BPA in continuous aqueous phase was major target of riboflavin photosensitization. However, BPA was distributed more densely in lipid phase and more protected from riboflavin photosensitized O/W emulsions. This study can help to decrease the level of BPA in foods made of O/W emulsions containing riboflavin, which could be displayed under visible light irradiation. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Antioxidant effect of water and acetone extracts of Fucus vesiculosuson oxidative stability of skin care emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poyato, Candelaria; Thomsen, Birgitte Raagaard; Hermund, Ditte Baun

    2017-01-01

    A water and an acetone extract of the Icelandic brown algae Fucus vesiculosus were evaluated as potential natural sources of antioxidant compounds in skin care emulsions. To assess their efficacy in inhibiting lipid oxidation caused by photo- or thermoxidation, they were stored in darkness and room...... temperature. High temperature also caused greater increments in the droplet size of the emulsions. The analysis of the tocopherol content, peroxide value and volatile compounds during the storage revealed that, whereas both water and acetone extracts showed (at 2 mg/g of emulsion) protective effect against...

  10. Effective Surfactants Blend Concentration Determination for O/W Emulsion Stabilization by Two Nonionic Surfactants by Simple Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, O/W emulsion sets were prepared by using different concentrations of two nonionic surfactants. The two surfactants, tween 80(HLB=15.0) and span 80(HLB=4.3) were used in a fixed proportions equal to 0.55:0.45 respectively. HLB value of the surfactants blends were fixed at 10.185. The surfactants blend concentration is starting from 3% up to 19%. For each O/W emulsion set the conductivity was measured at room temperature (25±2°), 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80°. Applying the simple linear regression least squares method statistical analysis to the temperature-conductivity obtained data determines the effective surfactants blend concentration required for preparing the most stable O/W emulsion. These results were confirmed by applying the physical stability centrifugation testing and the phase inversion temperature range measurements. The results indicated that, the relation which represents the most stable O/W emulsion has the strongest direct linear relationship between temperature and conductivity. This relationship is linear up to 80°. This work proves that, the most stable O/W emulsion is determined via the determination of the maximum R² value by applying of the simple linear regression least squares method to the temperature-conductivity obtained data up to 80°, in addition to, the true maximum slope is represented by the equation which has the maximum R² value. Because the conditions would be changed in a more complex formulation, the method of the determination of the effective surfactants blend concentration was verified by applying it for more complex formulations of 2% O/W miconazole nitrate cream and the results indicate its reproducibility.

  11. Oxidative stability of pork emulsion containing tomato products and pink guava pulp during refrigerated aerobic storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Serlene; Chatli, Manish K; Biswas, Ashim K; Sahoo, Jhari

    2014-11-01

    Lipid oxidation-induced quality problems can be minimized with the use of natural antioxidants. Antioxidant potential of tomato puree (10 %; T-1), tomato pulp (12.5 %; T-2), lyophilized tomato peel (6 %; T-3), and pink guava pulp (10 %; T-4) was evaluated in raw pork emulsion during refrigerated storage for 9 days under aerobic packaging. The lycopene and β-carotene content varied in pork emulsion as T-3 > T-1 > T-2 > T-4 and decreased (P emulsions than in control. Overall, incorporation of tomato products and pink guava pulp improved the visual colour and odour scores of raw pork emulsion. These results indicated that tomato products and guava pulp can be utilized as sources of natural antioxidants in raw pork products to minimize lipid oxidation, off-odour development, and surface discolouration.

  12. Highly efficient separation of surfactant stabilized water-in-oil emulsion based on surface energy gradient and flame retardancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mengying; Peng, Shan; Deng, Wanshun; Miao, Xinrui; Wen, Ni; Zhou, Qiannan; Deng, Wenli

    2018-06-15

    Surface energy gradient would generate an imbalance force to drive tiny water droplets in dry air from the hydrophilic bumps to superhydrophobic domains, which has found on the Stenocara beetle's back. Inspired by this phenomenon, we introduced a pristine superhydrophilic filter paper on the lower surface energy superhydrophobic filter paper. ZnSn(OH) 6 particles and polydimethylsiloxane were mixed to prepare the superhydrophobic coating, and the coating was spray-coated on the poly(dialkyldimethylammonium chloride) covered filter paper to separate the span 80 stabilized water-in-isooctane emulsion. A pristine filter paper was added on the superhydrophobic filter paper to fabricate another membrane for separation. The results revealed that with a pristine filter paper, the membrane performed higher efficiency and more recyclability, and it could separate the emulsions with higher surfactant concentrations. The stabilized water droplets passed the superamphiphilic surface, and hindered by the superhydrophobic surface, generating a surface energy gradient for better separation. In addition, the superhydrophobic membrane could be protected from fire to some degree due to the introduced ZnSn(OH) 6 particles with excellent flame retardancy. This easy and efficient approach via simply bringing in pristine superhydrophilic membrane has great potential applications for water-in-oil emulsion separation or oil purification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Elaboration, characterization, and stability study of a sunscreen emulsion for use as a towelette application in pediatric photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clares, B; Gálvez, P; Gallardo, V; Ruiz, M A

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as much as 80% of the solar radiation that an adult receives throughout his/her life is received during the first 18 years (1). Skin protection against harmful solar radiation during this early stage of life is therefore a highly important factor in the prevention of future skin-related diseases. In this respect, recent developments in pediatric dermatology and cosmetic technology have led to remarkable improvements in child skin protection products. However, in spite of these scientific breakthroughs, many currently available commercial sunscreen formulations have not been well received by the general public, due to inadequate sensory properties, chemical instability, undesirable side effects, and low effectiveness. These disadvantages are not only attributable to the formulations themselves, active principle, and excipients, but also, to a large extent, galenic aspects. The objective of this work was to develop and characterize a sunscreen emulsion for pediatric use, using a towelette as vehicle, to overcome problems of ineffectiveness and formulation instability, and to improve skin-sensory properties. The composition of the towelette, the emulsion, and the presentation format were selected on the basis of the differences between children's and adult skin. In order to evaluate the chemical stability of the formulation, a study of the organoleptic, physicochemical, microbiological, and rheological characteristics was carried out at 4°, 25°, and 40°C over a period of 30 days. Tests were performed on both the sunscreen emulsion only and the same formulation impregnated within a towel, to test the influence the towel may have on the stability of the emulsion.

  14. Structure and stability of human hemoglobin microparticles prepared with a double emulsion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrati, N; Bonneaux, F; Labrude, P; Maincent, P

    1997-09-01

    Hemoglobin solutions can be used as blood substitutes but they present some disadvantages often due to their rapid removal from the bloodstream after injection. A possible way of overcoming this problem is to trap hemoglobin inside particles. This study deals with the preparation, structure and stability of poly(lactic acid) and ethylcellulose microparticles containing human hemoglobin obtained with a double emulsion technique. We investigated the manufacturing process of these particles in order to increase the encapsulation ratio of hemoglobin. For this purpose, some parameters involved in the procedure were optimized, such as hemoglobin concentration and duration of stirring: hemoglobin loading increases with its concentration in the preparation and well-defined stirring time avoids a leakage of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin concentration, surfactant concentration i.e. poly(vinylic alcohol), amounts of polymer and solvent (methylene chloride), duration and speed of stirring. The microparticles were prepared with satisfactory yields (60 to 73%). They were spherical and their mean size was lower than 200 microns. The functional properties of entrapped hemoglobin were studied. The encapsulation did not alter hemoglobin and the oxygen affinity of the hemoglobin remained unmodified (P50 about 13.9 mm Hg in a Bis-Tris buffer pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C). Moreover, only low levels of methemoglobin could be detected (less than 3%). Besides, about 90% of encapsulated hemoglobin could be released from microparticles, with a speed related to the internal structure of the particles. The prepared microparticles were stored during one month at +4 degrees C. No degradation of the particle structure occurred and the functional properties of hemoglobin were preserved. These particles could provide a potential source of oxygen in the field of biotechnologies but any application for a transfusional purpose would first require a drastic reduction in particle size.

  15. Effect of lipid viscosity and high-pressure homogenization on the physical stability of "Vitamin E" enriched emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Abu-Fayyad, Ahmed; Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem M; Sylvester, Paul W; Nazzal, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in vitamin E for its potential use in cancer therapy. The objective of this work was therefore to formulate a physically stable parenteral lipid emulsion to deliver higher doses of vitamin E than commonly used in commercial products. Specifically, the objectives were to study the effects of homogenization pressure, number of homogenizing cycles, viscosity of the oil phase, and oil content on the physical stability of emulsions fortified with high doses of vitamin E (up to 20% by weight). This was done by the use of a 27-run, 4-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken statistical design. Viscosity, homogenization pressure, and number of cycles were found to have a significant effect on particle size, which ranged from 213 to 633 nm, and on the percentage of vitamin E remaining emulsified after storage, which ranged from 17 to 100%. Increasing oil content from 10 to 20% had insignificant effect on the responses. Based on the results it was concluded that stable vitamin E rich emulsions could be prepared by repeated homogenization at higher pressures and by lowering the viscosity of the oil phase, which could be adjusted by blending the viscous vitamin E with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT).

  16. Impact of endogenous canola phenolics on the oxidative stability of oil‐in‐water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Friel, James; Winkler‐Moser, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of phenolics naturally present in canola seeds and meal. Individual phenolics were extracted from ground, defatted canola seeds, and meal. Fractionated extracts rich in sinapic acid, sinapine, or canolol as well as a non......‐fractionated extract were used. These extracts (100 and 350 µM) were evaluated as antioxidants in stripped canola oil‐in‐water (o/w) emulsion. For comparison, the antioxidative effect of phenolic standards for sinapic acid and sinapine (as sinapine thiocyanate) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BTH) as a positive control....... Therefore, these canola extracts can be used for protecting canola oil emulsion or other emulsions against lipid oxidation. However, the results indicate that the antioxidant activity of the extracts rich in sinapine and canolol had a concentration‐sensitive effect. In order to get the best antioxidative...

  17. Oxidative stability of pork emulsion containing tomato products and pink guava pulp during refrigerated aerobic storage

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Serlene; Chatli, Manish K.; Biswas, Ashim K.; Sahoo, Jhari

    2012-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-induced quality problems can be minimized with the use of natural antioxidants. Antioxidant potential of tomato puree (10 %; T-1), tomato pulp (12.5 %; T-2), lyophilized tomato peel (6 %; T-3), and pink guava pulp (10 %; T-4) was evaluated in raw pork emulsion during refrigerated storage for 9 days under aerobic packaging. The lycopene and β-carotene content varied in pork emulsion as T-3 > T-1 > T-2 > T-4 and decreased (P 

  18. STABILITY OF EMULSIFIER-FREE EMULSION COPOLYMERIZATION OF METHYL METHACRYLATE/ BUTYL ACRYLATE/SODIUM MONO(ETHYL POLYOXYETHYLENE) MALEATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-gen Zhang; Zhi-xue Weng; Zhi-ming Huang; Zu-ren Pan

    1999-01-01

    A series of new water-soluble bifunctional comonomers having both carboxyl and alkyl polyoxyethylene groups, such as sodium mono(ethyl polyoxyethylene) maleate (ZE series) with various molecular weights of polyoxyethylene ethyl ether, were synthesized and characterized. The effects of the structural factor, the amount and feeding mode of the comonomers, the initiator concentration and polymerization temperature on the stability of emulsifier-free emulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) in the presence of a small amount of ZE with potassium persulfate as initiator were investigated. Stable, almost monodispersed MMA/BA/ZE emulsifier-free latex particles were prepared.

  19. Effects of electron beam irradiated natural casings on the quality properties and shelf stability of emulsion sausage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Choi, Ji-Hun; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hack-Youn; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2012-01-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiated hog and sheep casings (1, 3, and 8 kGy) on the physicochemical properties and shelf stability of emulsion sausage was evaluated. There were no significant differences in pH, instrumental color, sensory properties (overall acceptability), and hardness between all the samples. The cooking yields for the irradiated treated samples were larger than that of the yields obtained for the non-irradiated samples for both the hog and sheep casing. The irradiated natural casings accelerated lipid oxidation, and inhibited the formation of volatile basic nitrogen and the increase in total aerobic bacteria. In conclusion, the natural casings irradiated below at a dose of 3 kGy had no effect on physicochemical and sensory properties of the emulsion sausages, however, that improved the shelf-stability over 5 weeks. Therefore, natural casings irradiated at moderate doses are suitable for sausage production. - Highlights: ► The effect of E-beam irradiated natural casings on sausage quality was evaluated. ► The use of irradiated casings improved shelf stability of sausage. ► Natural casings irradiated below 3 kGy are suitable for sausage production.

  20. Factors affecting the oxidative stability of omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    Omega-3 fatty acids are prone to lipid oxidation due to their unsaturated nature. In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the structure at the interface are therefore expected to be of great...

  1. Encapsulation of fish oil in nanofibers by emulsion electrospinning: Physical characterization and oxidative stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Moreno, Pedro Jesús; Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; van derKruijs, Jules

    2016-01-01

    The encapsulation of fish oil in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers by emulsion electrospinning was investigated. Independently of the emulsifier used, whey protein isolate (WPI) or fish protein hydrolysate (FPH), PVA concentration had a high influence on fiber morphology. Fibers without bead d...

  2. Histidine-functionalized carbon-based dot-Zinc(II) nanoparticles as a novel stabilizer for Pickering emulsion synthesis of polystyrene microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiyi, Li; Zaijun, Li; Junkang, Liu

    2017-05-01

    Carbon-based dots (CDs) are nanoparticles with size-dependent optical and electronic properties that have been widely applied in energy-efficient displays and lighting, photovoltaic devices and biological markers. However, conventional CDs are difficult to be used as ideal stabilizer for Pickering emulsion due to its irrational amphiphilic structure. The study designed and synthesized a new histidine-functionalized carbon dot-Zinc(II) nanoparticles, which is termed as His-CD-Zn. The His-CD was made via one-step hydrothermal treatment of histidine and maleic acid. The His-CD reacted with Zn 2+ to form His-CD-Zn. The as-prepared His-CD-Zn was used as a solid particle surfactant for stabilizing styrene-in-water emulsion. The Pickering emulsion exhibits high stability and sensitive pH-switching behaviour. The introduction of S 2 O 8 2- triggers the emulsion polymerization of styrene. The resulted polystyrene microsphere was well coated with His-CDs on the surface. It was successfully used as an ideal adsorbent for removal of heavy metallic ions from water with high adsorption capacity. The study also provides a prominent approach for fabrication of amphiphilic carbon-based nanoparticles for stabilizing Pickering emulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of Phospholipids and Tocopherols on the Oxidative Stability of Soybean Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samdani, Gautam K; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2018-04-18

    Phospholipids have been shown to act synergistically with tocopherols and delay lipid oxidation in bulk oil. The synergistic activity between phospholipids and tocopherols is due to the ability of amino-group-containing phospholipids (e.g., phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS)) to convert oxidized tocopherol back into tocopherols. This study shows the effect of PE and PS on the antioxidant activity of different tocopherol homologues in oil-in-water emulsions. Effect of emulsifier type on the interaction between tocopherols and phospholipids was also studied. δ-Tocopherol and PE exhibited greater antioxidant activity as compared to α-tocopherol and PE. PS displayed 1.5-3 times greater synergism than PE with Tween 20 as emulsifier whereas both PE and PS had a similar antioxidant activity in the presence of α-tocopherol when bovine serum albumin was used as the emulsifier. This study is the first to show that PE and PS can act synergistically with tocopherols to inhibit lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions and can present a new clean label antioxidant strategy for food emulsions.

  4. Biodistribution of emulsions stabilized with phosphatidylcholine-surfactant mixtures for neutron-capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kaoru; Miyamaoto, Masahito; Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu

    1999-01-01

    Here was conducted on a manufacturing pharmaceutical investigation to practise tumor accumulation of a sensitizer due to its body circulation. As blood vessel call wall of a newly formed tumorous vessel has a structure with high permeability, a particle with diameter of less than 100 nm can be emitted out of the blood vessel, and, as a result, it was well known that these super fine particles with high residual capacity in blood showed high accumulation and residual capacity in a tumorous texture. therefore, an emulsion pharmaceuticals with a diameter of less than 100 nm and modified at its surface with hydrophobic polymer to increase its residual capacity was prepared to investigate biodistribution by using tumor carrying animals. To a tracer of the emulsion, a hydrophobic derivative gadopentetic acid was used. As a result, it was found that the presently developed in-blood residual emulsion has possibility to become a career to transfer a sensitizer into tumor through body circulation. (G.K.)

  5. EVALUATION OF STABILITY OF EMULSION OIL / WATER FRONT OF THE USE OF DIFFERENT SURFACTANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cristina Wiedusch Sindelar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The reuse of waste generated by various industrial sectors is a practice that has been increasingly used due to impairment of industries with their social responsibility (environmental protection or the requirements of the protection of the environment, since many residues do not have proper disposal. In the processing industry in the reuse of stones is no different. This study aims to evaluate the reuse of the oil used as a lubricant in the stone processing industry, along with water, surfactants and corrosion. To prepare the emulsions samples were used of diesel oil as a lubricant used in the cutting industry this type of industry, plus the following surfactants: Tween 20, Tween 80, sodium lauryl ether sulphate and Cetiol HE. After completing the pH, viscosity, density and phase separation in these emulsions, the conclusion was reached that the surfactant Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulfate provided the best formulation. Using this result, new emulsions prepared with the surfactant Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulfate and an anticorrosive, in this case, sodium molybdate. In such solutions containing sodium molybdate were analyzed power anticorrosive this substance, using the SAE 1020 steel plates. After these analyzes, it was found that the addition of an anticorrosive may reduce or inhibit oxidation, but in other cases, as in this study, can promote oxidation even greater.

  6. Influence of asphaltene aggregation and pressure on crude oil emulsion stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auflem, Inge Harald

    2002-07-01

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions stabilised by various surface-active components are one of the major problems in relation to petroleum production. This thesis presents results from high-pressure separation experiments on ''live'' crude oil and model oil emulsions, as well as studies of Interactions between various indigenous stabilising materials in crude oil. A high-pressure separation rig was used to study the influence of gas and gas bubbles on the separation of water-in-crude oil emulsions. The results were interpreted as a flotation effect from rising gas bubbles, which led to increased separation efficiency. The separation properties of a ''live'' crude oil were compared to crude oil samples recombined with various gases. The results showed that water-in-oil emulsions produced from the ''live'' crude oil samples, generally separated faster and more complete, than emulsions based on recombined samples of the same crude oil. Adsorption of asphaltenes and resins onto a hydrophilic surface from solutions with varying aromatic/aliphatic character was investigated by a quarts crystal microbalance. The results showed that asphaltenes adsorbed to a larger degree than the resins. The resins were unable to desorb pre-adsorbed asphaltenes from the surface, and neither did they adsorb onto the asphaltene-coated surface. In solutions of both of resins and asphaltenes the two constituents associated in bulk liquid and adsorbed to the surface in the form of mixed aggregates. Near infrared spectroscopy and pulsed field gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance were used to study asphaltene aggregation and the influence of various amphiphiles on the asphaltene aggregate size. The results showed Interactions between the asphaltenes and various chemicals, which were proposed to be due to acid-base interactions. Among the chemicals used were various naphthenic acids. Synthesised monodisperse acids gave a reduction of size of the asphaltene aggregates, whereas polydisperse

  7. Influence of asphaltene aggregation and pressure on crude oil emulsion stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auflem, Inge Harald

    2002-07-01

    Water-in-crude oil emulsions stabilised by various surface-active components are one of the major problems in relation to petroleum production. This thesis presents results from high-pressure separation experiments on ''live'' crude oil and model oil emulsions, as well as studies of Interactions between various indigenous stabilising materials in crude oil. A high-pressure separation rig was used to study the influence of gas and gas bubbles on the separation of water-in-crude oil emulsions. The results were interpreted as a flotation effect from rising gas bubbles, which led to increased separation efficiency. The separation properties of a ''live'' crude oil were compared to crude oil samples recombined with various gases. The results showed that water-in-oil emulsions produced from the ''live'' crude oil samples, generally separated faster and more complete, than emulsions based on recombined samples of the same crude oil. Adsorption of asphaltenes and resins onto a hydrophilic surface from solutions with varying aromatic/aliphatic character was investigated by a quarts crystal microbalance. The results showed that asphaltenes adsorbed to a larger degree than the resins. The resins were unable to desorb pre-adsorbed asphaltenes from the surface, and neither did they adsorb onto the asphaltene-coated surface. In solutions of both of resins and asphaltenes the two constituents associated in bulk liquid and adsorbed to the surface in the form of mixed aggregates. Near infrared spectroscopy and pulsed field gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance were used to study asphaltene aggregation and the influence of various amphiphiles on the asphaltene aggregate size. The results showed Interactions between the asphaltenes and various chemicals, which were proposed to be due to acid-base interactions. Among the chemicals used were various naphthenic acids. Synthesised monodisperse acids gave a reduction of

  8. The influence of alkali fatty acids on the properties and the stability of parenteral O/W emulsions modified with solutol HS 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszello, K; Harnisch, S; Müller, R H; Müller, B W

    2000-03-01

    Arachis oil based parenteral O/W emulsions were prepared using soya bean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and different combinations of co-emulsifiers containing polyethylene glycol fatty acid esters (Solutol HS 15) and alkali fatty acids (sodium laurate, sodium stearate). The parameters measured were droplet size (both by photon correlation spectroscopy and laser diffractometry), pH and zeta potential. All emulsions were subjected to autoclaving. The addition of polyethylene glycol 12-hydroxy stearate (Solutol HS 15) led to a significant decrease of mean oil droplet size. For long-term stability the amount added turned out to be the most important factor. With increased amounts of Solutol HS 15 the packing density of the emulsifier layer and the zeta potential decreased leading to instability. The optimum load of Solutol HS 15 was found to be 15 micromol/ml. Alkali fatty acids markedly improved the physical stability of the emulsions. Improved stability properties conferred to emulsions by alkali fatty acids could be attributed to the zeta potential increase even in the presence of Solutol HS 15. Consequently a mixed emulsifier film was established in which the ionized fatty acids determined the interface charge. In addition to this a strengthening of the molecular interactions occurring between phospholipid and Solutol HS 15 emulsifier in the presence of ionized fatty acids at the O/W interface can be assumed (L. Rydhag, The importance of the phase behaviour of phospholipids for emulsion stability, Fette Seifen Anstrichm. 81 (1979) 168-173). Different co-emulsifier mixtures were shown to have a pronounced impact on the plasma protein adsorption onto emulsion droplets.

  9. Slowing the Starch Digestion by Structural Modification through Preparing Zein/Pectin Particle Stabilized Water-in-Water Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Feng; Guo, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Zhi-Li; Yang, Juan; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2018-04-25

    Slowing the digestion of starch is one of the dominant concerns in the food industry. A colloidal structural modification strategy for solving this problem was proposed in this work. Due to thermodynamic incompatibility between two biopolymers, water/water emulsion of waxy corn starch (WCS) droplets dispersed in a continuous aqueous guar gum (GG) was prepared, and zein particles (ZPs), obtained by antisolvent precipitation and pectin modification, were used as stabilizer. As the ratio of zein to pectin in the particles was 1:1, their wetting properties in the two polysaccharides were similar, which made them accumulate at the interface and cover the WCS-rich droplets. The analysis of digestibility curves indicated that a rapid (rate constant k 1 : 0.145 min -1 ) and a slow phase ( k 2 : 0.022 min -1 ) existed during WCS digestion. However, only one slow phase ( k 2 : 0.019 min -1 ) was found in the WCS/GG emulsion, suggesting that this structure was effective in slowing starch digestion.

  10. The Influence of Emulgator on Stability of Emulsion H3PO4 in Topo-Kerosene and Efficiency at Emulsion Membrane Extraction of La and Nd Concentrate Product of Monazite Sand Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purwani, MV.; Bintarti, AN.; Subagiono, R.

    2002-01-01

    The making of La and Nd concentrate from monazite sand have been done. The separation of La and Nd by emulsion 1M H 3 PO 4 in 5 % TOPO-Kerosene membrane extraction. The feed or aqueous phase was La and Nd concentrate in 1M HNO 3 . Emulgator Span-80 and Tween-80 were used to stabilize emulsion membrane. The influence parameters were percentage of Span-80 and ratio of Span-80 and Tween-80. After formation of emulsion membrane, the extraction process was carried out. Ratio of volume of feed : volume membrane phase = 1 : 1, ratio of volume of 5% TOPO - Kerosene : ratio of volume of 1M H 3 PO 4 1 : 1. The best yield were obtained time of emulsification was 10 minutes with the speed of emulsion was 6000 rpm and concentration of span-80 was 5%. At this condition was obtained the extraction efficiency of La was 55.55%, the extraction efficiency of Nd was 41.6% the stripping efficiency of La was 35.05%, the stripping efficiency of Nd was 87.32 %, the total efficiency of La was 19.46%, the total efficiency of Nd was 36.30% and Separation factor of Nd and La = 1.87. (author)

  11. Redox-initiated poly(methyl methcrylate) emulsion polymerizations stabilized with block copolymers based on poly(ethylene oxide), e-caprolactone and linoleic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, B.H.; Nabuurs, Tijs; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2009-01-01

    A redox initiating system, consisting of t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHPO), isoascorbic acid (iAA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ferric-sodium salt (FeEDTA) was employed in emulsion polymerizations of methyl methacrylate (MMA) at high solids contents of 30 wt % in water. The system was stabilized

  12. Redox-Initiated Poly(methyl methacrylate) Emulsion Polymerizations Stabilized with Block Copolymers Based on Methoxy-Poly(ethylene glycol), epsilon-Caprolactone, and Linoleic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Boonhua; Nabuurs, Tijs; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2009-01-01

    A redox initiating system, consisting of t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHPO), isoascorbic acid (iAA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ferric-sodium salt (FeEDTA) was employed in emulsion polymerizations of methyl methacrylate (MMA) at high solids contents of 30 wt % in water. The system was stabilized

  13. Effect of cross-linking of interfacial sodium caseinate by natural processing on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoon, Pui Yeu; Paul, Lake N; Burgner, John W; San Martin-Gonzalez, M Fernanda; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2014-04-02

    This study investigated how enzymatic cross-linking of interfacial sodium caseinate and emulsification, via high-pressure homogenization, influenced the intrinsic oxidative stability of 4% (w/v) menhaden oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by 1% (w/v) caseinate at pH 7. Oil oxidation was monitored by the ferric thiocyanate perioxide value assay. Higher homogenization pressure resulted in improved intrinsic emulsion oxidative stability, which is attributed to increased interfacial cross-linking as indicated by higher weighted average sedimentation coefficients of interfacial protein species (from 11.2 S for 0 kpsi/0.1 MPa to 18 S for 20 kpsi/137.9 MPa). Moderate dosage of transglutaminase at 0.5-1.0 U/mL emulsion enhanced intrinsic emulsion oxidative stability further, despite a contradictory reduction in the antioxidant property of cross-linked caseinate as tested by the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) assay. This implied the prominent role of cross-linked interfacial caseinate as a physical barrier for oxygen transfer, hence its efficacy in retarding oil oxidation.

  14. Physical and oxidative stability of fish oil-in-water emulsions fortified with enzymatic hydrolysates from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelichi, Sakhi; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Physical and oxidative stability of 5% (by weight) cod liver oil-in-water emulsions fortified with common carp (C. carpio) roe protein hydrolysate (CRPH) were examined. CRPH was obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of discarded roe by using Alcalase 2.4 L for 30, 60, 90, and 120 min to yield different...

  15. Specially Treated Aramid Fiber Stabilized Gel-Emulsions: Preparation of Porous Polymeric Monoliths and Highly Efficient Removing of Airborne HCHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianfei; Chen, Xiangli; Wang, Pei; Fu, Xuwei; Liu, Kaiqiang; Fang, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Porous polymeric monoliths with densities as low as ≈0.060 g cm -3 are prepared in a gel-emulsion template way, of which the stabilizer employed is a newly discovered acidified aramid fiber that is so efficient that 0.05% (w/v, accounts for continuous phase) is enough to gel the system. The porous monoliths as obtained can be dried at ambient conditions, avoiding energy-consuming processes. Importantly, the monoliths show selective adsorption to HCHO, and the corresponding adsorption capacity (M6) is ≈2700 mg g -1 , the best result that is reported until now. More importantly, the monoliths can be reused after drying. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Compatibility and Stability of VARUBI (Rolapitant) Injectable Emulsion Admixed with Intravenous Palonosetron Hydrochloride Injection and Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, George; Powers, Dan; Yeung, Stanley; Chen, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Prophylaxis or therapy with a combination of a neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist (RA), a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) RA, and dexamethasone is recommended by international antiemesis guidelines for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting for patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy and for selected patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. VARUBI (rolapitant) is a substance P/NK-1 RA that was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an injectable emulsion in combination with other antiemetic agents in adults for the prevention of delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, including, but not limited to, highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Palonosetron is one of the 5-HT3 RAs indicated for the prevention of nausea and/or vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of emetogenic cancer therapy, including high-dose cisplatin. Herein, we describe the physical and chemical compatibility and stability of VARUBI injectable emulsion (166.5 mg/92.5 mL [1.8 mg/mL, free base], equivalent to 185 mg of rolapitant hydrochloride) admixed with palonosetron injection 0.25 mg free base in 5 mL (equivalent to 0.28 mg hydrochloride salt) and with either 5 mL (20 mg) or 2.5 mL (10 mg) of dexamethasone sodium phosphate. Admixtures were prepared and stored in VARUBI injectable emulsion ready-to-use glass vials as supplied by the rolapitant manufacturer and in four types of commonly used intravenous administration (tubing) sets. Assessment of the physical and chemical compatibility and stability of the admixtures in the VARUBI ready-to-use vials stored at room temperature (20°C to 25°C) under fluorescent light and under refrigeration (2°C to 8°C protected from light) was conducted at 0, 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours, and that of the admixtures in the intravenous tubing sets was evaluated at 0, 2, and 6 hours of storage at 20°C to 25°C. Physical stability

  17. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall conditioning, and AASHTO T-283 tests and to evaluate the long-term stripping susceptibility of CBETB while also predicting the liquid antistripping additives to assess the mixture’s durability and workability. Specimens were stabilized with Portland cement (0%–6%, bitumen emulsion (0%–5%, and Portland cement-bitumen emulsion mixtures and cured for 7 days, and their short- and long-term performances were studied. Evaluation results of both the Marshall stability ratio and the tensile strength ratio show that the additions of additives increase the resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage. Results of durability tests performed for determining the resistance of compacted specimens to repeated FT cycles indicate that the specimen with the 4% cement-3% bitumen emulsion mixture significantly improves water absorption, volume changes, and weight losses. This indicates the effectiveness of this additive as a road base stabilizer with excellent engineering properties for cold regions.

  18. Simulation of emulsion copolymerization reactions in a continuous pulsed sieve-plate column reactor

    OpenAIRE

    C. Sayer; R. Giudici

    2004-01-01

    This work addressed the viability of using a pulsed sieve-plate column reactor to carry out continuous vinyl acetate/butyl acrylate emulsion copolymerization reactions. A rigorous mathematical model of emulsion copolymerization reactions in a tubular reactor with axial dispersion was used for this purpose. Operational conditions were defined to attain high monomer conversions at the reactor outlet in a relatively short residence time and, at the same time, produce a copolymer with a more homo...

  19. Simulation of emulsion copolymerization reactions in a continuous pulsed sieve-plate column reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayer C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addressed the viability of using a pulsed sieve-plate column reactor to carry out continuous vinyl acetate/butyl acrylate emulsion copolymerization reactions. A rigorous mathematical model of emulsion copolymerization reactions in a tubular reactor with axial dispersion was used for this purpose. Operational conditions were defined to attain high monomer conversions at the reactor outlet in a relatively short residence time and, at the same time, produce a copolymer with a more homogeneous composition.

  20. Rheological characterization and stability study of an emulsion made with a dairy by-product enriched with omega-3 fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela María Ormaza ZAPATA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study involved a rheological characterization of a W/O emulsion manufactured on a pilot scale using omega-3 fatty acids as part of the oil phase and butter milk as the emulsifier. Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids are essential to prevent cardiovascular diseases, improve pulmonary function and also form part of the neurological structure. Buttermilk is a by-product of the dairy industry and has a high organic load which possesses surfactant properties and constitutes a good substitute for conventional emulsifiers in the food industry. The microstructural nature of the emulsion was characterized from the viscoelastic parameters and mechanical spectra. The linear viscoelastic range was determined, from which the maximum stress that the emulsion could withstand from the processing conditions without altering its microstructure was established. In addition, the storage stability of the emulsion was studied to instrumentally predict the rheological behaviour before sensory destabilization of the emulsion was observed. At the frequencies used, a significant decrease in dynamic viscoelastic parameters was periodically observed (G 'and G'', showing a structural change during storage. Furthermore, a coalescence phenomenon was observed after 18 months. The formulation with added omega-3 fatty acids and buttermilk provided a basis for obtaining a functional food as well as adding value to an industrial by-product.

  1. Study on some characteristics of nuclear emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonglian, Liu; Jinqin, Han; Huichang, Liu [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1993-11-01

    The authors describe the variation of some characteristics of the nuclear emulsion such as sensitivity, fog density and latent image stability influenced by adding ascorbic acid into the finished emulsion N-4. A comparative study of latent image stability is made between Fuji ET-7B nuclear emulsion and authors' under different temperature and relative humidity. The result indicates that the addition of ascorbic acid obviously improves the latent image stability of the emulsion N-4. The Fuji ET-7B emulsion and the emulsion N-4 containing ascorbic acid have similar latent image fading quality at lower temperature while the Japanese sample does have better quality at room temperature.

  2. Reversed phase HPLC analysis of stability and microstructural effects on degradation kinetics of β-carotene encapsulated in freeze-dried maltodextrin-emulsion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnkarnsujarit, Nathdanai; Charoenrein, Sanguansri; Roos, Yrjö H

    2012-09-26

    Degradation of dispersed lipophilic compounds in hydrophilic solids depends upon matrix stability and lipid physicochemical properties. This study investigated effects of solid microstructure and size of lipid droplets on the stability of dispersed β-carotene in freeze-dried systems. Emulsions of β-carotene in sunflower oil were dispersed in maltodextrin systems (M040/DE6, M100/DE11, and M250/DE25.5) (8% w/w oil) and prefrozen at various freezing conditions prior to freeze-drying to control nucleation and subsequent pore size and structural collapse of freeze-dried solids. The particle size, physical state, and β-carotene contents of freeze-dried emulsions were measured during storage at various water activity (a(w)) using a laser particle size analyzer, differential scanning calorimeter, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The results showed that M040 stabilized emulsions in low temperature freezing exhibited lipid crystallization. Collapse of solids in storage at a(w) which plasticized systems to the rubbery state led to flow and increased the size of oil droplets. Degradation of β-carotene analyzed using a reversed-phase C(30) column followed first-order kinetics. Porosity of solids had a major effect on β-carotene stability; however, the highest stability was found in fully plasticized and collapsed solids.

  3. Preparation and characterization of quercetin-loaded silica microspheres stabilized by combined multiple emulsion and sol-gel processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite exhibiting a wide spectrum of cosmeceutical properties, flavonoids and related compounds have some limitations related to their stability and solubility in distilledwater. In this project, we prepared silica microspheres using a novel method that uses polyol-in-oil-in-water (P/O/W emulsion and sol-gel methods as techniques for stabilizing quercetin. A stable microsphere suspension was successfully preparedusing a mixed solvent system comprising a polyol-phase medium for performing the sol-gel processing of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as an inorganic precursor with outer water phase. The morphology of the microsphere was evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, which showed a characteristic spherical particle shape with a smooth surface. Furthermore, SEM/EDSanalysis of a representative microsphere demonstrated that the inner structure of the silica microspheres was filled with quercetin. The mean diameter of the microsphere was in the range 20.6-35.0 μm, and the encapsulation efficiency ranged from 17.8% to 27.5%. The free and encapsulated quercetin samples were incubated in separateaqueous solutions at 25 and 42°C for 28 days. The residualcontent of the quercetin encapsulated by silica microspheres was 82% at 42°C. In contrast, that of the free quercetin stored at 42°C decreased to ~24%.

  4. Release behavior and stability of encapsulated D-limonene from emulsion-based edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzo, Eva; Debeaufort, Frédéric; Sensidoni, Alessandro; Tat, Lara; Beney, Laurent; Hambleton, Alicia; Peressini, Donatella; Voilley, Andrée

    2012-12-12

    Edible films may act as carriers of active molecules, such as flavors. This possibility confers to them the status of active packaging. Two different film-forming biopolymers, gluten and ι-carrageenans, have been compared. D-Limonene was added to the two film formulations, and its release kinetics from emulsion-based edible films was assessed with HS-SPME. Results obtained for edible films were compared with D-limonene released from the fatty matrix called Grindsted Barrier System 2000 (GBS). Comparing ι-carrageenans with gluten-emulsified film, the latter showed more interesting encapsulating properties: in fact, D-limonene was retained by gluten film during the process needed for film preparation, and it was released gradually during analysis time. D-Limonene did not show great affinity to ι-carrageenans film, maybe due to high aroma compound hydrophobicity. Carvone release from the three different matrices was also measured to verify the effect of oxygen barrier performances of edible films to prevent D-limonene oxidation. Further investigations were carried out by FT-IR and liquid permeability measurements. Gluten film seemed to better protect D-limonene from oxidation. Gluten-based edible films represent an interesting opportunity as active packaging: they could retain and release aroma compounds gradually, showing different mechanical and nutritional properties from those of lipid-based ingredients.

  5. The Effect of Perilla frutescens Extract on the Oxidative Stability of Model Food Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skowyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyphenolic profile of leaves and stalks of Perilla frutescens, was assessed as a source of natural antioxidants. The amount of caffeic and rosmarinic acids, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, were 0.51 mg/g dry weight (DW and 2.29 mg/g DW, respectively. The measurement of scavenging capacity against the 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical cation, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP were 65.03 mg Trolox equivalents (TE/g DW, 179.60 mg TE/g DW and 44.46 mg TE/g DW, respectively. P. frutescens extracts also showed good antioxidant properties in 10% sunflower oil-in-water emulsions during storage at 32 °C. Perilla extract at 320 ppm was as effective as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA at 20 ppm in slowing down the formation of hydroperoxides as measured by peroxide value, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and hexanal content. The results of this study indicate that extract of P. frutescens may be suitable for use in the food matrix to help achieve potential health benefits.

  6. Preparation and Oxidation Stability Evaluation of Tea Polyphenols-Loaded Inverse Micro-Emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiaohong; Sun, Jingjing; Yang, Ying; Chen, Mengjie; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Jinhong; Wang, Zhengwu

    2017-05-01

    Compared to synthetic antioxidants, tea polyphenols (TPs) has its own advantages in edible oil industry, however, the hydrophilic properties have restricted its applications. In this study, the ternary phase diagram of TPs-loaded micro-emulsion (ME) system was constructed, in which glyceryl monooleate (GMO), Tween80, linoleic acid as the surfactants, ethanol as the co-surfactant and soybean, corn, sunflower oil as the oil phase, have been used for the preparation of ME. The results indicated that a composition of ME (57.5% oil, 18% Tween80, 18% GMO, 4% Linolic acid, and 2.5% water+ethanol) could dissolve maximum water and could stable for 2 mo at room temperature with an average diameter of 6 to 7 nm, as detected by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The loaded of TPs into ME led to an increase of particle size to 15 to 16 nm, due to increased polarity of the water phase. The antioxidant capacity of TPs in ME was characterized by the peroxide value (POV) method. The addition of 1% water phase with 0.1 g/mL TPs could retain the POV at low value for 30 d at accelerating temperature 50 °C. Meanwhile, comparing the three edible oil, ME with corn oil has lower conductivity and higher value of POV during the storage. This work provides an efficient and environmentally friendly approach for the preparation of TPs-loaded ME, which is beneficial to the application of TPs in edible oil. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  7. Electrochemically driven emulsion inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyösti

    2007-09-01

    It is shown that emulsions stabilized by ionic surfactants can be inverted by controlling the electrical potential across the oil-water interface. The potential dependent partitioning of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by cyclic voltammetry at the 1,2-dichlorobenzene|water interface. In the emulsion the potential control was achieved by using a potential-determining salt. The inversion of a 1,2-dichlorobenzene-in-water (O/W) emulsion stabilized by SDS was followed by conductometry as a function of added tetrapropylammonium chloride. A sudden drop in conductivity was observed, indicating the change of the continuous phase from water to 1,2-dichlorobenzene, i.e. a water-in-1,2-dichlorobenzene emulsion was formed. The inversion potential is well in accordance with that predicted by the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation if the interfacial potential is appropriately accounted for.

  8. Virgin olive oil and biophenols in oil-in-water food emulsions: stability and interactions in relation to the release of aroma compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Caporaso, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The use of olive oil in several food products as been increasing in the past few years due to its healthy fatty acid composition, content of phenolic compounds and appreciated flavour. The addition of natural phenolic compounds in foods is also an interesting issue for researchers and food industry, as several challenges have to be addressed, such as lipid oxidation and the effects on the physical stability over storage. Usually, emulsions used as sauce or dressing creams are not formulated w...

  9. Formulation and Stabilization of Concentrated Edible Oil-in-Water Emulsions Based on Electrostatic Complexes of a Food-Grade Cationic Surfactant (Ethyl Lauroyl Arginate) and Cellulose Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Long; Xiang, Wenchao; Huan, Siqi; Rojas, Orlando J

    2018-05-14

    We report on high-internal-phase, oil-in-water Pickering emulsions that are stable against coalescence during storage. Viscous, edible oil (sunflower) was emulsified by combining naturally derived cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and a food-grade, biobased cationic surfactant obtained from lauric acid and L-arginine (ethyl lauroyl arginate, LAE). The interactions between CNC and LAE were elucidated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and supplementary techniques. LAE adsorption on CNC surfaces and its effect on nanoparticle electrostatic stabilization, aggregation state, and emulsifying ability was studied and related to the properties of resultant oil-in-water emulsions. Pickering systems with tunable droplet diameter and stability against oil coalescence during long-term storage were controllably achieved depending on LAE loading. The underlying stabilization mechanism was found to depend on the type of complex formed, the LAE structures adsorbed on the cellulose nanoparticles (as unimer or as adsorbed admicelles), the presence of free LAE in the aqueous phase, and the equivalent alkane number of the oil phase (sunflower and dodecane oils were compared). The results extend the potential of CNC in the formulation of high-quality and edible Pickering emulsions. The functional properties imparted by LAE, a highly effective molecule against food pathogens and spoilage organisms, open new opportunities in food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical applications, where the presence of CNC plays a critical role in achieving synergistic effects with LAE.

  10. Functionalities of chitosan conjugated with stearic acid and gallic acid and application of the modified chitosan in stabilizing labile aroma compounds in an oil-in-water emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tsung-Shi; Liu, Tai-Ti; Lin, I-Hwa

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this research were to conjugate chitosan (CT) with stearic acid (SA) and gallic acid (GA), and apply the modified chitosan to stabilize labile aroma compounds such as allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and limonene in oil-in-water emulsions. Generally, the antioxidant activity of CT-SA-GA increased as the GA content in the conjugate increased. In most assays, GA had a lower IC 50 value than that of CT-SA-GA; however, CT-SA-GA exhibited better performance than GA in the Fe 2+ -chelating activity. In accelerated tests (heating or illumination) for evaluating the chemical stability of AITC and limonene during storage, CT-SA and CT-SA-GA were used to prepare AITC and limonene O/W emulsions, respectively. Tween 80 and Span 80 (T-S-80), an emulsifier mixture, were used as a control in both emulsions for comparison. The results show that CT-SA or CT-SA-GA could protect AITC or limonene from degradation or oxidation more effectively than T-S-80. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative stability of fish and algae oils containing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in bulk and in oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, E.N.; Satue-Gracia, T.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2002-01-01

    from algae are unusually stable to oxidation, Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) prevented oxidation of both fish and algal oil emulsions without added iron and at low iron:EDTA molar concentrations. EDTA, however, promoted the oxidation of the corresponding emulsions that contained...... high iron:EDTA ratios. Therefore, to be effective as a metal chelator, EDTA must be added at molar concentrations higher than that of iron to inhibit oxidation of foods containing long-chain PUFA from either fish or algae and fortified with iron.......The oxidative stability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing fish and algae oils varies widely according to their fatty acid composition, the physical and colloidal states of the lipids, the contents of tocopherols and other antioxidants...

  12. From bijels to Pickering emulsions: A lattice Boltzmann study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, F.; Harting, J.

    2011-01-01

    Particle stabilized emulsions are ubiquitous in the food and cosmetics industry, but our understanding of the influence of microscopic fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions on the macroscopic rheology is still limited. In this paper we present a simulation algorithm based on a

  13. Emulsion properties of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Vereijken, J.M.; Merck, K.B.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Emulsions were made with sunflower protein isolate (SI), helianthinin, and sunflower albumins (SFAs). Emulsion formation and stabilization were studied as a function of pH and ionic strength and after heat treatment of the proteins. The emulsions were characterized with respect to average droplet

  14. Creating nanoscale emulsions using condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Ingrid F; Anand, Sushant; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2017-11-08

    Nanoscale emulsions are essential components in numerous products, ranging from processed foods to novel drug delivery systems. Existing emulsification methods rely either on the breakup of larger droplets or solvent exchange/inversion. Here we report a simple, scalable method of creating nanoscale water-in-oil emulsions by condensing water vapor onto a subcooled oil-surfactant solution. Our technique enables a bottom-up approach to forming small-scale emulsions. Nanoscale water droplets nucleate at the oil/air interface and spontaneously disperse within the oil, due to the spreading dynamics of oil on water. Oil-soluble surfactants stabilize the resulting emulsions. We find that the oil-surfactant concentration controls the spreading behavior of oil on water, as well as the peak size, polydispersity, and stability of the resulting emulsions. Using condensation, we form emulsions with peak radii around 100 nm and polydispersities around 10%. This emulsion formation technique may open different routes to creating emulsions, colloidal systems, and emulsion-based materials.

  15. Influence of Surfactant Structure on the Stability of Water-in-Oil Emulsions under High-Temperature High-Salinity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhalim I. A. Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emulsified water-in-oil (W/O systems are extensively used in the oil industry for water control and acid stimulation. Emulsifiers are commonly utilized to emulsify a water-soluble material to form W/O emulsion. The selection of a particular surfactant for such jobs is critical and certainly expensive. In this work, the impact of surfactant structure on the stability of W/O emulsions is investigated using the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB of the surfactant. Different commercial surfactants were evaluated for use as emulsifiers for W/O systems at high-temperature (up to 120°C high-salinity (221,673 ppm HTHS conditions. Diverse surfactants were examined including ethoxylates, polyethylene glycols, fluorinated surfactants, and amides. Both commercial Diesel and waste oil are used for the oleic phase to prepare the emulsified system. Waste oil has shown higher stability (less separation in comparison with Diesel. This work has successfully identified stable emulsified W/O systems that can tolerate HTHS environments using HLB approach. Amine Acetate family shows higher stability in comparison with Glycol Ether family and at even lower concentration. New insights into structure-surfactant stability relationship, beyond the HLB approach, are provided for surfactant selection.

  16. Influence of non-migratory metal-chelating active packaging film on food quality: impact on physical and chemical stability of emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Decker, Eric A; McClements, D Julian; Goddard, Julie M

    2014-05-15

    Previously, we developed a novel metal-chelating packaging film (PP-g-PAA) by grafting acrylic acid (AA) monomer from polypropylene (PP) film surface, and demonstrated its potential in controlling iron-promoted lipid oxidation. Herein, we further established the industrial practicality of this active film. Specifically, the influence of film surface area-to-product volume ratio (SA/V) and product pH on the application of the film was investigated using an oil-in-water emulsion system. The films equally inhibited lipid oxidation throughout the range of SA/V ratios tested (2-8 cm(2)/ml). PP-g-PAA films were most effective at pH 7.0, and the activity decreased with decreasing pH. The particle size examination of emulsions indicated no adverse influence from the active film on the stability of this emulsion system. FTIR analysis suggested a non-migratory nature of PP-g-PAA films. These results provide fundamental knowledge that will facilitate the application of this effective and economical active packaging film in the food industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Porous Polystyrene Monoliths and Microparticles Prepared from Core Cross-linked Star (CCS) Polymers-Stabilized Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qijing; Shi, Ting; Han, Fei; Li, Zihan; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng

    2017-08-17

    A hydrophobic CCS polymer of poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA) was prepared in toluene by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated dispersion polymerization. The CCS polymer, with poly(benzyl methacrylate) as the arm and crosslinked N, N'-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) as the core, was confirmed by characterization with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Three kinds of oils (toluene, anisole and styrene) were chosen to study the emulsification properties of PBzMA CCS polymer. The oils can be emulsified by CCS polymer to form water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. Moreover, w/o high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) can be obtained with the increase of toluene and styrene volume fractions from 75% to 80%. Porous polystyrene monolith and microparticles were prepared from the emulsion templates and characterized by the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). With the internal phase volume fraction increased, open-pore porous monolith was obtained.

  18. Impact of Endogenous Phenolics in Canola Oil on the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Friel, James; Moser, Jill

    canola seeds. Fractionated extracts of Sinapic acid, Sinapine and Canolol was used as well as a non fractionated extract. These extracts was added (100 and 350 μM) to 10% o/w emulsion with stripped canola oil in order to evaluate their effect on lipid oxidation in emulsions. For comparison......Canola oil is low in saturated fat, high in monounsaturated fat and has a favourable omega-6:omega-3 ratio . Therefore, Canola oil has a healthier fatty acid profile compared to other plant oils such as soy oil. Therefore, canola oil is also an ingredient in many food products. However, the content...... of unsaturated lipid makes canola oil susceptible towards lipid oxidation. Many food products are lipid containing emulsions and a lot of efforts have been put into developing methods to protect the lipids against oxidation. Since lipid oxidation has a negative influence on the shelf life of the foods, efficient...

  19. Relating the variation of secondary structure of gelatin at fish oil-water interface to adsorption kinetics, dynamic interfacial tension and emulsion stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huihua; Wang, Bo; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relationship between secondary structure of gelatin and its adsorption at the fish-oil/water interface and to quantify the implication of the adsorption on the dynamic interfacial tension (DST) and emulsion stability. The surface hydrophobicity of the gelatin solutions decreased when the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, while opposite tend was observed in the viscosity of the solution. The DST values decreased as the pH increased from 4.0 to 6.0, indicating that higher positive charges (measured trough zeta potential) in the gelatin solution tended to result in higher DST values. The adsorption kinetics of the gelatin solution was examined through the calculated diffusion coefficients (Deff). The addition of acid promoted the random coil and β-turn structures at the expense of α-helical structure. The addition of NaOH decreased the β-turn and increased the α-helix and random coil. The decrease in the random coil and triple helix structures in the gelatin solution resulted into increased Deff values. The highest diffusion coefficients, the highest emulsion stability and the lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures were observed at pH=4.8. The lowest amount of random coil and triple helix structures in the interfacial protein layer correlated with the highest stability of the emulsion (highest ESI value). The lower amount of random coil and triple helix structures allowed higher coverage of the oil-water interface by relatively highly ordered secondary structure of gelatin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Estabilidade de emulsões de d-limoneno em quitosana modificada Stability of d-limonene emulsions in modified chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Borgognoni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A quitosana é um biopolímero produzido a partir da quitina, presente na casca de crustáceos. Atualmente, o estudo de suas propriedades se deve às suas diversas utilizações nas áreas farmacêutica e alimentícia. A quitosana utilizada neste estudo foi quimicamente modificada para tornar-se solúvel em água (quitosana succinilada. Estudou-se a estabilidade de emulsões com d-limoneno para que estes dados sejam úteis na sua posterior utilização como agente de encapsulação de d-limoneno por liofilização. Sua estabilidade foi analisada por espectrofotometria, em diferentes temperaturas, e por cromatografia gasosa associada à técnica da análise do espaço livre, à temperatura ambiente. Sua caracterização foi feita por microscopia óptica. Emulsões de maltodextrina com d-limoneno foram utilizadas para comparação já que maltodextrinas são muito usadas como agentes de encapsulação de aromas. Observou-se boa estabilidade de emulsões de quitosana succinilada com d-limoneno ao longo do tempo e características muito distintas em relação às observadas em emulsões de maltodextrina com d-limoneno. Pode-se concluir neste estudo que emulsões de quitosana succinilada com d-limoneno apresentaram características favoráveis à encapsulação de aromas.Chitosan is a biopolymer derived from chitin, a component of the shells of crustaceans. Recently, special attention has been given to the study of chitosan properties as a consequence of their wide application in pharmaceutical and food areas. In this study, the chitosan used was chemically modified in order to become water soluble (succinyl chitosan. The stability of succinyl chitosan emulsion with d-limonene was studied so that these results could be useful in a subsequent use of succinyl chitosan as a d-limonene encapsulating agent by lyophilization. The stability of the emulsion was analyzed using a spectrophotometer in different temperatures and by the headspace

  1. A soluble star-shaped silsesquioxane-cored polymer-towards novel stabilization of pH-dependent high internal phase emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yuxiu; Peng, Jun; Xu, Kai; Gao, Shuxi; Gui, Xuefeng; Liang, Shengyuan; Sun, Longfeng; Chen, Mingcai

    2017-08-30

    A well-defined pH-responsive star-shaped polymer containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) arms and a cage-like methacryloxypropyl silsesquioxane (CMSQ-T 10 ) core was used as an interfacial stabilizer for emulsions consisting of m-xylene and water. We explored the properties of the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer using the characteristic results of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential and conductivity measurements. The interfacial tension results showed that the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer reduced the interfacial tension between water and oil in a pH-dependent manner. Gelled high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) including o/w and w/o types were formed in the pH ranges of 1.2-5.8 and 9.1-12.3 with the CMSQ/PDMA star-shaped polymer as a stabilizer, when the oil fractions were 80-90 vol% and 10-20 vol%, respectively. The soluble star-shaped polymer aggregated spontaneously to form a microgel that adsorbed to the two immiscible phases. Images of the fluorescently labeled polymers demonstrated that there was a star-shaped polymer in the continuous phase, and the non-Pickering stabilization based on the percolating network of the star-shaped polymer also contributed to the stabilization of the HIPE. This pH-dependent HIPE was prepared with a novel stabilization mechanism consisting of microgel adsorption and non-Pickering stabilization. Moreover, the preparation of HIPEs provided the possibility of their application in porous materials and responsive materials.

  2. Study of chemical stability of lemon oil components in sodium caseinate-lactose glycoconjugate-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabik, Hassan; Achouri, Allaoua; Alfaro, Maria; Pelletier, Marylène; Belanger, Denis; Britten, Michel; Fustier, Patrick

    2014-07-25

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method was developed to quantify lemon oil components and their degradation products in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate-heated-lactose (NaC-T + Lact) glycoconjugates as wall materials at two pH values (3.0 and 6.8). NaC-T + Lact conjugates had a significantly lower solubility at both pHs. Hydrolysis prior to glycation enhanced the solubility of glycoconjugates. Glycation with lactose did not improve the emulsion activity of NaC, while caseinate glycoconjugates showed much stronger antioxidant activity than the NaC-control sample. This might be due to the presence of melanoidins formed between the sugar and amino acid compounds as supported by the increase in browning intensity. Among the SPME-fibres tested, carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) provided better results in terms of sensitivity and selectivity for oil lemon components and their degradation products. Storage studies of these emulsions demonstrated that glycated NaC-T + Lact showed protection against peroxidation compared to the control. However, acidic pH conditions altered their stability over storage time. The major off-flavor components (α-terpineol and carvone) were inhibited in emulsions stabilized with glycated NaC, particularly at pH 6.8. The use of NaC-T + Lact conjugates showed improved encapsulation efficiency and stability and could be used as potential food ingredient-emulsifiers for stabilising citrus oils against oxidative degradation in food and beverage applications.

  3. Experimental and theoretical approach to the assessment of stability criteria for safe transport of ammonium nitrate based emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabiano, B.; Kersten, R.J.A.; Barbucci, A.; Boers, M.N.

    2013-01-01

    The safety issues connected to storage and transportation of ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate emulsions are to be considered of primary importance, as demonstrated by the Tolouse explosion and various handling and storage accidents in different countries. This paper is focused on the assessment

  4. The physicochemical stability and in vitro bioaccessibility of beta-carotene in oil-in- water sodium caseinate emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beta-carotene (BC), the most important dietary source of provitamin A, is necessary for optimum human health. BC is insoluble or only slightly soluble in most liquids but its bioavailability improves when ingested with fat. Therefore lipid emulsions are ideal matrices for BC delivery. BC (0.1%) in ...

  5. Stability studies of cosmetic emulsions prepared from natural products such as wine, grape seed oil and mastic resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glampedaki, P.; Dutschk, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made in this study to use diluted wine as the aqueous phase and grapeseed oil as the oil phase for the preparation of oil-in-water cosmetic emulsions. Two monovarietal wines of Hellenic origin were used in this study; a red one from Sangiovese grapes and a white one from Muscat of

  6. The stability of emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woods, Donald R.

    Recent work on the film thinning behavior during the coalescence of oil drops in water is summarized. In the experimental work, color movies were taken of the light interference patterns produced by the thin film of water trapped between the rising drop and the bulk oil phase. The drops were

  7. Simulation of SBWR startup transient and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.S.; Khan, H.J.; Rohatgi, U.S.

    1998-01-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) designed by General Electric is a natural circulation reactor with enhanced safety features for potential accidents. It has a strong coupling between power and flow in the reactor core, hence the neutronic coupling with thermal-hydraulics is specially important. The potential geysering instability during the early part of a SBWR startup at low flow, low power and low pressure is of particular concern. The RAMONA-4B computer code developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the SBWR has been used to simulate a SBWR startup transient and evaluate its stability, using a simplified four-channel representation of the reactor core for the thermal-hydraulics. This transient was run for 20,000 sec (5.56 hrs) in order to cover the essential aspect of the SBWR startup. The simulation showed that the SBWR startup was a very challenging event to analyze as it required accurate modeling of the thermal-hydraulics at low pressures. This analysis did not show any geysering instability during the startup, following the startup procedure as proposed by GE

  8. Dynamic large eddy simulation: Stability via realizability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    The concept of dynamic large eddy simulation (LES) is highly attractive: such methods can dynamically adjust to changing flow conditions, which is known to be highly beneficial. For example, this avoids the use of empirical, case dependent approximations (like damping functions). Ideally, dynamic LES should be local in physical space (without involving artificial clipping parameters), and it should be stable for a wide range of simulation time steps, Reynolds numbers, and numerical schemes. These properties are not trivial, but dynamic LES suffers from such problems over decades. We address these questions by performing dynamic LES of periodic hill flow including separation at a high Reynolds number Re = 37 000. For the case considered, the main result of our studies is that it is possible to design LES that has the desired properties. It requires physical consistency: a PDF-realizable and stress-realizable LES model, which requires the inclusion of the turbulent kinetic energy in the LES calculation. LES models that do not honor such physical consistency can become unstable. We do not find support for the previous assumption that long-term correlations of negative dynamic model parameters are responsible for instability. Instead, we concluded that instability is caused by the stable spatial organization of significant unphysical states, which are represented by wall-type gradient streaks of the standard deviation of the dynamic model parameter. The applicability of our realizability stabilization to other dynamic models (including the dynamic Smagorinsky model) is discussed.

  9. Bioaccessibility and Cellular Uptake of β-Carotene Encapsulated in Model O/W Emulsions: Influence of Initial Droplet Size and Emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial emulsion structure (droplet size and emulsifier on the properties of β-carotene-loaded emulsions and the bioavailability of β-carotene after passing through simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT digestion were investigated. Exposure to GIT significantly changed the droplet size, surface charge and composition of all emulsions, and these changes were dependent on their initial droplet size and the emulsifiers used. Whey protein isolate (WPI-stabilized emulsion showed the highest β-carotene bioaccessibility, while sodium caseinate (SCN-stabilized emulsion showed the highest cellular uptake of β-carotene. The bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated β-carotene based on the results of bioaccessibility and cellular uptake showed the same order with the results of cellular uptake being SCN > TW80 > WPI. An inconsistency between the results of bioaccessibility and bioavailability was observed, indicating that the cellular uptake assay is necessary for a reliable evaluation of the bioavailability of emulsion-encapsulated compounds. The findings in this study contribute to a better understanding of the correlation between emulsion structure and the digestive fate of emulsion-encapsulated nutrients, which make it possible to achieve controlled or potential targeted delivery of nutrients by designing the structure of emulsion-based carriers.

  10. Recovery of synthetic dye from simulated wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane process containing tri-dodecyl amine as a mobile carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, N., E-mail: norasikin@cheme.utm.my [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Zailani, S.N.; Mili, N. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emulsion liquid membrane process for synthetic reactive dyes recovery was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobile carriers of tri-dodycylamine and salicyclic acid was used in formulation to remove the reactive dyes from simulated wastewater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost 100% of dye was extracted and recovered in receiving phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An electrical field was used to breakdown the emulsion to separate the liquid membrane and receiving/recovery phase. - Abstract: The extraction of Red 3BS reactive dye from aqueous solution was studied using emulsion liquid membrane (ELM). ELM is one of the processes that have very high potential in treating industrial wastewater consisting of dyes. In this research, Red 3BS reactive dye was extracted from simulated wastewater using tridodecylamine (TDA) as the carrier agent, salicyclic acid (SA) to protonate TDA, sodium chloride as the stripping agent, kerosene as the diluent and SPAN 80 as emulsifier. Experimental parameters investigated were salicyclic acid concentration, extraction time, SPAN 80 concentration, sodium chloride concentration, TDA concentration, agitation speed, homogenizer speed, emulsifying time and treat ratio. The results show almost 100% of Red 3BS was removed and stripped in the receiving phase at the optimum condition in this ELM system. High voltage coalesce was applied to break the emulsion hence, enables recovery of Red 3BS in the receiving phase.

  11. Synergy of licorice extract and pea protein hydrolysate for oxidative stability of soybean oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Xiong, Youling L; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Lirong

    2014-08-13

    Previously developed radical-scavenging pea protein hydrolysates (PPHs) prepared with Flavourzyme (Fla-PPH) and Protamex (Pro-PPH) were used as cosurfactants with Tween 20 to produce soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, and the suppression of lipid oxidation was investigated. Both PPHs significantly retarded oxidation (P < 0.05) of the emulsions when stored at 37 °C for 14 days. Electron microscopy revealed an interfacial peptidyl membrane around oil droplets, which afforded steric restrictions to oxidation initiators. When licorice extract (LE) was also used in emulsion preparation, a remarkable synergistic oxidation inhibition was observed with both PPHs. LE adsorbed onto oil droplets either directly or through associating with PPH to produce a thick and compact interfacial membrane enabling the defense against oxygen species. Liquiritin apioside, neolicuroside, glabrene, and 18β-glycyrrhetic acid were the predominant phenolic derivatives partitioning at the interface and most likely the major contributors to the notable synergistic antioxidant activity when coupled with PPHs.

  12. Effect of non-homogeneous spatial distributions of surfactants on the stability of high-content bitumen-in-water emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbina-Villalba, German; Garcia-Sucre, Maximo

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the effects of non-homogeneous spatial distributions of surfactants on the drop size of high-content bitumen-in-water emulsions, a modification of a standard Brownian Dynamics algorithm was employed. The new algorithm is able to simulate the evolution of oil/water emulsions towards flocculation and coalescence. The simulation boxes contain 216 and 125 particles initially distributed in a homogeneous simple cubic arrangement, corresponding to bitumen/water volume fractions of 0.30 and 0.51, respectively. The particles interact through a DLVO potential dependent on the total surfactant concentration, spatial surfactant distribution, and the amount of surfactant adsorbed to the bitumen/water interface. As will be shown in this article, certain combinations of the referred variables can produce a wide variety of repulsive potentials between similar drops. The variation of the total number of drops with time does not obey the usual analytical formalisms developed for more diluted cases, and instead, a simple exponential decrease of the number of drops with time is found. Such behavior has already been confirmed by experiment. Some similarities between the present results and those previously published for more diluted systems are discussed [es

  13. Interconnectivity of macroporous molecularly imprinted polymers fabricated by hydroxyapatite-stabilized Pickering high internal phase emulsions-hydrogels for the selective recognition of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanhua; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Jiangfeng; Huang, Ling; Qiu, Tianyun; Zhong, Shian

    2017-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite hybridized molecularly imprinted polydopamine polymers with selective recognition of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) were successfully prepared via Pickering oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions-hydrogels and molecularly imprinting technique. The emulsions were stabilized by hydroxyapatite of which the wettability was modified by 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The materials were characterized by SEM, IR and TGA. The results showed that the BHb imprinted polymers based on Pickering hydrogels (Hydro-MIPs) possess macropores ranging from 20μm to 50μm, and their large numbers of amino groups and hydroxyl groups result in a favorable adsorption capacity for BHb. The maximum adsorption capacity of Hydro-MIPs for BHb was 438mg/g, 3.27 times more than that of the non-imprinted polymers (Hydro-NIPs). The results indicated that Hydro-MIPs possessing well-defined hierarchical porous structures exhibited outstanding recognition behavior towards the target protein molecules. This work provided a promising alternative method for the fabrication of polymer materials with tunable and interconnected pores structures for the separation and purification of protein in vitro. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Polyamide nanocapsules and nano-emulsions containing Parsol® MCX and Parsol® 1789: in vitro release, ex vivo skin penetration and photo-stability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno, Ibrahim; Anselmi, Cecilia; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2012-02-01

    To prepare polyamide nanocapsules for skin photo-protection, encapsulating α-tocopherol, Parsol®MCX (ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate) and/or Parsol®1789 (butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane). Nanocapsules were obtained by combining spontaneous emulsification and interfacial polycondensation reaction between sebacoyl chloride and diethylenetriamine. Nano-emulsions used as control were obtained by the same process without monomers. The influence of carrier on release rate was studied in vitro with a membrane-free model. Epidermal penetration of encapsulated sunscreens was ex vivo evaluated using Franz diffusion cells. Ability of encapsulated sunscreens to improve photo-stability was verified by comparing percentage of degradation after UV radiation exposure. Sunscreen-containing nanocapsules (260-400 nm) were successfully prepared; yield of encapsulation was >98%. Parsol®MCX and Parsol®1789 encapsulation led to decreased release rate by up to 60% in comparison with nano-emulsion and allowed minimum penetration through pig ear epidermis. Presence of polyamide shell protected encapsulated sunscreen filters from photo-degradation without affecting their activity. Encapsulation of Parsol®MCX and Parsol®1789 into oil-core of polyamide nanocapsules allowed protection from photo-degradation, controlled release from nanocapsules, and limited penetration through pig ear epidermis.

  15. Modelling of Emulsion Flow in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H. [UAE University (United Arab Emirates); Farouq Ali, S.M. [UAE University (United Arab Emirates)

    1995-06-01

    Oil recovery methods predominantly involve emulsion formation. Oil recovery simulation requires the incorporation of emulsion characteristics and flow in porous media, in order to optimize oil recovery from petroleum reservoirs. This paper explored the nature and rheology of emulsions, and evaluated several models of flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in porous media. It also summarized in situ emulsion formation in porous media. A model for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian emulsion fluid flow was proposed, with special emphasis on pore size, and tortuosity in the porous media.

  16. Whey Peptide-Iron Complexes Increase the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Comparison to Iron Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Silva, Maria Elisa; Barros Mariutti, Lilian Regina; Bragagnolo, Neura; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa; Netto, Flavia Maria

    2018-02-28

    Food fortification with iron may favor lipid oxidation in both food matrices and the human body. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of peptide-iron complexation on lipid oxidation catalyzed by iron, using oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a model system. The extent of lipid oxidation of emulsions containing iron salts (FeSO 4 or FeCl 2 ) or iron complexes (peptide-iron complexes or ferrous bisglycinate) was evaluated during 7 days, measured as primary (peroxide value) and secondary products (TBARS and volatile compounds). Both salts catalyzed lipid oxidation, leading to peroxide values 2.6- to 4.6-fold higher than the values found for the peptide-iron complexes. The addition of the peptide-iron complexes resulted in the formation of lower amounts of secondary volatiles of lipid oxidation (up to 78-fold) than those of iron salts, possibly due to the antioxidant activity of the peptides and their capacity to keep iron apart from the lipid phase, since the iron atom is coordinated and takes part in a stable structure. The peptide-iron complexes showed potential to reduce the undesirable sensory changes in food products and to decrease the side effects related to free iron and the lipid damage of cell membranes in the organism, due to the lower reactivity of iron in the complexed form.

  17. Physico-chemical properties, oxidative stability and non-enzymatic browning in marine phospholipid emulsions and their use in food applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng

    Marine phospholipids (PL) contain a high level of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA), which have documented beneficial effect on human health. In addition, marine PL are more advantageous than crude or refined fish oils. Marine PL are more resistant to oxidation, provide...... of current marine PL that was used for emulsion preparation and food application. In addition, the oxidative stability and sensory quality of marine PL fortified products varied depending on the quality and source of marine PL used for fortification. Although the attempts to incorporate marine PL into food...... better bioavailability and ability to form liposomes. All these unique properties of marine PL make them an attractive choice as ingredients for food fortification. Nowadays, a wide range of food products fortified with n-3 triglycerides (TAG) are available worldwide. However, the feasibility of using...

  18. Microfluidic methods to study emulsion formation

    OpenAIRE

    Muijlwijk, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Emulsions are dispersions of one liquid in another that are commonly used in various products, and methods such as high-pressure homogenisers and colloid mills are used to form emulsions. The size and size distribution of emulsion droplets are important for the final product properties and thus need to be controlled. Rapid coalescence of droplets during emulsification increases droplet size and widens the size distribution, and therefore needs to be prevented. To increase stability of emulsio...

  19. Formulation and characterization of a multiple emulsion containing 1% L-ascorbic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Akhtar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to prepare a stable multiple emulsion containing a skin anti-aging agent and using paraffin oil. Vitamin C, was incorporated into the inner aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w multiple emulsion at a concentration of 1%. Multiple emulsion was prepared by two step method. Stability studies were performed at different accelerated conditions, i.e. 8 oC (in refrigerator, 25 oC (in oven, 40 oC (in oven, and 40 oC at 75% RH (in stability cabin for 28 days to predict the stability of formulations. Different parameters, namely pH, globule size, electrical conductivity and effect of centrifugation (simulating gravity were determined during stability studies. Data obtained was evaluated statistically using ANOVA two way analyses and LSD tests. Multiple emulsion formulated was found to be stable at lower temperatures (i.e. 8 and 25 oC for 28 days. No phase separation was observed in the samples during stability testing. It was found that there was no significant change (p > 0.05 in globule sizes in most of the samples kept at various conditions. Insignificant changes (p > 0.05 in both pH and conductivity values were determined for the samples kept at 8, 40, and 40 oC at 75% RH, throughout the study period. Further studies are needed to formulate more stable emulsions with other emulsifying agents.

  20. Investigation of stability, consistency, and oil oxidation of emulsion filled gel prepared by inulin and rice bran oil using ultrasonic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourbehesht, Newsha; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Soltanizadeh, Nafiseh

    2018-04-01

    Inulin, rice bran oil and rosemary essential oil were used to produce high quality emulsion filled gel (EFG) using ultrasonic radiation. Response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects of oil content, inulin content and power of ultrasound on the stability and consistency of prepared EFG. The process conditions were optimized by conducting experiments at five different levels. Second order polynomial response surface equations were developed indicating the effect of variables on EFG stability and consistency. The oil content of 18%; inulin content of 44.6%; and power of ultrasound of 256 W were found to be the optimum conditions to achieve the best EFG stability and consistency. Microstructure and rheological properties of prepared EFG were investigated. Oil oxidation as a result of using ultrasonic radiation was also investigated. The increase of oxidation products and the decrease of total phenolic compounds as well as radical scavenging activity of antioxidant compounds showed the damaging effect of ultrasound on the oil quality of EFG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability of molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a shadow Hamiltonian for discrete classical dynamics, obtained by an asymptotic expansion for a discrete symplectic algorithm, is employed to determine the limit of stability for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with respect to the time-increment h of the discrete dynamics....... The investigation is based on the stability of the shadow energy, obtained by including the first term in the asymptotic expansion, and on the exact solution of discrete dynamics for a single harmonic mode. The exact solution of discrete dynamics for a harmonic potential with frequency ω gives a criterion...... for the limit of stability h ⩽ 2/ω. Simulations of the Lennard-Jones system and the viscous Kob-Andersen system show that one can use the limit of stability of the shadow energy or the stability criterion for a harmonic mode on the spectrum of instantaneous frequencies to determine the limit of stability of MD...

  2. Cleaning fluid emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikryl, J; Kotyza, R; Krulikovsky, J; Mjartan, V; Valisova, I

    1981-09-15

    Composition of cleaning fluid emulsion are presented for drilling small diameter wells in clay soils, at high drill bit rotation velocity. The emulsions have lubricating properties and the abilty to improve stability of the drilled soil. The given fluids have a high fatty acid content with 12-24 carbon atoms in a single molecule, with a predominance of resinous acids 1-5% in mass, and having been emulsified in water or clay suspension without additives, or in a clay suspension with high-molecular polymer additives (glycobate cellulose compounds and/or polysaccharides, and/or their derivatives) in an amount of 0.1-3% per mass; thinning agents - huminite or lignite compounds in the amount of 0.01 to 0.5% in mass; weighting material - barite or lime 0.01 to 50% per mass; medium stabilizers - organic poly-electrolyte with polyacrylate in the amount of 0.05 to 2% in mass, or alkaline chloride/alkaline-ground metals 1-10% per mass. A cleaning emulsion fluid was prepared in the laboratory according to the given method. Add 3 kg tall oil to a solution of 1 kg K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ per 100 l of water. Dynamic viscosity was equal to 1.4 x 10-/sup 3/ Pa/s. When drilling in compacted clay soils, when the emulsions require improved stability, it is necessary to add the maximum amount of tall oil whose molecules are absorbed by the clay soil and increase its durability.

  3. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  4. Characterization of flaxseed oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei-En; Choo, Wee-Sim

    2015-07-01

    The emulsifying capacity of surfactants (polysorbate 20, polysorbate 80 and soy lecithin) and proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil was measured based on 1 % (w/w) of emulsifier. Surfactants showed significantly higher emulsifying capacity compared to the proteins (soy protein isolate and whey protein isolate) in flaxseed oil. The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a mixer was ranked in the following order: 1,000 rpm (58 min) ≈ 1,000 rpm (29 min) ≈ 2,000 rpm (35 min) >2,000 rpm (17.5 min). The emulsion stability of the flaxseed oil emulsions with whey protein isolate (10 % w/w) prepared using a homogenizer (Ultra Turrax) was independent of the speed and mixing time. The mean particle size of the flaxseed oil emulsions prepared using the two mixing devices ranged from 23.99 ± 1.34 μm to 47.22 ± 1.99 μm where else the particle size distribution and microstructure of the flaxseed oil emulsions demonstrated using microscopic imaging were quite similar. The flaxseed oil emulsions had a similar apparent viscosity and exhibited shear thinning (pseudoplastic) behavior. The flaxseed oil emulsions had L* value above 70 and was in the red-yellow color region (positive a* and b* values).

  5. Food enrichment with marine phospholipid emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline P.

    marine PL emulsions with and without addition of fish oil. The oxidative stability of marine PL emulsions was significantly influenced by the chemical composition of marine PL used for emulsions preparation. For instance, emulsions with good oxidative stability could be obtained when using raw materials...... with high purity, low fish oil content and high PL, cholesterol and α-tocopherol content. In addition, non-enzymatic browning reactions may also affect the oxidative stability of the marine PL emulsion. These reactions included Strecker degradation and pyrrolization, and their occurrence were due......Many studies have shown that marine phospholipids (PL) provide more advantages than fish oil. They seem to have better bioavailability, better resistance towards oxidation and higher content of eicosapentaenoic acids and docosahexaenoic acids than fish oil, which essentially contains triglycerides...

  6. An estimation of percentage of pion, kaon and other particles produced in nuclear emulsion - a simulated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Swarnapratim; Haiduc, Maria; Neagu, Alina Tania; Firu, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Multiparticle production in both high-energy nuclear and particle collisions is still a mystery, as far as the understanding of the dynamics of the production of secondary particles, especially of the soft varieties, is concerned. Of the various types of particles produced, mesons, especially the π-mesons, constitute, in practical terms, the near totality of the produced particles. Along with pions, in high-energy interactions kaons, hyperons and other mesons are also produced. In online experiments such as RHIC or LHC all the mesons can be detected. However, in emulsion experiments, there is no identification of the produced particles making a study of particle ratio fluctuations or net charge fluctuations impossible. In emulsion experiments, therefore, it is not possible to distinguish between pions and other mesons. There is one way to look at the compositions of the particles produced in high-energy nucleus-nucleus interactions in nuclear emulsion track detector

  7. Formulation and characterization of a multiple emulsion containing 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to prepare a stable multiple emulsion containing a skin anti-aging agent and using paraffin oil. Vitamin C, was incorporated into the inner aqueous phase of water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) multiple emulsion at a concentration of 1%. Multiple emulsion was prepared by two step method. Stability ...

  8. Co-delivery of hydrophobic curcumin and hydrophilic catechin by a water-in-oil-in-water double emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, N P; Aditya, Sheetal; Yang, Hanjoo; Kim, Hye Won; Park, Sung Ook; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-04-15

    Curcumin and catechin are naturally occurring phytochemicals with extreme sensitivity to oxidation and low bioavailability. We fabricated a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsion encapsulating hydrophilic catechin and hydrophobic curcumin simultaneously. The co-loaded emulsion was fabricated using a two-step emulsification method, and its physicochemical properties were characterised. Volume-weighted mean size (d43) of emulsion droplets was ≈3.88 μm for blank emulsions, whereas it decreased to ≈2.8-3.0 μm for curcumin and/or catechin-loaded emulsions, which was attributed to their capacity to act as emulsifiers. High entrapment efficiency was observed for curcumin and/or catechin-loaded emulsions (88-97%). Encapsulation of catechin and curcumin within an emulsion increased their stability significantly in simulated gastrointestinal fluid, which resulted in a four-fold augmentation in their bioaccessibility compared to that of freely suspended curcumin and catechin solutions. Co-loading of curcumin and catechin did not have adverse effects on either compound's stability or bioaccessibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Complexes of lutein with bovine and caprine caseins and their impact on lutein chemical stability in emulsion systems: Effect of arabinogalactan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Gutierrez, A; Attaie, R; Núñez de González, M T; Jung, Y; Woldesenbet, S; Marquez, S A

    2018-01-01

    Lutein is an important xanthophyll carotenoid with many benefits to human health. Factors affecting the application of lutein as a functional ingredient in low-fat dairy-like beverages (pH 6.0-7.0) are not well understood. The interactions of bovine and caprine caseins with hydrophobic lutein were studied using UV/visible spectroscopy as well as fluorescence. Our studies confirmed that the aqueous solubility of lutein is improved after binding with bovine and caprine caseins. The rates of lutein solubilization by the binding to bovine and caprine caseins were as follows: caprine α S1 -II-casein 34%, caprine α S1 -I-casein 10%, and bovine casein 7% at 100 μM lutein. Fluorescence of the protein was quenched on binding supporting complex formation. The fluorescence experiments showed that the binding involves tryptophan residues and some nonspecific interactions. Scatchard plots of lutein binding to the caseins demonstrated competitive binding between the caseins and their sites of interaction with lutein. Competition experiments suggest that caprine α S1 -II casein will bind a larger number of lutein molecules with higher affinity than other caseins. The chemical stability of lutein was largely dependent on casein type and significant increases occurred in the chemical stability of lutein with the following pattern: caprine α S1 -II-casein > caprine α S1 -I-casein > bovine casein. Addition of arabinogalactan to lutein-enriched emulsions increases the chemical stability of lutein-casein complexes during storage under accelerated photo-oxidation conditions at 25°C. Therefore, caprine α S1 -II-casein alone and in combination with arabinogalactan can have important applications in the beverage industry as carrier of this xanthophyll carotenoid (lutein). Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of betaine on the foam stability: Molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fengfeng [Chemistry Engineering Department, Zibo Vocational Institute, Zibo 255314 (China); Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Guokui [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yuan, Shiling, E-mail: shilingyuan@sdu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The reasons of betaine to enhance the stability of foam films are investigated by molecular simulation. • An electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface due to the electrostatic interaction. • The electrostatic structure becomes denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. - Abstract: Zwitterionic betaines are widely used as foam boosters due to these can enhance the stability of foam films. In this paper, mechanistic insights of betaine to improve the stability of alkyl-polyoxyethylene carboxylate (AEC) foam are provided by molecular simulation. In the simulation, we observe the electropositive nitrogen atoms in betaine interact with the electronegative sulfur atoms, an electrostatic structure is formed at the air/water interface. Interaction energies of the mixed surfactants are calculated by the quantum chemistry methods. The calculations show betaine-AEC and betaine–betaine possess attractive interaction, and that AEC–AEC has repulsion to each other. In the other words, the repulsion between the headgroups of anionic surfactants is relaxed by betaine. Additionally, the influence of concentration of betaine on the stability of foam films is also simulated. The RDF and coordination numbers show that the electrostatic structures become denser with the increasing concentration of betaine. Therefore, entry barrier is enhanced accordingly. The SMD simulation also demonstrates the same variation tendency of entry barrier. The simulation details provide vital supplements to experiments.

  11. PENGARUH WAKTU REAKSI ETANOLISIS PADA SUHU RUANG TERHADAP RENDEMEN DAN STABILITAS EMULSI PRODUK ETANOLISIS Palm Kernel Oil (PKO [The Effect of Ethanolisis Reaction Time at Room Temperature on Yield and Emulsion Stability Ofproduct of Ethanolisis Palm Kernel Oil (PKO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Yunggo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available PKO (palm kernel oil is made from palm kernel of Elaesis gueneensis Jacq, which is a mixture of triglycerides. Triglycerides can be converted into a number of derivative products such as mono-diglycerides (MG-DG. MG-DG can be formed by ethanolisis reaction. In this study ethanolisis reaction of PKO was done by adding 96% of technical ethanol containing NaOH 1% (w/w PKO on PKO solution at a room temperature and a shorter time than the another PKO ethanolisis before. This study was aimed to find the best PKO ethanolisis reaction time in providing products of ethanolisis PKO with yield and high emulsion stability. The experiment was a nonfactorial  and arranged in a complete randomized block design (CRBD with four replications.  The single factor studied was 7 levels of  the reaction time in which  were 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13 minutes.  The data  were analysed using ANOVA and  further by Orthogonal polynomial on the significant level of 1% and 5%. The results showed that the reaction time ethanolisis had no effect on the yield and stability of the emulsion of fresh coconut milk. The yield of the resulting range between 17.32% - 18.07% and the stability of emulsion ranged between 88.88% - 92.50% during one day and 85.23% - 89.50% during two days. The sensory observation indicated that PKO ethanolisis product can preserve coconut milk for 3 days of storage time with color and scent of fresh coconut milk, and  more stable compared to control. Keywords: emulsion stability, ethanolisis, PKO, time, yield

  12. Response of nuclear emulsions to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.; Pinkerton, F.E.

    1975-01-01

    Heavy ion tracks in Ilford K-2 emulsion are simulated with a computer program which makes use of the delta-ray theory of track structure, and the special assumption that the response of this emulsion to gamma-rays is 8-or-more hit. The Ilford K-series of nuclear emulsions is produced from a parent stock called K.0 emulsion, sensitized to become K.1 to K.5, and desensitized to become K-1 to K-3. Our simulations demonstrate that the emulsions K.5 through K.0 to K-1 are 1-or-more hit detectors, while K-2 is an 8-or-more hit detector. We have no data for K-3 emulsion. It would appear that emulsions of intermediate hittedness might be produced by an intermediate desensitization, to mimic or match the RBE-LET variations of biological cells, perhaps to produce a ''rem-dosimeter''. In the K-2 emulsion no developable gains are produced by stopping H, He, and Li ions. The emulsion has ''threshold-like'' properties, resembling etchable track detectors. It should prove useful in the measurement of high LET dose in a strong low LET background, as for pions or neutrons. Since it can be expected to accumulate and repair ''sub-lethal damage'', to display the ion-kill and gamma-kill inactivation modes, the grain-count and track width regimes, it may serve to model biological effects. (auth)

  13. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Borge; Dufek, Jan [Div. of Nuclear Reactor Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-08-15

    A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  14. Promising perspectives for ruminal protection of polyunsaturated fatty acids through polyphenol-oxidase-mediated crosslinking of interfacial protein in emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, N; Vlaeminck, B; Gadeyne, F; Claeys, E; Van der Meeren, P; Fievez, V

    2018-03-16

    Previously, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from linseed oil were effectively protected (>80%) against biohydrogenation through polyphenol-oxidase-mediated protein crosslinking of an emulsion, prepared with polyphenol oxidase (PPO) extract from potato tuber peelings. However, until now, emulsions of only 2 wt% oil have been successfully protected, which implies serious limitations both from a research perspective (e.g. in vivo trials) as well as for further upscaling toward practical applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to increase the oil/PPO ratio. In the original protocol, the PPO extract served both an emulsifying function as well as a crosslinking function. Here, it was first evaluated whether alternative protein sources could replace the emulsifying function of the PPO extract, with addition of PPO extract and 4-methylcatechol (4MC) to induce crosslinking after emulsion preparation. This approach was then further used to evaluate protection of emulsions with higher oil content. Five candidate emulsifiers (soy glycinin, gelatin, whey protein isolate (WPI), bovine serum albumin and sodium caseinate) were used to prepare 10 wt% oil emulsions, which were diluted five times (w/w) with PPO extract (experiment 1). As a positive control, 2 wt% oil emulsions were prepared directly with PPO extract according to the original protocol. Further, emulsions of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt% oil were prepared, with 80 wt% PPO extract (experiment 2), or with 90, 80, 70, 60 and 50 wt% PPO extract, respectively (experiment 3) starting from WPI-stabilized emulsions. Enzymatic crosslinking was induced by 24-h incubation with 4MC. Ruminal protection efficiency was evaluated by 24-h in vitro batch simulation of the rumen metabolism. In experiment 1, protection efficiencies were equal or higher than the control (85.5% to 92.5% v. 81.3%). In both experiments 2 and 3, high protection efficiencies (>80%) were achieved, except for emulsions containing 10 wt% oil emulsions

  15. Stability Simulation of a Vehicle with Wheel Active Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brabec Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the possibility of increasing the vehicle driving stability at a higher speed. One of the ways how to achieve higher stability is using the 4WS system. Mathematical description of vehicle general movement is a very complex task. For simulation, models which are aptly simplified are used. For the first approach, so-called single-truck vehicle model (often linear is usually used. For the simulation, we have chosen to extend the model into a two-truck one, which includes the possibility to input more vehicle parameters. Considering the 4WS system, it is possible to use a number of potential regulations. In our simulation model, the regulation system with compound coupling was used. This type of regulation turns the rear wheels depending on the input parameters of the system (steering angle of the front wheels and depending on the output moving quantities of the vehicle, most frequently the yaw rate. Criterion for compensation of lateral deflection centre of gravity angle is its zero value, or more precisely the zero value of its first-order derivative. Parameters and set-up of the simulation model were done in conjunction with the dSAPACE software. Reference performances of the vehicle simulation model were made through the defined manoeuvres. But the simulation results indicate that the rear-wheels steering can have a positive effect on the vehicle movement stability, especially when changing the driving direction at high speed.

  16. Exploratory study on prevaporation membranes for removal of water from water-crude oil emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-11

    The main objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of removing water from oil/water and water/oil emulsions by means of prevaporation. Simulated oil/water and water/oil emulsions were prepared by mixing water and kerosene of various concentrations and stabilized by adding sodium lauryl sulfate. Preliminary experiments were conducted on 12 membranes fabricated from two different materials. One membrane of each type of material was chosen for further work based on the results of preliminary tests, in which two different kinds of membranes, cellulose and polyvinylalcohol, were used. All experiments were carried out under two different down-stream pressures and various temperatures. The tests showed clearly that permeation rate increases at increasing temperatures. It was demonstrated that over 97% of water can be recovered from synthetic oil emulsions. The results also proved that both cellulose and polyvinylalcohol membranes produced permeates relatively free of oil even when the synthetic or crude oil emulsions had oil content higher than 90%. The study concluded that prevaporation was effective, but more extensive studies on various field oil emulsions with improved membrane material and systems were necessary due to the complex and site-specific characteristics of the actual field emulsions. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapkovich, A.M.; Sadakov, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The paper deals with numerical simulation of plasma vertical position stabilization in ITER. The calculations are performed using EDDY C-2 code by the method of direct numerical simulation of transient electromagnetic processes taking into account the evolution of plasma position, cross-section shape and full plasma current. When simulating free vertical plasma drift in ITER with twin passive stabilization loops, it was shown that account of the effects of cross-section deformation and plasma current alternations results in almost two fold degradation of passive stabilization parameters as compared to the calculations for 'rigid displacement' model. In terms of methodology, the account of the effects of cross section deformation and plasma current alternations requires clarification of the definitions for reverse increment of vertical instability and for stability margin coefficient. The simulation of plasma pinch return to equilibrium position after the closure of control coils allows to assess the required parameters of active control system and demonstrate the effect of screen current reverse in twin loops. The obtained results were used to develop the ITER conceptual design and affected the choice of the concept of twin passive loops and new positron of control coils as the basis approaches. 11 refs.; 12 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Stability of reaction fronts in random walk simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagy, Noemi; Izsak, F.

    A model of propagating reaction fronts is given for simple autocatalytic reactions and the stability of the propagating reaction fronts are studied in several numerical experiments. The corresponding random walk simulations - extending of a recent algorithm - make possible the simultaneous treatment

  19. Use of olive oil-in-water gelled emulsions in model turkey breast emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, M.; Öztürk, B.

    2017-09-01

    Today, gelled emulsion systems offer a novel possibility in lipid modification of meat products. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality characteristics of model turkey emulsions that were prepared with olive oil-in-water gelled emulsion (GE) as partial or total beef fat replacer. The results indicated that while most of the GE treatments showed equivalent emulsion characteristics in terms of emulsion stability, water-holding capacity and cook yield, utilization of 100% GE as the lipid source could increase total expressible fluid of the model turkey emulsion and thus negatively affect the quality. Utilization of GE was effective in total fat reduction, as the model turkey emulsions formulated with more than 50% GE had significantly lower fat content compared to full-beef fat control model emulsion. However, beef fat replacement with GE produced considerable changes in colour parameters. Finally, it was concluded that utilization of GE as a partial beef fat replacer has good potential to enhance stability and reduce total fat in turkey meat emulsion products.

  20. Rheology of attractive emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sujit S; Gerrard, Dustin D; Rhodes, Travers S; Mason, Thomas G; Weitz, David A

    2011-10-01

    We show how attractive interactions dramatically influence emulsion rheology. Unlike the repulsive case, attractive emulsions below random close packing, φ(RCP), can form soft gel-like elastic solids. However, above φ(RCP), attractive and repulsive emulsions have similar elasticities. Such compressed attractive emulsions undergo an additional shear-driven relaxation process during yielding. Our results suggest that attractive emulsions begin to yield at weak points through the breakage of bonds, and, above φ(RCP), also undergo droplet configurational rearrangements.

  1. A MARTe based simulator for the JET Vertical Stabilization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellizio, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.bellizio@unina.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); De Tommasi, Gianmaria; Risoli, Nicola; Albanese, Raffaele [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Neto, Andre [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior, Tecnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Validation by means of simulation is a crucial step when developing real-time control systems. Modeling and simulation are an essential tool since the early design phase, when the control algorithms are designed and tested. This phase is commonly carried out in off-line environments such as Matlab and Simulink. A MARTe-based simulator has been recently developed to validate the new JET Vertical Stabilization (VS) system. MARTe is the multi-thread framework used at JET to deploy hard real-time control systems. This paper presents the software architecture of the MARTe-based simulator and it shows how this tool has been effectively used to evaluate the effects of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) on the VS system. By using the simulator it is possible to analyze different plasma configurations, extrapolating the limit of the new vertical amplifier in terms of the energy of the largest rejectable ELM.

  2. Vinyl Acetate/butyl acrylate/acrylate Research of Ternary Soap-free Emulsion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li-guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the vinyl acetate/butyl acrylate/acrylic acrylic emulsion preparation without soap vinegar, with solid content, gel, emulsion stability and film forming properties and tensile strength as the main index to study the effect of raw materials on the properties of emulsion. Through the infrared spectrometer soap-free emulsion for microscopic analysis research. Study of the ternary soap-free vinegar acrylic emulsion with good performance.

  3. Simulation studies on stability of hot electron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1985-01-01

    Stability of a hot electron plasma in an NBT(EBT)-like geometry is studied by using a 2-1/2 dimensional relativistic, electromagnetic particle code. For the low-frequency hot electron interchange mode, comparison of the simulation results with the analytical predictions of linear stability theory show fairly good agreement with the magnitude of the growth rates calculated without hot electron finite Larmor radius effects. Strong stabilizing effects by finite Larmor radius of the hot electrons are observed for short wavelength modes. As for the high-frequency hot electron interchange mode, there is a discrepancy between the simulation results and the theory. The high-frequency instability is not observed though a parameter regime is chosen in which the high-frequency hot electron interchange mode is theoretically predicted to grow. Strong cross-field diffusion in a poloidal direction of the hot electrons might explain the stability. Each particle has a magnetic drift velocity, and the speed of the magnetic drift is proportional to the kinetic energy of each particle. Hence, if the particles have high temperature, the spread of the magnetic drift velocity is large. This causes a strong cross-field diffusion of the hot electrons. In the simulation for this interchange mode, an enhanced temperature relaxation is observed between the hot and cold electrons although the theoretically predicted high frequency modes are stable. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Emulsion stability and properties of fish gelatin-based films as affected by palm oil and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsuwan, Krisana; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon

    2016-05-01

    Gelatin films exhibit the poor water vapour barrier properties. The use of palm oil, which is abundant and available in Thailand, can be a means to lower water vapour migration. To disperse oil in film-forming dispersion (FFD), a surfactant along with appropriate homogenization is required. The study aimed to investigate the influence of palm oil level and surfactants in the absence or presence of glycerol on characteristics of FFD and resulting gelatin films. Similar oil droplet sizes, both d32 and d43 values, of FFD containing soy lecithin were observed, regardless of palm oil level used (P > 0.05). FFD with Tween-20 had larger droplet size as the levels of oil increased (P palm oil level increased (P 0.05). FFD containing 500 or 750 g kg(-1) palm oil using soy lecithin as a surfactant in the presence of 300 g kg(-1) glycerol had the enhanced homogeneity and stability of oil droplets. The resulting gelatin film had the improved water vapour barrier properties. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Pickering Emulsions for Food Applications: Background, Trends, and Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton-Carabin, C.C.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Particle-stabilized emulsions, also referred to as Pickering emulsions, have garnered exponentially increasing interest in recent years. This has also led to the first food applications, although the number of related publications is still rather low. The involved stabilization mechanisms are

  6. Laboratory effectiveness testing of water-in-oil emulsion breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Bier, I.; Conrod, D.; Tennyson, E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics and chemistry of water-in-oil emulsions dominate the development of effectiveness tests. Emulsions are variable in stability--this variability is largely dependent on oil type and degree of weathering. These factors complicate the development of a test. Emulsions which have low stability will apparently break easily with chemical emulsion breakers. Broken emulsions will form a foam-like material, called rag, which retains water which is not part of the stable emulsions. Analytical methods used to determine the final stability of the broken or unbroken emulsion were evaluated. Measurements of water content and viscosity measurements show correlation to emulsion stability. Viscosity provides a more reliable measure of emulsion stability but water content measurements are more convenient and are largely used in this study. Twelve tests were developed in the past. Two testing methods have been developed to a usable stage. These tests are described and data using them provided. The effects of mixing time, agent amount, settling time and mixing energy on effectiveness results are presented

  7. Two-dimensional simulation of the MHD stability, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1976-03-01

    The two-dimensional computer code has been prepared to study MHD stability of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma with and without the surrounding vacuum region. It also includes the effect of magnetic surfaces with non-circular cross sections. The linearized equations of motion are solved as an initial value problem. The results by computer simulation are compared with those by the theory for the cylindrical plasma; they are in good agreement. (auth.)

  8. Utilisation de la DSC pour la caractérisation de la stabilité des émulsions eau dans pétrole Use of the Dsc Technique to Characterize Water-In-Crude Oil Emulsions Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalmazzone C.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La technique DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry a été appliquée à l'étude des émulsions eau dans pétrole, qui se forment naturellement après un déversement de pétrole en mer. Ces émulsions, également appelées mousses au chocolat , peuvent contenir de 50 à 80% d'eau et se présentent souvent sous la forme d'un produit visqueux, difficile à récupérer mécaniquement, à traiter ou à brûler. Il est par conséquent important de pouvoir estimer leur stabilité pour optimiser le choix du traitement. Un grand nombre de techniques, généralement fondées sur l'analyse de la distribution de tailles de gouttes, peuvent être utilisées pour estimer la stabilité d'une émulsion. Malheureusement, la plupart ne sont pas adaptées à l'étude des émulsions eau dans huile opaques. La méthode la plus utilisée pour caractériser la stabilité de ce type d'émulsions est le bottle test. Elle consiste à mesurer la séparation de phases en fonction du temps. Ce test est la source d'une quantité d'informations appréciables quant à la stabilité de l'émulsion et à la qualité de la phase aqueuse séparée, mais il reste très empirique. La technique DSC est généralement utilisée pour déterminer la composition des émulsions eau dans huile, car elle permet de distinguer l'eau libre de l'eau émulsifiée. Cette étude a montré qu'il s'agit d'une technique très utile qui permet à la fois l'étude de l'évolution de la taille des gouttes dans l'émulsion, et une détermination précise de la quantité d'eau. The DSC technique (Differential Scanning Calorimetry was applied to the study of water-in-crude oil emulsions, which naturally form after an oil spill. The resulting emulsions contain between 50 and 80% seawater and they are often heavy materials, hard to recover mechanically, treat or burn. It is therefore important to assess their stability in order to optimize their treatments. A great variety of techniques are available for

  9. Effect of lyophilized water extracts of Melissa officinalis on the stability of algae and linseed oil-in-water emulsion to be used as a functional ingredient in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ciriano, Mikel García-Iñiguez; Rehecho, Sheyla; Calvo, Maria Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Navarro, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2010-06-01

    Previous work pointed out the possibility to enhance the nutritional value of meat products using long chain omega-3 PUFA enriched emulsions. Oil-in-water emulsions elaborated with a mixture of algae and linseed oils (15:10) in order to be used as functional ingredient were stabilized with BHA (butylhydroxyanisol) or with a lyophilized water extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm). The lipid profile of the oil mixture showed a high amount of DHA (31.7%), oleic (25.4%) and alpha-linolenic acid (12.7%) resulting in a very low omega-6/omega-3 ratio (0.12). The lyophilized extract of M. officinalis showed a high antioxidant activity (being 62ppm of the lyophilized water extract of Melissa equivalent to 200ppm of BHA, using the DPPH assay as reference), and high total phenolic content. Studying the oxidation process in the emulsions during 15days at room temperature, it could be concluded that this extract was as efficient as BHA in order to control the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characteristics of Nano-emulsion for Cold Thermal Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumoto, Koji; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi

    Phase change emulsion (PCE) is novel kind of heat storage and heat transfer fluids. It has characteristics as follows; greater apparent specific heat and higher heat transfer abilities in the phase change temperature range than conventional single phase heat transfer fluid. In this paper, a phase change emulsion, which has droplet diameter distribution of nanometer, were prepared. The Nano-emulsion was formed by low energy emulsification methods, as known the phase inversion temperature (PIT) method. Physical properties, such as viscosity, diameter and its distribution of emulsion were investigated. Especially, the relationships between preparation method and the concentration of surfactant have been discussed in detail. The results show that the viscosity of the Nano-emulsion is lower than the micro-emulsion, which was made by same mixing ratio of surfactant and concentration of phase change material. In addition, the Nano-emulsion clarified that stability was higher than microemulsions.

  11. Stabilization effect of fission source in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börge Olsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A fission source can act as a stabilization element in coupled Monte Carlo simulations. We have observed this while studying numerical instabilities in nonlinear steady-state simulations performed by a Monte Carlo criticality solver that is coupled to a xenon feedback solver via fixed-point iteration. While fixed-point iteration is known to be numerically unstable for some problems, resulting in large spatial oscillations of the neutron flux distribution, we show that it is possible to stabilize it by reducing the number of Monte Carlo criticality cycles simulated within each iteration step. While global convergence is ensured, development of any possible numerical instability is prevented by not allowing the fission source to converge fully within a single iteration step, which is achieved by setting a small number of criticality cycles per iteration step. Moreover, under these conditions, the fission source may converge even faster than in criticality calculations with no feedback, as we demonstrate in our numerical test simulations.

  12. Simulation and linear stability of traffic jams; Kotsu jutai no senkei anteisei to simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, M. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Nagatani, T. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-05-25

    A traffic jam induced by slowing down is investigated using simulation techniques of molecular dynamics. When cars are decelerated by the presence of hindrance, two typical traffic jams occur behind the hindrance: one is an oscillating jam and the other is a homogeneous jam. When the slowing down is small, the oscillating jam occurs. If the slowing down is large, the jam is homogeneous over space and time. Also, a backward propagating soliton-like jam is observed. The linear stability theory is applied to the traffic flow. The phase boundary between the oscillating and homogeneous jams is compared with the neutral stability line obtained by the linear stability theory. (author)

  13. Effect of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin on the oxidative stability of 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions depends on pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Wulff, Tune; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pH on lipid oxidation and protein partitioning in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with different whey protein isolates with varying ratios of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin. Results showed that an increase in pH increased...

  14. Metal-ion retention properties of water-soluble amphiphilic block copolymer in double emulsion systems (w/o/w) stabilized by non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencia, Manuel; Rivas, Bernabé L

    2011-11-15

    Metal-ion retention properties of water-soluble amphiphilic polymers in presence of double emulsion were studied by diafiltration. Double emulsion systems, water-in-oil-in-water, with a pH gradient between external and internal aqueous phases were prepared. A poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (PSAM) solution at pH 6.0 was added to the external aqueous phase of double emulsion and by application of pressure a divalent metal-ion stream was continuously added. Metal-ions used were Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) at the same pH of polymer solution. According to our results, metal-ion retention is mainly the result of polymer-metal interaction. Interaction between PSMA and reverse emulsion globules is strongly controlled by amount of metal-ions added in the external aqueous phase. In addition, as metal-ion concentration was increased, a negative effect on polymer retention capacity and promotion of flocculation phenomena were produced. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adsorption of polyvinylalcohol on paraffin-water interfaces and the properties of paraffin-in-water emulsions stabilized by polyvinylalcohol : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankveld, J.M.G.

    1970-01-01

    The adsorption of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) on the paraffin-water interface has been studied by interfacial tension measurements and by direct measurement of the adsorption with emulsions. The aim of the study was to provide more insight into the factors which influence the adsorption of polymers

  16. Effect of sucrose ester concentration on the interfacial characteristics and physical properties of sodium caseinate-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiangzhong; Liu, Daolin; Long, Zhao; Yang, Bao; Fang, Min; Kuang, Wanmei; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-05-15

    The effect of sucrose ester (SE) concentration on interfacial tension and surface dilatational modulus of SE and sodium caseinate (NaCas)-SE solutions were investigated. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SE was presumed to be 0.05% by measuring interfacial tension of SE solution. The interfacial tension of NaCas-SE solution decreased with increased SE concentration. A sharp increase in surface dilatational modulus of NaCas solution was observed when 0.01% SE was added and a decline was occurred at higher SE level. The influence of SE concentration on droplet size and confocal micrograph, surface protein concentration, ζ-potential and rheological properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions prepared with 1% NaCas was also examined. The results showed that addition of SE reduced droplet size and surface protein concentration of the O/W emulsions. The ζ-potential of the O/W emulsions increased initially and decreased afterward with increased SE concentration. All the O/W emulsions exhibited a shear-thinning behaviour and the data were well-fitted into the Herschel-Bulkley model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.

    2014-01-10

    To enable high fidelity simulation of combustion phenomena in realistic devices, an embedded boundary method is implemented into direct numerical simulations (DNS) of reacting flows. One of the additional numerical issues associated with reacting flows is the stable treatment of the embedded boundaries in the presence of multicomponent species and reactions. The implemented method is validated in two test con gurations: a pre-mixed hydrogen/air flame stabilized in a backward-facing step configuration, and reactive flows around a square prism. The former is of interest in practical gas turbine combustor applications in which the thermo-acoustic instabilities are a strong concern, and the latter serves as a good model problem to capture the vortex shedding behind a bluff body. In addition, a reacting flow behind the square prism serves as a model for the study of flame stabilization in a micro-channel combustor. The present study utilizes fluid-cell reconstruction methods in order to capture important flame-to-solid wall interactions that are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  18. Hydrodynamic stability of inverted annular flow in an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.; Linehan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from large aspect ratio nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, breakup mode, and dispersed core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow destabilization led to inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and to dispersed droplet flow, core breakup length correlations were developed by extending work on free liquid jets to include this coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. The results show length dependence upon D/sub J/, Re/sub J/, We/sub J/, α, and We/sub G/,rel. Correlations for core shape, breakup mechanisms, and dispersed core droplet size were also developed, by extending the results of free jet stability, roll wave entrainment, and churn turbulent droplet stability studies

  19. Recent Emulsion Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariga, A.

    2011-01-01

    Emulsion technologies are very much developed in the last decade and still developing in both the emulsion gel and the data taking. Emulsion detectors are suitable for the neutrino experiments because they can distinguish all 3 flavors of neutrino. The OPERA experiment, a recent pillar in the emulsion experiments aiming at the first observation of the neutrino oscillation in CNGS beam in appearance mode, is running, showing the good capability to separate 3 flavor neutrino interactions. In this poster, the recent developments and prospects of the emulsions for the next generation experiments are reported.

  20. Exploratory study on pervaporation membranes for removal of water from water-crude oil emulsions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Study to explore the feasibility of removing water from oil/water (O/W) and water/oil (W/O) emulsions by means of pervaporation. Initial study involved preparation of simulated O/W and W/O emulsions prepared by mixing water and kerosene of various concentrations and stabilized by adding sodium lauryl sulfate. Preliminary experiments were conducted on 12 membranes fabricated from 2 different materials. One membrane of each type of material was chosen for further work based on the results of the preliminary tests. All experiments were carried out under 2 different downstream pressures and various temperatures.

  1. Simulation of the Nonlinear Dose Dependence of Stabilized Point Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R; Pagonis, V; Lawless, J L

    2010-01-01

    The dose dependence of the concentration of point defects in alkali-halides as well as other crystals, as exhibited by the dependence of the thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption and ESR on the dose of non-ionizing UV excitation is studied using numerical simulation. The relevant set of coupled rate equations are first written and plausible sets of trapping parameters are chosen. Instead of using simplifying assumptions previously used for reaching conclusions concerning this dose behavior, exact numerical solutions have now been reached. Depending on the parameters chosen, different dose dependencies are seen. In some cases, linear dose dependence is reached in a broad range. Sublinear dose dependence, close to a D 1/2 dependence when D is the dose of excitation can be reached when retrapping is stronger than trapping in other traps stabilizing the defects. When strong competition between stabilizing traps takes place, an initial linear range is observed followed by strong superlinearity and an approach to saturation. All these behaviors have been observed experimentally in TL measurements as well as ESR and optical absorption in different materials. Similarities and dissimilarities to linear and non-linear dose dependencies obtained experimentally and by simulations when ionizing irradiation is used for excitation are discussed.

  2. Tuning Amphiphilicity of Particles for Controllable Pickering Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pickering emulsions with the use of particles as emulsifiers have been extensively used in scientific research and industrial production due to their edge in biocompatibility and stability compared with traditional emulsions. The control over Pickering emulsion stability and type plays a significant role in these applications. Among the present methods to build controllable Pickering emulsions, tuning the amphiphilicity of particles is comparatively effective and has attracted enormous attention. In this review, we highlight some recent advances in tuning the amphiphilicity of particles for controlling the stability and type of Pickering emulsions. The amphiphilicity of three types of particles including rigid particles, soft particles, and Janus particles are tailored by means of different mechanisms and discussed here in detail. The stabilization-destabilization interconversion and phase inversion of Pickering emulsions have been successfully achieved by changing the surface properties of these particles. This article provides a comprehensive review of controllable Pickering emulsions, which is expected to stimulate inspiration for designing and preparing novel Pickering emulsions, and ultimately directing the preparation of functional materials.

  3. Interplay between Colloids and Interfaces : Emulsions, Foams and Microtubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Folter, J.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this thesis is the interplay between colloids and interfaces. The adsorption of colloids at fluid-fluid interfaces is the main topic and covers Chapters 2-6. Pickering emulsions where colloidal particles act as emulsion stabilizers in the absence of surfactants are studied in a

  4. Aqueous polymer emulsions by chemical modifications of thermosetting alternating polyketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Youchun; Broekhuis, A. A.; Picchioni, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aqueous polymer emulsions were prepared by chemical modifications of thermosetting alternating polyketones in a one-pot reaction. Polymeric amines derived from the polyketones can act as polymeric surfactants for the self-emulsification of polyketones. The stability and structure of the emulsions

  5. Synthetic Polymers at Interfaces: Monodisperse Emulsions Multiple Emulsions and Liquid Marbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanqing

    The adsorption of polymeric materials at interfaces is an energetically favorable process which is investigated in much diversified fields, such as emulsions, bubbles, foams, liquid marbles. Pickering emulsion, which is emulsion stabilized by solid particles has been investigated for over one century and preparation of Pickering emulsion with narrow size distribution is crucial for both the theoretical study of the stabilization mechanism and practical application, such as templated fabrication of colloidosomes. The precise control over the size and functionality of polymer latices allows the preparation of monodisperse Pickering emulsions with desired sizes through SPG membrane emulsification at rather rapid rate compared to microfludic production. Double or multiple emulsions have long been investigated but its rapid destabilization has always been a major obstacle in applying them into practical applications. The modern living polymerization techniques allow us to prepare polymers with designed structure of block copolymers which makes it possible to prepare ultra-stable multiple emulsions. The precise tuning of the ratio of hydrophobic part over the hydrophilic can unveil the stabilization mechanism. Liquid marble is a new type of materials of which liquid droplets are coated by dry particles. The coating of an outer layer of dry particles renders the liquid droplets non-sticky at solid surface which is useful in transportation of small amount of liquid without leakage at extreme low friction force. The property of liquid marbles relies largely on the stabilizers and the drying condition of polymeric latices is shown to have great influence on the property of liquid marbles. Firstly, an introduction to the interfacial and colloidal science with special attention to topics on emulsions, multiple emulsion and liquid marbles is given in Chapter 1. The unique features of an interface and a discussion on the definition of colloids are introduced prior to the

  6. Increasing of registering capacity of nuclear emulsion for autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskaya, K.M.; Savvateeva, J.P.; Tolkacheva, E.N.

    1977-01-01

    The ways of increasing detecting power of the type M nuclear emulsion gel have been investigated in these studies. There have been found conditions under which type M emulsion sensitivity increased by 15 to 20% without increasing fog grain background. The stability of photographic sensitivity during emulsion gel storage increased by two times. The prevention of latent image fading (by means of layer moisture content) decreased to 1.2% and increasing the detecting power of the emulsion (by means of exposure temperature) by up to 37 0 C. The exposure time of tritium labelled autographs has been decreased to about 20%. (author)

  7. The choice of homogenisation equipment affects lipid oxidation in emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    2012-01-01

    in emulsions has been shown to be affected by the emulsification conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of homogenisation equipment (microfluidizer vs. two-stage valve homogeniser) on lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with two different milk proteins....... Emulsions were prepared at pH 7 with similar droplet sizes. Results showed that the oxidative stability of emulsions prepared with sodium caseinate was not influenced by the type of homogeniser used. In contrast, the type of homogenisation equipment significantly influenced lipid oxidation when whey protein...

  8. Emulsion characteristics, chemical and textural properties of meat systems produced with double emulsions as beef fat replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, double emulsions are stated to have a promising potential in low-fat food production, however, there are very few studies on their possible applications in meat matrices. We aimed to investigate the quality of beef emulsion systems in which beef fat was totally replaced by double emulsions (W1/O/W2) prepared with olive oil and sodium caseinate (SC) by two-step emulsification procedure. Incorporation of W1/O/W2 emulsion resulted in reduced lipid, increased protein content, and modified fatty acid composition. W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments had lower jelly and fat separation, higher water-holding capacity and higher emulsion stability than control samples with beef fat. Increased concentrations of W1/O/W2 emulsions resulted in significant changes in texture parameters. TBA values were lower in W1/O/W2 emulsion treatments than control treatment after 60days of storage. In conclusion, our study confirms that double emulsions had promising impacts on modifying fatty acid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable beef emulsion systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimal Subinterval Selection Approach for Power System Transient Stability Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soobae Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modal analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.

  10. Effects of flavonoid glycosides obtained from a Ginkgo biloba extract fraction on the physical and oxidative stabilities of oil-in-water emulsions prepared from a stripped structured lipid with a low omega-6 to omega-3 ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Gan, Lu-Jing; Zhang, Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak; Hong, Soon-Taek

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we have produced a structured lipid with a low ω6/ω3 ratio by lipase-catalysed interesterification with perilla and grape seed oils (1:3, wt/wt). A Ginkgo biloba leaf extract was fractionated in a column packed with HP-20 resin, producing a flavonoid glycoside fraction (FA) and a biflavone fraction (FB). FA exhibited higher antioxidant capacity than FB, showing 58.4 mmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g-of-total-phenol-content, 58.8 mg quercetin equivalent (QUE)/g-of-total-flavonoid-content, 4.5 mmol trolox/g-of-trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity, 0.14 mg extract/mL-of-free-radical-scavenging-activity (DPPH assay, IC50), and 2.3 mmol Fe2SO4 · 7H2O/g-of-ferric-reducing-antioxidant-power. The oil-in-water emulsion containing the stripped structured lipid as an oil phase with FA exhibited the highest stability and the lowest oil globule diameters (d43 and d32), where the aggregation was unnoticeable by Turbiscan and particle size analyses during 30 days of storage. Furthermore, FA was effective in retarding the oxidation of the emulsions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel Submicron Emulsion System Loaded with Doxorubicin Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in MCF-7/ADR Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W P; Hua, H Y; Sun, P C; Zhao, Y X

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop the Solutol HS15-based doxorubicin submicron emulsion with good stability and overcoming multi-drug resistance. In this study, we prepared doxorubicin submicron emulsion, and examined the stability after autoclaving, the in vitro cytotoxic activity, the intracellular accumulation and apoptpsis of doxorubicin submicron emulsion in MCF-7/ADR cells. The physicochemical properties of doxorubicin submicron emulsion were not significantly affected after autoclaving. The doxorubicin submicron emulsion significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin submicron emulsion and enhanced cytotoxic activity and apoptotic effects of doxorubicin. These results may be correlated to doxorubicin submicron emulsion inhibitory effects on efflux pumps through the progressive release of intracellular free Solutol HS15 from doxorubicin submicron emulsion. Furthermore, these in vitro results suggest that the Solutol HS15-based submicron emulsion may be a potentially useful drug delivery system to circumvent multi-drug resistance of tumor cells.

  12. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Encapsulation of emulsion droplets by organo–silica shells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoldesi, C.; Steegstra, Patrick; Imhof, Arnout

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant-stabilized emulsion droplets were used as templates for the synthesis of hollow colloidal particles. Monodisperse silicone oil droplets were prepared by hydrolysis and polymerization of dimethyldiethoxysiloxane monomer, in the presence of surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, anionic)

  14. Film self-assembly properties of vacuum residua from crude oil and correlation to the stability of water/crude oil emulsions[Supercritical fluid extraction and fractional technology (SFEF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Bo

    2005-07-01

    In this thesis, SFEF technology has been used to obtain a fine separation of vacuum residua. Three kinds of vacuum residua from Iranian Heavy Crude Oil, Iranian Light Crude Oil and Daqing Crude Oil have been separated respectively into three series narrow cut fractions as a function of the average molecular weight. And their molecular parameters have been characterized by Vapour Pressure Osmometry(VPO) system, Ultraviolet(UV) spectroscopy, Infrared(IR) spectroscopy as well as by elemental analysis. The various fractions of vacuum residua have been added to an oil/water model system. The oil phase used was pure heptane, pure toluene, a mixture of heptane and toluene etc. Various properties of the interfacial film have been studied such as the self-assembly properties, interfacial tension and interfacial viscosity, etc. The self-assembly procedure of interfacial film of vacuum residua fractions were focused by means of the Wilhelmy plate method (Paper 1). The self-assembly states of interfacial film of vacuum residua fraction from Iranian Heavy and Daqing crude oil have been revealed by using Langmuir-Blodgett technology respectively (Paper II and Paper III). From measurement of the interfacial shear viscosity, the mechanical strength of the interfacial film formed by the vacuum residua fraction has been described (Paper IV) and the roles of the surfactants added in the interfacial film have been confirmed (Paper V). At the same time, the oil/water interfacial tensions of vacuum residua fractions from the three kinds of crude oil have been studied and compared (Paper VI and Paper VII). Characteristic properties of emulsions stabilized by the vacuum residua, such as Zeta potential (Paper VIII) and particle size distribution (Paper IX), have also been studied. An attempt has been made to explain the variations of emulsion properties in terms of the interfacial self-assembly of vacuum residua fractions. Finally, based up the above research and using chemometric methods

  15. Emulsion Science Basic Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Schmitt, Véronique

    2007-01-01

    Emulsions are generally made out of two immiscible fluids like oil and water, one being dispersed in the second in the presence of surface-active compounds.They are used as intermediate or end products in a huge range of areas including the food, chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, paint, and coating industries. Besides the broad domain of technological interest, emulsions are raising a variety of fundamental questions at the frontier between physics and chemistry. This book aims to give an overview of the most recent advances in emulsion science. The basic principles, covering aspects of emulsions from their preparation to their destruction, are presented in close relation to both the fundamental physics and the applications of these materials. The book is intended to help scientists and engineers in formulating new materials by giving them the basics of emulsion science.

  16. Superhydrophobic cellulose-based bionanocomposite films from Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Steele, Adam; Martorana, Philip J.; Loth, Eric; Miller, Lance

    2009-04-01

    Inherently superhydrophobic and flexible cellulose-based bionanocomposites were fabricated from solid stabilized (Pickering) emulsions. Emulsions were formed by dispersing cyclosiloxanes in water stabilized by layered silicate particles and were subsequently modified by blending into a zinc oxide nanofluid. The polymer matrix was a blend of cellulose nitrate and fluoroacrylic polymer (Zonyl 8740) precompatibilized in solution. Coatings were spray cast onto aluminum substrates from polymer blends dispersed in modified Pickering emulsions. No postsurface treatment was required to induce superhydrophobicity. Effect of antiseptic additives on bionanocomposite superhydrophobicity is also discussed. Replacing cellulose nitrate with commercial liquid bandage solutions produced identical superhydrophobic coatings.

  17. Relativistic nuclear photographic emulsion for multilayer piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolov, K.S.; Romanovskaya, K.M.; Razorenova, I.F.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear photoemulsion layers having a high sensitivity to relativistic singly charged particles, a high sensitivity stability, time stability of the latent image, as well as a high constancy of the emulsion thickness within the limits of the layer, were developed and fabricated for a large nuclear photoemulsion stack that was exposed in space during the experiments carried out on the artificial earth satellite ''Intercosmos-6''

  18. Desenvolvimento e estudos de estabilidade preliminares de emulsões O/A contendo Cetoconazol 2,0% = Development and Preliminary Stability Evaluations of O/W emulsion containing Ketoconazole 2.0%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Catalá Casteli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver emulsões O/A contendo Cetoconazol 2,0% e avaliar sua estabilidade preliminar por meio da análise de suas características físicoquímicas, tais como homogeneidade, formação de agregados, floculação, cremeação ecoalescência. As emulsões foram formuladas utilizando diferentes bases autoemulsionantes, compostas por álcool cetoestearílico, álcool etoxilado, álcool graxos superiores, ácido esteárico, lanolina e outros. As emulsões foram submetidas aos testes de centrifugação,estresse térmico e ciclo gela-degela, e suas características organolépticas e físico-químicas foram avaliadas no início e no final de cada ensaio. Todas as amostras mantiveram sua homogeneidade após o teste de centrifugação, mas somente os sistemas preparados comceras autoemulsionáveis constituídas por álcool graxos superiores (Polawax NF® e Copolímero de Amônio Acriloil dimetiltaurato VP, Trilauril 4 fosfato, Sesquisosterato de metil glicose, Óleo de flores de verão e Tetradibutil pentaeritritil hidroxihidrocinamato deGlicerina (Hostacerin NCB® mantiveram sua estabilidade após testes de estresse térmico e ciclo gela-degela.The objective of this work was the development of O/W emulsions containing Ketoconazole 2.0% and to evaluate their preliminary stability by analyzing physical-chemical characteristics such as homogeneity, aggregation formation, flocculation, creaming and coalescence. The emulsions were formulated using different self-emulsifying bases, composed of cetearyl alcohol, ethoxylalcohol, higher fatty alcohol, stearic acid, lanolin and others. The O/W emulsions were evaluated by centrifugation test, thermal stress test, and freezing/defrosting cycles, and its organoleptic and physical-chemistry characteristics were analyzed before and after eachassay. All samples maintained their homogeneity after the centrifugation test, but only the systems prepared with self emulsifying composed of

  19. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450 0 C to 1100 0 C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour from an 1100 0 C melt down to 500 0 C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO 2 and (Ni, Mn, Fe) 2 O 4 form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500 0 C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300 0 C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so

  20. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  1. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  2. Emulsions inside Gargamelle

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    A feasibility test was made with a 2.5 litre emulsion stack installed within the chamber. The stack was contained in a thermally insulated aluminium alloy pressure vessel (photo). See Annual Report 1978 p. 79 Fig. 5.

  3. An evaluation of Retaine™ ophthalmic emulsion in the management of tear film stability and ocular surface staining in patients diagnosed with dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousler III G

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available George Ousler III,1 Douglas K Devries,2 Paul M Karpecki,3 Joseph B Ciolino41Ora, Inc, Andover, MA, USA; 2Eye Care Associates of Nevada, Sparks, NV, USA; 3Koffler Vision Group, Lexington, KY, USA; 4Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: A single-center, open-label study consisting of two visits over the course of approximately 2 weeks was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Retaine™ ophthalmic emulsion in improving the signs and symptoms of dry eye. Forty-two subjects were enrolled and received 1–2 drops twice daily of Retaine™ beginning at the first visit (day 1 and ending at the second visit. Subjects were instructed to complete a symptomatology diary twice daily prior to drop instillation through the morning of the second visit. Ocular sign and symptom assessments, visual acuity procedures, and comfort assessments were conducted during both visits. A statistically significant reduction was observed in mean breakup area on the second visit between the predose time and the postdose time (P=0.026. On the second visit, subjects had significantly less corneal fluorescein staining in the superior (P=0.002, central (P=0.017, corneal sum (P=0.011, and all ocular regions combined (P=0.038 than on the first visit. On the second visit, statistically significant reductions in dryness (P<0.001, grittiness (P=0.0217, ocular discomfort (P=0.0017, and all symptoms (P<0.001 were also seen as measured by the Ora Calibra™ Ocular Discomfort and 4-Symptom Questionnaire (0–5 scale. Subjects reported a statistically significant improvement in their abilities to work with a computer at night (P=0.044. Mean drop comfort scores ranged from 1.29–1.81 on the Ora Calibra™ 0–10 Drop Comfort Scale, on which 0 is very comfortable and 10 is very uncomfortable. Retaine™ demonstrates promising results as a novel artificial tear option for individuals suffering from dry eye. The unique mechanism of action of Retaine™ provides enhanced comfort

  4. The effect of simulated acid rain on the stabilization of cadmium in contaminated agricultural soils treated with stabilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hao; Wu, Chunfa; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xumei

    2018-04-16

    Stabilization technology is one of widely used remediation technologies for cadmium (Cd)-contaminated agricultural soils, but stabilized Cd in soil may be activated again when external conditions such as acid rain occurred. Therefore, it is necessary to study the effect of acid rain on the performance of different stabilizing agents on Cd-polluted agriculture soils. In this study, Cd-contaminated soils were treated with mono-calcium phosphate (MCP), mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP), and artificial zeolite (AZ) respectively and incubated 3 months. These treatments were followed by two types of simulated acid rain (sulfuric acid rain and mixed acid rain) with three levels of acidity (pH = 3.0, 4.0, and 5.6). The chemical forms of Cd in the soils were determined by Tessier's sequential extraction procedure, and the leaching toxicities of Cd in the soils were assessed by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The results show that the three stabilizing agents could decrease the mobility of Cd in soil to some degree with or without simulated acid rain (SAR) treatment. The stabilization performances followed the order of AZ stabilized soil, and both anion composition and pH of acid rain were two important factors that influenced the stabilization effect of Cd.

  5. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT K2 HPO4, NaCl LEVELS AND TWO DIFFERENT TEMPARATURES ON SOME EMULSION PROPERTIES OF GOAT MEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa KARAKAYA

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Different levels of K2 HPO4 (0.00 %, 0.25 % and 0.50 % and NaCl (2.5 % and 3.0 % were added into goat meat, at the two different temperatures (11o C and 18o C in order to investigate the emulsion properties in the model emulsion system. Emulsion capacity (EK, emulsion viscocity (EV, emulsion stability ratio (ES, the ratio of separated water (ESO and oil (EYO ratio from the emulsion, and the emulsion pH were determined. K2 HPO4 and NaCl levels and the oil temperatures have significant effect (p

  6. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT K2 HPO4, NaCl LEVELS AND TWO DIFFERENT TEMPARATURES ON SOME EMULSION PROPERTIES OF GOAT MEAT

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa KARAKAYA; Hüsnü Yusuf GÖKALP; Ramazan BAYRAK

    1996-01-01

    Different levels of K2 HPO4 (0.00 %, 0.25 % and 0.50 %) and NaCl (2.5 % and 3.0 %) were added into goat meat, at the two different temperatures (11o C and 18o C) in order to investigate the emulsion properties in the model emulsion system. Emulsion capacity (EK), emulsion viscocity (EV), emulsion stability ratio (ES), the ratio of separated water (ESO) and oil (EYO) ratio from the emulsion, and the emulsion pH were determined. K2 HPO4 and NaCl levels and the oil temperatures have significant ...

  7. Tailoring the Wettability of Colloidal Particles for Pickering Emulsions via Surface Modification and Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meina Xiao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pickering emulsions are water or oil droplets that are stabilized by colloidal particles and have been intensely studied since the late 90s. The surfactant-free nature of these emulsions has little adverse effects such as irritancy and contamination of environment and typically exhibit enhanced stability compared to surfactant-stabilized emulsions. Therefore, they offer promising applications in cosmetics, food science, controlled release, and the manufacturing of microcapsules and porous materials. The wettability of the colloidal particles is the main parameter determining the formation and stability of Pickering emulsions. Tailoring the wettability by surface chemistry or surface roughness offers considerable scope for the design of a variety of hybrid nanoparticles that may serve as novel efficient Pickering emulsion stabilizers. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances in the development of surface modification of nanoparticles.

  8. Two-dimensional simulation of the MHD stability, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Gen-ichi; Amano, Tsuneo.

    1977-09-01

    Growth rate and eigen-function of the MHD instability of a toroidal plasma were calculated numerically as an initial-boundary value problem. When a conducting shell is away from the plasma, toroidicity hardly influences growth rate of the external kink modes in a slender tokamak, but it stabilizes the modes in a fat tokamak. On the other hand, when the shell is near to the plasma, the unstable external modes are stabilized by both toroidicity and shell effect. (auth.)

  9. Transitions in Structure in Oil-in-Water Emulsions As Studied by Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.; Gruijthuijsen, van K.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Transitions in structure of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions were studied using conventional rheometry as well as diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Structural differences were induced by different amounts of stabilizer, and transitions in structure were induced by acidification. Special

  10. Properties of emulsions stabilised by sodium caseinate–chitosan complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinoviadou, K.; Scholten, E.; Moschakis, T.; Biliaderis, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions (10%, w/w, oil) were prepared at pH 5.7 by using electrostatically formed complexes of 0.5% (w/w) sodium caseinate (Na-CAS) and 0–0.6% (w/w) chitosan. Emulsions stabilized by complexes with increased levels of chitosan (>0.2% w/w) had a smaller average droplet size and

  11. The nature of the apolar phase influences the structure of the protein emulsifier in oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine serum albumin. A front-surface fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, Vincent; Brossard, Chantal; Mouhous-Riou, Nadine; Bousseau, Benoît; Llamas, Geneviève; Genot, Claude

    2004-05-20

    Proteins are widely used as emulsifiers in food emulsions. Model emulsions, designed to study emulsifying properties of proteins and their conformation at the interfaces often contain a hydrocarbon as apolar phase instead of natural triglycerides as found in food products. Yet, some results indicate that the protein conformation at the interface depends on the nature of the apolar phase. Front-surface fluorescence spectroscopy was used to evidence differences in the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed at the interface of emulsions prepared with different apolar phases: an hydrocarbon (n-dodecane), a synthetic medium-chain triglyceride (miglyol) and a natural vegetable oil (sunflower oil). Emulsions had similar size distributions of oil droplets. Front-surface fluorescence emission spectra of tryptophanyl residues of the protein (Trp) in emulsions, creams and serums varied as a function of the nature of hydrophobic phase. In emulsions and creams, wavelength of the maximum fluorescence intensities was blue-shifted as compared to the BSA solution. The shift was larger in creams than in emulsions and in samples containing dodecane than with the other apolar phases. Fourth derivative spectra of emulsions and creams exhibited two peaks assigned, respectively, to Trp located in hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments. The peaks were slightly red-shifted in the presence of sunflower oil as compared to miglyol and dodecane and the relative intensity of the "hydrophobic peak" was higher in dodecane. The effects were greater in creams than in emulsions. Fluorescence intensity of Trp was the highest in the serums of emulsions prepared with dodecane as compared to serums issued from sunflower oil and miglyol emulsions. Thus, proportion of adsorbed protein was lower in dodecane emulsions than with the other apolar phases. These results evidence that the mean environment of Trp was more hydrophobic in emulsions and creams than in solutions due to a displacement of

  12. Improving stability of stabilized and multiscale formulations in flow simulations at small time steps

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Ming-Chen

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to show that use of the element-vector-based definition of stabilization parameters, introduced in [T.E. Tezduyar, Computation of moving boundaries and interfaces and stabilization parameters, Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids 43 (2003) 555-575; T.E. Tezduyar, Y. Osawa, Finite element stabilization parameters computed from element matrices and vectors, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 190 (2000) 411-430], circumvents the well-known instability associated with conventional stabilized formulations at small time steps. We describe formulations for linear advection-diffusion and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and test them on three benchmark problems: advection of an L-shaped discontinuity, laminar flow in a square domain at low Reynolds number, and turbulent channel flow at friction-velocity Reynolds number of 395. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Different Co-Antioxidants on the Photochemical- and Functional-Stability of Epigallocatechin-3-gallate in Topical Creams Exposed to Simulated Sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo Scalia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The catechin (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG exhibits high antioxidant activity and it has been reported to provide protection of the skin against damage induced by solar UV radiation. However, EGCG is highly unstable under sunlight. The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the co-antioxidant agents vitamin E, butylated hydroxytoluene, vitamin C and a-lipoic acid for their potential to protect the catechin from photochemical degradation. Model creams (oil-in-water emulsions containing EGCG (1%, w/w alone or combined with equimolar concentrations of co-antioxidant were exposed to a solar simulator at an irradiance corresponding to natural sunlight. Photodegradation was evaluated by HPLC-UV and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Addition of the co-antioxidants vitamin C and a-lipoic acid to the formulation significantly reduced the light-induced decomposition of EGCG from 76.9 ± 4.6% to 20.4 ± 2.7% and 12.6 ± 1.6%, respectively. Conversely, butylated hydroxytoluene had no effect (EGCG loss, 78.1 ± 4.6% and vitamin E enhanced the EGCG photolysis to 84.5 ± 3.4%. The functional stability of the catechin in the creams exposed to the solar simulator was also evaluated by measuring the in vitro antioxidant activity. Following irradiation, the reduction of the EGCG formulation antioxidant power was lower (21.8% than the extent of degradation (76.9%, suggesting the formation of photoproducts with antioxidant properties. The influence of the examined co-antioxidants on the functional stability of the catechin under simulated sunlight paralleled that measured for the EGCG photodecomposition, a-lipoic acid exerting the greatest stabilising effect (antioxidant activity decrease, 1.4%. These results demonstrated that a-lipoic acid is an effective co-antioxidant agent for the stabilization of EGCG in dermatological products for skin photoprotection.

  14. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: Oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Baron, Caroline; Bruni Let, Mette

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed...

  15. Emulsions from Aerosol Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengelmolen; Vincent; Hassall

    1997-12-01

    An electrostatic emulsification apparatus has been designed for the purpose of studying diffusion from oil droplets which have a mean size in the range of approximately 1.5-3.5 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of 40-50%. The emulsification technique involves the collection of a spray of electrically charged oil droplets onto a rotating water film which is sustained from a reservoir. In this way, emulsions with volume fractions of approximately 10(-3) are produced within several minutes at oil flow rates of around 10(-2) ml min-1. Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to assess droplet size distributions for the sprays and emulsions. Results show that the mean emulsion droplet size was smaller than the mean spray droplet size by several orders of magnitude. At flow rates around 10(-2) ml min-1, the spray droplet size distribution was little affected by the applied potential between about -4.20 and -4.65 kV (mean droplet size between approximately 7.6 and 7.8 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of approximately 20%), whereas the mean droplet size of the corresponding emulsion decreased more rapidly with applied potential. Above an applied potential of approximately -4.30 kV, which corresponded to an emulsion droplet size below approximately 2 &mgr;m, the measured volume fraction of the emulsion decreased with respect to the volume fraction as calculated on the basis of total amount of injected oil. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  16. Methane recovery from coal mine gas using hydrate formation in water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Dong-Liang; Ding, Kun; Lu, Yi-Yu; Yan, Jin; Zhao, Wei-Long

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A water-in-oil emulsion was developed for CH_4 separation from coal mine methane gas. • Stable W/O emulsions were obtained with water cut in the range of (10–70%). • Gas hydrates nucleated faster with the reduction of water–oil volume ratio. • Gas uptake increased with the decrease of water–oil volume ratio. • CH_4 recovery was greatly enhanced by hydrate formation in W/O emulsions. - Abstract: In this work, a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion was developed using liquid water, mineral oil, Sorbitan monooleate (Span 80), and cyclopentane. It was employed to enhance gas hydrate formation for CH_4 separation from a simulated coal mine methane (CMM) gas (30 mol% CH_4, 60 mol% N_2, and 10 mol% O_2). The stability test at atmospheric pressure and at a high pressure of 3.5 MPa showed that stable W/O emulsions were obtained when the water–oil volume ratio (WOR) was below 80%. The emulsified droplets size was measured with WOR ranging from 10% to 70%. Then kinetic experiments of CH_4 separation by hydrate formation in W/O emulsions were carried out at 273.6 K and (3.5–5.0) MPa in batch operation. The results indicated that water–oil volume ratio is a key factor that affects the kinetics of gas hydrate formation from the CMM gas mixture. Hydrate nucleation was observed to occur faster while WOR was decreased, and gas uptake increased significantly with the decrease of WOR. CH_4 concentration in the recovered gas mixture was increased to 52 mol% as compared to 30 mol% in the original gas mixture through one-stage hydrate formation in the W/O emulsions. It was found that the experimental conditions of 273.6 K, 3.5 MPa and WOR = 30% were favorable for CH_4 recovery from the CMM gas. The CH_4 recovery obtained under these conditions was 43%. It was higher than those obtained at WOR = 10% and 70%, and was greatly increased as compared with those obtained in the same reactor with the presence of TBAB (26%) and CP (33%).

  17. Dynamic Biological Functioning Important for Simulating and Stabilizing Ocean Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, P. J.; Matear, R. J.; Chase, Z.; Phipps, S. J.; Bindoff, N. L.

    2018-04-01

    The biogeochemistry of the ocean exerts a strong influence on the climate by modulating atmospheric greenhouse gases. In turn, ocean biogeochemistry depends on numerous physical and biological processes that change over space and time. Accurately simulating these processes is fundamental for accurately simulating the ocean's role within the climate. However, our simulation of these processes is often simplistic, despite a growing understanding of underlying biological dynamics. Here we explore how new parameterizations of biological processes affect simulated biogeochemical properties in a global ocean model. We combine 6 different physical realizations with 6 different biogeochemical parameterizations (36 unique ocean states). The biogeochemical parameterizations, all previously published, aim to more accurately represent the response of ocean biology to changing physical conditions. We make three major findings. First, oxygen, carbon, alkalinity, and phosphate fields are more sensitive to changes in the ocean's physical state. Only nitrate is more sensitive to changes in biological processes, and we suggest that assessment protocols for ocean biogeochemical models formally include the marine nitrogen cycle to assess their performance. Second, we show that dynamic variations in the production, remineralization, and stoichiometry of organic matter in response to changing environmental conditions benefit the simulation of ocean biogeochemistry. Third, dynamic biological functioning reduces the sensitivity of biogeochemical properties to physical change. Carbon and nitrogen inventories were 50% and 20% less sensitive to physical changes, respectively, in simulations that incorporated dynamic biological functioning. These results highlight the importance of a dynamic biology for ocean properties and climate.

  18. Immunomodulatory and Physical Effects of Oil Composition in Vaccine Adjuvant Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reed, Steven G.; Vedvick, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Squalene-based oil-in-water emulsions have been used for years in some seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. However, concerns have been expressed regarding squalene source and potential biological activities. Little information is available regarding the immunomodulatory activity of squalene in comparison with other metabolizable oils in the context of oil-in-water emulsions formulated with vaccines. The present work describes the manufacture and physical characterization of emulsions composed of different classes of oils, including squalene, long chain triglycerides, a medium chain triglyceride, and a perfluorocarbon, all emulsified with egg phosphatidylcholine. Some differences were apparent among the non-squalene oils in terms of emulsion stability, including higher size polydispersity in the perfluorocarbon emulsion, more rapid visual instability at 60 °C for the long-chain triglyceride and perfluorocarbon emulsions, and an increased creaming rate in the medium-chain triglyceride emulsion at 60 °C as detected by laser scattering optical profiling. The biological activity of each of these emulsions was compared when formulated with either a recombinant malaria antigen or a split-virus inactivated influenza vaccine. Overall, vaccines containing the squalene emulsion elicited higher antibody titers and more abundant long-lived plasma cells than vaccines containing emulsions based on other oils. Since squalene-based emulsions show higher adjuvant potency compared to the other oils tested, non-squalene oils may be more suitable as carriers of amphiphilic or hydrophobic immunostimulatory molecules (such as TLR agonists) rather than as stand-alone adjuvants. PMID:21906648

  19. Distributed-Order Dynamic Systems Stability, Simulation, Applications and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Zhuang; Podlubny, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Distributed-order differential equations, a generalization of fractional calculus, are of increasing importance in many fields of science and engineering from the behaviour of complex dielectric media to the modelling of nonlinear systems. This Brief will broaden the toolbox available to researchers interested in modeling, analysis, control and filtering. It contains contextual material outlining the progression from integer-order, through fractional-order to distributed-order systems. Stability issues are addressed with graphical and numerical results highlighting the fundamental differences between constant-, integer-, and distributed-order treatments. The power of the distributed-order model is demonstrated with work on the stability of noncommensurate-order linear time-invariant systems. Generic applications of the distributed-order operator follow: signal processing and viscoelastic damping of a mass–spring set up. A new general approach to discretization of distributed-order derivatives and integrals ...

  20. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R&D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion.

  1. Development of High Sensitivity Nuclear Emulsion and Fine Grained Emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, H.; Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Naganawa, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear emulsion is a particle detector having high spacial resolution and angular resolution. It became useful for large statistics experiment thanks to the development of automatic scanning system. In 2010, a facility for emulsion production was introduced and R and D of nuclear emulsion began at Nagoya university. In this paper, we present results of development of the high sensitivity emulsion and fine grained emulsion for dark matter search experiment. Improvement of sensitivity is achieved by raising density of silver halide crystals and doping well-adjusted amount of chemicals. Production of fine grained emulsion was difficult because of unexpected crystal condensation. By mixing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to gelatin as a binder, we succeeded in making a stable fine grained emulsion

  2. The development of polyurethane modified bitumen emulsions for cold mix applications

    OpenAIRE

    Carrera Páez, Virginia; Cuadri Vega, Antonio Abad; García Morales, Moisés; Partal López, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Bitumen emulsions stand for an alternative paving practice to the traditional hot-mix asphalts. In addition, modified bitumen emulsions show a better performance than unmodified ones. This work studies the feasibility of obtaining polyurethane modified bitumen emulsions, in which an isocyanate-functionalized polyol constitutes the bitumen modifier (in varying concentration from 1 to 4 wt.%). Storage stability and high in-service performance are evaluated by means of evolution of droplet size ...

  3. Simulation of longitudinal differential protection of transmission lines with additional stabilization and APU system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajić Tomislav D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the algorithm for the longitudinal differential protection of transmission lines with automatic reclosing. Classic stabilization is not sufficient for avoiding of unnecessary operations caused by saturation of current transformer. This problem can occur during the fault plased outside of the protected zone of the transmission line. It is shown how unnecessary operation can occur during the outside fault whithout using of additional stabilization. The different types of faults were simulated and comparison of relay operations with and without additional stabilization is presented. The simulations were performed on the three-phase model of the transmission line formed by using of MATLAB/Simulink program.

  4. Inverted emulsion drilling fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana, I; Astanei, E; Mireanu, G; Orosz, M; Popescu, F; Vasile, I

    1979-07-28

    The subject of the invention is the method of obtaining inverted drilling fluid which is required during stripping of a productive bed and ending of a well where difficulties develop during drilling of the argillaceous rock. Example: in a reservoir with capacity 30 m/sup 3/, 10 m/sup 3/ of diesel fuel are added. A total of 1000 kg of emulsifier are added to the diesel fuel consisting of: 85 mass% of a mixture of sodium and potassium salts of fatty acids, residues of fatty acids or naphthene acids with high molecular weight taken in proportion of 10:90; 5 mass% of a mixture of polymers with hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties obtained by mixing 75 mass% of polyethylene oxide with molecular weight 10,000 and 25 mass% of propylene oxide with molecular weight 15,000, and 10 mass% of salt on alkaline earth metal (preferably calcium chloride). The mixture is mixed into complete dissolving. Then 1200 kg of filtering accelerator are added obtained from concentrated sulfuric acid serving for sulfur oxidation, asphalt substance with softening temperature 85-104/sup 0/C and fatty acids C/sub 10/-C/sub 20/ taken in a proportion of 23.70 and 7 mass% The mixture obtained in this manner is neutralized by adding calcium hydroxide and equal quantities of alumina and activated bentonite clay in a concentration of 1-10 mass%, more preferably 5 mass% in relation to the initial mixture. The obtained mass is mixed until complete dispersion, after which 200 kg of organophilic clay are added obtained from bentonite of the type montmorillonite of sodium by processing with derivate obtained from amine of the type of the quaternary base of ammonium salt, and agent of hydrophobization of the type of fatty alcohols, fatty acids, nonion surfactants of the block-polymer type. After complete dispersion of the organophilic clay, 100 kg of stabilizer of emulsion of the surfactant type was added with molecular weight of 250010,000, more preferably 5000, in concentration of 0.1-5.0 mass%, more

  5. Transient Stability Improvement of IEEE 9 Bus System Using Power World Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Ramandeep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of transient stability of power system was one of the most challenging research areas in power engineer.The main aim of this paper was transient stability analysis and improvement of IEEE 9 bus system. These studies were computed using POWER WORLD SIMULATOR. The IEEE 9 bus system was modelled in power world simulator and load flow studies were performed to determine pre-fault conditions in the system using Newton-Raphson method. The transient stability analysis was carried out using Runga method during three-phase balanced fault. For the improvement transient stability, the general methods adopted were fast acting exciters, FACT devices and addition of parallel transmission line. These techniques play an important role in improving the transient stability, increasing transmission capacity and damping low frequency oscillations.

  6. Fast simulation of wind generation for frequency stability analysis in island power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, James [EirGrid, Dublin (Ireland)

    2010-07-01

    Frequency stability is a major issue for power system planning and operation in an island power system such as Ireland. As increasing amounts of variable speed wind generation are added to the system, this issue becomes more prominent, as variable speed wind generation does not provide an inherent inertial response. This lack of an inertial response means that simplified models for variable speed wind farms can be used for investigating frequency stability. EirGrid uses DIgSILENT Power Factory (as well as other software tools) to investigate frequency stability. In PowerFactory, an automation program has been created to convert detailed wind farm representation (as necessary for other types of analysis) to negative load models for frequency stability analysis. The advantage of this approach is much-improved simulation speed without loss of accuracy. This approach can also be to study future wind energy targets, and long-term simulation of voltage stability. (orig.)

  7. Utilisation of water-in-oil-water (W1/O/W2) double emulsion in a set-type yogurt model for the delivery of probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kadri, Hani; Lalou, Sofia; Mantzouridou, FaniTh; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2018-05-01

    W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion in set-type yogurt has the potential to segregate probiotics in order to avoid interference with the starter culture as well as protection against harsh processing and digestion conditions. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei DC 412 probiotic cells in milk-based W 1 /O/W 2 emulsions were incorporated in yogurt, in addition to starter cultures Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, and the effect on the fermentation, bacterial growth kinetics, physicochemical properties, and structural characteristics was investigated. Stability of W 1 /O/W 2 was monitored with optical microscopy and cryo-SEM and localisation of encapsulated L. paracasei in yogurt was monitored using fluorescent microscopy. During fermentation, starter culture was not affected by introduction of L. paracasei and/or W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion. The viability of L. paracasei encapsulated in W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion was enhanced during storage and after exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. L. paracasei remained within the inner W 1 phase till the end of the storage period (28 days at 4 °C). Moreover, W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion altered physicochemical and textural properties; however, these were within acceptable range. These results demonstrate the capability of W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion to be utilised for probiotic fortification of yogurt to increase functionality without interfering with starter culture and fermentation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Design of Simulation Product for Stability of Electric Power System Using Power System Stabilizer and Optimal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaidi, Agus; Hamid, K. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    This paper will discuss the use of optimal control and Power System Stabilizer (PSS) in improving the oscillation of electric power system. Oscillations in the electric power system can occur due to the sudden release of the load (Switcing-Off). The oscillation of an unstable system for a long time causes the equipment to work in an interruption. To overcome this problem, a control device is required that can work effectively in repairing the oscillation. The power system is modeled from the Single Machine Infinite Bus Model (SMIB). The state space equation is used to mathematically model SMIB. SMIB system which is a plant will be formed togetherness state variables (State-Space), using riccati equation then determined the optimal gain as controller plant. Plant is also controlled by Power Stabilizer System using phase compensation method. Using Matlab Software based simulation will be observed response of rotor speed change and rotor angle change for each of the two controlling methods. Simulation results using the Simulink-MATLAB 6.1 software will compare the analysis of the plant state in Open loop state and use the controller. The simulation response shows that the optimal control and PSS can improve the stability of the power system in terms of acceleration to achieve settling-time and Over Shoot improvement. From the results of both methods are able to improve system performance.

  9. Integrated, Continuous Emulsion Creamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Wesley G; Hackler, Amber L; Cavett, Valerie J; Price, Alexander K; Paegel, Brian M

    2017-12-19

    Automated and reproducible sample handling is a key requirement for high-throughput compound screening and currently demands heavy reliance on expensive robotics in screening centers. Integrated droplet microfluidic screening processors are poised to replace robotic automation by miniaturizing biochemical reactions to the droplet scale. These processors must generate, incubate, and sort droplets for continuous droplet screening, passively handling millions of droplets with complete uniformity, especially during the key step of sample incubation. Here, we disclose an integrated microfluidic emulsion creamer that packs ("creams") assay droplets by draining away excess oil through microfabricated drain channels. The drained oil coflows with creamed emulsion and then reintroduces the oil to disperse the droplets at the circuit terminus for analysis. Creamed emulsion assay incubation time dispersion was 1.7%, 3-fold less than other reported incubators. The integrated, continuous emulsion creamer (ICEcreamer) was used to miniaturize and optimize measurements of various enzymatic activities (phosphodiesterase, kinase, bacterial translation) under multiple- and single-turnover conditions. Combining the ICEcreamer with current integrated microfluidic DNA-encoded library bead processors eliminates potentially cumbersome instrumentation engineering challenges and is compatible with assays of diverse target class activities commonly investigated in drug discovery.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of bluff-body-stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Arias, Paul G.; Lee, Bok Jik; Im, Hong G.

    2014-01-01

    are important in confined multicomponent reacting flows. Results show that the DNS with embedded boundaries can be extended to more complex geometries without loss of accuracy and the high fidelity simulation data can be used to develop and validate turbulence and combustion models for the design of practical combustion devices.

  11. Simulation methods with extended stability for stiff biochemical Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rué Pau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing computer power, simulating the dynamics of complex systems in chemistry and biology is becoming increasingly routine. The modelling of individual reactions in (biochemical systems involves a large number of random events that can be simulated by the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA. The key quantity is the step size, or waiting time, τ, whose value inversely depends on the size of the propensities of the different channel reactions and which needs to be re-evaluated after every firing event. Such a discrete event simulation may be extremely expensive, in particular for stiff systems where τ can be very short due to the fast kinetics of some of the channel reactions. Several alternative methods have been put forward to increase the integration step size. The so-called τ-leap approach takes a larger step size by allowing all the reactions to fire, from a Poisson or Binomial distribution, within that step. Although the expected value for the different species in the reactive system is maintained with respect to more precise methods, the variance at steady state can suffer from large errors as τ grows. Results In this paper we extend Poisson τ-leap methods to a general class of Runge-Kutta (RK τ-leap methods. We show that with the proper selection of the coefficients, the variance of the extended τ-leap can be well-behaved, leading to significantly larger step sizes. Conclusions The benefit of adapting the extended method to the use of RK frameworks is clear in terms of speed of calculation, as the number of evaluations of the Poisson distribution is still one set per time step, as in the original τ-leap method. The approach paves the way to explore new multiscale methods to simulate (biochemical systems.

  12. Preparation of Lipid Nano emulsions Incorporating Curcumin for Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuchapreeda, S.; Anuchapreeda, S.; Fukumori, Y.; Ichikawa, H.; Okonogi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new formulation of a curcumin lipid nano emulsion having the smallest particle size, the highest loading, and a good physical stability for cancer chemotherapy. Curcumin lipid nano emulsions were prepared by a modified thin-film hydration method followed by sonication. Soybean oil, hydrogenated L-α-phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk, and co surfactants were used to formulate the emulsions. The resultant nano emulsions showed mean particle diameter of 47-55 nm, could incorporate 23-28 mg curcumin per 30 mL, and were stable in particle size for 60 days at 4 degree C. The cytotoxicity studies of curucumin solution and curcumin-loaded nano emulsion using B16F10 and leukemic cell lines showed IC 50 values ranging from 3.5 to 30.1 and 22.2 to 53.7μM, respectively. These results demonstrated the successful incorporation of curcumin into lipid nano emulsion particles with small particle size, high loading capacity, good physical stability, and preserved cytotoxicity

  13. Sardine Fish Oil By Sentrifugation and Adsorbent for Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Haryati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sardine fish meal by-product contain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic (DHA and it can be made as emulsion. The purpose of this study were to determine the best fish oil emulsion by mixingthe oil phase (lecithin 3% and oil and water phase (carboxymethyl cellulose/CMC 2% and fruit juice and then stored until creaming, and the emulsion is analyzed their viscosity, pH, percent of stability and longseparation. Sardine oil is separated from the emulsion and tested oxidation parameters. The best emulsion was fish oil emulsion after refined without citric acid (RTS with viscosity (2470.31 cP, pH (5.64, percent of stability (56.14% and long separation (14 days. Primary and secondary oxidation parameters of RTS  were FFA (14.87%, PV (14.43 meq/kg, AV (32.57 meq KOH/g, AnV (17.3 meq/kg, and Totox (46.16 meq/kg.

  14. Studies of water-in-oil emulsions : testing of emulsion formation in OHMSETT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the stability of water-in-oil emulsions in the OHMSETT tank facility. The results were then compared with previous laboratory studies which suggested that the stability of emulsions can be grouped into four categories, stable, unstable, meso-stable and entrained. It has been determined that entrained emulsions can retain oil by viscous forces long enough for interfacial agents, resins and asphaltenes to stabilize the droplets. This paper also described the difference in viscosity between the 4 categories of emulsion stability. The OHMSETT tests were conducted in two series of one week each. The first series of tests were conducted in July and involved 12 experiments on 2 different types of oils which were placed at varying thicknesses on the water. The second set of tests were conducted in November and involved 12 experiments on 6 oils. The rheological properties of the oils were measured and compared to the same oils undergoing emulsification in the laboratory. The oils and water-in-oil states produced were found to have analogous properties between the laboratory and the first set of tests at the OHMSETT facility. All the oils tested produced entrained water-in-oil states in both the laboratory and the test tank. The energy in the two test conditions was found to be similar, with the OHMSETT emulsions similar to one produced in the laboratory at high energies. The second series of tests at OHMSETT did not result in the expected water in-oil- states. This unexpected result was most likely due to the residual surfactant from an earlier dispersant experiment. The study showed that the conditions for emulsion formation are analogous in the OHMSETT tank and in the laboratory tests. The level of energy is considered to be the major variant. It was concluded that the energy levels between the laboratory mixing experiments and the OHMSETT is similar. It was shown that surfactants left over from dispersant testing inhibited the formation

  15. Two-fluid model stability, simulation and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Bertodano, Martín López de; Clausse, Alejandro; Ransom, Victor H

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the linear and nonlinear two-phase stability of the one-dimensional Two-Fluid Model (TFM) material waves and the numerical methods used to solve it. The TFM fluid dynamic stability is a problem that remains open since its inception more than forty years ago. The difficulty is formidable because it involves the combined challenges of two-phase topological structure and turbulence, both nonlinear phenomena. The one dimensional approach permits the separation of the former from the latter. The authors first analyze the kinematic and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities with the simplified one-dimensional Fixed-Flux Model (FFM). They then analyze the density wave instability with the well-known Drift-Flux Model. They demonstrate that the Fixed-Flux and Drift-Flux assumptions are two complementary TFM simplifications that address two-phase local and global linear instabilities separately. Furthermore, they demonstrate with a well-posed FFM and a DFM two cases of nonlinear two-phase behavior that are ...

  16. Showing Emulsion Properties with Common Dairy Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Diaz, Carlos; Gonzalez-Romero, Elisa

    1996-09-01

    Foods are mixtures of different chemical compounds, and the quality we sense (taste, texture, color, etc.) are all manifestations of its chemical properties. Some of them can be visualized with the aid of simple, safe and inexpensive experiments using dairy products that can be found in any kitchen and using almost exclusively kitchen utensils. In this paper we propose some of them related with food emulsions. Food emulsions cover an extremely wide area of daily-life applications such as milk, sauces, dressings and beverages. Experimentation with some culinary recipes to prepare them and the analyisis of the observed results is close to ideal subject for the introduction of chemical principles, allowing to discuss about the nature and composition of foods, the effects of additives, etc. At the same time it allows to get insights into the scientific reasons that underlie on the recipes (something that it is not usually found in most cookbooks). For example, when making an emulsion like mayonnaise, why the egg yolks and water are the first materials in the bowl , and the oil is added to them rather than in the other way around? How you can "rescue" separate emulsions (mayonnaise)? Which parameters affect emulsion stability? Since safety, in its broad sense, is the first requisite for any food, concerns about food exist throughout the world and the more we are aware of our everyday life, the more likely we will be to deal productively with the consequences. On the other hand, understanding what foods are and how cooking works destroys no delightful mystery of the art of cuisine, instead the mystery expands.

  17. Pickering interfacial catalysis for biphasic systems: from emulsion design to green reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera-Titus, Marc; Leclercq, Loïc; Clacens, Jean-Marc; De Campo, Floryan; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique

    2015-02-09

    Pickering emulsions are surfactant-free dispersions of two immiscible fluids that are kinetically stabilized by colloidal particles. For ecological reasons, these systems have undergone a resurgence of interest to mitigate the use of synthetic surfactants and solvents. Moreover, the use of colloidal particles as stabilizers provides emulsions with original properties compared to surfactant-stabilized emulsions, microemulsions, and micellar systems. Despite these specific advantages, the application of Pickering emulsions to catalysis has been rarely explored. This Minireview describes very recent examples of hybrid and composite amphiphilic materials for the design of interfacial catalysts in Pickering emulsions with special emphasis on their assets and challenges for industrially relevant biphasic reactions in fine chemistry, biofuel upgrading, and depollution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Water-in-oil emulsions results of formation studies and applicability to oil spill modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, Merv; Fieldhouse, Ben; Mullin, Joe

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarises studies of water-in-oil emulsions, their stability, and modelling of their formation. Studies show that water-in-oil emulsions might be characterised into three categories (stable, mesostable and unstable). These categories were established by visual appearance, elasticity and viscosity difference. It was also shown that water content was not an important factor. A fourth category of water-in-oil exists, that of water entrainment, which is not an emulsion. Water-in-oil emulsions made from crude oils have different classes of stabilities as a result of the asphaltene and resin contents. The differences in the emulsion types are readily distinguished both by their rheological properties, and simply by appearance. The apparent viscosity of a stable emulsion at a shear rate of one reciprocal second, is at least three orders-of-magnitude greater than the starting oil. An unstable emulsion usually has a viscosity no more than one order-of-magnitude greater than that of the starting oil. A stable emulsion has a significant elasticity, whereas an unstable emulsion does not. Stable emulsions have sufficient asphaltenes (>∼7%) to establish films of these compounds around water droplets. Mesostable emulsions have insufficient asphaltenes to render them completely stable. Stability is achieved by visco-elastic retention of water and secondarily by the presence of asphaltene or resin films. Mesostable emulsions display apparent viscosities of about 80-600 times that of the starting oil and true viscosities of 20-200 times that of the starting oil. Mesostable emulsions have an asphaltene and resin content greater than 3%. Entrained water occurs when a viscous oil retains larger water droplets, but conditions are not suitable for the formation of an emulsion. Entrained water may have a viscosity that is similar or slightly greater (∼ 2-10 times) than the starting oil. It was found that emulsion formation occurs at a threshold energy, however this energy

  19. Rippled shock front solutions for testing hydrodynamic stability simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    The response of a shock front to arbitrary small perturbations can be calculated analytically. Such rippled shock front solutions are useful for determining the accuracy of hydrodynamic simulation codes such as LASNEX [Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 2, 51 (1977)], which are used to compute perturbation growth in inertial fusion targets. The LASNEX fractional errors are of order κ 2 L 2 , where κ is the transverse wavenumber of the perturbation, and L is the largest zone dimension. Numerical errors are about 25% for a calculation using 26 zones per transverse wavelength

  20. Serum separation and structure of depletion- and bridging-flocculated emulsions: a comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijdenstein, T.B.J.; Winden, van A.J.M.; Vliet, van T.; Aken, van G.A.

    2004-01-01

    Stability against demixing, rheology and microstructure of emulsions that were flocculated by depletion or bridging were compared. Flocculation by depletion and bridging was induced by addition of the polysaccharide carboxy-methylcellulose (CMC) to emulsions that were stabilised by ß-lactoglobulin

  1. Transition from Spherical to Irregular Dispersed Phase in Water/Oil Emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Limage, S.; Grigoriev, D.O.; Krägel, J.; Dutschk, Victoria; Vincent-Bonnieu, S.; Miller, R.; Antoni, M.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk properties of transparent and dilute water in paraffin oil emulsions stabilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are analyzed by optical scanning tomography. Each scanning shot of the considered emulsions has a precision of 1 mu m. The influence of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in the structure

  2. The emulsifying and tribological properties of modified graphene oxide in oil-in-water emulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Yinglei; Zeng, Xiangqiong; Ren, Tianhui; de Vries, Erik G.; van der Heide, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was asymmetric chemically modified with myristyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) to get modified graphene oxide (MGO). This MGO was used as an emulsifier and additive in oil-in-water emulsion. The emulsifying tests showed MGO greatly improved the stability of base emulsion and

  3. Stabilizing simulations of complex stochastic representations for quantum dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, C; Petersen, W P, E-mail: wpp@math.ethz.ch [Seminar for Applied Mathematics, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-03-04

    Path integral representations of quantum dynamics can often be formulated as stochastic differential equations (SDEs). In a series of papers, Corney and Drummond (2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 260401), Deuar and Drummond (2001 Comput. Phys. Commun. 142 442-5), Drummond and Gardnier (1980 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 13 2353-68), Gardiner and Zoller (2004 Quantum Noise: A Handbook of Markovian and Non-Markovian Quantum Stochastic Methods with Applications to Quantum Optics (Springer Series in Synergetics) 3rd edn (Berlin: Springer)) and Gilchrist et al (1997 Phys. Rev. A 55 3014-32) and their collaborators have derived SDEs from coherent states representations for density matrices. Computationally, these SDEs are attractive because they seem simple to simulate. They can be quite unstable, however. In this paper, we consider some of the instabilities and propose a few remedies. Particularly, because the variances of the simulated paths typically grow exponentially, the processes become de-localized in relatively short times. Hence, the issues of boundary conditions and stable integration methods become important. We use the Bose-Einstein Hamiltonian as an example. Our results reveal that it is possible to significantly extend integration times and show the periodic structure of certain functionals.

  4. Simulation of beam pointing stability on targeting plane of high power excimer laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dahui; Zhao Xueqing; Zhang Yongsheng; Zheng Guoxin; Hu Yun; Zhao Jun

    2011-01-01

    Based on characteristics of image-relaying structure in high power excimer MOPA laser system, simulation and analysis software of targeting beam's barycenter stability was designed by using LABVIEW and MATLAB. Simulation was made to measured results of every optical component in laboratory environment. Simulation and validation of budget values for optical components was and optimization of error budget of system was accomplished via post-allocation for several times. It is shown that targeting beam's barycenter stability in the condition of current laboratory environment can't satisfy needs and index of high demand optical components can be allotted to 1.7 μrad when index of low demand optical components have some stability margin. These results can provide a guide to construction of system and design and machining of optical components and optimization of system. Optical components of laboratory on work can satisfy optimized distributed index, which reduce the demand of structure to some extent. (authors)

  5. arXiv Simulation of gain stability of THGEM gas-avalanche particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, P.M.M.; Azevedo, C.D.R.; Breskin, A.; Bressler, S.; Oliveira, C.A.B.; Silva, A.L.M.; Veenhof, R.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.

    2018-01-19

    Charging-up processes affecting gain stability in Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (THGEM) were studied with a dedicated simulation toolkit. Integrated with Garfield++, it provides an effective platform for systematic phenomenological studies of charging-up processes in MPGD detectors. We describe the simulation tool and the fine-tuning of the step-size required for the algorithm convergence, in relation to physical parameters. Simulation results of gain stability over time in THGEM detectors are presented, exploring the role of electrode-thickness and applied voltage on its evolution. The results show that the total amount of irradiated charge through electrode's hole needed for reaching gain stabilization is in the range of tens to hundreds of pC, depending on the detector geometry and operational voltage. These results are in agreement with experimental observations presented previously.

  6. Contribution to the development study of a personal fast neutron dosemeter using nuclear emulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, C.

    1985-02-01

    This work deals with the response of a personal neutron dosemeter using nuclear emulsion. The main characteristics of the detector are studied with the help of a computer programme simulating the conditions of the formation of recoil protons tracks recorded by nuclear emulsions. The lecture limits of nuclear emulsions with light microscope and the validity of our computer code are checked by comparing our theoretical values with experimental results [fr

  7. Charm studies in emulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinin, Sergey

    Neutrino-nucleon scattering is an effective way to investigate the inner structure of the nucleon, to extract the Standard Model parameters and to explore heavy quarks production dynamics. In the last decades, several experiments have been constructed to study weak interactions of neutrinos with nucleons. One of them was CERN-WA95 experiment operated by the CHORUS collaboration. It is based on a hybrid detector with nuclear emulsion as a target followed by electronic devices. Nuclear emulsion provides three dimensional spatial information with an outstanding resolution of the order of one micron. Therefore, it is ideal to detect short-lived particles. A special technique has been developed to reconstruct events in the emulsion which allows to perform a detailed investigation of events such as charmed hadrons production by neutrinos. As a result, the backround in the selected charm sample is up to six times lower compared to similar experiments. Such a method also permits to make direct measurements of some qu...

  8. Calculation and Simulation Study on Transient Stability of Power System Based on Matlab/Simulink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiu Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability of the power system is destroyed, will cause a large number of users power outage, even cause the collapse of the whole system, extremely serious consequences. Based on the analysis in single machine infinite system as an example, when at the f point two phase ground fault occurs, the fault lines on either side of the circuit breaker tripping resection at the same time,respectively by two kinds of calculation and simulation methods of system transient stability analysis, the conclusion are consistent. and the simulation analysis is superior to calculation analysis.

  9. Rheology of unstable mineral emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolović Dunja S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the rheology of mineral oils and their unstable water emulsion were investigated. The oil samples were domestic crude oil UA, its fractions UA1, UA4 and blend semi-product UP1, while the concentration of oil in water emulsions was in the range from 1 up to 30%. The results were analyzed based on shear stress. The oil samples UA, UA1 and UP1 are Newtonian fluids, while UA4 is pseudoplastic fluid. The samples UA and UA4 show higher value of shear stress (83.75 Pa, 297 Pa, then other two samples UA1 and UP1 (18.41 Pa, 17.52 Pa. Rheology of investigated oils due to its complex chemical composition should be analyzed as a simultaneous effect of all their components. Therefore, structural composition of the oils was determined, namely content of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and asphaltenes. All samples contain paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics but only oils UA and UA4 contain asphaltenes as well. All investigated emulsions except 30% EUA4 are Newtonian fluids. The EUA4 30% emulsion shows pseudoplastic behaviour, and it is the only 30% emulsion among investigated ones that achieves lower shear stress then its oil. The characteristics of oil samples that could have an influence on their properties and their emulsion rheology, were determined. These characteristics are: neutralization number, interfacial tension, dielectric constant, and emulsivity. Oil samples UA and UA4 have significantly higher values of neutralization number, dielectric constants, and emulsivity. The sample UA has the lowest value of interface tension and the greatest emulsivity, indicating that this oil, among all investigated, has the highest preference for building emulsion. This could be the reason why 20% and 30% emulsions of the oil UA achieve the highest shear stress among all investigated emulsions.

  10. Submicron Emulsions and Their Applications in Oral Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Veenu; Patel, Mitali; Sawant, Krutika

    2016-01-01

    A "submicron emulsion" is an isotropic mixture of drug, lipids, and surfactants, usually with hydrophilic cosolvents and with droplet diameters ranging from 10 to 500 nm. Submicron emulsions are of increasing interest in medicine due to their kinetic stability, high solubilizing capacity, and tiny globule size. Because of these properties, they have been applied in various fields, such as personal care, cosmetics, health care, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. Submicron emulsions are by far the most advanced nanoparticulate systems for the systemic delivery of biologically active agents for controlled drug delivery and targeting. They are designed mainly for pharmaceutical formulations suitable for various routes of administration like parenteral, ocular, transdermal, and oral. This review article describes the marked potential of submicron emulsions for oral drug delivery owing to their numerous advantages like reduced first pass metabolism, inhibition of P-glycoprotein efflux system, and enhanced absorption via intestinal lymphatic pathway. To overcome the limitations of liquid dosage forms, submicron emulsions can be formulated into solid dosage forms such as solid self-emulsifying systems. This article covers various types of submicron emulsions like microemulsion, nanoemulsion, and self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS), and their potential pharmaceutical applications in oral delivery with emphasis on their advantages, limitations, and advancements.

  11. The calcium phosphate coating of soy lecithin nanoemulsion with performance in stability and as an oxygen carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu B.

    This work studied the relationship between surfactant, oil, and water, by building ternary phase diagrams, the goal of which was to identify the oil-in-water phase composition. The resulting nano-sized emulsion was coated with dicalcium phosphate by utilizing the ionic affinity between calcium ions and the emulsion surface. Since the desired function of the particle is as an oxygen carrier, the particle stability, oxygen capacity, and oxygen release rate were investigated. The first step in the process was to construct ternary phase diagrams with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA) and soy derived lecithin. The results showed that the lecithin surfactant formed an oil-in-water phase region that was 36 times greater than that of DOPA. With the desired phase composition set, the lecithin emulsion was extruded, resulting in a well-dispersed nanosized particle. A pH titration study of the emulsion found an optimized calcium phosphate coating condition at pH 8.8, at which, the calcium ion had a greater affinity for the emulsion surface than phosphate. A Hill plot was used to show calcium cooperativeness on the emulsion surface which suggested one calcium ion binds to one lecithin molecule. The lecithin emulsion particles were then coated with calcium phosphate using a layering technique that allowed for careful control of the coating thickness. The overall particle hydrodynamic radius was consistent with the growth of the calcium phosphate coating, from 8 nm to 28 nm. This observation was further supported with cryo-TEM measurements. The stability of the coated emulsion was tested in conditions that simulate practical thermal, physical, and time-dependent conditions. Throughout the tests, the coated emulsion exhibited a constant mono-dispersed particle size, while the uncoated emulsion size fluctuated greatly and exhibited increased polydispersion. The fast mixing method with the stopped-flow apparatus was employed to test the product as an oxygen carrier, and it

  12. Emulsion design for the delivery of β-carotene in complex food systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Like; Wang, Di; Liu, Fuguo; Gao, Yanxiang

    2018-03-24

    β-Carotene has been widely investigated both in the industry and academia, due to its unique bioactive attributes as an antioxidant and pro-vitamin A. Many attempts were made to design delivery systems for β-carotene to improve its dispersant state and chemical stability, and finally to enhance the functionality. Different types of oil-in-water emulsions were proved to be effective delivery systems for lipophilic bioactive ingredients, and intensive studies were performed on β-carotene emulsions in the last decade. Emulsions are thermodynamically unstable, and emulsions with intact structures are preferable in delivering β-carotene during processing and storage. β-Carotene in emulsions with smaller particle size has poor stability, and protein-type emulsifiers and additional antioxidants are effective in protecting β-carotene from degradation. Recent development in the design of protein-polyphenol conjugates has provided a novel approach to improve the stability of β-carotene emulsions. When β-carotene is consumed, its bioaccessibility is highly influenced by the digestion of lipids, and β-carotene in smaller oil droplets containing long-chain fatty acids has a higher bioaccessibility. In order to better deliver β-carotene in complex food products, some novel emulsions with tailor-made structures have been developed, e.g., multilayer emulsions, solid lipid particles, Pickering emulsions. This review summarizes the updated understanding of emulsion-based delivery systems for β-carotene, and how emulsions can be better designed to fulfill the benefits of β-carotene in functional foods.

  13. Mixing Time, Inversion and Multiple Emulsion Formation in a Limonene and Water Pickering Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sawiak

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available It has previously been demonstrated that particle-stabilized emulsions comprised of limonene, water and fumed silica particles exhibit complex emulsification behavior as a function of composition and the duration of the emulsification step. Most notably the system can invert from being oil-continuous to being water-continuous under prolonged mixing. Here we investigate this phenomenon experimentally for the regime where water is the majority liquid. We prepare samples using a range of different emulsification times and we examine the final properties in bulk and via confocal microscopy. We use the images to quantitatively track the sizes of droplets and clusters of particles. We find that a dense emulsion of water droplets forms initially which is transformed, in time, into a water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion with concomitant changes in droplet and cluster sizes. In parallel we carry out rheological studies of water-in-limonene emulsions using different concentrations of fumed silica particles. We unite our observations to propose a mechanism for inversion based on the changes in flow properties and the availability of particles during emulsification.

  14. Exploiting the pliability and lateral mobility of Pickering emulsion for enhanced vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yufei; Wu, Jie; Wei, Wei; Du, Yiqun; Wan, Tao; Ma, Xiaowei; An, Wenqi; Guo, Aiying; Miao, Chunyu; Yue, Hua; Li, Shuoguo; Cao, Xuetao; Su, Zhiguo; Ma, Guanghui

    2018-02-01

    A major challenge in vaccine formulations is the stimulation of both the humoral and cellular immune response for well-defined antigens with high efficacy and safety. Adjuvant research has focused on developing particulate carriers to model the sizes, shapes and compositions of microbes or diseased cells, but not antigen fluidity and pliability. Here, we develop Pickering emulsions--that is, particle-stabilized emulsions that retain the force-dependent deformability and lateral mobility of presented antigens while displaying high biosafety and antigen-loading capabilities. Compared with solid particles and conventional surfactant-stabilized emulsions, the optimized Pickering emulsions enhance the recruitment, antigen uptake and activation of antigen-presenting cells, potently stimulating both humoral and cellular adaptive responses, and thus increasing the survival of mice upon lethal challenge. The pliability and lateral mobility of antigen-loaded Pickering emulsions may provide a facile, effective, safe and broadly applicable strategy to enhance adaptive immunity against infections and diseases.

  15. Antioxidant Behavior of Olive Phenolics in Oil-in-Water Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Vito Michele; Di Mattia, Carla; Giarnetti, Mariagrazia; Chiarini, Marco; Andrich, Lucia; Caponio, Francesco

    2016-07-27

    The effect of the surrounding molecular environment (β-lactoglobulin as an emulsion stabilizer and maltodextrin as a viscosity modifier) on the antioxidant activity of three olive oil phenolic compounds (PCs) in olive oil-in-water emulsions was investigated. Oxidation potential, phenolic partitioning, and radical quenching capacity were assessed in solution and in emulsion for oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol; the influence of β-lactoglobulin and maltodextrin concentration was also evaluated. Finally, the observed properties were related to the oxidative stability of the emulsions containing the PCs to explain their behavior. The order hydroxytyrosol > oleuropein > tyrosol was observed among the antioxidants for both oxidation potential and radical quenching activity. Radical quenching capacity in emulsion and anodic potential were complementary indices of antioxidant effectiveness. As the intrinsic susceptibility of an antioxidant to oxidation expressed by its anodic potential decreased, the environmental conditions (molecular interactions and changes in continuous phase viscosity) played a major role in the antioxidant effectiveness in preventing hydroperoxide decomposition.

  16. Advanced hybrid transient stability and EMT simulation for VSC-HVDC systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Meer, A.A.; Gibescu, M.; Van Der Meijden, M.A.M.M.; Kling, W.L.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with advanced hybrid transient stability and electromagnetic-transient (EMT) simulation of combined ac/dc power systems containing large amounts of renewable energy sources interfaced through voltage-source converter-high-voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC). The concerning transient

  17. Emulsifier development for high-concentrated reverse emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Kovalenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The reverse emulsions have found broad application in ore mining industry as matrixes of emulsion explosive substances and boring washing waters. The defining characteristic of reverse emulsions of industrial explosive substances is the high stability and immunity to crystallization. Aim: The aim of this work is to assess the mechanism of emulsifiers effect like SMO and some PIBSA-derivatives, that are most abundantly used in world practice, and also to develop an effective domestic emulsifier of reverse emulsions. Materials and methods: Using the semi-dynamic method with use of the reverse stalagmometer it was determined the decreasing in interfacial tension on “water / diesel fuel” border in the presence of 0.5 wt % sorbitan monooleate of various producers. Emulsions with use of the chosen emulsifiers using the dynamic mixer on the basis of monosolution of ammonium nitrate and diesel fuel have been produced. The emulsions have the following composition, wt %: ammonium nitrate – 76.8; water – 15.6; diesel fuel – 6.0; emulsifier – 1.6. Results: By the researches results of the interfacial tension “surfactant water / solution in diesel fuel”, the stability of emulsions using monosolution of ammonium nitrate and the IR spectrums of SMO of various producers it is established that presence in product of impurity of oleic acid, di- and trioleates leads to decreasing in interphase activity, increasing of emulsifier oil solubility and decreasing the resistance of emulsions to crystallization. On the basis of the spectral data analysis it is suggested about possibility of specific interaction on the mechanism of “spectral resonance” between emulsifiers of the PIBSA-MEA, LZX type and crystals nucleus of NH4NO3 ammonium nitrate in dispersed phase of emulsion. Amidation of vegetable oils by monoethanol amine is implemented at the reduced temperatures (90…100 °C. It was proved the availability mainly of fatty acids amides in product

  18. Relative viscosity of emulsions in simple shear flow: Temperature, shear rate, and interfacial tension dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Bin; Lee, Joon Sang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    We simulate an emulsion system under simple shear rates to analyze its rheological characteristics using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We calculate the relative viscosity of an emulsion under a simple shear flow along with changes in temperature, shear rate, and surfactant concentration. The relative viscosity of emulsions decreased with an increase in temperature. We observed the shear-thinning phenomena, which is responsible for the inverse proportion between the shear rate and viscosity. An increase in the interfacial tension caused a decrease in the relative viscosity of the decane-in-water emulsion because the increased deformation caused by the decreased interfacial tension significantly influenced the wall shear stress.

  19. Influence of processing parameters on morphology of polymethoxyflavone in emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yuwen; Li, Colin C; Wang, Yin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Qingrong

    2015-01-21

    Polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) are groups of compounds isolated from citrus peels that have been documented with wide arrays of health-promoting bioactivities. Because of their hydrophobic structure and high melting point, crystallized PMFs usually have poor systemic bioavailability when consumed orally. To improve the oral efficiency of PMFs, a viscoelastic emulsion system was formulated. Because of the crystalline nature, the inclusion of PMFs into the emulsion system faces great challenges in having sufficient loading capacity and stabilities. In this study, the process of optimizing the quality of emulsion-based formulation intended for PMF oral delivery was systematically studied. With alteration of the PMF loading concentration, processing temperature, and pressure, the emulsion with the desired droplet and crystal size can be effectively fabricated. Moreover, storage temperatures significantly influenced the stability of the crystal-containing emulsion system. The results from this study are a good illustration of system optimization and serve as a great reference for future formulation design of other hydrophobic crystalline compounds.

  20. Studies of water-in-oil emulsions : energy and work threshold as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lerouge, L.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted in which the effect of temperature on the kinetics and stability of water-in-oil formation was examined. Previous studies have shown that viscosity influences the formation and stability of water in oil emulsions, therefore a viscosity window has been postulated as necessary for the formation of stable emulsions. The temperature dependence of this physical property is examined through a study of 3 oils, Green Canyon, Arabian Light and Point Arguello. The oils were subjected to mixing at 5, 15 and 25 degrees C. Both Arabian Light and Point Arguello formed meso-stable emulsions at 15 degrees C and were examined further. Arabian Light had a relatively high viscosity, while Point Arguello had a low viscosity. The objective was to examine the effects of changing viscosity resulting from changes in temperature on oil at either end of the observed viscosity window. The total energy applied to the oil/water in the emulsion formation apparatus was varied from about 50 to 600,000 ergs. Work was varied from 1 to 5123 Joules per second. It was determined that a minimum energy threshold is needed for most emulsion formation, but only work correlates with the stability value. The emulsions formed at lower temperatures exhibited higher stability than would be expected from the increase in viscosity. This is most likely because the increase was insufficient, in the case of Green Canyon oil, to result in the formation of emulsions. It was concluded that the stability of an emulsion formed from a given oil increases with decreasing formation temperature. The apparent viscosity is higher at the lower temperature. The work was found to correlate most closely with the stability of the emulsion or water-in-oil state. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  1. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  2. Simulation of the MHD stabilities of the experiment on HL-2A tokamak by GATO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wei; Chen Liaoyuan; Dong Jiaqi; Shen Yong; Zhang Jinhua

    2009-01-01

    The ideal two-dimensional MHD stabilities code, GATO, has been successfully immigrated to the high-performance computing system of HL-2A and used to the simulation study of the ideal MHD stabilities of the plasmas produced by one of the pellets injection experiments on HL-2A tokamak. The EFIT code was used to reconstruct the equilibrium configures firstly and the GATO was used to compute their MHD stabilities secondly whose source data were obtained by the NO.4050 discharge of the experiments on HL-2A, and finally by analyzing these results the preliminary conclusion was devised that the confinement performance of the plasma was improved because of the stabilization effect of the anti-sheared configures created by the pellets injection. (authors)

  3. Validation of SIMULATE-3K for stability analysis of Laguna Verde nuclear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelio.castillo@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Alonso, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.alonso@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Ed. 9, Lindavista, D.F. 07300 (Mexico); Ramírez, J. Ramón, E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de México 52750 (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic/thermal hydraulic event in Laguna Verde is modeled. • A good agreement is obtained between SIMULATE-3K results and data plant for frequency and DR. • Other noise analysis techniques are used for the same purpose with good agreement. • Validation of SIMULATE-3K for stability analysis of Laguna Verde is confirmed - Abstract: Boiling Water Reactors are two phase flow systems which are susceptible to different types of flow instabilities. Among these are the coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic instabilities, these may compromise established fuel safety limits. These instabilities are characterized by periodic core-power and hydraulic oscillations. SIMULATE-3K code has been tested for stability analysis for several benchmarks, however to qualify the SIMULATE-3K code for a particular power plant a specific reactor plant analysis must be done. In this paper, the plant model of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant is built and SIMULATE-3K is tested against the 1995 coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic instability event of Laguna Verde. Results obtained show the adequacy of this code to specific Laguna Verde power plant stability analysis.

  4. A new method to determine oxidative stability of vegetable fats and oils at simulated frying temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertz Christian

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure at simulated frying conditions in our laboratory was developed to monitor frying stability of fats and oils. Water-conditioned silica was prepared and added to the fresh vegetable oil, which was heated for two hours at 170°C. The oil stability at frying temperature was then evaluated by determining the amount of formed dimeric triglycerides The results obtained showed that the stability of the vegetable oils at frying temperature could not be explained by the fatty acid composition alone. Corn oil was observed to be more stable than soybean oil, and rapeseed oil was better than olive oil. It was also observed that crude, non-refined oils were found to have a better heat stability than refin-ed oils. To estimate the effectiveness of synthetic and naturally occurring antioxidants, namely various tocopherols, tocopherol acetate and phytosterol fractions, phenolic compounds like quercetin, oryzanol, ferulic acid, gallates, BHT, BHA and other compounds like ascorbic acid 6-palmitate and squalene were added to refined sunflower and rape seed oil, and their oxidative stability at elevated temperature (OSET values determined. Both linoleic and oleic rich oils gave comparable results for the activity of the various compounds. alpha-tocopherol, tocopherol esters and BHA had low effects on oil stability at frying temperature, while ascorbyl palmitate and some phytosterol fractions were found to have the most stabilizing activity under frying conditions.

  5. Egg white powder-stabilised multiple (water-in-olive oil-in-water) emulsions as beef fat replacers in model system meat emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Burcu; Urgu, Müge; Serdaroğlu, Meltem

    2017-05-01

    Today, multiple emulsions are believed to have a considerable application potential in food industry. We aimed to investigate physical, chemical and textural quality characteristics of model system meat emulsions (MSME) in which beef fat (C) was totally replaced by 10% (E-10), 20% (E-20) or 30% (E-30) multiple emulsions (W 1 /O/W 2 ) prepared with olive oil and egg white powder (EWP). Incorporation of W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion resulted in reduced fat (from 11.54% to 4.01%), increased protein content (from 13.66% to 14.74%), and modified fatty acid composition, significantly increasing mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid content and decreasing saturated fatty acid content. E-20 and E-30 samples had lower jelly and fat separation (5.77% and 5.25%) compared to C and E-10 (9.67% and 8.55%). W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion treatments had higher water-holding capacity (93.96-94.35%) than C samples (91.84%), and also showed the desired storage stability over time. Emulsion stability results showed that E-20 and E-30 samples had lower total expressible fluid (14.05% and 14.53%) and lower total expressible fat (5.06% and 5.33%) compared to C samples (19.13% and 6.09%). Increased concentrations of W 1 /O/W 2 emulsions led to alterations in colour and texture parameters. TBA values of samples were lower in W 1 /O/W 2 emulsion treatments than control treatment during 60 days of storage. Our results indicated that multiple emulsions prepared with olive oil and EWP had promising impacts on reducing fat, modifying the lipid composition and developing both technologically and oxidatively stable meat systems. These are the first findings concerning beef matrix fat replacement with multiple emulsions stabilised by EWP. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Structurally modified pectin for targeted lipid antioxidant capacity in linseed/sunflower oil-in-water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celus, Miete; Salvia-Trujillo, Laura; Kyomugasho, Clare; Maes, Ine; Van Loey, Ann M; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2018-02-15

    The present work explored the lipid antioxidant capacity of citrus pectin addition to 5%(w/v) linseed/sunflower oil emulsions stabilized with 0.5%(w/v) Tween 80, as affected by pectin molecular characteristics. The peroxide formation in the emulsions, containing tailored pectin structures, was studied during two weeks of storage at 35°C. Low demethylesterified pectin (≤33%) exhibited a higher antioxidant capacity than high demethylesterified pectin (≥58%), probably due to its higher chelating capacity of pro-oxidative metal ions (Fe 2+ ), whereas the distribution pattern of methylesters along the pectin chain only slightly affected the antioxidant capacity. Nevertheless, pectin addition to the emulsions caused emulsion destabilization probably due to depletion or bridging effect, independent of the pectin structural characteristics. These results evidence the potential of structurally modified citrus pectin as a natural antioxidant in emulsions. However, optimal conditions for emulsion stability should be carefully selected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Instant polysaccharide-based emulsions: impact of microstructure on lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcello-Gómez, Amelia; Foster, Timothy J

    2017-06-21

    The development of emulsion-based products through optimisation of ingredients, reduction in energy-input during manufacture, while fulfilling healthy attributes, are major objectives within the food industry. Instant emulsions can meet these features, but comprehensive studies are necessary to investigate the effect of the initial formulation on the final microstructure and, in turn, on the in vitro lipolysis, comprising the double aim of this work. The instant emulsion is formed within 1.5-3 min after pouring the aqueous phase into the oil phase which contains a mixture of emulsifier (Tween 20), swelling particles (Sephadex) and thickeners (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, HPMC, and guar gum, GG) under mild shearing (180 rpm). The creation of oil-in-water emulsions is monitored in situ by viscosity analysis, the final microstructure visualised by microscopy and the release of free fatty acids under simulated intestinal conditions quantified by titration. Increasing the concentration and molecular weight (M w ) of GG leads to smaller emulsion droplets due to increased bulk viscosity upon shearing. This droplet size reduction is magnified when increasing the M w of HPMC or swelling capacity of viscosifying particles. In addition, in the absence of the emulsifier Tween 20, the sole use of high-Mw HPMC is effective in emulsification due to combined increased bulk viscosity and interfacial activity. Hence, optimisation of the ingredient choice and usage level is possible when designing microstructures. Finally, emulsions with larger droplet size (>20 μm) display a slower rate and lower extent of lipolysis, while finer emulsions (droplet size ≤20 μm) exhibit maximum rate and extent profiles. This correlates with the extent of emulsion destabilisation observed under intestinal conditions.

  8. Study on superhigh energy γ-ray family events with large-scale Fe emulsion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Jingru; Lu Suiling; Su Shi

    1990-01-01

    Using a large-scale iron emulsion chamber, a big γ-ray family event with observed energy ΣE r = 7631 TeV was obtained. This paper described the advantages of iron emulsion chamber for studying big families and the characteristics of the event observed, together with a comparison with the Monte-Carlo simulation results

  9. Modified montmorillonite clay microparticles for stable oil-in-seawater emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jiannan; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Lynn M; Chen, Yunshen; Cornell, Kevin A; Bryant, Steven L; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-07-23

    Environmentally benign clay particles are of great interest for the stabilization of Pickering emulsions. Dodecane-in-synthetic seawater (SSW) emulsions formed with montmorillonite (MMT) clay microparticles modified with bis(2-hydroxyethyl)oleylamine were stable against coalescence, even at clay concentrations down to 0.1% w/v. Remarkably, as little as 0.001% w/v surfactant lowered the hydrophilicity of the clay to a sufficient level for stabilization of oil-in-SSW emulsions. The favorable effect of SSW on droplet size reduction and emulsion stability enhancement is hypothesized to be due to reduced electrostatic repulsion between adsorbed clay particles and a consequent increase in the continuous phase (an aqueous clay suspension) viscosity. Water/oil (W/O) emulsions were inverted to O/W either by decreasing the mass ratio of surfactant-to-clay (transitional inversion) or by increasing the water volume fraction (catastrophic inversion). For both types of emulsions, coalescence was minimal and the sedimentation or creaming was highly correlated with the droplet size. For catastrophic inversions, the droplet size of the emulsions was smaller in the case of the preferred curvature. Suspensions of concentrated clay in oil dispersions in the presence of surfactant were stable against settling. The mass transfer pathways during emulsification of oil containing the clay particles were analyzed on the droplet size/stability phase diagrams to provide insight for the design of dispersant systems for remediating surface and subsurface oceanic oil spills.

  10. Studies on emulsion-type buffalo meat sausages incorporating skeletal and offal meat with different levels of pork fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, K R; Sharma, N

    1990-01-01

    Ready-to-eat emulsion-type buffalo meat sausages were developed by using a combination of 80% meat components with 20% pork back fat. The meat components were constituted of 70 parts buffalo skeletal meat and 30 parts offal meat (rumen meat and heart meat in equal proportions). The emulsion stability, cooking losses of emulsions and sausages, composition of cooked sausages, eating quality of sausages and the microscopic characteristics of the raw emulsion and cooked sausages were studied. The light microscope micrograph of the raw emulsion showed uniformly well distributed fat globules embedded in a dense protein gel. The cooked emulsion also showed uniformly sized fat globules well distributed in a fine, compact, coagulated protein gel, which retained their original spherical shape. Good quality emulsion-type sausages could be produced having a high emulsion stability (0·87 ± 0·07 ml fat release/100 g emulsion); a low emulsion cooking loss (9·60 ± 0·60%) and a low sausage cooking loss (8·83 ± 0·48%). The overall acceptability of sausages was also high. Copyright © 1990. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Time-dependent simulations of feedback stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes in KSTAR plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyungjin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Yong-Su, E-mail: ysna@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Seok [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Maraschek, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany); Park, Y.S. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany); Terzolo, L. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zohm, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    A simulation is performed for feedback stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) for KSTAR in preparation for experiments. An integrated numerical system is constructed by coupling plasma transport, NTM stability, and heating and current drive modules and applied to a KSTAR plasma by assuming similar experimental conditions as ASDEX Upgrade to predict NTM behaviors in KSTAR. System identification is made with database produced by predictive simulations with this integrated numerical system so that three plasma response models are extracted which describe the relation between the EC poloidal launcher angle and the island width in KSTAR. Among them, the P1DI model exhibiting the highest fit accuracy is selected for designing a feedback controller based on the classical Proportional–Integral–Derivative (PID) concept. The controller is coupled with the integrated numerical system and applied to a simulation of NTM stabilization. It is observed that the controller can search and fully stabilize the mode even though the poloidal launch angle is misaligned with the island initially.

  12. Scenario for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegel, W.K.; Groenewold, J.

    2009-01-01

    We show theoretically that under certain conditions colloidal particles can give rise to spontaneous emulsification of oil/water systems. The capillary penalty to create a large interface is compensated by entropic contributions connected to ionic dissociation on the colloid surfaces. The colloids

  13. The effect of different levels of sunflower head pith addition on the properties of model system emulsions prepared from fresh and frozen beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariçoban, Cemalettin; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Karakaya, Mustafa; Tiske, Sümeyra Sultan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sunflower head pith on the functional properties of emulsions was studied by using a model system. Oil/water (O/W) model emulsion systems were prepared from fresh and frozen beef by the addition of the pith at five concentrations. Emulsion capacity (EC), stability (ES), viscosity (EV), colour and flow properties of the prepared model system emulsions were analyzed. The pith addition increased the EC and ES and the highest EC and ES values were reached when 5% of pith added; however, further increase in the pith concentration caused an inverse trend in these values. Fresh beef emulsions had higher EC and ES values than did frozen beef emulsions. One percent pith concentration was the critic level for the EV values of fresh beef emulsions. EV values of the emulsions reached a maximum level at 5% pith level, followed by a decrease at 7% pit level.

  14. Radiation induced emulsion polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannett, V.T.; Stahel, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    High energy radiation is particularly favored for the initiation of emulsion polymerization. The yield of free radicals, for example, from the radiolysis of the aqueous phase, is high; G(radical) values of 5-7. In addition, the rather special kinetics associated with emulsion polymerization lead, in general, to very large kinetic chain lengths, even with 'non-ideal' monomers such as vinyl acetate. Together, high polymerization rates at low doses become possible. There are some important advantages of radiation polymerization compared with chemical initiators, such as potassium persulfate. Perhaps the most important among them is the temperature independence of the initiation step. This makes low temperature polymerization very accessible. With monomers such as vinyl acetate, where chain termination to monomer is predominant, low temperatures lead to often highly desirable higher molecular weights. With styrene, the classical ideally behaved monomer, there are the advantages such as, for example, the feasibility of using cationic monomers. These and some attendant disadvantages are discussed in detail, including pilot plant studies

  15. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Naresh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Baone, Chaitanya [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Veda, Santosh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Dai, Jing [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Chaudhuri, Nilanjan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Leonardi, Bruno [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Sanches-Gasca, Juan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Diao, Ruisheng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Di [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Yu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Shuangshuang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Bin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Yousu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  16. Stability of nanocrystalline Ni-based alloys: coupling Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseda, O.; Goldenstein, H.; Silva, G. F. B. Lenz e.; Neiva, A.; Chantrenne, P.; Morthomas, J.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Veiga, R. G. A.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal stability of nanocrystalline Ni due to small additions of Mo or W (up to 1 at%) was investigated in computer simulations by means of a combined Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) two-steps approach. In the first step, energy-biased on-lattice MC revealed segregation of the alloying elements to grain boundaries. However, the condition for the thermodynamic stability of these nanocrystalline Ni alloys (zero grain boundary energy) was not fulfilled. Subsequently, MD simulations were carried out for up to 0.5 μs at 1000 K. At this temperature, grain growth was hindered for minimum global concentrations of 0.5 at% W and 0.7 at% Mo, thus preserving most of the nanocrystalline structure. This is in clear contrast to a pure Ni model system, for which the transformation into a monocrystal was observed in MD simulations within 0.2 μs at the same temperature. These results suggest that grain boundary segregation of low-soluble alloying elements in low-alloyed systems can produce high-temperature metastable nanocrystalline materials. MD simulations carried out at 1200 K for 1 at% Mo/W showed significant grain boundary migration accompanied by some degree of solute diffusion, thus providing additional evidence that solute drag mostly contributed to the nanostructure stability observed at lower temperature.

  17. POTENTIAL APPLICATION OF ROSELLE EXTRACT IN FUNCTIONAL FOOD EMULSIONS [Aplikasi Ekstrak Rosela sebagai Pengemulsi pada Sistem Emulsi Pangan Fungsional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zul Helmi Rozaini2

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was undertaken to investigate the effect of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa. L extract on the physical properties and stability of extra virgin olive oil emulsions. Four different emulsions were prepared with methanolic Roselle extract (0.01 and 0.02% and 0.02% BHT (commercial antioxidant as well as without the extract/ antioxidant (control. The physical properties were studied in terms of pH, droplet size distribution, microstructure, viscosity and stability towards phase separation and lipid oxidation (under accelerated oxidation at 60°C for 10 days. The emulsions with Roselle extract was found to exhibit lower polydispersity and more uniform droplet size as compared to control and BHT emulsions. The highest viscosity was observed for the emulsion with 0.02%. The BHT emulsion was the most unstable towards phase separation after 15 days of storage at 5°C. A protective effect of Roselle extract against lipid oxidation in the emulsions was clearly observed at 0, 2, 8 and 10 days of accelerated storage (at 60°C with considerably low total oxidation values (5.4 to 13. All emulsions showed insignificant deterioration with peroxide value < 20 meq/kg after oxidation period. This study provided important preliminary data on possibility of applying Roselle extract (which is known to content a significant amount of bioactive compounds in producing functional food emulsions with acceptable properties and stability.

  18. Bitumen coating as a tool for improving the porosity and chemical stability of simulated cement-waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Coating process of simulated cement-based waste form with bitumen was evaluated by performing physical and chemical experimental tests. X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electron microscope investigations were applied on coated and non-coated simulated waste forms. Experimental results indicated that coating process improved the applicable properties of cement-based waste form such as porosity and leachability. Diffusion coefficients and leach indecies of coated specimens were calculated and show acceptable records. It could be stated that coating cemented waste form by bitumen emulsion, isolate the radioactive contaminants, thus reduces their back release to surrounding and in consequently save the environment proper and safe

  19. ZETA POTENTIAL AND COLOR INVESTIGATIONS OF VEGETABLE OIL BASED EMULSIONS AS ECO-FRIENDLY LUBRICANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMICĂ CREŢU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past 10 years, the need for biodegradable lubricants has been more and more emphasized. The use of vegetable oils as lubricants offers several advantages. The vegetable oils are biodegradable; thus, the environmental pollution is minimal either during or after their use. The aim of this paper is to presents a preliminary study concerning the influence of some preparation conditions on the stability of vegetable oil-in-water (O/W emulsions as eco-friendly lubricants stabilized by nonionic surfactant. In this context, vegetable oil-in-water emulsions characteristics where assessed using microscopically observation and zeta potential. In addition, the color of these emulsions can be evaluated. It can be observed that the emulsions tend to stabilize in time.

  20. Improving the Stability and Accuracy of Power Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Using Virtual Impedance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL systems are advanced, real-time platforms for combined software and hardware testing. Two paramount issues in PHIL simulations are the closed-loop stability and simulation accuracy. This paper presents a virtual impedance (VI method for PHIL simulations that improves the simulation’s stability and accuracy. Through the establishment of an impedance model for a PHIL simulation circuit, which is composed of a voltage-source converter and a simple network, the stability and accuracy of the PHIL system are analyzed. Then, the proposed VI method is implemented in a digital real-time simulator and used to correct the combined impedance in the impedance model, achieving higher stability and accuracy of the results. The validity of the VI method is verified through the PHIL simulation of two typical PHIL examples.

  1. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  2. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  3. LISA Pathfinder E2E performance simulation: optical and self-gravity stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, N.; Fichter, W.; Kersten, M.; Lucarelli, S.; Montemurro, F.

    2005-05-01

    End-to-end (E2E) modelling and simulation, i.e. verifying the science performance of LISA Pathfinder (spacecraft and payload), is mandatory in order to minimize mission risks. In this paper, focus is on two particular applications of the E2E performance simulator currently being developed at EADS Astrium GmbH: the opto-dynamical stability and the self-gravity disturbance stability analysis. The E2E models applied here comprise the opto-dynamical modelling of the optical metrology systems (OMS) laser interferometry, the thermo-elastic distortion modelling of the OMS optical elements and the self-gravity disturbance model accounting for structural distortions. Preliminary analysis results are presented in detail, identifying shortcomings of the current LISA technology package (LTP) mounting baseline. As a consequence, the design is now being revised.

  4. LISA Pathfinder E2E performance simulation: optical and self-gravity stability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, N; Fichter, W; Kersten, M; Lucarelli, S; Montemurro, F

    2005-01-01

    End-to-end (E2E) modelling and simulation, i.e. verifying the science performance of LISA Pathfinder (spacecraft and payload), is mandatory in order to minimize mission risks. In this paper, focus is on two particular applications of the E2E performance simulator currently being developed at EADS Astrium GmbH: the opto-dynamical stability and the self-gravity disturbance stability analysis. The E2E models applied here comprise the opto-dynamical modelling of the optical metrology systems (OMS) laser interferometry, the thermo-elastic distortion modelling of the OMS optical elements and the self-gravity disturbance model accounting for structural distortions. Preliminary analysis results are presented in detail, identifying shortcomings of the current LISA technology package (LTP) mounting baseline. As a consequence, the design is now being revised

  5. State-dependent sensorimotor processing: gaze and posture stability during simulated flight in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Kimberly L; Dickman, J David

    2011-04-01

    Vestibular responses play an important role in maintaining gaze and posture stability during rotational motion. Previous studies suggest that these responses are state dependent, their expression varying with the environmental and locomotor conditions of the animal. In this study, we simulated an ethologically relevant state in the laboratory to study state-dependent vestibular responses in birds. We used frontal airflow to simulate gliding flight and measured pigeons' eye, head, and tail responses to rotational motion in darkness, under both head-fixed and head-free conditions. We show that both eye and head response gains are significantly higher during flight, thus enhancing gaze and head-in-space stability. We also characterize state-specific tail responses to pitch and roll rotation that would help to maintain body-in-space orientation during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular sensorimotor processing is not fixed but depends instead on the animal's behavioral state.

  6. Experimental Study of Turbine Fuel Thermal Stability in an Aircraft Fuel System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal stability of aircraft gas turbines fuels was investigated. The objectives were: (1) to design and build an aircraft fuel system simulator; (2) to establish criteria for quantitative assessment of fuel thermal degradation; and (3) to measure the thermal degradation of Jet A and an alternative fuel. Accordingly, an aircraft fuel system simulator was built and the coking tendencies of Jet A and a model alternative fuel (No. 2 heating oil) were measured over a range of temperatures, pressures, flows, and fuel inlet conditions.

  7. Integrated ELM simulation with edge MHD stability and transport of SOL-divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Takizuka, Tomonori; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Ozeki, Takahisa; Oyama, Naoyuki

    2007-07-01

    The effect of the pressure profile on the energy loss caused by edge localized modes (ELMs) has been investigated by using an integrated simulation code TOPICS-IB based on a core transport code with a stability code for the peeling-ballooning modes and a transport model for scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas. The steep pressure gradient inside the pedestal top is found to broaden the region of the ELM enhanced transport through the broadening of eigenfunctions and enhance the ELM energy loss. The ELM energy loss in the simulation becomes larger than 15% of the pedestal energy, as is shown in the database of multi-machine experiments. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of feedback stabilization of axisymmetric modes in tokamaks using driven halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to model a new method of feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric instability in tokamaks using driven halo (or scrape-off layer) currents. The method appears to be feasible for a wide range of plasma edge parameters. It may offer advantages over the more conventional method of controlling this instability when applied in a reactor environment. (author)

  9. Stability analysis and finite element simulations of superplastic forming in the presence of hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    It is established that some superplastic materials undergo significant cavitation during deformation. In this work, stability analysis for the superplastic copper based alloy Coronze-638 at 550 °C based on Hart's definition of stable plastic deformation and finite element simulations for the balanced biaxial loading case are carried out to study the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cavitation evolution during superplastic forming. The finite element results show that imposing hydrostatic pressure yields to a reduction in cavitation growth.

  10. Simulation for transient stability study of the Taiwan power system - a nuclear majority system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A transient stability program was developed for the Taiwan Power Company, which has a high proportion of nuclear generation in its power system. This program offers a new territory to investigate nuclear plant effects on the power system transient stability. This program also provides a high speed tool for the Taipower system operational planning. A generalized procedure of synchronous machine modeling for a large-scale stability study is presented. The merits and weaknesses of machine modeling can be comprehended through each item of this procedure. Three types of nonlinear synchronous machine modeling implemented into this stability program are derived by following this procedure. A robust subroutine was derived to perform the fourth order Runge-Kutta integration method, making the software programming neat and systematical. For simulating the nuclear plant influence on the system, this program implemented an additional four functions: load-limit operation simulated by a low-value gate in the governor model, bypass valve capacity monitored by sending out a warning message, rotor overspeed protection relay, and generator anti-motoring relay

  11. Characteristics of W/O emulsions containing polymeric emulsifier PEG 30-dipolyhydroxystearate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milinković Jelena R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-in-oil (W/O emulsions are dispersed systems which are often used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries as products, or as carriers of active substances. It is well known that they are very unstable, so that selection of the emulsifier and properties of the oil and water phase are main factors affecting their stability. The aim of this paper was to examine the possibility of application of a lipophilic, polymeric emulsifier, PEG 30-dipolyhydroxystearate (CithrolTM DPHS, for stabilization of W/O emulsions. Behaviour of the emulsifier at W/O interfaces was determined by means of tensiometry. A series of emulsions were prepared with 20% (w/w of water and different types of oil. Droplet size, droplet size distribution, viscosity, and sedimentation stability during 30 days of storage at room temperature of the emulsions prepared with paraffin oil, olive oil, grape seed oil, and medium-chain triglycerides, stabilized with 1% CithrolTM DPHS, were determined. All investigated emulsions were stable for 30 days, except the one prepared with paraffin oil. The results of this study confirmed that PEG 30-dipolyhydroxylstearate is a good emulsifier and stabilizer of W/O emulsions which contain different types of oil. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46010

  12. Simulation methods supporting homologation of Electronic Stability Control in vehicle variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Albert; Schick, Bernhard; Holzmann, Henning; Kochem, Michael; Meyer-Tuve, Harald; Lange, Olav; Mao, Yiqin; Tosolin, Guido

    2017-10-01

    Vehicle simulation has a long tradition in the automotive industry as a powerful supplement to physical vehicle testing. In the field of Electronic Stability Control (ESC) system, the simulation process has been well established to support the ESC development and application by suppliers and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs). The latest regulation of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe UN/ECE-R 13 allows also for simulation-based homologation. This extends the usage of simulation from ESC development to homologation. This paper gives an overview of simulation methods, as well as processes and tools used for the homologation of ESC in vehicle variants. The paper first describes the generic homologation process according to the European Regulation (UN/ECE-R 13H, UN/ECE-R 13/11) and U.S. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS 126). Subsequently the ESC system is explained as well as the generic application and release process at the supplier and OEM side. Coming up with the simulation methods, the ESC development and application process needs to be adapted for the virtual vehicles. The simulation environment, consisting of vehicle model, ESC model and simulation platform, is explained in detail with some exemplary use-cases. In the final section, examples of simulation-based ESC homologation in vehicle variants are shown for passenger cars, light trucks, heavy trucks and trailers. This paper is targeted to give a state-of-the-art account of the simulation methods supporting the homologation of ESC systems in vehicle variants. However, the described approach and the lessons learned can be used as reference in future for an extended usage of simulation-supported releases of the ESC system up to the development and release of driver assistance systems.

  13. Effects of Partial Beef Fat Replacement with Gelled Emulsion on Functional and Quality Properties of Model System Meat Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdaroğlu, Meltem; Nacak, Berker; Karabıyıkoğlu, Merve; Keser, Gökçen

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of partial beef fat replacement (0, 30, 50, 100%) with gelled emulsion (GE) prepared with olive oil on functional and quality properties of model system meat emulsion (MSME). GE consisted of inulin and gelatin as gelling agent and characteristics of gelled and model system meat emulsions were investigated. GE showed good initial stability against centrifugation forces and thermal stability at different temperatures. GE addition decreased the pH with respect to increase in GE concentration. Addition of GE increased lightness and yellowness but reduced redness compared to control samples. The results of the study showed that partial replacement of beef fat with GE could be used for improving cooking yield without negative effects on water holding capacity and emulsion stability compared to C samples when replacement level is up to 50%. The presence of GE significantly affected textural behaviors of samples ( p <0.05). In conclusion, our study showed that GE have promising impacts on developing healthier meat product formulations besides improving technological characteristics.

  14. Simulating the effect of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability during oil and gas development in deepwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingchao; Cheng, Yuanfang; Zhang, Huaiwen; Yan, Chuanliang; Liu, Yuwen

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that methane hydrate has been identified as an alternative resource due to its massive reserves and clean property. However, hydrate dissociation during oil and gas development (OGD) process in deep water can affect the stability of subsea equipment and formation. Currently, there is a serious lack of studies over quantitative assessment on the effects of hydrate dissociation on wellhead stability. In order to solve this problem, ABAQUS finite element software was used to develop a model and to evaluate the behavior of wellhead caused by hydrate dissociation. The factors that affect the wellhead stability include dissociation range, depth of hydrate formation and mechanical properties of dissociated hydrate region. Based on these, series of simulations were carried out to determine the wellhead displacement. The results revealed that, continuous dissociation of hydrate in homogeneous and isotropic formations can causes the non-linear increment in vertical displacement of wellhead. The displacement of wellhead showed good agreement with the settlement of overlying formations under the same conditions. In addition, the shallower and thicker hydrate formation can aggravate the influence of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability. Further, it was observed that with the declining elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio, the wellhead displacement increases. Hence, these findings not only confirm the effect of hydrate dissociation on the wellhead stability, but also lend support to the actions, such as cooling the drilling fluid, which can reduce the hydrate dissociation range and further make deepwater operations safer and more efficient.

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Swirl Stabilized Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo-Rios, Salvador; Karagozian, Ann

    2017-11-01

    Flame stabilization is an important design criterion for many combustion chambers, especially at lean conditions and/or high power output, where insufficient stabilization can result in dangerous oscillations and noisy or damaged combustors. At high flow rates, swirling flow can offer a suitable stabilization mechanism, although understanding the dynamics of swirl-stabilized turbulent flames remains a significant challenge. Utilizing the General Equation and Mesh Solver (GEMS) code, which solves the Navier-Stokes equations along with the energy equation and five species equations, 2D axisymmetric and full 3D parametric studies and simulations are performed to guide the design and development of an experimental swirl combustor configuration and to study the effects of swirl on statistically stationary combustion. Results show that as the momentum of air is directed into the inner air inlet rather than the outer inlet of the swirl combustor, the central recirculating region becomes stronger and more unsteady, improving mixing and burning efficiency in that region. A high temperature region is found to occur as a result of burning of the trapped fuel from the central toroidal vortex. The effects of other parameters on flowfield and flame-stabilization dynamics are explored. Supported by ERC, Inc. (PS150006) and AFOSR (Dr. Chiping Li).

  16. Learning Probabilistic Models of Hydrogen Bond Stability from Molecular Dynamics Simulation Trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-04-02

    Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. H-bonds involving atoms from residues that are close to each other in the main-chain sequence stabilize secondary structure elements. H-bonds between atoms from distant residues stabilize a protein’s tertiary structure. However, H-bonds greatly vary in stability. They form and break while a protein deforms. For instance, the transition of a protein from a nonfunctional to a functional state may require some H-bonds to break and others to form. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor. Other local interactions may reinforce (or weaken) an H-bond. This paper describes inductive learning methods to train a protein-independent probabilistic model of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories. The training data describes H-bond occurrences at successive times along these trajectories by the values of attributes called predictors. A trained model is constructed in the form of a regression tree in which each non-leaf node is a Boolean test (split) on a predictor. Each occurrence of an H-bond maps to a path in this tree from the root to a leaf node. Its predicted stability is associated with the leaf node. Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. In particular, their performance is roughly 20% better than that of models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a given conformation. The paper discusses several extensions that may yield further improvements.

  17. W/O Emulsions in High Electric Fields as Studied by Means of Time Domain Dielectric Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerdedal, Harald

    1995-11-01

    Since oil and brine coexist in the oil reservoirs, the crude oil produced contains free and emulsified water. The type of emulsion formed, water-in-oil or vice versa, generally depends on the amounts of water and oil before mixing. However, the presence of stabilisers, which occur naturally in crude oil, is also of major importance. It is found that dielectric spectroscopy is an appropriate experimental technique for investigating water-in-oil emulsion. When the instrumentation is equipped with an external power supply, information about the coalescence process can be obtained when the critical electric field is approached. Two distinctly different behaviours are observed. In model emulsions stabilised by commercial liquid surfactants a decrease in the static permittivity is observed as the electric field is applied. On the other hand, model emulsions stabilised by indigenous surfactants extracted from crude oils show an increase in the static permittivity as they are exposed to the external electric field. A quantitative parameter is derived for the emulsion stability. The value of the critical electric field is found to be sensitive to changes in the interfacial conditions, and multivariate analysis proves to be suitable for obtaining information about the general trends of variables on the emulsion stability. The stability of emulsions depends on several parameters, such as the amount and properties of the phases, the properties of the stabiliser, etc. Multivariate analysis reveals what variables are most important in characterising the stability/instability of emulsions.

  18. Effects of Flaxseed and pH on the Emulsion Properties of Beef by Using a Model System

    OpenAIRE

    Şükrü Kurt; Huriye Gözde Ceylan

    2018-01-01

    The effects of ground flaxseed (0-0.5%) and pH (3.88-8.12) on the emulsion properties of beef were studied using a model system. A central composite rotatable design was used to determine the response surface. pH, flaxseed and their interactions had significant effects on the emulsion properties of beef. pH and the interaction between pH and flaxseed increased emulsion capacity (EC). Flaxseed and pH increased emulsion stability (ES) until a critical point, which was reached at a flaxseed lev...

  19. Determination of hydrophilic–lipophilic balance value and emulsion properties of sacha inchi oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiattiphumi Saengsorn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine hydrophilic–lipophilic balance (HLB value, stability of formulate emulsion and properties of sacha inchi oil. Methods: The physiochemical characteristics of sacha inchi oil were first investigated. Free radical scavenging property was studied by DPPH assay. HLB value of sacha inchi oil was experimentally determined by preparing the emulsion using emulsifiers at different HLB value. Sacha inchi oil emulsion was prepared using the obtained HLB and its stability was conducted by centrifugation, temperature cycling, and accelerated stability test. The efficiency of the prepared emulsion was clinically investigated by 15 volunteers. The primary skin irritation was performed using closed patch test. Subjective sensory assessment was evaluated by using 5-point hedonic scale method. Results: Peroxide value of sacha inchi oil was 18.40 meq O2/kg oil and acid value was 1.86 KOH/g oil. The major fatty acids are omega-3 (44%, omega-6 (35% and omega-9 (9%. The vitamin E content was 226 mg/100 g oil. Moreover, sacha inchi oil (167 ppm and its emulsion showed 85% and 89% DPPH inhibition, respectively. The experimental HLB value of sacha inchi oil was 8.5. The sacha inchi oil emulsion exhibited good stability after stability test. The emulsion was classified as non-irritant after tested by primary skin irritation method. The skin hydration value significantly increased from 38.59 to 45.21 (P < 0.05 after applying sacha inchi oil emulsion for 1 month and the overall product satisfaction of volunteers after use was with score of 4.2. Conclusions: This work provides information on HLB value and emulsion properties of sacha inchi oil which is useful for cosmetic and pharmaceutical application. Keywords: Sacha inchi oil, Hydrophilic–lipophilic balance value, Emulsion stability, Efficacy test, Sensory test

  20. An Automatic Approach to the Stabilization Condition in a HIx Distillation Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Woon; Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young; Kim, Yong Wan; Chang, Jong Hwa; Youn, Cheung

    2010-01-01

    In the Sulfur-Iodine(SI) thermochemical process to produce nuclear hydrogen, an H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary mixture solution discharged from the Bunsen reaction is primarily concentrated by electro-electrodialysis. The concentrated solution is distillated in the HIx distillation column to generate a high purity HI vapor. The pure HI vapor is obtained at the top of the HIx distillation column and the diluted HIx solution is discharged at the bottom of the column. In order to simulate the steady-state HIx distillation column, a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) model of the H 2 O-HI-I 2 ternary system is required and the subprogram to calculate VLE concentrations has been already introduced by KAERI research group in 2006. The steady state simulation code for the HIx distillation process was also developed in 2007. However, the intrinsic phenomena of the VLE data such as the steep slope of a T-x-y diagram caused the instability of the simulation calculation. In this paper, a computer program to automatically find a stabilization condition in the steady state simulation of the HIx distillation column is introduced. A graphic user interface (GUI) function to monitor an approach to the stabilization condition was added in this program

  1. Omega-3s in food emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take into considera...... into consideration when developing food emulsions enriched with omega-3 oils and examples on how oxidation can be reduced in products such as mayonnaise, spreads, milk, yoghurt are also given.......There is an increasing interest in the use of healthy long chain omega-3 oils in foods. Incorporation of omega-3 oils into foods decreases their oxidative stability and therefore precautions need to be taken to avoid lipid oxidation. This review summarises the major factors to take...

  2. Separation Properties of Wastewater Containing O/W Emulsion Using Ceramic Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration (MF/UF Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Matsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Washing systems using water soluble detergent are used in electrical and mechanical industries and the wastewater containing O/W emulsion are discharged from these systems. Membrane filtration has large potential for the efficient separation of O/W emulsion for reuses of treated water and detergent. The separation properties of O/W emulsions by cross-flow microfiltration and ultrafiltration were studied with ceramic MF and UF membranes. The effects of pore size; applied pressure; cross-flow velocity; and detergent concentration on rejection of O/W emulsion and flux were systematically studied. At the condition achieving complete separation of O/W emulsion the pressure-independent flux was observed and this flux behavior was explained by gel-polarization model. The O/W emulsion tended to permeate through the membrane at the conditions of larger pore size; higher emulsion concentration; and higher pressure. The O/W emulsion could permeate the membrane pore structure by destruction or deformation. These results imply the stability of O/W emulsion in the gel-layer formed on membrane surface play an important role in the separation properties. The O/W emulsion was concentrated by batch cross-flow concentration filtration and the flux decline during the concentration filtration was explained by the gel- polarization model.

  3. Separation Properties of Wastewater Containing O/W Emulsion Using Ceramic Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration (MF/UF) Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuho; Matsumoto, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Washing systems using water soluble detergent are used in electrical and mechanical industries and the wastewater containing O/W emulsion are discharged from these systems. Membrane filtration has large potential for the efficient separation of O/W emulsion for reuses of treated water and detergent. The separation properties of O/W emulsions by cross-flow microfiltration and ultrafiltration were studied with ceramic MF and UF membranes. The effects of pore size; applied pressure; cross-flow velocity; and detergent concentration on rejection of O/W emulsion and flux were systematically studied. At the condition achieving complete separation of O/W emulsion the pressure-independent flux was observed and this flux behavior was explained by gel-polarization model. The O/W emulsion tended to permeate through the membrane at the conditions of larger pore size; higher emulsion concentration; and higher pressure. The O/W emulsion could permeate the membrane pore structure by destruction or deformation. These results imply the stability of O/W emulsion in the gel-layer formed on membrane surface play an important role in the separation properties. The O/W emulsion was concentrated by batch cross-flow concentration filtration and the flux decline during the concentration filtration was explained by the gel- polarization model. PMID:24958621

  4. Governor stability simulations of Svartisen power plant verified by the installed monitoring system on site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, T K; Kjeldsen, M

    2010-01-01

    Many Norwegian hydro power plants have complex lay-out with several reservoirs, broke intakes, surge shafts and even air cushion chambers. There are kilometers of excavated tunnels as well as long tail water systems. The stations are often equipped by multiple of turbines, both in series and parallel. A number of operation modes are therefore possible. Doing transient simulations and simulations of governor stability in the design phase, the problem is to find the worst case scenario regarding these operating modes. Svartisen power plant has been of particular interest these days. The power plant is originally designed for two 350 MW Francis turbines, however, only one turbine was installed. When designed, governor stability was regarded as problematic due to the long penstock. A long penstock will give a too high time constant for the hydraulic inertia. The main problem here is, however, the water hammer frequency that interferes with the governor performance. The frequency is in the same range as the cross frequency. Therefore the governor will react on these water hammer waves, which in its nature is notoriously unstable. The common solution is to build an air cushion and thereby increase the water hammer frequency above the cross frequency. The expenses were, however, deemed too high, and it was necessary to seek for other solutions. A pressure feedback on the governor was introduced in order to have stable operation at least for two turbines. With only one turbine installed, the pressure feedback has not been activated because, based on the simulations, it was regarded unnecessary. Even if the original simulations shows good stability margins when only one turbine is running, there has been some indications that the aggregate has suffered from instability. In 2004 Svartisen Power Plant was equipped with a comprehensive monitoring system. Both the turbine and the generator performance have been observed. This gives valuable information on how the hydropower

  5. Governor stability simulations of Svartisen power plant verified by the installed monitoring system on site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T. K.; Kjeldsen, M.

    2010-08-01

    Many Norwegian hydro power plants have complex lay-out with several reservoirs, broke intakes, surge shafts and even air cushion chambers. There are kilometers of excavated tunnels as well as long tail water systems. The stations are often equipped by multiple of turbines, both in series and parallel. A number of operation modes are therefore possible. Doing transient simulations and simulations of governor stability in the design phase, the problem is to find the worst case scenario regarding these operating modes. Svartisen power plant has been of particular interest these days. The power plant is originally designed for two 350 MW Francis turbines, however, only one turbine was installed. When designed, governor stability was regarded as problematic due to the long penstock. A long penstock will give a too high time constant for the hydraulic inertia. The main problem here is, however, the water hammer frequency that interferes with the governor performance. The frequency is in the same range as the cross frequency. Therefore the governor will react on these water hammer waves, which in its nature is notoriously unstable. The common solution is to build an air cushion and thereby increase the water hammer frequency above the cross frequency. The expenses were, however, deemed too high, and it was necessary to seek for other solutions. A pressure feedback on the governor was introduced in order to have stable operation at least for two turbines. With only one turbine installed, the pressure feedback has not been activated because, based on the simulations, it was regarded unnecessary. Even if the original simulations shows good stability margins when only one turbine is running, there has been some indications that the aggregate has suffered from instability. In 2004 Svartisen Power Plant was equipped with a comprehensive monitoring system. Both the turbine and the generator performance have been observed. This gives valuable information on how the hydropower

  6. Rheological properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with oil and protein isolates from sesame (Sesamum Indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ramirez BREWER

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, food emulsions of oil in water from sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates and their oil were formulated and standardised. The effect of the concentrations of sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates and base oil and the speed of the emulsification process for the food emulsion stability was studied. The protein isolates were achieved from the defatted sesame flour (DSF, obtaining a percentage of 80% ± 0.05% of protein. Emulsions were formulated through a factorial design 23. The rheological behaviour of sesame (Sesamum indicum protein isolates-stabilised emulsions and microstructural composition were investigated. Stable emulsions with suitable rheological properties and microstructure were formulated at a concentration of 10% sesame oil and different concentrations of protein isolates, between 1.5% and 2.5%, with the best droplet distribution characteristics being shown for the 2.5% sesame protein isolates. The emulsions showed a non-Newtonian fluid behaviour, adjusting the Sisko model.

  7. Engine performance and emissions characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-bioethanol emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Yie Hua; Abdullah, Mohammad Omar; Nolasco-Hipolito, Cirilo; Zauzi, Nur Syuhada Ahmad; Abdullah, Georgie Wong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Different composition of diesel fuel, biodiesel and bioethanol emulsions were examined. • The fuels were tested in a direct injection diesel engine and parameters were evaluated. • Engine power, torque, exhaust gas temperature & fuel consumptions were compared. • Emulsions fuels emitted lower CO and CO_2 than fossil diesel. • Lower NOx emission was observed at medium engine speeds and loads for emulsion fuels. - Abstract: In this research work, the experimental investigation of the effect of diesel-biodiesel-bioethanol emulsion fuels on combustion, performance and emission of a direct injection (DI) diesel engine are reported. Four kind of emulsion fuels were employed: B (diesel-80%, biodiesel-20% by volume), C (diesel-80%, biodiesel-15%, bioethanol-5%), D (diesel-80%, biodiesel-10%, bioethanol-10%) and E (diesel-80%, biodiesel-5%, bioethanol-15%) to compare its’ performance with the conventional diesel, A. These emulsion fuels were prepared by mechanical homogenizer machine with the help of Tween 80 (1% v/v) and Span 80 (0.5% v/v) as surfactants. The emulsion characteristics were determined by optical electron microscope, emulsification stability test, FTIR, and the physiochemical properties of the emulsion fuels which were all done by following ASTM test methods. The prepared emulsion fuels were then tested in diesel engine test bed to obtain engine performance and exhaust emissions. All the engine experiments were conducted with engine speeds varying from 1600 to 2400 rpm. The results showed the heating value and density of the emulsion fuels decrease as the bioethanol content in the blend increases. The total heating value of the diesel-biodiesel-bioethanol fuels were averagely 21% higher than the total heating value of the pure biodiesel and slightly lower (2%) than diesel fuel. The engine power, torque and exhaust gas temperature were reduced when using emulsion fuels. The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) for the emulsion fuels

  8. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy study of globular proteins in emulsions: influence of droplet flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampon, V; Genot, C; Riaublanc, A; Anton, M; Axelos, M A V; McClements, D J

    2003-04-23

    Measurement of the intensity (I(MAX)) and/or wavelength (lambda(MAX)) of the maximum in the tryptophan (TRP) emission spectrum using front-face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) can be used to provide information about the molecular environment of proteins in nondiluted emulsions. Many protein-stabilized emulsions in the food industry are flocculated, and therefore, we examined the influence of droplet flocculation on FFFS. Stock oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine serum albumin were prepared by high-pressure valve homogenization (30 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.35 wt % BSA, pH 7). These emulsions were used to create model systems with different degrees of droplet flocculation, either by changing the pH, adding surfactant, or adding xanthan. Emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA) with different pH (5 and 7) and molar ratios of Tween 20 to BSA (R = 0-131) were prepared by dilution of the stock emulsion. As the surfactant concentration was increased, the protein was displaced from the droplet surfaces, which caused an increase in both I(MAX) and lambda(MAX), because of the change in TRP environment. The dependence of I(MAX) and lambda(MAX) on surfactant concentration followed a similar pattern in emulsions that were initially flocculated (pH 5) and nonflocculated (pH 7). Relatively small changes in FFFS emission spectra were observed in emulsions (21 wt % n-hexadecane, 0.22 wt % BSA, pH 7) with different levels of depletion flocculation induced by adding xanthan. These results suggested that droplet flocculation did not have a major impact on FFFS. This study shows that FFFS is a powerful technique for nondestructively providing information about the molecular environment of proteins in concentrated and flocculated protein-stabilized emulsions. Nevertheless, in general the suitability of the technique may also depend on protein type and the nature of the physicochemical matrix surrounding the proteins.

  9. Mixed Finite Element Simulation with Stability Analysis for Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas exists in considerable quantities in tight reservoirs. Tight formations are rocks with very tiny or poorly connected pors that make flow through them very difficult, i.e., the permeability is very low. The mixed finite element method (MFEM, which is locally conservative, is suitable to simulate the flow in porous media. This paper is devoted to developing a mixed finite element (MFE technique to simulate the gas transport in low permeability reservoirs. The mathematical model, which describes gas transport in low permeability formations, contains slippage effect, as well as adsorption and diffusion mechanisms. The apparent permeability is employed to represent the slippage effect in low-permeability formations. The gas adsorption on the pore surface has been described by Langmuir isotherm model, while the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used in the thermodynamic calculations. Important compatibility conditions must hold to guarantee the stability of the mixed method by adding additional constraints to the numerical discretization. The stability conditions of the MFE scheme has been provided. A theorem and three lemmas on the stability analysis of the mixed finite element method (MFEM have been established and proven. A semi-implicit scheme is developed to solve the governing equations. Numerical experiments are carried out under various values of the physical parameters.

  10. Influence of Steam Injection and Water-in-Oil Emulsions on Diesel Fuel Combustion Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Meagan

    Water injection can be an effective strategy for reducing NOx because water's high specific heat allows it to absorb heat and lower system temperatures. Introducing water as an emulsion can potentially be more effective at reducing emissions than steam injection due to physical properties (such as microexplosions) that can improve atomization and increase mixing. Unfortunately, the immiscibility of emulsions makes them difficult to work with so they must be mixed properly. In this effort, a method for adequately mixing surfactant-free emulsions was established and verified using high speed cinematography. As the water to fuel mass ratio (W/F) increased, emulsion atomization tests showed little change in droplet size and spray angle, but a shorter overall breakup point. Dual-wavelength planar laser induced fluorescence (D-PLIF) patternation showed an increase in water near the center of the spray. Steam injection flames saw little change in reaction stability, but emulsion flames experienced significant losses in stability that limited reaction operability at higher W/F. Emulsions were more effective at reducing NOx than steam injection, likely because of liquid water's latent heat of vaporization and the strategic injection of water into the flame core. OH* chemiluminescence showed a decrease in heat release for both methods, though the decrease was greater for emulsions. Both methods saw decreases in flame length for W/F 0.15. Lastly, flame imaging showed a shift towards a redder appearance with the addition or more water, as well as a reduction in flame flares.

  11. Jussara berry (Euterpe edulis M.) oil-in-water emulsions are highly stable: the role of natural antioxidants in the fruit oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Aline G A; Silva, Kelly A; Silva, Laís O; Costa, André M M; Akil, Emília; Coelho, Maria A Z; Torres, Alexandre G

    2018-05-23

    Antioxidants help prevent lipid oxidation, and therefore are critical to maintain sensory quality and chemical characteristics of edible oils. Jussara berry (Euterpe edulis M.) oil is a source of minor compounds with potential antioxidant activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of such compounds on the effectiveness to prevent or delay oxidation of oil present in oil-in-water emulsions, and how the emulsions physical stability would be affected. Jussara berry oil extracted by ethanol extraction, its stripped variations (partially stripped, highly stripped and highly stripped with added BHT), and expeller pressed oil were used to prepare oil-in-water emulsions. Jussara berry oils were analyzed before emulsions preparation to ensure its initial quality and composition, and oil-in-water emulsions were analyzed regarding their oxidative and physical stability. Ethanol extracted oil emulsion presented higher oxidative stability when compared to highly stripped oil emulsion with added synthetic antioxidant BHT (oxidative stability index 45% lower, after 60 days, and reached undetectable levels after 90 days). All emulsions maintained physically stable for up to 120 days of storage. Our results indicate that natural antioxidants in jussara berry oil protect emulsions from oxidation while keeping physical stability unchanged. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of a boundary layer developed on wavy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Camarri, Simone; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    The development of passive methods leading to a laminar to turbulent transition delay in a boundary layer (BL) is a topic of great interest both for applications and academic research. In literature it has been shown that a proper and stable spanwise velocity modulation can reduce the growth rate of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and delay transition. In this study, we investigate numerically the possibility of obtaining a stabilizing effect of the TS waves through the use of a spanwise sinusoidal modulation of a flat plate. This type of control has been already successfully investigated experimentally. An extensive set of direct numerical simulations is carried out to study the evolution of a BL flow developed on wavy surfaces with different geometric characteristics, and the results will be presented here. Moreover, since this configuration is characterized by a slowly-varying flow field in streamwise direction, a local stability analysis is applied to define the neutral stability curves for the BL flow controlled by this type of wall modifications. These results give the possibility of investigating this control strategy and understanding the effect of the free parameters on the stabilization mechanism.

  13. Bioactive hydroxyapatite/graphene composite coating and its corrosion stability in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janković, Ana; Eraković, Sanja [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitrić, Miodrag [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Mike Petrovića Alasa 12-14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Matić, Ivana Z.; Juranić, Zorica D. [Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tsui, Gary C.P.; Tang, Chak-yin [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Mišković-Stanković, Vesna [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rhee, Kyong Yop, E-mail: rheeky@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo Jin [Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Bioactive HAP/Gr coating on Ti was successfully obtained by EPD. • Increased fracture toughness of the HAP/Gr coating compared to pure HAP coating. • HAP/Gr coating exhibited superior biomimetic mineralization vs. pure HAP coating. • Gr improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of HAP/Gr coating. • HAP/Gr coating was classified as non-cytotoxic against the targeted PBMC. - Abstract: The hydroxyapatite/graphene (HAP/Gr) composite was electrodeposited on Ti using the electrophoretic deposition process to obtain uniform bioactive coating with improved mechanical strength and favorable corrosion stability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Incorporation of Gr was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron analysis. The HAP/Gr composite coating exhibited reduced surface cracks, nearly double the hardness, and elastic modulus increased by almost 50% compared to pure HAP coating, as estimated by a nanoindentation test. The bioactive HAP/Gr composite coating provided a newly formed apatite layer in SBF with enhanced corrosion stability, as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the HAP/Gr coating was improved in comparison to the pure HAP coating, and the Ca/P ratio was closer to the stoichiometric value. No antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli could be verified. The HAP/Gr composite coating was classified as non-cytotoxic when tested against healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

  14. Bioactive hydroxyapatite/graphene composite coating and its corrosion stability in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janković, Ana; Eraković, Sanja; Mitrić, Miodrag; Matić, Ivana Z.; Juranić, Zorica D.; Tsui, Gary C.P.; Tang, Chak-yin; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bioactive HAP/Gr coating on Ti was successfully obtained by EPD. • Increased fracture toughness of the HAP/Gr coating compared to pure HAP coating. • HAP/Gr coating exhibited superior biomimetic mineralization vs. pure HAP coating. • Gr improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of HAP/Gr coating. • HAP/Gr coating was classified as non-cytotoxic against the targeted PBMC. - Abstract: The hydroxyapatite/graphene (HAP/Gr) composite was electrodeposited on Ti using the electrophoretic deposition process to obtain uniform bioactive coating with improved mechanical strength and favorable corrosion stability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Incorporation of Gr was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron analysis. The HAP/Gr composite coating exhibited reduced surface cracks, nearly double the hardness, and elastic modulus increased by almost 50% compared to pure HAP coating, as estimated by a nanoindentation test. The bioactive HAP/Gr composite coating provided a newly formed apatite layer in SBF with enhanced corrosion stability, as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the HAP/Gr coating was improved in comparison to the pure HAP coating, and the Ca/P ratio was closer to the stoichiometric value. No antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli could be verified. The HAP/Gr composite coating was classified as non-cytotoxic when tested against healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

  15. Study on removal of cadmium from wastewater by emulsion liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortaheb, Hamid R.; Kosuge, Hitoshi; Mokhtarani, Babak; Amini, Mohammad H.; Banihashemi, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    Removal of cadmium from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) is studied in the present study. A polyamine-type surfactant was used for stabilizing the emulsion phase. Tri-iso-octyl amine (TIOA) has been used as a carrier for transferring of cadmium through the membrane. The results show good performance in the separation process. To determine the optimum operation conditions, the effect of several parameters such as surfactant concentration, carrier concentration, pH of external and internal phases, oil to internal phase volume ratio, emulsion to external phase volume ratio, solvent type, solute concentration, presence of iodide and chloride in external phase, and mixing conditions have been investigated.

  16. Synergistic and alkaline stability studies of mixtures of simulated high level waste sludge with selected energetic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the stability of mercury oxalate and mercury fulminate in alkaline sludge simulating Savannah River Site waste. These compounds represent two classes of energetic compounds previously speculated as potential components in sludge stored without a supernatant liquid

  17. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  18. Isotachophoresis with emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goet, G.; Baier, T.; Hardt, S.; Sen, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on isotachophoresis (ITP) in which an emulsion is used as leading electrolyte (LE) is reported. The study aims at giving an overview about the transport and flow phenomena occurring in that context. Generally, it is observed that the oil droplets initially dispersed in the LE are collected at the ITP transition zone and advected along with it. The detailed behavior at the transition zone depends on whether or not surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidon, PVP) are added to the electrolytes. In a system without surfactants, coalescence is observed between the droplets collected at the ITP transition zone. After having achieved a certain size, the droplets merge with the channel walls, leaving an oil film behind. In systems with PVP, coalescence is largely suppressed and no merging of droplets with the channel walls is observed. Instead, at the ITP transition zone, a droplet agglomerate of increasing size is formed. In the initial stages of the ITP experiments, two counter rotating vortices are formed inside the terminating electrolyte. The vortex formation is qualitatively explained based on a hydrodynamic instability triggered by fluctuations of the number density of oil droplets. PMID:24404037

  19. Oil-in-water emulsions as a delivery system for n-3 fatty acids in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Hanna; Herrmann, Kurt; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    The oxidative and physical stabilities of oil-in-water emulsions containing n-3 fatty acids (25 wt.% oil, 2.5 wt.% whey protein, pH 3.0 or pH 6.0), and their subsequent incorporation into meat products were investigated. The physical stability of fish oil emulsions was excellent and neither coalescence nor aggregation occurred during storage. Oxidative stability was better at pH 6.0 compared to pH 3.0 likely due to antioxidative continuous phase proteins. Incorporation of fish oil emulsions into pork sausages led to an increase in oxidation compared to sausages without the added fish oil emulsion. Confocal microscopy of pork sausages with fish oil emulsions revealed that droplets had coalesced in the meat matrix over time which may have contributed to the decreased oxidative stability. Results demonstrate that although interfacial engineering of n-3 fatty acids containing oil-in-water emulsions provides physical and oxidative stability of the base-emulsion, their incorporation into complex meat matrices is a non-trivial undertaking and products may incur changes in quality over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae-ik [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Division of Heavy Ion Clinical Research, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Chiyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sungkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong, E-mail: sblee@ncc.re.kr [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center (Korea, Republic of); Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hyun [Center for Underground Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Sook [Department of refinement education, Dongseo University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jung Keun [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Incerti, Sebastien [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Université Bordeaux 1, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-04-15

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  1. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the ‘NETSCAN’ method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion

  2. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  3. Learning probabilistic models of hydrogen bond stability from molecular dynamics simulation trajectories

    KAUST Repository

    Chikalov, Igor

    2011-02-15

    Background: Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) play a key role in both the formation and stabilization of protein structures. They form and break while a protein deforms, for instance during the transition from a non-functional to a functional state. The intrinsic strength of an individual H-bond has been studied from an energetic viewpoint, but energy alone may not be a very good predictor.Methods: This paper describes inductive learning methods to train protein-independent probabilistic models of H-bond stability from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories of various proteins. The training data contains 32 input attributes (predictors) that describe an H-bond and its local environment in a conformation c and the output attribute is the probability that the H-bond will be present in an arbitrary conformation of this protein achievable from c within a time duration ?. We model dependence of the output variable on the predictors by a regression tree.Results: Several models are built using 6 MD simulation trajectories containing over 4000 distinct H-bonds (millions of occurrences). Experimental results demonstrate that such models can predict H-bond stability quite well. They perform roughly 20% better than models based on H-bond energy alone. In addition, they can accurately identify a large fraction of the least stable H-bonds in a conformation. In most tests, about 80% of the 10% H-bonds predicted as the least stable are actually among the 10% truly least stable. The important attributes identified during the tree construction are consistent with previous findings.Conclusions: We use inductive learning methods to build protein-independent probabilistic models to study H-bond stability, and demonstrate that the models perform better than H-bond energy alone. 2011 Chikalov et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Postural stability changes in the elderly with cataract simulation and refractive blur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vijay; Buckley, John G; Scally, Andy; Elliott, David B

    2003-11-01

    To determine the influence of cataractous and refractive blur on postural stability and limb-load asymmetry (LLA) and to establish how postural stability changes with the spatial frequency and contrast of the visual stimulus. Thirteen elderly subjects (mean age, 70.76 +/- 4.14 [SD] years) with no history of falls and normal vision were recruited. Postural stability was determined as the root mean square [RMS] of the center of pressure (COP) signal in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and medial-lateral directions and LLA was determined as the ratio of the average body weight placed on the more-loaded limb to the less-loaded limb, recorded during a 30-second period. Data were collected under normal standing conditions and with somatosensory system input disrupted. Measurements were repeated with four visual targets with high (8 cyc/deg) or low (2 cyc/deg) spatial frequency and high (Weber contrast, approximately 95%) or low (Weber contrast, approximately 25%) contrast. Postural stability was measured under conditions of binocular refractive blur of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 D and with cataract simulation. The data were analyzed in a population-averaged linear model. The cataract simulation caused significant increases in postural instability equivalent to that caused by 8-D blur conditions, and its effect was greater when the input from the somatosensory system was disrupted. High spatial frequency targets increased postural instability. Refractive blur, cataract simulation, or eye closure had no effect on LLA. Findings indicate that cataractous and refractive blur increase postural instability, and show why the elderly, many of whom have poor vision along with musculoskeletal and central nervous system degeneration, are at greater risk of falling. Findings also highlight that changes in contrast sensitivity rather than resolution changes are responsible for increasing postural instability. Providing low spatial frequency information in certain environments may be useful in

  5. Uso do óleo de pequi (Caryocar brasiliense em emulsões cosméticas: desenvolvimento e avaliação da estabilidade física Use of pequi oil (Caryocar brasiliense in cosmetics emulsions: development and evaluate of physical stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rocha Pianovski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste trabalho foram desenvolver e avaliar a estabilidade física de emulsões O/A contendo óleo de pequi (Caryocar brasiliense. Emulsões O/A contendo 10,0% (p/p de óleo de pequi foram preparadas e, para promover a estabilidade, a adição de carbomer, magnesium sulfate, sodium chloride e sorbitan oleate, foram estudadas. O tipo de emulsão foi verificado pelo método de diluição e o aspecto, homogeneidade e características organolépticas avaliadas através de análises macroscópicas. Como testes preliminares foram utilizados a centrifugação, ciclo gela-degela e o estresse térmico. Para avaliar a estabilidade acelerada as amostras foram submetidas em diferentes condições de estresse e analisadas a partir do valor de pH, análises macroscópicas e comportamento reológico. As emulsões preparadas com óleo de pequi, 0,3% (p/p de Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrilate Crosspolymer e 0,2% (p/p de carbomer apresentaram-se estáveis com propriedades pseudoplásticas e tixotrópicas. As características macroscópicas e valores obtidos de pH, viscosidade aparente, índices de fluxo e de consistência da área de histerese durante a estocagem indicaram estabilidade da formulação.The aims of this study were to development and evaluated the physical stability of O/W emulsions containing "Pequi" oil (Caryocar brasiliense. O/W emulsions containing 10.0% (w/w of Pequi oil were prepared, and to improve the stability, the carbomer, magnesium sulfate, sodium chloride and sorbitan oleate were added and studied. The direction of the emulsions was evaluated by dilution method and by macroscopic analysis, the appearance, homogeneity and organoleptic properties were evaluated. The centrifugation, freeze/defrost cycles and stress thermal were used to investigate the preliminary stability. To evaluate the accelerated stability, the samples were stored at different stress conditions and evaluated the pH value, macroscopic analysis and rheological

  6. Brownian dynamics simulations of an order-disorder transition in sheared sterically stabilized colloidal suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigos, A.A.; Wilemski, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shear thinning behavior of a sterically stabilized nonaqueous colloidal suspension was investigated using nonequilibrium Brownian dynamics simulations of systems with 108 and 256 particles. At a volume fraction of 0.4, the suspension is thixotropic: it has a reversible shear thinning transition from a disordered state to an ordered, lamellar state with triangularly packed strings of particles. The time scale for the transition is set by the free particle diffusion constant. For the smaller system, the transition occurs gradually with increasing shear rate. For the larger system, the transition is sharp and discontinuous shear thinning is found. 34 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. The determination of temperature stability of silver nanotubes by the molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, O.; Soldatenko, S.; Soldatenko, O.

    2018-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using the embedded-atom method is applied to study thermal stability of silver nanotubes and its coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The correspondence of face centered cubic structure potential for this task is tested. Three types of nanotubes are modelled: scrolled from graphene-like plane, scrolled from plane with cubic structure and cut from cylinder. It is established that only the last two of them are stable. The last one describes in details. There is critical temperature when free ends of the nanotube close but the interior surface retains. At higher temperatures, the interior surface collapses and the nanotube is unstable.

  8. Stabilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Al-Malack

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fuel oil flyash (FFA produced in power and water desalination plants firing crude oils in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is being disposed in landfills, which increases the burden on the environment, therefore, FFA utilization must be encouraged. In the current research, the effect of adding FFA on the engineering properties of two indigenous soils, namely sand and marl, was investigated. FFA was added at concentrations of 5%, 10% and 15% to both soils with and without the addition of Portland cement. Mixtures of the stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, California Bearing Ratio (CBR, unconfined compressive strength (USC and durability tests. Results of these tests indicated that stabilized sand mixtures could not attain the ACI strength requirements. However, marl was found to satisfy the ACI strength requirement when only 5% of FFA was added together with 5% of cement. When the FFA was increased to 10% and 15%, the mixture’s strength was found to decrease to values below the ACI requirements. Results of the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP, which was performed on samples that passed the ACI requirements, indicated that FFA must be cautiously used in soil stabilization.

  9. Dietary protein and fat emulsions, processed by ultrasound and pulsed magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Verboloz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the baking of baked goods in order to save fats, different types of endorsement and protein-fatty emulsions which are used as ingredients in goods and for the protection of metal moulds from burning. Usually emulsion is prepared on bakery enterprises by National State Standard Р 51785–2001, involving mechanical beating up of ingredients. The authors suggested and studied the way of manufacturing of more stable food protein-fatty emulsions using ultrasonic transmitter with rigid neodymium magnets on its thickener. As ingredients, there were applied curd whey diluted with water, unpurified sunflower oil and sunflower phosphatides. Ratio of whey and water is 1:7. Physical effects of ultrasound and field of magnets in contact layer of liquid ingredients being dispersed have increased the viscosity and dispersion of protein-fatty emulsions. Hypothesis of increase of stability and sterility of protein-fatty emulsion by the selection of parameters of magnetic field and power of ultrasound transmitter is confirmed experimentally. Microscopic analysis shows high degree of homogeneity of emulsion under the time of processing 3-4 minutes and intensity of ultrasound 2 W/cm2, that is energetically profitable. There was revealed synergism of influence of physical effects of ultrasound and magnetic field on the durability and steadiness of emulsion to mechanical and temperature effect and also cidal effect, prolonging terms of product using. Manufacture of emulsions by the declared way using the ultrasound and magnetic field of constant neodymium magnets decreases number of injected elements-emulsifiers by 3-4 times or excludes their use at all. Existing piezoelectric ultrasound units as well as neodymium magnets have small sizes and low energy consumption, easily built into the line of continuous manufacture of emulsion for the bread production. Such emulsions are less demanding to the storage and transportation.

  10. Chemistry and technology of emulsion polymerisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herk, van A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Emulsion polymerisation produces high value polymers in a low cost, environmentally friendly process. The drive to develop environmentally benign production methods for polymers has resulted in widespread development and implementation of the emulsion polymerisation technique. In addition, when

  11. Electrospun composite matrices of poly(ε-caprolactone)-montmorillonite made using tenside free Pickering emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Archana; Takkar, Sonam; Kulshreshtha, Ritu; Nandan, Bhanu; Srivastava, Rajiv K.

    2016-01-01

    The production of composite electrospun matrices of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) using an emulsifier-free emulsion, made with minimal organic solvent, as precursor is reported. Pickering emulsions of PCL were prepared using modified montmorillonite (MMT) clay as the stabilizer. Hydrophobic tallow group of the modified MMT clay resulted in analogous interaction of clay with oil and aqueous phase and its adsorption at the interface to provide stability to the resultant emulsion. Composite fibrous matrices of PCL and MMT were produced using electrospinning under controlled conditions. The fiber fineness was found to alter with PCL concentration and volume fraction of the aqueous and oil phases. A higher tensile strength and modulus was obtained with inclusion of MMT in PCL electrospun matrix in comparison to a matrix made using neat PCL. The presence of clay in the fibrous matrix did not change the cell proliferation efficiency in comparison to neat PCL matrix. Composite fibrous matrices of PCL/MMT bearing enhanced tensile properties may find applications in areas other than tissue engineering for example food packaging and filtration. - Highlights: • Tenside free, clay stabilized Pickering emulsion of PCL is made with minimal organic solvent. • Organic–inorganic composite fibrous matrices were produced via emulsion electrospinning. • Fiber fineness was efficiently controlled by variation in emulsion formulation. • Fibrous matrices of high tensile strength and modulus were obtained in comparison to neat PCL matrix. • PCL/clay matrices showed effective cell proliferation as a neat PCL matrix.

  12. Electrospun composite matrices of poly(ε-caprolactone)-montmorillonite made using tenside free Pickering emulsions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Archana [Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Takkar, Sonam; Kulshreshtha, Ritu [Department of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Nandan, Bhanu [Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Srivastava, Rajiv K., E-mail: rajiv@textile.iitd.ac.in [Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-12-01

    The production of composite electrospun matrices of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) using an emulsifier-free emulsion, made with minimal organic solvent, as precursor is reported. Pickering emulsions of PCL were prepared using modified montmorillonite (MMT) clay as the stabilizer. Hydrophobic tallow group of the modified MMT clay resulted in analogous interaction of clay with oil and aqueous phase and its adsorption at the interface to provide stability to the resultant emulsion. Composite fibrous matrices of PCL and MMT were produced using electrospinning under controlled conditions. The fiber fineness was found to alter with PCL concentration and volume fraction of the aqueous and oil phases. A higher tensile strength and modulus was obtained with inclusion of MMT in PCL electrospun matrix in comparison to a matrix made using neat PCL. The presence of clay in the fibrous matrix did not change the cell proliferation efficiency in comparison to neat PCL matrix. Composite fibrous matrices of PCL/MMT bearing enhanced tensile properties may find applications in areas other than tissue engineering for example food packaging and filtration. - Highlights: • Tenside free, clay stabilized Pickering emulsion of PCL is made with minimal organic solvent. • Organic–inorganic composite fibrous matrices were produced via emulsion electrospinning. • Fiber fineness was efficiently controlled by variation in emulsion formulation. • Fibrous matrices of high tensile strength and modulus were obtained in comparison to neat PCL matrix. • PCL/clay matrices showed effective cell proliferation as a neat PCL matrix.

  13. Self-organization and stability of magnetosome chains—A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Damien; Klumpp, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria orient in magnetic fields with the help of their magnetosome chain, a linear structure of membrane enclosed magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) anchored to a cytoskeletal filament. Here, we use simulations to study the assembly and the stability of magnetosome chains. We introduce a computational model describing the attachment of the magnetosomes to the filament and their magnetic interactions. We show that the filamentous backbone is crucial for the robust assembly of the magnetic particles into a linear chain, which in turn is key for the functionality of the chain in cellular orientation and magnetically directed swimming. In addition, we simulate the response to an external magnetic field that is rotated away from the axis of the filament, an experimental method used to probe the mechanical stability of the chain. The competition between alignment along the filament and alignment with the external fields leads to the rupture of a chain if the applied field exceeeds a threshold value. These observations are in agreement with previous experiments at the population level. Beyond that, our simulations provide a detailed picture of chain rupture at the single cell level, which is found to happen through two abrupt events, which both depend on the field strength and orientation. The re-formation of the chain structure after such rupture is found to be strongly sped up in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to the filament, an observation that may also be of interest for the design of self-healing materials. Our simulations underline the dynamic nature of the magnetosome chain. More generally, they show the rich complexity of self-assembly in systems with competing driving forces for alignment. PMID:29315342

  14. Bulk-loaded emulsion explosives technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.G. [Blasting Analysis International, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The largest use of emulsion explosives and emulsion-Anfo blends is in surface mining operations. An emulsion explosive is a two-phase system: the inner phase is madeup of an oxidizer solution; the outer phase is made up of oils or an oil/wax blend. Emulsion Anfo blends have been used to expand drill patterns, increase fragmentation, and provide extra energy for blast casting. 3 tabs.

  15. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt

  16. Thiolated alkyl-modified carbomers: Novel excipients for mucoadhesive emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonengel, Sonja; Hauptstein, Sabine; Leonaviciute, Gintare; Griessinger, Julia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-07-30

    The aim of this study was the design and evaluation of mucoadhesive emulsifying polymeric excipients. Three thiol bearing ligands with increasing pKa values of their sulfhydryl group, namely 4-aminothiophenol (pKa=6.86), l-cysteine (pKa=8.4) and d/l-homocysteine (pKa=10.0) were coupled to the polymeric backbone of alkyl-modified carbomer (PA1030). Resulting conjugates displayed 818.5μmol 4-aminothiophenol, 698.5μmol cysteine and 651.5μmol homocysteine per gram polymer and were evaluated regarding the reactivity of thiol groups, emulsifying and mucoadhesive properties. In general, the synthesized conjugates showed a pH dependent reactivity, whereby the fastest oxidation occurred in PA1030-cysteine, as almost no free thiol groups could be detected after 120min. Emulsification of medium chain triglycerides was feasible with all synthesized conjugates leading to oil-in-water-emulsions. Emulsions with PA1030-cysteine displayed the highest stability and the smallest droplet size among the tested formulations. Oxidation and consequently cross-linking of the thiomers prior to the emulsification process led to an overall decreased emulsion stability. Evaluating mucosal residence time of thiomer emulsions on porcine buccal mucosa, a 9.2-fold higher amount of formulation based on PA1030-cysteine remained on the mucosal tissue within 3h compared to the unmodified polymer. According to these results, the highest reactive ligand l-cysteine seems to be most promising in order to obtain thiolated polymers for the preparation of mucoadhesive o/w-emulsions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilities and Dynamics of Protein Folding Nuclei by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong-Shun; Zhou, Xin; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Wang, Yan-Ting

    2017-07-01

    To understand how the stabilities of key nuclei fragments affect protein folding dynamics, we simulate by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in aqueous solution four fragments cut out of a protein G, including one α-helix (seqB: KVFKQYAN), two β-turns (seqA: LNGKTLKG and seqC: YDDATKTF), and one β-strand (seqD: DGEWTYDD). The Markov State Model clustering method combined with the coarse-grained conformation letters method are employed to analyze the data sampled from 2-μs equilibrium MD simulation trajectories. We find that seqA and seqB have more stable structures than their native structures which become metastable when cut out of the protein structure. As expected, seqD alone is flexible and does not have a stable structure. Throughout our simulations, the native structure of seqC is stable but cannot be reached if starting from a structure other than the native one, implying a funnel-shape free energy landscape of seqC in aqueous solution. All the above results suggest that different nuclei have different formation dynamics during protein folding, which may have a major contribution to the hierarchy of protein folding dynamics. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2013CB932804, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11421063, and the CAS Biophysics Interdisciplinary Innovation Team Project

  18. Stability of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Sushila; Tran, Van H; Duke, Colin C

    2007-11-30

    The degradation kinetics of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol were investigated in simulated gastric (pH 1) and intestinal (pH 7.4) fluids at 37 degrees C. Degradation products were quantitatively determined by HPLC (Lichrospher 60 RP select B column, 5 microm, 125 mm x 4 mm; mobile phase: methanol-water-acetic acid (60:39:1 v/v); flow rate: 0.6 ml/min; detection UV: 280 nm). In simulated gastric fluid (SGF) [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol underwent first-order reversible dehydration and hydration reactions to form [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol, respectively. The degradation was catalyzed by hydrogen ions and reached equilibrium at approximately 200 h. In simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) both [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol showed insignificant interconversion between one another. Addition of amino acids glycine, 3-amino propionic acid (beta-alanine) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), and ammonium acetate at a range of concentrations of 0.05-0.5mM had no effect on the rate of degradation of [6]-shogaol in SGF and 0.1M HCl solution. However, at exceedingly high concentration (0.5M) of ammonium acetate and glycine, significant amounts of [6]-shogaol ammonia and glycine adducts were detected. The degradation profile of [6]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol under simulated physiological conditions reported in this study will provide insight into the stability of these compounds when administered orally.

  19. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  20. Spinel formation for stabilizing simulated nickel-laden sludge with aluminum-rich ceramic precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Kaimin; White, Tim; Leckie, James O

    2006-08-15

    The feasibility of stabilizing nickel-laden sludge from commonly available Al-rich ceramic precursors was investigated and accomplished with high nickel incorporation efficiency. To simulate the process, nickel oxide was mixed alternatively with gamma-alumina, corundum, kaolinite, and mullite and was sintered from 800 to 1480 degrees C. The nickel aluminate spinel (NiAl2O4) was confirmed as the stabilization phase for nickel and crystallized with efficiencies greater than 90% for all precursors above 1250 degrees C and 3-h sintering. The nickel-incorporation reaction pathways with these precursors were identified, and the microstructure and spinel yield were investigated as a function of sintering temperature with fixed sintering time. This study has demonstrated a promising process for forming nickel spinel to stabilize nickel-laden sludge from a wide range of inexpensive ceramic precursors, which may provide an avenue for economically blending waste metal sludges via the building industry processes to reduce the environmental hazards of toxic metals. The correlation of product textures and nickel incorporation efficiencies through selection of different precursors also provides the option of tailoring property-specific products.

  1. Computer Simulation Study of the Stability Mechanism of Thermophile, MJ0305

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyundeok; Beck, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Methanococcus jannaschii (MJ) is a methane-producing thermophile, which was discovered in a 2600m-deep Pacific Ocean vent in 1983. It has the ability to thrive at high temperatures and high pressures, which are unfavorable for most life forms. There have been some experiments to study its stability under extreme conditions, but still the origin of the stability of MJ is not exactly known. MJ0305 is MJ's chloride channel protein. The structure of MJ0305 was built by homology modeling. We compared the stability of MJ0305 with mesophilic Ecoli at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation to test the effects of temperature. Our results show that high temperatures significantly affect the number of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. High temperatures decreased the average number of hydrogen bonds for Ecoli and MJ0305. Increased salt bridges at 330K make MJ0305 more stable. Network analysis of MJ0305 showed an increase in the number of hubs at high temperatures. In contrast, the number of hubs of Ecoli was decreased at high temperatures. Calculated network entropy is proportional to the number of hubs. Increased network entropy of MJ0305 at 330K implies increased robustness.

  2. Microfluidic methods to study emulsion formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijlwijk, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Emulsions are dispersions of one liquid in another that are commonly used in various products, and methods such as high-pressure homogenisers and colloid mills are used to form emulsions. The size and size distribution of emulsion droplets are important for the final product properties and thus

  3. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen and Cation Diffusion in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is of interest to the aerospace community, notably for its application as a thermal barrier coating for turbine engine components. In such an application, diffusion of both oxygen ions and cations is of concern. Oxygen diffusion can lead to deterioration of a coated part, and often necessitates an environmental barrier coating. Cation diffusion in YSZ is much slower than oxygen diffusion. However, such diffusion is a mechanism by which creep takes place, potentially affecting the mechanical integrity and phase stability of the coating. In other applications, the high oxygen diffusivity of YSZ is useful, and makes the material of interest for use as a solid-state electrolyte in fuel cells. The kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) method offers a number of advantages compared with the more widely known molecular dynamics simulation method. In particular, kMC is much more efficient for the study of processes, such as diffusion, that involve infrequent events. We describe the results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen and cation diffusion in YSZ. Using diffusive energy barriers from ab initio calculations and from the literature, we present results on the temperature dependence of oxygen and cation diffusivity, and on the dependence of the diffusivities on yttria concentration and oxygen sublattice vacancy concentration. We also present results of the effect on diffusivity of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the barrier cations that determine the oxygen diffusion energy barriers.

  4. Parameterization experiments performed via synthetic mass movements prototypes generated by 3D slope stability simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The central purpose of this work is to perform a reverse procedure in the mass movement conventional parameterization approach. The idea is to generate a number of synthetic mass movements by means of the "slope stability simulator" (Colangelo, 2007), and compeer their morphological and physical properties with "real" conditions of effective mass movements. This device is an integrated part of "relief unity emulator" (rue), that permits generate synthetic mass movements in a synthetic slope environment. The "rue" was build upon fundamental geomorphological concepts. These devices operate with an integrated set of mechanical, geomorphic and hydrological models. The "slope stability simulator" device (sss) permits to perform a detailed slope stability analysis in a theoretical three dimensional space, by means of evaluation the spatial behavior of critical depths, gradients and saturation levels in the "potential rupture surfaces" inferred along a set of slope profiles, that compounds a synthetic slope unity. It's a meta-stable 4-dimensional object generated by means of "rue", that represents a sequence evolution of a generator profile applied here, was adapted the infinite slope model for slope. Any slope profiles were sliced by means of finite element solution like in Bishop method. For the synthetic slope systems generated, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. Sixteen variables were included in the "rue-sss" device that operates in an integrated manner. For each cell, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, potential rupture surface gradient, slope surface gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density and vegetation surcharge. The slope soil was considered as cohesive material. The 16 variables incorporated in the models were analyzed for

  5. Model system evaluation of the effects of pea and pH on the emulsion properties of beef

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt, Ş.; Ceylan, H. G.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of dried ground pea (0 - 1%) and pH (4.80 - 7.20) on the emulsion properties of beef were investigated using the model system. The study was designed according to the central composite rotatable design using the Response Surface Methodology. Pea had significant effects on emulsion activity and stability. The effects of pH on emulsion capacity, stability, activity, density, viscosity and apparent yield stress were significant. In addition, the interaction of both factors (pea and p...

  6. Do oil-in-water (O/W) nano-emulsions have an effect on survival and growth of bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Hani El; Devanthi, Putu Virgina Partha; Overton, Tim W; Gkatzionis, Konstantinos

    2017-11-01

    Nano-emulsions (typically droplet diameternano-emulsions even in reference to similar microbial species and formulations. Following up, this study aimed to investigate the effect of nano-emulsions on four bacterial species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus cereus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and five Escherichia coli strains) possessing different surface charge and hydrophobicity. Model oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions with different size of oil droplets were prepared with sunflower oil stabilised by polysorbate 80 (Tween80) emulsifier (hydrophilic), using high shear mixing followed by ultrasonication. The viability of bacteria was monitored by culture, membrane integrity was assessed with flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide (PI) staining and fluorescence microscopy monitored the spatial distribution of cells within the O/W emulsions. The stability of the nano-O/W emulsions in the presence of bacteria was assessed by monitoring the droplet size [D (4, 3)] and creaming height. In contrast to other reports the survival and growth of bacteria was not affected by the size of the oil droplets, no damage to the bacterial membrane was evident with flow cytometry and emulsion stability was not affected by the presence of bacteria during 7days of storage. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of caprylic acid (CA) was compared between O/W coarse and nano-emulsions while varying the concentration of the hydrophilic surfactant Tween80. The activity of CA was similar in nano-emulsion and coarse emulsion; however, it was higher than in bulk oil and was reduced with increasing Tween80 concentration, suggesting that its efficacy is dictated by formulation rather than oil droplet size. The results demonstrated no enhanced antimicrobial activity due to nano-sized oil droplets and that conclusions on nano-emulsions should be taken with caution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Stability of Anthocyanins from Commercial Black Currant Juice under Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alija Uzunović

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins are effective antioxidants but they have also been proposed to have other biological activities independent of their antioxidant capacities that produce health benefits. Examples range from inhibition of cancer cell growth in vitro, induction of insulin production in isolated pancreatic cells, reduction of starch digestion through inhibition of a-glucosidase activity, suppression of inflammatory responses as well as protection against age-related declines in cognitive behavior and neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system. However, to achieve any biological effect in a specific tissue or organ, anthocyanins must be bioavailable; i.e. effectively absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT into the circulation and delivered to the appropriate location within the body. In this study, we assess the stability of anthocyanins from commercial Black currant (Ribes nigrum L. juice using an in vitro digestion procedure that mimics the physiochemical and biochemical conditions encountered in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. The main objective of this work was the evaluation of stability of anthocyanins during in vitro digestion in gastric and intestinal fluid regarding whether appropriate enzyme (pepsin or pancreatin was added or not. Anthocyanins present in commercial black currant juice remain stable during in vitro digestion in gastric fluid regardless whether pepsin was added into the medium or not. Also, they remain stable during in vitro digestion in simulated intestinal fluid without pancreatin. The stability studies of anthocyanins in the intestinal fluid containing pancreatin indicated reduced stability, which also mainly contribute to slight reduction of total anthocyanins content (1,83%- in commercial black currant juice.

  8. Transdermal delivery of forskolin from emulsions differing in droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Elżbieta; Llinas, Meritxell; Garcia-Celma, Maria Jose; Escribano, Elvira; Solans, Conxita

    2015-02-01

    The skin permeation of forskolin, a diterpene isolated from Coleus forsholii, was studied using oil in water (O/W) emulsions as delivery formulations and also an oil solution for comparative purposes. Two forskolin-loaded emulsions of water/Brij 72:Symperonic A7/Miglyol 812:Isohexadecane, at 0.075 wt% forskolin concentration were prepared with the same composition and only differing in droplet size (0.38 μm and 10 μm). The emulsions showed high kinetic stability at 25 °C. In vitro study of forskolin penetration through human skin was carried out using the MicroettePlus(®) system. The concentration of the active in the receptor solution (i.e. ethanol/phosphate buffer 40/60, v/v) was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. The obtained results showed that forskolin permeation from the emulsions and the oil solution, through human skin, was very high (up to 72.10%), and no effect of droplet size was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiation-induced emulsion polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwa, Takeshi

    1979-10-01

    The radiation-induced emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) has been studied at initial pressure 2 - 25 kg/cm 2 and temperature 30 0 - 110 0 C for dose rate 0.57 x 10 4 - 3.0 x 10 4 rad/hr. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a hydrophobic polymer, forms as a stable latex in the absence of an emulsifier. Stability of the latex is governed by the dose rate/TFE pressure ratio; it increases with sufficient TFE monomer. PTFE particles produced in this polymerization system are stable due to the carboxyl end groups and adsorption of OH - and HF on the particles. PTFE latex of molecular weight higher than 2 x 10 7 is obtained by addition of a radical scavenger such as hydroquinone. The molecular weight of PTFE can be measured from the heat of crystallization conveniently with high reliability, which was found in the course of study on the melting and crystallization behavior. (author)

  10. Destabilization of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Formed Using Highly Hydrolyzed Whey Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola; Singh; Munro; Dalgleish; Singh

    1998-01-19

    Oil-in-water emulsions (4 wt % soy oil) were prepared with 0.5-5 wt % whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) (27% degree of hydrolysis), in a two-stage homogenizer using various first-stage pressures of 10.3, 20.6, and 34.3 MPa and a constant second-stage pressure of 3.4 MPa. Destabilization studies on the emulsions were carried out for up to 24 h, using both laser light scattering and confocal laser microscopy. It was found that emulsions formed with oiling off and coalescence at all homogenization pressures. Emulsions formed with 2, 3, and 4% WPH showed coalescence and creaming only, while slight flocculation but no creaming occurred in emulsions formed with 5% WPH. Furthermore, the apparent rate of coalescence increased with homogenization pressure but decreased with WPH concentration. In contrast, the surface concentration of WPH increased with the WPH concentration in the emulsions but decreased with homogenization pressure. Analysis of WPH by high-performance liquid chromatography showed an increase in the concentration of high molecular weight peptides at the droplet surface compared to the WPH solution. This was considered very important for the stability of these oil-in-water emulsions.

  11. Content iodine in sauces of type emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bakirov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The scarcity of natural resources arouse a necessity to find additional sources of protein, fat, carbohydrates, and their complexes with scarce mineral compounds. Therefore, a relevant issue is to enrich the diets deficient iodine compounds through research and development of new food products. Materials and methods. Investigation of iodine content in emulsion-type sauces at all stages was performed using Xray -fluorescence analyzer «Elvax». X-ray -fluorescence method consists of the appearance characteristic X-radiation of atoms of a chemical element at infringement they the primary X-ray irradiation. Results and discussion. Investigated for the determination of organic and inorganic forms of iodine in content of food items, and installed the total loss of iodine in sauces after cooking and storage at +5 ... +10 ° C for 30 days. Using iodine-proteinaceous additive from 0.5 ... 2.5% by mass of iodine 0.01% can be achieved from 15 to 50% of the human daily requirement by iodine. The resulting product does not lose its organoleptic, physico - chemical, consumer characteristics and meets the requirements of normative documents. As a result of our research, it was found that the addition of the supplements enriched protein-mineral (SEPM in composition sauces does not adversely affect the physical -chemical characteristics of sauces, but due to the stabilizing effect of additives iodine-proteinaceous increased emulsion stability up to 98 - 100% without additional foo d additives (emulsifiers. This additive has passed a series of tests that indicate on compliance with requirements normative and technical documentation. Conclusions. Used methodical approach allowed us to estimate the level of organic and inorganic iodine, as well as describe in more detail and correctly interpret the chemical composition of foods fortified with iodine and predict their health properties.

  12. Use of emulsion for warm mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahabir Panda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to increase in energy costs and emission problems in hot mix asphalt usually used, it brought a great interest to the researchers to develop the warm mix technology for pavement constructions. Commonly known as warm mix asphalt (WMA, it is a typical method in the bituminous paving technology, which allows production and placement of bituminous mixes at lower temperatures than that used for hot mix asphalt (HMA. The WMA involves an environmental friendly production process that utilises organic additives, chemical additives and water based technologies. The organic and chemical additives are normally very costly and still involve certain amount of environmental issues. These factors motivated the authors to take up this technology using simple, environment friendly and somewhat cost effective procedure. In this study, an attempt has been made to prepare warm mixes by first pre-coating the aggregates with medium setting bitumen emulsion (MS and then mixing the semi-coated aggregates with VG 30 bitumen at a lower temperature than normally required. After a number of trials it was observed that mostly three mixing temperatures, namely temperatures 110 °C, 120 °C and 130 °C were appropriate to form the bituminous mixes with satisfactory homogeneity and consistency and as such were maintained throughout this study. Marshall samples for paving mixes were prepared using this procedure for dense bituminous macadam (DBM gradings as per the specifications of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways (MORTH and subsequently Marshall properties of the resultant mixes were studied with the main objective of deciding the different parameters that were considered for development of appropriate warm mix asphalt. In this study it has been observed that out of three mixing temperatures tried, the mixes prepared at 120 °C with bitumen-emulsion composition of 80B:20E for DBM warm mix, offer highest Marshall stability and highest indirect tensile strength

  13. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy

  14. Stability of magnetite nanoparticles with different coatings in a simulated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Pérez-Robles, J. Francisco [Center for Research and Advanced Studies of National Polytechnic Institute, CINVESTAV-Querétaro Unit (Mexico); García-Casillas, Perla E. [Autonomous University of Juarez, Department of Materials Science, Institute of Engineering and Technology (Mexico); Godinez-Garcia, Andrés, E-mail: andgodinez@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Ingeniería de Procesos e Hidráulica (Mexico)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated to be a potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, magnetite is unstable at the blood plasma conditions. Therefore, to study their stability in a broad range of particle size, the MNPs were synthesized using two methods, the fast injection co-precipitation method (FIC) and the reflux co-precipitation method (RC). The MNPs obtained by the RC and the FIC methods have an average size of agglomerates of 200 and 45 nm respectively. They were dispersed using sodium citrate as surfactant and were coated with silica and chitosan. A total of four kind of coated MNPs were synthesized: magnetite/sodium citrate, magnetite/silica, magnetite/sodium citrate/silica and magnetite/sodium citrate/silica/chitosan. Different samples of the coated MNPs were immersed in a simulated blood plasma solution (Phosphate-Buffered Saline, PBS, Gibco{sup ®}), for periods of 24, 48 and 72 h. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique was used to analyze the composition of the simulated plasma after those periods of time. The obtained results suggest that the uncoated samples showed an appreciable weight loss, and the iron composition in the simulated plasma increased. This last means that the used coatings avoid iron dissolution from the MNPs.Graphical abstract.

  15. Multilayer emulsions as a strategy for linseed oil and α-lipoic acid micro-encapsulation: study on preparation and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Wang, Qiang; Li, Tong; Xia, Nan; Xia, Qiang

    2018-01-04

    Linseed oil and α-lipoic acid are bioactive ingredients, which play an important role in human nutrition and health. However, their application in functional foods is limited because of their instabilities and poor solubilities in hydrophilic matrices. Multilayer emulsions are particularly useful to protect encapsulated bioactive ingredients. The aim of this study was to fabricate multilayer emulsions by a high-pressure homogenization method to encapsulate linseed oil and α-lipoic acid simultaneously. Tween 20 and lecithin were used as surfactants to stabilize the oil droplets of primary emulsions. Multilayer emulsions were produced by using an electrostatic layer-by-layer deposition process of lecithin-chitosan membranes. Thermal treatment exhibited that chitosan encapsulation could improve the thermal stability of primary emulsions. During in vitro digestion, it was found that chitosan encapsulation had little effect on the lipolysis of linseed oil and bioaccessibility of α-lipoic acid. The oxidation stability of linseed oil in multilayer emulsions was improved effectively by chitosan encapsulation and α-lipoic acid. Chitosan encapsulation could inhibit the degradation of α-lipoic acid. A physical stability study indicated that multilayer emulsions had good centrifugal, dilution and storage stabilities. Multilayer emulsion is an effective delivery system to incorporate linseed oil and α-lipoic acid into functional foods and beverages. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. High-conversion emulsion polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maxwell, I.A.; Verdurmen, E.M.F.J.; German, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The four important factors that det. the rate of emulsion polymn. are the propagation rate coeff., the latex-particle concn., the monomer concn. in the latex particles, and the free-radical concn. in the latex particles. Both theor. considerations and exptl. evidence suggested that the important

  17. Modeling of emulsion copolymer microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doremaele, G.H.J.; Herk, van A.M.; German, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    A model is developed to describe stages II and III of batch emulsion copolymn., and its predictive capabilities are investigated by application to the system styrene-Me acrylate. The main reaction site is the monomer-swollen polymer particle. Copolymn. rate and copolymer microstructure (molar

  18. Effect of Phytosterols on the Crystallization Behavior of Oil-in-Water Milk Fat Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowski, Lisa M; Logan, Amy; Augustin, Mary Ann; Kelly, Alan L; Zabara, Alexandru; O'Mahony, James A; Conn, Charlotte E; Auty, Mark A E

    2016-08-31

    Milk has been used commercially as a carrier for phytosterols, but there is limited knowledge on the effect of added plant sterols on the properties of the system. In this study, phytosterols dispersed in milk fat at a level of 0.3 or 0.6% were homogenized with an aqueous dispersion of whey protein isolate (WPI). The particle size, morphology, ζ-potential, and stability of the emulsions were investigated. Emulsion crystallization properties were examined through the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Synchrotron X-ray scattering at both small and wide angles. Phytosterol enrichment influenced the particle size and physical appearance of the emulsion droplets, but did not affect the stability or charge of the dispersed particles. DSC data demonstrated that, at the higher level of phytosterol addition, crystallization of milk fat was delayed, whereas, at the lower level, phytosterol enrichment induced nucleation and emulsion crystallization. These differences were attributed to the formation of separate phytosterol crystals within the emulsions at the high phytosterol concentration, as characterized by Synchrotron X-ray measurements. X-ray scattering patterns demonstrated the ability of the phytosterol to integrate within the milk fat triacylglycerol matrix, with a concomitant increase in longitudinal packing and system disorder. Understanding the consequences of adding phytosterols, on the physical and crystalline behavior of emulsions may enable the functional food industry to design more physically and chemically stable products.

  19. Concanavalin-A conjugated fine-multiple emulsion loaded with 6-mercaptopurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khopade, A J; Jain, N K

    2000-01-01

    Fine-multiple (water-in-oil-in-water) emulsions were prepared by two-step emulsification using sonication. They were coated with concanavalin-A (Con-A) by three methods. The one involving covalent coupling of Con-A to the multiple emulsion incorporated anchor was better compared with lipid derivatized Con-A anchoring or the glutaraldehyde-based cross-linking method, as shown by the faster rate of dextran-induced aggregation. The selected multiple emulsions were characterized by physical properties such as droplet size, encapsulation efficiency, and zeta potential. Stability parameters such as droplet size, creaming, leakage, and aggregation as a function of relative turbidity were monitored over a 1-month period, which revealed good stability of the formulations. The release profile of 6-mercaptopurine followed zero-order kinetics. Pharmacokinetic studies showed an increase in half-life and bioavailability from multiple emulsion formulations administered intravenously. There was prolonged retention of drug in various tissues of rats when treated with Con-A-coated multiple emulsion as compared with uncoated one. Our study demonstrates the suitability of fine-multiple emulsion for intravenous administration and the potential for prolonged retention of drugs and targeting in biological systems.

  20. Synergistic performance of lecithin and glycerol monostearate in oil/water emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran-Valero, María I; Ruiz-Henestrosa, Víctor M Pizones; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the combination of two low-molecular weight emulsifiers (lecithin and glycerol-monostearate (GMS)) on the stability, the dynamic interfacial properties and rheology of emulsions have been studied. Different lecithin/GMS ratios were tested in order to assess their impact in the formation and stabilization of oil in water emulsions. The combination of the two surfactants showed a synergistic behaviour, mainly when combined at the same ratio. The dynamic film properties and ζ-potential showed that lecithin dominated the surface of oil droplets, providing stability to the emulsions against flocculation and coalescence, while allowing the formation of small oil droplets. At long times of adsorption, all of the mixtures showed similar interfacial activity. However, higher values of interfacial pressure at the initial times were reached when lecithin and GMS were at the same ratio. Interfacial viscoelasticity and viscosity of mixed films were also similar to that of lecithin alone. On the other hand, emulsions viscosity was dominated by GMS. The synergistic performance of lecithin-GMS blends as stabilizers of oil/water emulsions is attributed to their interaction both in the bulk and at the interface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Emulsion properties of pork myofibrillar protein in combination with microbial transglutaminase and calcium alginate under various pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Geun Pyo; Min, Sang-Gi; Chin, Koo Bok

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) and calcium alginate (CA) systems in combination with soybean oil on the emulsion properties of porcine myofibrillar protein (MP) were evaluated under various pH conditions. MTG was shown to improve emulsifying capacity and creaming stability, which increased with increasing pH values up to 6.5. The CA did not influence emulsifying capacity, but it improved the creaming stability of the MP-stabilized emulsions. Both MTG and CA enhanced the rheological properties, but their effects on the physical characteristics of the protein evidenced an opposite trend in relation to pH, i.e., the MTG system improved both the emulsion and gelling properties with increasing pH, whereas the CA system was effective when the pH was lowered. By combining the two MP gelling systems, a stable and pH-insensible emulsion could be produced. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of lipophilization of dihydrocaffeic acid on its antioxidative properties in fish oil enriched emulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; de Diego, Sara; Petersen, Lone Kristine

    oxidation than PUFAs from vegetable oils due to their highly polyunsaturated nature, it is necessary to develop methods to protect these PUFAs. Many food systems are emulsions. Due to the so-called polar paradox phenomenon, hydrophilic antioxidants may in many cases be better antioxidants in bulk oil than...... lipophilic compounds, whereas lipophilic antioxidants are more efficient than hydrophilic antioxidants in emulsions. This phenomenon has been explained by the affinity of the compounds towards the different phases in bulk oil and emulsions. The hydrophilic character of many naturally occurring antioxidants...... that generally, lipophilized dihydrocaffeic acid and rutin increased the oxidative stability of o/w emulsions and fish oil enriched milk compared with their parent compound. The results supported a cut-off effect in relation to the acyl chain length esterified to the phenolic compound. Octyl dihydrocaffeate (C8...

  3. Food emulsions with amidated pectin from celery (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum D.C. tubers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iv. Petrova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Hydrocolloids, especially polysaccharides from traditional plant sources and their derivatives possessed significant emulsifying properties. Pectin was isolated from celery tubers by accelerated “green” method for extraction based on ultrasonic irradiation. Further chemical modification of celery pectin was performed with 4 mol/L NH The amidated celery pectin was obtained with the following characteristics: the degree of esterification (DE 31%, the degree of 3. amidation (DA 16%, degree of acetylation (DAc 2% and anhydrouronic acid content (AUAC 68%. This modified pectin was incorporated in preparation of model 30, 40 and 50% oil-in-water emulsions. The effect of amidation of celery pectin on the stability of emulsions was investigated. The results showed that amidation increased the emulsifying properties of pectic polysaccharides. It affected also the rheological characteristics of model emulsion. The current study demonstrated preparation of emulsion with low-caloric amidated pectin as proper alternative to the traditional emulsifiers.

  4. Transitional phase inversion of crude oil emulsions by solid particles; Inversao transicional de emulsoes de petroleo com particulas solidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Troner A. de; Scheer, Agnes P.; Soares, Cristyan R.; Luz Junior, Luiz Fernando de Lima [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Oliveira, Marcia Cristina K. de [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In petroleum production water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) can be found, due to simultaneous flowing of the oil and formation water. This emulsions provide an increase in the viscosity; that can be reduced for the phase inversion in oil-in-water emulsions (O/W), resulting in pressure drop and consequently cost production reduction. The petroleum emulsions W/O were prepared at 60 deg C, with 50% v/v of saline water containing 50 g.L{sup -1} of NaCl. The hydrophilic solids content was varied between 0,5% and 8%, mass fraction, related to the water. The quantity of solids needed to phase inversion of the emulsion was measured by conductivimetry. The stability of the emulsions was verified, at 60 deg C, for the time determination in order to have two phases in four hours, checking the viability for production; and during 24 hours, checking the viability for transportation. Under dynamics conditions, was also noted the stability at 20 deg C, for reproduce the flowing condition. Two of the hydrophilic particles tested in the transitional phase inversion of petroleum emulsions presented better results in quantity and stability. Preliminaries rheological properties measurements were carried out adjusting the temperature of the sample in the range of 30 deg C to 12 deg C a shear rate from 20s{sup -1} to 250s {sup -1}, viscosity decrease was observed until two orders of magnitude. (author)

  5. One dimensional simulation on stability of detached plasma in a tokamak divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Shinji; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi

    1999-06-01

    The stability of radiation front in the Scrape-Off-Layer (SOL) of a tokamak is studied with a one dimensional fluid code; the time-dependent transport equations are solved in the direction parallel to a magnetic field line. The simulation results show that stable detached solutions exist, where the plasma temperature near the divertor target is ∼2 eV. It is found that whenever such stable detached states are attained, the strong radiation front is contact with or at a small distance from the divertor target. When the energy externally injected into the SOL is decreased below a critical value, the radiation front starts to move towards the X-point, cooling the SOL plasma. In such cases, no stationary solutions such that the radiation front rests in the divertor channel are observed in our parameter space. This qualitatively corresponds to the results of tokamak divertor experiments which show the movement of radiation front. (author)

  6. Study of MHD stability beta limit in LHD by hierarchy integrated simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, K.Y.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-10-01

    The beta limit by the ideal MHD instabilities (so-called 'MHD stability beta limit') for helical plasmas is studied by a hierarchy integrated simulation code. A numerical model for the effect of the MHD instabilities is introduced such that the pressure profile is flattened around the rational surface due to the MHD instabilities. The width of the flattening of the pressure gradient is determined from the width of the eigenmode structure of the MHD instabilities. It is assumed that there is the upper limit of the mode number of the MHD instabilities which directly affect the pressure gradient. The upper limit of the mode number is determined using a recent high beta experiment in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The flattening of the pressure gradient is calculated by the transport module in a hierarchy integrated code. The achievable volume averaged beta value in the LHD is expected to be beyond 6%. (author)

  7. Large Scale Simulation of Hydrogen Dispersion by a Stabilized Balancing Domain Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-He Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion behaviour of leaking hydrogen in a partially open space is simulated by a balancing domain decomposition method in this work. An analogy of the Boussinesq approximation is employed to describe the connection between the flow field and the concentration field. The linear systems of Navier-Stokes equations and the convection diffusion equation are symmetrized by a pressure stabilized Lagrange-Galerkin method, and thus a balancing domain decomposition method is enabled to solve the interface problem of the domain decomposition system. Numerical results are validated by comparing with the experimental data and available numerical results. The dilution effect of ventilation is investigated, especially at the doors, where flow pattern is complicated and oscillations appear in the past research reported by other researchers. The transient behaviour of hydrogen and the process of accumulation in the partially open space are discussed, and more details are revealed by large scale computation.

  8. Effect of starch as hydrocolloids for formation of a stable emulsion system in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Lugovska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Іntroduction. It is necessary to determine the effect of the physicochemical properties of native and modified starches in their use in food. Matherials and methods. Investigated two samples of food emulsions using starches of different nature of origin (native, modified starch. Using laboratory balances, volume of cylinders determined percentage of water separation during freezing and unfreezing emulsions; Brukfild viscometer measured the viscosity increase depending on the time, temperature and pH of food emulsions. Results. When freezing / unfreezing emulsion of native starch in the first cycle of water has been separated by 8% in the second cycle of 38%, the third 50%, in contrast to the emulsion with modified starch water separation starts from the fourth cycle slightly, in the fifth cycle percentage of water separation is 1%, the sixth cycle of 3 %. As a result, studies of viscosity versus time, temperature and pH of food emulsions proved that in an acidic medium at pH 6.5 viscosity emulsion with modified starch is stored and then increases over a longer time compared with the emulsion of native starch where the viscosity at the beginning of the storage period increases and then decreases. Conclusions. Investigated the properties of native starch in the emulsion show that their use in industrial processes can lead to blockage of the heat exchanger, and the viscosity of the output of the production process is unpredictable and varies greatly depending on the combination of temperature and mechanical stress. It makes use in the manufacture of modified starches that combines a combination of two types of modifications: stabilization and crosslinking.

  9. Two-dimensional simulations of steady perforated-plate stabilized premixed flames

    KAUST Repository

    Altay, H. Murat

    2010-03-17

    The objective of this work is to examine the impact of the operating conditions and the perforated-plate design on the steady, lean premixed flame characteristics. We perform two-dimensional simulations of laminar flames using a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for methane-air combustion, consisting of 20 species and 79 reactions. We solve the heat conduction problem within the plate, allowing heat exchange between the gas mixture and the solid plate. The physical model is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the axisymmetric compressible conservation equations. The results suggest that the flame consumption speed, the flame structure, and the flame surface area depend significantly on the equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, the distance between the perforated-plate holes and the plate thermal conductivity. In the case of an adiabatic plate, a conical flame is formed, anchored near the corner of the hole. When the heat exchange between themixture and the plate is finite, the flame acquires a Gaussian shape stabilizing at a stand-off distance, that grows with the plate conductivity. The flame tip is negatively curved; i.e. concave with respect to the reactants. Downstream of the plate, the flame base is positively curved; i.e. convex with respect to the reactants, stabilizing above a stagnation region established between neighboring holes. As the plate\\'s thermal conductivity increases, the heat flux to the plate decreases, lowering its top surface temperature. As the equivalence ratio increases, the flame moves closer to the plate, raising its temperature, and lowering the flame stand-off distance. As the mean inlet velocity increases, the flame stabilizes further downstream, the flame tip becomes sharper, hence raising the burning rate at that location. The curvature of the flame base depends on the distance between the neighboring holes; and the flame there is characterized by high concentration of intermediates, like carbon monoxide. © 2010 Taylor

  10. Simulation of neoclassical tearing mode stabilization via minimum seeking method on ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. H.; Kim, K.; Na, D. H.; Byun, C. S.; Na, Y. S. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M. [FNC Technology Co. Ltd, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are well known resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. These instabilities are sustained by a helically perturbed bootstrap current. NTMs produce magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas that can degrade confinement and lead to plasma disruption. Because of this, the stabilization of NTMs is one of the key issues for tokamaks that achieve high fusion performance such as ITER. Compensating for the lack of bootstrap current by an Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) has been proved experimentally as an effective method to stabilize NTMs. In order to stabilize NTMs, it is important to reduce misalignment. So that even ECCD can destabilize the NTMs when misalignment is large. Feedback control method that does not fully require delicate and accurate real-time measurements and calculations, such as equilibrium reconstruction and EC ray-tracing, has also been proposed. One of the feedback control methods is minimum seeking method. This control method minimizes the island width by tuning the misalignment, assuming that the magnetic island width is a function of the misalignment. As a robust and simple method of controlling NTM, minimum 'island width growth rate' seeking control is purposed and compared with performance of minimum ' island width' seeking control. At the integrated numerical system, simulations of the NTM suppression are performed with two types of minimum seeking controllers; one is a FDM based minimum seeking controller and the other is a sinusoidal perturbation based minimum seeking method. The full suppression is achieved both types of controller. The controllers adjust poloidal angle of EC beam and reduce misalignment to zero. The sinusoidal perturbation based minimum seeking control need to modify the adaptive gain.

  11. Preliminary numerical simulation for shallow strata stability of coral reef in South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinqin; Zhan, Wenhuan; Zhang, Jinchang

    2017-04-01

    Coral reefs are the geologic material and special rock and soil, which live in shallow water of the tropic ocean and are formed through biological and geological action. Since infrastructure construction is being increasingly developed on coral reefs during recent years, it is necessary to evaluate the shallow strata stability of coral reefs in the South China Sea. The paper is to study the borehole profiles for shallow strata of coral reefs in the South China Sea, especially in the hydrodynamic marine environment?, and to establish a geological model for numerical simulation with Geo-Studio software. Five drilling holes show a six-layer shallow structure of South China Sea, including filling layer, mid-coarse sand, coral sand gravel, fine sand, limestone debris and reef limestone. The shallow coral reef profile next to lagoon is similar to "layers cake", in which the right side close to the sea is analogous to "block cake". The simulation results show that coral reef stability depends on wave loads and earthquake strength, as well as the physical properties of coral reefs themselves. The safety factor of the outer reef is greater than 10.0 in the static condition, indicating that outer reefs are less affected by the wave and earthquake. However, the safety factor next to lagoon is ranging from 0.1 to 4.9. The main reason for the variations that the strata of coral reefs close to the sea are thick. For example, the thickness of reef limestone is more than 10 m and equivalent to the block. When the thickness of inside strata is less than 10 m, they show weak engineering geological characteristics. These findings can provide useful information for coral reef constructions in future. This work was funded by National Basic Research Program of China (contract: 2013CB956104) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (contract: 41376063).

  12. Simulation and stability analysis of supersonic impinging jet noise with microjet control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, Joseph W.

    2014-11-01

    A model for an ideally expanded 1.5 Mach turbulent jet impinging on a flat plate using unstructured high-fidelity large eddy simulations (LES) and hydrodynamic stability analysis is presented. Note the LES configuration conforms exactly to experiments performed at the STOVL supersonic jet facility of the Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion allowing validation against experimental measurements. The LES are repeated for different nozzle-wall separation distances as well as with and without the addition of sixteen microjets positioned uniformly around the nozzle lip. For some nozzle-wall distances, but not all, the microjets result in substantial noise reduction. Observations of substantial noise reduction are associated with a relative absence of large-scale coherent vortices in the jet shear layer. To better understand and predict the effectiveness of microjet noise control, the application of global stability analysis about LES mean fields is used to extract axisymmetric and helical instability modes connected to the complex interplay between the coherent vortices, shocks, and acoustic feedback. We gratefully acknowledge computational resources provided by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility.

  13. Simulated stability tests of a small articulated tractor designed for extreme-sloped vineyards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mazzetto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A new reversible wheeled articulated tractor, designed to work in terraced vineyards trained with “pergola” system, common in mountain areas, is here described in its latest version and analysed through numerical simulations. This tractor has small dimensions, necessary to operate in that environment, and its central articulation has two rotational degrees-offreedom. The described features are surely strong design points but could be critical for vehicle’s stability, as affecting the supporting base’s dimensions and shape. Therefore, the tractor was equipped with a new automatic safety system: a self-locking articulation activated by contact sensors on the wheels. This device makes the vehicle partially-rigid in case of lateral unbalancing, so that rollover can happen only by overcoming the whole vehicle mass. A mathematical description of vehicle-ground interactions was implemented to deeply inquiry the tractor behaviour in different configurations (straight, angled at increasing values of ground slope; roll and pitch stability indexes were then computed and used for comparisons with conventional tractors. Thanks to the low centre-of-gravity, the resulting rollover angle with the vehicle in straight configuration is promising (43.8°→96%: it is greater than the maximum lateral (20°→36% and frontal (38°→78% slope angle ever recorded on terraced vineyards. The same rollover angle is lower when the tractor turns.

  14. Desenvolvimento e estudos de estabilidade preliminares de emulsões O/A contendo Cetoconazol 2,0% - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.812 Development and Preliminary Stability Evaluations of O/W emulsion containing Ketoconazole 2.0% - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.812

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Augusto Leite de Campos

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver emulsões O/A contendo Cetoconazol 2,0% e avaliar sua estabilidade preliminar por meio da análise de suas características físico-químicas, tais como homogeneidade, formação de agregados, floculação, cremeação e coalescência. As emulsões foram formuladas utilizando diferentes bases autoemulsionantes, compostas por álcool cetoestearílico, álcool etoxilado, álcool graxos superiores, ácido esteárico, lanolina e outros. As emulsões foram submetidas aos testes de centrifugação, estresse térmico e ciclo gela-degela, e suas características organolépticas e físico-químicas foram avaliadas no início e no final de cada ensaio. Todas as amostras mantiveram sua homogeneidade após o teste de centrifugação, mas somente os sistemas preparados com ceras autoemulsionáveis constituídas por álcool graxos superiores (Polawax NF® e Copolímero de Amônio Acriloil dimetiltaurato VP, Trilauril 4 fosfato, Sesquisosterato de metil glicose, Óleo de flores de verão e Tetradibutil pentaeritritil hidroxihidrocinamato de Glicerina (Hostacerin NCB® ; mantiveram sua estabilidade após testes de estresse térmico e ciclo gela-degelaThe objective of this work was the development of O/W emulsions containing Ketoconazole 2.0% and to evaluate their preliminary stability by analyzing physical-chemical characteristics such as homogeneity, aggregation formation, flocculation, creaming and coalescence. The emulsions were formulated using different self-emulsifying bases, composed of cetearyl alcohol, ethoxyl alcohol, higher fatty alcohol, stearic acid, lanolin and others. The O/W emulsions were evaluated by centrifugation test, thermal stress test, and freezing/defrosting cycles, and its organoleptic and physical-chemistry characteristics were analyzed before and after each assay. All samples maintained their homogeneity after the centrifugation test, but only the systems prepared with self emulsifying

  15. 19F-MRI of stomach and intestine using 50% FTPA emulsion under 2T MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Teturou; Mishima, Hideyuki

    1991-01-01

    1 H-MRI is of clinical value in many lesions, but imaging of gastrointestinal lesions is still difficult by 1 H-MRI. To overcome this weak point of 1 H-MRI, rabbit stomachs were examined by 19 F-MRI using 50% FTPA emulsion. We also examined the stability of 50% FTPA emulsion in the stomach and its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. We found that 50% FTPA emulsion was very stable at pH 1.5, and only a very small amount was absorbed. A rabbit (weighing 2 kg) was anesthetized, and 100 ml of 50% FTPA emulsion was infused into the stomach by catheter. 19 F-MRI was performed in this rabbit using a 2 T superconducting MRI system designed for human use, and clear pictures of the stomach were obtained. From our results we conclude that 19 F-MRI of the stomach using 50% FTPA emulsion is of practical value. (author)

  16. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  17. A novel energy regeneration system for emulsion pump tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilei, Li; Zhencai, Zhu; Guohua, Cao [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China); Guoan, Chen [Command Academy of the Corps of Engineers, Xuzhou (China)

    2013-04-15

    A novel energy regeneration system based on cylinders and a rectifier valve for emulsion pump tests is presented and studied. The overall structure and working principles of this system are introduced. Both simulation and experiments are carried out to investigate the energy regeneration feasibility and capability of this novel system. The simulation and experimental results validate that this system is able to save energy and satisfy the test requirement. The energy recovery coefficient and overall energy regeneration coefficient of the test bench are 0.785 and 0.214, respectively. Measures to improve these two coefficients are also given accordingly after analysis of power loss. This novel system brings a new method of energy regeneration for emulsion pump tests.

  18. Emulsion Liquid Membrane Technology in Organic Acid Purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norela Jusoh; Norasikin Othman; Nur Alina Nasruddin

    2016-01-01

    Emulsion Liquid Membrane (ELM) process have shown a great potential in wide application of industrial separations such as in removal of many chemicals, organic compounds, metal ions, pollutants and biomolecules. This system promote many advantages including simple operation, high selectivity, low energy requirement, and single stage extraction and stripping process. One potential application of ELM is in the purification of succinic acid from fermentation broth. This study outline steps for developing emulsion liquid membrane process in purification of succinic acid. The steps include liquid membrane formulation, ELM stability and ELM extraction of succinic acid. Several carrier, diluent and stripping agent was screened to find appropriate membrane formulation. After that, ELM stability was investigated to enhance the recovery of succinic acid. Finally, the performance of ELM was evaluated in the extraction process. Results show that formulated liquid membrane using Amberlite LA2 as carrier, palm oil as diluent and sodium carbonate, Na_2CO_3 as stripping agent provide good performance in purification. On the other hand, the prepared emulsion was observed to be stable up to 1 hour and sufficient for extraction process. In conclusion, ELM has high potential to purify succinic acid from fermentation broth. (author)

  19. Electric field induced instabilities in free emulsion films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchoukov, P.; Dabros, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada); Mostowfi, F. [Schlumberger DBR Technology Center, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Panchev, N. [Champion Technologies Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Czarnecki, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This presentation reported on a study that investigated the mechanism of electric field-induced breakdown of free emulsion films. Instability patterns were observed on the plane of a water-oil-water film following electric polarization. The length-scales of the instabilities were measured by analyzing images immediately after applying the electric field. Linear stability analysis was used to calculate the theoretical dominant wavelengths. The calculated values were found to be in good agreement with measured values. The films were formed in a thin film apparatus modified so that the oil film separated 2 aqueous phase compartments, each in contact with a platinum electrode. This enabled the measurement of disjoining pressure while applying the electric field to the film. It was concluded that breakdown of thin films induced by electric field has many applications, including electrostatic de-emulsification/desalination of crude oil and emulsion stability measurements. It was concluded that electroporation and dielectric breakdown may be responsible for electric field-induced breakdown. This study also presented evidence of an increase in electric field-induced instabilities in emulsion films resulting in rupture. tabs., figs.

  20. Modeling boundary-layer transition in direct and large-eddy simulations using parabolized stability equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Durán, A.; Hack, M. J. P.; Moin, P.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the potential of the nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE) to provide an accurate yet computationally efficient treatment of the growth of disturbances in H-type transition to turbulence. The PSE capture the nonlinear interactions that eventually induce breakdown to turbulence and can as such identify the onset of transition without relying on empirical correlations. Since the local PSE solution at the onset of transition is a close approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations, it provides a natural inflow condition for direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) by avoiding nonphysical transients. We show that a combined PSE-DNS approach, where the pretransitional region is modeled by the PSE, can reproduce the skin-friction distribution and downstream turbulent statistics from a DNS of the full domain. When the PSE are used in conjunction with wall-resolved and wall-modeled LES, the computational cost in both the laminar and turbulent regions is reduced by several orders of magnitude compared to DNS.

  1. Effect of gold nanoparticle on stability of the DNA molecule: A study of molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izanloo, Cobra

    2017-09-02

    An understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions with gold nanoparticles is useful in today medicine applications. We have performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a B-DNA duplex (CCTCAGGCCTCC) in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle with a truncated octahedron structure composed of 201 gold atoms (diameter ∼1.8 nm) to investigate gold nanoparticle (GNP) effects on the stability of DNA. During simulation, the nanoparticle is closed to DNA and phosphate groups direct the particles into the major grooves of the DNA molecule. Because of peeling and untwisting states that are occur at end of DNA, the nucleotide base lies flat on the surface of GNP. The configuration entropy is estimated using the covariance matrix of atom-positional fluctuations for different bases. The results show that when a gold nanoparticle has interaction with DNA, entropy increases. The results of conformational energy and the hydrogen bond numbers for DNA indicated that DNA becomes unstable in the vicinity of a gold nanoparticle. The radial distribution function was calculated for water hydrogen-phosphate oxygen pairs. Almost for all nucleotide, the presence of a nanoparticle around DNA caused water molecules to be released from the DNA duplex and cations were close to the DNA.

  2. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  3. Steroidal compounds in commercial parenteral lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn(®) II, Liposyn(®) III, Lipofundin(®) MCT, Lipofundin(®) N, Structolipid(®), Intralipid(®), Ivelip(®) and ClinOleic(®). Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  4. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat A. Siddiqui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  5. Fuzzy Clustering-Based Modeling of Surface Interactions and Emulsions of Selected Whey Protein Concentrate Combined to i-Carrageenan and Gum Arabic Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gums and proteins are valuable ingredients with a wide spectrum of applications. Surface properties (surface tension, interfacial tension, emulsion activity index “EAI” and emulsion stability index “ESI”) of 4% whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a combination with '- carrageenan (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.5...

  6. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  7. Structural study of the continuous medium of spontaneous ternary emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desforge, Christine

    1993-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of the structure of a continuous medium of spontaneous ternary emulsions of oil-in-water type, composed of water and octane, and stabilised by means of a cationic surfactant (DDAB, didodecyldimethyl ammonium bromide). It shows that the kinetic stability is due to electrostatic repulsions between octane drops, and that these repulsions are due to the presence of positive charges on the DDAB mono-layer located at the interface between water and oil. Various aspects are highlighted by neutron and X ray scattering. In this study, the DDAB is replaced by a non-ionic surfactant. Its use results in very steady oil/water emulsions [fr

  8. Lipid oxidation in omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    An increasing body of evidence supports the health beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Therefore, incorporation of marine oils into foods has also gained an increasing interest. However, the highly unsaturated lipids present in marine oils are prone to lipid oxidation......, and their addition to foods is therefore limited by the development of unpleasant off-flavors. Hence, efficient strategies are necessary to protect the lipids and thereby make fish oil-enriched food products successful in the marketplace. In an attempt to increase the oxidative stability of fish oil-enriched food...... stable product. Thus, a better understanding of factors influencing lipid oxidation in delivery emulsions themselves is therefore needed to understand the differences observed between food systems. In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface...

  9. Effects of Pre-Converted Nitrite from Red Beet and Ascorbic Acid on Quality Characteristics in Meat Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of fermented red beet extract and ascorbic acid on color development in meat emulsions. The pH of meat emulsions containing red beet extract decreased with an increase in the amount of extract added. The redness of the treated meat emulsions was higher than that of the control with no added nitrite or fermented red beet extract (pmeat emulsions treated with fermented red beet extract only was lower than in that treated with both fermented red beet extract and ascorbic acid (pmeat emulsions treated with fermented red beet extract were higher than in that treated with both fermented red beet extract and ascorbic acid (pmeat emulsions tested. Treatment T2, containing nitrite and ascorbic acid, had the highest overall acceptability score (pnitrite from red beet extract and 0.05% ascorbic acid (p>0.05). The residual nitrite content of the meat emulsions treated with ascorbic acid was lower than in those treated without ascorbic acid (pnitrite for the stability of color development in meat emulsions. PMID:28515652

  10. Combined Effect of Kimchi Powder and Onion Peel Extract on Quality Characteristics of Emulsion Sausages Prepared with Irradiated Pork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Si-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of kimchi powder and onion peel extract on the quality characteristics of emulsion sausage manufactured with irradiated pork. The emulsion sausages were formulated with 2% kimchi powder and/or 0.05% onion peel extract. The changes in pH value of all treatments were similar, depending on storage periods. The addition of kimchi powder increased the redness and yellowness of the emulsion sausage. The addition of onion peel extract decreased the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances value of the emulsion sausages prepared with irradiated pork. The volatile basic nitrogen value of the emulsion sausage prepared with kimchi powder was the highest, whereas that of the emulsion sausage prepared with onion peel extract was the lowest. The treatment without kimchi powder or onion peel extract and the treatments prepared with onion peel extract showed lower microbial populations than the other treatment. Sensory evaluations indicated that a higher acceptability was attained when kimchi powder was added to the emulsion sausages manufactured with irradiated pork. In conclusion, our results suggest that combined use of kimchi powder and onion peel extract could improve quality characteristics and shelf stability of the emulsion sausage formulated with irradiated pork during chilled storage. PMID:26761840

  11. Interfacial rheology of model particles at liquid interfaces and its relation to (bicontinuous) Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J. H. J.; Vermant, J.

    2018-01-01

    Interface-dominated materials are commonly encountered in both science and technology, and typical examples include foams and emulsions. Conventionally stabilised by surfactants, emulsions can also be stabilised by micron-sized particles. These so-called Pickering-Ramsden (PR)